WorldWideScience

Sample records for model intensity profiles

  1. Risk profiling of hookworm infection and intensity in southern Lao People's Democratic Republic using Bayesian models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Armelle; Vounatsou, Penelope; Sayasone, Somphou; Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Bouakhasith, Dalouny; Utzinger, Jürg; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Among the common soil-transmitted helminth infections, hookworm causes the highest burden. Previous research in the southern part of Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) revealed high prevalence rates of hookworm infection. The purpose of this study was to predict the spatial distribution of hookworm infection and intensity, and to investigate risk factors in the Champasack province, southern Lao PDR. A cross-sectional parasitological and questionnaire survey was conducted in 51 villages. Data on demography, socioeconomic status, water, sanitation, and behavior were combined with remotely sensed environmental data. Bayesian mixed effects logistic and negative binomial models were utilized to investigate risk factors and spatial distribution of hookworm infection and intensity, and to make predictions for non-surveyed locations. A total of 3,371 individuals were examined with duplicate Kato-Katz thick smears and revealed a hookworm prevalence of 48.8%. Most infections (91.7%) were of light intensity (1-1,999 eggs/g of stool). Lower hookworm infection levels were associated with higher socioeconomic status. The lowest infection levels were found in preschool-aged children. Overall, females were at lower risk of infection, but women aged 50 years and above harbored the heaviest hookworm infection intensities. Hookworm was widespread in Champasack province with little evidence for spatial clustering. Infection risk was somewhat lower in the lowlands, mostly along the western bank of the Mekong River, while infection intensity was homogeneous across the Champasack province. Hookworm transmission seems to occur within, rather than between villages in Champasack province. We present spatial risk maps of hookworm infection and intensity, which suggest that control efforts should be intensified in the Champasack province, particularly in mountainous areas.

  2. Effect of high intensity ultrasound on the fermentation profile of Lactobacillus sakei in a meat model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Kumari Shikha; Kerry, Joseph P; Alvarez, Carlos; Walsh, Des; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of high intensity ultrasound on the fermentation profile of Lactobacillus sakei in a meat model system. Ultrasound power level (0-68.5 W) and sonication time (0-9 min) at 20 °C were assessed against the growth of L. sakei using a Microplate reader over a period of 24h. The L. sakei growth data showed a good fit with the Gompertz model (R(2)>0.90; SEfermentation of ultrasound treated samples showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium at lower concentrations compared to control. No significant difference (pfermentation period. This study showed that both stimulation and retardation of L. sakei is possible, depending on the ultrasonic power and sonication time employed. Hence, fermentation process involving probiotics to develop functional food products can be tailored by selection of ultrasound processing parameters.

  3. CONTINUUM INTENSITY AND [O i] SPECTRAL LINE PROFILES IN SOLAR 3D PHOTOSPHERIC MODELS: THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbian, D.; Moreno-Insertis, F., E-mail: damian@iac.es, E-mail: fmi@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-04-01

    The importance of magnetic fields in three-dimensional (3D) magnetoconvection models of the Sun’s photosphere is investigated in terms of their influence on the continuum intensity at different viewing inclination angles and on the intensity profile of two [O i] spectral lines. We use the RH numerical radiative transfer code to perform a posteriori spectral synthesis on the same time series of magnetoconvection models used in our publications on the effect of magnetic fields on abundance determination. We obtain a good match of the synthetic disk-center continuum intensity to the absolute continuum values from the Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) observational spectrum; the match of the center-to-limb variation synthetic data to observations is also good, thanks, in part, to the 3D radiation transfer capabilities of the RH code. The different levels of magnetic flux in the numerical time series do not modify the quality of the match. Concerning the targeted [O i] spectral lines, we find, instead, that magnetic fields lead to nonnegligible changes in the synthetic spectrum, with larger average magnetic flux causing both of the lines to become noticeably weaker. The photospheric oxygen abundance that one would derive if instead using nonmagnetic numerical models would thus be lower by a few to several centidex. The inclusion of magnetic fields is confirmed to be important for improving the current modeling of the Sun, here in particular in terms of spectral line formation and of deriving consistent chemical abundances. These results may shed further light on the still controversial issue regarding the precise value of the solar oxygen abundance.

  4. The Intensity Profile of the Solar Supergranulation

    CERN Document Server

    Goldbaum, N J; Ermolli, I; Sands, J S; Berrilli, F

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the average radial (cell center to network boundary) profile of the continuum intensity contrast associated with supergranular flows using data from the Precision Solar Photometric Telescope (PSPT) at the Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO). After removing the contribution of the network flux elements by the application of masks based on Ca II K intensity and averaging over more than 10^5 supergranular cells, we find a ~ 0.1% decrease in red and blue continuum intensity from the supergranular cell centers outward, corresponding to a ~ 1.0 K decrease in brightness temperature across the cells. The radial intensity profile may be caused either by the thermal signal associated with the supergranular flows or a variation in the packing density of unresolved magnetic flux elements. These are not unambiguously distinguished by the observations, and we raise the possibility that the network magnetic fields play an active role in supergranular scale selection by enhancing the radiative cooling of the ...

  5. Engineering parabolic beams with dynamic intensity profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas, Adrian; Lopez-Aguayo, Servando; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2013-08-01

    We present optical fields formed by superposing nondiffracting parabolic beams with distinct longitudinal wave-vector components, generating light profiles that display intensity fluxes following parabolic paths in the transverse plane. Their propagation dynamics vary depending on the physical mechanism originating interference, where the possibilities include constructive and destructive interference between traveling parabolic beams, interference between stationary parabolic modes, and combinations of these. The dark parabolic region exhibited by parabolic beams permits a straightforward superposition of intensity fluxes, allowing formation of a variety of profiles, which can exhibit circular, elliptic, and other symmetries.

  6. Effect of Gaussian intensity profiles on difference-frequency generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, K. C.; Gupta, P. K.

    1980-04-01

    The effect of a Gaussian intensity profile on the efficiency of difference-frequency generation in the near-field limit is evaluated. The effect of a nonuniform intensity profile in the incident beams are significant qualitatively as well as quantitatively. These effects become more important when the incident pump intensity is much larger than the incident idler intensity.

  7. Nonequilibrium statistics of the laser beam intensity profile at the output of a model channel with strong turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyan, Tatiana I.; Babanin, Eugeniy A.; Komarov, Aleksandr G.; Suhareva, Natalia A.; Zotov, Aleksey M.

    2014-11-01

    The experimentally obtained space-time distortions of the signal beam profile in the optical data transmitting channels are presented. Interpretation and prognostication of distortion structure was carried out using the non-equilibrium thermodynamics and statistics methods, particularly non-extensive Renyi entropy. The method of media state operational control using a single sampling frame is proposed.

  8. Modeling of power spectral density of modified von Karman atmospheric phase turbulence and acousto-optic chaos using scattered intensity profiles over discrete time intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Monish R.; Mohamed, Fathi H. A.

    2014-10-01

    In recent research, propagation of plane electromagnetic (EM) waves through a turbulent medium with modified von Karman phase characteristics was modeled and numerically simulated using transverse planar apertures representing narrow phase turbulence along the propagation path. The case for extended turbulence was also studied by repeating the planar phase screens multiple times over the propagation path and incorporating diffractive effects via a split-step algorithm. The goal of the research reported here is to examine two random phenomena: (a) atmospheric turbulence due to von Karman-type phase fluctuations, and (b) chaos generated in an acousto-optic (A-O) Bragg cell under hybrid feedback. The latter problem has been thoroughly examined for its nonlinear dynamics and applications in secure communications. However, the statistical characteristics (such as the power spectral density (PSD)) of the chaos have not been estimated in recent work. To that end, treating the chaos phenomena as a random process, the time waveforms of the chaos intensity and their spectra are numerically evaluated over a (large) number of time iterations. These spectra are then averaged to derive the equivalent PSD of the A-O chaos. For the turbulence problem, an optical beam passing through an input pinhole is propagated through a random phase screen (placed at different locations) to a desired distance (typically near-field) under different levels of turbulence strength. The resulting spatial intensity profile is then averaged and the process repeated over a (large) number of pre-specified time intervals. From this data, once again, the turbulence PSD is calculated via the Fourier spectra of the average intensity snapshots. The results for the two systems are compared.

  9. haematological profiles of pigs raised under intensive management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EZE J I

    MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN SOUTH-EASTERN NIGERIA. *EZE, J. I. ... SUMMARY. The haematological profile of pigs raised under intensive management system in South- ... Monogastric (both swine and poultry), has made a ... pig production has played a significant role in meat ... adversely affect the health or welfare of.

  10. Transfusional profile in different types of intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilusca Cardoso de Paula

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: anemia is a common clinical finding in intensive care units. The red blood cell transfusion is the main form of treatment, despite the associated risks. Thus, we proposed to evaluate the profile of transfusional patients in different intensive care units. Methods: prospective analysis of patients admitted in the intensive care units of a tertiary university hospital with an indication for transfusion of packed red blood cells. Demographic profile and transfusional profile were collected, a univariate analysis was done, and the results were considered significant at p = 0.05. Results: 408 transfusions were analyzed in 71 patients. The mean hemoglobin concentration on admission was 9.7 ± 2.3 g/dL and the pre-transfusional concentration was 6.9 ± 1.1 g/dL. The main indications for transfusion were hemoglobin concentration (49% and active bleeding (32%. The median number of units transfused per episode was 2 (1-2 and the median storage time was 14 (7-21 days. The number of patients transfused with hemoglobin levels greater than 7 g/dL and the number of bags transfused per episode were significantly different among intensive care units. Patients who received three or more transfusions had longer mechanical ventilation time and intensive care unit stay and higher mortality after 60 days. There was an association of mortality with disease severity but not with transfusional characteristics. Conclusions: the practice of blood products transfusion was partially in agreement with the guidelines recommended, although there are differences in behavior between the different profiles of intensive care units. Transfused patients evolved with unfavorable outcomes. Despite the scarcity of blood in blood banks, the mean storage time of the bags was high.

  11. Functional profile of swallowing in clinical intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rodrigues Padovani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the functional profile of swallowing and feedingin patients admitted to a clinical intensive care unit. Methods: Asurvey on the speech therapy care provided at clinical intensive careunit, from May to August 2006, to establish indicators to describeswallowing functional profile. In this study we included patients referredfor suspected dysphagia after undergoing long periods of mechanicalventilation and/or tracheostomy, and we excluded those suspectedof neurogenic dysphagia. Results: We observed a 65% prevalence oforopharyngeal dysphagia in four months of speech therapy. Amongthe patients who were previously submitted to orotracheal intubation,we observed oropharyngeal dysphagia in 64% of assessments, and wenoticed a reduction in dysphagia severity after speech therapy. Thirtyninepercent of cases required further speech therapy. Conclusion:Speech therapy in non-neurogenic dysphagia in clinical intensive careunit focuses mainly on patients who were intubated for more than 48hours. These patients benefited from the intervention through the useof therapeutic techniques based on the necessary criteria for safefeeding habits.

  12. Dose profile analysis of small fields in intensity modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medel B, E. [IMSS, Centro Medico Nacional Manuel Avila Camacho, Calle 2 Nte. 2004, Barrio de San Francisco, 72090 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Tejeda M, G.; Romero S, K., E-mail: romsakaren@gmail.com [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Av. San Claudio y 18 Sur, Ciudad Universitaria, 72570 Puebla, Pue.(Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Small field dosimetry is getting a very important worldwide task nowadays. The use of fields of few centimeters is more common with the introduction of sophisticated techniques of radiation therapy, as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). In our country the implementation of such techniques is just getting started and whit it the need of baseline data acquisition. The dosimetry under small field conditions represents a challenge for the physicists community. In this work, a dose profile analysis was done, using various types of dosimeters for further comparisons. This analysis includes the study of quality parameters as flatness, symmetry, penumbra, and other in-axis measurements. (Author)

  13. Effects of the plasma profiles on photon and pair production in ultrahigh intensity laser solid interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y. X.; Jin, X. L., E-mail: jinxiaolin@uestc.edu.cn; Yan, W. Z.; Li, J. Q.; Li, B. [Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Yu, J. Q. [Vacuum Electronics National Laboratory, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    The model of photon and pair production in strong field quantum electrodynamics is implemented into our 1D3V particle-in-cell code with Monte Carlo algorithm. Using this code, the evolution of the particles in ultrahigh intensity laser (∼10{sup 23} W/cm{sup 2}) interaction with aluminum foil target is observed. Four different initial plasma profiles are considered in the simulations. The effects of initial plasma profiles on photon and pair production, energy spectra, and energy evolution are analyzed. The results imply that one can set an optimal initial plasma profile to obtain the desired photon distributions.

  14. R & D of a Gas-Filled RF Beam Profile Monitor for Intense Neutrino Beam Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonehara, K. [Fermilab; Backfish, M. [Fermilab; Moretti, A. [Fermilab; Tollestrup, A. V. [Fermilab; Watts, A. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. M. [Fermilab; Abrams, R. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Cummings, M. A.; Dudas, A. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Johnson, R. P. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kazakevich, G. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Neubauer, M. [MUONS Inc., Batavia; Liu, Q. [Case Western Reserve U.

    2017-05-01

    We report the R&D of a novel radiation-robust hadron beam profile monitor based on a gas-filled RF cavity for intense neutrino beam experiments. An equivalent RF circuit model was made and simulated to optimize the RF parameter in a wide beam intensity range. As a result, the maximum acceptable beam intensity in the monitor is significantly increased by using a low-quality factor RF cavity. The plan for the demonstration test is set up to prepare for future neutrino beam experiments.

  15. One-dimensional velocity profiles in open-channel flow with intense transport of coarse sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrostlík Štěpán

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with laboratory experiments in open-channel flows with intense transport of model sediment (coarse plastic particles in our new tilting flume. The major objectives of the paper are: 1. to discuss applied measuring methods, 2. to analyze measured velocity profiles. Ad 1. A profile of the longitudinal component of local velocity was measured across the vertical axis of symmetry of a flume cross section using three independent measuring methods (Prandtl tube, Ultrasonic Velocity Profiler, Acoustic Doppler Velocity Profiler. Due to strong stratification of the flow in the flume, parts of the profile are measured in regions of very different local concentrations of sediment (from virtually zero concentration to the maximum concentration of bed packing. This makes measurements complicated, particularly for ultrasonic measuring techniques. Profiles measured using the different techniques are evaluated and mutually compared. Ad 2. The layered character of the flow causes that shapes of velocity profiles tend to be different in the transport layer (rich on transported particles above the bed and in the solids-free region between the top of the transport layer and the water surface. Shapes of the profiles are analyzed. Particular attention is paid to the logarithmic profile in the solids-free region of the flow cross section. The profile can be handled using the law of the hydraulically-rough wall. In the law, the eroded top of the bed with the transport layer is supposed to be the rough boundary and appropriate values are sought for its variables.

  16. Relating multi-sequence longitudinal intensity profiles and clinical covariates in incident multiple sclerosis lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Elizabeth M; Shinohara, Russell T; Dewey, Blake E; Schindler, Matthew K; Muschelli, John; Reich, Daniel S; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Eloyan, Ani

    2016-01-01

    The formation of multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions is a complex process involving inflammation, tissue damage, and tissue repair - all of which are visible on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and potentially modifiable by pharmacological therapy. In this paper, we introduce two statistical models for relating voxel-level, longitudinal, multi-sequence structural MRI intensities within MS lesions to clinical information and therapeutic interventions: (1) a principal component analysis (PCA) and regression model and (2) function-on-scalar regression models. To do so, we first characterize the post-lesion incidence repair process on longitudinal, multi-sequence structural MRI from 34 MS patients as voxel-level intensity profiles. For the PCA regression model, we perform PCA on the intensity profiles to develop a voxel-level biomarker for identifying slow and persistent, long-term intensity changes within lesion tissue voxels. The proposed biomarker's ability to identify such effects is validated by two experienced clinicians (a neuroradiologist and a neurologist). On a scale of 1 to 4, with 4 being the highest quality, the neuroradiologist gave the score on the first PC a median quality rating of 4 (95% CI: [4,4]), and the neurologist gave the score a median rating of 3 (95% CI: [3,3]). We then relate the biomarker to the clinical information in a mixed model framework. Treatment with disease-modifying therapies (p < 0.01), steroids (p < 0.01), and being closer to the boundary of abnormal signal intensity (p < 0.01) are all associated with return of a voxel to an intensity value closer to that of normal-appearing tissue. The function-on-scalar regression model allows for assessment of the post-incidence time points at which the covariates are associated with the profiles. In the function-on-scalar regression, both age and distance to the boundary were found to have a statistically significant association with the lesion intensities at some time point

  17. Profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karla Camila Lima de Souza; Nataly Gurgel Campos; Francisco Fleury Uchoa Santos Júnior

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit, characterizing the study population according to their neonatal variables and risk factors...

  18. Intensive treatment models and coercion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenschlaeger, Johan; Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone;

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence exists concerning the optimal treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and the effect on traditional outcomes. The aim was to investigate whether optimal treatment models have an effect on the level of use of coercion and on traditional outcomes. ...... treatment. A higher number of bed-days in Hospital-based Rehabilitation did not influence the effect on the outcomes measured........ Hospital-based Rehabilitation, an intensified inpatient treatment model, Integrated Treatment, an intensified model of Assertive Community Treatment, and standard treatment were compared for patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Ninety-four patients with first-episode schizophrenia......-spectrum disorders estimated to benefit from long-term hospitalization were included consecutively from the Copenhagen OPUS-trial and randomized to the three treatment models. At 1-year follow-up, Hospital-based Rehabilitation and Integrated Treatment had better scores on symptoms in the negative dimension...

  19. Evaluation of a tailored injection profile (TIP) algorithm for uniform contrast-enhanced signal intensity profiles in MR angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gregory J; Maki, Jeffrey H

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a contrast agent injection method that provides constant magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signal intensity throughout a contrast-enhanced MR angiography acquisition. A tailored injection profile (TIP) algorithm was developed that used the signal intensity profile from a test bolus as an impulse response function, and predicted the response to various multiphasic injection profiles. Antecubital vein injections were administered via a commercially available multiphasic power injector. The TIP algorithm evaluated the predicted responses and selected the injection that best matched the desired (20-sec plateau) profile. Resulting signal intensity profiles from tailored and standard injection profiles were compared in 20 subjects (10 each). All subjects received a weight-based single-dose (0.1 mmol/kg) of gadoteridol, and abdominal aorta signal intensities were measured at 3T with a time-resolved, thick-slice, 3D spoiled-gradient-echo MR sequence with parameters approximating contrast-enhanced MR angiography. The single-phase, standard injection was injected at 1.6 mL/sec. Full-width at 80% maximum (FW80M) signal intensity was significantly longer for the tailored injection profiles (23.0 ± 2.2 vs. 9.0 ± 4.2 sec; P < 0.01). Concurrently, the profile peak signal intensity was reduced by 19% for the tailored profiles (12.0 ± 3.1 vs. 14.8 ± 2.8 times baseline; P = 0.058), nearly reaching significance. Multiphasic tailored injections from a power injector produced longer signal intensity profiles (156% increase in FW80M) with an accompanying decrease (19%) in peak signal intensity compared to a standard, single-phase injection. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1664-1672. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Intensive treatment models and coercion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenschlaeger, Johan; Thorup, Anne; Petersen, Lone

    2007-01-01

    Little evidence exists concerning the optimal treatment for patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and the effect on traditional outcomes. The aim was to investigate whether optimal treatment models have an effect on the level of use of coercion and on traditional outcomes...

  1. Exposure at Default Modeling with Default Intensities

    OpenAIRE

    Witzany, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the Exposure at Default (EAD) definition, requirements, and estimation methods as set by the Basel II regulation. A new methodology connected to the intensity of default modeling is proposed. The numerical examples show that various estimation techniques may lead to quite different results with intensity of default based model being recommended as the most faithful with respect to a precise probabilistic definition of the EAD parameter.

  2. Modelling Soil Profiles in their Landscape Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Through models, explores the relationships between the interacting drivers of soil profile evolution. Soil hydrology drives the partition of precipitation between overland flow, shallow subsurface flow and deeper percolation/ lateral flow. Critical parts of this interchange occurs close to the surface, within the zone of strong bioturbation, where inorganic composition is determined by the balance between erosion and weathering rates expressed in the chemical depletion ratio. The intensity of organic matter cycling may also limit the final composition of weathering products. Erosion rates are partly driven by the geomorphic environment, through gradient and hydrology, but also constrained by the degree of soil weathering, through particle size and mineralogy. Weathering rates are determined by water movement below the bioturbation zone and ionic diffusion from parent material, which control the rate of decline with soil depth. These interactions are explored through simple equilibrium and evolutionary models for the soil profile that are applicable across a wide range of geological and climatic environments.

  3. Modeling of neutrals in the Linac4 H{sup −} ion source plasma: Hydrogen atom production density profile and H{sub α} intensity by collisional radiative model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T., E-mail: t.yamamoto@ppl.appi.keio.ac.jp; Shibata, T.; Ohta, M.; Yasumoto, M.; Nishida, K.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Mattei, S.; Lettry, J. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Sawada, K. [Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Fantz, U. [Max-Plank-Instutut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To control the H{sup 0} atom production profile in the H{sup −} ion sources is one of the important issues for the efficient and uniform surface H{sup −} production. The purpose of this study is to construct a collisional radiative (CR) model to calculate the effective production rate of H{sup 0} atoms from H{sub 2} molecules in the model geometry of the radio-frequency (RF) H{sup −} ion source for Linac4 accelerator. In order to validate the CR model by comparison with the experimental results from the optical emission spectroscopy, it is also necessary for the model to calculate Balmer photon emission rate in the source. As a basic test of the model, the time evolutions of H{sup 0} production and the Balmer H{sub α} photon emission rate are calculated for given electron energy distribution functions in the Linac4 RF H{sup −} ion source. Reasonable test results are obtained and basis for the detailed comparisons with experimental results have been established.

  4. The profile of indications for radiography in the Neonatal Intensive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pro le of indications for radiographs in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Universitas Academic Hospital, Bloemfontein, South .... blackening and processing, viewing conditions, and analysis of .... central catheter lines migrate within 24 hours.

  5. Workload modelling for data-intensive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lassnig, Mario

    This thesis presents a comprehensive study built upon the requirements of a global data-intensive system, built for the ATLAS Experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider. First, a scalable method is described to capture distributed data management operations in a non-intrusive way. These operations are collected into a globally synchronised sequence of events, the workload. A comparative analysis of this new data-intensive workload against existing computational workloads is conducted, leading to the discovery of the importance of descriptive attributes in the operations. Existing computational workload models only consider the arrival rates of operations, however, in data-intensive systems the correlations between attributes play a central role. Furthermore, the detrimental effect of rapid correlated arrivals, so called bursts, is assessed. A model is proposed that can learn burst behaviour from captured workload, and in turn forecast potential future bursts. To help with the creation of a full representative...

  6. Computer Profiling Based Model for Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Choudhary

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer profiling is used for computer forensic analysis, and proposes and elaborates on a novel model for use in computer profiling, the computer profiling object model. The computer profiling object model is an information model which models a computer as objects with various attributes and inter-relationships. These together provide the information necessary for a human investigator or an automated reasoning engine to make judgments as to the probable usage and evidentiary value of a computer system. The computer profiling object model can be implemented so as to support automated analysis to provide an investigator with the informationneeded to decide whether manual analysis is required.

  7. Effect of secondary convective cells on turbulence intensity profiles, flow generation, and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, S.; Kwon, J. M.; Rhee, T. [National Fusion Research Institute, Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Eoeun-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0429 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    This paper reports the results of gyrokinetic simulation studies of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence which investigate the role of non-resonant modes in turbulence spreading, turbulence regulation, and self-generated plasma rotation. Non-resonant modes, which are those without a rational surface within the simulation domain, are identified as nonlinearly driven, radially extended convective cells. Even though the amplitudes of such convective cells are much smaller than that of the resonant, localized turbulence eddies, we find from bicoherence analysis that the mode-mode interactions in the presence of such convective cells increase the efficiency of turbulence spreading associated with nonlocality phenomena. Artificial suppression of the convective cells shows that turbulence spreading is reduced, and that the turbulence intensity profile is more localized. The more localized turbulence intensity profile produces stronger Reynolds stress and E Multiplication-Sign B shear flows, which in turn results in more effective turbulence self-regulation. This suggests that models without non-resonant modes may significantly underestimate turbulent fluctuation levels and transport.

  8. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Sonu Sen; Meenu Asthana Varshney; Dinesh Varshney

    2014-01-01

    In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have num...

  9. Towards evaluating the intensity of convective systems by using GPS radio occultation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Steiner, Andrea K.; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2015-04-01

    Deep convective systems, also more casually often just called storms, are destructive weather phenomena causing every year many deaths, injuries and damages and accounting for major economic losses in several countries. The number and intensity of such phenomena increased over the last decades in some areas of the globe, including Europe. Damages are mostly caused by strong winds and heavy rain and these parameters are strongly connected to the structure of the storm. Convection over land is usually stronger and deeper than over the ocean and some convective systems, known as supercells, also develop tornadoes through processes which are still mostly unclear. The intensity forecast and monitoring of convective systems is one of the major challenges for meteorology because in-situ measurements during extreme events are too sparse or not reliable and most ongoing satellite missions do not provide suitable time/space coverage. With this study we propose a new method for detecting the convection intensity in terms of rain rate and surface wind speed by using meteorological surface measurements in combination with atmospheric profiles from Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation observations, which are available in essentially all weather conditions and with global coverage. The analysis of models indicated a relationship between the cloud top altitude and the intensity of a storm. We thus use GPS radio occultation bending angle profiles for detecting the storm's cloud top altitude and we correlate this value to the rain rate and wind speed measured by meteorological station networks in two different regions, the WegenerNet climate station network (South-Eastern Styria, Austria) and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site (ARM, Southern Great Plains, USA), respectively. The results show a good correlation between the cloud top altitude and the maximum rain rate in the monitored areas, while this is not found for maximum wind speed. We conclude from this

  10. Pacing Profiles in Competitive Track Races: Regulation of Exercise Intensity is related to Cognitive Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Van Biesen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pacing has been defined as the goal-directed regulation of exercise intensity over an exercise bout, in which athletes need to decide how and when to invest their energy. The purpose of this study was to explore if the regulation of exercise intensity during competitive track races is different between runners with and without intellectual impairment, which is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning (IQ≤75 and adaptive behavioral deficits, diagnosed before the age of 18. The samples included elite runners with intellectual impairment (N= 36 and a comparison group of world class runners without impairment (N= 39, of which 47 were 400m runners (all male and 28 were 1500m-runners (15 male and 13 female. Pacing was analysed by means of 100m split times (for 400m races and 200m split times (for 1500m races. Based on the split times, the average velocity was calculated for four segments of the races. Velocity fluctuations were defined as the differences in velocity between consecutive race segments. A mixed model ANOVA revealed significant differences in pacing profiles between runners with and without intellectual impairment (p<.05. Maximal velocity of elite 400m runners with intellectual impairment in the first race segment (7.9 ± 0.3 m/s was well below the top-velocity reached by world level 400m runners without intellectual impairment (8.9 ±0.2 m/s, and their overall pace was slower (F=120.7, p<.05. In addition, both groups followed a different pacing profile and inter-individual differences in pacing profiles were larger, with differences most pronounced for 1500m races. Whereas male 1500m-runners without intellectual impairment reached a high velocity in the first 100m (7.2±0.1 m/s, slowly decelerated in the second race segment (-0.6±0.1 m/s, and finished with an end sprint (+0.9±0.1 m/s; the 1500m runners with intellectual impairment started slower (6.1±0.3 m/s, accelerated in the second segment (+ 0.2±0

  11. The K-band intensity profile of R Leonis probed by VLTI/VINCI

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, D; Paresce, F; Scholz, M; Wood, P R; Ciroi, S

    2004-01-01

    We present near-infrared K-band interferometric measurements of the Mira star R Leonis obtained in April 2001 and January 2002 with the VLTI, the commissioning instrument VINCI, and the two test siderostats. These epochs correspond to near-maximum stellar variability phases $\\sim$ 0.08 and $\\sim$ 1.02 (one cycle later), respectively. The April 2001 data cover a range of spatial frequencies (31--35 cycles/arcsecond) within the first lobe of the visibility function. These measurements indicate a center-to-limb intensity variation (CLV) that is clearly different from a uniform disk (UD) intensity profile. We show that these measured visibility values are consistent with predictions from recent self-excited dynamic Mira model atmospheres that include molecular shells close to continuum-forming layers. We derive high-precision Rosseland diameters of 28.5 +/- 0.4 mas and 26.2 +/- 0.8 mas for the April 2001 and January 2002 data, respectively. Together with literature estimates of the distance and the bolometric flu...

  12. Pacing Profiles in Competitive Track Races: Regulation of Exercise Intensity Is Related to Cognitive Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Biesen, Debbie; Hettinga, Florentina J.; McCulloch, Katina; Vanlandewijck, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Pacing has been defined as the goal-directed regulation of exercise intensity over an exercise bout, in which athletes need to decide how and when to invest their energy. The purpose of this study was to explore if the regulation of exercise intensity during competitive track races is different between runners with and without intellectual impairment, which is characterized by significant limitations in intellectual functioning (IQ ≤ 75) and adaptive behavioral deficits, diagnosed before the age of 18. The samples included elite runners with intellectual impairment (N = 36) and a comparison group of world class runners without impairment (N = 39), of which 47 were 400 m runners (all male) and 28 were 1500 m-runners (15 male and 13 female). Pacing was analyzed by means of 100 m split times (for 400 m races) and 200 m split times (for 1500 m races). Based on the split times, the average velocity was calculated for four segments of the races. Velocity fluctuations were defined as the differences in velocity between consecutive race segments. A mixed model ANOVA revealed significant differences in pacing profiles between runners with and without intellectual impairment (p 100 m (7.2 ± 0.1 m/s), slowly decelerated in the second race segment (−0.6 ± 0.1 m/s), and finished with an end sprint (+0.9 ± 0.1 m/s); the 1500 m runners with intellectual impairment started slower (6.1 ± 0.3 m/s), accelerated in the second segment (+0.2 ± 0.7 m/s), and then slowly decreased until the finish (F = 6.8, p < 0.05). Our findings support the hypothesis that runners with intellectual impairment have difficulties to efficiently self-regulate their exercise intensity. Their limited cognitive resources may constrain the successful integration of appropriate pacing strategies during competitive races. PMID:28066258

  13. Modelling background intensity in Affymetrix Genechips

    CERN Document Server

    Kroll, K M; Carlon, E

    2008-01-01

    DNA microarrays are devices that are able, in principle, to detect and quantify the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences in complex biological mixtures. The measurement consists in detecting fluorescence signals from several spots on the microarray surface onto which different probe sequences are grafted. One of the problems of the data analysis is that the signal contains a noisy background component due to non-specific binding. This paper presents a physical model for background estimation in Affymetrix Genechips. It combines two different approaches. The first is based on the sequence composition, specifically its sequence dependent hybridization affinity. The second is based on the strong correlation of intensities from locations which are the physical neighbors of a specific spot on the chip. Both effects are incorporated in a background functional which contains 24 free parameters, fixed by minimization on a training data set. In all data analyzed the sequence specific parameters, obtained by min...

  14. QUALITY-OF-LIFE AFTER INTENSIVE-CARE WITH THE SICKNESS IMPACT PROFILE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TIAN, ZM; MIRANDA, DR

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: a) to validate the structure of the Sickness Impact Profile scale (SIP) when applied to intensive care patients after discharge from the hospital; b) to explore the influence of age upon the various components of quality of life. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Patients admitted to 3

  15. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  16. A UML profile for framework modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-liang(徐小良); WANG Le-yu(汪乐宇); ZHOU Hong(周泓)

    2004-01-01

    The current standard Unified Modeling Language(UML) could not model framework flexibility and extendibility adequately due to lack of appropriate constructs to distinguish framework hot-spots from kernel elements. A new UML profile that may customize UML for framework modeling was presented using the extension mechanisms of UML, providing a group of UML extensions to meet the needs of framework modeling. In this profile, the extended class diagrams and sequence diagrams were defined to straightforwardly identify the hot-spots and describe their instantiation restrictions. A transformation model based on design patterns was also put forward, such that the profile based framework design diagrams could be automatically mapped to the corresponding implementation diagrams. It was proved that the presented profile makes framework modeling more straightforwardly and therefore easier to understand and instantiate.

  17. A UML profile for framework modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-liang; Wang, Le-yu; Zhou, Hong

    2004-01-01

    The current standard Unified Modeling Language(UML) could not model framework flexibility and extendability adequately due to lack of appropriate constructs to distinguish framework hot-spots from kernel elements. A new UML profile that may customize UML for framework modeling was presented using the extension mechanisms of UML, providing a group of UML extensions to meet the needs of framework modeling. In this profile, the extended class diagrams and sequence diagrams were defined to straightforwardly identify the hot-spots and describe their instantiation restrictions. A transformation model based on design patterns was also put forward, such that the profile based framework design diagrams could be automatically mapped to the corresponding implementation diagrams. It was proved that the presented profile makes framework modeling more straightforwardly and therefore easier to understand and instantiate.

  18. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams; Elektronenstrahl-Diagnostik zur Bestimmung vom transversalen Profil intensiver Ionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-11-03

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  19. Electron beam based transversal profile measurements of intense ion beams; Elektronenstrahl-Diagnostik zur Bestimmung vom transversalen Profil intensiver Ionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Moussati, Said

    2014-11-03

    A non-invasive diagnostic method for the experimental determination of the transverse profile of an intense ion beam has been developed and investigated theoretically as well as experimentally within the framework of the present work. The method is based on the deflection of electrons when passing the electromagnetic field of an ion beam. To achieve this an electron beam is employed with a specifically prepared transversal profile. This distinguish this method from similar ones which use thin electron beams for scanning the electromagnetic field [Roy et al. 2005; Blockland10]. The diagnostic method presented in this work will be subsequently called ''Electron-Beam-Imaging'' (EBI). First of all the influence of the electromagnetic field of the ion beam on the electrons has been theoretically analyzed. It was found that the magnetic field causes only a shift of the electrons along the ion beam axis, while the electric field only causes a shift in a plane transverse to the ion beam. Moreover, in the non-relativistic case the magnetic force is significantly smaller than the Coulomb one and the electrons suffer due to the magnetic field just a shift and continue to move parallel to their initial trajectory. Under the influence of the electric field, the electrons move away from the ion beam axis, their resulting trajectory shows a specific angle compared to the original direction. This deflection angle practically depends just on the electric field of the ion beam. Thus the magnetic field has been neglected when analysing the experimental data. The theoretical model provides a relationship between the deflection angle of the electrons and the charge distribution in the cross section of the ion beam. The model however only can be applied for small deflection angles. This implies a relationship between the line-charge density of the ion beam and the initial kinetic energy of the electrons. Numerical investigations have been carried out to clarify the

  20. Computational models for analyzing lipoprotein profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, A.A. de; Schalkwijk, D.B. van

    2011-01-01

    At present, several measurement technologies are available for generating highly detailed concentration-size profiles of lipoproteins, offering increased diagnostic potential. Computational models are useful in aiding the interpretation of these complex datasets and making the data more accessible f

  1. Directional Profiles of Wind Speed and Turbulence Intensity over Forest and Open Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Elisabeth; Dietz, Sebastian; Pinter, Anna

    2014-05-01

    More and more wind turbines are built onshore and reduce the available areas for wind energy. Forests are additional potential for wind energy priority areas. But the high roughness of wooden areas and the resulting turbulences make it difficult to assess sites in forests. In order to cope with this problem some measurements were done inside and outside wooden areas. Therefore met masts equipped with ultra sonic and cup anemometers and LIDAR were used. With the measured wind speed and its standard deviation the turbulence intensity was calculated. The results are direction dependent profiles of wind speed and turbulence intensity.

  2. Phase Determination Method to Directly Measure Intensity and Frequency of Temporal Profiles of Attosecond EUV Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Yu-Cheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ A new method of phase determination is presented to directly measure the intensity and frequency temporalprofiles of attosecond EUV pulses. The profiles can be reconstructed from the photoelectron energy spectra measured with two different laser intensities at 0° and 180° with respect to the linear laser polarization using a cross correlation between the femtosecond laser and the attosecond EUV. The method has a temporal measurement range from a quarter to about half of a laser oscillation period. The time resolution depends on the jitter and control precision of laser and EUV pulses. This method improves the time resolution in measuring attosecond EUV pulses.

  3. Profile and Determinants of Retinal Optical Intensity in Normal Eyes with Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binyao Chen

    Full Text Available To investigate the profile and determinants of retinal optical intensity in normal subjects using 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT.A total of 231 eyes from 231 healthy subjects ranging in age from 18 to 80 years were included and underwent a 3D OCT scan. Forty-four eyes were randomly chosen to be scanned by two operators for reproducibility analysis. Distribution of optical intensity of each layer and regions specified by the Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS were investigated by analyzing the OCT raw data with our automatic graph-based algorithm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed between retinal optical intensity and sex, age, height, weight, spherical equivalent (SE, axial length, image quality, disc area and rim/disc area ratio (R/D area ratio.For optical intensity measurements, the intraclass correlation coefficient of each layer ranged from 0.815 to 0.941, indicating good reproducibility. Optical intensity was lowest in the central area of retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer and photoreceptor layer, except for the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Optical intensity was positively correlated with image quality in all retinal layers (0.5530.05. There was no relationship between retinal optical intensity and sex, height, weight, SE, axial length, disc area and R/D area ratio.There was a specific pattern of distribution of retinal optical intensity in different regions. The optical intensity was affected by image quality and age. Image quality can be used as a reference for normalization. The effect of age needs to be taken into consideration when using OCT for diagnosis.

  4. Face in profile view reduces perceived facial expression intensity: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun; Shaw, Heather

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies measuring the facial expressions of emotion have focused primarily on the perception of frontal face images. As we frequently encounter expressive faces from different viewing angles, having a mechanism which allows invariant expression perception would be advantageous to our social interactions. Although a couple of studies have indicated comparable expression categorization accuracy across viewpoints, it is unknown how perceived expression intensity and associated gaze behaviour change across viewing angles. Differences could arise because diagnostic cues from local facial features for decoding expressions could vary with viewpoints. Here we manipulated orientation of faces (frontal, mid-profile, and profile view) displaying six common facial expressions of emotion, and measured participants' expression categorization accuracy, perceived expression intensity and associated gaze patterns. In comparison with frontal faces, profile faces slightly reduced identification rates for disgust and sad expressions, but significantly decreased perceived intensity for all tested expressions. Although quantitatively viewpoint had expression-specific influence on the proportion of fixations directed at local facial features, the qualitative gaze distribution within facial features (e.g., the eyes tended to attract the highest proportion of fixations, followed by the nose and then the mouth region) was independent of viewpoint and expression type. Our results suggest that the viewpoint-invariant facial expression processing is categorical perception, which could be linked to a viewpoint-invariant holistic gaze strategy for extracting expressive facial cues.

  5. An Empirical Model of FUV Auroral Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-25

    intensity [Feldstein and Starkov , 1970; Sandford, 1968; Shepherd, 1979] is the large field-of-view of the space-borne imaging instrument, the automatic...BEAR, Ultraviolet Technology, Proc. SPIE, 1988. Feldstein, Y. I., and Starkov , G. V., The auroral oval and the boundary of closed field lines of

  6. Associations between intensive diabetes therapy and NMR-determined lipoprotein subclass profiles in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Jenkins, Alicia J; Basu, Arpita; Stoner, Julie A; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Klein, Richard L; Lyons, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    Our objective is to define differences in circulating lipoprotein subclasses between intensive versus conventional management of type 1 diabetes during the randomization phase of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT). NMR-determined lipoprotein subclass profiles (NMR-LSPs), which estimate molar subclass concentrations and mean particle diameters, were determined in 1,294 DCCT subjects after a median of 5 years (interquartile range: 4-6 years) of randomization to intensive or conventional diabetes management. In cross-sectional analyses, we compared standard lipids and NMR-LSPs between treatment groups. Standard total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol levels were similar between randomization groups, while triglyceride levels were lower in the intensively treated group. NMR-LSPs showed that intensive therapy was associated with larger LDL diameter (20.7 vs. 20.6 nm, P = 0.01) and lower levels of small LDL (median: 465 vs. 552 nmol/l, P = 0.007), total IDL/LDL (mean: 1,000 vs. 1,053 nmol/l, P = 0.01), and small HDL (mean: 17.3 vs. 18.6 μmol/l, P diabetes therapy was associated with potentially favorable changes in LDL and HDL subclasses in sera. Further research will determine whether these changes contribute to the beneficial effects of intensive diabetes management on vascular complications.

  7. Modeling nitrogen plasmas produced by intense electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angus, J. R.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Schumer, J. W.; Hinshelwood, D. D. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P. F. [Independent contractors for NRL through Engility, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia 22314 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    A new gas–chemistry model is presented to treat the breakdown of a nitrogen gas with pressures on the order of 1 Torr from intense electron beams with current densities on the order of 10 kA/cm{sup 2} and pulse durations on the order of 100 ns. For these parameter regimes, the gas transitions from a weakly ionized molecular state to a strongly ionized atomic state on the time scale of the beam pulse. The model is coupled to a 0D–circuit model using the rigid–beam approximation that can be driven by specifying the time and spatial profiles of the beam pulse. Simulation results are in good agreement with experimental measurements of the line–integrated electron density from experiments done using the Gamble II generator at the Naval Research Laboratory. It is found that the species are mostly in the ground and metastable states during the atomic phase, but that ionization proceeds predominantly through thermal ionization of optically allowed states with excitation energies close to the ionization limit.

  8. Anthropometric, Sprint, and High-Intensity Running Profiles of English Academy Rugby Union Players by Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrall-Jones, Joshua D; Jones, Ben; Till, Kevin

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running profiles of English academy rugby union players by playing positions, and to investigate the relationships between anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running characteristics. Data were collected from 67 academy players after the off-season period and consisted of anthropometric (height, body mass, sum of 8 skinfolds [∑SF]), 40-m linear sprint (5-, 10-, 20-, and 40-m splits), the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test level 1 (Yo-Yo IRTL-1), and the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (30-15 IFT). Forwards displayed greater stature, body mass, and ∑SF; sprint times and sprint momentum, with lower high-intensity running ability and sprint velocities than backs. Comparisons between age categories demonstrated body mass and sprint momentum to have the largest differences at consecutive age categories for forwards and backs; whereas 20-40-m sprint velocity was discriminate for forwards between under 16s, 18s, and 21s. Relationships between anthropometric, sprint velocity, momentum, and high-intensity running ability demonstrated body mass to negatively impact on sprint velocity (10 m; r = -0.34 to -0.46) and positively affect sprint momentum (e.g., 5 m; r = 0.85-0.93), with large to very large negative relationships with the Yo-Yo IRTL-1 (r = -0.65 to -0.74) and 30-15 IFT (r = -0.59 to -0.79). These findings suggest that there are distinct anthropometric, sprint, and high-intensity running ability differences between and within positions in junior rugby union players. The development of sprint and high-intensity running ability may be impacted by continued increases in body mass as there seems to be a trade-off between momentum, velocity, and the ability to complete high-intensity running.

  9. Postprandial lipoprotein profile in two modes of high-intensity intermittent exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panissa, Valéria Leme Gonçalves; Julio, Ursula Ferreira; Diniz, Tiego Aparecido; de Moura Mello Antunes, Barbara; Lira, Fabio Santos; Takito, Monica Yuri; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-01-01

    The aim of present study was to compare blood lipid postprandial profile response in two modes of high-intensity intermittent exercise. Twelve individuals (6 men and 6 women) were submitted to a maximal incremental test (to determine maximal aerobic power [MAP] and V. O2peak [peak oxygen uptake]), high-intensity intermittent all-out exercise (60×8-sec bouts interspersed by 12-sec passive recovery) and fixed high-intensity intermittent exercise (100% maximal aerobic speed, consisted of 1-min repetitions at MAP [70 rpm] separated by 1-min of passive recovery). Blood samples were collected pre, immediately, 45 and 90-min postexercise. Serum was analyzed for total cholesterol and its ratio, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, and triacylglycerol (TAG). For TAG there was a main effect of moment with higher values immediately postexercise compared to 45-min postexercise. For VLDL there was a main effect to moment with higher values immediately post exercise than pre and 45-min postexercise; higher values 90-min postexercise than 45-min postexercise. There was no effect for HDL-c, LDL-c, and cholesterol. For area under the curve there was no difference for any variable. Our results indicated that both kinds of acute exercise session lead to no improvement in the acute response of serum lipid profile of healthy young. PMID:27807528

  10. Intensity profile during an ultra-endurance triathlon in relation to testing and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, A; Chaverri, D; Erola, P; Iglesias, X; Rodríguez, F A

    2014-12-01

    We examined the heart rate (HR)-based intensity profile during an ultra-endurance triathlon (UET) estimated from the individual HR-oxygen uptake (˙VO2) relationship during specific graded tests, relating it to race performance. 9 male ultra-endurance triathletes completed the study. Before racing, subjects performed graded exercise tests involving cycle (C) ergometry, treadmill running (R) and free swimming (S) for peak ˙VO2 and HR at ventilatory thresholds (VT). Exercise-specific HR-˙VO2 regression equations were developed. Mean race HR was higher during S (149.2 (10.1) bpm) than during C (137.1 (5.7) bpm) and R (136.2 (10.5) bpm). During C and R, HR was below both VT (11% and 27-28%). HR differences between S and C correlated with C, R and final times. The greatest differences between S and C were related to the worst times in the next stages. These ultra-endurance triathletes performed S at a higher relative intensity, which was inversely correlated with performance in the following stages. The best predictors of final racing time (81%) were weight-adjusted ˙VO2max and HR difference between C and S. A more adequate characterization of the time pattern during the whole race, especially during S, adds new information concerning the intensity profile and cardiovascular demands of an UET race.

  11. Beam profile measurement on HITU transducers using a thermal intensity sensor technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, V.; Sonntag, S.; Jenderka, K.-V.

    2011-02-01

    Thermal intensity sensors based on the transformation of the incident ultrasonic energy into heat inside a small cylindrical absorber have been developed at PTB in the past, in particular to determine the acoustic output of medical diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Currently, this sensor technique is being expanded to match the measurement challenges of high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) fields. At the high acoustic power levels as utilized in the clinical application of HITU transducers, beam characterization using hydrophones is critical due to the possible damage of the sensitive and expensive measurement devices. Therefore, the low-cost and robust thermal sensors developed offer a promising alternative for the determination of high intensity output beam profiles. A sensor prototype with a spatial resolution of 0.5 mm was applied to the beam characterization of an HITU transducer operated at several driving amplitude levels. Axial beam plots and lateral profiles at focus were acquired. The absolute continuous wave output power was, in addition, determined using a radiation force balance.

  12. Linguistics Computation, Automatic Model Generation, and Intensions

    CERN Document Server

    Nourani, C F

    1994-01-01

    Techniques are presented for defining models of computational linguistics theories. The methods of generalized diagrams that were developed by this author for modeling artificial intelligence planning and reasoning are shown to be applicable to models of computation of linguistics theories. It is shown that for extensional and intensional interpretations, models can be generated automatically which assign meaning to computations of linguistics theories for natural languages. Keywords: Computational Linguistics, Reasoning Models, G-diagrams For Models, Dynamic Model Implementation, Linguistics and Logics For Artificial Intelligence

  13. Additive Intensity Regression Models in Corporate Default Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, David; Medhat, Mamdouh; Nielsen, Mads Stenbo

    2013-01-01

    We consider additive intensity (Aalen) models as an alternative to the multiplicative intensity (Cox) models for analyzing the default risk of a sample of rated, nonfinancial U.S. firms. The setting allows for estimating and testing the significance of time-varying effects. We use a variety of mo...

  14. Parallel plate chambers for monitoring the profiles of high-intensity pulsed antiproton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki

    2004-01-01

    Two types of beam profile monitor with thin parallel-plate electrodes have been used in experiments carried out at the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) and Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. The detectors were used to measure non-destructively the spatial profiles, absolute intensities, and time structures of 100-300-ns- long beam pulses containing between 10**7 and 10**9 antiprotons. The first of these monitors was a parallel plate ionization chamber operated at gas pressure P=65 mbar. The other was a secondary electron emission detector, and was operated in the ultra-high vacuum of the AD. Both designs may be useful in medical and commercial applications. The position-sensitive electrodes in these detectors were manufactured by a novel method in which a laser trimmer was used to cut strip patterns on metallized polyester foils.

  15. Reflected light intensity profile of two-layer tissues: phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankri, Rinat; Taitelbaum, Haim; Fixler, Dror

    2011-08-01

    Experimental measurements of the reflected light intensity from two-layer phantoms are presented. We report, for the first time, an experimental observation of a typical reflected light intensity behavior for the two-layer structure characterized by two different slopes in the reflected light profile of the irradiated tissue. The point in which the first slope changes to the second slope, named as the crossover point, depends on the upper layer thickness as well as on the ratio between the absorption coefficients of the two layers. Since similar experiments from one-layer phantoms present a monotonic decay behavior, the existence and the location of the crossover point can be used as a diagnostic fingerprint for two-layer tissue structures. This pertains to two layers with greater absorptivity in the upper layer, which is the typical biological case in tissues like skin.

  16. Non-destructive profile measurement of intensive heavy ion beams; Zerstoerungsfreie Profilmessung intensiver Schwerionenstrahlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Frank

    2010-02-08

    Within the framework of the FAIR-project (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI (Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research), high intensity beams from protons to uranium ions with kinetic energies up to 30 AGeV are foreseen. Present GSI-accelerators like the UNILAC and the Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS-18) with a magnetic rigidity of 18 Tm will be used as injectors for the future synchrotron (SIS-100). Their beam current will be increased by up to two orders of magnitude. An accurate beam position and beam profile measurement is mandatory for a safe operation of transport sections, in particular in front of production targets (Fragment Separator (FRS)-target, anti p-production-target and Warm Dense Matter (WDM)-targets). Conventional intercepting profile monitors will not withstand the thermal stress of intensive ion beams, particularly for low energy applications or focused beams. For transverse profile determination a non-intercepting Beam Induced Fluorescence (BIF)-monitor was developed, working with residual gas. The BIF-monitor exploits fluorescence light emitted by residual gas molecules after atomic collisions with beam ions. Fluorescence-images were recorded with an image-intensified camera system, and beam profiles were obtained by projecting these images. Within the scope of this dissertation the following topics have been investigated: The photon yield, profile shape and background contribution were determined for different ion species (H{sup +}, S{sup 6+}, Ar{sup 18+}, K{sup +}, Ni{sup 9+}, Xe{sup 48+}, Ta{sup 24+}, Au{sup 65+}, U{sup 73+}), beam energies (7.7 AkeV-750 AMeV), gas pressures (10{sup -6}-3 mbar) and gas species (N{sub 2}, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe). Applying an imaging spectrograph and narrowband 10 nm interference filters, the spectral response was mapped and associated with the corresponding gas transitions. Spectrally resolved beam profiles were also obtained form the spectrographic images. Major results are the light yield showing a

  17. Profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Camila Lima de Souza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the profile of newborns undergoing early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care unit, characterizing the study population according to their neonatal variables and risk factors indicative for the early stimulation treatment. Methods: Cross-sectional and analytical study, held in a reference hospital of Fortaleza, in the period from February to March 2011, with sample consisting of 116 medical records of newborns indicated for the early stimulation treatment. The following variables were analyzed: weight, sex, gestational age, Apgar score, diagnosis of Respiratory Distress Syndrome and Intracranial Hemorrhage, use of mechanical ventilation and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. The variables were analyzed using Microsoft Excel™ 2007 software to obtain mean and mode. Results: Among the studied variables, there was a prevalence of low birth weight, prematurity and male newborns. According to the Apgar score, scores of 1st and 5th minutes showed increasing values. Regarding the studied pathologies, the Respiratory Distress Syndrome stands out as the most prevalent, followed by Intracranial Hemorrhage. Concerning the use of mechanical ventilation, CPAP was the most frequently indicated modality, followed by mechanical ventilation. Conclusion: The profile of newborns investigated in this study, which underwent early stimulation in a neonatal intensive care, is represented by male, premature, low weight and high rate of Apgar score at 1st and 5th minutes, with prevalence of respiratory distressand increased use of CPAP. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5020/18061230.2013.p523

  18. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have numerical appreciation of the results the propagation equation for plasma is solved using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the initial plane wave front of the beam, using boundary conditions. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma and significantly adds self-focusing in plasma. This causes the laser beam to become more focused by reduction of diffraction effect, which is an important phenomenon in inertial confinement fusion and also for the understanding of self-focusing of laser pulses. Numerical computations are presented and discussed in the form of graphs for typical parameters of laser-plasma interaction.

  19. ANN valuation model of material LCIA profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Wei-ping; LIU Hua; ZHAO Hai-dong; ZHU Quan-li; LI Yuan-yuan

    2005-01-01

    Weighting model is the only valuation model of life cycle impact assessment(LCIA) profile now.It simplifies evaluation function into linear function,and makes the determination of weighting factor complicated.Therefore the valuation of LCIA profile is the most critical and controversial step in life cycle assessment(LCA).Development on valuation models,which are understood easily and accepted widely,is urgently needed in the field of LCA.The modeling approaches for the linear evaluation function were summed up.The modeling approaches for the nonlinear evaluation function were set up by function approximation theory,which include choosing preference products,forming preference data,establishing artificial neural network(ANN) and training ANN by preference data.By selecting 7 material products as preference product,experience was done with modeling approaches of the nonlinear evaluation function.The results show that the modeling approaches and valuation model of the nonlinear evaluation function are more practical than the weighting model.

  20. Forward modeling of gyrosynchrotron intensity perturbations by sausage modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B box 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Antolin, P., E-mail: Veronika.Reznikova@wis.kuleuven.be [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-04-20

    To determine the observable radio signatures of the fast sausage standing wave, we examine gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission modulation using a linear three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of a plasma cylinder. Effects of the line-of-sight angle and instrumental resolution on perturbations of the GS intensity are analyzed for two models: a base model with strong Razin suppression and a low-density model in which the Razin effect was unimportant. Our finding contradicts previous predictions made with simpler models: an in-phase variation of intensity between low (f < f {sub peak}) and high (f > f {sub peak}) frequencies is found for the low-density model and an anti-phase variation for the base model in the case of a viewing angle of 45°. The spatially inhomogeneous character of the oscillating emission source and the spatial resolution of the model are found to have a significant effect on the resulting intensity.

  1. Personalised modelling of facial action unit intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Shuang; Rudovic, Ognjen; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Facial expressions depend greatly on facial morphology and expressiveness of the observed person. Recent studies have shown great improvement of the personalized over non-personalized models in variety of facial expression related tasks, such as face and emotion recognition. However, in the context

  2. INTENSIVE READING: A NEW MODEL OF CLASSROOM TEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The intensive reading class should focus on students’ reading problems and the techniques they need to become efficient readers. A model of reading technique training, including attack skills at the word, sentence and discourse level, is presented.

  3. Monitoring of intense neuromuscular blockade in a pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Matias V; Donatsky, Anders M; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-01-01

    .15 min after injection. We established a pig model for monitoring intense NMB with surface stimulation electrodes and acceleromyography. We verified total relaxation of the diaphragm and the abdominal muscles at the PTC 0-1 by suction test and with surface electromyography. This pig model is suitable...... for studies with experimental abdominal surgery with monitoring of intense NMB, and where relaxation of the diaphragm and the abdominal muscles are required....

  4. Simulated intensity profiles for cylindrical objects in magnification mammography: the effect of the spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma-Alejandro, Karla-Denaly; Brandan, Maria-Ester, E-mail: brandan@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF (Mexico); Valdeolivas, Alberto; Chevalier, Margarita; Guibelalde, Eduardo [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Alieva, Tatiana [Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    We present a user-friendly Matlab simulation interface tool to predict intensity profiles for magnified X-ray images of weakly attenuating cylindrical objects, including phase effects. Based on a previous monoenergetic formalism, we now consider polyenergetic X-ray beams and we study the effect of the spectral description on the predicted phase contrast. It was found that, for weakly attenuating objects with diameters <{approx}1 mm, detailed resolution in the spectrum description is not necessary. Simulations are compared with images of cylindrical objects, which were obtained under conditions found in a commercial digital mammography system. The magnification images of phantom plastic fibers show weak, however visible, edge enhancement due to phase contrast. The polyenergetic simulations provide an improved description of the data with respect to the effective energy monoenergetic assumption. (author)

  5. Interpreting metabolomic profiles using unbiased pathway models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul C Deo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Human disease is heterogeneous, with similar disease phenotypes resulting from distinct combinations of genetic and environmental factors. Small-molecule profiling can address disease heterogeneity by evaluating the underlying biologic state of individuals through non-invasive interrogation of plasma metabolite levels. We analyzed metabolite profiles from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in 50 individuals, 25 with normal (NGT and 25 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT. Our focus was to elucidate underlying biologic processes. Although we initially found little overlap between changed metabolites and preconceived definitions of metabolic pathways, the use of unbiased network approaches identified significant concerted changes. Specifically, we derived a metabolic network with edges drawn between reactant and product nodes in individual reactions and between all substrates of individual enzymes and transporters. We searched for "active modules"--regions of the metabolic network enriched for changes in metabolite levels. Active modules identified relationships among changed metabolites and highlighted the importance of specific solute carriers in metabolite profiles. Furthermore, hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis demonstrated that changed metabolites in OGTT naturally grouped according to the activities of the System A and L amino acid transporters, the osmolyte carrier SLC6A12, and the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate transporter SLC25A13. Comparison between NGT and IGT groups supported blunted glucose- and/or insulin-stimulated activities in the IGT group. Using unbiased pathway models, we offer evidence supporting the important role of solute carriers in the physiologic response to glucose challenge and conclude that carrier activities are reflected in individual metabolite profiles of perturbation experiments. Given the involvement of transporters in human disease, metabolite profiling may contribute to improved

  6. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  7. Modeling the Dependency Structure of Integrated Intensity Processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Ki Ma

    Full Text Available This paper studies an important issue of dependence structure. To model this structure, the intensities within the Cox processes are driven by dependent shot noise processes, where jumps occur simultaneously and their sizes are correlated. The joint survival probability of the integrated intensities is explicitly obtained from the copula with exponential marginal distributions. Subsequently, this result can provide a very useful guide for credit risk management.

  8. Modelling of asymmetric nebulae. II. Line profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Morisset, C

    2006-01-01

    We present a tool, VELNEB_3D, which can be applied to the results of 3D photoionization codes to generate emission line profiles, position-velocity maps and 3D maps in any emission line by assuming an arbitrary velocity field. We give a few examples, based on our pseudo-3D photoionization code NEBU_3D (Morisset, Stasinska and Pena, 2005) which show the potentiality and usefulness of our tool. One example shows how complex line profiles can be obtained even with a simple expansion law if the nebula is bipolar and the slit slightly off-center. Another example shows different ways to produce line profiles that could be attributed to a turbulent velocity field while there is no turbulence in the model. A third example shows how, in certain circumstances, it is possible to discriminate between two very different geometrical structures -- here a face-on blister and its ``spherical impostor'' -- when using appropriate high resolution spectra. Finally, we show how our tool is able to generate 3D maps, similar to the ...

  9. Modeling Bivariate Longitudinal Hormone Profiles by Hierarchical State Space Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyue; Cappola, Anne R; Crofford, Leslie J; Guo, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is crucial in coping with stress and maintaining homeostasis. Hormones produced by the HPA axis exhibit both complex univariate longitudinal profiles and complex relationships among different hormones. Consequently, modeling these multivariate longitudinal hormone profiles is a challenging task. In this paper, we propose a bivariate hierarchical state space model, in which each hormone profile is modeled by a hierarchical state space model, with both population-average and subject-specific components. The bivariate model is constructed by concatenating the univariate models based on the hypothesized relationship. Because of the flexible framework of state space form, the resultant models not only can handle complex individual profiles, but also can incorporate complex relationships between two hormones, including both concurrent and feedback relationship. Estimation and inference are based on marginal likelihood and posterior means and variances. Computationally efficient Kalman filtering and smoothing algorithms are used for implementation. Application of the proposed method to a study of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia reveals that the relationships between adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in the patient group are weaker than in healthy controls.

  10. Average intensity and directionality of partially coherent model beams propagating in turbulent ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun

    2016-08-01

    We studied Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including the Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell model (LGSM), and Bessel-Gaussian Schell model (BGSM), propagating through oceanic turbulence. The expressions of average intensity, beam spreading, and beam wander for GSM, LGSM, and BGSM beams in the paraxial channel are derived. We make a contrast for the three models in numerical simulations and find that the GSM beam has smaller spreading than the others, and the LGSM beam needs longer propagation distance to transform into a well-like profile of average intensity than the BGSM beam in the same conditions. The salinity fluctuation has a greater contribution to the wander of LGSM and BGSM beams than that of the temperature fluctuation. Our results can be helpful in the design of an optical wireless communication link operating in oceanic environment.

  11. Analysis of Intensity Fluctuations of SASE using the AR Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Ryukou; Isoyama, Goro; Kashiwagi, Shigeru; Okamoto, C; Suemine, Shoji; Yamamoto, Tamotsu

    2004-01-01

    We are conducting experimental study on Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in the far-infrared region using the L-band linac at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University. The intensity of SASE fluctuates intrinsically because the number of coherent optical pulses generated in an electron bunch is limited. In the actual system, however, another factor producing intensity fluctuations also shows up, which is instability of the linac. Generally speaking, it is difficult to distinguish contributions of these two factors in measured intensity fluctuations. We have applied the autoregressive (AR) model, which is one of the techniques of statistical analysis, to exclude contributions of linac instability from measured data. In the AR model, the present data can be expressed with a linear combination of the past data plus white noise. In the analysis, contributions of the linac instability are identified with the AR model and can be subtracted from the measured data of SASE,...

  12. Serological profile of offspring on an intensive pig farm affected byPorcine reproductive andrespiratory syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SilvaJ; RochaD; CunhaI; RuiSalesL; NetoF; FontesMC; Simes J

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate/predict the offspring serum profile of antibodies against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in an affected intensive herd, whereas sows are vaccinated, and determine the better sample time using pigs as sentinels. Methods:Serum samples were collected from a total of 66 offspring pigs from a PRRSV endemic herd, whereas only sows were vaccinated. Six animals per grouped age were randomly selected with 0 (at perinatal time), 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 weeks of age. Individual and three pooled samples were tested by ELISA and PCR, respectively.Results: The proportion of seropositive animals was 75.0% (18/24), 33.3% (6/18) and 95.8% (23/24) at farrowing (0 to 3 weeks), nursery (6 to 12 weeks) and growing/finishing (15 to 24 weeks) phases, respectively. It was 46 times more likely (P<0.01) to observe seropositive pigs on the growing/finishing than on nursery phase. European PRSSV strain was detected on serum of 6, 9 and 15-weeks old pigs. Polynomial fit degree 4 regression between sample-to-positive (S/P) ratios and age of pigs(r=0.78; R2= 0.60;P<0.001) estimated a quickly decrease of maternal antibodies, above 0.4 S/P value (cut off), until the 6th week following by a progressive increment of humoral immunity until 21st week of age, when it declines.Conclusions:The results indicate that the piglets can present viremia early at nursery, and the 18th – 21st weeks are the best time to sample offspring pigs, as sentinel, from PRRSV contaminated intensive herds.

  13. The Super Gaussian Laser Intensity Profile in HYDRA's 3D Laser Ray Trace Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-05

    In this note, the laser focal plane intensity pro le for a beam modeled using the 3D ray trace package in HYDRA is determined. First, the analytical model is developed followed by a practical numerical model for evaluating the resulting computationally intensive normalization factor for all possible input parameters.

  14. Pressure and velocity profiles in a static mechanical hemilarynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2002-12-01

    This study examined pressure and velocity profiles in a hemilarynx mechanical model of phonation. The glottal section had parallel walls and was fabricated from hard plastic. Twelve pressure taps were created in the vocal fold surface and connected to a differential pressure transducer through a pressure switch. The glottal gap was measured with feeler gauges and the uniform glottal duct was verified by use of a laser system. Eight pressure transducers were placed in the flat wall opposite the vocal fold. Hot-wire anemometry was used to obtain velocity profiles upstream and downstream of the glottis. The results indicate that the pressure distribution on the vocal fold surface was consistent with pressure change along a parallel duct, whereas the pressures on the opposite flat wall typically were lower (by 8%-40% of the transglottal pressure just past mid-glottis). The upstream velocity profiles were symmetric regardless of the constriction shape and size. The jet flow downstream of the glottis was turbulent even for laminar upstream conditions. The front of the jet was consistently approximately 1.5 mm from the flat wall for glottal gaps of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 mm. The turbulence intensity also remained approximately at the same location of about 4 mm from the flat wall for the two larger gaps.

  15. Measurement of Rapid Protein Diffusion in the Cytoplasm by Photo-Converted Intensity Profile Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotem Gura Sadovsky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence microscopy methods presently used to characterize protein motion in cells infer protein motion from indirect observables, rather than measuring protein motion directly. Operationalizing these methods requires expertise that can constitute a barrier to their broad utilization. Here, we have developed PIPE (photo-converted intensity profile expansion to directly measure the motion of tagged proteins and quantify it using an effective diffusion coefficient. PIPE works by pulsing photo-convertible fluorescent proteins, generating a peaked fluorescence signal at the pulsed region, and analyzing the spatial expansion of the signal. We demonstrate PIPE’s success in measuring accurate diffusion coefficients in silico and in vitro and compare effective diffusion coefficients of native cellular proteins and free fluorophores in vivo. We apply PIPE to measure diffusion anomality in the cell and use it to distinguish free fluorophores from native cellular proteins. PIPE’s direct measurement and ease of use make it appealing for cell biologists.

  16. Profiling of genes central to human mitochondrial energy metabolism following low intensity laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.; Masha, Roland; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2012-09-01

    Background: Wound healing involves three overlapping phases: inflammation, granulation and tissue remodelling. If this process is disrupted, delayed wound healing ensues, a common complication seen in diabetic patients. Low intensity laser irradiation (LILI) has been found to promote healing in such patients. However, the exact mechanisms of action are poorly understood. Purpose: This study aimed to profile the expression of key genes involved in mitochondrial respiration. Materials and Methods: Diabetic wounded fibroblast cells were exposed to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 and incubated for 30 min. Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used for real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis. The array contained genes important for each of the mitochondrial complexes involved in the electron transport chain (ETC). Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were also determined post-irradiation by ATP luminescence. Results: Genes involved in complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), COX6B2 and COX6C, and PPA1 which is involved in complex V (ATP synthase) were significantly up-regulated. There was a significant increase in ATP levels in diabetic wounded cells post-irradiation. Discussion and Conclusion: LILI stimulates the ETC at a transcriptional level, resulting in an increase in ATP. This study helps understand the mechanisms of LILI in diabetic wound healing, and gives information on activation of genes in response to LILI.

  17. Intial characterization fo a commerical electron gun for profiling high intensity proton beams in Project X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Zhang, D.; /Fermilab; Blokland, W.; /Oak Ridge

    2011-03-01

    Measuring the profile of a high-intensity proton beam is problematic in that traditional invasive techniques such as flying wires don't survive the encounter with the beam. One alternative is the use of an electron beam as a probe of the charge distribution in the proton beam as was done at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL. Here we present an initial characterization of the beam from a commercial electron gun from Kimball Physics, intended for use in the Fermilab Main Injector for Project X. Despite the fact that the horizontal spot size is abnormally large in the high current measurement, the spot size at the downstream cross X2 is reasonable in the context of measuring the deflection. A thin foil OTR would help with the beam heating and should be tried. The next phase of this experiment is to simulate the proton beam with a pair of current carrying wires and to design and construct a fast deflector. Some of the remaining issues to be considered include determining the minimum beam current needed to observe the deflected beam for a given sweep time and the impact of longitudinal variations in the charge density of the bunch.

  18. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  19. Further Evaluation of a Brief, Intensive Teacher-Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Dorothea C.; Tetreault, Allison; Hovanetz, Alyson; Strobel, Margaret; Garro, Joanie

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further evaluate the outcomes of a model program that was designed to train current teachers of children with autism. Nine certified special education teachers participating in an intensive 5-day summer training program were taught a relatively large number of specific skills in two areas (preference assessment and…

  20. Hybrid simulation models for data-intensive systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barisits, Martin

    Data-intensive systems are used to access and store massive amounts of data by combining the storage resources of multiple data-centers, usually deployed all over the world, in one system. This enables users to utilize these massive storage capabilities in a simple and efficient way. However, with the growth of these systems it becomes a hard problem to estimate the effects of modifications to the system, such as data placement algorithms or hardware upgrades, and to validate these changes for potential side effects. This thesis addresses the modeling of operational data-intensive systems and presents a novel simulation model which estimates the performance of system operations. The running example used throughout this thesis is the data-intensive system Rucio, which is used as the data man- agement system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. Existing system models in literature are not applicable to data-intensive workflows, as they only consider computational workflows or make assumpti...

  1. Stabilizing the intensity for a Hamiltonian model of the FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, R; Fanelli, D; Leoncini, X; Vittot, M

    2008-01-01

    The intensity of an electromagnetic wave interacting self-consistently with a beam of charged particles, as in a Free Electron Laser, displays large oscillations due to an aggregate of particles, called the macro-particle. In this article, we propose a strategy to stabilize the intensity by destabilizing the macro-particle. This strategy involves the study of the linear stability of a specific periodic orbit of a mean-field model. As a control parameter - the amplitude of an external wave - is varied, a bifurcation occur in the system which has drastic effects on the self-consistent dynamics, and in particular, on the macro-particle. We show how to obtain an appropriate tuning of the control parameter which is able to strongly decrease the oscillations of the intensity without reducing its mean-value.

  2. Stabilizing the intensity for a Hamiltonian model of the FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachelard, R. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS Luminy, Case 907, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: bachelard@cpt.univ-mrs.fr; Chandre, C. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS Luminy, Case 907, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Fanelli, D. [Theoretical Physics Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Leoncini, X.; Vittot, M. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS Luminy, Case 907, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France)

    2008-08-01

    The intensity of an electromagnetic wave interacting self-consistently with a beam of charged particles, as in a Free Electron Laser, displays large oscillations due to an aggregate of particles, called the macro-particle. In this article, we propose a strategy to stabilize the intensity by destabilizing the macro-particle. This strategy involves the study of the linear stability of a specific periodic orbit of a mean-field model. As a control parameter-the amplitude of an external wave-is varied, a bifurcation occurs in the system which has drastic effects on the self-consistent dynamics, and in particular, on the macro-particle. We show how to obtain an appropriate tuning of the control parameter which is able to strongly decrease the oscillations of the intensity without reducing its mean-value.

  3. High intensity profile monitor for time resolved spectrometry at the CLIC Test Facility 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvegård, M.; Adli, E.; Braun, H. H.; Bravin, E.; Chritin, N.; Corsini, R.; Dabrowski, A. E.; Döbert, S.; Dutriat, C.; Egger, D.; Lefèvre, T.; Mete, O.; Skowronski, P. K.; Tecker, F.

    2012-08-01

    The power source of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) relies on the generation and deceleration of a high-intensity electron drive beam. In order to provide the best radio-frequency (RF) to beam-energy transfer efficiency, the electron beam is accelerated using fully loaded RF cavities, which leads to strong beam loading effects resulting in a high-energy transient. The stability of the RF power produced by the drive beam depends on the stability of the drive beam energy and energy spread along the pulse. The control and the monitoring of the time evolution of the beam energy distribution are therefore crucial for the accelerator performance. For this purpose segmented beam dumps, which are simple and robust devices, have been designed and installed at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3). These devices are located at the end of spectrometer lines and provide horizontal beam profiles with a time resolution better than 10 ns. The segmented dumps are composed of parallel, vertical, metallic plates, and are based on the same principle as a Faraday cup: the impinging beam current is read by a fast acquisition channel. Both FLUKA and Geant4 simulations were performed to define the optimum detector geometry for beam energies ranging from 5 MeV to 150 MeV. This paper presents a detailed description of the different steps of the design: the optimization of the detector spatial resolution, the minimization of the thermal load and the long-term damage resulting from high radiation doses. Four segmented dumps are currently used in the CTF3 complex. Their measured performance and limitations are presented in this paper. Typical beam spectra as measured in the CTF3 linac are also presented along with a description of the RF manipulations needed for tuning the beam energy spectrum.

  4. Profile of Intravenous Admixture Compatibility in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharly Dwijayanti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available which may directly impact to the outcome of treatment to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU patients. The objective of this study was to identify the profile of compatibility and incompatibility among IV admixtures given to the ICU patients. This observational research was conducted prospectively to the patients admitted in the ICU at a private hospital in Surabaya from October–December 2014. In this research, compatibility data of IV drug and its solution was compared with drug brochure and Handbook on Injectable Drugs 17th ed (2013 as references to analyze the compatibility of IV admixtures. The admixture between IV drug and its solvent was classified as compatible, incompatible, no information (NI, not applicable (NA, and not clear (NC, using a specific criteria. There were 1.186 IV drug‑solvent admixtures observed in 39 ICU patients. There were no IV drug-solvent admixtures classified as incompatible in both adult and child patients. Most of IV drugs were admixed with compatible solvents (adults: 72.31%; children: 69.84%. However, according to two of IV drugs compatibility references used in this research, there were some IV drug-solvent admixtures with unknown information about its compatibility that were classified as NI (adults: 19.68%; children: 30.16%. There were a few of IV drug-solvent admixtures classified as NA and NC, of 7.48% and 0.53%, respectively. The lack of information related to compatibility and stability of the IV admixtures emphasize the importance to continually monitor patients’ condition and drug concentration.

  5. Solution profiles for some simple combustion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bebernes, J.; Eberly, D.; Fulks, W.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, the shape (solution profile) of the solutions of the Gelfand problem and the perturbed Gelfand problem are studied. Both of these models play a fundamental role in the mathematical theory of thermal explosions for finite rigid and gaseous systems. For rigid systems the physical processes are determined by a pointwise balance between chemical heat addition and heat loss by conduction. During the inductive period, with a duration measured by the conduction time scale of the bounding container, the heat released by the chemical reaction is redistributed by thermal conduction. As the temperature of the container increases, the reaction rate grows dramatically. Eventually, the characteristic time for heat release becomes significantly smaller than the conduction time in a well-defined hot spot embedded in the system. Then the heat released is used almost entirely to increase the hot-spot temperature. The purpose of this paper is to show that both models detect this hot-spot development in a very precise manner. This hot-spot development had previously been detected only numerically.

  6. HMMEditor: a visual editing tool for profile hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jianlin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profile Hidden Markov Model (HMM is a powerful statistical model to represent a family of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. Profile HMM has been widely used in bioinformatics research such as sequence alignment, gene structure prediction, motif identification, protein structure prediction, and biological database search. However, few comprehensive, visual editing tools for profile HMM are publicly available. Results We develop a visual editor for profile Hidden Markov Models (HMMEditor. HMMEditor can visualize the profile HMM architecture, transition probabilities, and emission probabilities. Moreover, it provides functions to edit and save HMM and parameters. Furthermore, HMMEditor allows users to align a sequence against the profile HMM and to visualize the corresponding Viterbi path. Conclusion HMMEditor provides a set of unique functions to visualize and edit a profile HMM. It is a useful tool for biological sequence analysis and modeling. Both HMMEditor software and web service are freely available.

  7. Empirical profile mixture models for phylogenetic reconstruction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Si Quang, Le; Gascuel, Olivier; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: Previous studies have shown that accounting for site-specific amino acid replacement patterns using mixtures of stationary probability profiles offers a promising approach for improving...

  8. Modelling of the urban wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Batchvarova, Ekaterina

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of meteorological measurements from tall masts in rural and urban areas show that the height of the boundary layer influences the wind profile even in the lowest hundreds of meters. A parameterization of the wind profile for the entire boundary layer is formulated with emphasis on the lo...

  9. Characterizing intra-annual density fluctuations using fine-spatial resolution blue intensity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Flurin; Wright, William; Szejner, Paul; Wells, Leon; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Monson, Russell

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly rising evaporative demand threatens forests in semi-arid areas around the world, but the timing of stem growth response to drought is often coarsely known. This is partly due to a shortage of sub-annual growth records, particularly outside the Mediterranean region where most intra-annual density fluctuation (IADF) chronologies are based. We anticipate that an automated, cost-effective, and easily implementable method to characterize IADFs could foster more widespread development of sub-annual chronologies. Here, we applied a peak detection algorithm to fine-spatial resolution blue intensity (BI) profiles of Ponderosa pine tree rings from two sites located in neighboring mountain ranges in southern Arizona (~300 m elevation difference). This automated procedure proved reliable to isolate and characterize IADFs, thus offering an efficient and objective alternative to visual identification. Out of seven investigated BI parameters, peak height, width, and area showed satisfactory chronology statistics. We assessed the response of these BI and radial growth parameters to six monthly-resolved climate variables and to the onset date of the North American summer monsoon (NAM). The NAM is an atmospheric mode that provides a clear time marker for the termination of a pre-summer drought period (May-June) causing regular IADFs in trees growing near the dry margin of their distribution range. We observed divergent water limitation at the two sites, despite comparable site characteristics. Radial growth at the lower-elevation site depended mainly on winter precipitation, whereas the higher site relied on spring and monsoon precipitation. The pre-summer drought period indeed promoted IADFs in early ring portions at both sites. Yet, IADFs at the higher site were only formed, if spring was sufficiently humid to assume enough radial growth. Late-position IADFs were caused by a weak monsoon and additionally promoted by favorable conditions towards the end of the growing

  10. Metabolomic Profiling of Submaximal Exercise at a Standardised Relative Intensity in Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhsen Ali, Ali; Burleigh, Mia; Daskalaki, Evangelia; Zhang, Tong; Easton, Chris; Watson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Ten physically active subjects underwent two cycling exercise trials. In the first, aerobic capacity (VO2max) was determined and the second was a 45 min submaximal exercise test. Urine samples were collected separately the day before (day 1) , the day of (day 2), and the day after (day 3) the submaximal exercise test (12 samples per subject). Metabolomic profiling of the samples was carried out using hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled to an Orbitrap Exactive mass spectrometer. Data were extracted, database searched and then subjected to principle components (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares (OPLSDA) modelling. The best results were obtained from pre-treating the data by normalising the metabolites to their mean output on days 1 and 2 of the trial. This allowed PCA to separate the day 2 first void samples (D2S1) from the day 2 post-exercise samples (D2S3) PCA also separated the equivalent samples obtained on day 1 (D1S1 and D1S3). OPLSDA modelling separated both the D2S1 and D2S3 samples and D1S1 and D1S3 samples. The metabolites affected by the exercise samples included a range of purine metabolites and several acyl carnitines. Some metabolites were subject to diurnal variation these included bile acids and several amino acids, the variation of these metabolites was similar on day 1 and day 2 despite the exercise intervention on day 2. Using OPLS modelling it proved possible to identify a single abundant urinary metabolite provisionally identified as oxo-aminohexanoic acid (OHA) as being strongly correlated with VO2max when the levels in the D2S3 samples were considered. PMID:26927198

  11. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles and their use in Ocean Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Oyvind; Bidlot, Jea-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Mogensen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deep-water approximations to the Stokes drift velocity profile are explored as alternatives to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profiles investigated rely on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons against parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profiles give a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. Of the two Stokes drift profiles explored here, the profile based on the Phillips spectrum is by far the best. In particular, the shear near the surface is almost identical to that influenced by the f-5 tail of spectral wave models. The NEMO general circulation ocean model was recently extended to incorporate the Stokes-Coriolis force along with two other wave-related effects. The ECWMF coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean ensemble forecast system now includes these wave effects in the ocean model component (NEMO).

  12. Simulation calculation for the energy deposition profile and the transmission fraction of intense pulsed electron beam at various incident angles

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Hai Liang; Zhang Jia Sheng; Huang Jian Jun; Sun Jian Feng

    2002-01-01

    The incident angles have a heavy effect on the intense pulsed electron beam energy deposition profile, energy deposition fraction and beam current transmission fraction in material. The author presents electron beam energy deposition profile and energy deposition fraction versus electron energy (0.5-2.0 MeV), at various incident angles for three aluminum targets of various thickness via theoretical calculation. The intense pulsed electron beam current transmission fractions versus electron energy (0.4-1.4 MeV) at various incident angles for three thickness of carbon targets were also theoretically calculated. The calculation results indicate that the deposition energy in unit mass of material surface layer increase with the rise of electron beam incident angle, and electron beam with low incident angle (closer to normal incident angle) penetrates deeper into the target material. The electron beams deposit more energy in unit mass of material surface layer at 60 degree-70 degree incident angle

  13. A Warm Fluid Model of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkenton, G. M.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E. H.; Leemans, W. P.

    2001-10-01

    Following up on our previous work on modeling intense laser-plasma interactions with cold fluids,(B.A.Shadwick, G. M. Tarkenton, E.H. Esarey, and W.P. Leemans, ``Fluid Modeling of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions'', in Advanced Accelerator Concepts), P. Colestock and S. Kelley editors, AIP Conf. Proc. 569 (AIP, NY 2001), pg. 154. we are exploring warm fluid models. These models represent the next level in a hierarchy of complexity beyond the cold fluid approximation. With only a modest increase in computation effort, warm fluids incorporate effects that are relevant to a variety of technologically interesting cases. We present a derivation of the warm fluid from a kinetic (i.e. Vlasov) perspective and make a connection with the usual relativistic thermodynamic approach.(S. R. de Groot, W. A. van Leeuwen and Ch. G. van Weert, Relativistic Kinetic Theory: Principles and Applications), North-Holland (1980). We will provide examples where the warm fluids yield physics results not contained in the cold model and discuss experimental parameters where these effects are believed to be important.

  14. XML The Impact of High Intensity Interval Training On Lipid Profile, Inflammatory Markers and Anthropometric Parameters in Inactive Women

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrin Zaer Ghodsi (MSc); Mohammad Reza Zolfaghari; Amir Fattah (MSc)

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a recently proposed exercise protocol, which is time-effective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of HIIT for 8 weeks on the lipid profile, C-reactive protein (CRP), fasting blood sugar (FBS) and anthropometric parameters of young women who do not exercise. Methods: In this study, 20 young physically inactive women performed HIIT workouts for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week. The training protocol cons...

  15. Distributed modelling of shallow landslides triggered by intense rainfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Crosta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hazard assessment of shallow landslides represents an important aspect of land management in mountainous areas. Among all the methods proposed in the literature, physically based methods are the only ones that explicitly includes the dynamic factors that control landslide triggering (rainfall pattern, land-use. For this reason, they allow forecasting both the temporal and the spatial distribution of shallow landslides. Physically based methods for shallow landslides are based on the coupling of the infinite slope stability analysis with hydrological models. Three different grid-based distributed hydrological models are presented in this paper: a steady state model, a transient "piston-flow" wetting front model, and a transient diffusive model. A comparative test of these models was performed to simulate landslide occurred during a rainfall event (27–28 June 1997 that triggered hundreds of shallow landslides within Lecco province (central Southern Alps, Italy. In order to test the potential for a completely distributed model for rainfall-triggered landslides, radar detected rainfall intensity has been used. A new procedure for quantitative evaluation of distributed model performance is presented and used in this paper. The diffusive model results in the best model for the simulation of shallow landslide triggering after a rainfall event like the one that we have analysed. Finally, radar data available for the June 1997 event permitted greatly improving the simulation. In particular, radar data allowed to explain the non-uniform distribution of landslides within the study area.

  16. An intensity-based stochastic model for terrestrial laser scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wujanz, D.; Burger, M.; Mettenleiter, M.; Neitzel, F.

    2017-03-01

    Up until now no appropriate models have been proposed that are capable to describe the stochastic characteristics of reflectorless rangefinders - the key component of terrestrial laser scanners. This state has to be rated as unsatisfactory especially from the perception of Geodesy where comprehensive knowledge about the precision of measurements is of vital importance, for instance to weigh individual observations or to reveal outliers. In order to tackle this problem, a novel intensity-based stochastic model for the reflectorless rangefinder of a Zoller + Fröhlich Imager 5006 h is experimentally derived. This model accommodates the influence of the interaction between the emitted signal and object surface as well as the acquisition configuration on distance measurements. Based on two different experiments the stochastic model has been successfully verified for three chosen sampling rates.

  17. A Clinic Model: Post-Intensive Care Syndrome and Post-Intensive Care Syndrome-Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Elizabeth L; Bloom, Sarah L; Stollings, Joanna L; Camp, Mildred; Sevin, Carla M; Jackson, James C

    2016-01-01

    The number of patients surviving critical illness in the United States has increased with advancements in medicine. Post-intensive care syndrome and post-intensive care syndrome-family are terms developed by the Society of Critical Care Medicine in order to address the cognitive, psychological, and physical sequelae emerging in patients and their families after discharge from the intensive care unit. In the United Kingdom and Europe, intensive care unit follow-up clinics have been used to address the complications of post-intensive care syndrome for some time. However, the interprofessional clinic at Vanderbilt University Medical Center is among the first in the United States to address the wide variety of problems experienced by intensive care survivors and to provide patients and their families with care after discharge from the intensive care unit.

  18. A Multilevel Nonlinear Profile Analysis Model for Dichotomous Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Steven Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This study linked nonlinear profile analysis (NPA) of dichotomous responses with an existing family of item response theory models and generalized latent variable models (GLVM). The NPA method offers several benefits over previous internal profile analysis methods: (a) NPA is estimated with maximum likelihood in a GLVM framework rather than…

  19. Riboswitch Detection Using Profile Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamachari A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Riboswitches are a type of noncoding RNA that regulate gene expression by switching from one structural conformation to another on ligand binding. The various classes of riboswitches discovered so far are differentiated by the ligand, which on binding induces a conformational switch. Every class of riboswitch is characterized by an aptamer domain, which provides the site for ligand binding, and an expression platform that undergoes conformational change on ligand binding. The sequence and structure of the aptamer domain is highly conserved in riboswitches belonging to the same class. We propose a method for fast and accurate identification of riboswitches using profile Hidden Markov Models (pHMM. Our method exploits the high degree of sequence conservation that characterizes the aptamer domain. Results Our method can detect riboswitches in genomic databases rapidly and accurately. Its sensitivity is comparable to the method based on the Covariance Model (CM. For six out of ten riboswitch classes, our method detects more than 99.5% of the candidates identified by the much slower CM method while being several hundred times faster. For three riboswitch classes, our method detects 97-99% of the candidates relative to the CM method. Our method works very well for those classes of riboswitches that are characterized by distinct and conserved sequence motifs. Conclusion Riboswitches play a crucial role in controlling the expression of several prokaryotic genes involved in metabolism and transport processes. As more and more new classes of riboswitches are being discovered, it is important to understand the patterns of their intra and inter genomic distribution. Understanding such patterns will enable us to better understand the evolutionary history of these genetic regulatory elements. However, a complete picture of the distribution pattern of riboswitches will emerge only after accurate identification of riboswitches across genomes

  20. Serological profile of offspring on an intensive pig farm affected by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Silva

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: The results indicate that the piglets can present viremia early at nursery, and the 18th – 21st weeks are the best time to sample offspring pigs, as sentinel, from PRRSV contaminated intensive herds.

  1. Estimating suspended solids concentrations from backscatter intensity measured by acoustic Doppler current profiler in San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    The estimation of mass concentration of suspended solids is one of the properties needed to understand the characteristics of sediment transport in bays and estuaries. However, useful measurements or estimates of this property are often problematic when employing the usual methods of determination from collected water samples or optical sensors. Analysis of water samples tends to undersample the highly variable character of suspended solids, and optical sensors often become useless from biological fouling in highly productive regions. Acoustic sensors, such as acoustic Doppler current profilers that are now routinely used to measure water velocity, have been shown to hold promise as a means of quantitatively estimating suspended solids from acoustic backscatter intensity, a parameter used in velocity measurement. To further evaluate application of this technique using commercially available instruments, profiles of suspended solids concentrations are estimated from acoustic backscatter intensity recorded by 1200- and 2400-kHz broadband acoustic Doppler current profilers located at two sites in San Francisco Bay, California. ADCP backscatter intensity is calibrated using optical backscatterance data from an instrument located at a depth close to the ADCP transducers. In addition to losses from spherical spreading and water absorption, calculations of acoustic transmission losses account for attenuation from suspended sediment and correction for nonspherical spreading in the near field of the acoustic transducer. Acoustic estimates of suspended solids consisting of cohesive and noncohesive sediments are found to agree within about 8-10% (of the total range of concentration) to those values estimated by a second optical backscatterance sensor located at a depth further from the ADCP transducers. The success of this approach using commercially available Doppler profilers provides promise that this technique might be appropriate and useful under certain conditions in

  2. Measuring and modeling suspended sediment concentration profiles in the surf zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles across the surf zone were measured in a large-scale three-dimensional movable bed laboratory facility (LSTF:Large-scale Sediment Transport Facility). Sediment suspension under two different types of breaking waves, spilling and plunging breakers, was investigated. The magnitudes and shapes of the concentration profiles varied substantially at different locations across the surf zone, reflecting the different intensities of breaking-induced turbulence. Sediment sus- pension at the energetic plunging breaker-line was much more active, resulting in nearly homogeneous concentration profiles throughout most of the water column, as compared to the reminder of the surf zone and at the spilling breaker-line. Four suspended sediment concentration models were examined based on the LSTF data, including the mixing turbulence length approach, segment eddy viscosity model, breaking-induced wave-energy dissipation approach, and a combined breaking and turbulence length model developed by this study. Neglecting the breaking-induced turbulence and subsequent sediment mixing, suspended sediment concentration models failed to predict the across-shore variations of the sediment suspension, especially at the plunging breaker-line. Wave-energy dissipation rate provided an accurate method for estimating the intensity of turbulence generated by wave breaking. By incorporating the breaking-induced turbulence, the combined breaking and turbulence length model reproduced the across-shore variation of sediment suspension in the surf zone. The combined model reproduced the measured time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles reasonably well across the surf zone.

  3. Modeling and clustering users with evolving profiles in usage streams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chongsheng

    2012-09-01

    Today, there is an increasing need of data stream mining technology to discover important patterns on the fly. Existing data stream models and algorithms commonly assume that users\\' records or profiles in data streams will not be updated or revised once they arrive. Nevertheless, in various applications such asWeb usage, the records/profiles of the users can evolve along time. This kind of streaming data evolves in two forms, the streaming of tuples or transactions as in the case of traditional data streams, and more importantly, the evolving of user records/profiles inside the streams. Such data streams bring difficulties on modeling and clustering for exploring users\\' behaviors. In this paper, we propose three models to summarize this kind of data streams, which are the batch model, the Evolving Objects (EO) model and the Dynamic Data Stream (DDS) model. Through creating, updating and deleting user profiles, these models summarize the behaviors of each user as a profile object. Based upon these models, clustering algorithms are employed to discover interesting user groups from the profile objects. We have evaluated all the proposed models on a large real-world data set, showing that the DDS model summarizes the data streams with evolving tuples more efficiently and effectively, and provides better basis for clustering users than the other two models. © 2012 IEEE.

  4. DIGITAL GEOMETRIC MODELLING OF TEETH PROFILE BY USING CAD METHODOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof TWARDOCH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the problem of properly defining the spatial model of tooth profile with CAD methodologies. Moved by the problem of the accuracy of the mapping defined curves describing the geometry of the teeth. Particular attention was paid to precise geometric modeling involute tooth profile, which has a significant influence on the process of identifying the mesh stiffness for tests performed on the dynamic phenomena occurring in the gear transmission systems conducted using dynamic models

  5. Comparison of Dst Forecast Models for Intense Geomagnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Eun-Young; Moon, Y.-J.; Gopalswamy, N.; Lee, D.-H.

    2012-01-01

    We have compared six disturbance storm time (Dst) forecast models using 63 intense geomagnetic storms (Dst Dst data and the predicted Dst during the geomagnetic storm period as well as the difference of the value of minimum Dst (Delta Dst(sub min)) and the difference in the absolute value of Dst minimum time (Delta t(sub Dst)) between the observed and the predicted. As a result, we found that the model by Temerin and Li gives the best prediction for all parameters when all 63 events are considered. The model gives the average values: the linear correlation coefficient of 0.94, the RMS error of 14.8 nT, the Delta Dst(sub min) of 7.7 nT, and the absolute value of Delta t(sub Dst) of 1.5 hour. For further comparison, we classified the storm events into two groups according to the magnitude of Dst. We found that the model of Temerin and Lee is better than the other models for the events having 100 Dst Dst <= 200 nT.

  6. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibrationa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappatou, A.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Delabie, E.; Marchuk, O.; Biel, W.; Jakobs, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  7. Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

  8. Modeling the intensity and polarization response of planar bolometric detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher N; Withington, Stafford; Chuss, David T; Wollack, Edward J; Moseley, S Harvey

    2010-05-01

    Far-infrared bolometric detectors are used extensively in ground-based and space-borne astronomy, and thus it is important to understand their optical behavior precisely. We have studied the intensity and polarization response of free-space bolometers and shown that when the size of the absorber is reduced below a wavelength, the response changes from being that of a classical optical detector to that of a few-mode antenna. We have calculated the modal content of the reception patterns and found that for any volumetric detector having a side length of less than a wavelength, three magnetic and three electric dipoles characterize the behavior. The size of the absorber merely determines the relative strengths of the contributions. The same formalism can be applied to thin-film absorbers, where the induced current is forced to flow in a plane. In this case, one magnetic and two electric dipoles characterize the behavior. The ability to model easily the intensity, polarization, and straylight characteristics of electrically small detectors will be of great value when designing high-performance polarimetric imaging arrays.

  9. IT Business Value Model for Information Intensive Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Gastaud Maçada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have highlighted the capacity Information Technology (IT has for generating value for organizations. Investments in IT made by organizations have increased each year. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to analyze the IT Business Value for Information Intensive Organizations (IIO - e.g. banks, insurance companies and securities brokers. The research method consisted of a survey that used and combined the models from Weill and Broadbent (1998 and Gregor, Martin, Fernandez, Stern and Vitale (2006. Data was gathered using an adapted instrument containing 5 dimensions (Strategic, Informational, Transactional, Transformational and Infra-structure with 27 items. The instrument was refined by employing statistical techniques such as Exploratory and Confirmatory Factorial Analysis through Structural Equations (first and second order Model Measurement. The final model is composed of four factors related to IT Business Value: Strategic, Informational, Transactional and Transformational, arranged in 15 items. The dimension Infra-structure was excluded during the model refinement process because it was discovered during interviews that managers were unable to perceive it as a distinct dimension of IT Business Value.

  10. Probing the Relationship Between Detected Ion Intensity, Laser Fluence, and Beam Profile in Thin Film and Tissue in MALDI MSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Rory T.; Race, Alan M.; Bunch, Josephine

    2016-08-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is increasingly widely used to provide information regarding molecular location within tissue samples. The nature of the photon distribution within the irradiated region, the laser beam profile, and fluence, will significantly affect the form and abundance of the detected ions. Previous studies into these phenomena have focused on circular-core optic fibers or Gaussian beam profiles irradiating dried droplet preparations, where peptides were employed as the analyte of interest. Within this work, we use both round and novel square core optic fibers of 100 and 50 μm diameter to deliver the laser photons to the sample. The laser beam profiles were recorded and analyzed to quantify aspects of the photon distributions and their relation to the spectral data obtained with each optic fiber. Beam profiles with a relatively small number of large beam profile features were found to give rise to the lowest threshold fluence. The detected ion intensity versus fluence relationship was investigated, for the first time, in both thin films of α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) with phosphatidylcholine (PC) 34:1 lipid standard and in CHCA coated murine tissue sections for both the square and round optic fibers in continuous raster imaging mode. The fluence threshold of ion detection was found to occur at between ~14 and ~64 J/m2 higher in tissue compared with thin film for the same lipid, depending upon the optic fiber employed. The image quality is also observed to depend upon the fluence employed during image acquisition.

  11. Nitrate-Nitrogen Leaching and Modeling in Intensive Agriculture Farmland in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protecting water resources from nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N contamination is an important public health concern and a major national environmental issue in China. Loss of NO3-N in soils due to leaching is not only one of the most important problems in agriculture farming, but is also the main factor causing nitrogen pollution in aquatic environments. Three typical intensive agriculture farmlands in Jiangyin City in China are selected as a case study for NO3-N leaching and modeling in the soil profile. In this study, the transport and fate of NO3-N within the soil profile and nitrate leaching to drains were analyzed by comparing field data with the simulation results of the LEACHM model. Comparisons between measured and simulated data indicated that the NO3-N concentrations in the soil and nitrate leaching to drains are controlled by the fertilizer practice, the initial conditions and the rainfall depth and distribution. Moreover, the study reveals that the LEACHM model gives a fair description of the NO3-N dynamics in the soil and subsurface drainage at the field scale. It can also be concluded that the model after calibration is a useful tool to optimize as a function of the combination “climate-crop-soil-bottom boundary condition” the nitrogen application strategy resulting for the environment in an acceptable level of nitrate leaching. The findings in this paper help to demonstrate the distribution and migration of nitrogen in intensive agriculture farmlands, as well as to explore the mechanism of groundwater contamination resulting from agricultural activities.

  12. Nitrate-Nitrogen Leaching and Modeling in Intensive Agriculture Farmland in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ligang; Xu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Protecting water resources from nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) contamination is an important public health concern and a major national environmental issue in China. Loss of NO3-N in soils due to leaching is not only one of the most important problems in agriculture farming, but is also the main factor causing nitrogen pollution in aquatic environments. Three typical intensive agriculture farmlands in Jiangyin City in China are selected as a case study for NO3-N leaching and modeling in the soil profile. In this study, the transport and fate of NO3-N within the soil profile and nitrate leaching to drains were analyzed by comparing field data with the simulation results of the LEACHM model. Comparisons between measured and simulated data indicated that the NO3-N concentrations in the soil and nitrate leaching to drains are controlled by the fertilizer practice, the initial conditions and the rainfall depth and distribution. Moreover, the study reveals that the LEACHM model gives a fair description of the NO3-N dynamics in the soil and subsurface drainage at the field scale. It can also be concluded that the model after calibration is a useful tool to optimize as a function of the combination “climate-crop-soil-bottom boundary condition” the nitrogen application strategy resulting for the environment in an acceptable level of nitrate leaching. The findings in this paper help to demonstrate the distribution and migration of nitrogen in intensive agriculture farmlands, as well as to explore the mechanism of groundwater contamination resulting from agricultural activities. PMID:23983629

  13. Multipass beam position, profile, and polarization measurements using intense photon target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabekov, I.P.; Neil, G.R. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Karabekian, S.; Musakhanian, V. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Erevan (Armenia)

    1994-05-01

    The Compton scattering of a circularly polarized laser beam condensed by an optical resonator can be used for multipass measurement of beam profile, position, and polarization in CEBAF`s 250-m-long linac straight sections. The position and profile of the beam will be measured with an accuracy of {approximately}10 {mu}m in about 200 seconds and beam polarization with 10% accuracy in 100 seconds when the lowest beam energy is 500 MeV and the beam current is 100 {mu}A. For higher energies the times for measurement are much less. The photon target is within an optical resonator having a quality factor of 50. The Nd:Yag 5 W CW laser photon beam at wavelength {lambda} = 0.532 nm will have a waist {omega}{sub o} {approximately}30 {mu}m and a Rayleigh range of about 10 mm. Scanning the electron beams in the linac sections by this photon beam at a crossing angle of 0.1 rad will send to a proportional detector installed after the spreader magnet scattered photons with energies sharply correlated with the energy of the electrons.

  14. The Evaluation of the Distribution and Antimcrobial Susceptibility Profile of the Strains Isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ece

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hospital infections are important uptodate health problems because of high mortality and increased cost. The increment in antimicrobial resistance is progressing though new antimicrobial agents are arising. This leads to an increase in hospital infections and difficulty in treatment. In our study we aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit. Material and Method: The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit between April 1st 2012- October 25th 2012 were included. The identification and the antimicrobial susceptibility were studied by automatized Vitek version 2.0 (Biomerieux, France. Results: A total of 155 strains isolated from wound, blood, tracheal secretion, sputum and urine samples were included. They are consisted of 40 A. baumannii, 24 E.coli, 25 P. aeruginosa, 20 K.pneumoniae, 12 Methicilin Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (MRCoNS, nine Methiciline Susceptible S.aureus (MSSA, eight C.albicans, four Methicilin Resistant S.aureus (MRSA, one C.famata, one C.tropicalis, three E.faecalis, two E.faecium, three S.marsecens, two P. mirabilis and one H.influenzae. Clinical samples were 81 tracheal secretions, 25 wound specimen, 23 blood culture, 18 urine, seven sputum, and one BAL. All the Gram positive strains were susceptible to glycopeptides. Enterobacteriaceae members were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. Discussion: Antimicrobial resistance is an important issue worldwide. Multidiciplinary approach is needed as in ICUs where the complicated patients are followed. Monitoring antibiotic resistance profile contributes to treatment and decreasing resistance rates. The resistance profile will guide the antibiotic use policy. Increment in number of isolates in future will help to obtain the antimicrobial resistance profile.

  15. Gene expression profiling during intensive cardiovascular lifestyle modification: Relationships with vascular function and weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Blackburn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease and related sequelae are a leading cause of death and healthcare expenditure throughout the world. Although many patients opt for surgical interventions, lifestyle modification programs focusing on nutrition and exercise have shown substantial health benefits and are becoming increasing popular. We conducted a year-long lifestyle modification program to mediate cardiovascular risk through traditional risk factors and to investigate how molecular changes, if present, may contribute to long-term risk reduction. Here we describe the lifestyle intervention, including clinical and molecular data collected, and provide details of the experimental methods and quality control parameters for the gene expression data generated from participants and non-intervention controls. Our findings suggest successful and sustained modulation of gene expression through healthy lifestyle changes may have beneficial effects on vascular health that cannot be discerned from traditional risk factor profiles. The data are deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus, series GSE46097 and GSE66175.

  16. Statistical modelling of transcript profiles of differentially regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant Martin J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast quantities of gene expression profiling data produced in microarray studies, and the more precise quantitative PCR, are often not statistically analysed to their full potential. Previous studies have summarised gene expression profiles using simple descriptive statistics, basic analysis of variance (ANOVA and the clustering of genes based on simple models fitted to their expression profiles over time. We report the novel application of statistical non-linear regression modelling techniques to describe the shapes of expression profiles for the fungus Agaricus bisporus, quantified by PCR, and for E. coli and Rattus norvegicus, using microarray technology. The use of parametric non-linear regression models provides a more precise description of expression profiles, reducing the "noise" of the raw data to produce a clear "signal" given by the fitted curve, and describing each profile with a small number of biologically interpretable parameters. This approach then allows the direct comparison and clustering of the shapes of response patterns between genes and potentially enables a greater exploration and interpretation of the biological processes driving gene expression. Results Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-derived time-course data of genes were modelled. "Split-line" or "broken-stick" regression identified the initial time of gene up-regulation, enabling the classification of genes into those with primary and secondary responses. Five-day profiles were modelled using the biologically-oriented, critical exponential curve, y(t = A + (B + CtRt + ε. This non-linear regression approach allowed the expression patterns for different genes to be compared in terms of curve shape, time of maximal transcript level and the decline and asymptotic response levels. Three distinct regulatory patterns were identified for the five genes studied. Applying the regression modelling approach to microarray-derived time course data

  17. Modeling Profiles and Signatures of Enrichments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Qualls, C.; Lucas, S. G.; Lombari, G.; Appenzeller, O.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic and geochemical enrichment of soils and living matter have been well documented 1, 2, 3.Here we report on geochemical, anthropogenic and biological enrichments with heavy metals in Modern Peru and compared this to Modern and ancient data from New Mexico, USA. We established a signature derived from the quantities of 25 metals in various biological, fossil and soil materials. We also speculate that human adaptation to mercury toxicity may occur in remarkably short time spans during the Holocene. We found mercury concentrations in Modern pigeon feathers and llama wool from free foraging birds and animals in Albuquerque, NM, ranging from 0.006 to 0.019 mg/Kg of tissue. The values for Modern Peru ranged from 22.0 to 556 mg/Kg for the same tissues. We discovered, in 64 million-year-old fossilized plants from New Mexico (Paleocene Nacimiento Formation, San Juan Basin), a mercury concentration of 1.11 mg/Kg of fossil, whereas Modern plant material from the Rio Grande Basin in New Mexico contained no mercury. Profiling of metal content of these samples suggests that mercury is a proxy for anthropogenic rather than geochemical enrichment in the localities we examined. We found no overt signs of mercury toxicity in contemporaneous inhabitants of Huancavelica4, Peru; one of the ten most mercury-polluted places in the world and the mercury concentration in their hair is well below modern admissible levels. However, assessment of their annual scalp hair growth-rate showed marked reduction in growth (~ 5cm/yr) versus ~ 16cm/year for normal scalp hair from other continents4. This is consistent with a toxic effect of heavy metals on human metabolism and especially autonomic nervous system function in Huancavelica, Peru. Contemporaneous anthropogenic activities are known to increase heavy metal content in the biosphere with potentially toxic effects on humans. However, signs of human evolutionary adaptation to such toxins might already be evident in Peru4.

  18. Efficient Calibration of Computationally Intensive Groundwater Models through Surrogate Modelling with Lower Levels of Fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, S.; Anderson, D.; Martin, P.; MacMillan, G.; Tolson, B.; Gabriel, C.; Zhang, B.

    2012-12-01

    Many sophisticated groundwater models tend to be computationally intensive as they rigorously represent detailed scientific knowledge about the groundwater systems. Calibration (model inversion), which is a vital step of groundwater model development, can require hundreds or thousands of model evaluations (runs) for different sets of parameters and as such demand prohibitively large computational time and resources. One common strategy to circumvent this computational burden is surrogate modelling which is concerned with developing and utilizing fast-to-run surrogates of the original computationally intensive models (also called fine models). Surrogates can be either based on statistical and data-driven models such as kriging and neural networks or simplified physically-based models with lower fidelity to the original system (also called coarse models). Fidelity in this context refers to the degree of the realism of a simulation model. This research initially investigates different strategies for developing lower-fidelity surrogates of a fine groundwater model and their combinations. These strategies include coarsening the fine model, relaxing the numerical convergence criteria, and simplifying the model geological conceptualisation. Trade-offs between model efficiency and fidelity (accuracy) are of special interest. A methodological framework is developed for coordinating the original fine model with its lower-fidelity surrogates with the objective of efficiently calibrating the parameters of the original model. This framework is capable of mapping the original model parameters to the corresponding surrogate model parameters and also mapping the surrogate model response for the given parameters to the original model response. This framework is general in that it can be used with different optimization and/or uncertainty analysis techniques available for groundwater model calibration and parameter/predictive uncertainty assessment. A real-world computationally

  19. A Dual Aspect Process Model of Intensive Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Graham

    2009-01-01

    Intensive Interaction is an empirically researched approach to developing fundamental communication and sociability for people with severe and profound learning disabilities and/or autism. However, it is the author's contention that certain aspects of Intensive Interaction are not universally conceptualised in a uniform manner, and that there are…

  20. Lifetime injury prevention: The sport profile model*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-04

    Jan 4, 2012 ... develop models of understanding of injury risk at different life ... University of Brighton, Sussex Centre for Sport and Exercise ... of knee and hip osteoarthritis in former professional soccer players is ... equally to all situations for that sport. .... prevention and better treatment of injuries that limit physical activity.

  1. Profiling of Indoor Plant to Deteriorate Carbon Dioxide Using Low Light Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaimi Shamsuri Mohd Mahathir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reasonable grounds that human needs the plants because their abilities reduce carbon dioxide (CO2. However, it is not constantly human with the plants, especially in the building. This paper intends to study the abilities of seven plants (Anthurium, Dumb Cane, Golden Pothos, Prayer Plants, Spider Plant, and Syngonium to absorb CO2 gas. The research was conducted in chambers (one cubic meter with temperature, lux intensity and CO2 concentration at 25±10C, 300 lux, and 450±10 ppm. Before experimental were carried out, all plants selected should be assimilated with an indoor setting for performance purpose, and the experiment was conducted during daytime (9 am-5 pm. The experiments run in triplicate. Based on the results that are using extremely low light that ever conducted on plants, only Spider Plants are not capable to absorb CO2, instead turn up the CO2 rate during respiration. Meanwhile, Prayer Plant is the most plant performed with CO2 reduction is 7.62%, and this plant also has equivalent results in triplicate study based on an ANOVA test with significant value at 0.072. The conclusions of this research, only Spider Plant cannot survive at indoor condition with extremely low light for plants live and reduce CO2 concentration for indoor air quality (IAQ. The rate of 300 lux is a minimum light at indoor that are set by the Department of Occupational Safety and Health (DOSH, Malaysia.

  2. Selection between Linear Factor Models and Latent Profile Models Using Conditional Covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Maraun, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for selecting between K-dimensional linear factor models and (K + 1)-class latent profile models is proposed. In particular, it is shown that the conditional covariances of observed variables are constant under factor models but nonlinear functions of the conditioning variable under latent profile models. The performance of a convenient…

  3. Selection between Linear Factor Models and Latent Profile Models Using Conditional Covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Maraun, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    A method for selecting between K-dimensional linear factor models and (K + 1)-class latent profile models is proposed. In particular, it is shown that the conditional covariances of observed variables are constant under factor models but nonlinear functions of the conditioning variable under latent profile models. The performance of a convenient…

  4. Tenure profiles and effficient separation in a stochastic productivity model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhai, S.; Teulings, C.N.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a new way of analyzing tenure profiles in wages, by modelling simultaneously the evolution of wages and the distribution of tenures. We develop a theoretical model based on efficient bargaining, where both log outside wage and log wage in the current job follow a random walk, as

  5. An exploratory numerical model of rocky shore profile evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hironori; Dickson, Mark E.; Kench, Paul S.

    2016-09-01

    Rocky shores occur along much of the world's coastline and include a wide range of coastal morphologies, such as intertidal shore platforms. Considerable research effort has been placed on trying to understand developmental processes on rocky shores, but progress has been forestalled because these landscapes develop slowly and preserve little evidence of evolution through time. This paper presents a new exploratory numerical model developed to study long-term shore profile evolution on rock coasts. The model purposely considers only a limited number of processes, each represented in a highly abstracted way. Despite these simplifications, the model exhibits a large range of emergent shore profile shapes. This behavior is enabled both by broader spatial representation of the driving erosion forces and the flexibility provided by a grid discretization scheme. Initial model testing shows the development of varied rocky profile geometries, ranging from steep plunging cliffs, cliffs with narrow benches, and cliffs with a variety of shore platform shapes. Most of the model geometries are similar to those observed in the field, and model behavior is robust and internally consistent across a relatively large parameter space. This paper provides a detailed description of the new model and its subsequent testing. Emphasis is placed on comparison of model results with published field observations in which morphometric relationships are described between shore platform gradient and tidal range, and platform elevation and platform width. The model adequately simulates these morphometric relationships, while retaining its ability to simulate a wide range of profile shapes. The simplicity of process representations, and the limited number of processes implemented, means that model outputs can be interpreted reasonably easily. Hence, an opportunity is now provided, following the testing described in this paper, to use the model to systematically investigate the broader controlling

  6. PEMBUATAN MODEL PROFIL MAHASISWA FAKULTAS TEKNIK UNIVERSITAS PANCASILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paryudi Paryudi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promotion is a must for a university to get students. With the innocence of the promotion team about the existing student profile, it will cause the team does not know which segment should be the promotion target. The consequence is that the promotion cost will be higher. In order to have a better promotion, we can use direct marketing method. In this method, a profile model of the existing students must be first created. With this profile model, promotion team can focus the promotion only to candidate student match with the model. The advantages of this method are: promotion cost can be reduced, response rate increase, and profit also increase. In order to create a model in direct marketing, we need previous promotion data. Since previous promotion data is not available, two methods in creating preliminary models are proposed. Next, the preliminary models will be tested using data mining software available in the market. Model with minimal accuracy of 75% will be chosen. If there are more than one model with minimal accuracy of 75%, then model with the highest accuracy will be chosen. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Promosi merupakan suatu keharusan bagi sebuah universitas untuk mendapatkan mahasiswa. Dengan masih awamnya tim promosi terhadap profil mahasiswa yang sudah ada, maka tim promosi melakukan promosi tanpa melihat segmen pasar yang harus dituju. Konsekuensinya adalah biaya promosi menjadi lebih mahal. Untuk melakukan promosi dengan lebih baik, dapat menggunakan metode direct marketing. Pada metode ini, model profil dari mahasiswa yang sudah ada harus dibuat terlebih dulu. Dengan menggunakan model profil ini, tim promosi dapat memfokuskan promosi hanya pada calon-calon mahasiswa yang sesuai dengan model. Keuntungan dari metode promosi ini adalah biaya promosi dapat dikurangi, tingkat respon meningkat, dan keuntungan juga meningkat. Untuk membuat model pada direct marketing dibutuhkan data dari promosi sebelumnya. Karena data promosi

  7. Stacking Spectra in Protoplanetary Disks: Detecting Intensity Profiles from Hidden Molecular Lines in HD 163296

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Puspitaningrum, Evaria; Hirano, Naomi; Lee, Chin-Fei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new stacking method in Keplerian disks that (1) enhances signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of detected molecular lines and (2) makes visible otherwise-undetectable weak lines. Our technique takes advantage of the Keplerian rotational velocity pattern. It aligns spectra according to their different centroid velocities at their different positions in a disk and stacks them. After aligning, the signals are accumulated in a narrower velocity range as compared to the original line width without alignment. Moreover, originally correlated noise becomes decorrelated. Stacked and aligned spectra thus have a higher S/N. We apply our method to Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) archival data of DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), N2D+ (3-2), and H2CO (3{}{0,3}-2{}{0,2}), (3{}{2,2}-2{}{2,1}), and (3{}{2,1}-2{}{2,0}) in the protoplanetary disk around HD 163296. As a result, (1) the S/Ns of the originally detected DCN (3-2), DCO+ (3-2), H2CO (3{}{0,3}-2{}{0,2}), and N2D+ (3-2) lines are boosted by a factor of ≳4-5 at their spectral peaks, implying one order of magnitude shorter integration times to reach the original S/N; and (2) the previously undetectable spectra of the H2CO (3{}{2,2}-2{}{2,1}) and (3{}{2,1}-2{}{2,0}) lines are materialized at more than 3σ. These dramatically enhanced S/Ns allow us to measure intensity distributions in all lines with high significance. The principle of our method can be applied not only to Keplerian disks but also to any systems with ordered kinematic patterns.

  8. Profile and severity of the patients of intensive care units: prospective application of the APACHE II index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Freitas, Eliane Regina Ferreira Sernache

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the profile and severity of patients in physiotherapy treatment after their admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) by applying the APACHE II index. One hundred and forty six subjects, with a mean age of 60.5 +/- 19.2 years, were evaluated. The APACHE II index was applied in the first 24 hours to evaluate the severity and mortality risk score. Patients were monitored until hospital discharge or death. The mean APACHE II score was 20+/-7.3 with an estimated risk of death of 32.4% and observed mortality of 58.2%. The mean hospital stay was 27.8+/-25.2 days. The patients in physiotherapy at the institution studied were predominantly male, elderly, from the emergency service for treatment (non-surgical), and had clear severity, suggested by the APACHE II score and the observed mortality.

  9. Modeling dune response using measured and equilibrium bathymetric profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauver, Laura A.; Thompson, David M.; Sallenger, Asbury H.

    2007-01-01

    Coastal engineers typically use numerical models such as SBEACH to predict coastal change due to extreme storms. SBEACH model inputs include pre-storm profiles, wave heights and periods, and water levels. This study focuses on the sensitivity of SBEACH to the details of pre-storm bathymetry. The SBEACH model is tested with two initial conditions for bathymetry, including (1) measured bathymetry from lidar, and (2) calculated equilibrium profiles. Results show that longshore variability in the predicted erosion signal is greater over measured bathymetric profiles, due to longshore variations in initial surf zone bathymetry. Additionally, patterns in predicted erosion can be partially explained by the configuration of the inner surf zone from the shoreline to the trough, with surf zone slope accounting for 67% of the variability in predicted erosion volumes.

  10. Osteoradionecrosis of the mandible. Minimized risk profile following Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer, G.; Huguenin, P.; Luetolf, U.M.; Glanzmann, C. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Studer, S.P.; Zwahlen, R.A.; Graetz, K.W. [Dept. of Craniomaxillofacial Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-05-15

    Background and purpose: osteoradionecrosis (ON) of the mandible is a serious late complication of high-dose radiation therapy for tumors of the oropharynx and oral cavity. After doses between 60 and 72 Gy using standard fractionation, an incidence of ON between 5% and 15% is reported in a review from 1989, whereas in more recent publications using moderately accelerated or hyperfractionated irradiation and doses between 69 and 81 Gy, the incidence of ON is between < 1% and {proportional_to} 6%. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is expected to translate into a further important reduction of ON. The aim of this descriptive study was to assess absolute and relative bone volumes exposed to high IMRT doses, related to observed bone tolerance. Patients and methods: between December 2001 and November 2004, 73 of 123 patients treated with IMRT were identified as subgroup ''at risk'' for ON (> 60 Gy for oropharyngeal or oral cavity cancer). 21/73 patients were treated in a postoperative setting, 52 patients underwent primary definitive irradiation. In 56 patients concomitant cisplatin-based chemotherapy was applied. Mean follow-up time was 22 months (12-46 months). Oral cavity including the mandible bone outside the planning target volume was contoured and dose-volume constraints were defined in order to spare bone tissue. Dose-volume histograms were obtained from contoured mandible in each patient and were analyzed and related to clinical mandible bone tolerance. Results: using IMRT with doses between 60 and 75 Gy (mean 67 Gy), on average 7.8, 4.8, 0.9, and 0.3 cm{sup 3} were exposed to doses > 60, 65, 70, and 75 Gy, respectively. These values are substantially lower than when using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The difference has been approximately quantified by comparison with a historic series. Additional ON risk factors of the patients were also analyzed. Only one grade 3 ON of the lingual horizontal branch, treated with

  11. Modeling the Distribution of Rainfall Intensity using Hourly Data

    OpenAIRE

    Salisu Dan'azumi; Supiah Shamsudin; Azmi Aris

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Design of storm water best management practices to control runoff and water pollution can be achieved if a prior knowledge of the distribution of rainfall characteristics is known. Rainfall intensity, particularly in tropical climate, plays a major role in the design of runoff conveyance and erosion control systems. This study is aimed to explore the statistical distribution of rainfall intensity for Peninsular Malaysia using hourly rainfall data. Approach: Hourly rainfall ...

  12. Interpretation models and charts of production profiles in horizontal wells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Stratified flow is common for the gravity segregation and flow regimes are very complex because of borehole inclination,therefore,all the conventional production logging tools cannot be effectively applied in horizontal wells,thus significantly increasing the difficulties in log interpretation. In this paper,firstly,the overseas progress in updated integration tools for horizontal wells and production profile interpretation methods has been discussed in brief. Secondly,by means of theory study and experimental simulations,we have obtained the production profile interpretation model and experimental interpretation charts,which have been calibrated by the improved downhole technology and optimization methods. Finally,we have interpreted X-well with the production profile interpretation software designed by us,and it proves that the methods are useful for the production profile interpretation in horizontal wells.

  13. Planetary Gear Profile Modification Design Based on Load Sharing Modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IGLESIAS Miguel; FERNÁNDEZ DEL RINCÓN Alfonso; DE-JUAN Ana Magdalena; GARCIA Pablo; DIEZ Alberto; VIADERO Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In order to satisfy the increasing demand on high performance planetary transmissions, an important line of research is focused on the understanding of some of the underlying phenomena involved in this mechanical system. Through the development of models capable of reproduce the system behavior, research in this area contributes to improve gear transmission insight, helping developing better maintenance practices and more efficient design processes. A planetary gear model used for the design of profile modifications ratio based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio is presented. The gear profile geometry definition, following a vectorial approach that mimics the real cutting process of gears, is thoroughly described. Teeth undercutting and hypotrochoid definition are implicitly considered, and a procedure for the incorporation of a rounding arc at the tooth tip in order to deal with corner contacts is described. A procedure for the modeling of profile deviations is presented, which can be used for the introduction of both manufacturing errors and designed profile modifications. An easy and flexible implementation of the profile deviation within the planetary model is accomplished based on the geometric overlapping. The contact force calculation and dynamic implementation used in the model are also introduced, and parameters from a real transmission for agricultural applications are presented for the application example. A set of reliefs is designed based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio for the example transmission, and finally some other important dynamic factors of the transmission are analyzed to assess the changes in the dynamic behavior with respect to the non-modified case. Thus, the main innovative aspect of the proposed planetary transmission model is the capacity of providing a simulated load sharing ratio which serves as design variable for the calculation of the tooth profile modifications.

  14. Improving Self-Guiding of an Ultra-Intense Laser by Tailoring the Longitudinal Profile of the Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Warren; Tzoufras, Michail; Tsung, Frank; Sahai, Aakash

    2013-10-01

    Self-guiding of an ultra-intense laser pulse requires the refractive index to build up rapidly to a sufficient value before the main body of the pulse passes by. For short single-frequency pulses this occurs within a plasma period and a large portion of the leading edge is subject to diffraction. Nevertheless, if the body of the pulse survives long enough, the concomitant changes in its spectral content result in highly localized absorption, such that a large amount of the energy of the leading edge of the pulse is absorbed before it can diffract. To illustrate these mechanisms and optimize laser wakefield accelerators we propose a pulse profile with a ``bulbous bow,'' that is a lower-intensity low-energy precursor, that can produce the necessary buildup for the index of refraction to guide the body of the laser. The wake-field behind such a pulse is more stable, contains more energy, is sustained longer, and the corresponding de-phasing length is extended.

  15. A method for high precision reconstruction of air shower Xmax using two-dimensional radio intensity profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Buitink, S; Enriquez, J E; Halcke, H; Hörandel, J R; Huege, T; Nelles, A; Rachen, J P; Schellart, P; Scholten, O; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Trinh, T N G

    2014-01-01

    The mass composition of cosmic rays contains important clues about their origin. Accurate measurements are needed to resolve long-standing issues such as the transition from Galactic to extragalactic origin, and the nature of the cutoff observed at the highest energies. Composition can be studied by measuring the atmospheric depth of the shower maximum Xmax of air showers generated by high-energy cosmic rays hitting the Earth's atmosphere. We present a new method to reconstruct Xmax based on radio measurements. The radio emission mechanism of air showers is a complex process that creates an asymmetric intensity pattern on the ground. The shape of this pattern strongly depends on the longitudinal development of the shower. We reconstruct Xmax by fitting two-dimensional intensity profiles, simulated with CoREAS, to data from the LOFAR radio telescope. In the dense LOFAR core, air showers are detected by hundreds of antennas simultaneously. The simulations fit the data very well, indicating that the radiation me...

  16. Apoptosis induced by low-intensity ultrasound in vitro: Alteration of protein profile and potential molecular mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yi; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    To analyze the potential mechanism related to the apoptosis induced by low intensity focused ultrasound, comparative proteomic method was introduced in the study. After ultrasound irradiation (3.0 W/cm2, 1 minute, 6 hours incubation post-irradiation), the human SMMC-7721 hepatocarcinoma cells were stained by trypan blue to detect the morphologic changes, and then the percentage of early apoptosis were tested by the flow cytometry with double staining of FITC-labelled Annexin V/Propidium iodide. Two-dimensional SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to get the protein profile and some proteins differently expressed after ultrasound irradiation were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. It's proved early apoptosis of cells were induced by low intentisy focused ultrasound. After ultrasound irradiation, the expressing characteristics of several proteins changed, in which protein p53 and heat shock proteins are associated with apoptosis initiation. It is suggested that the low-intensity ultrasound-induced apoptotic cancer therapy has the potential application via understanding its relevant molecular signaling and key proteins. Moreover, the comparative proteomic method is proved to be useful to supply information about the protein expression to analyze the metabolic processes related to bio-effects of biomedical ultrasound.

  17. Measuring and modeling suspended sediment concentration profiles in the surf zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles across the surf zone were measured in a large-scale three-dimensional movable bed laboratory facility (LSTF: Large-scale Sediment Transport Facility. Sediment suspension under two different types of breaking waves, spilling and plunging breakers, was investigated. The magnitudes and shapes of the concentration profiles varied substantially at different locations across the surf zone, reflecting the different intensities of breaking-induced turbulence. Sediment suspension at the energetic plunging breaker-line was much more active, resulting in nearly homogeneous concentration profiles throughout most of the water column, as compared to the reminder of the surf zone and at the spilling breaker-line. Four suspended sediment concentration models were examined based on the LSTF data, including the mixing turbulence length approach, segment eddy viscosity model, breaking-induced wave-energy dissipation approach, and a combined breaking and turbulence length model developed by this study. Neglecting the breaking-induced turbulence and subsequent sediment mixing, suspended sediment concentration models failed to predict the across-shore variations of the sediment suspension, especially at the plunging breaker-line. Wave-energy dissipation rate provided an accurate method for estimating the intensity of turbulence generated by wave breaking. By incorporating the breaking-induced turbulence, the combined breaking and turbulence length model reproduced the across-shore variation of sediment suspension in the surf zone. The combined model reproduced the measured time-averaged suspended sediment concentration profiles reasonably well across the surf zone.

  18. Recovery of acetylene absorption line profile basing on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation and photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Thursby, Graham; Stewart, George; Arsad, Norhana; Uttamchandani, Deepak; Culshaw, Brian; Wang, Yiding

    2010-04-01

    A novel and direct absorption line recovery technique based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy with intensity modulation is presented. Photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied for high sensitivity, zero background and efficient acoustic enhancement at a low modulation frequency. A micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror driven by an electrothermal actuator is used for generating laser intensity modulation (without wavelength modulation) through the external reflection. The MEMS mirror with 10μm thick structure material layer and 100nm thick gold coating is formed as a circular mirror of 2mm diameter attached to an electrothermal actuator and is fabricated on a chip that is wire-bonded and placed on a PCB holder. Low modulation frequency is adopted (since the resonant frequencies of the photoacoustic gas cell and the electrothermal actuator are different) and intrinsic high signal amplitude characteristics in low frequency region achieved from measured frequency responses for the MEMS mirror and the gas cell. Based on the property of photoacoustic spectroscopy and Beer's law that detectable sensitivity is a function of input laser intensity in the case of constant gas concentration and laser path length, a Keopsys erbium doped fibre amplifier (EDFA) with opto-communication C band and high output power up to 1W is chosen to increase the laser power. High modulation depth is achieved through adjusting the MEMS mirror's reflection position and driving voltage. In order to scan through the target gas absorption line, the temperature swept method is adopted for the tunable distributed feed-back (DFB) diode laser working at 1535nm that accesses the near-infrared vibration-rotation spectrum of acetylene. The profile of acetylene P17 absorption line at 1535.39nm is recovered ideally for ~100 parts-per-million (ppm) acetylene balanced by nitrogen. The experimental signal to noise ratio (SNR) of absorption line recovery for 500mW laser power was ~80 and hence the

  19. Towards improved quality of GPCR models by usage of multiple templates and profile-profile comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Latek

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are targets of nearly one third of the drugs at the current pharmaceutical market. Despite their importance in many cellular processes the crystal structures are available for less than 20 unique GPCRs of the Rhodopsin-like class. Fortunately, even though involved in different signaling cascades, this large group of membrane proteins has preserved a uniform structure comprising seven transmembrane helices that allows quite reliable comparative modeling. Nevertheless, low sequence similarity between the GPCR family members is still a serious obstacle not only in template selection but also in providing theoretical models of acceptable quality. An additional level of difficulty is the prediction of kinks and bulges in transmembrane helices. Usage of multiple templates and generation of alignments based on sequence profiles may increase the rate of success in difficult cases of comparative modeling in which the sequence similarity between GPCRs is exceptionally low. Here, we present GPCRM, a novel method for fast and accurate generation of GPCR models using averaging of multiple template structures and profile-profile comparison. In particular, GPCRM is the first GPCR structure predictor incorporating two distinct loop modeling techniques: Modeller and Rosetta together with the filtering of models based on the Z-coordinate. We tested our approach on all unique GPCR structures determined to date and report its performance in comparison with other computational methods targeting the Rhodopsin-like class. We also provide a database of precomputed GPCR models of the human receptors from that class. AVAILABILITY: GPCRM SERVER AND DATABASE: http://gpcrm.biomodellab.eu.

  20. Load distribution model and voltage static profile of Smart Grid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qiu-ye; LI Zhong-xu; YANG Jun; LUO Yan-hong

    2010-01-01

    Voltage profiles of feeders with the connection of distributed generations(DGs)were investigated.A unified typical load distribution model was established.Based on this model,exact expressions of feeder voltage profile with single and double DGs were derived and used to analyze the impact of DG's location and capacity on the voltage profile quantitatively.Then,a general formula of the voltage profile was derived.The limitation of single DG and necessity of multiple DGs for voltage regulation were also discussed.Through the simulation,voltage profiles of feeders with single and double DGs were compared.The voltage excursion rate is 7.40% for only one DG,while 2.48% and 2.36% for double DGs.It is shown that the feeder voltage can be retained in a more appropriate range with multiple DGs than with only one DG.Distributing the total capacity of DGs is better than concentrating it at one point.

  1. Reduced Lorenz models for anomalous transport and profile resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, Odd Erik

    2007-01-01

    to resilience of the profile. Particular emphasis is put on the diffusionless limit, where these equations reduce to a simple dynamical system depending only on one single forcing parameter. This model is studied numerically, stressing experimentally observable signatures, and some of the perils of dimension...

  2. Tenure Profiles and Efficient Separation in a Stochastic Productivity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S. Buhai (Sebastian); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis paper provides a new way of analyzing tenure profiles in wages, by modelling simultaneously the evolution of wages and the distribution of tenures. Starting point is the observation that within-job log wages for an individual can be described by random walk. We develop a theoretical

  3. Mapping and modelling of changes in agricultural intensity in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temme, A.J.A.M.; Verburg, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Spatial maps of agricultural intensity are needed for analyses of environmental issues, including biodiversity changes. We present a method to produce such maps for Europe. While most studies beyond farm level focus on land cover change only, this paper focuses on spatial variation in land use

  4. Measurement of water column primary production using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical chlorophyll profile, and underwater light intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, A. B.; Gagarin, V. I.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    A method has been developed to measure water column integrated primary production (PPint) in the water column using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical profile of chlorophyll a concentration, and the underwater light intensity. Good correlation has been found for the results calculated with this method and light dependences in situ. The advantages of this method are the independence of PPint calculation from CTD profiling and water sampling, and thus optimization (reduction) of the station working time.

  5. Proteomic profiling of animal models mimicking skeletal muscle disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Doran, Philip; Gannon, Joan; O'Connell, Kathleen; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Over the last few decades of biomedical research, animal models of neuromuscular diseases have been widely used for determining pathological mechanisms and for testing new therapeutic strategies. With the emergence of high-throughput proteomics technology, the identification of novel protein factors involved in disease processes has been decisively improved. This review outlines the usefulness of the proteomic profiling of animal disease models for the discovery of new reliable biomarkers, fo...

  6. Piecewise multivariate modelling of sequential metabolic profiling data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholson Jeremy K

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modelling the time-related behaviour of biological systems is essential for understanding their dynamic responses to perturbations. In metabolic profiling studies, the sampling rate and number of sampling points are often restricted due to experimental and biological constraints. Results A supervised multivariate modelling approach with the objective to model the time-related variation in the data for short and sparsely sampled time-series is described. A set of piecewise Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures (OPLS models are estimated, describing changes between successive time points. The individual OPLS models are linear, but the piecewise combination of several models accommodates modelling and prediction of changes which are non-linear with respect to the time course. We demonstrate the method on both simulated and metabolic profiling data, illustrating how time related changes are successfully modelled and predicted. Conclusion The proposed method is effective for modelling and prediction of short and multivariate time series data. A key advantage of the method is model transparency, allowing easy interpretation of time-related variation in the data. The method provides a competitive complement to commonly applied multivariate methods such as OPLS and Principal Component Analysis (PCA for modelling and analysis of short time-series data.

  7. Profile of patients and physiotherapy patterns in intensive care units in public hospitals in Zimbabwe: a descriptive cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Physiotherapy is integral to patient management in the Intensive Care Unit. The precise role that physiotherapists play in the critical care differs significantly worldwide. The aim of the study was to describe the profile of patients and the current patterns of physiotherapy services delivered for patients admitted in the five public hospital intensive care units in Zimbabwe. Methods A prospective record review was performed and records of all consecutive patients admitted into th...

  8. Conformal profiles in the Hilhorst-van Leeuwen model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karevski, D.; Turban, L.; Iglói, F.

    2000-04-01

    We study the critical energy and magnetization profiles for the Ising quantum chain with a marginal extended surface perturbation of the form A /y , y being the distance from the surface (Hilhorst-van Leeuwen model). For weak local couplings, A A c , there is surface order at the bulk critical point. If conformal invariance is assumed to hold with such marginal perturbations, it predicts conformal profiles with the same scaling form as for the unperturbed quantum chain, with marginal surface exponents replacing the unperturbed ones. The results of direct analytical and numerical calculations of the profiles confirm the validity of the conformal expressions in the regimes of second- and first-order surface transitions.

  9. Consistent Static Models of Local Thermospheric Composition Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Picone, J M; Drob, D P

    2016-01-01

    The authors investigate the ideal, nondriven multifluid equations of motion to identify consistent (i.e., truly stationary), mechanically static models for composition profiles within the thermosphere. These physically faithful functions are necessary to define the parametric core of future empirical atmospheric models and climatologies. Based on the strength of interspecies coupling, the thermosphere has three altitude regions: (1) the lower thermosphere (herein z ~200 km), in which the species flows are approximately uncoupled; and (3) a transition region in between, where the effective species particle mass and the effective species vertical flow interpolate between the solutions for the upper and lower thermosphere. We place this view in the context of current terminology within the community, i.e., a fully mixed (lower) region and an upper region in diffusive equilibrium (DE). The latter condition, DE, currently used in empirical composition models, does not represent a truly static composition profile ...

  10. X-ray scattering study of pike olfactory nerve: intensity of the axonal membrane, solution of the phase problem and electron density profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Vittorio; Vachette, Patrice; Benoit, Evelyne; Charpentier, Gilles

    2004-10-08

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering experiments were performed on unmyelinated pike olfactory nerves. The difference between the meridional and the equatorial traces of the 2-D spectra yielded the 1-D equatorial intensity of the macromolecular components oriented with respect to the nerve: axonal membranes, microtubules and other cytoskeletal filaments. These 1-D spectra display a diffuse band typical of bilayer membranes and, at small s, a few sharper bands reminiscent of microtubules. All the spectra merge at large s. The intensity of the axonal membrane was determined via a noise analysis of the nerve-dependent spectra, involving also the notion that the thickness of the membrane is finite. The shape of the intensity function indicated that the electron density profile is not centrosymmetric. The knowledge of intensity and thickness paved the way to the electron density profile via an ab initio solution of the phase problem. An iterative procedure was adopted: (i) choose the lattice D of a 1-D pseudo crystal, interpolate the intensity at the points sh = h/D, adopt an arbitrary set of initial phases and compute the profile; (ii) determine the phases corresponding to this profile truncated by the thickness D/2; (iii) repeat the operation with the updated phases until a stable result is obtained. This iterative procedure was carried out for different D-values, starting in each case from randomly generated phases: stable results were obtained in less than 10,000 iterations. Most importantly, for D in the vicinity of 200 A, the overwhelming majority of the profiles were congruent with each other. These profiles were strongly asymmetric and otherwise typical of biological membranes.

  11. Metabolite profiling of phenolic and carotenoid contents in tomatoes after moderate-intensity pulsed electric field treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Odriozola-Serrano, Isabel; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Martín-Belloso, Olga; Elez-Martínez, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    A metabolite profiling approach was used to study the effect of moderate-intensity pulsed electric field (MIPEF) treatments on the individual polyphenol and carotenoid contents of tomato fruit after refrigeration at 4°C for 24h. The MIPEF processing variables studied were electric field strength (from 0.4 to 2.0kV/cm) and number of pulses (from 5 to 30). Twenty four hours after MIPEF treatments, an increase was observed in hydroxycinnamic acids and flavanones, whereas flavonols, coumaric and ferulic acid-O-glucoside were not affected. Major changes were also observed for carotenoids, except for the 5-cis-lycopene isomer, which remain unchanged after 24h of MIPEF treatments. MIPEF treatments, conducted at 1.2kV/cm and 30 pulses, led to the greatest increases in chlorogenic (152%), caffeic acid-O-glucoside (170%) and caffeic (140%) acids. On the other hand, treatments at 1.2kV/cm and 5 pulses led to maximum increases of α-carotene, 9- and 13-cis-lycopene, which increased by 93%, 94% and 140%, respectively. Therefore, MIPEF could stimulate synthesis of secondary metabolites and contribute to production of tomatoes with high individual polyphenol and carotenoid contents.

  12. Profiling of Ionospheric Electron Density Based on FormoSat-3/COSMIC Data: Results from the Intense Observation Period Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chih Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-channel Global Position System (GPS carrier phase signals received by the FormoSat-3 (FS3/COSMIC program's six low Earth orbiting (LEO satellites were used to undertake active limb sounding of the Earth¡¦s atmosphere and ionosphere via radio occultation (RO. In this study, the effects of large-scale horizontal gradients and/or inhomogeneous ionospheric electron densities (ne were considered by developing an iterative scheme to determine "compensated" total electron content (TEC values through nearby occultation observations. Using an iterative Abel inversion through "compensated" TEC values, more than one-hundred and eighty thousand vertical ionospheric ne profiles were collected during the intense observation period (IOP of 20 June - 27 September (day number 171 to 270 2006. Coincidences of GPS RO observations to ionospheric ne ionosonde data from forty-nine worldwide stations have been examined. It is found that the iterative scheme gives improved retrievals over the standard Abel inversion. From several thousand matches within the IOP experiment, the root mean square (rms foF2 differences between the ionosonde measurements and the FS3/COSMIC retrievals are improved from 1.67 to 1.07 MHz. The results also show improvement in the overestimates (underestimates on low (high retrieved foF2s, while the obtained hmF2s give better agreement with ionosonde observations.

  13. [Epidemiological profile and antibiotic susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates within the burned patient hospitalized in the intensive care burn unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamia, Thabet; Bousselmi, K; Saida, Ben Redjeb; Allah, Messadi Amen

    2007-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a predominant role as an etiological agent involved in serious infections in burned patients. Treatment of these infections is frequently complicated by antibiotic resistance, a problem that is is increasing in recent years. The objective of this study is to analyze epidemiological profile and antibiotic susceptibility of P. aeruginosa isolates within the burned patients admitted in our intensive care department. During a period of 4 years (2000/2003), 828 burn patients were admitted. The survey of antibiotic susceptibility of P. aeruginosa showed high percentages of resistance to the different antibiotics. 60.9% of strains were resistant to piperacillin, 53.4% to ceftazidime, 37.6% to imipenem, 70.6% to cefsulodine, 59.3% to tobramycin, 80% to gentamicin, 62.4% to amikacin and 53.4% to ciprofloxacin. It is necessary to implement urgent measures to prevent the spreading of this multiresistant strain. These measures include: sensible limitation of the use of antimicrobial agent, strict disinfection and hygienic procedures.

  14. Clinical Profiles and Factors Associated with Death in Adults with Dengue Admitted to Intensive Care Units, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Heringer, Tiago Pires; de Oliveira, Cristina da Cunha Hueb Barata; Fassy, Liliane Boaventura; de Carvalho, Frederico Bruzzi; Oliveira, Daniela Pagliari; de Oliveira, Claudio Dornas; Botoni, Fernando Otoni; Magalhães, Fernanda do Carmo; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical profile of dengue-infected patients admitted to Brazilian intensive care units (ICU) and evaluate factors associated with death. A longitudinal, multicenter case series study was conducted with laboratory-confirmed dengue patients admitted to nine Brazilian ICUs situated in Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2013. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data; disease severity scores; and mortality were evaluated. A total of 97 patients were studied. The in-ICU and in-hospital mortality rates were 18.6% and 19.6%, respectively. Patients classified as having severe dengue according to current World Health Organization classifications showed an increased risk of death in a univariate analysis. Nonsurvivors were older, exhibited lower serum albumin concentrations and higher total leukocyte counts and serum creatinine levels. Other risk factors (vomiting, lethargy/restlessness, dyspnea/respiratory distress) were also associated with death in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated that in-hospital mortality was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. The ICU and in-hospital mortality observed in this study were higher than values reported in similar studies. An increased frequency of ICU admission due to severe organ dysfunction, higher severity indices and scarcity of ICU beds may partially explain the higher mortality. PMID:26090676

  15. XML The Impact of High Intensity Interval Training On Lipid Profile, Inflammatory Markers and Anthropometric Parameters in Inactive Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Zaer Ghodsi (MSc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: High-intensity interval training (HIIT is a recently proposed exercise protocol, which is time-effective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of HIIT for 8 weeks on the lipid profile, C-reactive protein (CRP, fasting blood sugar (FBS and anthropometric parameters of young women who do not exercise. Methods: In this study, 20 young physically inactive women performed HIIT workouts for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week. The training protocol consisted of 10-times treadmill running for 15 seconds at maximum effort and then 30 seconds of resting. Blood samples were taken while fasting, a day before and after the training and then the considered parameters were measured. Wilcoxon test was used to compare the obtained data. Results: HIIT significantly reduced FBS, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein /cholesterol ratio and CRP while increasing the HDL levels. There was a significant difference in the weight, body fat percentage, waist circumference, abdominal circumference and chest circumference of the subjects before and after the training (p <0.05. Conclusion: HIIT can improve lipid, inflammatory and anthropometric parameters, thus it can be considered as a suitable alternative to time-consuming exercises, especially for physically inactive women who like to spend less time to achieve optimal physical wellness and body fitness.

  16. Hidden Markov Models for the Activity Profile of Terrorist Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, Vasanthan; Tartakovsky, Alexander G

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this work is on developing models for the activity profile of a terrorist group, detecting sudden spurts and downfalls in this profile, and in general, tracking it over a period of time. Toward this goal, a d-state hidden Markov model (HMM) that captures the latent states underlying the dynamics of the group and thus its activity profile is developed. The simplest setting of d = 2 corresponds to the case where the dynamics are coarsely quantized as Active and Inactive, respectively. Two strategies for spurt detection and tracking are developed here: a model-independent strategy that uses the exponential weighted moving-average (EWMA) filter to track the strength of the group as measured by the number of attacks perpetrated by it, and a state estimation strategy that exploits the underlying HMM structure. The EWMA strategy is robust to modeling uncertainties and errors, and tracks persistent changes (changes that last for a sufficiently long duration) in the strength of the group. On the othe...

  17. MODELLING AND VIBRATION ANALYSIS OF A ROAD PROFILE MEASURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Patel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During a vehicle development program, load data representing severe customer usage is required. The dilemma faced by a design engineer during the design process is that during the initial stage, only predicted loads estimated from historical targets are available, whereas the actual loads are available only at the fag end of the process. At the same time, changes required, if any, are easier and inexpensive during the initial stages of the design process whereas they are extremely costly in the latter stages of the process. The use of road profiles and vehicle models to predict the load acting on the whole vehicle is currently being researched. This work hinges on the ability to accurately measure road profiles. The objective of the work is to develop an algorithm, using MATLAB Simulink software, to convert the input signals into measured road profile. The algorithm is checked by the MATLAB Simulink 4 degrees of freedom half car model. To make the whole Simulink model more realistic, accelerometer and laser sensor properties are introduced. The present work contains the simulation of the mentioned algorithm with a half car model and studies the results in distance, time, and the frequency domain.

  18. Further Examining Berry's Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A three-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in…

  19. Further Examining Berry's Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A three-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in…

  20. Further Examining Berry's Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A three-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in…

  1. A simple model for reconstructing geomagnetic field intensity with (10)~Be production rate and its application in Loess studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.; Warren; BECK

    2008-01-01

    A simple model for reconstructing the paleomagnetic field intensity with (10)~Be production rate was used for the first time in Loess (10)~Be studies of Luochuan profile. Using the LGM (Last Glacial Maxmium) method, the climatic effects and geomagnetic modulation effects on loess (10)~Be was separated and in turn the 80 ka geomagnetic excursion sequence reconstructed, of which the globally remarkable geomagnetic excursion events such as the Laschamp (42 ka), Mono Lake (32 ka) during the Last Glacial period were revealed and the paleo-geomagnetic intensity curve from Loess (10)~Be over the past 80 ka was quantitatively reconstructed. The reconstructed paleo-intensity fits well with the paleo-intensity curves (SINT200 and NAPIS75), which indicates the significance of global criterion of the (10)~Be paleo- intensity curve and the future direction of loess (10)~Be tracing studies. Results show the irregular vari-ability of the East Asian monsoon precipitation in Loess Plateau is the main cause that has resulted in the ambiguity of the geomagnetic modulation of the (10)~Be record in the loess, and the intrinsic source component of the loess (10)~Be and inherited fraction of magnetic susceptibility (SUS) are characterized by the "quasi-homogeneous distribution" manner.

  2. A simple model for reconstructing geomasnetic field intensity with 10Be production rate and its application in Loess studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAN Feng; AN ZhiSheng; WU ZhenKun; J.Warren BECK; YU HuaGui; KANG ZhiHai; CHENG Peng

    2008-01-01

    A simple model for reconstructing the paleomagnetic field intensity with 10Be production rate was used for the first time in Loess 10Be studies of Luochuan profile. Using the LGM (Last Glacial Maxmium) method, the climatic effects and geomagnetic modulation effects on loess 10Be was separated and in turn the 80 ka geomagnetic excursion sequence reconstructed, of which the globally remarkable geomagnetic excursion events such as the Laschamp (42 ka), Mono Lake (32 ka) during the Last Glacial period were revealed and the paleo-geomagnetic intensity curve from Loess 10Be over the past 80 ka was quantitatively reconstructed. The reconstructed paleo-intensity fits well with the paleo-intensity curves (SINT200 and NAPIS75), which indicates the significance of global criterion of the 10Be paleo-intensity curve and the future direction of loess 10Be tracing studies. Results show the irregular vari-ability of the East Asian monsoon precipitation in Loess Plateau is the main cause that has resulted in the ambiguity of the geomagnetic modulation of the 10Be record in the loess, and the intrinsic source component of the loess 10Be and inherited fraction of magnetic susceptibility (SUS) are characterized by the "quasi-homogeneous distribution" manner.

  3. A latent profile analysis of the Five Factor Model of personality: Modeling trait interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Erin L; Roesch, Scott C

    2011-12-01

    Interactions among the dimensions of the Five Factor Model (FFM) have not typically been evaluated in mental health research, with the extant literature focusing on bivariate relationships with psychological constructs of interest. This study used latent profile analysis to mimic higher-order interactions to identify homogenous personality profiles using the FFM, and also examined relationships between resultant profiles and affect, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, and coping efficacy. Participants (N = 371) completed self-report and daily diary questionnaires. A 3-profile solution provided the best fit to the data; the profiles were characterized as well-adjusted, reserved, and excitable. The well-adjusted group reported better psychological functioning in validation analyses. The reserved and excitable groups differed on anxiety, with the excitable group reporting generally higher anxiety than the reserved group. Latent profile analysis may be a parsimonious way to model personality heterogeneity.

  4. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  5. A model independent safeguard for unbinned Profile Likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Priel, Nadav; Landsman, Hagar; Manfredini, Alessandro; Budnik, Ranny

    2016-01-01

    We present a general method to include residual un-modeled background shape uncertainties in profile likelihood based statistical tests for high energy physics and astroparticle physics counting experiments. This approach provides a simple and natural protection against undercoverage, thus lowering the chances of a false discovery or of an over constrained confidence interval, and allows a natural transition to unbinned space. Unbinned likelihood enhances the sensitivity and allows optimal usage of information for the data and the models. We show that the asymptotic behavior of the test statistic can be regained in cases where the model fails to describe the true background behavior, and present 1D and 2D case studies for model-driven and data-driven background models. The resulting penalty on sensitivities follows the actual discrepancy between the data and the models, and is asymptotically reduced to zero with increasing knowledge.

  6. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Ho Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future.

  7. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  8. A metastatistical approach to modelling extreme hurricane intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Reza; Marani, Marco; Scaioni, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Estimating the probability of occurrence of extreme hurricane intensities is significant in a vast number of fields and plays a crucial role in hurricane risk assessment. The method typically employed for these analyses applies traditional Extreme Value Theory (EVT) to fit the Generalize Extreme Value Distribution (GEVD) to hurricane maximum wind speed. In this framework, an asymptotic regime or a Poisson occurrence process are assumed to derive the GEVD, which is fitted using values over a high threshold or yearly maxima. However, the relative rarity of hurricanes implies that the number of events per year is not nearly sufficient for this asymptotic hypothesis to be valid, and the selection of a subset of the events drastically reduces the amount of information used. To overcome this limitation, we apply an alternative approach based on the Metastatistical Extreme Value Distribution (MEVD) to extreme hurricane intensity analyses. The derivation of the MEVD relaxes the limiting assumption of the traditional EVT, by taking into account the distribution of the entire range of recorded event magnitudes, rather than just the distributional tail. Taking advantage of this method, we can use the entire observational set, including hurricanes with relatively lower intensities, with clear statistical advantages. We comparatively assess the MEVD and the classical EVT quantile estimation uncertainties using the 130-year long Maximum Sustained Wind (MSW) speed time series for all hurricanes in the north Atlantic basin obtained from the National Hurricane Center (Atlantic HURDAT2). The parameters of the GEVD are estimated using a range of methods to ensure an optimal estimator is found. The MEVD is fitted assuming a Generalize Pareto Distribution (GPD) for the "ordinary" values of MSW over 5- to 10-year blocks using Probability Weighted Moments (PWM). The statistical tests are performed by dividing the dataset (of length L) into two distinct parts: S years for calibration and

  9. MODELLING OF SHORT DURATION RAINFALL (SDR INTENSITY EQUATIONS FOR ERZURUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan ŞENOCAK

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this study is to develop a rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF equation for some return periods at Erzurum rainfall station. The maximum annual rainfall values for 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes are statistically analyzed for the period 1956 – 2004 by using some statistical distributions such as the Generalized Extreme Values (GEV, Gumbel, Normal, Two-parameter Lognormal, Three-parameter Lognormal, Gamma, Pearson type III and Log-Pearson type III distributions. ?2 goodness-of-fit test was used to choose the best statistical distribution among all distributions. IDF equation constants and coefficients of correlation (R for each emprical functions are calculated using nonlinear estimation method for each return periods (T = 2, 5, 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 years. The most suitable IDF equation is observed that ( B max i (t = A/ t + C , except for T=100 years, because of the highest coefficients of correlation.

  10. The effect of grazing intensity and supplementation on performance, stress indicators and metabolic profiles of finishing lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Ramos Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of grazing intensity (GI and feed supplementation in sixty-four crossbred Santa Inês lambs was assessed based on performance, blood stress indicators, and metabolic profiles. The GIs analyzed were VH = very high, H = high, L = low, and VL = very low, and were represented by the residual leaf area index (LAIr. The lambs were divided into two groups, supplemented (SP and non-supplemented (NSP. The dry matter intake (DMI and average daily gain (ADG increased linearly with decreasing GI (P < 0.05, and the ADG was higher for the NSP group than the SP group (P < 0.05. The plasma cortisol concentration was higher in the NSP group (P < 0.05, and it was not affected by GIs (P > 0.05. The neutrophil:lymphocyte (N:L ratio decreased linearly with GI (P < 0.05, and the SP group had a higher N:L ratio (P < 0.05. None of the parameters evaluated for protein metabolism were affected by GI (P > 0.05, except albumin, where the SP group had a higher concentration of this metabolite (P < 0.05. Regarding energy metabolism indicators, glucose showed a linear increase with a decrease in GI (P < 0.05 and was higher in the SP group (P < 0.05; however, there was a decreasing linear effect (P < 0.05 and the NSP group had higher serum levels (P < 0.05 of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA. The concentration of beta hydroxybutyrate (HBA-B was higher in the SP group (P < 0.05. The concentration of calcium was affected by GI (P < 0.05. The phosphorus concentration was higher in the SP group (P < 0.05, and concentration of magnesium was not affected by any of the treatments (P > 0.05. It was concluded that GI and SP modified the performance, stress indicators, and metabolic profiles of finishing lambs.

  11. High-intensity ultrasound production of Maillard reaction flavor compounds in a cysteine-xylose model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Olivia X H; Seow, Yi-Xin; Ong, Peter K C; Zhou, Weibiao

    2015-09-01

    Application of high intensity ultrasound has shown potential in the production of Maillard reaction odor-active flavor compounds in model systems. The impact of initial pH, sonication duration, and ultrasound intensity on the production of Maillard reaction products (MRPs) by ultrasound processing in a cysteine-xylose model system were evaluated using Response Surface Methodology (RSM) with a modified mathematical model. Generation of selected MRPs, 2-methylthiophene and tetramethyl pyrazine, was optimal at an initial pH of 6.00, accompanied with 78.1 min of processing at an ultrasound intensity of 19.8 W cm(-2). However, identification of volatiles using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed that ultrasound-assisted Maillard reactions generated fewer sulfur-containing volatile flavor compounds as compared to conventional heat treatment of the model system. Likely reasons for this difference in flavor profile include the expulsion of H2S due to ultrasonic degassing and inefficient transmission of ultrasonic energy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. COMPLEX PROGRAMS FOR MODELING HIGHWAY: PARK, PROFILE AND COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iu. Smirnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main part of developing computer-aided design of roads are simulation systems to see the road in action. Modeling of the functioning of the road in such a simulation system - this test road design in the computer. This article describes three modules: PARK, PROFILE, COMPOSITION and comprising a set of process simulation programs functioning road. A significant increase in the accuracy of simulation results provides software parks established normative reference database of technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the stream. Completeness framework allows continuous adjustment and constant up-dating of the parameters types of cars in different scales calculation excludes construction and operating costs in justifying economic calculations optimality design solutions and increases the reliability of evaluating the effectiveness of capital investments in the construction and reconstruction of roads. Optimization of the design solutions in general, as a single continuous sequence of combinations of elements contributes to road profile program that analyzes the geometric elements of the plan, longitudinal section, compressing the geometry information of the way for the subsequent modeling of the functioning of the road. Program PROFILE (and built on its basis BASIS program, PROFILE is a nexus between the projecting programs and programs that simulate traffic. Transport and road performance computer modeled for a particular stream of automobile. Technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the flow (up to 20, which is sufficient for practical and research tasks and their percentage in the flow of the program selects COMPOSITION regulatory reference framework articulated earlier PARK module and writes them to a working file for their subsequent use module RIDE.

  13. Incidence, microbiological profile of nosocomial infections, and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a high volume Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections (NIs in the postoperative period not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also impose a significant economic burden on the health care infrastructure. This retrospective study was undertaken to (a evaluate the incidence, characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of NIs and (b identify common microorganisms responsible for infection and their antibiotic resistance profile in our Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CSICU. Patients and Methods: After ethics committee approval, the CSICU records of all patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery between January 2013 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of NI, distribution of NI sites, types of microorganisms and their antibiotic resistance, length of CSICU stay, and patient-outcome were determined. Results: Three hundred and nineteen of 6864 patients (4.6% developed NI after cardiac surgery. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs accounted for most of the infections (44.2% followed by surgical-site infection (SSI, 11.6%, bloodstream infection (BSI, 7.5%, urinary tract infection (UTI, 6.9% and infections from combined sources (29.8%. Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent pathogens isolated in patients with LRTI, BSI, UTI, and SSI, respectively. The Gram-negative bacteria isolated from different sources were found to be highly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Conclusion: The incidence of NI and sepsis-related mortality, in our CSICU, was 4.6% and 1.9%, respectively. Lower respiratory tract was the most common site of infection and Gram-negative bacilli, the most common pathogens after cardiac surgery. Antibiotic resistance was maximum with Acinetobacter spp.

  14. Profile of Congenital Surgical Anomalies in Neonates Admitted to Tertiary Care Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Saurashtra Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalak Shah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital surgical anomaly is a major indication for admission of a neonate to an intensive care unit. Profile of surgical conditions is variable by system affecting the neonate and outcomes of the individual conditions depending upon treatment and post surgical facilities. This study was undertaken to highlight the surgical conditions, their burden and their prognosis encountered in our newborn care unit. Methodology: This study is a cross sectional study. All information was collected from the case records of all neonates admitted in newborn care unit of our centre between 1st April, 2011 and 31st October, 2014 with congenital surgical conditions and the following information extracted: surgical condition, age, sex, maturity, birth weight, its treatment and outcome, and other associated features were studied. Result: A total of 9213 neonates were admitted in the study period, of which 328 neonates (3.6% had surgical conditions. Surgery was performed in 225 neonates. Commonest congenital surgical condition was of gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Commonest GIT anomalies were tracheo-oesophageal fistula (28.6%, intestinal obstruction (23.7%, anorectal malformation (17.9%, and omphalocoele (7%. The overall mortality in neonates with congenital surgical condition in this study was 51.2%. Significantly, more deaths occurred in preterm than in term neonates (P = 0.00003 and low birth weight babies more than normal weight (p=0.0002. Conclusion: High mortality is found in neonates suffering from surgical conditions. Commonest anomaly includes conditions of Gastrointestinal tract. Prematurity and low birth weight is a significant factor associated with high mortality. [Natl J Med Res 2016; 6(2.000: 168-170

  15. Incidence, microbiological profile of nosocomial infections, and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a high volume Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Siddharth, Bharat; Choudhury, Arin; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Singh, Sarvesh Pal; Menon, Ramesh; Kapoor, Poonam Malhotra; Talwar, Sachin; Choudhary, Shiv; Airan, Balram

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections (NIs) in the postoperative period not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also impose a significant economic burden on the health care infrastructure. This retrospective study was undertaken to (a) evaluate the incidence, characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of NIs and (b) identify common microorganisms responsible for infection and their antibiotic resistance profile in our Cardiac Surgical Intensive Care Unit (CSICU). After ethics committee approval, the CSICU records of all patients who underwent cardiovascular surgery between January 2013 and December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. The incidence of NI, distribution of NI sites, types of microorganisms and their antibiotic resistance, length of CSICU stay, and patient-outcome were determined. Three hundred and nineteen of 6864 patients (4.6%) developed NI after cardiac surgery. Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) accounted for most of the infections (44.2%) followed by surgical-site infection (SSI, 11.6%), bloodstream infection (BSI, 7.5%), urinary tract infection (UTI, 6.9%) and infections from combined sources (29.8%). Acinetobacter, Klebsiella, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent pathogens isolated in patients with LRTI, BSI, UTI, and SSI, respectively. The Gram-negative bacteria isolated from different sources were found to be highly resistant to commonly used antibiotics. The incidence of NI and sepsis-related mortality, in our CSICU, was 4.6% and 1.9%, respectively. Lower respiratory tract was the most common site of infection and Gram-negative bacilli, the most common pathogens after cardiac surgery. Antibiotic resistance was maximum with Acinetobacter spp.

  16. A multi-model analysis of vertical ozone profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Jonson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A multi-model study of the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from major anthropogenic source regions was coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP. Vertical profiles of ozone at 12-h intervals from 2001 are available from twelve of the models contributing to this study and are compared here with observed profiles from ozonesondes. The contributions from each major source region are analysed for selected sondes, and this analysis is supplemented by retroplume calculations using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model to provide insight into the origin of ozone transport events and the cause of differences between the models and observations.

    In the boundary layer ozone levels are in general strongly affected by regional sources and sinks. With a considerably longer lifetime in the free troposphere, ozone here is to a much larger extent affected by processes on a larger scale such as intercontinental transport and exchange with the stratosphere. Such individual events are difficult to trace over several days or weeks of transport. This may explain why statistical relationships between models and ozonesonde measurements are far less satisfactory than shown in previous studies for surface measurements at all seasons. The lowest bias between model-calculated ozone profiles and the ozonesonde measurements is seen in the winter and autumn months. Following the increase in photochemical activity in the spring and summer months, the spread in model results increases, and the agreement between ozonesonde measurements and the individual models deteriorates further.

    At selected sites calculated contributions to ozone levels in the free troposphere from intercontinental transport are shown. Intercontinental transport is identified based on differences in model calculations with unperturbed emissions and

  17. Markov modulated Poisson process models incorporating covariates for rainfall intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayakaran, R; Ramesh, N I

    2013-01-01

    Time series of rainfall bucket tip times at the Beaufort Park station, Bracknell, in the UK are modelled by a class of Markov modulated Poisson processes (MMPP) which may be thought of as a generalization of the Poisson process. Our main focus in this paper is to investigate the effects of including covariate information into the MMPP model framework on statistical properties. In particular, we look at three types of time-varying covariates namely temperature, sea level pressure, and relative humidity that are thought to be affecting the rainfall arrival process. Maximum likelihood estimation is used to obtain the parameter estimates, and likelihood ratio tests are employed in model comparison. Simulated data from the fitted model are used to make statistical inferences about the accumulated rainfall in the discrete time interval. Variability of the daily Poisson arrival rates is studied.

  18. A multi-model analysis of vertical ozone profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Tarasick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A multi-model study of the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from major anthropogenic source regions was coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP. Vertical profiles of ozone at 12-h intervals in year 2001 are available from twelve of the models contributing to this study and are compared here with observed profiles from ozonesondes. The contributions from each major source region are analysed for selected sondes, and this analysis is supplemented by retroplume calculations using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model to provide insight into the origin of ozone transport events and the cause of differences between the models and observations.

    In the boundary layer ozone levels are in general strongly affected by regional sources and sinks. With a considerably longer lifetime in the free troposphere, ozone here is to a much larger extent affected by processes on a larger scale such as intercontinental transport and exchange with the stratosphere. Such individual events are difficult to trace over several days or weeks of transport. As a result statistical relationships between models and ozone sonde measurements are far less satisfactory than for surface measurements at all seasons. The lowest bias between model calculated ozone profiles and the ozone sonde measurements is seen in the winter and autumn months. Following the increase in photochemical activity in the spring and summer months the spread in model results increases and the agreement between ozone sonde measurements and the individual models deteriorates further.

    At selected sites calculated contributions to ozone levels in the free troposphere from intercontinental transport are presented. Intercontinental transport is identified based on differences in model calculations with unperturbed emissions and emissions reduced by 20% by

  19. An estimate of maintenance efficiency in Brown-Proschan imperfect repair model with bathtub failure intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makram Krit

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Estimate the maintenance efficiency in the Brown-Proschan model with the bathtub failure intensity.Design/methodology/approach: Empirical research through which we propose a framework to establish the characteristics of failure process and its influence on maintenance process.Findings: The main contribution of the present study is the reformulation of the Brown and Proschan model using the bathtub failure intensityPractical implications: Our model is defined by BP reformulation one using bathtub failure intensity. This form of intensity is presented like superposition of two NHPP and Homogeneous Poisson one.Originality/value: This is the follow on research on the study that employed the power-law-process type of failure intensity.

  20. Element-specific density profiles in interacting biomembrane models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Bertinetti, Luca; Marin, Egor; Novikov, Dmitri; Konovalov, Oleg; Gochev, Georgi

    2017-03-01

    Surface interactions involving biomembranes, such as cell–cell interactions or membrane contacts inside cells play important roles in numerous biological processes. Structural insight into the interacting surfaces is a prerequisite to understand the interaction characteristics as well as the underlying physical mechanisms. Here, we work with simplified planar experimental models of membrane surfaces, composed of lipids and lipopolymers. Their interaction is quantified in terms of pressure–distance curves using ellipsometry at controlled dehydrating (interaction) pressures. For selected pressures, their internal structure is investigated by standing-wave x-ray fluorescence (SWXF). This technique yields specific density profiles of the chemical elements P and S belonging to lipid headgroups and polymer chains, as well as counter-ion profiles for charged surfaces.

  1. Solitonic description of interface profiles in competition models

    CERN Document Server

    Azevedo, T; Menezes, J

    2014-01-01

    We consider the spatial patterns provided by mean field numerical simulations for two competing species. As all individuals have the same rate of mobility, reproduction and competition, interfaces of empty spaces separating domains of single species are formed by a spontaneous process of symmetry breaking. We construct a Lagrangian formalism for studying the static profile of such interfaces by means of a scalar field theory framework. We identify the number density of empty spaces created by the competition interactions with a function of the energy density in scalar field systems. We then present a potential with $Z_2$ symmetry, which leads to differential equations whose solitonic solutions describe interface profile. Finally, we compare the theoretical results with data from one-dimensional numerical simulation of the Lotka-Volterra equations and show that our model fits well the properties of interfaces.

  2. Computational modeling of Krypton gas puffs with tailored mass density profiles on Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, C. A.; Ampleford, D. J.; Lamppa, D. C.; Hansen, S. B.; Jones, B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Jobe, M.; Strizic, T.; Reneker, J.; Rochau, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Large diameter multi-shell gas puffs rapidly imploded by high current (∼20 MA, ∼100 ns) on the Z generator of Sandia National Laboratories are able to produce high-intensity Krypton K-shell emission at ∼13 keV. Efficiently radiating at these high photon energies is a significant challenge which requires the careful design and optimization of the gas distribution. To facilitate this, we hydrodynamically model the gas flow out of the nozzle and then model its implosion using a 3-dimensional resistive, radiative MHD code (GORGON). This approach enables us to iterate between modeling the implosion and gas flow from the nozzle to optimize radiative output from this combined system. Guided by our implosion calculations, we have designed gas profiles that help mitigate disruption from Magneto-Rayleigh–Taylor implosion instabilities, while preserving sufficient kinetic energy to thermalize to the high temperatures required for K-shell emission.

  3. Mixing intensity modulated electron and photon beams: combining a steep dose fall-off at depth with sharp and depth-independent penumbras and flat beam profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, E W; Heijmen, B J; Woudstra, E; Huizenga, H; Brahme, A

    1999-09-01

    For application in radiotherapy, intensity modulated high-energy electron and photon beams were mixed to create dose distributions that feature: (a) a steep dose fall-off at larger depths, similar to pure electron beams, (b) flat beam profiles and sharp and depth-independent beam penumbras, as in photon beams, and (c) a selectable skin dose that is lower than for pure electron beams. To determine the required electron and photon beam fluence profiles, an inverse treatment planning algorithm was used. Mixed beams were realized at a MM50 racetrack microtron (Scanditronix Medical AB, Sweden), and evaluated by the dose distributions measured in a water phantom. The multileaf collimator of the MM50 was used in a static mode to shape overlapping electron beam segments, and the dynamic multileaf collimation mode was used to realize the intensity modulated photon beam profiles. Examples of mixed beams were generated at electron energies of up to 40 MeV. The intensity modulated electron beam component consists of two overlapping concentric fields with optimized field sizes, yielding broad, fairly depth-independent overall beam penumbras. The matched intensity modulated photon beam component has high fluence peaks at the field edges to sharpen this penumbra. The combination of the electron and the photon beams yields dose distributions with the characteristics (a)-(c) mentioned above.

  4. Modeling Comovements in Trading Intensities to Distinguish Sector and Stock Specific News

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierdijk, L.; Nijman, T.E.; van Soest, A.H.O.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we propose a bivariate model for the trading intensities of stocks in a particular industry.The model consists of a univariate duration model for trades in either of the stocks and a probit-specification for which of the two stocks is traded.We apply the model to the trading intensitie

  5. Modeling the dynamics of intense internal waves on the shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talipova, T. G.; Pelinovsky, E. N.; Kurkin, A. A.; Kurkina, O. E.

    2014-11-01

    The transformation of the internal wave packet during its propagation over the shelf of Portugal was studied in the international experiment EU MAST II MORENA in 1994. This paper presents the results of modeling of the dynamics of this packet under hydrological conditions along the pathway of its propagation. The modeling was performed on the basis of the generalized Gardner-Ostrovskii equation, including inhomogeneous hydrological conditions, rotation of the Earth, and dissipation in the bottom boundary layer. We also discuss the results of the comparison of the observed and simulated forms and phases of individual waves in a packet at reference points.

  6. Modeling diurnal hormone profiles by hierarchical state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyue; Guo, Wensheng

    2015-10-30

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) diurnal patterns contain both smooth circadian rhythms and pulsatile activities. How to evaluate and compare them between different groups is a challenging statistical task. In particular, we are interested in testing (1) whether the smooth ACTH circadian rhythms in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia patients differ from those in healthy controls and (2) whether the patterns of pulsatile activities are different. In this paper, a hierarchical state space model is proposed to extract these signals from noisy observations. The smooth circadian rhythms shared by a group of subjects are modeled by periodic smoothing splines. The subject level pulsatile activities are modeled by autoregressive processes. A functional random effect is adopted at the pair level to account for the matched pair design. Parameters are estimated by maximizing the marginal likelihood. Signals are extracted as posterior means. Computationally efficient Kalman filter algorithms are adopted for implementation. Application of the proposed model reveals that the smooth circadian rhythms are similar in the two groups but the pulsatile activities in patients are weaker than those in the healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Predictive model for SEPSIS in the intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavoisier Morais de Medeiros

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to provide a probabilistic decision model for sepsis, early diagnosis. The data contained in the medical records of 100 individuals admitted to a general ICU in a public hospital in the inland of the State of Paraiba were analyzed, in the period from March to September, 2011. The studied variables were: age, gender, initial diagnosis, minimum and maximum axillary temperature, heart and breathing rate, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressure, lactate serum levels, potassium, sodium, total count of leukocytes, bands and segs., among others. The binary logistic regression were used to determine the prediction model, and data were analyzed by SPSS software, version 19.0. 63% of the subjects were male, with a 62.5 year average age. as explanatory variables the following were considered: minimum axillary temperature, maximum axillary temperature, carbon dioxide partial pressure, lactate, white blood cell count and number of bands. Through ROC curve we identified the ideal cut-off point for classifying the subjects with regard to the presence or absence of disease, which has contributed to formulating the decision-making rule for sepsis early diagnosis. The concordance degree were compared between blood culture result regarded as gold standard for infection diagnosis and the model submitted in the study using Kappa coefficient, obtaining a 0.93 concordance percentage, regarded as outstanding. It was demonstrated being possible to carry out sepsis early detection adopting statistical models as the submitted one, however, new studies with populations from different ICUs must be performed in order to provide a better casuistry, making the found results reproducible in different clinical situations.

  8. Modelling cosmic ray intensities along the Ulysses trajectory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Ndiitwani

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Time dependent cosmic ray modulation in the inner heliosphere is studied by comparing results from a 2-D, time-dependent cosmic ray transport model with Ulysses observations. A compound approach, which combines the effects of the global changes in the heliospheric magnetic field magnitude with drifts to establish a realistic time-dependence, in the diffusion and drift coefficients, are used. We show that this model results in realistic cosmic ray modulation from the Ulysses launch (1990 until recently (2004 when compared to 2.5-GV electron and proton and 1.2-GV electron and Helium observations from this spacecraft. This approach is also applied to compute radial gradients present in 2.5-GV cosmic ray electron and protons in the inner heliosphere. The observed latitude dependence for both positive and negative charged particles during both the fast latitude scan periods, corresponding to different solar activity conditions, could also be realistically computed. For this an additional reduction in particle drifts (compared to diffusion toward solar maximum is needed. This results in a realistic charge-sign dependent modulation at solar maximum and the model is also applied to predict charge-sign dependent modulation up to the next expected solar minimum.

  9. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crum Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57 were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R, and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions.

  10. Convective Signatures in Ozone Profiles: Guidance for Cloud Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, J. B.; Thompson, A. M.; Miller, S. K.; Witte, J. C.; Pickering, K. E.; Tao, W. K.

    2006-05-01

    Ozone throughout the free troposphere is a tracer for convection, stratospheric exchange and pollution. Convective influences are typically manifested in two ways: (1) redistribution of ozone from the boundary-layer to free troposphere. In unpolluted regions, this usually means decreasing ozone in the upper troposphere (UT) or UT/LS (upper troposphere-lower stratosphere). Over polluted regions, the opposite may occur. (2) enhancing O3 precursors (NO, CO, hydrocarbons) in the free troposphere, through redistribution, or in the case of lightning, through direct production of NO, adds to photochemical ozone formation. Since about 1990 we have studied ozone dynamics and photochemistry with cloud-resolving (CRM) and larger-scale models. Aircraft profiles of O3, ozone precursors (NO, CO, hydrocarbons) and photochemically related constituents guide model input and are used to evaluate model output. Recently, we have used a semi-empirical approach ("lamina-layering," after Pierce and Grant [1998]) to identifying convective impacts on ozone profiles taken with soundings. The latter are measured by ozonesondes that are flown with radiosondes, to collect PTU data. The advantage of ozonesondes is consistent vertical sampling of ozone into the UT/LS with 5- 25 m resolution, and regular frequency at stations where they are launched. Examples of convective influence in ozone profiles - case studies and climatology at selected locations - will be shown for mid-latitudes and tropics. In mid-latitudes convective ozone budgets are compared to influences of stratospheric exchange and pollution. In the tropics, convective impacts reflect El Nino, the MJO and possible trends in a cooling UT/LS.

  11. Evolution of radial profiles in regular Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi dust models

    CERN Document Server

    Sussman, Roberto A

    2010-01-01

    By introducing a quasi--local scalar representation for regular Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) dust models, we undertake a comprehensive and rigorous analytic study of the evolution of radial profiles of covariant scalars in these models. We consider specifically the phenomenon of "profile inversions" in which an initial clump profile of density, spatial curvature or the expansion scalar, might evolve into a void profile (and vice versa). Previous work in the literature on models with density void profiles and/or allowing for density profile inversions is given full generalization, with some erroneous results corrected. We prove rigorously that if an evolution without shell crossings is assumed, then only the 'clump to void' density profile inversion can occur, and only in hyperbolic models or regions. The profiles of spatial curvature follow similar patterns as those of the density, with 'clump to void' inversions only possible for hyperbolic models or regions. However, profiles of the expansion scalar are less...

  12. Line profile modelling for multi-pixel CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, T.; Vadawale, S. V.; Rao, A. R.; Bhattacharya, D.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Bhalerao, V.

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors have been the mainstay for hard X-ray astronomy for its high quantum efficiency, fine energy resolution, near room temperature operation, and radiation hardness. In order to fully utilize the spectroscopic capabilities of CZT detectors, it is important to generate accurate response matrix, which in turn requires precise modelling of the line profiles for the CZT detectors. We have developed a numerical model taking into account the mobility and lifetime of the charge carriers and intrpixel charge sharing for the CZT detectors. This paper describes the details of the modelling along with the experimental measurements of mobility, lifetime and charge sharing fractions for the CZT detector modules of thickness of 5 mm and 2.5 mm pixel size procured from Orbotech Medical Solutions (same modules used in AstroSat-CZTI).

  13. A model for quantification of temperature profiles via germination times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pipper, Christian Bressen; Adolf, Verena Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Current methodology to quantify temperature characteristics in germination of seeds is predominantly based on analysis of the time to reach a given germination fraction, that is, the quantiles in the distribution of the germination time of a seed. In practice interpolation between observed...... time and a specific type of accelerated failure time models is provided. As a consequence the observed number of germinated seeds at given monitoring times may be analysed directly by a grouped time-to-event model from which characteristics of the temperature profile may be identified and estimated...... germination fractions at given monitoring times is used to obtain the time to reach a given germination fraction. As a consequence the obtained value will be highly dependent on the actual monitoring scheme used in the experiment. In this paper a link between currently used quantile models for the germination...

  14. A model for abrupt changes in pulsar pulse profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, R.; Melrose, D. B.

    2017-08-01

    We propose and explore a purely magnetospheric model for observed abrupt changes in pulsar radio profile. The flow rate of the magnetospheric plasma is dependent on the magnetospheric state described by the parameter y. We include the effect of the motion of the visible point along its trajectory, whose omission from a 'standard' version of viewing geometry is strictly valid only for align rotation and approximately valid for oblique rotation only in a narrow range of pulsar phase, which decreases as the obliquity increases. Emission is assumed from spots, distributed uniformly around the magnetic axis, so that observable features, such as subpulses, appear to rotate at a rate, ωR, relative to the visible point. We find that the apparent motion of an individual spot is not constant, and the apparent distribution of emission spots around the trajectory of the visible point is uneven being highest around the centre of the pulse window, where their apparent motion is slowest, allowing more spots to be present simultaneously in the pulse window than in the 'standard' version. An abrupt (or more gradual) change in y implies a change in ωR, which affects the pulse structure and profile. As a case study, we apply the model to 'swooshing' in PSR B0919+06. We discuss correlated slowing down rate in the model and related time-dependent phenomena in radio pulsars.

  15. Complex Data Modeling and Computationally Intensive Statistical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mantovan, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    The last years have seen the advent and development of many devices able to record and store an always increasing amount of complex and high dimensional data; 3D images generated by medical scanners or satellite remote sensing, DNA microarrays, real time financial data, system control datasets. The analysis of this data poses new challenging problems and requires the development of novel statistical models and computational methods, fueling many fascinating and fast growing research areas of modern statistics. The book offers a wide variety of statistical methods and is addressed to statistici

  16. A Parametric Model for Barred Equilibrium Beach Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-10

    A parametric model for barred equilibrium beach profiles Robert A. Holman a,⁎, David M. Lalejini a, Kacey Edwards b, Jay Veeramony b a Marine...a limited cross-shore span. Coastal Engineering 90 (2014) 85–94 ⁎ Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 541 737 2914. E-mail addresses: holman ...coas.oregonstate.edu (R.A. Holman ), David.Lalejini@nrlssc.navy.mil (D.M. Lalejini), kacey.edwards@nrlssc.navy.mil (K. Edwards), jay.veeramony@nrlssc.navy.mil (J

  17. On the relation between the linear factor model and the latent profile model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, P.F.; Dolan, C.V.; Grasman, R.P.P.P.; de Boeck, P.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between linear factor models and latent profile models is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation based on the joint distribution of the manifest variables. Although the two models are well known to imply equivalent covariance decompositions, in general they do

  18. On the Relation between the Linear Factor Model and the Latent Profile Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Dolan, Conor V.; Grasman, Raoul P. P. P.; De Boeck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between linear factor models and latent profile models is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation based on the joint distribution of the manifest variables. Although the two models are well known to imply equivalent covariance decompositions, in general they do not yield equivalent estimates of the…

  19. Mortality profile across our Intensive Care Units: A 5-year database report from a Singapore restructured hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Shahla

    2015-12-01

    Intensive care remains an area of high acuity and high mortality across the globe. With a rapidly aging population, the disease burden requiring intensive care is growing. The cost of critical care also is rising with new technology becoming available rapidly. We present the all-cause mortality results of 5 years database established in a restructured, large public hospital in Singapore, looking at all three types of Intensive Care Units present in our hospital. These include medical, surgical, and coronary care units.

  20. Impact of high-intensity pulsed electric fields on carotenoids profile of tomato juice made of moderate-intensity pulsed electric field-treated tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallverdú-Queralt, Anna; Odriozola-Serrano, Isabel; Oms-Oliu, Gemma; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa M; Elez-Martínez, Pedro; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2013-12-01

    The effect of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on the carotenoid content of tomato juices was studied. First, moderate-intensity PEF (MIPEF) was applied to raw tomatoes. Afterwards, MIPEF-treated and untreated tomatoes were immediately refrigerated at 4 °C for 24 h and then, they were separately ground to produce tomato juices. Juices were treated by heat treatments or by high-intensity PEF (HIPEF) and stored under refrigeration for 56 days. MIPEF treatment of tomatoes increased the content of carotenoid compounds in tomato juices. An enhancement of 63-65% in 15-cis-lycopene was observed in juices prepared with MIPEF-treated tomatoes. A slight increase in cis-lycopene isomers was observed over time, whereas other carotenoids slightly decreased. However, HIPEF treated tomato juices maintained higher carotenoid content (10-20%) through the storage time than thermally and untreated juices. The combination of MIPEF and HIPEF treatments could be used not only to produce tomato juices with high carotenoid content but also, to maintain higher the carotenoid content during storage time.

  1. The effect of position sources on estimated eigenvalues in intensity modeled data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikse, Anne; Veldhuis, Raymond; Spreeuwers, Luuk; Goseling, Jasper; Weber, Jos H.

    2010-01-01

    In biometrics, often models are used in which the data distributions are approximated with normal distributions. In particular, the eigenface method models facial data as a mixture of fixed-position intensity signals with a normal distribution. The model parameters, a mean value and a covariance mat

  2. Solar intensity measurement using a thermoelectric module; experimental study and mathematical modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbar, Nader; Asadi, Amin

    2016-01-01

    The present study is intended to design, manufacture, and modeling an inexpensive pyranometer using a thermoelectric module. The governing equations relating the solar intensity, output voltage, and ambient temperature have been derived by applying the mathematical and thermodynamic models....... According to the thermodynamics modeling, the output voltage is a function of solar intensity, ambient temperature, internal parameters of thermoelectric module, convection and radiation coefficients, and geometrical characteristics of the setup. Moreover, the solar intensity can be considered as a linear...... function of voltage and ambient temperature within an acceptable range of accuracy. The experiments have been carried out on a typical winter day under climatic conditions of Semnan (35°33′N, 53°23′E), Iran. The results also indicated that the output voltage is dependent on the solar intensity and its...

  3. Transcriptional profile of a myotube starvation model of atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Eric J.; Koncarevic, Alan; Giresi, Paul G.; Jackman, Robert W.; Kandarian, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting is a pervasive phenomenon that can result from a wide range of pathological conditions as well as from habitual muscular inactivity. The present work describes a cell-culture condition that induces significant atrophy in skeletal muscle C2C12 myotubes. The failure to replenish differentiation media in mature myotubes leads to rapid atrophy (53% in diameter), which is referred to here as starvation. Affymetrix microarrays were used to develop a transcriptional profile of control (fed) vs. atrophied (nonfed) myotubes. Myotube starvation was characterized by an upregulation of genes involved in translational inhibition, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, and cell cycle arrest/apoptosis, among others. Downregulated genes included several structural and regulatory elements of the extracellular matrix as well as several elements of Wnt/frizzled and TGF-beta signaling pathways. Interestingly, the characteristic transcriptional upregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, calpains, and cathepsins known to occur in multiple in vivo models of atrophy were not seen during myotube starvation. With the exception of the downregulation of extracellular matrix genes, serine protease inhibitor genes, and the upregulation of the translation initiation factor PHAS-I, this model of atrophy in cell culture has a transcriptional profile quite distinct from any study published to date with atrophy in whole muscle. These data show that, although the gross morphology of atrophied muscle fibers may be similar in whole muscle vs. myotube culture, the processes by which this phenotype is achieved differ markedly.

  4. Insulin kinetics and the Neonatal Intensive Care Insulin-Nutrition-Glucose (NICING) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, J L; Pretty, C G; Alsweiler, J; Lynn, A; Chase, J G

    2017-02-01

    Models of human glucose-insulin physiology have been developed for a range of uses, with similarly different levels of complexity and accuracy. STAR (Stochastic Targeted) is a model-based approach to glycaemic control. Elevated blood glucose concentrations (hyperglycaemia) are a common complication of stress and prematurity in very premature infants, and have been associated with worsened outcomes and higher mortality. This research identifies and validates the model parameters for model-based glycaemic control in neonatal intensive care. C-peptide, plasma insulin, and BG from a cohort of 41 extremely pre-term (median age 27.2 [26.2-28.7] weeks) and very low birth weight infants (median birth weight 839 [735-1000] g) are used alongside C-peptide kinetic models to identify model parameters associated with insulin kinetics in the NICING (Neonatal Intensive Care Insulin-Nutrition-Glucose) model. A literature analysis is used to determine models of kidney clearance and body fluid compartment volumes. The full, final NICING model is validated by fitting the model to a cohort of 160 glucose, insulin, and nutrition data records from extremely premature infants from two different NICUs (neonatal intensive care units). Six model parameters related to insulin kinetics were identified. The resulting NICING model is more physiologically descriptive than prior model iterations, including clearance pathways of insulin via the liver and kidney, rather than a lumped parameter. In addition, insulin diffusion between plasma and interstitial spaces is evaluated, with differences in distribution volume taken into consideration for each of these spaces. The NICING model was shown to fit clinical data well, with a low model fit error similar to that of previous model iterations. Insulin kinetic parameters have been identified, and the NICING model is presented for glycaemic control neonatal intensive care. The resulting NICING model is more complex and physiologically relevant, with no

  5. Alterations of urinary metabolite profile in model diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stec, Donald F. [Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Wang, Suwan; Stothers, Cody [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Avance, Josh [Berea College, 1916 CPO, Berea, KY 40404 (United States); Denson, Deon [Choctaw Central High School, Philadelphia, MS 39350 (United States); Harris, Raymond [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Voziyan, Paul, E-mail: paul.voziyan@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was employed to study urinary metabolite profile in diabetic mouse models. • Mouse urinary metabolome showed major changes that are also found in human diabetic nephropathy. • These models can be new tools to study urinary biomarkers that are relevant to human disease. - Abstract: Countering the diabetes pandemic and consequent complications, such as nephropathy, will require better understanding of disease mechanisms and development of new diagnostic methods. Animal models can be versatile tools in studies of diabetic renal disease when model pathology is relevant to human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetic models using endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice develop major renal lesions characteristic of human disease. However, it is unknown whether they can also reproduce changes in urinary metabolites found in human DN. We employed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic mouse models of DN, i.e. STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db, with the goal of determining changes in urinary metabolite profile using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Six urinary metabolites with significantly lower levels in diabetic compared to control mice have been identified. Specifically, major changes were found in metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid catabolism including 3-indoxyl sulfate, cis-aconitate, 2-oxoisocaproate, N-phenyl-acetylglycine, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate, and hippurate. Levels of 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and hippuric acid showed the strongest reverse correlation to albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), which is an indicator of renal damage. Importantly, similar changes in urinary hydroxyphenyl acetate and hippurate were previously reported in human renal disease. We demonstrated that STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db mouse models can recapitulate changes in urinary metabolome found in human DN and therefore can be

  6. Effects of a high-intensity intermittent training program on aerobic capacity and lipid profile in trained subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouerghi N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nejmeddine Ouerghi,1,2 Marwa Khammassi,1 Sami Boukorraa,1 Moncef Feki,2 Naziha Kaabachi,2 Anissa Bouassida,1,3 1Research Unit, Sportive Performance and Physical Rehabilitation, High Institute of Sports and Physical Education of Kef, University of Jendouba, Kef, Tunisia, 2Laboratory of Biochemistry, Rabta Hospital, Faculty of Medicine of Tunis, El Manar University, Tunis, 3Physiology Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine Ibn el Jazzar, Sousse, Tunisia Background: Data regarding the effect of training on plasma lipids are controversial. Most studies have addressed continuous or long intermittent training programs. The present study evaluated the effect of short-short high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT on aerobic capacity and plasma lipids in soccer players. Methods: The study included 24 male subjects aged 21–26 years, divided into three groups: experimental group 1 (EG1, n=8 comprising soccer players who exercised in addition to regular short-short HIIT twice a week for 12 weeks; experimental group 2 (EG2, n=8 comprising soccer players who exercised in a regular football training program; and a control group (CG, n=8 comprising untrained subjects who did not practice regular physical activity. Maximal aerobic velocity and maximal oxygen uptake along with plasma lipids were measured before and after 6 weeks and 12 weeks of the respective training program. Results: Compared with basal values, maximal oxygen uptake had significantly increased in EG1 (from 53.3±4.0 mL/min/kg to 54.8±3.0 mL/min/kg at 6 weeks [P<0.05] and to 57.0±3.2 mL/min/kg at 12 weeks [P<0.001]. Maximal oxygen uptake was increased only after 12 weeks in EG2 (from 52.8±2.7 mL/min/kg to 54.2±2.6 mL/min/kg, [P<0.05], but remain unchanged in CG. After 12 weeks of training, maximal oxygen uptake was significantly higher in EG1 than in EG2 (P<0.05. During training, no significant changes in plasma lipids occurred. However, after 12 weeks, total and low-density lipoprotein

  7. The Dynamic Range Paradox: A Central Auditory Model of Intensity Change Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Andrew J.R.; Reiss, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we use empirical loudness modeling to explore a perceptual sub-category of the dynamic range problem of auditory neuroscience. Humans are able to reliably report perceived intensity (loudness), and discriminate fine intensity differences, over a very large dynamic range. It is usually assumed that loudness and intensity change detection operate upon the same neural signal, and that intensity change detection may be predicted from loudness data and vice versa. However, while loudness grows as intensity is increased, improvement in intensity discrimination performance does not follow the same trend and so dynamic range estimations of the underlying neural signal from loudness data contradict estimations based on intensity just-noticeable difference (JND) data. In order to account for this apparent paradox we draw on recent advances in auditory neuroscience. We test the hypothesis that a central model, featuring central adaptation to the mean loudness level and operating on the detection of maximum central-loudness rate of change, can account for the paradoxical data. We use numerical optimization to find adaptation parameters that fit data for continuous-pedestal intensity change detection over a wide dynamic range. The optimized model is tested on a selection of equivalent pseudo-continuous intensity change detection data. We also report a supplementary experiment which confirms the modeling assumption that the detection process may be modeled as rate-of-change. Data are obtained from a listening test (N = 10) using linearly ramped increment-decrement envelopes applied to pseudo-continuous noise with an overall level of 33 dB SPL. Increments with half-ramp durations between 5 and 50,000 ms are used. The intensity JND is shown to increase towards long duration ramps (p<10−6). From the modeling, the following central adaptation parameters are derived; central dynamic range of 0.215 sones, 95% central normalization, and a central loudness JND

  8. The dynamic range paradox: a central auditory model of intensity change detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J R Simpson

    Full Text Available In this paper we use empirical loudness modeling to explore a perceptual sub-category of the dynamic range problem of auditory neuroscience. Humans are able to reliably report perceived intensity (loudness, and discriminate fine intensity differences, over a very large dynamic range. It is usually assumed that loudness and intensity change detection operate upon the same neural signal, and that intensity change detection may be predicted from loudness data and vice versa. However, while loudness grows as intensity is increased, improvement in intensity discrimination performance does not follow the same trend and so dynamic range estimations of the underlying neural signal from loudness data contradict estimations based on intensity just-noticeable difference (JND data. In order to account for this apparent paradox we draw on recent advances in auditory neuroscience. We test the hypothesis that a central model, featuring central adaptation to the mean loudness level and operating on the detection of maximum central-loudness rate of change, can account for the paradoxical data. We use numerical optimization to find adaptation parameters that fit data for continuous-pedestal intensity change detection over a wide dynamic range. The optimized model is tested on a selection of equivalent pseudo-continuous intensity change detection data. We also report a supplementary experiment which confirms the modeling assumption that the detection process may be modeled as rate-of-change. Data are obtained from a listening test (N = 10 using linearly ramped increment-decrement envelopes applied to pseudo-continuous noise with an overall level of 33 dB SPL. Increments with half-ramp durations between 5 and 50,000 ms are used. The intensity JND is shown to increase towards long duration ramps (p<10(-6. From the modeling, the following central adaptation parameters are derived; central dynamic range of 0.215 sones, 95% central normalization, and a central

  9. An Intercomparison of Cloud-Resolving Models with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Summer 1997 Intensive Observation Period Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kuan-Man; Cederwall, Richard T.; Donner, Leo J.; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Guichard, Francoise; Johnson, Daniel E.; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Krueger, Steven K.; Petch, Jon C.; Randall, David A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports an intercomparison study of midlatitude continental cumulus convection simulated by eight two-dimensional and two three-dimensional cloud-resolving models (CRMs), driven by observed large-scale advective temperature and moisture tendencies, surface turbulent fluxes, and radiative-heating profiles during three sub-periods of the summer 1997 Intensive Observation Period of the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. Each sub-period includes two or three precipitation events of various intensities over a span of 4 or 5 days. The results can be summarized as follows. CRMs can reasonably simulate midlatitude continental summer convection observed at the ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed site in terms of the intensity of convective activity, and the temperature and specific-humidity evolution. Delayed occurrences of the initial precipitation events are a common feature for all three sub-cases among the models. Cloud mass fluxes, condensate mixing ratios and hydrometeor fractions produced by all CRMs are similar. Some of the simulated cloud properties such as cloud liquid-water path and hydrometeor fraction are rather similar to available observations. All CRMs produce large downdraught mass fluxes with magnitudes similar to those of updraughts, in contrast to CRM results for tropical convection. Some inter-model differences in cloud properties are likely to be related to those in the parametrizations of microphysical processes. There is generally a good agreement between the CRMs and observations with CRMs being significantly better than single-column models (SCMs), suggesting that current results are suitable for use in improving parametrizations in SCMs. However, improvements can still be made in the CRM simulations; these include the proper initialization of the CRMs and a more proper method of diagnosing cloud boundaries in model outputs for comparison with satellite and radar cloud observations.

  10. The impact of celestial pole offset modelling on VLBI UT1 Intensive results

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2011-01-01

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) Intensive sessions are scheduled to provide operational Universal Time (UT1) determinations with low latency. UT1 estimates obtained from these observations heavily depend on the model of the celestial pole motion used during data processing. However, even the most accurate precession-nutation model, IAU 2000/2006, is not accurate enough to realize the full potential of VLBI observations. To achieve the highest possible accuracy in UT1 estimates, a celestial pole offset (CPO), which is the difference between the actual and modelled precession-nutation angles, should be applied. Three CPO models are currently available for users. In this paper, these models have been tested and the differences between UT1 estimates obtained with those models are investigated. It has been shown that neglecting CPO modelling during VLBI UT1 Intensive processing causes systematic errors in UT1 series of up to 20 microarcseconds. It has been also found that using different CPO models causes...

  11. Measuring Neutron Star Radii via Pulse Profile Modeling with NICER

    CERN Document Server

    Ozel, Feryal; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Morsink, Sharon; Baubock, Michi

    2015-01-01

    The Neutron-star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER) is an X-ray astrophysics payload that will be placed on the International Space Station. Its primary science goal is to measure with high accuracy the pulse profiles that arise from the non-uniform thermal surface emission of rotation-powered pulsars. Modeling general relativistic effects on the profiles will lead to measuring the radii of these neutron stars and to constraining their equation of state. Achieving this goal will depend, among other things, on accurate knowledge of the source, sky, and instrument backgrounds. We use here simple analytic estimates to quantify the level at which these backgrounds need to be known in order for the upcoming measurements to provide significant constraints on the properties of neutron stars. We show that, even in the minimal-information scenario, knowledge of the background at a few percent level for a background-to-source countrate ratio of 0.2 allows for a measurement of the neutron star compactness to better t...

  12. Data assimilation of Argo profiles in a northwestern Pacific model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoyi; Storto, Andrea; Pinardi, Nadia; Liu, Guimei; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Based on a novel estimation of background-error covariances for assimilating Argo profiles, an oceanographic three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) data assimilation scheme was developed for the northwestern Pacific Ocean model (NwPM) for potential use in operational predictions and maritime safety applications. Temperature and salinity data extracted from Argo profiles from January to December 2010 were assimilated into the NwPM. The results show that the average daily temperature (salinity) root mean square error (RMSE) decreased from 0.99 °C (0.10 psu) to 0.62 °C (0.07 psu) in assimilation experiments throughout the northwestern Pacific, which represents a 37.2 % (27.6 %) reduction in the error. The temperature (salinity) RMSE decreased by ˜ 0.60 °C ( ˜ 0.05 psu) for the upper 900 m (1000 m). Sea level, temperature and salinity were in better agreement with in situ and satellite datasets after data assimilation than before. In addition, a 1-month experiment with daily analysis cycles and 5-day forecasts explored the performance of the system in an operational configuration. The results highlighted the positive impact of the 3DVAR initialization at all forecast ranges compared to the non-assimilative experiment. Therefore, the 3DVAR scheme proposed here, coupled to ROMS, shows a good predictive performance and can be used as an assimilation scheme for operational forecasting.

  13. Learning nonlinear statistical regularities in natural images by modeling the outer product of image intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Peng; Hu, Xiaolin

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that there exist nonlinear statistical regularities in natural images. Existing approaches for capturing such regularities always model the image intensities by assuming a parameterized distribution for the intensities and learn the parameters. In the letter, we propose to model the outer product of image intensities by assuming a gaussian distribution for it. A two-layer structure is presented, where the first layer is nonlinear and the second layer is linear. Trained on natural images, the first-layer bases resemble the receptive fields of simple cells in the primary visual cortex (V1), while the second-layer units exhibit some properties of the complex cells in V1, including phase invariance and masking effect. The model can be seen as an approximation of the covariance model proposed in Karklin and Lewicki (2009) but has more robust and efficient learning algorithms.

  14. Validation of risk stratification models in acute myeloid leukemia using sequencing-based molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Lindberg, J; Klevebring, D; Nilsson, C; Mer, A S; Rantalainen, M; Lehmann, S; Grönberg, H

    2017-10-01

    Risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients needs improvement. Several AML risk classification models based on somatic mutations or gene-expression profiling have been proposed. However, systematic and independent validation of these models is required for future clinical implementation. We performed whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing and panel-based deep DNA sequencing of 23 genes in 274 intensively treated AML patients (Clinseq-AML). We also utilized the The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-AML study (N=142) as a second validation cohort. We evaluated six previously proposed molecular-based models for AML risk stratification and two revised risk classification systems combining molecular- and clinical data. Risk groups stratified by five out of six models showed different overall survival in cytogenetic normal-AML patients in the Clinseq-AML cohort (P-value0.5). Risk classification systems integrating mutational or gene-expression data were found to add prognostic value to the current European Leukemia Net (ELN) risk classification. The prognostic value varied between models and across cohorts, highlighting the importance of independent validation to establish evidence of efficacy and general applicability. All but one model replicated in the Clinseq-AML cohort, indicating the potential for molecular-based AML risk models. Risk classification based on a combination of molecular and clinical data holds promise for improved AML patient stratification in the future.

  15. Mortality prediction models for pediatric intensive care : comparison of overall and subgroup specific performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Idse H. E.; Hazelzet, Jan A.; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; Hogenbirk, Karin; van Woensel, Job B.; van Heerde, Marc; van Waardenburg, Dick A.; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.

    2013-01-01

    To validate paediatric index of mortality (PIM) and pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) models within the overall population as well as in specific subgroups in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Variants of PIM and PRISM prediction models were compared with respect to calibration (agreement be

  16. APPROXIMATE MODEL OF INTENSE FIELD STABILIZATION FOR.HYDlROGEN ATOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE BAI-SONG

    2000-01-01

    An approximate model is proposed to study the stabilization problem of hydrogen atoms under monochromatic intense laser field.The stabilization regime for system parameters such as laser field strength,laser field frequency and atomic magnetic quantum number are obtained by stability analysis of fixed points of the model.The results are consistent with those obtained by other methods.

  17. Mortality prediction models for pediatric intensive care : comparison of overall and subgroup specific performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Idse H. E.; Hazelzet, Jan A.; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; Hogenbirk, Karin; van Woensel, Job B.; van Heerde, Marc; van Waardenburg, Dick A.; Jansen, Nicolaas J. G.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.

    2013-01-01

    To validate paediatric index of mortality (PIM) and pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM) models within the overall population as well as in specific subgroups in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Variants of PIM and PRISM prediction models were compared with respect to calibration (agreement be

  18. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages.

  19. Relativistic self-focusing of intense laser beam in thermal collisionless quantum plasma with ramped density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, S.; Yazdani, E.; Rezaee, S.; Anvari, A.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2015-04-01

    Propagation of a Gaussian x-ray laser beam has been analyzed in collisionless thermal quantum plasma with considering a ramped density profile. In this density profile due to the increase in the plasma density, an earlier and stronger self-focusing effect is noticed where the beam width oscillates with higher frequency and less amplitude. Moreover, the effect of the density profile slope and the initial plasma density on the laser propagation has been studied. It is found that, by increasing the initial density and the ramp slope, the laser beam focuses faster with less oscillation amplitude, smaller laser spot size and more oscillations. Furthermore, a comparison is made among the laser self-focusing in thermal quantum plasma, cold quantum plasma and classical plasma. It is realized that the laser self-focusing in the quantum plasma becomes stronger in comparison with the classical regime.

  20. Locally adaptive MR intensity models and MRF-based segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimzianova, Alfiia; Lesjak, Žiga; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Špiclin, Žiga

    2015-03-01

    Neuroimaging biomarkers are an important paraclinical tool used to characterize a number of neurological diseases, however, their extraction requires accurate and reliable segmentation of normal and pathological brain structures. For MR images of healthy brains the intensity models of normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) in combination with Markov random field (MRF) models are known to give reliable and smooth NABT segmentation. However, the presence of pathology, MR intensity bias and natural tissue-dependent intensity variability altogether represent difficult challenges for a reliable estimation of NABT intensity model based on MR images. In this paper, we propose a novel method for segmentation of normal and pathological structures in brain MR images of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients that is based on locally-adaptive NABT model, a robust method for the estimation of model parameters and a MRF-based segmentation framework. Experiments on multi-sequence brain MR images of 27 MS patients show that, compared to whole-brain model and compared to the widely used Expectation-Maximization Segmentation (EMS) method, the locally-adaptive NABT model increases the accuracy of MS lesion segmentation.

  1. A simple model for the short-time evolution of near-surface current and temperature profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, A D; Jenkins, Alastair D.; Ward, Brian

    2005-01-01

    A simple analytical/numerical model has been developed for computing the evolution, over periods of up to a few hours, of the current and temperature profile in the upper layer of the ocean. The model is based upon conservation laws for heat and momentum, and employs an eddy diffusion parameterisation which is dependent on both the wind speed and the wind stress applied at the sea surface. Other parameters such as the bulk-skin surface temperature difference and CO$_2$ flux are determined by application of the Molecular Oceanic Boundary Layer Model (MOBLAM) of Schluessel and Soloviev. A similar model, for the current profile only, predicts a temporary increase in wave breaking intensity and decrease in wave height under conditions where the wind speed increases suddenly, such as, for example, during gusts and squalls. The model results are compared with measurements from the lagrangian Skin Depth Experimental Profiler (SkinDeEP) surface profiling instrument made during the 1999 MOCE-5 field experiment in the ...

  2. Epidemiologic profile and risk factors of patients at intensive care unit, Hospital San José, Popayán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Illera

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: I.C.U. is an area dedicated to integral attention of severe ill patients. Objective: To establish the epidemiological profile of patients admitted to adult I.C.U. of Hospital Universitario San José of Popayán, Colombia, 2012. To determine risk factors associated to mortality and most prevalent diagnoses. Methods: Descriptive, retrospective study of the epidemiological profile of patients admitted to I.C.U. After authorization from ethics committee, 949 patients selected from the database were studied. Variables were codified according to investigators criteria. Associations were established among variables and mortality and diagnoses using chi² to determine statistical significance (p

  3. The presence of resilience is associated with a healthier psychological profile in intensive care unit (ICU) nurses: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealer, Meredith; Jones, Jacqueline; Newman, Julia; McFann, Kim K; Rothbaum, Barbara; Moss, Marc

    2012-03-01

    ICU nurses are repeatedly exposed to work related stresses resulting in the development of psychological disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder and burnout syndrome. Resilience is a learnable multidimensional characteristic enabling one to thrive in the face of adversity. In a national survey, we sought to determine whether resilience was associated with healthier psychological profiles in intensive care unit nurses. Surveys were mailed to 3500 randomly selected ICU nurses across the United States and included: demographic questions, the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Overall, 1239 of the mailed surveys were returned for a response rate of 35%, and complete data was available on a total of 744 nurses. Twenty-two percent of the intensive care unit nurses were categorized as being highly resilient. The presence of high resilience in these nurses was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, symptoms of anxiety or depression, and burnout syndrome (resilience was independently associated with a lower prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (presilience was independently associated with a lower prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and burnout syndrome in intensive care unit nurses. Future research is needed to better understand coping mechanisms employed by highly resilient nurses and how they maintain a healthier psychological profile. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling spatiotemporal patterns of understory light intensity using airborne laser scanner (LiDAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouzhang; Zhao, Chuanyan; Xu, Zhonglin

    2014-11-01

    This study described a spatiotemporally explicit 3D raytrace model to provide spatiotemporal patterns of understory light (light intensity in the forest floor and along the vertical gradient). The model was built based on voxels derived from LiDAR and field investigation data, geographical information (elevation and location), and solar position (azimuth and altitude angles). We calculated the distance (L, in meters) traveled by solar ray in the crowns based on the model, and then calibrated and verified the light attenuation function using L based on Beer's law. L and the ratio of below canopy light intensity to above canopy light intensity showed obviously exponential relationship, with R2 = 0.94 and P competition, soil evaporation, plant transpiration, and snowmelt in the forest.

  5. Using regression models to enhance signals in a dispersive radiative field: Reducing stray light corruption in the limb profiles of the Ozone Mapper Profiler Suite (OMPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, J. W.; Flynn, L. E.; Hornstein, J. S.; Lumpe, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    As the technology of remote sensing using radiometric observations advances and we are confronted with weaker and weaker signals, stray light corruption will become an increasingly important challenge. Stray light is particularly important for instruments that sample a large dynamic range such as the OMPS limb profiler. In that case, even a very small fraction of photons straying from the high-intensity region of spectral/viewing angle space can dominate measurements in the low intensity region. For the OMPS limb profiler, stray light represents a small linear perturbation to the overall observed energy, even though it dominates observations for some wavelengths and viewing angles. By exploiting those characteristics, we have found that both iterative techniques based on a Taylor expansion of the inverse stray light operator and linear regression models can effectively reduce stray light corruption from the OMPS measurements provided there is sufficient sampling of the measured radiant energy. Regression models are extremely efficient in operational application because their cost is incurred during offline training. However, they can perform no better than the data used to train them and only work well for systems whose dynamical operators are largely linear. Regression models can be problematic in an operational application if the instrument undergoes changes (e.g., pixel failure in the detector); with the instrument in orbit, retraining can be difficult. Thus, it is important to both characterize stray light with instrument tests before it is launched and to find stray light removal techniques that are flexible and can be altered to accommodate instrument changes. We examine three variations of an ozone retrieval algorithm that utilizes regression models to characterize photon dispersion and other instrument effects. These three methods are compared in terms of their sensitivity to model error, their sensitivity to errors in the assumed background atmospheric

  6. Alterations of urinary metabolite profile in model diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Donald F; Wang, Suwan; Stothers, Cody; Avance, Josh; Denson, Deon; Harris, Raymond; Voziyan, Paul

    2015-01-09

    Countering the diabetes pandemic and consequent complications, such as nephropathy, will require better understanding of disease mechanisms and development of new diagnostic methods. Animal models can be versatile tools in studies of diabetic renal disease when model pathology is relevant to human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetic models using endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice develop major renal lesions characteristic of human disease. However, it is unknown whether they can also reproduce changes in urinary metabolites found in human DN. We employed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic mouse models of DN, i.e. STZ-eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS and eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS db/db, with the goal of determining changes in urinary metabolite profile using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Six urinary metabolites with significantly lower levels in diabetic compared to control mice have been identified. Specifically, major changes were found in metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid catabolism including 3-indoxyl sulfate, cis-aconitate, 2-oxoisocaproate, N-phenyl-acetylglycine, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate, and hippurate. Levels of 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and hippuric acid showed the strongest reverse correlation to albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), which is an indicator of renal damage. Importantly, similar changes in urinary hydroxyphenyl acetate and hippurate were previously reported in human renal disease. We demonstrated that STZ-eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS and eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS db/db mouse models can recapitulate changes in urinary metabolome found in human DN and therefore can be useful new tools in metabolomic studies relevant to human pathology.

  7. Integrative structural modeling with small angle X-ray scattering profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneidman-Duhovny Dina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent technological advances enabled high-throughput collection of Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS profiles of biological macromolecules. Thus, computational methods for integrating SAXS profiles into structural modeling are needed more than ever. Here, we review specifically the use of SAXS profiles for the structural modeling of proteins, nucleic acids, and their complexes. First, the approaches for computing theoretical SAXS profiles from structures are presented. Second, computational methods for predicting protein structures, dynamics of proteins in solution, and assembly structures are covered. Third, we discuss the use of SAXS profiles in integrative structure modeling approaches that depend simultaneously on several data types.

  8. Profiling Patients’ Healthcare Needs to Support Integrated, Person-Centered Models for Long-Term Disease Management (Profile: Research Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne MJ Elissen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article presents the design of PROFILe, a study investigating which (biomedical and non-(biomedical patient characteristics should guide more tailored chronic care. Based on this insight, the project aims to develop and validate ‘patient profiles’ that can be used in practice to determine optimal treatment strategies for subgroups of chronically ill with similar healthcare needs and preferences. Methods/Design: PROFILe is a practice-based research comprising four phases. The project focuses on patients with type 2 diabetes. During the first study phase, patient profiles are drafted based on a systematic literature research, latent class growth modeling, and expert collaboration. In phase 2, the profiles are validated from a clinical, patient-related and statistical perspective. Phase 3 involves a discrete choice experiment to gain insight into the patient preferences that exist per profile. In phase 4, the results from all analyses are integrated and recommendations formulated on which patient characteristics should guide tailored chronic care. Discussion: PROFILe is an innovative study which uses a uniquely holistic approach to assess the healthcare needs and preferences of chronically ill. The patient profiles resulting from this project must be tested in practice to investigate the effects of tailored management on patient experience, population health and costs.

  9. Minimal model quantification of pulmonary gas exchange in intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karbing, Dan Stieper; Kjærgaard, Søren; Andreassen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    of both oxygen and carbon dioxide. Three models of varying complexity were compared for their ability to fit measured data from intensive care patients and to provide adequate description of patients' gas exchange abnormalities. Pairwise F-tests showed that a two parameter model provided superior fit......Mathematical models are required to describe pulmonary gas exchange. The challenge remains to find models which are complex enough to describe physiology and simple enough for clinical practice. This study aimed at finding the necessary 'minimal' modeling complexity to represent the gas exchange...... to patient data compared to a shunt only model (p...

  10. Observations and modelling of line intensity ratios of OV multiplet lines for ? - ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Rachlew-Källne, E.; Hörling, P.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    1996-09-01

    Line intensity ratios of OV multiplet lines for the 0953-4075/29/18/019/img3 (J = 2,1,0) transitions are studied using a collisional radiative model and the results are compared with measurements from the reversed field pinch experiments Extrap T1 and T2 at KTH. The measured line intensity ratios deviate from the predictions of the model and the possible causes for the discrepancy are discussed with regard to errors in rate coefficients and non-quasi-steady state.

  11. The effect of playing formation on high-intensity running and technical profiles in English FA Premier League soccer matches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Paul S; Carling, Chris; Archer, Dave

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of playing formation on high-intensity running and technical performance during elite soccer matches. Twenty English FA Premier League games were analysed using a multiple-camera computerized tracking system (n = 153 players). Overall ball possessio...

  12. Acute toxicity profile of craniospinal irradiation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy in children with medulloblastoma: A prospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.C.; Kusters, J.M.; Gidding, C.E.M.; Schieving, J.H.; Lindert, E.J. van; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Janssens, G.O.R.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To report on the acute toxicity in children with medulloblastoma undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with daily intrafractionally modulated junctions. METHODS: Newly diagnosed patients, aged 3-21, with standard-risk (SR) or high-risk (HR) medulloblastoma were

  13. Full-field feature profile models in process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavecz, Terrence E.

    2005-05-01

    Most process window analysis applications are capable of deriving the functional focus-dose workspace available to any set of device specifications. Previous work in this area has concentrated on calculating the superpositioned optimum operating points of various combinations of feature orientations or feature types. These studies invariably result in an average performance calculation that is biased by the impact of the substrate, reticle and exposure tool contributed perturbations. Many SEM's and optical metrology tools now provide full-feature profile information for multiple points in the exposure field. The inclusion of field spatial information into the process window analysis results in a calculation of greater accuracy and process understanding because now the capabilities of each exposure tool can be individually modeled and optimized. Such an analysis provides the added benefit that after the exposure tool is characterized, it's process perturbations can be removed from the analysis to provide greater understanding of the true process performance. Process window variables are shown to vary significantly across the exposure field of the scanner. Evaluating the depth-of-focus and optimum focus-dose at each point in the exposure field yields additional information on the imaging response of the reticle and scan-linearity of the exposure tool's reticle stage. The optimal focus response of the reticle is then removed from a full wafer exposure and the results are modeled to obtain a true process response and performance.

  14. Degradation kinetic modelling of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remini, Hocine; Mertz, Christian; Belbahi, Amine; Achir, Nawel; Dornier, Manuel; Madani, Khodir

    2015-04-15

    The stability of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) during one month of storage was investigated at 4-37 °C. The effects of ascorbic acid fortification (at 100, 200 mg L(-1)) and deaeration, temperature/time storage on the kinetic behaviour were determined. Ascorbic acid was monitored by HPLC-DAD and colour intensity by spectrophotometric measurements. Degradation kinetics were best fitted by first-order reaction models for both ascorbic acid and colour intensity. Three models (Arrhenius, Eyring and Ball) were used to assess the temperature-dependent degradation. Following the Arrhenius model, activation energies were ranged from 51 to 135 kJ mol(-1) for ascorbic acid and from 49 to 99 kJ mol(-1) for colour intensity. The effect of storage temperature and deaeration are the most influent factors on kinetics degradation, while the fortification revealed no significant effect on ascorbic acid content and colour intensity.

  15. Modeling culture profiles of the heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Neissa M; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2006-01-01

    Heterocyst differentiation is a unique feature of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria, potentially important for photobiological hydrogen production. Despite the significant advances in genetic investigation on heterocyst differentiation, there were no quantitative culture-level models that describe the effects of cellular activities and cultivation conditions on the heterocyst differentiation. Such a model was developed in this study, incorporating photosynthetic growth of vegetative cells, heterocyst differentiation, self-shading effect on light penetration, and nitrogen fixation. The model parameters were determined by fitting experimental results from the growth of the heterocystous cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae CCAP 1403/13f in media without and with different nitrate concentrations and under continuous illumination of white light at different light intensities (2, 5, 10, 17, 20 and 50 microE m-2 s-1). The model describes the experimental profiles well and gives reasonable predictions even for the transition of growth from that on external N source to that via nitrogen fixation, responding to the change in external N concentrations. The significance and implications of the best-fit values of the model parameters are discussed.

  16. Flatness and Profile Integration Control Model for Tandem Cold Mills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Using the effective matrix methods of flatness and profile control synthetically, the flatness and profile in- tegration control scheme for tandem cold mills is built in order to increase flatness and profile control precision of tan- dem cold mills. Corresponding control strategies are adopted for various control objectives of different stands and the coordination control strategies of various stands are given, which makes the on-line flatness control cooperate with on-line profile control and implements the parallel control of different stands. According to the measured flatness and profile data of some 1550 mm tandem cold mills, the control scheme is verified and the result indicates that the scheme has high flatness and profile control precision with steady and reliable control process. A new way and method is supplied for researching shade control of tandem cold mills.

  17. Intense precipitation extremes in a warmer climate: results from CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    scoccimarro, enrico; gualdi, silvio; bellucci, alessio; zampieri, matteo; navarra, antonio

    2013-04-01

    In this work the authors investigate possible changes in the intensity of extreme precipitation events under a warmer climate, using the results of a set of 20 climate models taking part to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 effort (CMIP5). Future changes are evaluated as the epoch difference between the last four decades of the 21st and the 20th Century assuming the Representative Concentration Pathway RCP8.5 scenario. As a measure of the intensity associated with extreme precipitation events, we use the difference between the 99th and the 90th percentiles. Despite a slight tendency to underestimate the observed extreme precipitation intensity, the considered CMIP5 models well represent the observed patterns during both summer and winter seasons for the 1997-2005 period. Future changes in average precipitation are consistent with previous findings based on CMIP3 models. CMIP5 models show a projected increase for the end of the twenty-first century of the intensity of the extreme precipitations, particularly pronounced over India, South East Asia, Indonesia and Central Africa during boreal summer, as well as over South America and the southern Africa during boreal winter. These changes are consistent with a strong increase of the column integrated water content availability over the afore mentioned regions.

  18. A point rainfall model and rainfall intensity-duration-frequency analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Chul-Sang; Jung, Kwang-Sik [Korea University, Jochiwon(Korea); Kim, Nam-Won [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, Koyang(Korea)

    2001-12-31

    This study proposes a theoretical methodology for deriving a rainfall intensity-duration-frequency(I-D-F) curve using a simple rectangular pulses Poisson process model. As the I-D-F curve derived by considering the model structure is dependent on the rainfall model parameters estimated using the observed first and second order statistics, it becomes less sensitive to the unusual rainfall events than that derived using the annual maxima rainfall series. This study has been applied to the rainfall data at Seoul and Incheon stations to check its applicability by comparing the two I-D-F curves from the model and the data. The results obtained are as followed. (1) As the duration becomes longer, the overlap probability increases significantly. However, its contribution to the rainfall intensity decreases a little. (2) When considering the overlap of each rainfall event, especially for large duration and return period, we could see obvious increases of rainfall intensity. This result is normal as the rainfall intensity is calculated by considering both the overlap probability and return period. Also, the overlap effect for Seoul station is found much higher than that for Incheon station, which is mainly due to the different overlap probabilities calculated using different rainfall model parameter sets. (3) As the rectangular pulses Poisson processes model used in this study cannot consider the clustering characteristics of rainfall, the derived I-D-F curves show less rainfall intensities than those from the annual maxima series. However, overall pattern of both I-D-F curves are found very similar, and the difference is believed to be overcome by use of a rainfall model with the clustering consideration. (author). 14 refs., 6 tabs., 2 figs.

  19. A Statistical Cyclone Intensity Prediction (SCIP) model for the Bay of Bengal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Kotal; S K Roy Bhowmik; P K Kundu; Ananda Kumar Das

    2008-04-01

    A statistical model for predicting the intensity of tropical cyclones in the Bay of Bengal has been proposed. The model is developed applying multiple linear regression technique. The model parameters are determined from the database of 62 cyclones that developed over the Bay of Bengal during the period 1981–2000. The parameters selected as predictors are: initial storm intensity, intensity changes during past 12 hours, storm motion speed, initial storm latitude position, vertical wind shear averaged along the storm track, vorticity at 850 hPa, Divergence at 200 hPa and sea surface temperature (SST). When the model is tested with the dependent samples of 62 cyclones, the forecast skill of the model for forecasts up to 72 hours is found to be reasonably good. The average absolute errors (AAE) are less than 10 knots for forecasts up to 36 hours and maximum forecast error of order 14 knots occurs at 60 hours and 72 hours. When the model is tested with the independent samples of 15 cyclones (during 2000 to 2007), the AAE is found to be less than 13 knots (ranging from 5.1 to 12.5 knots) for forecast up to 72 hours. The model is found to be superior to the empirical model proposed by Roy Bhowmik et al (2007) for the Bay of Bengal.

  20. Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Ilaria; Curci, Gabriele; Falasca, Serena; Ferrero, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys Ilaria Gandolfi1,2, Gabriele Curci1,2, Serena Falasca1,2, Luca Ferrero3 1 Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 2 Center of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 3 POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126, Milan, Italy Last decades were characterized by a growing interest in aerosols: mainly for their effect on human health and on the energy balance of solar and planetary radiation, thus their role in climate change. In this study, we analyze the evolution of vertical profile of black carbon (BC) through tethered balloon observations and chemistry-transport modelling. Black carbon is regarded as the second most important anthropogenic climate forcing agent and its concentration varies significantly depending on the altitude and the sources on the territory. In winter of 2010 University Of Milan Bicocca conducted three intensive measurements campaigns over three Italian basin valleys (Terni, Po Valley, Passiria Valley). The choice of the valleys was made taking into consideration the orography and the river basin structure. The measurement campaign was based on a helium-filled tethered balloon, on which the instrumentation for the analysis has been mounted; the instrumentation consisted on a meteorological station, an OPC, a cascade impactor and a micro-Aethalometer. Subsequently, at University of L'Aquila simulations were produced to help interpretation of these vertical aerosol profiles (mass, composition and distribution) and related optical properties (scattering, absorption) using a chemistry-transport model (WRF-CHIMERE) at high horizontal resolution (1 km). The analysis focused primarily on the calculation of the heating rate and of the Direct Radiative Effect (DRE), and on the analysis of the

  1. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.;

    1987-01-01

    The temperature profiles produced by various heating profiles are calculated from local heat transport models. The models take the heat flux to be the sum of heat diffusion and a non-diffusive heat flow, consistent with local measurements of heat transport. Two models are developed analytically i...

  2. Thunderstorm formation and intensity determined from a three-dimensional subsynoptic-scale trajectory model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1979-01-01

    A diagnostic trajectory model was used to provide a better understanding of the interrelationships between synoptic and convective-scale systems. Results indicate that synoptic scale systems exert a strong controlling influence over the formation and intensity of small mesoscale convective circulations.

  3. Use of a Modified Vector Model for Odor Intensity Prediction of Odorant Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchun Yan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Odor intensity (OI indicates the perceived intensity of an odor by the human nose, and it is usually rated by specialized assessors. In order to avoid restrictions on assessor participation in OI evaluations, the Vector Model which calculates the OI of a mixture as the vector sum of its unmixed components’ odor intensities was modified. Based on a detected linear relation between the OI and the logarithm of odor activity value (OAV—a ratio between chemical concentration and odor threshold of individual odorants, OI of the unmixed component was replaced with its corresponding logarithm of OAV. The interaction coefficient (cosα which represented the degree of interaction between two constituents was also measured in a simplified way. Through a series of odor intensity matching tests for binary, ternary and quaternary odor mixtures, the modified Vector Model provided an effective way of relating the OI of an odor mixture with the lnOAV values of its constituents. Thus, OI of an odor mixture could be directly predicted by employing the modified Vector Model after usual quantitative analysis. Besides, it was considered that the modified Vector Model was applicable for odor mixtures which consisted of odorants with the same chemical functional groups and similar molecular structures.

  4. Forest Management and Forest Sector of Russia: Conditions and Ways for Transition to Intensive Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Moiseev

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The causes for protracted crisis at the system of forest management and development of forest sector in Russia are discussed in the paper and recommendations for recovery from recession have been done based on transition from extensive to the intensive model of development.

  5. Optimal Gaussian Mixture Models of Tissue Intensities in Brain MRI of Patients with Multiple-Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yiming; Shah, Mohak; Francis, Simon; Arnold, Douglas L.; Arbel, Tal; Collins, D. Louis

    Brain tissue segmentation is important in studying markers in human brain Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of patients with diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Parametric segmentation approaches typically assume unimodal Gaussian distributions on MRI intensities of individual tissue classes, even in applications on multi-spectral images. However, this assumption has not been rigorously verified especially in the context of MS. In this work, we evaluate the local MRI intensities of both healthy and diseased brain tissues of 21 multi-spectral MRIs (63 volumes in total) of MS patients for adherence to this assumption. We show that the tissue intensities are not uniform across the brain and vary across (anatomical) regions of the brain. Consequently, we show that Gaussian mixtures can better model the multi-spectral intensities. We utilize an Expectation Maximization (EM) based approach to learn the models along with a symmetric Jeffreys divergence criterion to study differences in intensity distributions. The effects of these findings are also empirically verified on automatic segmentation of brains with MS.

  6. Driving the Model to Its Limit: Profile Likelihood Based Model Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwald, Tim; Hass, Helge; Steiert, Bernhard; Vanlier, Joep; Engesser, Raphael; Raue, Andreas; Kipkeew, Friederike; Bock, Hans H; Kaschek, Daniel; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In systems biology, one of the major tasks is to tailor model complexity to information content of the data. A useful model should describe the data and produce well-determined parameter estimates and predictions. Too small of a model will not be able to describe the data whereas a model which is too large tends to overfit measurement errors and does not provide precise predictions. Typically, the model is modified and tuned to fit the data, which often results in an oversized model. To restore the balance between model complexity and available measurements, either new data has to be gathered or the model has to be reduced. In this manuscript, we present a data-based method for reducing non-linear models. The profile likelihood is utilised to assess parameter identifiability and designate likely candidates for reduction. Parameter dependencies are analysed along profiles, providing context-dependent suggestions for the type of reduction. We discriminate four distinct scenarios, each associated with a specific model reduction strategy. Iterating the presented procedure eventually results in an identifiable model, which is capable of generating precise and testable predictions. Source code for all toy examples is provided within the freely available, open-source modelling environment Data2Dynamics based on MATLAB available at http://www.data2dynamics.org/, as well as the R packages dMod/cOde available at https://github.com/dkaschek/. Moreover, the concept is generally applicable and can readily be used with any software capable of calculating the profile likelihood.

  7. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Hung T. [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Case, David A., E-mail: case@biomaps.rutgers.edu [BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States)

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+}) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein–Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko–Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  8. pHMM-tree: phylogeny of profile hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Luyang; Zhang, Han; Huo, Xueting; Yang, Yasong; Li, Xueqiong; Yin, Yanbin

    2017-04-01

    Protein families are often represented by profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs). Homology between two distant protein families can be determined by comparing the pHMMs. Here we explored the idea of building a phylogeny of protein families using the distance matrix of their pHMMs. We developed a new software and web server (pHMM-tree) to allow four major types of inputs: (i) multiple pHMM files, (ii) multiple aligned protein sequence files, (iii) mixture of pHMM and aligned sequence files and (iv) unaligned protein sequences in a single file. The output will be a pHMM phylogeny of different protein families delineating their relationships. We have applied pHMM-tree to build phylogenies for CAZyme (carbohydrate active enzyme) classes and Pfam clans, which attested its usefulness in the phylogenetic representation of the evolutionary relationship among distant protein families. This software is implemented in C/C ++ and is available at http://cys.bios.niu.edu/pHMM-Tree/source/. zhanghan@nankai.edu.cn or yyin@niu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Modelling Variable Fire Severity in Boreal Forests: Effects of Fire Intensity and Stand Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelajauregui, Yosune; Cumming, Steven G; Gauthier, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming clear that fires in boreal forests are not uniformly stand-replacing. On the contrary, marked variation in fire severity, measured as tree mortality, has been found both within and among individual fires. It is important to understand the conditions under which this variation can arise. We integrated forest sample plot data, tree allometries and historical forest fire records within a diameter class-structured model of 1.0 ha patches of mono-specific black spruce and jack pine stands in northern Québec, Canada. The model accounts for crown fire initiation and vertical spread into the canopy. It uses empirical relations between fire intensity, scorch height, the percent of crown scorched and tree mortality to simulate fire severity, specifically the percent reduction in patch basal area due to fire-caused mortality. A random forest and a regression tree analysis of a large random sample of simulated fires were used to test for an effect of fireline intensity, stand structure, species composition and pyrogeographic regions on resultant severity. Severity increased with intensity and was lower for jack pine stands. The proportion of simulated fires that burned at high severity (e.g. >75% reduction in patch basal area) was 0.80 for black spruce and 0.11 for jack pine. We identified thresholds in intensity below which there was a marked sensitivity of simulated fire severity to stand structure, and to interactions between intensity and structure. We found no evidence for a residual effect of pyrogeographic region on simulated severity, after the effects of stand structure and species composition were accounted for. The model presented here was able to produce variation in fire severity under a range of fire intensity conditions. This suggests that variation in stand structure is one of the factors causing the observed variation in boreal fire severity.

  10. Impact of distribution intensity on perceived quality, brand awareness and brand loyality - structural model

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan-Damir Anić; Edo Rajh

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study was to determine the impacts of distribution intensity on perceived quality and brand awareness, and to analyze the effects of perceived quality and brand awareness on brand loyalty. A structural equation model was used to identify the size and the direction of proposed relationships. The model was tested on a sample of 956 students using three brand categories in the manufacturing industry and three brand categories in the service industry. The proposed hy...

  11. Effect of a 10 week high intensity interval training supplemented with green tea on lipid profiles and body composition in overweight women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghasemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Increasing the intensity of physical activity along with regular consumption of green tea can be effective on energy metabolism, weight, and body fat content. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of a 10 week. .high intensity interval training supplemented with consuming green tea .on lipid profiles and body composition in overweight women. Materials and Methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 30 overweight women were purposefully and randomly chosen and divided into 3 equal groups. Training group performed training programs including 3 sessions per week at maximum intensity of 85-95% heart rate and the supplement group consumed 3 tablets of green tea (500 mg daily for 10 weeks High intensity interval training and the supplement group both underwent intervention. Blood samples were collected before and after the intervention in fasting state. Finally,the obtained data was fed into SPSS software (V. 19 and analyzed using paired t test, covariance analysis, one way-variance analysis, and Bonferroni post- hoc tests at the significant level of P<0.05. Results: After the period of high intensity interval training and green tea supplementation triglycerides (P=0.001, LDL (P=0.02, weight (P=0.0001, body mass index (P=0.0001, and body fat percentage (P=0.0001 in all the groups and total cholesterol (P=0.01 decreased ,but  HDL (P=0.01 increased in high intensity interval training plus supplements and high intensity interval training plus placebo groups. However, these two indicators did not differ significantly in the supplement group (P=0.23 and P=0.06, respectively. Furthermore, systolic (P= 0.55 and diastolic (P= 0.15 blood pressure and waist-to-hip ratio (P= 0.08 did not change after intervention in all the groups. Conclusion: It was found that consumption of green tea along with performing of high intensity interval training can be effective in improving of cardiovascular risk factors in overweight women.

  12. Time-variant modelling of heart rate responses to exercise intensity during road cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefever, Joris; Berckmans, Daniel; Aerts, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if heart rate responses to training intensity during road cycling could be modelled with compact time-variant mathematical model structures. The model performance was evaluated in terms of model order (complexity), number of inputs and parameter estimation methods used (time-invariant vs. time-variant). Thirteen male cyclists performed two identical cycling tests of 27 km on the road. Uphill sections were introduced to induce dynamic variations in heart rate. The heart rate and training intensity, represented by power output and road inclination, were measured in real-time. Taking only power as system input allowed to explain the variations in heart rate in an accurate way R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, since adding the road inclination as an additional input did not significantly improve the modelling performance R2 T = 0.87 ± 0.08, P = 0.32. Furthermore, we demonstrated that models with first-order dynamics accurately describes the heart rate responses to power variations R2 T = 0.86 ± 0.08, but that more complex second-order model structures R2 T = 0.88 ± 0.08 were significantly better than the first-order model structures (P = 0.028). Finally, the heart rate dynamics appeared to be time-variant, since the time-variant model structures R2 T = 0.89 ± 0.07 were significantly better than the time-invariant model structures R2 T = 0.84 ± 0.08, P = 0.0002. So, compact time-variant second-order model structures could be used to model the heart rate response to training intensity as a basis for training optimisation.

  13. Muscle wasting and the temporal gene expression pattern in a novel rat intensive care unit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llano-Diez Monica

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM or critical illness myopathy (CIM is frequently observed in intensive care unit (ICU patients. To elucidate duration-dependent effects of the ICU intervention on molecular and functional networks that control the muscle wasting and weakness associated with AQM, a gene expression profile was analyzed at time points varying from 6 hours to 14 days in a unique experimental rat model mimicking ICU conditions, i.e., post-synaptically paralyzed, mechanically ventilated and extensively monitored animals. Results During the observation period, 1583 genes were significantly up- or down-regulated by factors of two or greater. A significant temporal gene expression pattern was constructed at short (6 h-4 days, intermediate (5-8 days and long (9-14 days durations. A striking early and maintained up-regulation (6 h-14d of muscle atrogenes (muscle ring-finger 1/tripartite motif-containing 63 and F-box protein 32/atrogin-1 was observed, followed by an up-regulation of the proteolytic systems at intermediate and long durations (5-14d. Oxidative stress response genes and genes that take part in amino acid catabolism, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, muscle development, and protein synthesis together with myogenic factors were significantly up-regulated from 5 to 14 days. At 9-14 d, genes involved in immune response and the caspase cascade were up-regulated. At 5-14d, genes related to contractile (myosin heavy chain and myosin binding protein C, regulatory (troponin, tropomyosin, developmental, caveolin-3, extracellular matrix, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, cytoskeleton/sarcomere regulation and mitochondrial proteins were down-regulated. An activation of genes related to muscle growth and new muscle fiber formation (increase of myogenic factors and JunB and down-regulation of myostatin and up-regulation of genes that code protein synthesis and translation factors were found from 5 to 14 days. Conclusions Novel

  14. Intensity Correlation Function and Associated Relaxation Time of a Saturation Laser Model with Correlated Noises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ping; CHEN Shi-Bo; MEI Dong-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the intensity correlation function C(s) and its associated relaxation time Tc for a saturation model of single-mode laser with correlated noises.The expressions of C(s) and Tc are derived by means of the projection operator method,and effects of correlations between an additive noise and a multiplicative noise are discussed by numerical calculation.Based on the calculated results,it is found that the correlation strength λ between the additive noise and the multiplicative noise can enhance the fluctuation decay of the laser intensity.

  15. Transcriptomic profiling of soybean in response to high-intensity UV-B irradiation reveals stress defense signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Young Yoon

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere has led to a dramatic spike in ultraviolet B (UV-B intensity and increased UV-B light levels. The direct absorption of high-intensity UV-B induces complex abiotic stresses in plants, including excessive light exposure, heat, and dehydration. However, UV-B stress signaling mechanisms in plants including soybean (Glycine max [L.] remain poorly understood. Here, we surveyed the overall transcriptional responses of two soybean genotypes, UV-B-sensitive Cheongja 3 and UV-B-resistant Buseok, to continuous UV-B irradiation for 0 (control, 0.5, and 6 h using RNA-seq analysis. Homology analysis using UV-B-related genes from Arabidopsis thaliana revealed differentially expressed genes (DEGs likely involved in UV-B stress responses. Functional classification of the DEGs showed that the categories of immune response, stress defense signaling, and reactive oxygen species (ROS metabolism were over-represented. UV-B-resistant Buseok utilized phosphatidic acid-dependent signaling pathways (based on subsequent reactions of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase rather than phospholipase D in response to UV-B exposure at high fluence rates, and genes involved in its downstream pathways, such as ABA signaling, mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, and ROS overproduction, were upregulated in this genotype. In addition, the DEGs for TIR-NBS-LRR and heat shock proteins are positively activated. These results suggest that defense mechanisms against UV-B stress at high fluence rates are separate from the photomorphogenic responses utilized by plants to adapt to low-level UV light. Our study provides valuable information for deep understanding of UV-B stress defense mechanisms and for the development of resistant soybean genotypes that survive under high-intensity UV-B stress.

  16. An intensity-dependent quantum Rabi model: Spectrum, SUSY partner and optical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-Lara, B M

    2014-01-01

    We study an intensity-dependent quantum Rabi model that can be written in terms of SU(1,1) group elements and is related to the Buck-Sukumar model for the Bargmann parameter $k=1/2$. The spectrum seems to present avoiding crossings for all valid parameter sets and, thus, may be integrable. For a degenerate qubit, the model is soluble and we construct an unbroken supersymmetric parter for it. We discuss the classical simulation of the general model in photonic lattices and show that it presents quasi-periodic reconstruction for a given initial state and parameter set.

  17. Nonfermentative gram-negative microorganisms isolated from intensive care units and their resistance profiles in a training and research hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Bayındır Bilman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the pathogenic agents, which have been isolated in ICUs and determine their antimicrobial susceptibility in the first two years of our hospital. Methods: A total 368 strains (194 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 174 Acinetobacter baumannii that were considered as an infectious agent and isolated from different clinical samples of hospitalized patients in intensive care units between January 2011 and December 2012 were included in the study. Conventional methods and automatized system were used for the identification and antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates with according to guidelines of Clinical and Laboratory Standarts Institute (CLSI. Imipenem and meropenem resistance has been confirmed by the E test method and interpreted according to CLSI. Results: Resistance rates of P.aeruginosa strains were as follows: Meropenem 35%, imipenem 36%, cefepim 21%, ceftazidim and ciprofloxacin 29%, gentamicin 33%, piperacilin/tazobactam 35%, amikacin 37%. Resistance rates of A.baumannii strains were as follows: Meropenem 85%, imipenem 87%, amikacin 22%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole 25%, gentamicin 46%, piperacilin/tazobactam 54%, ampicilin/sulbactam 59%, cefepim 64%, ciprofloxacin 71%, ceftazidim 83%. Conclusion: Increased carbapenem resistance in our ICUs demonstrates importance of antimicrobial susceptibility tests. The antibiotic susceptibility tests should be surveyed continuously to avoid the spread of intensive care unit isolates carrying high level antibiotic resistance for better achievement of treatment regimens. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 391-396

  18. Profile of Patients with Acute Poisoning and Factors Effecting Prognosis: A Retrospective Analysis in the Intensive Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Toptaş

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse demographic and epidemiologic characteristics, clinical course, laboratory results and prognosis of patients who were admitted to Haseki Training and Research Hospital Intensive Care Unit due to intoxication between 24.11 2007 and 21.02.2013. Methods: We evaluated age, gender, types of intoxication (accident, suicide, etiology, length of stay, mortality rate, duration of mechanical ventilation, and blood pressure, heart rate and symptoms at the time of admission. Patients who took multiple drugs were recorded. Liver and kidney function tests, blood glucose, complete blood count parameters, electrolytes and arterial blood gas values at the time of admission were evaluated. Results: A total of 59 cases of intoxication were studied. 59.7% of patients were male, 42.4% were female. The mean age was 32±13 years. 86.4% of cases occurred due to suicide attempts and 13.6%, accidentally. In our study, it was found that the most common intoxication agents were paracetamol and amitriptyline, and the most common cause of death was methyl alcohol intoxication. Conclusion: Our results showed that a significant portion of the intoxication cases admitted to the intensive care unit were young adults who attempted suicide by overdosing on drugs. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 29-33

  19. Analysis of Internet Usage Intensity in Iraq: An Ordered Logit Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almas Heshmati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Intensity of Internet use is significantly influenced by government policies, people’s levels of income, education, employment and general development and economic conditions. Iraq has very low Internet usage levels compared to the region and the world. This study uses an ordered logit model to analyse the intensity of Internet use in Iraq. The results showed that economic reasons (internet cost and income level were key cause for low level usage intensity rates. About 68% of the population revealed that Internet access at homes is costly. Thus, it is no wonder that Internet cafés is the most commonly used mode of Internet use followed by broadband and dial-up connections. Iraq has to develop proper strategies to enhance the rate of Internet use in the country. These strategies need to focus on decreasing internet access prices, increasing awareness about the importance of the technology and internet education in schools and universities.

  20. A Market Model for Evaluating Technologies That Impact Critical-Material Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ananth V.; Vedantam, Aditya

    2016-07-01

    A recent Critical Materials Strategy report highlighted the supply chain risk associated with neodymium and dysprosium, which are used in the manufacturing of neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets (PM). In response, the Critical Materials Institute is developing innovative strategies to increase and diversify primary production, develop substitutes, reduce material intensity and recycle critical materials. Our goal in this paper is to propose an economic model to quantify the impact of one of these strategies, material intensity reduction. Technologies that reduce material intensity impact the economics of magnet manufacturing in multiple ways because of: (1) the lower quantity of critical material required per unit PM, (2) more efficient use of limited supply, and (3) the potential impact on manufacturing cost. However, the net benefit of these technologies to a magnet manufacturer is an outcome of an internal production decision subject to market demand characteristics, availability and resource constraints. Our contribution in this paper shows how a manufacturer's production economics moves from a region of being supply-constrained, to a region enabling the market optimal production quantity, to a region being constrained by resources other than critical materials, as the critical material intensity changes. Key insights for engineers and material scientists are: (1) material intensity reduction can have a significant market impact, (2) benefits to manufacturers are non-linear in the material intensity reduction, (3) there exists a threshold value for material intensity reduction that can be calculated for any target PM application, and (4) there is value for new intellectual property (IP) when existing manufacturing technology is IP-protected.

  1. Robust intensification of hydroclimatic intensity over East Asia from multi-model ensemble regional projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Soon; Choi, Yeon-Woo; Ahn, Joong-Bae

    2017-08-01

    This study assesses the hydroclimatic response to global warming over East Asia from multi-model ensemble regional projections. Four different regional climate models (RCMs), namely, WRF, HadGEM3-RA, RegCM4, and GRIMs, are used for dynamical downscaling of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model version 2-Atmosphere and Ocean (HadGEM2-AO) global projections forced by the representative concentration pathway (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) scenarios. Annual mean precipitation, hydroclimatic intensity index (HY-INT), and wet and dry extreme indices are analyzed to identify the robust behavior of hydroclimatic change in response to enhanced emission scenarios using high-resolution (12.5 km) and long-term (1981-2100) daily precipitation. Ensemble projections exhibit increased hydroclimatic intensity across the entire domain and under both the RCP scenarios. However, a geographical pattern with predominantly intensified HY-INT does not fully emerge in the mean precipitation change because HY-INT is tied to the changes in the precipitation characteristics rather than to those in the precipitation amount. All projections show an enhancement of high intensity precipitation and a reduction of weak intensity precipitation, which lead to a possible shift in hydroclimatic regime prone to an increase of both wet and dry extremes. In general, projections forced by the RCP8.5 scenario tend to produce a much stronger response than do those by the RCP4.5 scenario. However, the temperature increase under the RCP4.5 scenario is sufficiently large to induce significant changes in hydroclimatic intensity, despite the relatively uncertain change in mean precipitation. Likewise, the forced responses of HY-INT and the two extreme indices are more robust than that of mean precipitation, in terms of the statistical significance and model agreement.

  2. Robust intensification of hydroclimatic intensity over East Asia from multi-model ensemble regional projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eun-Soon; Choi, Yeon-Woo; Ahn, Joong-Bae

    2016-06-01

    This study assesses the hydroclimatic response to global warming over East Asia from multi-model ensemble regional projections. Four different regional climate models (RCMs), namely, WRF, HadGEM3-RA, RegCM4, and GRIMs, are used for dynamical downscaling of the Hadley Centre Global Environmental Model version 2-Atmosphere and Ocean (HadGEM2-AO) global projections forced by the representative concentration pathway (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) scenarios. Annual mean precipitation, hydroclimatic intensity index (HY-INT), and wet and dry extreme indices are analyzed to identify the robust behavior of hydroclimatic change in response to enhanced emission scenarios using high-resolution (12.5 km) and long-term (1981-2100) daily precipitation. Ensemble projections exhibit increased hydroclimatic intensity across the entire domain and under both the RCP scenarios. However, a geographical pattern with predominantly intensified HY-INT does not fully emerge in the mean precipitation change because HY-INT is tied to the changes in the precipitation characteristics rather than to those in the precipitation amount. All projections show an enhancement of high intensity precipitation and a reduction of weak intensity precipitation, which lead to a possible shift in hydroclimatic regime prone to an increase of both wet and dry extremes. In general, projections forced by the RCP8.5 scenario tend to produce a much stronger response than do those by the RCP4.5 scenario. However, the temperature increase under the RCP4.5 scenario is sufficiently large to induce significant changes in hydroclimatic intensity, despite the relatively uncertain change in mean precipitation. Likewise, the forced responses of HY-INT and the two extreme indices are more robust than that of mean precipitation, in terms of the statistical significance and model agreement.

  3. Complex data modeling and computationally intensive methods for estimation and prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Secchi, Piercesare; Advances in Complex Data Modeling and Computational Methods in Statistics

    2015-01-01

    The book is addressed to statisticians working at the forefront of the statistical analysis of complex and high dimensional data and offers a wide variety of statistical models, computer intensive methods and applications: network inference from the analysis of high dimensional data; new developments for bootstrapping complex data; regression analysis for measuring the downsize reputational risk; statistical methods for research on the human genome dynamics; inference in non-euclidean settings and for shape data; Bayesian methods for reliability and the analysis of complex data; methodological issues in using administrative data for clinical and epidemiological research; regression models with differential regularization; geostatistical methods for mobility analysis through mobile phone data exploration. This volume is the result of a careful selection among the contributions presented at the conference "S.Co.2013: Complex data modeling and computationally intensive methods for estimation and prediction" held...

  4. Experimental verification of a model describing the intensity distribution from a single mode optical fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, Erik A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Puckett, Anthony D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [UCSD

    2011-01-24

    The intensity distribution of a transmission from a single mode optical fiber is often approximated using a Gaussian-shaped curve. While this approximation is useful for some applications such as fiber alignment, it does not accurately describe transmission behavior off the axis of propagation. In this paper, another model is presented, which describes the intensity distribution of the transmission from a single mode optical fiber. A simple experimental setup is used to verify the model's accuracy, and agreement between model and experiment is established both on and off the axis of propagation. Displacement sensor designs based on the extrinsic optical lever architecture are presented. The behavior of the transmission off the axis of propagation dictates the performance of sensor architectures where large lateral offsets (25-1500 {micro}m) exist between transmitting and receiving fibers. The practical implications of modeling accuracy over this lateral offset region are discussed as they relate to the development of high-performance intensity modulated optical displacement sensors. In particular, the sensitivity, linearity, resolution, and displacement range of a sensor are functions of the relative positioning of the sensor's transmitting and receiving fibers. Sensor architectures with high combinations of sensitivity and displacement range are discussed. It is concluded that the utility of the accurate model is in its predicative capability and that this research could lead to an improved methodology for high-performance sensor design.

  5. Constraining snow model choices in a transitional snow environment with intensive observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayand, N. E.; Massmann, A.; Clark, M. P.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of existing energy balance snow models exhibits a large spread in the simulated snow water equivalent, snow depth, albedo, and surface temperature. Indentifying poor model representations of physical processes within intercomparison studies is difficult due to multiple differences between models as well as non-orthogonal metrics used. Efforts to overcome these obstacles for model development have focused on a modeling framework that allows multiple representations of each physical process within one structure. However, there still exists a need for snow study sites within complex terrain that observe enough model states and fluxes to constrain model choices. In this study we focus on an intensive snow observational site located in the maritime-transitional snow climate of Snoqualmie Pass WA (Figure 1). The transitional zone has been previously identified as a difficult climate to simulate snow processes; therefore, it represents an ideal model-vetting site. From two water years of intensive observational data, we have learned that a more honest comparison with observations requires that the modeled states or fluxes be as similar to the spatial and temporal domain of the instrument, even if it means changing the model to match what is being observed. For example, 24-hour snow board observations do not capture compaction of the underlying snow; therefore, a modeled "snow board" was created that only includes new snow accumulation and new snow compaction. We extend this method of selective model validation to all available Snoqualmie observations to constrain model choices within the Structure for Understanding Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA) framework. Our end goal is to provide a more rigorous and systematic method for diagnosing problems within snow models at a site given numerous snow observations.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling in an in Vitro Model of Angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, Jeanne; Mehraban, Fuad; Ingle, Gladys; Xin, Xiaohua; Bryant, Juliet E.; Vehar, Gordon; Schoenfeld, Jill; Grimaldi, Chrisopher J.; Peale, Franklin; Draksharapu, Aparna; Lewin, David A.; Gerritsen, Mary E.

    2000-01-01

    In the present study we have used a novel, comprehensive mRNA profiling technique (GeneCalling) for determining differential gene expression profiles of human endothelial cells undergoing differentiation into tubelike structures. One hundred fifteen cDNA fragments were identified and shown to represent 90 distinct genes. Although some of the genes identified have previously been implicated in angiogenesis, potential roles for many new genes, including OX-40, white protein homolog, KIAA0188, a...

  7. Temporal and spatial profiles of emission intensities in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulse: Experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Cheng; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shen, Yuan [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Weidong [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Saint Peter' s University, Jersey City, New Jersey 07306 (United States); Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Naidis, George V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-28

    A needle-circular electrode structure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulsed power is studied. Spatially resolved emission results show that the emission intensity of He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) line decreases monotonically along the axial direction, while those of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}), N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}∑{sup +}{sub u}), and O(3p{sup 5}P) reach their maxima at 3 cm, 2.6 cm, and 1.4 cm, respectively. The plasma plume of the four species shows different characteristics: The N{sub 2} emission plume travels at a fast speed along the entire plasma jet; the N{sub 2}{sup +} emission plume is composed of a bright head and relatively weak tail and travels a shorter distance than the N{sub 2} emission plume; the He emission plume travels at a slower speed for only a very short distance; propagation of the O emission plume is not observed. Results of calculation of radiation fluxes emitted by positive streamers propagating along helium plasma jets are presented. It is shown, in agreement with the results of the present experiment and with other available experimental data, that the intensities of radiation of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}) molecules and He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) atoms vary with time (along the plasma jet) quite differently. The factors resulting in this difference are discussed.

  8. The embedded feature model for the interpretation of chromospheric contrast profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, R.; Gebbie, K. B.; Bar, V.

    1977-01-01

    Contrast profiles obtained from chromospheric filtergrams and spectra of bright and dark mottles have to date been interpreted almost exclusively in terms of Becker's cloud model. Here we demonstrate the failure of this model to account in a physically consistent way for the observed contrasts. As an alternative, we introduce an embedded-feature model, restricting our discussion in this paper to stationary features. Our model is then characterized by three independent parameters: the density of absorbing atoms, the geometrical depth, and the profile of the absorption coefficient. An analytic approximation to the contrast resulting from such a model reproduces well the observed behavior of all types of contrast profiles.

  9. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-05-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed within a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions, which allows a comparison of the models with the average wind profile computed in seven stability classes, showing a better agreement than compared to the traditional surface-layer wind profile. The wind profile is measured by combining cup anemometer and lidar observations, showing good agreement at the overlapping heights. The height of the boundary layer, a parameter required for the wind profile models, is estimated under neutral and stable conditions using surface-layer turbulence measurements, and under unstable conditions based on the aerosol backscatter profile from ceilometer observations.

  10. Whole vertebral bone segmentation method with a statistical intensity-shape model based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Shouhei; Fritscher, Karl; Schuler, Benedikt; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni; Schubert, Rainer

    2011-03-01

    An automatic segmentation algorithm for the vertebrae in human body CT images is presented. Especially we focused on constructing and utilizing 4 different statistical intensity-shape combined models for the cervical, upper / lower thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, respectively. For this purpose, two previously reported methods were combined: a deformable model-based initial segmentation method and a statistical shape-intensity model-based precise segmentation method. The former is used as a pre-processing to detect the position and orientation of each vertebra, which determines the initial condition for the latter precise segmentation method. The precise segmentation method needs prior knowledge on both the intensities and the shapes of the objects. After PCA analysis of such shape-intensity expressions obtained from training image sets, vertebrae were parametrically modeled as a linear combination of the principal component vectors. The segmentation of each target vertebra was performed as fitting of this parametric model to the target image by maximum a posteriori estimation, combined with the geodesic active contour method. In the experimental result by using 10 cases, the initial segmentation was successful in 6 cases and only partially failed in 4 cases (2 in the cervical area and 2 in the lumbo-sacral). In the precise segmentation, the mean error distances were 2.078, 1.416, 0.777, 0.939 mm for cervical, upper and lower thoracic, lumbar spines, respectively. In conclusion, our automatic segmentation algorithm for the vertebrae in human body CT images showed a fair performance for cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae.

  11. Analysis and comparison model for measuring tropospheric scintillation intensity for Ku-band frequency in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep JS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study has been based on understanding local propagation signal data distribution characteristics and identifying and predicting the overall impact of significant attenuating factors regarding the propagation path such as impaired propagation for a signal being transmitted. Predicting propagation impairment is important for accurate link budgeting, thereby leading to better communication network system designation. This study has thus used sample data for one year concerning beacon satellite operation in Malaysia from April 2008 to April 2009. Data concerning 12GHz frequency (Ku-band and 40° elevation angle was collected and analysed, obtaining average signal amplitude value, ÷ and also standard deviation ó which is normally measured in dB to obtain long-term scintillation intensity distribution. This analysis showed that scintillation intensity distribution followed Gaussian distribution for long-term data distribution. A prediction model was then selected based on the above; Karasawa,
    ITU-R, Van de Kamp and Otung models were compared to obtain the best prediction model performance for selected data regarding specific meteorological conditions. This study showed that the Karasawa model had the best performance for predicting scintillation intensity for the selected da ta.

  12. Implicit Active Contour Model with Local and Global Intensity Fitting Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozeng Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new active contour model which integrates a local intensity fitting (LIF energy with an auxiliary global intensity fitting (GIF energy. The LIF energy is responsible for attracting the contour toward object boundaries and is dominant near object boundaries, while the GIF energy incorporates global image information to improve the robustness to initialization of the contours. The proposed model not only can provide desirable segmentation results in the presence of intensity inhomogeneity but also allows for more flexible initialization of the contour compared to the RSF and LIF models, and we give a theoretical proof to compute a unique steady state regardless of the initialization; that is, the convergence of the zero-level line is irrespective of the initial function. This means that we can obtain the same zero-level line in the steady state, if we choose the initial function as a bounded function. In particular, our proposed model has the capability of detecting multiple objects or objects with interior holes or blurred edges.

  13. Modelling stock order flows with non-homogeneous intensities from high-frequency data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.; Korolev, Victor Yu.; Zeifman, Alexander I.; Shorgin, Sergey Ya.; Chertok, Andrey V.; Evstafyev, Artem I.; Korchagin, Alexander Yu.

    2013-10-01

    A micro-scale model is proposed for the evolution of such information system as the limit order book in financial markets. Within this model, the flows of orders (claims) are described by doubly stochastic Poisson processes taking account of the stochastic character of intensities of buy and sell orders that determine the price discovery mechanism. The proposed multiplicative model of stochastic intensities makes it possible to analyze the characteristics of the order flows as well as the instantaneous proportion of the forces of buyers and sellers, that is, the imbalance process, without modelling the external information background. The proposed model gives the opportunity to link the micro-scale (high-frequency) dynamics of the limit order book with the macro-scale models of stock price processes of the form of subordinated Wiener processes by means of limit theorems of probability theory and hence, to use the normal variance-mean mixture models of the corresponding heavy-tailed distributions. The approach can be useful in different areas with similar properties (e.g., in plasma physics).

  14. General Laser Intensity Langevin Equation in a Single-Mode Laser Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Sheng-Zhi; CAO Li; WU Da-Jin; YAO Kai-Lun

    2001-01-01

    A two-dimensional single-mode laser model is investigated, with cross-correlations between the real and imaginary parts of the quantum noise as well as the pump noise. The general closed form of the laser intensity Langevin equation (GILE) is obtained under a stable locked phase resulting from the cross-correlation λq between the real and imaginary parts of the quantum noise. Because of the presence of a new term containing λq, we can unify the two opposite intensity Langevin equations which correspond to the two special cases for |λq| → 0 and |λq| → 1 in the GILE. It is expected that the transient and stationary properties of the laser model can be changed qualitatively when λq varies.

  15. Why Do Model Tropical Cyclones Grow Progressively in Size and Decay in Intensity after Reaching Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    TROPICAL CYCLONE RESEARCH REPORT TCRR 2: 1–16 (2015) Meteorological Institute Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich Why do model tropical cyclones ...behaviour of tropical cyclones in the prototype problem for cyclone intensification on an f -plane is examined using a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional...controlling the evolution of size and intensity of a tropical cyclone . It provides also a plausible, and arguably simpler, explanation for the expansion

  16. Modelling of radiation losses for ion acceleration at ultra-high laser intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capdessus Remi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiation losses of charged particles can become important in ultra high intensity laser plasma interaction. This process is described by the radiation back reaction term in the electron equation of motion. This term is implemented in the relativistic particle-in-cell code by using a renormalized Lorentz-Abraham-Dirac model. In the hole boring regime case of laser ion acceleration it is shown that radiation losses results in a decrease of the piston velocity.

  17. Modelling and assessment of urban flood hazards based on rainfall intensity-duration-frequency curves reformation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghazavi, Reza; Moafi Rabori, Ali; Ahadnejad Reveshty, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Estimate design storm based on rainfall intensity–duration–frequency (IDF) curves is an important parameter for hydrologic planning of urban areas. The main aim of this study was to estimate rainfall intensities of Zanjan city watershed based on overall relationship of rainfall IDF curves and appropriate model of hourly rainfall estimation (Sherman method, Ghahreman and Abkhezr method). Hydrologic and hydraulic impacts of rainfall IDF curves change in flood properties was evaluated via Stormw...

  18. How would peak rainfall intensity affect runoff predictions using conceptual water balance models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B.

    2015-06-01

    Most hydrological models use continuous daily precipitation and potential evapotranspiration for streamflow estimation. With the projected increase in mean surface temperature, hydrological processes are set to intensify irrespective of the underlying changes to the mean precipitation. The effect of an increase in rainfall intensity on the long-term water balance is, however, not adequately accounted for in the commonly used hydrological models. This study follows from a previous comparative analysis of a non-stationary daily series of stream flow of a forested watershed (River Rimbaud) in the French Alps (area = 1.478 km2) (1966-2006). Non-stationarity in the recorded stream flow occurred as a result of a severe wild fire in 1990. Two daily models (AWBM and SimHyd) were initially calibrated for each of three distinct phases in relation to the well documented land disturbance. At the daily and monthly time scales, both models performed satisfactorily with the Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency (NSE) varying from 0.77 to 0.92. When aggregated to the annual time scale, both models underestimated the flow by about 22% with a reduced NSE at about 0.71. Exploratory data analysis was undertaken to relate daily peak hourly rainfall intensity to the discrepancy between the observed and modelled daily runoff amount. Preliminary results show that the effect of peak hourly rainfall intensity on runoff prediction is insignificant, and model performance is unlikely to improve when peak daily precipitation is included. Trend analysis indicated that the large decrease of precipitation when daily precipitation amount exceeded 10-20 mm may have contributed greatly to the decrease in stream flow of this forested watershed.

  19. Gyrokinetic modelling of stationary electron and impurity profiles in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Skyman, Andreas; Tegnered, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Particle transport due to Ion Temperature Gradient/Trapped Electron (ITG/TE) mode turbulence is investigated using the gyrokinetic code GENE. Both a reduced quasilinear (QL) treatment and nonlinear (NL) simulations are performed for typical tokamak parameters corresponding to ITG dominated turbulence. A selfconsistent treatment is used, where the stationary local profiles are calculated corresponding to zero particle flux simultaneously for electrons and trace impurities. The scaling of the stationary profiles with magnetic shear, safety factor, electron-to-ion temperature ratio, collisionality, toroidal sheared rotation, triangularity, and elongation is investigated. In addition, the effect of different main ion mass on the zero flux condition is discussed. The electron density gradient can significantly affect the stationary impurity profile scaling. It is therefore expected, that a selfconsistent treatment will yield results more comparable to experimental results for parameter scans where the stationary b...

  20. A NUMERICAL MODEL OF THE LASER LIGHT INTENSITY TRANSVERSAL DISTRIBUTION INTO UNDEFORMED/DEFORMED OPTICAL FIBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula COPĂESCU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary results obtained in developing a numerical model of laser light intensity transversedistribution into undeformed/deformed step index optical fiber are presented. The main purpose ofthe presented preliminary numerical modelling results consists in developing a simple method offiber optical sensors interrogation, especially concerning strain and pressure measurements. It is apotential important matter for aeronautical research and industry because of the more extendeduse of fibre optic sensors in aircraft manufacturing. The developed numerical model relies onsolving the equations of electromagnetic waves propagation into optical fibers by using the finiteelement method technique (FEM. The results of numerical simulation obtained by consideringsingle mode or multimode and various laser wavelengtsh are presented. One importantachievement reported in this paper consists in preliminary experimental results concerning themodification of laser intensity transverse distribution observed for multimode optical fiber with andwithout perpendicular mechanical load. The reported preliminary experimental results confirm tosome extent the predictions of numerical simulations regarding laser intensity distribution underlow and medium transverse mechanical load. One important conclusion of this paper consists inthe future development of fiber optic sensor interrogation techniques based on the reportedpreliminary experimental and numerical simulation results.

  1. A novel generalized DCT-based JND profile based on an elaborate CM-JND model for variable block-sized transforms in monochrome images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Ho; Kim, Munchurl

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a new DCT-based just noticeable difference (JND) profile incorporating the spatial contrast sensitivity function, the luminance adaptation effect, and the contrast masking (CM) effect. The proposed JND profile overcomes two limitations of conventional JND profiles: 1) the CM JND models in the conventional JND profiles employed simple texture complexity metrics, which are not often highly correlated with perceived complexity, especially for unstructured patterns. So, we proposed a new texture complexity metric that considers not only contrast intensity, but also structureness of image patterns, called the structural contrast index. We also newly found out that, as the structural contrast index of a background texture pattern increases, the modulation factors for CM-JND show a bandpass property in frequency. Based on this observation, a new CM-JND is modeled as a function of DCT frequency and the proposed structural contrast index, showing significantly high correlations with measured CM-JND values and 2) while the conventional DCT-based JND profiles are only applicable for specific transform block sizes, our proposed DCT-based JND profile is first designed to be applicable to any size of transform by deriving a new summation effect function, which can also be appropriately applied for quad-tree transform of high efficiency video coding. For the overall performance, the proposed DCT-based JND profile shows more tolerance for distortions with better perceptual quality than other JND profiles under comparison.

  2. The pharmacokinetic profile of synthetic cathinones in a pregnancy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Lauren G; Kochelek, Kerri; Keasling, Robert; Brown, Stacy D; Pond, Brooks B

    2017-09-01

    In recent years, the abuse of synthetic cathinones or 'bath salts' has become a major public health concern. Although these compounds were initially sold legally and labeled "not for human consumption", the 'bath salts' are psychostimulants, with similar structures and pharmacologic mechanisms to cocaine, the amphetamines, and 3,4 methylendioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Molly, or Ecstasy). The reported use of these substances by women of child-bearing age highlights the necessity of studies seeking to delineate risks of prenatal exposure. Three popular drugs of this type are methylone, mephedrone, and 3, 4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV). Unfortunately, there is currently no information available on the teratogenicity of these compounds, or of the extent to which they cross the placenta. As such, the purpose of this study was to examine the pharmacokinetic profile of the 'bath salts' in a pregnancy model. Pregnant mice (E17.5 gestation) were injected intraperitoneally with a cocktail of 5mg/kg methylone, 10mg/kg mephedrone, and 3mg/kg (MDPV) dissolved in sterile saline. Maternal brain, maternal plasma, placenta, and fetal brain were collected at 30s, 1min, 5min, 10min, 15min, 30min, 1h, 2h, 4h, and 8h following injection. Methylone, mephedrone, and MDPV were extracted from tissue by solid phase extraction, and concentrations were determined using a previously validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method. Interestingly, all 3 cathinones reached measurable concentrations in the placenta, as well as the fetal brain; in fact, for MDPV, the maximal concentration (Cmax) was highest in fetal brain, while mephedrone's highest Cmax value was achieved in placenta. Additionally, the total drug exposure for all 3 compounds (as represented by area under the curve, AUC) was higher in fetal matrices (placenta and fetal brain) than in maternal matrices (maternal brain and plasma), and the half-lives for the drugs were longer. Given the extensive

  3. Accurate Modeling of the Spiral Bevel and Hypoid Gear with a New Tooth Profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun-song; ADAYI Xieeryazidan; DING Han

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing with traditional tooth profile of spiral bevel and hypoid gear, it proposed a new tooth profile namely the spherical involute. Firstly, a new theory of forming the spherical involute tooth profile was proposed. Then, this theory was applied to complete parametric derivation of each part of its tooth profile. For enhancing the precision, the SWEEP method used for formation of each part of tooth surface and G1 stitching schema for obtaining a unified tooth surface are put forward and made the application in the accurate modeling. Lastly, owing to the higher accuracy of tooth surface of outputted model, it gave some optimization approaches. Given numerical example about the model can show that this designed gear with spherical involute tooth profile can achieve fast and accurate parametric modeling and provide a foundation for tooth contact analysis (TCA) in digitized design and manufacture.

  4. Average intensity and spreading of partially coherent model beams propagating in a turbulent biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Qiu; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-11-01

    For Gaussian beams with three different partially coherent models, including Gaussian-Schell model (GSM), Laguerre-Gaussian Schell-model (LGSM) and Bessel-Gaussian Schell-model (BGSM) beams propagating through a biological turbulent tissue, the expression of the spatial coherence radius of a spherical wave propagating in a turbulent biological tissue, and the average intensity and beam spreading for GSM, LGSM and BGSM beams are derived based on the fractal model of power spectrum of refractive-index variations in biological tissue. Effects of partially coherent model and parameters of biological turbulence on such beams are studied in numerical simulations. Our results reveal that the spreading of GSM beams is smaller than LGSM and BGSM beams on the same conditions, and the beam with larger source coherence width has smaller beam spreading than that with smaller coherence width. The results are useful for any applications involved light beam propagation through tissues, especially the cases where the average intensity and spreading properties of the light should be taken into account to evaluate the system performance and investigations in the structures of biological tissue.

  5. The epidemiological profile of pediatric patients admitted to the general intensive care unit in an Ethiopian university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe T

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Teshome Abebe, Mullu Girmay, Girma G/Michael, Million Tesfaye Department of Anesthesia, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia Background: In least developing countries, there are few data on children's critical care. This makes the provision of aid and improvement of outcome difficult. Objectives: To describe admission and outcome patterns of children managed in a general intensive care unit at Jimma University Specialized Hospital (JUSH, Ethiopia, over a 5-year period. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study design was used. All children from birth to 14 years of age who were admitted to the general ICU of the hospital from 2009–2013 were included. Patient charts and ICU documentation log were reviewed. Results: A total of 170 children were admitted to the ICU of JUSH over the study period. The greater share was taken by males (54.7%, with a male-to-female ratio of 1.2:1. The overall mortality rate was 40%. The majority of the children were in the age range of 10–14 years (38.8%. Of the total number of patients admitted, 34.7% were trauma cases, 45.8% of whom died. The highest percentage, 69.5%, of trauma patients were admitted for head injuries. Among the trauma cases, burn and polytrauma were the second and third leading causes (15.3% of admission. Postoperative patients and medical patients accounted for the rest of the admitted cases (28.2% and 27.6% of the cases respectively. Conclusion: The leading cause of admission and death was trauma. Postoperative and medical causes of admission were also significant. The mortality rate in the ICU was very high, and this could be due to various factors. Further research benchmarking and interventions are highly recommended. Keywords: trauma, critical care, pediatric, ICU, ventilation, oxygenation

  6. Semiempirical models in theory of intensities of rotation—vibration spectra of polyatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, V. I.; El'kin, M. D.

    1992-10-01

    Two fundamental models in the theory of intensities of rotation—vibration spectra of polyatomic molecules are considered: a valence-optical scheme (Volkenstein—Elyashevitch—Stepanov scheme) and the Mayants—Averbukh method. The mathematics of the tensor analysis are proposed for the reception of the calculated formulae of overtonic spectroscopy in the limit of the debated models. It is shown that the difference in these formulae is conditioned by the form of the system of curvilinear coordinates, which are used to describe the different kinds of molecular motion.

  7. Scattering for mixtures of hard spheres: comparison of total scattering intensities with model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B J; Gopalakrishnan, V; Ramakrishnan, S; Zukoski, C F

    2006-03-01

    The angular dependence of the intensity of x-rays scattered from binary and ternary hard sphere mixtures is investigated and compared to the predictions of two scattering models. Mixture ratio and total volume fraction dependent effects are investigated for size ratios equal to 0.51 and 0.22. Comparisons of model predictions with experimental results indicate the significant impact of the role of particle size distributions in interpreting the angular dependence of the scattering at wave vectors probing density fluctuations intermediate between the sizes of the particles in the mixture.

  8. PROFILE OF ASPHYXIATED BABIES AT NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN NORTH EASTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Birth asphyxia is one of the major causes of neonatal mortality as well as morbidity in India, but it studied that the causes which lead to asphyxia are usually preventable. Many metabolic as well as other sequential changes occurs in the body as a result of birth asphyxia which further lead to major long-term sequelae like cerebral palsy, mental retardation and seizure disorder. AIM To identify antepartum, intrapartum and postnatal risk factors for neonatal mortality due to birth asphyxia and to assess the clinico-biochemical status and outcome in the early neonatal period of babies who were asphyxiated at birth. DESIGN Cohort study. SETTING Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Gauhati Medical College and Hospital. METHODS After clearance from the Hospital Ethical Committee, all severely asphyxiated babies at birth, admitted to neonatal unit from August 2009 to July 2010 were included in the study. A specially designed questionnaire was used to assess the role of maternal factors and neonatal presentation of birth asphyxia. Antenatal and intrapartum factors like maternal anaemia, Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH, eclampsia, antenatal visits, Meconium Stained Amniotic Fluid (MSAF were recorded. Asphyxiated babies were observed for stages of Hypoxic Ischaemic Encephalopathy (HIE, reflexes and any end organ involvement. Investigations were done for blood counts, electrolytes, USG, etc. RESULTS Among 150 babies, we found significant association between birth asphyxia and factors like poor antenatal check-up (48%, MSAF (38.7%, maternal anaemia (78%, PIH (20.7%, eclampsia (15.3%, prolonged labour (28%, ante partum foetal distress (14.7%; 24% cases were in HIE stage I, 32% in stage II and 44% in stage III. Multiorgan involvement seen with renal (9.3%, haematological (3.3% abnormalities. During management 54.6% needed inotropes (54.6% for circulatory support, 60% cases needed anticonvulsant and mortality rate was (48%. CONCLUSION There were lots

  9. A mechanistic model of infection: why duration and intensity of contacts should be included in models of disease spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smieszek Timo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical models and simulations of disease spread often assume a constant per-contact transmission probability. This assumption ignores the heterogeneity in transmission probabilities, e.g. due to the varying intensity and duration of potentially contagious contacts. Ignoring such heterogeneities might lead to erroneous conclusions from simulation results. In this paper, we show how a mechanistic model of disease transmission differs from this commonly used assumption of a constant per-contact transmission probability. Methods We present an exposure-based, mechanistic model of disease transmission that reflects heterogeneities in contact duration and intensity. Based on empirical contact data, we calculate the expected number of secondary cases induced by an infector (i for the mechanistic model and (ii under the classical assumption of a constant per-contact transmission probability. The results of both approaches are compared for different basic reproduction numbers R0. Results The outcomes of the mechanistic model differ significantly from those of the assumption of a constant per-contact transmission probability. In particular, cases with many different contacts have much lower expected numbers of secondary cases when using the mechanistic model instead of the common assumption. This is due to the fact that the proportion of long, intensive contacts decreases in the contact dataset with an increasing total number of contacts. Conclusion The importance of highly connected individuals, so-called super-spreaders, for disease spread seems to be overestimated when a constant per-contact transmission probability is assumed. This holds particularly for diseases with low basic reproduction numbers. Simulations of disease spread should weight contacts by duration and intensity.

  10. Intensive Class Training Model for Developing Lecturers’English Competence at IAIN Imam Bonjol Padang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmayenti Darmayenti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research and Development (R&D project was used to develop lecturers’ English competence particularly on speaking and writing at State Institute of Islamic Studies of Imam Bonjol Padang.  The lecturers need to develop their competence in English in order to prepare themselves to add new information of lecturing materials and writing papers. Borg and Gall’s steps were used to develop the model. Twenty active lecturers who had s2 and s3 program, who were randomly selected, participated on this research. During the process of the research, observation, questionnaire, and TOEFL test, speaking and writing tests were used to collect the data. The experimental research type and one group pre test- post test design were used to conduct the research. The result of the research showed that 74% of respondents need intensive class training model to develop their English competence. The implementation of intensive class training model gave a significant effect toward lecturers’ English competence. It is concluded that this model is more effective to improve lecturers’ on English competences. Therefore, it is recommended that this model can be implemented at IAIN Imam Bonjol Padang in order to develop lecturers’ English competences and to enhance the quality of lecturers.

  11. Intensive Class Training Model for Developing Lecturers’English Competence at IAIN Imam Bonjol Padang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darmayenti Darmayenti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Research and Development (R&D project was used to develop lecturers’ English competence particularly on speaking and writing at State Institute of Islamic Studies of Imam Bonjol Padang.  The lecturers need to develop their competence in English in order to prepare themselves to add new information of lecturing materials and writing papers. Borg and Gall’s steps were used to develop the model. Twenty active lecturers who had s2 and s3 program, who were randomly selected, participated on this research. During the process of the research, observation, questionnaire, and TOEFL test, speaking and writing tests were used to collect the data. The experimental research type and one group pre test- post test design were used to conduct the research. The result of the research showed that 74% of respondents need intensive class training model to develop their English competence. The implementation of intensive class training model gave a significant effect toward lecturers’ English competence. It is concluded that this model is more effective to improve lecturers’ on English competences. Therefore, it is recommended that this model can be implemented at IAIN Imam Bonjol Padang in order to develop lecturers’ English competences and to enhance the quality of lecturers.

  12. Semantic and Time-Dependent Expertise Profiling Models in Community-Driven Knowledge Curation Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hunter

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Online collaboration and web-based knowledge sharing have gained momentum as major components of the Web 2.0 movement. Consequently, knowledge embedded in such platforms is no longer static and continuously evolves through experts’ micro-contributions. Traditional Information Retrieval and Social Network Analysis techniques take a document-centric approach to expertise modeling by creating a macro-perspective of knowledge embedded in large corpus of static documents. However, as knowledge in collaboration platforms changes dynamically, the traditional macro-perspective is insufficient for tracking the evolution of knowledge and expertise. Hence, Expertise Profiling is presented with major challenges in the context of dynamic and evolving knowledge. In our previous study, we proposed a comprehensive, domain-independent model for expertise profiling in the context of evolving knowledge. In this paper, we incorporate Language Modeling into our methodology to enhance the accuracy of resulting profiles. Evaluation results indicate a significant improvement in the accuracy of profiles generated by this approach. In addition, we present our profile visualization tool, Profile Explorer, which serves as a paradigm for exploring and analyzing time-dependent expertise profiles in knowledge-bases where content evolves overtime. Profile Explorer facilitates comparative analysis of evolving expertise, independent of the domain and the methodology used in creating profiles.

  13. Effect of short-term fatigue, induced by high-intensity exercise, on the profile of the ground reaction force during single-leg anterior drop-jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Saya; Aizawa, Junya; Shimoda, Manabu; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Nakamura, Tomomasa; Okawa, Atushi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Fatigue may be an important contributing factor to non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sports. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of controlled lower limb fatigue, induced by a short-term, high-intensity exercise protocol, on the profile of the ground reaction force during landings from single-leg anterior drop-jumps. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy males, 18 to 24 years old, performed single-leg anterior drop-jumps, from a 20 cm height, under two conditions, ‘fatigue’ and ‘non-fatigue’. Short-term fatigue was induced by high-intensity interval cycling on an ergometer. Effects of fatigue on peak vertical ground reaction force, time-to-peak of the vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were evaluated by paired t-test. [Results] Fatigue shortened the time-to-peak duration of the vertical ground reaction force by 10% (non-fatigue, 44.0 ± 16.8 ms; fatigue, 39.6 ± 15.8 ms). Fatigue also yielded a 3.6% lowering in peak vertical ground reaction force and 9.4% increase in loading rate, although these effects were not significant. [Conclusion] The effects of fatigue in reducing time-to-peak of the vertical ground reaction force during single-leg anterior drop-jumps may increase the risk for non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury in males. PMID:28174454

  14. Forbush decrease in the intensity of cosmic rays in a toroidal model of a magnetic cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhova, A. S.; Petukhov, I. S.; Petukhov, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    The time dynamics of the particle distribution function in a magnetic cloud with the shape of a toroidal segment with the characteristic (forceless) structure of a magnetic field has been calculated. The shape of the cloud at the subsequent propagation in the interplanetary space has been determined by the kinematic model. The magnetic field of the cloud is calculated using the freezing-in condition. A significant effect of regions connecting the magnetic cloud with the Sun on the propagation of particles in the region of perturbation has been revealed. The calculation of the particle density and anisotropy of the intensity demonstrates reasonable agreement with the measurements. The results indicate the decisive role of the characteristic structure of the magnetic field in the time dynamics of the Forbush decrease in the intensity of cosmic rays.

  15. An Application of Bayesian Approach in Modeling Risk of Death in an Intensive Care Unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowena Syn Yin Wong

    Full Text Available There are not many studies that attempt to model intensive care unit (ICU risk of death in developing countries, especially in South East Asia. The aim of this study was to propose and describe application of a Bayesian approach in modeling in-ICU deaths in a Malaysian ICU.This was a prospective study in a mixed medical-surgery ICU in a multidisciplinary tertiary referral hospital in Malaysia. Data collection included variables that were defined in Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV (APACHE IV model. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation approach was applied in the development of four multivariate logistic regression predictive models for the ICU, where the main outcome measure was in-ICU mortality risk. The performance of the models were assessed through overall model fit, discrimination and calibration measures. Results from the Bayesian models were also compared against results obtained using frequentist maximum likelihood method.The study involved 1,286 consecutive ICU admissions between January 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010, of which 1,111 met the inclusion criteria. Patients who were admitted to the ICU were generally younger, predominantly male, with low co-morbidity load and mostly under mechanical ventilation. The overall in-ICU mortality rate was 18.5% and the overall mean Acute Physiology Score (APS was 68.5. All four models exhibited good discrimination, with area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC values approximately 0.8. Calibration was acceptable (Hosmer-Lemeshow p-values > 0.05 for all models, except for model M3. Model M1 was identified as the model with the best overall performance in this study.Four prediction models were proposed, where the best model was chosen based on its overall performance in this study. This study has also demonstrated the promising potential of the Bayesian MCMC approach as an alternative in the analysis and modeling of in-ICU mortality outcomes.

  16. An Application of Bayesian Approach in Modeling Risk of Death in an Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rowena Syn Yin; Ismail, Noor Azina

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives There are not many studies that attempt to model intensive care unit (ICU) risk of death in developing countries, especially in South East Asia. The aim of this study was to propose and describe application of a Bayesian approach in modeling in-ICU deaths in a Malaysian ICU. Methods This was a prospective study in a mixed medical-surgery ICU in a multidisciplinary tertiary referral hospital in Malaysia. Data collection included variables that were defined in Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV (APACHE IV) model. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation approach was applied in the development of four multivariate logistic regression predictive models for the ICU, where the main outcome measure was in-ICU mortality risk. The performance of the models were assessed through overall model fit, discrimination and calibration measures. Results from the Bayesian models were also compared against results obtained using frequentist maximum likelihood method. Results The study involved 1,286 consecutive ICU admissions between January 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010, of which 1,111 met the inclusion criteria. Patients who were admitted to the ICU were generally younger, predominantly male, with low co-morbidity load and mostly under mechanical ventilation. The overall in-ICU mortality rate was 18.5% and the overall mean Acute Physiology Score (APS) was 68.5. All four models exhibited good discrimination, with area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) values approximately 0.8. Calibration was acceptable (Hosmer-Lemeshow p-values > 0.05) for all models, except for model M3. Model M1 was identified as the model with the best overall performance in this study. Conclusion Four prediction models were proposed, where the best model was chosen based on its overall performance in this study. This study has also demonstrated the promising potential of the Bayesian MCMC approach as an alternative in the analysis and modeling of

  17. Losartan prevents heart fibrosis induced by long-term intensive exercise in an animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Gay-Jordi

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Recently it has been shown that long-term intensive exercise practice is able to induce myocardial fibrosis in an animal model. Angiotensin II is a profibrotic hormone that could be involved in the cardiac remodeling resulting from endurance exercise. OBJECTIVE: This study examined the antifibrotic effect of losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist, in an animal model of heart fibrosis induced by long-term intense exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: Male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 4 experimental groups: Exercise, Exercise plus losartan, Sedentary and Sedentary plus losartan. Exercise groups were conditioned to run vigorously for 16 weeks. Losartan was orally administered daily before each training session (50 mg/kg/day. Time-matched sedentary rats served as controls. After euthanasia, heart hypertrophy was evaluated by histological studies; ventricular collagen deposition was quantified by histological and biochemical studies; and messenger RNA and protein expression of transforming growth factor-β1, fibronectin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, procollagen-I and procollagen-III was evaluated in all 4 cardiac chambers. Daily intensive exercise caused hypertrophy in the left ventricular heart wall and originated collagen deposition in the right ventricle. Additionally long-term intensive exercise induced a significant increase in messenger RNA expression and protein synthesis of the major fibrotic markers in both atria and in the right ventricle. Losartan treatment was able to reduce all increases in messenger RNA expression and protein levels caused by exercise, although it could not completely reverse the heart hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS: Losartan treatment prevents the heart fibrosis induced by endurance exercise in training animals.

  18. Charnock's Roughness Length Model and Non-dimensional Wind Profiles Over the Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2008-01-01

    An analysis tool for the study of wind speed profiles over the water has been developed. The profiles are analysed using a modified dimensionless wind speed and dimensionless height, assuming that the sea surface roughness can be predicted by Charnock's roughness length model. In this form, the r...

  19. Market segment derivation and profiling via a finite mixture model framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M; Desarbo, WS

    2002-01-01

    The Marketing literature has shown how difficult it is to profile market segments derived with finite mixture models. especially using traditional descriptor variables (e.g., demographics). Such profiling is critical for the proper implementation of segmentation strategy. we propose a new finite mix

  20. [Impact of personality on the alcohol withdrawal syndrome intensity: a preliminary study with the Cloninger's model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coton, X; Pinto, E; Reggers, J; Hansenne, M; Parent, M; Ansseau, M

    2007-01-01

    The personality of alcohol dependant patients as a factor influencing the intensity of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome has been seldom examined. Cloninger's biosocial model of personality describes four temperaments (novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence, persistence) which, except for persistence, are admittedly linked to specific central neurotransmitters, and three characters. Novelty seeking is linked with low levels of mesencephalic dopamine, harm avoidance with high levels of serotonin in the septo-hippocampic system and reward dependence with low levels of noradrenaline in the ascending pathways from the locus coeruleus to the limbic system. The same neurotransmitters pathways are known to be involved in alcohol withdrawal, with a decrease of dopaminergic activity in the mesolimbic system, a decrease of serotonergic activity in the nucleus accumbens and an increase of the noradrenergic system. In view of the similarities between the neurobiological systems involved in Cloninger's model and in the neurobiological changes occurring during the withdrawal period, one would expect to observe severe withdrawal symptoms more frequently for patients with high novelty seeking, low harm avoidance and low reward dependence. To test this hypothesis, alcohol dependent patients according to DSM IV classification criteria who have drunk in the last twenty four hours were included in the study and received a standardized withdrawal treatment. The withdrawal syndrome intensity was examined with repeated measures of CIWA-Ar, the scores of which were correlated with TCI-R. Twenty eight patients, between 30 et 65 years old and drinking 22,2 +/- 12 standard drinks per day were included. Antidepressant drugs, benzodiazepines and neuroleptics treatment introduced before hospitalisation were stopped or decreased as much as possible. A correlation matrix was carried out between all the variables which could influence withdrawal intensity (age at the hospitalisation, age

  1. Discrete vortex model of a Helmholtz resonator subjected to high-intensity sound and grazing flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiwen; Jing, Xiaodong; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, a theoretical model is developed to study the acoustical response of a Helmholtz resonator as a duct-branched acoustic absorber subjected to both high-intensity sound and grazing flow. The present model is comprised of a discrete vortex model in combination with a one-dimensional duct sound propagation model. The present work is to study the overall effect of incident sound interacting with grazing flow but putting emphasis on the nonlinear or intermediate regime where the sound intensity has a marked or non-negligible influence on the acoustic behavior of the Helmholtz resonator. The numerical results reveal that the flow field around the orifice is dominated by the evolution of the vortex sheet and the flow pattern is influenced by the ratio of the orifice flow velocity to the grazing flow velocity. When the incident sound pressure is high or the resonance occurs, the resonator shows nonlinearity, i.e., the acoustic impedance and absorption coefficient vary not only with duct flow Mach number buy also with incident frequency and incident sound pressure level.

  2. Bifactor Approach to Modeling Multidimensionality of Physical Self-Perception Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, ChihMing; Liao, Xiaolan; Song, Hairong; Lee, Taehun

    2016-01-01

    The multi-dimensionality of Physical Self-Perception Profile (PSPP) has been acknowledged by the use of correlated-factor model and second-order model. In this study, the authors critically endorse the bifactor model, as a substitute to address the multi-dimensionality of PSPP. To cross-validate the models, analyses are conducted first in…

  3. Observed IRIS Profiles of the h and k Doublet of Mg ii and Comparison with Profiles from Quiescent Prominence NLTE Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Pelouze, Gabriel; Heinzel, Petr; Kleint, Lucia; Anzer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    With the launch of the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) mission, it is now possible to obtain high-resolution solar prominence spectra and to begin to distinguish the contributions of the many (apparent or not) threads that structure prominences. We aim at comparing unique observations obtained in the Mg ii h and k lines of a polar crown prominence with the radiative outputs from one-dimensional models built with non-local-thermodynamic equilibrium codes (Heinzel et al. Astron. Astrophys. 564, A132, 2014). We characterize the profiles obtained through thorough calibration procedures, with attention paid to the absolute values, full-width at half-maximum, and the ratio of k to h intensities. We also show that at the top of some structures, line-of-sight velocities of about 9 km s^{-1} can be detected. We find a range of static, low-pressure, low-thickness, low-temperature models that could fit k or h observed values, but that cannot satisfy the low observed k/h ratio. We investigate whether these low values might be explained by the inclusion of horizontal flows in small-scale threads. These flows are also necessary in another class of models, where the pressure is kept low but thickness and temperature are increased up to the observed thickness and up to 15 000 K.

  4. Analyzing mHealth Engagement: Joint Models for Intensively Collected User Engagement Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Emily A; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Li, Zhigang; Kane, John M

    2017-01-12

    Evaluating engagement with an intervention is a key component of understanding its efficacy. With an increasing interest in developing behavioral interventions in the mobile health (mHealth) space, appropriate methods for evaluating engagement in this context are necessary. Data collected to evaluate mHealth interventions are often collected much more frequently than those for clinic-based interventions. Additionally, missing data on engagement is closely linked to level of engagement resulting in the potential for informative missingness. Thus, models that can accommodate intensively collected data and can account for informative missingness are required for unbiased inference when analyzing engagement with an mHealth intervention. The objectives of this paper are to discuss the utility of the joint modeling approach in the analysis of longitudinal engagement data in mHealth research and to illustrate the application of this approach using data from an mHealth intervention designed to support illness management among people with schizophrenia. Engagement data from an evaluation of an mHealth intervention designed to support illness management among people with schizophrenia is analyzed. A joint model is applied to the longitudinal engagement outcome and time-to-dropout to allow unbiased inference on the engagement outcome. Results are compared to a naïve model that does not account for the relationship between dropout and engagement. The joint model shows a strong relationship between engagement and reduced risk of dropout. Using the mHealth app 1 day more per week was associated with a 23% decreased risk of dropout (PmHealth data may produce biased results. Joint models provide a way to model intensively collected engagement outcomes while simultaneously accounting for the relationship between engagement and missing data in mHealth intervention research.

  5. Projected changes in precipitation intensity and frequency over complex topography: a multi-model perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andreas; Keller, Denise; Liniger, Mark; Rajczak, Jan; Schär, Christoph; Appenzeller, Christof

    2014-05-01

    Fundamental changes in the hydrological cycle are expected in a future warmer climate. This is of particular relevance for the Alpine region, as a source and reservoir of several major rivers in Europe and being prone to extreme events such as floodings. For this region, climate change assessments based on the ENSEMBLES regional climate models (RCMs) project a significant decrease in summer mean precipitation under the A1B emission scenario by the mid-to-end of this century, while winter mean precipitation is expected to slightly rise. From an impact perspective, projected changes in seasonal means, however, are often insufficient to adequately address the multifaceted challenges of climate change adaptation. In this study, we revisit the full matrix of the ENSEMBLES RCM projections regarding changes in frequency and intensity, precipitation-type (convective versus stratiform) and temporal structure (wet/dry spells and transition probabilities) over Switzerland and surroundings. As proxies for raintype changes, we rely on the model parameterized convective and large-scale precipitation components. Part of the analysis involves a Bayesian multi-model combination algorithm to infer changes from the multi-model ensemble. The analysis suggests a summer drying that evolves altitude-specific: over low-land regions it is associated with wet-day frequency decreases of convective and large-scale precipitation, while over elevated regions it is primarily associated with a decline in large-scale precipitation only. As a consequence, almost all the models project an increase in the convective fraction at elevated Alpine altitudes. The decrease in the number of wet days during summer is accompanied by decreases (increases) in multi-day wet (dry) spells. This shift in multi-day episodes also lowers the likelihood of short dry spell occurrence in all of the models. For spring and autumn the combined multi-model projections indicate higher mean precipitation intensity north of the

  6. Computing Composition/Depth Profiles From X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Diffraction-intensity bands deconvolved relatively quickly. TIBAC constructs composition/depth profiles from X-ray diffraction-intensity bands. Intensity band extremely sensitive to shape of composition/depth profile. TIBAC incorporates straightforward transformation of intensity band that retains accuracy of earlier simulation models, but is several orders of magnitude faster in total computational time. TIBAC written in FORTRAN 77 for batch execution.

  7. Profile construction in experimental choice designs for mixed logit models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandor, Z; Wedel, M

    2002-01-01

    A computationally attractive model for the analysis of conjoint choice experiments is the mixed multinomial logit model, a multinomial logit model in which it is assumed that the coefficients follow a (normal) distribution across subjects. This model offers the advantage over the standard

  8. Intensity-specific leisure-time physical activity and the built environment among Brazilian adults: a best-fit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Deborah; Reis, Rodrigo S; Hino, Adriano A F; Hallal, Pedro C; Pratt, Michael

    2015-03-01

    There is little understanding about which sets of environmental features could simultaneously predict intensity-specific leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) among Brazilians. The objectives were to identify the environmental correlates for intensity-specific LTPA, and to build the best-fit linear models to predict intensity-specific LTPA among adults of Curitiba, Brazil. Cross sectional study in Curitiba, Brazil (2009, n = 1461). The International Physical Activity Questionnaire and Abbreviated Neighborhood Environment Assessment Scale were used. Ninety-two perceived environment variables were categorized in 10 domains. LTPA was classified as walking for leisure (LWLK), moderate-intensity leisure-time PA (MLPA), vigorous-intensity leisure-time PA (VLPA), and moderate-to-vigorous intensity leisure-time PA (MVLPA). Best fitting linear predictive models were built. Forty environmental variables were correlated to at least 1 LTPA outcome. The variability explained by the 4 best-fit models ranged from 17% (MLPA) to 46% (MVLPA). All models contained recreation areas and aesthetics variables; none included residential density predictors. At least 1 neighborhood satisfaction variable was present in each of the intensity-specific models, but not for overall MVLPA. This study demonstrates the simultaneous effect of sets of perceived environmental features on intensity-specific LTPA among Brazilian adults. The differences found compared with high-income countries suggest caution in generalizing results across settings.

  9. Examining diurnal cycle influences on convective intensity in idealized cloud resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Z.; Back, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    There is a large observed contrast in the lightning flash rate per unit precipitation between land and ocean in the tropics. Higher lightning flash rates are associated with faster updraft velocities, and thus greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation is associated with faster updrafts per unit precipitation, a clear measure of convective intensity. As it is the land regions exhibiting the greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation, there is an expectation that tropical land areas exhibit greater convective intensity than tropical oceans. Using a cloud resolving model (CRM) we tested whether the application of a diurnal cycle in sea surface temperature (SST) over a portion of the domain would result in faster updrafts per unit precipitation over that domain. We applied a Bernoulli sampling technique to the area of oscillating SST to give it the same effective mean precipitation as the fixed SST area. Once the mean precipitation values were equal, it was found that there were no differences in high intensity updraft velocity that could be associated with lightning flash rate per unit precipitation variations in the real world.

  10. Computational two-dimensional modeling of the stress intensity factor in a cracked metallic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolón, J. E.; Cendales, E. D.; Cruz, I. M.

    2016-02-01

    Cracking of metallic engineering materials is of great importance due cost of replacing mechanical elements cracked and the danger of sudden structural failure of these elements. One of the most important parameters during consideration of the mechanical behavior of machine elements having cracking and that are subject to various stress conditions is the stress intensity factor near the crack tip called factor Kic. In this paper a computational model is developed for the direct assessment of stress concentration factor near to the crack tip and compared with the results obtained in the literature in which other models have been established, which consider continuity of the displacement of the crack tip (XBEM). Based on this numerical approximation can be establish that computational XBEM method has greater accuracy in Kic values obtained than the model implemented by the method of finite elements for the virtual nodal displacement through plateau function.

  11. Medication errors in the intensive care unit: literature review using the SEIPS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Karen H

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors in intensive care units put patients at risk for injury or death every day. Safety requires an organized and systematic approach to improving the tasks, technology, environment, and organizational culture associated with medication systems. The Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety model can help leaders and health care providers understand the complicated and high-risk work associated with critical care. Using this model, the author combines a human factors approach with the well-known structure-process-outcome model of quality improvement to examine research literature. The literature review reveals that human factors, including stress, high workloads, knowledge deficits, and performance deficits, are associated with medication errors. Factors contributing to medication errors are frequent interruptions, communication problems, and poor fit of health information technology to the workflow of providers. Multifaceted medication safety interventions are needed so that human factors and system problems can be addressed simultaneously.

  12. The Magnetic Model of the LHC during Commissioning to higher Beam Intensities in 2010-2011

    CERN Document Server

    Deniau, L; Fiscarelli, L; Giovannozzi, M; Hagen, P; Lamont, M; Montenero, G; Steinhagen, R; Strzelczyk, M; Todesco, E; Tomas, R; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Wenninger, J

    2011-01-01

    The Field Description of the Large Hadron Collider (FiDeL) model is a set of semi-empirical equations linking the magnets behaviours established from magnetic measurements to the magnetic properties of the machine observed through beam measurements. The FiDeL model includes the parameterization of static and dynamic (time dependent) components. In the present paper, we outline the relationship between the beam observables (orbit, tune, chromaticity) and the model components during the commissioning to higher beam intensities in 2010-2011, with energy of 3.5 TeV per beam. The main relevant issues are (i) the operation at 10 A/s ramp rate and their influence on chromatic correction, (ii) the beta beating and its relation to the quadrupoles transfer functions and (iii) the origin of the observed tune decay at injection.

  13. Multifractal Solar EUV Intensity Fluctuations and their Implications for Coronal Heating Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, A. C.; Rivera, Y. J.; Lawrence, J. K.; Christian, D. J.; Jennings, P. J.; Rappazzo, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the scaling properties of the long-range temporal evolution and intermittency of Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/Solar Dynamics Observatory intensity observations in four solar environments: an active region core, a weak emission region, and two core loops. We use two approaches: the probability distribution function (PDF) of time series increments and multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA). Noise taints the results, so we focus on the 171 Å waveband, which has the highest signal-to-noise ratio. The lags between pairs of wavebands distinguish between coronal versus transition region (TR) emission. In all physical regions studied, scaling in the range of 15-45 minutes is multifractal, and the time series are anti-persistent on average. The degree of anti-correlation in the TR time series is greater than that for coronal emission. The multifractality stems from long-term correlations in the data rather than the wide distribution of intensities. Observations in the 335 Å waveband can be described in terms of a multifractal with added noise. The multiscaling of the extreme-ultraviolet data agrees qualitatively with the radiance from a phenomenological model of impulsive bursts plus noise, and also from ohmic dissipation in a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model for coronal loop heating. The parameter space must be further explored to seek quantitative agreement. Thus, the observational “signatures” obtained by the combined tests of the PDF of increments and the MF-DFA offer strong constraints that can systematically discriminate among models for coronal heating.

  14. Developing a Mathematical Model to Estimate the Intensity of the Global Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poramate CHUNPANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to create an empirical mathematical model to estimate the average monthly of total daily radiation of the global radiation in the middle of northeast Thailand. The model showed the ratio of the monthly average of daily radiation on the radiation outside the Earth's atmosphere which contains cloud index: n, ozone: l, perceptible water: w, and visibility: VIS, where: the value of n came from the data from meteorological satellites MTSAT-2, the value of l came from the data from AURA satellite, the value of w was calculated from temperature and humidity of the air, and the value of VIS came from the measurements from meteorological stations. For testing the performance of the model, the researchers calculated the average monthly of total daily radiation intensity at Maha Sarakham, Roi Et, Khon Kaen and Kalasin provincial meteorological stations. Then, the results were compared with the measured values. The comparison showed that the results from the calculation and measurement are consistent in the good standing. The Root Mean Square Difference value (RMSD of the monthly average of total daily radiation intensity was between 5.25 to 13.82%. On the other hand, the Mean Bias Difference value (MBD was negative within the range of -0.99 to -13.47%.

  15. Modeling jointly low, moderate, and heavy rainfall intensities without a threshold selection

    KAUST Repository

    Naveau, Philippe

    2016-04-09

    In statistics, extreme events are often defined as excesses above a given large threshold. This definition allows hydrologists and flood planners to apply Extreme-Value Theory (EVT) to their time series of interest. Even in the stationary univariate context, this approach has at least two main drawbacks. First, working with excesses implies that a lot of observations (those below the chosen threshold) are completely disregarded. The range of precipitation is artificially shopped down into two pieces, namely large intensities and the rest, which necessarily imposes different statistical models for each piece. Second, this strategy raises a nontrivial and very practical difficultly: how to choose the optimal threshold which correctly discriminates between low and heavy rainfall intensities. To address these issues, we propose a statistical model in which EVT results apply not only to heavy, but also to low precipitation amounts (zeros excluded). Our model is in compliance with EVT on both ends of the spectrum and allows a smooth transition between the two tails, while keeping a low number of parameters. In terms of inference, we have implemented and tested two classical methods of estimation: likelihood maximization and probability weighed moments. Last but not least, there is no need to choose a threshold to define low and high excesses. The performance and flexibility of this approach are illustrated on simulated and hourly precipitation recorded in Lyon, France.

  16. Wave intensity analysis of a computational model of the pulmonary circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Nicholas A.; Qureshi, Muhammad Umar

    2015-11-01

    A multiscale computational model has been developed to predict flow and pressure in the pulmonary circulation, in which the flow and pressure in the smaller blood vessels are described using linearised equations in pairs of asymmetric structured trees joined at the roots. The geometric and elastic properties of all the blood vessels are described by physiological parameters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to determine the geometry of the large pulmonary arteries and veins, and to measure the cardiac output from the right ventricle. The flow in the large blood vessels is solved using a Lax-Wendroff scheme, and the admittances of the structured trees provide the boundary conditions linking each large artery to its respective large vein. The results of simulating various pathological conditions are in agreement with clinical observations, showing that the model has potential for assisting with diagnosis and treatment of circulatory diseases within the lung. We use wave intensity analysis to study the propagation of forward and backward, compression and decompression waves in our model. The approximations for the pulse wave velocity used in experiments on wave intensity analysis are assessed, and reflected waves lower the peak pressure in the right ventricle.

  17. Modeling jointly low, moderate, and heavy rainfall intensities without a threshold selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveau, Philippe; Huser, Raphael; Ribereau, Pierre; Hannart, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    In statistics, extreme events are often defined as excesses above a given large threshold. This definition allows hydrologists and flood planners to apply Extreme-Value Theory (EVT) to their time series of interest. Even in the stationary univariate context, this approach has at least two main drawbacks. First, working with excesses implies that a lot of observations (those below the chosen threshold) are completely disregarded. The range of precipitation is artificially shopped down into two pieces, namely large intensities and the rest, which necessarily imposes different statistical models for each piece. Second, this strategy raises a nontrivial and very practical difficultly: how to choose the optimal threshold which correctly discriminates between low and heavy rainfall intensities. To address these issues, we propose a statistical model in which EVT results apply not only to heavy, but also to low precipitation amounts (zeros excluded). Our model is in compliance with EVT on both ends of the spectrum and allows a smooth transition between the two tails, while keeping a low number of parameters. In terms of inference, we have implemented and tested two classical methods of estimation: likelihood maximization and probability weighed moments. Last but not least, there is no need to choose a threshold to define low and high excesses. The performance and flexibility of this approach are illustrated on simulated and hourly precipitation recorded in Lyon, France.

  18. Using scale heights derived from bottomside ionograms for modelling the IRI topside profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Reinisch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundbased ionograms measure the Chapman scale height HT at the F2-layer peak that is used to construct the topside profile. After a brief review of the topside model extrapolation technique, comparisons are presented between the modeled profiles with incoherent scatter radar and satellite measurements for the mid latitude and equatorial ionosphere. The total electron content TEC, derived from measurements on satellite beacon signals, is compared with the height-integrated profiles ITEC from the ionograms. Good agreement is found with the ISR profiles and with results using the low altitude TOPEX satellite. The TEC values derived from GPS signal analysis are systematically larger than ITEC. It is suggested to use HT , routinely measured by a large number of Digisondes around the globe, for the construction of the IRI topside electron density profile.

  19. Modelling and measurements of bunch profiles at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, S. [Crete U.; Antoniou, F. [Liverpool U.; Argyropoulos, T. [CERN; Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Hostettler, M. [CERN; Papaphilippou, Y. [CERN

    2017-07-20

    The bunch profiles in the LHC are often observed to be non-Gaussian, both at Flat Bottom (FB) and Flat Top (FT) energies. Especially at FT, an evolution of the tail population in time is observed. In this respect, the Monte-Carlo Software for IBS and Radiation effects (SIRE) is used to track different types of beam distributions. The impact of the distribution shape on the evolution of bunch characteristics is studied. The results are compared with observations from the LHC Run 2 data.

  20. Dynamics for a two-atom two-mode intensity-dependent Raman coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Gilhare, K.

    2016-06-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of a two-atom Raman coupled model interacting with a quantized bimodal field with intensity-dependent coupling terms in a lossless cavity. The unitary transformation method used to solve the time-dependent problem also gives the eigensolutions of the interaction Hamiltonian. We study the atomic-population dynamics and dynamics of the photon statistics in the two cavity modes, and present evidence of cooperative effects in the production of antibunching and anticorrelations between the modes. We also investigate the effect of detuning on the evolution of second-order correlation functions and observe that the oscillations become more rapid for large detuning.

  1. Dynamics for a two-atom two-mode intensity-dependent Raman coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S., E-mail: vasudha-rnc1@rediffmail.com, E-mail: sudhhasingh@gmail.com; Gilhare, K. [Ranchi University, Department of Physics (India)

    2016-06-15

    We study the quantum dynamics of a two-atom Raman coupled model interacting with a quantized bimodal field with intensity-dependent coupling terms in a lossless cavity. The unitary transformation method used to solve the time-dependent problem also gives the eigensolutions of the interaction Hamiltonian. We study the atomic-population dynamics and dynamics of the photon statistics in the two cavity modes, and present evidence of cooperative effects in the production of antibunching and anticorrelations between the modes. We also investigate the effect of detuning on the evolution of second-order correlation functions and observe that the oscillations become more rapid for large detuning.

  2. Modeling of optical, transport, and thermodynamic properties of Al metal irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Khishchenko, Konstantin V; Andreev, Nikolay E; Fortov, Vladimir E; Levashov, Pavel R; Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed for the interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with solid targets on the basis of the two-temperature equation of state for an irradiated substance. It allows the description of the dynamics of the plasma formation and expansion. Comparison of available experimental data on the amplitude and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of aluminum with the simulation results provides new information on the transport coefficients and absorption capacity of the strongly coupled Al plasma over a wide range of temperatures and pressures.

  3. The Construction of Intensive and Organized Agricultural Industrialization Model with Farmers as the Main Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The current agricultural conflicts of China are analyzed and the forms and drawbacks of current agricultural industrial structure are listed.The situations for intensifying the farmland with appropriate scale are analyzed from the aspects of policy,farmers,farms and modernization of agriculture.It is pointed out that the situations for the intensive use of land are becoming mature.Taking the single pig-breeding chain as an example,the agricultural industrialization model,which takes farmers as the main body,is expounded.Besides,its functions and significance in solving "the three agriculture problems" and facilitating the modernization of agriculture are discussed.

  4. Mean-field thalamocortical modeling of longitudinal EEG acquired during intensive meditation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Manish; Zanesco, Anthony P; King, Brandon G; Bridwell, David A; MacLean, Katherine A; Aichele, Stephen R; Jacobs, Tonya L; Wallace, B Alan; Saron, Clifford D; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-07-01

    anatomy into account, to formally model brain processes associated with intensive meditation training. The observed changes in model parameters inform theoretical accounts of attention training through meditation, and may motivate future study on the use of meditation in a variety of clinical populations.

  5. The Optimal Design Method and Standardized Mathematical Model of Tooth Profile Modification of Spur Gear

    OpenAIRE

    Wenjie Mei; Jingzhou Na; Fan Yang; Guike Shen; Jiawei Chen

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports a tooth profile modification method of spur gear. After establishing a standardized mathematical model for optimized tooth profile and simulating meshing process with ANSYS finite element analysis, we obtained 625 groups of gear models with different modification parameters. The group with minimum transmission errors owns the optimal parameters. Genetic algorithm was adopted in the entire process for the purpose of reducing the variation of transmission errors in meshing pro...

  6. Sensitivity study of the inverse problem on retrieval of the altitude profile of ozone from emission intensities of the molecular oxygen in the MLT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyshenko, Kseniia; Yankovsky, Valentine

    2015-04-01

    Retrieval of the ozone density altitude profile is important problem for energetics of the upper atmosphere. For comparison of methods of retrieval of altitude profiles of ozone concentration from emissions of excited oxygen molecule and atom was used a modern model of electronic-vibrational kinetics of the products of O3 and O2 photolysis YM-2011 [1]. This study uses only a part of the complete model YM-2011 related to population of levels O2(b1Σ+g, v=0-2), O2(a1Δg, v=0-5) and metastable atom O(1D). Thereby, we obtained solutions of the inverse problem of [O3] retrieval from five proxies O2(a1Δg, v = 0), O2(b1Σ+g, v = 0, 1, 2) and O (1D). Theoretically, every proposed emission of excited component could be promising sources of information about [O3], because it depends on [O3] both in production and in quenching. Detailed analysis of the solutions of the inverse problem of [O3] retrieval were conducted by the sensitivity study of these levels for variations of all model parameters at altitudes of z=40-105 km. The maximum values of sensitivity coefficient to [O3] variations have the following components: O2(b1Σ+g, v = 1), O2(a1Δg, v = 0) and O(1D). The sensitivity of all excited component to variations of ozone decreases sharply above 105 km due to a drastic fall of ozone concentration. [O2(b1Σ+g, v=2)] does not depend on ozone completely at the proposed altitudes, and [O2(b1Σ+g, v=0)] has the lowest sensitivity to variations of [O3] among rest components. Based on the results of the sensitivity study authors investigated the ozone altitude profiles retrieval accuracy taking into account uncertainties of all input parameters (solar excitation and photodissociation rates, quantum yields of products and rate constants of aeronomical reactions). Uncertainties of retrieval of altitude profiles of [O3] from [O(1D)] don't exceed 10% in the interval 40-85 km were obtained. Profile of [O2(b1Σ+g, v=1] allows us to retrieval of [O3] with 21% uncertainty at z =40

  7. Global gene expression profile progression in Gaucher disease mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wujuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaucher disease is caused by defective glucocerebrosidase activity and the consequent accumulation of glucosylceramide. The pathogenic pathways resulting from lipid laden macrophages (Gaucher cells in visceral organs and their abnormal functions are obscure. Results To elucidate this pathogenic pathway, developmental global gene expression analyses were conducted in distinct Gba1 point-mutated mice (V394L/V394L and D409 V/null. About 0.9 to 3% of genes had altered expression patterns (≥ ± 1.8 fold change, representing several categories, but particularly macrophage activation and immune response genes. Time course analyses (12 to 28 wk of INFγ-regulated pro-inflammatory (13 and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory (11 cytokine/mediator networks showed tissue differential profiles in the lung and liver of the Gba1 mutant mice, implying that the lipid-storage macrophages were not functionally inert. The time course alterations of the INFγ and IL-4 pathways were similar, but varied in degree in these tissues and with the Gba1 mutation. Conclusions Biochemical and pathological analyses demonstrated direct relationships between the degree of tissue glucosylceramides and the gene expression profile alterations. These analyses implicate IFNγ-regulated pro-inflammatory and IL-4-regulated anti-inflammatory networks in differential disease progression with implications for understanding the Gaucher disease course and pathophysiology.

  8. Predictive models for pressure ulcers from intensive care unit electronic health records using Bayesian networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewprag, Pacharmon; Newton, Cheryl; Vermillion, Brenda; Hyun, Sookyung; Huang, Kun; Machiraju, Raghu

    2017-07-05

    We develop predictive models enabling clinicians to better understand and explore patient clinical data along with risk factors for pressure ulcers in intensive care unit patients from electronic health record data. Identifying accurate risk factors of pressure ulcers is essential to determining appropriate prevention strategies; in this work we examine medication, diagnosis, and traditional Braden pressure ulcer assessment scale measurements as patient features. In order to predict pressure ulcer incidence and better understand the structure of related risk factors, we construct Bayesian networks from patient features. Bayesian network nodes (features) and edges (conditional dependencies) are simplified with statistical network techniques. Upon reviewing a network visualization of our model, our clinician collaborators were able to identify strong relationships between risk factors widely recognized as associated with pressure ulcers. We present a three-stage framework for predictive analysis of patient clinical data: 1) Developing electronic health record feature extraction functions with assistance of clinicians, 2) simplifying features, and 3) building Bayesian network predictive models. We evaluate all combinations of Bayesian network models from different search algorithms, scoring functions, prior structure initializations, and sets of features. From the EHRs of 7,717 ICU patients, we construct Bayesian network predictive models from 86 medication, diagnosis, and Braden scale features. Our model not only identifies known and suspected high PU risk factors, but also substantially increases sensitivity of the prediction - nearly three times higher comparing to logistical regression models - without sacrificing the overall accuracy. We visualize a representative model with which our clinician collaborators identify strong relationships between risk factors widely recognized as associated with pressure ulcers. Given the strong adverse effect of pressure ulcers

  9. Multi-instrument observations and numerical modeling of intense ion upflows during stormtime polar cap expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, S.; Ozturk, D. S.; Ridley, A. J.; Jia, X.; Nicolls, M. J.; Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's ionosphere plays an important role in supplying plasma into the magnetosphere through ion upflow/outflow, particularly during periods of strong solar wind driving. An intense ion upflow flux event during the June 1, 2013 geomagnetic storm has been studied using observations from multiple instruments, including Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR) and GPS total electron content (TEC), as well as numerical simulations. After the IMF southward turning, the open-closed field line boundary (OCB) and convection cells in the high latitude Northern hemisphere, as observed by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars, expanded equatorward rapidly. When the cusp moved into the PFISR field-of-view, divergent ion fluxes were observed by the field-aligned beam of PFISR with intense ion upflow fluxes reaching 1.9 x1014 m-2s-1 at 600 km altitude. Both ion and electron temperatures increased significantly within the ion upflow and thus this upflow event was classified as Type-2 upflow. We discuss possible contributing factors for the formation of such intense ion upflow fluxes, including preconditioning by storm-enhanced density (SED) and temperature dependent chemistry. The global ionosphere thermosphere model (GITM) has been employed to quantitatively study the formation mechanisms of the upflows. During this event, the OCB and cusp were detected by DMSP between 15-16 MLTs, unusually duskward. Results from a global MHD simulation using the Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) have been used to provide a global context for this event. The global simulation suggests that due to the very low solar wind Mach number ( 4), magnetopause reconnection occurred across a wide range of local times extending into the dusk sector where DMSP observed the cusp.

  10. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiling of imipenem in patients admitted to an intensive care unit in India: A nonrandomized, cross-sectional, analytical, open-labeled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Abhilash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Widespread use of imipenem in intensive care units (ICUs in India has led to the development of numerous carbapenemase-producing strains of pathogens. The altered pathophysiological state in critically ill patients could lead to subtherapeutic antibiotic levels. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the variability in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of imipenem in critically ill patients admitted to an ICU in India. Materials and Methods: Plasma concentration of imipenem was determined in critically ill patients using high performance liquid chromatography, at different time points, by grouping them according to their locus of infection. The elimination half-life (t΍ and volume of distribution (V d values were also computed. The patients with imipenem trough concentration values below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and 5 times the MIC for the isolated pathogen were determined. Results: The difference in the plasma imipenem concentration between the gastrointestinal and the nongastrointestinal groups was significant at 2 h (P = 0.015 following drug dosing; while the difference was significant between the skin/cellulitis and nonskin/cellulitus groups at 2 h (P = 0.008, after drug dosing. The imipenem levels were above the MIC and 5 times the MIC for the isolated organism in 96.67% and 50% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic profile of imipenem does not vary according to the locus of an infection in critically ill patients. Imipenem, 3 g/day intermittent dosing, maintains a plasma concentration which is adequate to treat most infections encountered in patients admitted to an ICU. However, a change in the dosing regimen is suggested for patients infected with organisms having MIC values above 4 mg/L.

  11. Modeling of Top Scroll Profile Using Equidistant-Curve Approach for a Scroll Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Scroll profile plays a key role in determining the performance of a scroll compressor. In this study geometric and dynamic characteristics of the scroll profile are analyzed to investigate the influence of its geometric continuity on property of a scroll compressor. Firstly, scroll profiles are created to redesign the geometry of scroll wrap by using the equidistant-curve approach on the basis of a generation line consisting of involute of circle and circular arc. Subsequently, the geometric and dynamic models of the scroll compressor are established. These models are related to parameters of the generation line of scroll profile and rotation angle of a moving scroll. Lastly, some simulation examples of second-order continuity (SOC scroll profile are compared with first-order continuity (FOC scroll profiles and some important conclusions are obtained. Results show that SOC scroll profile is superior to FOC profile in terms of volume ratio, stability of gas force, and possible leakage loss in a scroll compressor.

  12. [Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Solaro, Massimo; Lumini, Enrico; Rasero, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units. Over the past 15 years, the model of medical and nursing care changed from being exclusively oriented to the diagnosis and treatment of acute illness, to the achievement of outcomes by preventing iatrogenic complications (Hospital Acquired Conditions). Nursing Sensitive Outcomes show as nursing is directly involved in the development and prevention of these complications. Many of these complications, including falls from the bed, use of restraints, urinary catheter associated urinary infections and intravascular catheter related sepsis, are related to basic nursing care. Ten years ago in critical care, a school of thought called get back to the basics, was started for the prevention of errors and risks associated with nursing. Most of these nursing practices involve hygiene and mobilization. On the basis of these reflections, Kathleen Vollman developed a model of nursing care in critical care area, defined Interventional Patient Hygiene (IPH). The IPH model provides a proactive plan of nursing interventions to strengthen the patients' through the Evidence-Based Nursing Care. The components of the model include interventions of oral hygiene, mobilization, dressing changes, urinary catheter care, management of incontinence and bed bath, hand hygiene and skin antisepsis. The implementation of IPH model follows the steps of Deming cycle, and requires a deep reflection on the priorities of nursing care in ICU, as well as the effective teaching of the importance of the basic nursing to new generations of nurses.

  13. Bayesian segmental models with multiple sequence alignment profiles for protein secondary structure and contact map prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei; Ghahramani, Zoubin; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei; Wild, David L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a segmental semi-Markov model (SSMM) for protein secondary structure prediction which incorporates multiple sequence alignment profiles with the purpose of improving the predictive performance. The segmental model is a generalization of the hidden Markov model where a hidden state generates segments of various length and secondary structure type. A novel parameterized model is proposed for the likelihood function that explicitly represents multiple sequence alignment profiles to capture the segmental conformation. Numerical results on benchmark data sets show that incorporating the profiles results in substantial improvements and the generalization performance is promising. By incorporating the information from long range interactions in beta-sheets, this model is also capable of carrying out inference on contact maps. This is an important advantage of probabilistic generative models over the traditional discriminative approach to protein secondary structure prediction. The Web server of our algorithm and supplementary materials are available at http://public.kgi.edu/-wild/bsm.html.

  14. Monitoring and Modeling Carbon Dynamics at a Network of Intensive Sites in the USA and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, R.; Wayson, C.; Johnson, K. D.; Pan, Y.; Angeles, G.; De Jong, B. H.; Andrade, J. L.; Dai, Z.

    2013-05-01

    The Forest Services of the USA and Mexico, supported by NASA and USAID, have begun to establish a network of intensive forest carbon monitoring sites. These sites are used for research and teaching, developing forest management practices, and forging links to the needs of communities. Several of the sites have installed eddy flux towers to basic meteorology data and daily estimates of forest carbon uptake and release, the processes that determine forest growth. Field sampling locations at each site provide estimates of forest biomass and carbon stocks, and monitor forest dynamic processes such as growth and mortality rates. Remote sensing facilitates scaling up to the surrounding landscapes. The sites support information requirements for implementing programs such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), enabling communities to receive payments for ecosystem services such as reduced carbon emissions or improved forest management. In addition to providing benchmark data for REDD+ projects, the sites are valuable for validating state and national estimates from satellite remote sensing and the national forest inventory. Data from the sites provide parameters for forest models that support strategic management analysis, and support student training and graduate projects. The intensive monitoring sites may be a model for other countries in Latin America. Coordination among sites in the USA, Mexico and other Latin American countries can ensure harmonization of approaches and data, and share experiences and knowledge among countries with emerging opportunities for implementing REDD+ and other conservation programs.

  15. Data-Model Comparisons of Photoelectron Flux Intensities on the Strong Crustal Field Lines at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, Michael; Trantham, Matthew; Mitchell, David

    2010-05-01

    This study quantifies the factors controlling photoelectron fluxes on strong crustal field lines in the Martian ionosphere. Using data from Mars Global Surveyor's Magnetometer and Electron Reflectometer instruments, dayside electron populations near the strong crustal fields in the southern hemisphere are analyzed versus various controlling parameters. These parameters include a Mars F10.7 proxy, a solar wind pressure proxy, local solar zenith angle, magnetic elevation angle, magnetic field strength. It was found that solar EUV radiation (corrected for solar zenith angle and the Mars-Sun distance) has the strongest influence on the photoelectron fluxes, and during different time periods this radiation has a stronger influence than at others times. Second, fluxes show a slight enhancement when the magnetic elevation angle is near zero degrees (horizontal field lines). Finally, other parameters, such as pressure and magnetic field strength, seem to have no major influence. These measurement-based results are then compared against numerical modeling flux intensities to quantify the physical mechanisms behind the observed relationships. The numerical code used for this study is our superthermal electron transport model, which solves for the electric distribution function along a magnetic field line. The code includes the influence of a variable magnetic field strength, pitch angle scattering and mirror trapping, and collisional energy cascading. The influence of solar EUV flux, atmospheric composition, solar wind dynamic pressure, and the local magnetic field are systematically investigated with this code to understand why some of these parameters have a strong influence on photoelectron flux intensity while others do not.

  16. The Contemporary Adaptive Model for the Expatriates’ Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Popa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the global realities and the technological evolution, within a knowledge-based economy, many organizations aim at the human capital development, setting up not just organizational standards but promoting environmentally HR’s adjustment criteria in order to provide sustainability for recruitment and selection processes. Therefore, developing an adapted employee profile for expatriates should be one of the major imperatives for International Human Resources Management (IHRM function. The work paper pleads for considering IHRM as an important organizational dimension, responsible for adjusting the international employee’s behaviour in accordance with the organizational and external domestic environment, in order to promote the overall value of foreign employees for national economy, culture and society.

  17. An inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model of pulsar emission II. frequency behavior of pulse profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, G J; Zhang, B; Han, J L

    2001-01-01

    The shapes of pulse profiles, especially their variations with respect to observing frequencies, are very important to understand emission mechanisms of pulsars, while no previous attempt has been made in interpreting the complicated phenomenology. In this paper, we present theoretical simulations for the integrated pulse profiles and their frequency evolution within the framework of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model proposed by Qiao (1988) and Qiao & Lin (1998). Using the phase positions of the pulse components predicted by the ``beam-frequency figure'' of the ICS model, we present Gaussian fits to the multi-frequency pulse profiles for some pulsars. It is shown that the model can reproduce various types of the frequency evolution behaviors of pulse profiles observed.

  18. A New Profile Learning Model for Recommendation System based on Machine Learning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen H. Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems (RSs have been used to successfully address the information overload problem by providing personalized and targeted recommendations to the end users. RSs are software tools and techniques providing suggestions for items to be of use to a user, hence, they typically apply techniques and methodologies from Data Mining. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a new user profile learning model to promote the recommendation accuracy of vertical recommendation systems. The proposed profile learning model employs the vertical classifier that has been used in multi classification module of the Intelligent Adaptive Vertical Recommendation (IAVR system to discover the user’s area of interest, and then build the user’s profile accordingly. Experimental results have proven the effectiveness of the proposed profile learning model, which accordingly will promote the recommendation accuracy.

  19. Meta-Model and UML Profile for Requirements Management of Software and Embedded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpinen Tero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Software and embedded system companies today encounter problems related to requirements management tool integration, incorrect tool usage, and lack of traceability. This is due to utilized tools with no clear meta-model and semantics to communicate requirements between different stakeholders. This paper presents a comprehensive meta-model for requirements management. The focus is on software and embedded system domains. The goal is to define generic requirements management domain concepts and abstract interfaces between requirements management and system development. This leads to a portable requirements management meta-model which can be adapted with various system modeling languages. The created meta-model is prototyped by translating it into a UML profile. The profile is imported into a UML tool which is used for rapid evaluation of meta-model concepts in practice. The developed profile is associated with a proof of concept report generator tool that automatically produces up-to-date documentation from the models in form of web pages. The profile is adopted to create an example model of embedded system requirement specification which is built with the profile.

  20. Theoretical Modeling of Intensity Noise in InGaN Semiconductor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces modeling and simulation of the noise properties of the blue-violet InGaN laser diodes. The noise is described in terms of the spectral properties of the relative intensity noise (RIN). We examine the validity of the present noise modeling by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements available in literature. We also compare the obtained noise results with those of AlGaAs lasers. Also, we examine the influence of gain suppression on the quantum RIN. In addition, we examine the changes in the RIN level when describing the gain suppression by the case of inhomogeneous spectral broadening. The results show that RIN of the InGaN laser is nearly 9 dB higher than that of the AlGaAs laser. PMID:25147848

  1. Theoretical modeling of intensity noise in InGaN semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Moustafa

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces modeling and simulation of the noise properties of the blue-violet InGaN laser diodes. The noise is described in terms of the spectral properties of the relative intensity noise (RIN). We examine the validity of the present noise modeling by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements available in literature. We also compare the obtained noise results with those of AlGaAs lasers. Also, we examine the influence of gain suppression on the quantum RIN. In addition, we examine the changes in the RIN level when describing the gain suppression by the case of inhomogeneous spectral broadening. The results show that RIN of the InGaN laser is nearly 9 dB higher than that of the AlGaAs laser.

  2. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  3. Left-Right Symmetric Models at the High-Intensity Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo-Felisola, Oscar; Helo, Juan C; Kovalenko, Sergey G; Ortiz, Sebastian E

    2015-01-01

    We study constraints on Left-Right Symmetric models from searches of semileptonic decays of $D$, $D_{s}$, $B$ mesons, mediated by heavy neutrinos $N$ with masses $m_N\\sim $ GeV that go on their mass shell leading to a resonant enhancement of the rates. Using these processes we examine, as a function of $m_N$ and $M_{W_R}$, the physics reach of the recently proposed high-intensity beam dump experiment SHiP, which is expected to produce a large sample of $D_s$ mesons. We compare these results with the corresponding reach of neutrinoless double beta decay experiments, as well as like-sign dilepton searches with displaced vertices at the LHC. We conclude that the SHiP experiment has clear advantages in probing the Left-Right Symmetric models for heavy neutrinos in the GeV mass range.

  4. Theoretical Modeling of Intensity Noise in InGaN Semiconductor Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moustafa Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces modeling and simulation of the noise properties of the blue-violet InGaN laser diodes. The noise is described in terms of the spectral properties of the relative intensity noise (RIN. We examine the validity of the present noise modeling by comparing the simulated results with the experimental measurements available in literature. We also compare the obtained noise results with those of AlGaAs lasers. Also, we examine the influence of gain suppression on the quantum RIN. In addition, we examine the changes in the RIN level when describing the gain suppression by the case of inhomogeneous spectral broadening. The results show that RIN of the InGaN laser is nearly 9 dB higher than that of the AlGaAs laser.

  5. Heterogeneous Speed Profiles in Discrete Models for Pedestrian Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bandini, Stefania; Crociani, Luca; Vizzari, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Discrete pedestrian simulation models are viable alternatives to particle based approaches based on a continuous spatial representation. The effects of discretisation, however, also imply some difficulties in modelling certain phenomena that can be observed in reality. This paper focuses on the possibility to manage heterogeneity in the walking speed of the simulated population of pedestrians by modifying an existing multi-agent model extending the floor field approach. Whereas some discrete ...

  6. Modeling of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional etch profiles in high density plasma reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, R.J.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sukharev, V. [LSI Logic Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    In order to model the plasma etching process from plasma generation to etch profile evolution, processes from the macroscopic reactor scale to the microscopic feature scale must be simulated. An integrated monte Carlo feature Profile Model (MCFPM) has been developed to examine the time evolution of etch profiles in high density plasma systems. By integrating the MCFPM with the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM), the authors are able to self-consistently determine the etch profiles for specific regions on the wafer in specific reactor geometry with specified parameters for power, chemistry, gas flow, etc. The latest improvements of the model include the effects of incoming particle angle and energy on reaction and reflection based on the results of molecular dynamics simulations. Increase the specular reflection of high energy particles leads to more vertical sidewalls and corner clearing but can also cause deformation of the bottom of the profile surface. For Chlorine etching of 2D and 3D profiles in polysilicon, the model results will be compared to experimental results in an inductively couple etching reactor. The changes due to radial location as well as sub wafer and superwafer topography be examined.

  7. Modeling the interaction of light intensity, nutrient concentration and uranium toxicity in Lemna minor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, E.; Horemans, N.; Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN (Belgium); Cedergreen, N. [University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jager, T. [Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-07-01

    Radioecology aims at assessing the effect of radionuclides and radiation on the environment. Since we cannot test every possible environmental situation in the laboratory, we need modeling approaches to extrapolate the results of toxicity assays to environmentally relevant scenarios. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to understand the effect of relevant environmental factors, such as nutrients, temperature and light on the toxicity of the test. Radionuclides are often found to induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In plants, an overload of ROS can lead to disturbances of the photosynthetic system. Since the light intensity determines the efficiency of the photo-systems in plants, it can be expected to interact with the effect of radionuclides. The nutrient concentration of the test medium determines the physiological state of the plant, affecting in turn the plant's capability of dealing with stress and hence influences the toxicity of the contaminant. To study the interaction of stressors with environmental conditions, mechanistic effect modeling is promoted widely in ecotoxicology. In principle, the modelling aims at a mechanistic understanding of the different processes causing the stress individually, and integrating them in one framework to study their joint effect and possible interaction. We here present a mechanistic effect model for Lemna minor (common duckweed), which is based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory. Models based on DEB have been used widely to study the effects of compounds on animals. Due to its general applicability to all types of organisms, it holds potential to be used for comparison of species and compounds in a broad context. Energy uptake from the environment is modeled explicitly, and metabolic rates are set to depend on temperature in DEB models. Therefore, they can be used to extrapolate effects to a wide range of environmentally relevant scenarios. Until now, the DEB research in ecotoxicology has

  8. A model of CT dose profiles in Banach space; with applications to CT dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Victor J.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper the scatter component of computed tomography dose profiles is modeled using the solution to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation. This scatter function is summed with a modeled primary function of approximate trapezoidal shape. The primary dose profile is modeled to include the analytic continuation of the Heaviside step function. A mathematical theory is developed in a Banach space. The modeled function is used to accurately fit data from a 256-slice GE Revolution scanner. A 60 cm long body phantom is assembled and used for data collection with both a pencil chamber and a Farmer-type chamber.

  9. Numerical and Physical Modeling of the Response of Resonator Liners to Intense Sound and High Speed Grazing Flow Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative research program is proposed that numerically and physically models the response of resonator liners to intense sound and high speed grazing flow. The...

  10. Field Evaluation of a TSI Model 3034 Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer in New York City: Winter 2004 Intensive Campaign

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hogrefe, Olga; Lala, G. Garland; Frank, Brian P; Schwab, James J; Demerjian, Kenneth L

    2006-01-01

    A new "single box" Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (TSI SMPS Model 3034) was deployed and operated during a period of four weeks as a part of the PMTACS-NY Winter 2004 intensive study in Queens College, New York City...

  11. Ensemble Kinetic Modeling of Metabolic Networks from Dynamic Metabolic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengjie Jia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic modeling of metabolic pathways has important applications in metabolic engineering, but significant challenges still remain. The difficulties faced vary from finding best-fit parameters in a highly multidimensional search space to incomplete parameter identifiability. To meet some of these challenges, an ensemble modeling method is developed for characterizing a subset of kinetic parameters that give statistically equivalent goodness-of-fit to time series concentration data. The method is based on the incremental identification approach, where the parameter estimation is done in a step-wise manner. Numerical efficacy is achieved by reducing the dimensionality of parameter space and using efficient random parameter exploration algorithms. The shift toward using model ensembles, instead of the traditional “best-fit” models, is necessary to directly account for model uncertainty during the application of such models. The performance of the ensemble modeling approach has been demonstrated in the modeling of a generic branched pathway and the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using generalized mass action (GMA kinetics.

  12. Mental Models about Seismic Effects: Students' Profile Based Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, Sara; Moura, Rui; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, meaningful learning takes a central role in science education and is based in mental models that allow the representation of the real world by individuals. Thus, it is essential to analyse the student's mental models by promoting an easier reconstruction of scientific knowledge, by allowing them to become consistent with the curricular…

  13. A Model-Based Approach for Joint Analysis of Pain Intensity and Opioid Consumption in Postoperative Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Knøsgaard, Katrine R; Olesen, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Joint analysis of pain intensity and opioid consumption is encouraged in trials of postoperative pain. However, previous approaches have not appropriately addressed the complexity of their interrelation in time. In this study, we applied a non-linear mixed effects model to simultaneously study pain...... intensity and opioid consumption in a 4-h postoperative period for 44 patients undergoing percutaneous kidney stone surgery. Analysis was based on 748 Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) scores of pain intensity and 51 observed morphine and oxycodone dosing events. A joint model was developed to describe...... the recurrent pattern of four key phases determining the development of pain intensity and opioid consumption in time; (A) Distribution of pain intensity scores which followed a truncated Poisson distribution with time-dependent mean score ranging from 0.93 to 2.45; (B) Probability of transition to threshold...

  14. Bayesian inference on multiscale models for poisson intensity estimation: applications to photon-limited image denoising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Stamatios; Maragos, Petros; Papandreou, George

    2009-08-01

    We present an improved statistical model for analyzing Poisson processes, with applications to photon-limited imaging. We build on previous work, adopting a multiscale representation of the Poisson process in which the ratios of the underlying Poisson intensities (rates) in adjacent scales are modeled as mixtures of conjugate parametric distributions. Our main contributions include: 1) a rigorous and robust regularized expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for maximum-likelihood estimation of the rate-ratio density parameters directly from the noisy observed Poisson data (counts); 2) extension of the method to work under a multiscale hidden Markov tree model (HMT) which couples the mixture label assignments in consecutive scales, thus modeling interscale coefficient dependencies in the vicinity of image edges; 3) exploration of a 2-D recursive quad-tree image representation, involving Dirichlet-mixture rate-ratio densities, instead of the conventional separable binary-tree image representation involving beta-mixture rate-ratio densities; and 4) a novel multiscale image representation, which we term Poisson-Haar decomposition, that better models the image edge structure, thus yielding improved performance. Experimental results on standard images with artificially simulated Poisson noise and on real photon-limited images demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  15. Forensic identification of seal oils using lipid profiles and statistical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadwater, Margaret H; Seaborn, Gloria T; Schwacke, John H

    2013-03-01

    Seal blubber oils are used as a source of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in Canada but prohibited in the United States and (FA) European Union. Thus, a reliable method is needed to identify oils originating from seals versus fish. Two lipid profiling methods, fatty acid analysis using gas chromatography and triacylglycerol (TAG) analysis using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, were applied with statistical models to discriminate commercial oils and blubber samples harvested from marine fish and seals. Significant differences were observed among FA profiles, and seal samples differed from each of the fish oils (p ≤ 0.001). FA and TAG profiles were used to discriminate sample groups using a random forest classifier; all samples were classified correctly as seals versus fish using both methods. We propose a two-step method for the accurate identification of seal oils, with preliminary identification based on FA profile analysis and confirmation with TAG profiles.

  16. The Effect of a 12-Week Moderate Intensity Interval Training Program on the Antioxidant Defense Capability and Lipid Profile in Men Smoking Cigarettes or Hookah: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessalem Koubaa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To examine the impact of interval training program on the antioxidant defense capability and lipid profile in men smoking cigarettes or hookah unable or unwilling to quit smoking. Methods. Thirty-five participants performed an interval training (2 : 1 work : rest ratio 3 times a week for 12 weeks at an intensity of 70% of VO2max. All subjects were subjected to a biochemical test session before and after the training program. Results. The increase of total antioxidant status (TAS, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and α-tocopherol, is significant only for cigarette smokers (CS and hookah smokers (HS groups. The decrease of malondialdehyde (MDA and the increase of glutathione reductase (GR are more pronounced in smokers groups compared to those of nonsmokers (NS. Superoxide dismutase (SOD increases in NS, CS, and HS groups by 10.1%, 19.5%, and 13.3%, respectively (P<0.001. Likewise, a significant improvement of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio was observed in CS and HS groups (P<0.05. Conclusion. Although the interval training program does not have a significant effect on blood lipid levels, it seems to be very beneficial in the defense and prevention programs of oxidative stress.

  17. A general model for stray dose calculation of static and intensity-modulated photon radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauri, Pascal, E-mail: pascal.hauri2@uzh.ch; Schneider, Uwe [Faculty of Science, University of Zurich, Zurich 8057, Switzerland and Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland); Hälg, Roger A.; Besserer, Jürgen [Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Hirslanden Medical Center, Aarau 5000 (Switzerland)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: There is an increasing number of cancer survivors who are at risk of developing late effects caused by ionizing radiation such as induction of second tumors. Hence, the determination of out-of-field dose for a particular treatment plan in the patient’s anatomy is of great importance. The purpose of this study was to analytically model the stray dose according to its three major components. Methods: For patient scatter, a mechanistic model was developed. For collimator scatter and head leakage, an empirical approach was used. The models utilize a nominal beam energy of 6 MeV to describe two linear accelerator types of a single vendor. The parameters of the models were adjusted using ionization chamber measurements registering total absorbed dose in simple geometries. Whole-body dose measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters in an anthropomorphic phantom for static and intensity-modulated treatment plans were compared to the 3D out-of-field dose distributions calculated by a combined model. Results: The absolute mean difference between the whole-body predicted and the measured out-of-field dose of four different plans was 11% with a maximum difference below 44%. Computation time of 36 000 dose points for one field was around 30 s. By combining the model-calculated stray dose with the treatment planning system dose, the whole-body dose distribution can be viewed in the treatment planning system. Conclusions: The results suggest that the model is accurate, fast and can be used for a wide range of treatment modalities to calculate the whole-body dose distribution for clinical analysis. For similar energy spectra, the mechanistic patient scatter model can be used independently of treatment machine or beam orientation.

  18. AUTOSCALA software improvements: topside-plasmasphere profiles and TEC model assisted by AIS ionosonde measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaroni, C.; Ippolito, A.; Scotto, C.; Ciraolo, L.

    2012-12-01

    The group of Upper Atmosphere Physics at INGV (Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia) developed Autoscala, a computer program for automatic scaling of the critical frequency foF2 and other ionospheric parameters derived from ionograms. Autoscala includes a routine that automatically estimates the electron density profile below F layer peak height hmF2, by adjusting the parameters of a model according to the recorded ionogram [Scotto (2009)]. Recently we have introduced a new algorithm for modeling upper ionosphere and plasmasphere electron density profiles following the approach suggested by Kutiev et al. (2009). In particular, these model uses the parameters of F layer peak (foF2, hmF2, scale height at hmF2) to obtain scale heights that are useful to construct H- and O+ density profiles, and consequently N(h) profile (given as the sum of the former two). Integrating electron density profiles we are then able to obtain a real time TEC estimation above the considered ionospheric station. A first validation of the model is carried out for data measured at Rome ionospheric station (Italy, 41°54' N 12°28' E) using independent TEC measurements from GPS receivers. References: Scotto, C. (2009). Electron density profile calculation technique for Autoscala ionogram analysis. Advances in Space Research, 44(6), 756-766. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2009.04.037 Kutiev, I., Marinov, P., Belehaki, a., Reinisch, B., & Jakowski, N. (2009). Reconstruction of topside density profile by using the topside sounder model profiler and digisonde data. Advances in Space Research, 43(11), 1683-1687. doi:10.1016/j.asr.2008.08.017

  19. Modelling the development of rocky shoreline profiles along the northern coast of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébaudeau, Benjamin; Trenhaile, Alan S.; Edwards, Robin J.

    2013-12-01

    A mathematical wave-erosion model is used to simulate postglacial shoreline profiles along the rocky, high energy coast of the north of Ireland. The wave erosion model is driven by a suite of relative sea-level (RSL) curves for the last 16,000 years produced from four glacial rebound models. Multiple runs are performed with different initial shore profiles and rock resistances to investigate shoreline evolution and the significance of inherited morphology on the resultant profile shape. The simulated profiles are then compared with mapped profiles from three areas of the north of Ireland with different lithological and hydrographic properties. Modelled profiles generally replicate the overall mean shoreline gradients observed across the region when rock resistance is relatively high and erosion rates correspondingly low. In these profiles, breaks in mean slope are observed at depths comparable to the RSL minima in several of the RSL scenarios (at c. - 10 m, - 15 m and - 20 m for North Antrim, Derry and Donegal respectively). At Portrush and Portballintrae (Derry), profiles may be influenced by structural controls relating to the underlying basalt surface and the removal of overlying glaciogenic sediments. All RSL scenarios replicate the observed eastward increase in cliff-platform junction height, reflecting the differential glacioisostatic rebound experienced along the coast. However, the precise elevation at which the simulated cliff base occurs is sensitive to the choice of RSL scenario, suggesting that this parameter may prove useful in evaluating glacial rebound model performance. Several of the RSL scenarios generate raised shore platforms or terraces in North Antrim and Derry at heights comparable to raised shoreline features reported in the literature. However, no single curve or combination of parameters is capable of generating the range of platform and terrace features observed in the bathymetric and topographic data. These misfits are consistent with

  20. Modeling of etch profile evolution including wafer charging effects using self consistent ion fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, R.J.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1996-12-31

    As high density plasma reactors become more predominate in industry, the need has intensified for computer aided design tools which address both equipment issues such as ion flux uniformity onto the water and process issues such etch feature profile evolution. A hierarchy of models has been developed to address these issues with the goal of producing a comprehensive plasma processing design capability. The Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM) produces ion and neutral densities, and electric fields in the reactor. The Plasma Chemistry Monte Carlo Model (PCMC) determines the angular and energy distributions of ion and neutral fluxes to the wafer using species source functions, time dependent bulk electric fields, and sheath potentials from the HPEM. These fluxes are then used by the Monte Carlo Feature Profile Model (MCFP) to determine the time evolution of etch feature profiles. Using this hierarchy, the effects of physical modifications of the reactor, such as changing wafer clamps or electrode structures, on etch profiles can be evaluated. The effects of wafer charging on feature evolution are examined by calculating the fields produced by the charge deposited by ions and electrons within the features. The effect of radial variations and nonuniformity in angular and energy distribution of the reactive fluxes on feature profiles and feature charging will be discussed for p-Si etching in inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) sustained in chlorine gas mixtures. The effects of over- and under-wafer topography on etch profiles will also be discussed.

  1. Density profiles of dark matter halos in an improved Secondary Infall model

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A; Recami, E; Spedicato, E

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the density profiles of virialized halos both in the case of structure evolving hierarchically from a scale-free Gaussian delta-field having a power spectrum P(k)=A k^n in a Omega=1 Universe and in the case of the CDM model, by using a modified version of Hoffman & Shaham's (1985) (hereafter HS) and Hoffman's (1988) model. We suppose that the initial density contrast profile around local maxima is given by the mean peak profile introduced by Bardeen et al. (1986) (hereafter BBKS), and is not just proportional to the two-point correlation function, as assumed by HS. We show that the density profiles, both for scale-free Universes and the CDM model, are not power-laws but have a logarithmic slope that increases from the inner halo to its outer parts. Both scale-free, for n >=-1, and CDM density profiles are well approximated by Navarro et al. (1995, 1996, 1997) profile. The radius a, at which the slope alpha=-2, is a function of the mass of the halo and in the scale-free models al...

  2. Impact of CO2-Induced Warming on Simulated Hurricane Intensity and Precipitation: Sensitivity to the Choice of Climate Model and Convective Parameterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Thomas R.; Tuleya, Robert E.

    2004-09-01

    Previous studies have found that idealized hurricanes, simulated under warmer, high-CO2 conditions, are more intense and have higher precipitation rates than under present-day conditions. The present study explores the sensitivity of this result to the choice of climate model used to define the CO2-warmed environment and to the choice of convective parameterization used in the nested regional model that simulates the hurricanes. Approximately 1300 five-day idealized simulations are performed using a higher-resolution version of the GFDL hurricane prediction system (grid spacing as fine as 9 km, with 42 levels). All storms were embedded in a uniform 5 m s-1 easterly background flow. The large-scale thermodynamic boundary conditions for the experiments— atmospheric temperature and moisture profiles and SSTs—are derived from nine different Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP2+) climate models. The CO2-induced SST changes from the global climate models, based on 80-yr linear trends from +1% yr-1 CO2 increase experiments, range from about +0.8° to +2.4°C in the three tropical storm basins studied. Four different moist convection parameterizations are tested in the hurricane model, including the use of no convective parameterization in the highest resolution inner grid. Nearly all combinations of climate model boundary conditions and hurricane model convection schemes show a CO2-induced increase in both storm intensity and near-storm precipitation rates. The aggregate results, averaged across all experiments, indicate a 14% increase in central pressure fall, a 6% increase in maximum surface wind speed, and an 18% increase in average precipitation rate within 100 km of the storm center. The fractional change in precipitation is more sensitive to the choice of convective parameterization than is the fractional change of intensity. Current hurricane potential intensity theories, applied to the climate model environments, yield an average increase of intensity

  3. High-intensity interval training in patients with coronary heart disease: Prescription models and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Paula A B; Boidin, Maxime; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Gayda, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has emerged as an alternative and/or complementary exercise modality to continuous aerobic exercise training (CAET) in CHD patients. However, the literature contains descriptions of many HIIT protocols with different stage durations, nature of recovery and intensities. In this review, we discuss the most recent forms of validated HIIT protocols in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and how to prescribe and use them during short- and long-term (phase II and III) cardiac rehabilitation programs. We also compare the superior and/or equivalent short- and long-term effects of HIIT versus CAET on aerobic fitness, cardiovascular function, and quality of life; their efficiency, safety, and tolerance; and exercise adherence. Short interval HIIT was found beneficial for CHD patients with lower aerobic fitness and would ideally be used in initiation and improvement stages. Medium and/or long interval HIIT protocols may be beneficial for CHD patients with higher aerobic fitness, and would be ideally used in the improvement and maintenance stages because of their high physiological stimulus. Finally, we propose progressive individualized models of HIIT programs (phase II to III) for patients with CHD and how to ideally use them according to the clinical status of patients and phase of the cardiac rehabilitation program.

  4. A reduced-form intensity-based model under fuzzy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; Zhuang, Yaming

    2015-05-01

    The external shocks and internal contagion are the important sources of default events. However, the external shocks and internal contagion effect on the company is not observed, we cannot get the accurate size of the shocks. The information of investors relative to the default process exhibits a certain fuzziness. Therefore, using randomness and fuzziness to study such problems as derivative pricing or default probability has practical needs. But the idea of fuzzifying credit risk models is little exploited, especially in a reduced-form model. This paper proposes a new default intensity model with fuzziness and presents a fuzzy default probability and default loss rate, and puts them into default debt and credit derivative pricing. Finally, the simulation analysis verifies the rationality of the model. Using fuzzy numbers and random analysis one can consider more uncertain sources in the default process of default and investors' subjective judgment on the financial markets in a variety of fuzzy reliability so as to broaden the scope of possible credit spreads.

  5. Modeling the impact of interventions against Acinetobacter baumannii transmission in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Tan N; Kong, David C M; Marshall, Caroline; Kirkpatrick, Carl M J; McBryde, Emma S

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of infection control interventions against Acinetobacter baumannii remains unclear, despite such information being critical for effective prevention of the transmission of this pathogen. Mathematical modeling offers an alternative to clinical trials, which may be prohibitively expensive, unfeasible or unethical, in predicting the impact of interventions. Furthermore, it allows the ability to ask key "what if" questions to evaluate which interventions have the most impact. We constructed a transmission dynamic model to quantify the effects of interventions on reducing A. baumannii prevalence and the basic reproduction ratio (R0) in intensive care units (ICUs). We distinguished between colonization and infection, and incorporated antibiotic exposure and transmission from free-living bacteria in the environment. Under the assumptions and parameterization in our model, 25% and 18% of patients are colonized and infected with A. baumannii, respectively; and R0 is 1.4. Improved compliance with hand hygiene (≥87%), enhanced environmental cleaning, reduced length of ICU stay of colonized patients (≤ 10 days), shorter durations of antibiotic treatment of A. baumannii (≤6 days), and isolation of infected patients combined with cleaning of isolation rooms are effective, reducing R0 to below unity. In contrast, expediting the recovery of the intestinal microbiota (e.g. use of probiotics) is not effective. This study represents a biologically realistic model of the transmission dynamics of A. baumannii, and the most comprehensive analysis of the effectiveness of interventions against this pathogen. Our study provides important data for designing effective infection control interventions.

  6. Finite element modeling of heating phenomena of cracks excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhao-Jiang; Zheng Jiang; Zhang Shu-Yi; Mi Xiao-Bing; Zheng Kai

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional thermo-mechanical coupled finite element model is built up to simulate the phenomena of dynamical contact and frictional heating of crack faces when the plate containing the crack is excited by high-intensity ultrasonic pulses. In the finite element model, the high-power ultrasonic transducer is modeled by using a piezoelectric thermal-analogy method, and the dynamical interaction between both crack faces is modeled using a contact-impact theory. In the simulations, the frictional heating taking place at the crack faces is quantitatively calculated by using finite element thermal-structural coupling analysis, especially, the influences of acoustic chaos to plate vibration and crack heating are calculated and analysed in detail Meanwhile, the related ultrasonic infrared images are also obtained experimentally, and the theoretical simulation results are in agreement with that of the experiments. The results show that, by using the theoretical method, a good simulation of dynamic interaction and friction heating process of the crack faces under non-chaotic or chaotic sound excitation can be obtained.

  7. Modeling of welded bead profile for rapid prototyping by robotic MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong; ZHU Sheng; WANG Tao; WANG Wanglong

    2009-01-01

    As a deposition technology, robotic metal active gas(MAG) welding has shown new promise for rapid prototyping (RP) of metallic parts. During the process of metal forming using robotic MAG welding, sectional profile of single-pass welded bead is critical to formed accuracy and quality of metal pans. In this paper, the experiments of single-pass welded bead for rapid prototyping using robotic MAG welding were carried out. The effect of some edge detectors on the cross-sectional edge of welded bead was discussed and curve fitting was applied using leat square fitting. Consequently, the mathematical model of welded bead profile was developed. The experimental results show that good shape could be obtained under suitable welding parameters. Canny operawr is suitable to edge detection of welded bead profile, and the mathematical model of welded bead profile developed is approximately parabola.

  8. A measurement model of multiple intelligence profiles of management graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Heamalatha; Awang, Siti Rahmah

    2017-05-01

    In this study, developing a fit measurement model and identifying the best fitting items to represent Howard Gardner's nine intelligences namely, musical intelligence, bodily-kinaesthetic intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence are the main interest in order to enhance the opportunities of the management graduates for employability. In order to develop a fit measurement model, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was applied. A psychometric test which is the Ability Test in Employment (ATIEm) was used as the instrument to measure the existence of nine types of intelligence of 137 University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM) management graduates for job placement purposes. The initial measurement model contains nine unobserved variables and each unobserved variable is measured by ten observed variables. Finally, the modified measurement model deemed to improve the Normed chi-square (NC) = 1.331; Incremental Fit Index (IFI) = 0.940 and Root Mean Square of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.049 was developed. The findings showed that the UTeM management graduates possessed all nine intelligences either high or low. Musical intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence contributed highest loadings on certain items. However, most of the intelligences such as bodily kinaesthetic intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence interpersonal intelligence and intrapersonal intelligence possessed by UTeM management graduates are just at the borderline.

  9. Estimation of volcanic ash emission profiles using ceilometer measurements and transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ka Lok; Geiß, Alexander; Gasteiger, Josef; Wagner, Frank; Wiegner, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the number of active remote sensing systems grows rapidly, since several national weather services initiated ceilometer networks. These networks are excellent tools to monitor the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds and to validate chemical transport models. Moreover, it is expected that the can be used to refine model calculations to better predict situations that might be dangerous for aviation. As a ceilometer can be considered as a simple single-wavelength backscatter lidar, quantitative aerosol profile information, i.e., the aerosol backscatter coefficient (βp) profile, can be derived provided that the ceilometer is calibrated. Volcanic ash concentration profile can then be estimated by using prior optical properties of volcanic ash. These profiles are then used for the inverse calculation of the emission profile of the volcanic eruption, thus, improving one of the most critical parameters of the numerical simulation. In this study, the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) is used to simulate the dispersion of volcanic ash. We simulate the distribution of ash for a given time/height grid, in order to compute the sensitivity functions for each measurements. As an example we use ceilometer measurements of the German weather service to reconstruct the temporal and spatial emission profile of Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010. We have also examined the sensitivity of the retrieved emission profiles to different measurement parameters, e.g., geolocation of the measurement sites, total number of measurement sites, temporal and vertical resolution of the measurements, etc. The first results show that ceilometer measurements in principle are feasible for the inversion of volcanic ash emission profiles.

  10. An analysis of the numerical model influence on the ground temperature profile determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczur, Marek; Polepszyc, Inga; Sapińska-Śliwa, Aneta; Gonet, Andrzej

    2017-02-01

    The estimation of the ground temperature profile with respect to the depth and time is the key issue in many engineering applications which use the ground as a source of thermal energy. In the present work, the influence of the model components on the calculated ground temperature distribution has been analysed in order to develop an accurate and robust model for the prediction of the ground temperature profile. The presented mathematical model takes into account all the key phenomena occurring in the soil and on its top surface. The impact of individual model elements on the temperature of the soil has been analysed. It has been found that the simplest models and the most complex model result in a similar temperature variation over the simulation period, but only at a low depth. A detailed analysis shows that a larger depth requires more complex models and the calculation with the use of simple models results in an incorrect temperature and a theoretical COP estimation.

  11. An approach to determine pressure profile generated by compression bandage using quasi-linear viscoelastic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bipin; Das, Apurba; Alagirusamy, R

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the stress relaxation behavior of the compression bandage could be very useful in determining the behavior of the interface pressure exerted by the bandage on a limb during the course of the compression treatment. There has been no comprehensive study in the literature to investigate the pressure profile (interface pressure with time) generated by a compression bandage when applied at different levels of strain. The present study attempts to describe the pressure profile, with the use of a quasi-linear viscoelastic model, generated by a compression bandage during compression therapy. The quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) theory proposed by Fung (Fung, 1972, "Stress Strain History Relations of Soft Tissues in Simple Elongation," Biomechanics: Its Foundations and Objectives, Y. C. Fung, N. Perrone, and M. Anliker, eds., Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, pp. 181-207). was used to model the nonlinear time- and history-dependent relaxation behavior of the bandage using the ramp strain approach. The regression analysis was done to find the correlation between the pressure profile and the relaxation behavior of the bandage. The parameters of the QLV model, describing the relaxation behavior of the bandage, were used to determine the pressure profile generated by the bandage at different levels of strain. The relaxation behaviors of the bandage at different levels of strain were well described by the QLV model parameters. A high correlation coefficient (nearly 0.98) shows a good correlation of the pressure profile with the stress relaxation behavior of the bandage.The prediction of the pressure profile using the QLV model parameters were in agreement with the experimental data. The pressure profile generated by a compression bandage could be predicted using the QLV model describing the nonlinear relaxation behavior of the bandage. This new application of the QLV theory helps in evaluating the bandage performance during compression therapy as scientific wound

  12. A Time-Dependent Oceanic Aerosol Profile Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-10

    t iCk t ,% il 01t 11Uc’. .l2 inm[proirnt ent in thi-, model can he ohtained bk simph\\ upgrading the .,irli(Ui ..uhr(iutntcN u,,cd tl ItiL " model Th...PRINT Ni 17 P(20)=4 18 RETURN 20 REM SAVE WORLD ROUTINE 21 P(20)=5 22 RETURN 10000 GO TO 30090 20000 REM -------------------- OVL -- AREA 20010 REM 30000...RETURN 20000 REM 20010 REM --- 20020 REM @AEROSOL/PROGRAM/TASK1 20030 REM STUART GATHMAN NRL CODE 4327 20040 REM - 20050 REM 20060 UNIT 1 20070 DIM A

  13. Development of a wear model for the wheel profile optimisation on railway vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignesti, M.; Innocenti, A.; Marini, L.; Meli, E.; Rindi, A.

    2013-09-01

    The modelling and the reduction of wear due to wheel-rail interaction is a fundamental aspect in the railway field, mainly correlated to safety, maintenance interventions and costs. In this work, the authors present two innovative wheel profiles, specifically designed with the aim of improving the wear and stability behaviour of the standard ORE S1002 wheel profile matched with the UIC60 rail profile canted at 1/20 rad, which represents the wheel-rail combination adopted in the Italian railway line. The two wheel profiles, conventionally named CD1 and DR2, have been developed by the authors in collaboration with Trenitalia S.p.A. The CD1 profile has been designed with the purpose of spreading the contact points in the flange zone on a larger area in order to reduce wear phenomena and having a constant equivalent conicity for small lateral displacements of the wheelset with respect to the centred position in the track. The DR2 wheel profile is instead designed to guarantee the same kinematic characteristics of the matching formed by ORE S1002 wheel profile and UIC60 rail profile with laying angle α p equal to 1/40 rad, widely common in European railways and characterised by good performances in both wear and kinematic behaviour. The evolution of wheel profiles due to wear has been evaluated through a wear model developed and validated by the authors in previous works. The wear model comprises two mutually interactive units: a vehicle model for the dynamic simulations and a model for the wear assessment. The whole model is based on a discrete process: each discrete step consists in one dynamic simulation and one profile update by means of the wear model while, within the discrete step, the profiles are supposed to be constant. The choice of an appropriate step is crucial in terms of precision and computational effort: the particular strategy adopted in the current work has been chosen for its capacity in representing the nonlinear wear evolution and for the low

  14. A Mathematical Model for the Exhaust Gas Temperature Profile of a Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, C. H. G.; Maia, C. B.; Sodré, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a heat transfer model for the exhaust gas of a diesel power generator to determine the gas temperature profile in the exhaust pipe. The numerical methodology to solve the mathematical model was developed using a finite difference method approach for energy equation resolution and determination of temperature profiles considering turbulent fluid flow and variable fluid properties. The simulation was carried out for engine operation under loads from 0 kW to 40 kW. The model was compared with results obtained using the multidimensional Ansys CFX software, which was applied to solve the governor equations of turbulent fluid flow. The results for the temperature profiles in the exhaust pipe show a good proximity between the mathematical model developed and the multidimensional software.

  15. A Mathematical Model for Non-monotonic Deposition Profiles in Deep Bed Filtration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Hao; Shapiro, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for suspension/colloid flow in porous media and non-monotonic deposition is proposed. It accounts for the migration of particles associated with the pore walls via the second energy minimum (surface associated phase). The surface associated phase migration is characterized...... by advection and diffusion/dispersion. The proposed model is able to produce a nonmonotonic deposition profile. A set of methods for estimating the modeling parameters is provided in the case of minimal particle release. The estimation can be easily performed with available experimental information...... condition for producing non-monotonic deposition profiles. The described physics by the additional equation may be different in different experimental settings....

  16. Model-Driven Development for scientific computing. Computations of RHEED intensities for a disordered surface. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniluk, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    separate thread inside each transaction generated by the master Growth09 program (see pii:S0010-4655(09)00386-5 A. Daniluk, Model-Driven Development for scientific computing. Computations of RHEED intensities for a disordered surface. Part II The RHEED1DProcess requires the user to provide the appropriate parameters for the crystal structure under investigation. These parameters are loaded from the parameters.ini file at run-time. Instructions on the preparation of the .ini files can be found in the new distribution. The RHEED1DProcess requires the user to provide the appropriate values of the layers of coverage profiles. The CoverageProfiles.dat file (generated by Growth09 master application) at run-time loads these values. The RHEED1DProcess enables carrying out one-dimensional dynamical calculations for the fcc lattice, with a two-atoms basis and fcc lattice, with one atom basis but yet the zeroth Fourier component of the scattering potential in the TRHEED1D::crystPotUg() function can be modified according to users' specific application requirements. * The figures mentioned can be downloaded, see "Supplementary material" below. Unusual features: The program is distributed in the form of main projects RHEED1DProcess.cbproj and Graph2D0x.cbproj with associated files, and should be compiled using Embarcadero RAD Studio 2010 along with Together visual-modelling platform. The program should be compiled with English/USA regional and language options. Additional comments: This version of the RHEED program is designed to run in conjunction with the GROWTH09 (ADVL_v3_0) program. It does not replace the previous, stand alone, RHEEDGR-09 (ADUY_v3_0) version. Running time: The typical running time is machine and user-parameters dependent. References:[1] OMG, Model Driven Architecture Guide Version 1.0.1, 2003.

  17. Bayesian Hierarchical Model for Estimating Gene Expression Intensity Using Multiple Scanned Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auvinen Petri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for improving the quality of signal from DNA microarrays by using several scans at varying scanner sen-sitivities. A Bayesian latent intensity model is introduced for the analysis of such data. The method improves the accuracy at which expressions can be measured in all ranges and extends the dynamic range of measured gene expression at the high end. Our method is generic and can be applied to data from any organism, for imaging with any scanner that allows varying the laser power, and for extraction with any image analysis software. Results from a self-self hybridization data set illustrate an improved precision in the estimation of the expression of genes compared to what can be achieved by applying standard methods and using only a single scan.

  18. Laser-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound heating in an in vivo small animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2016-11-01

    The enhanced heating effect during the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-optical-fluence laser illumination was investigated by using an in vivo murine animal model. The thighs of murine animals were synergistically irradiated by HIFU and pulsed nano-second laser light. The temperature increases in the target region were measured by a thermocouple under different HIFU pressures, which were 6.2, 7.9, and 9.8 MPa, in combination with 20 mJ/cm2 laser exposures at 532 nm wavelength. In comparison with conventional laser therapies, the laser fluence used here is at least one order of magnitude lower. The results showed that laser illumination could enhance temperature during HIFU applications. Additionally, cavitation activity was enhanced when laser and HIFU irradiation were concurrently used. Further, a theoretical simulation showed that the inertial cavitation threshold was indeed decreased when laser and HIFU irradiation were utilized concurrently.

  19. A comparative analysis of predictive models of morbidity in intensive care unit after cardiac surgery – Part I: model planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biagioli Bonizella

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different methods have recently been proposed for predicting morbidity in intensive care units (ICU. The aim of the present study was to critically review a number of approaches for developing models capable of estimating the probability of morbidity in ICU after heart surgery. The study is divided into two parts. In this first part, popular models used to estimate the probability of class membership are grouped into distinct categories according to their underlying mathematical principles. Modelling techniques and intrinsic strengths and weaknesses of each model are analysed and discussed from a theoretical point of view, in consideration of clinical applications. Methods Models based on Bayes rule, k-nearest neighbour algorithm, logistic regression, scoring systems and artificial neural networks are investigated. Key issues for model design are described. The mathematical treatment of some aspects of model structure is also included for readers interested in developing models, though a full understanding of mathematical relationships is not necessary if the reader is only interested in perceiving the practical meaning of model assumptions, weaknesses and strengths from a user point of view. Results Scoring systems are very attractive due to their simplicity of use, although this may undermine their predictive capacity. Logistic regression models are trustworthy tools, although they suffer from the principal limitations of most regression procedures. Bayesian models seem to be a good compromise between complexity and predictive performance, but model recalibration is generally necessary. k-nearest neighbour may be a valid non parametric technique, though computational cost and the need for large data storage are major weaknesses of this approach. Artificial neural networks have intrinsic advantages with respect to common statistical models, though the training process may be problematical. Conclusion Knowledge of model

  20. Tenure Profiles and Efficient Separation in a Stochastic Productivity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buhai, I.S.; Teulings, C.N.

    2014-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model based on efficient bargaining, where both log outside productivity and log productivity in the current job follow a random walk. This setting allows the application of real option theory. We derive the efficient worker-firm separation rule. We show that wage data from

  1. An ontologically well-founded profile for UML conceptual models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guizzardi, Giancarlo; Wagner, Gerd; Guarino, Nicola; Sinderen, van Marten; Persson, Anne; Stirna, Janis

    2004-01-01

    UML class diagrams can be used as a language for expressing a conceptual model of a domain. In a series of papers [1,2,3] we have been using the General Ontological Language (GOL) and its underlying upper level ontology, proposed in [4,5], to evaluate the ontological correctness of a conceptual UML

  2. The Component Slope Linear Model for Calculating Intensive Partial Molar Properties: Application to Waste Glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Jacob G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    Partial molar properties are the changes occurring when the fraction of one component is varied while the fractions of all other component mole fractions change proportionally. They have many practical and theoretical applications in chemical thermodynamics. Partial molar properties of chemical mixtures are difficult to measure because the component mole fractions must sum to one, so a change in fraction of one component must be offset with a change in one or more other components. Given that more than one component fraction is changing at a time, it is difficult to assign a change in measured response to a change in a single component. In this study, the Component Slope Linear Model (CSLM), a model previously published in the statistics literature, is shown to have coefficients that correspond to the intensive partial molar properties. If a measured property is plotted against the mole fraction of a component while keeping the proportions of all other components constant, the slope at any given point on a graph of this curve is the partial molar property for that constituent. Actually plotting this graph has been used to determine partial molar properties for many years. The CSLM directly includes this slope in a model that predicts properties as a function of the component mole fractions. This model is demonstrated by applying it to the constant pressure heat capacity data from the NaOH-NaAl(OH{sub 4}H{sub 2}O system, a system that simplifies Hanford nuclear waste. The partial molar properties of H{sub 2}O, NaOH, and NaAl(OH){sub 4} are determined. The equivalence of the CSLM and the graphical method is verified by comparing results detennined by the two methods. The CSLM model has been previously used to predict the liquidus temperature of spinel crystals precipitated from Hanford waste glass. Those model coefficients are re-interpreted here as the partial molar spinel liquidus temperature of the glass components.

  3. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Eikelder, H M M; Bošnački, D; Elevelt, A; Donato, K; Di Tullio, A; Breuer, B J T; van Wijk, J H; van Dijk, E V M; Modena, D; Yeo, S Y; Grüll, H

    2016-02-21

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  4. Modelling of catchment nitrogen concentrations response to observed varying fertilizer application intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Seifeddine; Jiang, Sanyuan; Yang, Xiaoqiang; Rode, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Eutrophication is a serious environmental problem. Despite numerous experimental and modelling efforts, understanding of the effect of land use and agriculture practices on in-stream nitrogen fluxes is still not fully achieved. This study combined intensive field monitoring and numerical modelling using 30 years of surface water quality data of a drinking water reservoir catchment in central Germany. The Weida catchment (99.5 km2) is part of the Elbe river basin and has a share of 67% of agricultural land use with significant changes in agricultural practices within the investigation period. The geology of the Weida catchment is characterized by clay schists and eruptive rocks, where rocks have low permeability. The semi-distributed hydrological water quality HYPE (Hydrological Predictions for the Environment) model was used to reproduce the measured data. First, the model was calibrated for discharge and nitrate-N concentrations (NO3-N) during the period 1997-2000. Then, the HYPE model was validated successfully for three different periods 1983-1987, 1989-1996 and 2000-2003, which are charaterized by different fertilizer application rates (with lowest discharge prediction performance of NSE = 0.78 and PBIAS = 3.74%, considering calibration and validation periods). Results showed that the measured as well as simulated in-stream nitrate-N concentration respond quickly to fertilizer application changes (increase/decrease). This rapid response can be explained with short residence times of interflow and baseflow runoff components due to the hardrock geological properties of the catchment. Results revealed that the surface runoff and interflow are the most dominant runoff components. HYPE model could reproduce reasonably well the NO3-N daily loads for varying fertilizer application, when detailed input data in terms of crop management (field-specific survey) are considered.

  5. Modelling the temperature evolution of bone under high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Eikelder, H. M. M.; Bošnački, D.; Elevelt, A.; Donato, K.; Di Tullio, A.; Breuer, B. J. T.; van Wijk, J. H.; van Dijk, E. V. M.; Modena, D.; Yeo, S. Y.; Grüll, H.

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) has been clinically shown to be effective for palliative pain management in patients suffering from skeletal metastasis. The underlying mechanism is supposed to be periosteal denervation caused by ablative temperatures reached through ultrasound heating of the cortex. The challenge is exact temperature control during sonication as MR-based thermometry approaches for bone tissue are currently not available. Thus, in contrast to the MR-HIFU ablation of soft tissue, a thermometry feedback to the HIFU is lacking, and the treatment of bone metastasis is entirely based on temperature information acquired in the soft tissue adjacent to the bone surface. However, heating of the adjacent tissue depends on the exact sonication protocol and requires extensive modelling to estimate the actual temperature of the cortex. Here we develop a computational model to calculate the spatial temperature evolution in bone and the adjacent tissue during sonication. First, a ray-tracing technique is used to compute the heat production in each spatial point serving as a source term for the second part, where the actual temperature is calculated as a function of space and time by solving the Pennes bio-heat equation. Importantly, our model includes shear waves that arise at the bone interface as well as all geometrical considerations of transducer and bone geometry. The model was compared with a theoretical approach based on the far field approximation and an MR-HIFU experiment using a bone phantom. Furthermore, we investigated the contribution of shear waves to the heat production and resulting temperatures in bone. The temperature evolution predicted by our model was in accordance with the far field approximation and agreed well with the experimental data obtained in phantoms. Our model allows the simulation of the HIFU treatments of bone metastasis in patients and can be extended to a planning tool prior to MR

  6. Towards an Enhancement of Organizational Information Security through Threat Factor Profiling (TFP) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidi, Fatimah; Daud, Maslina; Ahmad, Sabariah; Zainuddin, Naqliyah; Anneisa Abdullah, Syafiqa; Jabar, Marzanah A.; Suriani Affendey, Lilly; Ishak, Iskandar; Sharef, Nurfadhlina Mohd; Zolkepli, Maslina; Nur Majdina Nordin, Fatin; Amat Sejani, Hashimah; Ramadzan Hairani, Saiful

    2017-09-01

    Information security has been identified by organizations as part of internal operations that need to be well implemented and protected. This is because each day the organizations face a high probability of increase of threats to their networks and services that will lead to information security issues. Thus, effective information security management is required in order to protect their information assets. Threat profiling is a method that can be used by an organization to address the security challenges. Threat profiling allows analysts to understand and organize intelligent information related to threat groups. This paper presents a comparative analysis that was conducted to study the existing threat profiling models. It was found that existing threat models were constructed based on specific objectives, thus each model is limited to only certain components or factors such as assets, threat sources, countermeasures, threat agents, threat outcomes and threat actors. It is suggested that threat profiling can be improved by the combination of components found in each existing threat profiling model/framework. The proposed model can be used by an organization in executing a proactive approach to incident management.

  7. Model comparison of the dark matter profiles of Fornax, Sculptor, Carina and Sextans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breddels, Maarten A.; Helmi, Amina

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We compare dark matter profile models of four dwarf spheroidal galaxies satellites of the Milky Way using Bayesian evidence. Methods: We use orbit based dynamical models to fit the 2nd and 4th moments of the line of sight velocity distributions of the Fornax, Sculptor, Carina and Sextans dwarf

  8. A Dynamic Model of the Tragedy of the Commons in Marketing-Intensive Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohoon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a dynamic model and analyzes its process that may plunge the business ecosystem into ToC (the Tragedy of the Commons. When developing the model, we have in mind some industries where the marketing competition to secure a large installed base is intense. The social commerce industry is a representative example of this type of industries, but the scope of this study is not limited to the industry. We first introduce a previous study focusing on the static Nash equilibrium, and then present an extended version of the basic model in a dynamic perspective. According to our analyses on the dynamic equilibria together with their stability, there may be a unique interior equilibrium, but it is highly likely unstable. In addition, possible (near boundary equilibria are also unstable for a wide range of parameter values. We also conduct some numerical experiments and discover cycles as solutions to some particular instances. Since those cycles contain the ToC traps, a policy measure or regulation may need to be employed. Our approach and results will help to figure out a clue to escape from the ToC trap, thereby shedding new light on the sustainable growth of the business ecosystem, which is prone to excessive marketing competition.

  9. Modeling Intensive Longitudinal Data With Mixtures of Nonparametric Trajectories and Time-Varying Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziak, John J.; Li, Runze; Tan, Xianming; Shiffman, Saul; Shiyko, Mariya P.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral scientists increasingly collect intensive longitudinal data (ILD), in which phenomena are measured at high frequency and in real time. In many such studies, it is of interest to describe the pattern of change over time in important variables as well as the changing nature of the relationship between variables. Individuals' trajectories on variables of interest may be far from linear, and the predictive relationship between variables of interest and related covariates may also change over time in a nonlinear way. Time-varying effect models (TVEMs; see Tan, Shiyko, Li, Li, & Dierker, 2012) address these needs by allowing regression coefficients to be smooth, nonlinear functions of time rather than constants. However, it is possible that not only observed covariates but also unknown, latent variables may be related to the outcome. That is, regression coefficients may change over time and also vary for different kinds of individuals. Therefore, we describe a finite mixture version of TVEM for situations in which the population is heterogeneous and in which a single trajectory would conceal important, inter-individual differences. This extended approach, MixTVEM, combines finite mixture modeling with non- or semi-parametric regression modeling, in order to describe a complex pattern of change over time for distinct latent classes of individuals. The usefulness of the method is demonstrated in an empirical example from a smoking cessation study. We provide a versatile SAS macro and R function for fitting MixTVEMs. PMID:26390169

  10. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  11. An application to model traffic intensity of agricultural machinery at field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Katja; Kuhwald, Michael; Duttmann, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    Several soil-pressure-models deal with the impact of agricultural machines on soils. In many cases, these models were used for single spots and consider a static machine configuration. Therefore, a statement about the spatial distribution of soil compaction risk for entire working processes is limited. The aim of the study is the development of an application for the spatial modelling of traffic lanes from agricultural vehicles including wheel load, ground pressure and wheel passages at the field scale. The application is based on Open Source software, application and data formats, using python programming language. Minimum input parameters are GPS-positions, vehicles and tires (producer and model) and the tire inflation pressure. Five working processes were distinguished: soil tillage, manuring, plant protection, sowing and harvest. Currently, two different models (Diserens 2009, Rücknagel et al. 2015) were implemented to calculate the soil pressure. The application was tested at a study site in Lower Saxony, Germany. Since 2015, field traffic were recorded by RTK-GPS and used machine set ups were noted. Using these input information the traffic lanes, wheel load and soil pressure were calculated for all working processes. For instance, the maize harvest in 2016 with a crop chopper and one transport vehicle crossed about 55 % of the total field area. At some places the machines rolled over up to 46 times. Approximately 35 % of the total area was affected by wheel loads over 7 tons and soil pressures between 163 and 193 kPa. With the information about the spatial distribution of wheel passages, wheel load and soil pressure it is possible to identify hot spots of intensive field traffic. Additionally, the use of the application enables the analysis of soil compaction risk induced by agricultural machines for long- and short-term periods.

  12. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  13. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    OpenAIRE

    Sveiczer Akos; Buchwald Peter

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential) F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, whi...

  14. Small signal gain based on analytic models of thin intense electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Elliott, C.; McVey, Brian; Schmitt, Mark

    1991-07-01

    We develop the free electron laser theory of the effective energy distribution and the small signal gain for a thin electron beam. The assumption of thinness allows us to treat various transverse locations and electron beam trajectory angles as introducing phase shifts that have the same effect as those introduced by a change in energy of the electron. These ideas extend previous work of Colson et al., Dattoli et al., Scharlemann, and others in five important ways. The first is the ability to treat electron beams with three different classes of matching or symmetry conditions: (i) electron beams with separate betatron matching in each plane. (ii) those with aspect ratio matching, and (iii) crossed matched beams. Manifestations of these symmetries include elliptical cross-sections and electron beams that have modulated spatial profiles. For these we derive analytical expressions for effective energy distributions. Second, two emittance parameters for the electron beam are shown to consolidate into a single parameter that describes most of the energy variation of the effective energy distributions. Thus, the effective energy distribution for a 1:4 ribbon electron beam is nearly equivalent to a distribution for a beam of circular cross-section. Third, these calculations extend to energy distributions, angular distributions, and spatial distributions that all follow Gaussian profiles. Fourth, this model incorporates the description of the incident Gaussian optical beam and the above electron beam dynamics into a single influence function kernel. Emittance, energy spread, diffraction, and gain may be interpreted as limiting the length over which the bunching contributions of the propagating electric fields downstream are important. Fifth, three-dimensional profiles of the optical fields are computed. This work is complementary to the recent work of Yu, Krinsky and Gluckstern in that ours always describes the transition from low gain to high gain for a thin beam and not

  15. Profile and outcome of patients with acute toxicity admitted in intensive care unit: Experiences from a major corporate hospital in urban India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omender Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: There is scarcity of data from the Indian subcontinent regarding the profile and outcome of patients presenting with acute poisoning admitted to intensive care units (ICU. We undertook this retrospective analysis to assess the course and outcome of such patients admitted in an ICU of a tertiary care private hospital. Methods: We analyzed data from 138 patients admitted to ICU with acute poisoning between July 2006 and March 2009. Data regarding type of poisoning, time of presentation, reason for ICU admission, ICU course and outcome were obtained. Results: Seventy (50.7% patients were males and majority (47.8% of admissions were from age group 21 to 30 years. The most common agents were benzodiazepines, 41/138 (29.7%, followed by alcohol, 34/138 (24.63% and opioids, 10/138 (7.2%. Thirty-two (23% consumed two or more agents. Commonest mode of toxicity was suicidal (78.3% and the route of exposure was mainly oral (97.8%. The highest incidence of toxicity was due to drugs (46.3% followed by household agents (13%. Organ failure was present in 67 patients (48.5%. During their ICU course, dialysis was required in four, inotropic support in 14 and ventilator support in 13 patients. ICU mortality was 3/138 (2.8%. All deaths were due to aluminium phosphide poisoning. Conclusions: The present data give an insight into epidemiology of poisoning and represents a trend in urban India. The spectrum differs as we cater to urban middle and upper class. There is an increasing variety and complexity of toxins, with substance abuse attributing to significant number of cases.

  16. Complex network models reveal correlations among network metrics, exercise intensity and role of body changes in the fatigue process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vanessa Helena; Gama, Maria Carolina Traina; Sousa, Filipe Antônio Barros; Lewis, Theodore Gyle; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia Barros

    2015-05-01

    The aims of the present study were analyze the fatigue process at distinct intensity efforts and to investigate its occurrence as interactions at distinct body changes during exercise, using complex network models. For this, participants were submitted to four different running intensities until exhaustion, accomplished in a non-motorized treadmill using a tethered system. The intensities were selected according to critical power model. Mechanical (force, peak power, mean power, velocity and work) and physiological related parameters (heart rate, blood lactate, time until peak blood lactate concentration (lactate time), lean mass, anaerobic and aerobic capacities) and IPAQ score were obtained during exercises and it was used to construction of four complex network models. Such models have both, theoretical and mathematical value, and enables us to perceive new insights that go beyond conventional analysis. From these, we ranked the influences of each node at the fatigue process. Our results shows that nodes, links and network metrics are sensibility according to increase of efforts intensities, been the velocity a key factor to exercise maintenance at models/intensities 1 and 2 (higher time efforts) and force and power at models 3 and 4, highlighting mechanical variables in the exhaustion occurrence and even training prescription applications.

  17. Complex network models reveal correlations among network metrics, exercise intensity and role of body changes in the fatigue process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vanessa Helena; Gama, Maria Carolina Traina; Sousa, Filipe Antônio Barros; Lewis, Theodore Gyle; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia Barros

    2015-05-21

    The aims of the present study were analyze the fatigue process at distinct intensity efforts and to investigate its occurrence as interactions at distinct body changes during exercise, using complex network models. For this, participants were submitted to four different running intensities until exhaustion, accomplished in a non-motorized treadmill using a tethered system. The intensities were selected according to critical power model. Mechanical (force, peak power, mean power, velocity and work) and physiological related parameters (heart rate, blood lactate, time until peak blood lactate concentration (lactate time), lean mass, anaerobic and aerobic capacities) and IPAQ score were obtained during exercises and it was used to construction of four complex network models. Such models have both, theoretical and mathematical value, and enables us to perceive new insights that go beyond conventional analysis. From these, we ranked the influences of each node at the fatigue process. Our results shows that nodes, links and network metrics are sensibility according to increase of efforts intensities, been the velocity a key factor to exercise maintenance at models/intensities 1 and 2 (higher time efforts) and force and power at models 3 and 4, highlighting mechanical variables in the exhaustion occurrence and even training prescription applications.

  18. Statistical distribution of the optical intensity obtained using a Gaussian Schell model for space-to-ground link laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengnan; Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing; Yu, Siyuan; Yang, Qingbo; Wu, Jiajie

    2016-05-01

    Based on the characteristics of the laser device and the inevitable error of the processing technique, a laser beam emitted from a communication terminal can be represented by the Gaussian Schell model (GSM). In space-to-ground link laser communications, the optical intensity is affected by the source coherence parameter and the zenith angle. With full consideration of these two parameters, the statistical distribution model of the optical intensity with a GSM laser in both downlink and uplink is derived. The simulation results indicate that increasing the source coherence parameter has an effect on the statistical distribution of the optical intensity; this effect is highly similar to the effect of a larger zenith angle. The optical intensity invariably degrades with increasing source coherence parameter or zenith angle. The results of this work can promote the improvement of the redundancy design of a laser communication receiver system.

  19. A distributed model for slope stability analysis using radar detected rainfall intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, L.; Rossi, G.; Catani, F.

    2009-04-01

    The term shallow landslides is widely used in literature to describe a slope movement of limited size that mainly develops in soils up to a maximum of a few meters. Shallow landslides are usually triggered by heavy rainfall because, as the water starts to infiltrate in the soil, the pore-water pressure increases so that the shear strength of the soil is reduced leading to slope failure. We have developed a distributed hydrological-geotechnical model for the forecasting of the temporal and spatial distribution of shallow landslides to be used as a warning system for civil protection purpose. The model uses radar detected rainfall intensity as the input for the hydrological simulation of the infiltration. Using the rainfall pattern detected by the radar is in fact possible to dynamically control the redistribution of groundwater pressure associated with transient infiltration of rain so as to infer the slope stability of the studied area. The model deals with both saturated and unsaturated conditions taking into account the effect of soil suction when the soil is not completely saturated. Two pilot sites have been chosen to develop and test this model: the Armea basin (Liguria, Italy) and the Ischia Island (Campania, Italy). In recent years several severe rainstorms have occurred in both these areas. In at least two cases these have triggered numerous shallow landslides that have caused victims and damaged roads, buildings and agricultural activities. In its current stage, the basic basin-scale model applied for predicting the probable location of shallow landslides involves several stand-alone components. The solution suggested by Iverson for the Richards equation is used to estimate the transient groundwater pressure head distribution according to radar detected rainfall intensity. A soil depth prediction scheme and a limit-equilibrium infinite slope stability algorithm are used to calculate the distributed factor of safety (FS) at different depths and to record

  20. Analysis and modelling of the magnetic and plasma profiles during PPCD experiments in RFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puiatti, M. E.; Cappello, S.; Lorenzini, R.; Martini, S.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Sattin, F.; Terranova, D.; Bolzonella, T.; Buffa, A.; Canton, A.; Carraro, L.; Escande, D. F.; Garzotti, L.; Innocente, P.; Marrelli, L.; Martines, E.; Scarin, P.; Spizzo, G.; Valisa, M.; Zanca, P.; Antoni, V.; Apolloni, L.; Bagatin, M.; Baker, W.; Barana, O.; Bettella, D.; Bettini, P.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chitarin, G.; Cravotta, A.; D'Angelo, F.; Dal Bello, S.; DeLorenzi, A.; Desideri, D.; Fiorentin, P.; Franz, P.; Frassinetti, L.; Gaio, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Grando, L.; Guo, S. C.; Luchetta, A.; Malesani, G.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Martin, P.; Masiello, A.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Murari, A.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Pégourie, B.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Pomaro, N.; Preti, G.; Regnoli, G.; Rostagni, G.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Spolaore, M.; Taliercio, C.; Telesca, G.; Toigo, V.; Vianello, N.; Zaccaria, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zollino, G.; Zuin, M.

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we analyse the main features of the pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) technique, used in the reversed field pinch configuration to achieve improved confinement conditions. In the RFX experiment, PPCD corresponds to a decrease of the magnetic fluctuations, to a peaking of the temperature profile, and to a reduced transport and plasma-wall interaction. A three-dimensional MHD nonlinear code and one-dimensional time-dependent transport models have been applied to study the effect of PPCD on the magnetic and plasma profiles. The three-dimensional MHD simulations show that the external inductive drive pinches and peaks the current profile driving the configuration through a transient phase, where the spontaneous turbulent dynamo action is quenched. The one-dimensional transport codes indicate that the experimental profile modifications associated with PPCD are consistent with a reduction of the stochastic transport.

  1. Effect of different feeding strategies in intensive dairy farming systems on milk fatty acid profiles, and implications on feeding costs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borreani, G; Coppa, M; Revello-Chion, A; Comino, L; Giaccone, D; Ferlay, A; Tabacco, E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the fatty acid (FA) profile of milk from intensive dairy farming systems in the Po Plain (Italy) to estimate the costs of the adopted feeding strategies and to simulate the effect of supplementary premiums on the basis of milk FA composition on milk income. Twenty dairy farms with 5 different feeding strategies were studied: 3 corn silage-based systems in which cows were supplemented with a great proportion (CCH), a medium proportion (CCM), or without commercial concentrate mix (CC0), and 2 systems in which part of corn silage was replaced with grass or legume silage (HF) or with fresh herbage (G), cut and fed indoors. Bulk milk was sampled and lactating cow performance, feeding strategies and forage characteristics were recorded through a survey, 3 times during a year. The milk FA supplementary premium was calculated considering C18:3n-3 and saturated FA (SFA) concentrations, and ratio of total cis C18:1 isomers to C16:0. The CCH, CCM, and CC0 systems bought most of their dairy cow feeds off farm, which allowed them to increase milk production to 35,000 L/yr per hectare. Their low dry matter and crude protein self-sufficiency led to higher feeding costs per liter of milk (from €0.158 to €0.184), and highest income over feed cost was achieved only for milk yield performance greater than 10,000 kg/cow per year. The use of homegrown forages in HF and G increased dry matter and crude protein self-sufficiency and reduced the feeding costs per liter of milk from 9 to 22%, compared with the other studied systems, making HF and G feeding economically competitive, even for a lower milk yield per cow. The studied systems highlighted a remarkable variation in FA profiles. The concentrations of C16:0 and SFA were the highest in CCH (31.53 and 67.84 g/100g of FA) and G (31.23 and 68.45 g/100g of FA), because of the larger proportion of commercial concentrate mix in the cow diet. The concentrations of C16:0 and SFA were the lowest in

  2. Spatio-temporal modelling of biomass of intensively grazed perennial dairy pastures using multispectral remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirisinghe, Asoka; Clark, Dave; Waugh, Deanne

    2012-06-01

    Pasture biomass is a vital input for management of dairy systems in New Zealand. An accurate estimate of pasture biomass information is required for the calculation of feed budget, on which decisions are made for farm practices such as conservation, nitrogen use, rotational lengths and supplementary feeding leading to profitability and sustainable use of pasture resources. The traditional field based methods of measuring pasture biomass such as using rising plate metres (RPM) are largely inefficient in providing the timely information at the spatial extent and temporal frequency demanded by commercial environments. In recent times remote sensing has emerged as an alternative tool. In this paper we have examined the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from medium resolution imagery of SPOT-4 and SPOT-5 satellite sensors to predict pasture biomass of intensively grazed dairy pastures. In the space and time domain analysis we have found a significant dependency of time over the season and no dependency of space across the scene at a given time for the relationship between NDVI and field based pasture biomass. We have established a positive correlation (81%) between the two variables in a pixel scale analysis. The application of the model on 2 selected farms over 3 images and aggregation of the predicted biomass to paddock scale has produced paddock average pasture biomass values with a coefficient of determination of 0.71 and a standard error of 260 kg DM ha-1 in the field observed range between 1500 and 3500 kg DM ha-1. This result indicates a high potential for operational use of remotely sensed data to predict pasture biomass of intensively grazed dairy pastures.

  3. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Swindell

    Full Text Available Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1. While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis.

  4. Intensity of the geomagnetic field in Europe for the last 3 ka: Influence of data quality on geomagnetic field modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Gómez-Paccard, Miriam; Hervé, Gwenaël.; Osete, María. Luisa; Chauvin, Annick

    2014-06-01

    of the main challenges of paleomagnetic research is to obtain high-resolution geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions. For the last millennia, these reconstructions are mostly based on archeomagnetic data. However, the quality of the intensity data available in the databases is very variable, and the high scatter observed in the records clearly suggests that some of them might not be reliable. In this work we investigate how the geomagnetic field intensity reconstructions and, hence, our present knowledge of the geomagnetic field in the past, are affected by the quality of the data selected for modeling the Earth's magnetic field. For this purpose we rank the European archeointensity data in four quality categories following widely accepted paleomagnetic criteria based on the methodology used during the laboratory treatment of the samples and on the number of specimens retained to calculate the mean intensities. Four geomagnetic field regional models have been implemented by applying the revised spherical cap harmonic analysis to these four groups of input data. Geomagnetic field models strongly depend on the used data set. The model built using all the available data (without any preselection) appears to be the less accurate, indicating some internal inconsistencies of the data set. In addition, some features of this model are clearly dominated by the less reliable archeointensity data, suggesting that such features might not reflect real variations of the past geomagnetic field. On the contrary, the regional model built on selected high-quality intensity data shows a very consistent intensity pattern at the European scale, confirming that the main intensity changes observed in Europe in the recent history of the geomagnetic field occurred at the continental scale.

  5. Proposal of a flexible structural-organizing model for the Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iapichino, G; Radrizzani, D; Rossi, C; Pezzi, A; Anghileri, A; Boffelli, S; Giardino, M; Mistraletti, G; Bertolini, G

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the capability of the Italian Group for the Evaluation of Intervention in Intensive Care Medicine (Gruppo Italiano Valutazione Interventi in Terapia Intensiva, GiViTI) Intensive Care Units (ICUs) in providing high level care (HLC) and to develop a flexible organiziational model, allowing for different levels of care in each ICU. Once the number of active beds, personnel and technology of each ICU were determined, we computed whether the available bed number and all available resources could provide HLC according to international standards. For ICUs lacking staff or equipment for safe HLC in all declared beds, we calculated the best combination between HLC and observation/monitoring beds with less need for nurses and technology (low level of care, LLC) in order to optimise the utilization of each bed. We also investigated the work organisation of physicians and nurses in these units. There are 2 070 available beds in the 293 GiViTI ICUs. To provide HLC according to international criteria, the beds would decrease to 80.9%, because 144 ICUs do not have nurses or equipment to provide HLC in each bed. In order to maximize the suitable use of available resources, these ICUs would have to reduce the HLC bed number using the regained nurse workload for LLC. Because of this, the total number of HLC beds would further decrease to 65.9% of all declared beds. During Sundays and holidays, the bed/doctor and the bed/nurse ratios increase in most ICUs. To maximize the staff and equipment resources available, the bed numbers of a general ICU providing HLC must vary, even daily, according to the level of care provided. This level is not always high for all patients present. Applying this organizing model to each ICU, we could have enough flexibility to face the different demands for assistance if the ICU is built as a large open space to achieve the best clinical model and use of resources.

  6. Modeling and Predicting Tissue Movement and Deformation for High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiangyun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Lai, Qianfeng; Guo, Jiaxiang; Zheng, Qi; Yu, Sijiao; Tong, Qianqian; Si, Weixin; Sun, Mingui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In ultrasound-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, the target tissue (such as a tumor) often moves and/or deforms in response to an external force. This problem creates difficulties in treating patients and can lead to the destruction of normal tissue. In order to solve this problem, we present a novel method to model and predict the movement and deformation of the target tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. Methods Our method computationally predicts the position of the target tissue under external force. This prediction allows appropriate adjustments in the focal region during the application of HIFU so that the treatment head is kept aligned with the diseased tissue through the course of therapy. To accomplish this goal, we utilize the cow tissue as the experimental target tissue to collect spatial sequences of ultrasound images using the HIFU equipment. A Geodesic Localized Chan-Vese (GLCV) model is developed to segment the target tissue images. A 3D target tissue model is built based on the segmented results. A versatile particle framework is constructed based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Further, an iterative parameter estimation algorithm is utilized to determine the essential parameters of the versatile particle framework. Finally, the versatile particle framework with the determined parameters is used to estimate the movement and deformation of the target tissue. Results To validate our method, we compare the predicted contours with the ground truth contours. We found that the lowest, highest and average Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC) values between predicted and ground truth contours were, respectively, 0.9615, 0.9770 and 0.9697. Conclusion Our experimental result indicates that the proposed method can effectively predict the dynamic contours of the moving and deforming tissue during ultrasound-guided HIFU therapy. PMID:25993644

  7. Semi-parametric proportional intensity models robustness for right-censored recurrent failure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, S.T. [College of Engineering, University of Oklahoma, 202 West Boyd St., Room 107, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Landers, T.L. [College of Engineering, University of Oklahoma, 202 West Boyd St., Room 107, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)]. E-mail: landers@ou.edu; Rhoads, T.R. [College of Engineering, University of Oklahoma, 202 West Boyd St., Room 107, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports the robustness of the four proportional intensity (PI) models: Prentice-Williams-Peterson-gap time (PWP-GT), PWP-total time (PWP-TT), Andersen-Gill (AG), and Wei-Lin-Weissfeld (WLW), for right-censored recurrent failure event data. The results are beneficial to practitioners in anticipating the more favorable engineering application domains and selecting appropriate PI models. The PWP-GT and AG prove to be models of choice over ranges of sample sizes, shape parameters, and censoring severity. At the smaller sample size (U=60), where there are 30 per class for a two-level covariate, the PWP-GT proves to perform well for moderate right-censoring (P {sub c}{<=}0.8), where 80% of the units have some censoring, and moderately decreasing, constant, and moderately increasing rates of occurrence of failures (power-law NHPP shape parameter in the range of 0.8{<=}{delta}{<=}1.8). For the large sample size (U=180), the PWP-GT performs well for severe right-censoring (0.8

    model proves to outperform the PWP-TT and WLW for stationary processes (HPP) across a wide range of right-censorship (0.0{<=}P {sub c}{<=}1.0) and for sample sizes of 60 or more.

  8. Modeling of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced lesions in the presence of cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavrier; Chapelon; Gelet; Cathignol

    2000-07-01

    The classical "Bio Heat Transfer Equation (BHTE)" model is adapted to take into account the effects of oscillating microbubbles that occur naturally in the tissue during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. First, the Gilmore-Akulichev model is used to quantify the acoustic pressure scattered by microbubbles submitted to HIFU. Because this scattered pressure is not monochromatic, the concept of harmonic attenuation is introduced and a global attenuation coefficient is estimated for bubble-filled tissues. The first results show that this global attenuation coefficient varies significantly with respect to several parameters such as the frequency and the density of microbubbles in the medium, but also with respect to the incident acoustic pressure which thus becomes a transcendental function. Under these conditions, a layer-by-layer modeling, in the direction of propagation, is proposed to calculate the ultrasonic beam. Finally, the BHTE is solved and the HIFU-induced lesions are estimated by the calculation of the thermal dose. Using this model, it can be observed first that, when the firing power increases, the lesion develops clearly in the direction of the transducer, with a shape agreeing with in vivo experimentation. Next, it is observed that the lesion can be significantly modified in size and position, if an interface (skin or inner wall) is simulated as a zone with multiple cavitation nuclei. With a firing power increase, it is also shown how a secondary lesion can appear at the interface and how, beyond a certain threshold, this lesion develops at the main lesion expense. Finally, a better in-depth homogeneity of lesions is observed when the acoustic frequency of HIFU is increased.

  9. Characterising the Transmission Dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in Intensive Care Units Using Hidden Markov Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan N Doan

    Full Text Available Little is known about the transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in hospitals, despite such information being critical for designing effective infection control measures. In the absence of comprehensive epidemiological data, mathematical modelling is an attractive approach to understanding transmission process. The statistical challenge in estimating transmission parameters from infection data arises from the fact that most patients are colonised asymptomatically and therefore the transmission process is not fully observed. Hidden Markov models (HMMs can overcome this problem. We developed a continuous-time structured HMM to characterise the transmission dynamics, and to quantify the relative importance of different acquisition sources of A. baumannii in intensive care units (ICUs in three hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. The hidden states were the total number of patients colonised with A. baumannii (both detected and undetected. The model input was monthly incidence data of the number of detected colonised patients (observations. A Bayesian framework with Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm was used for parameter estimations. We estimated that 96-98% of acquisition in Hospital 1 and 3 was due to cross-transmission between patients; whereas most colonisation in Hospital 2 was due to other sources (sporadic acquisition. On average, it takes 20 and 31 days for each susceptible individual in Hospital 1 and Hospital 3 to become colonised as a result of cross-transmission, respectively; whereas it takes 17 days to observe one new colonisation from sporadic acquisition in Hospital 2. The basic reproduction ratio (R0 for Hospital 1, 2 and 3 was 1.5, 0.02 and 1.6, respectively. Our study is the first to characterise the transmission dynamics of A. baumannii using mathematical modelling. We showed that HMMs can be applied to sparse hospital infection data to estimate transmission parameters despite unobserved events and imperfect detection of

  10. CPHmodels-3.0--remote homology modeling using structure-guided sequence profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole;

    2010-01-01

    CPHmodels-3.0 is a web server predicting protein 3D structure by use of single template homology modeling. The server employs a hybrid of the scoring functions of CPHmodels-2.0 and a novel remote homology-modeling algorithm. A query sequence is first attempted modeled using the fast CPHmodels-2.......0 profile-profile scoring function suitable for close homology modeling. The new computational costly remote homology-modeling algorithm is only engaged provided that no suitable PDB template is identified in the initial search. CPHmodels-3.0 was benchmarked in the CASP8 competition and produced models.......3 A. These performance values place the CPHmodels-3.0 method in the group of high performing 3D prediction tools. Beside its accuracy, one of the important features of the method is its speed. For most queries, the response time of the server is...

  11. Neural network modeling of the light profile in a novel photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Peña, R; Alcaraz-González, V; González-Álvarez, V; Snell-Castro, R; Méndez-Acosta, H O

    2014-06-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) was implemented to model the light profile pattern inside a photobioreactor (PBR) that uses a toroidal light arrangement. The PBR uses Tequila vinasses as culture medium and purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris as biocatalyzer. The performance of the ANN was tested for a number of conditions and compared to those obtained by using deterministic models. Both ANN and deterministic models were validated experimentally. In all cases, at low biomass concentration, model predictions yielded determination coefficients greater than 0.9. Nevertheless, ANN yielded the more accurate predictions of the light pattern, at both low and high biomass concentration, when the bioreactor radius, the depth, the rotational speed of the stirrer and the biomass concentration were incorporated in the ANN structure. In comparison, most of the deterministic models failed to correlate the empirical data at high biomass concentration. These results show the usefulness of ANNs in the modeling of the light profile pattern in photobioreactors.

  12. A Model for Converting Solid State Fermentation Growth Profiles Between Absolute and Relative Measurement Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciele Viccini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed for converting between the two measurement bases commonly used in the construction of growth profiles in solid-state fermentation, namely absolute mass ratio m(dry biomass/m(initial dry matter and relative mass ratio m(dry biomass/m(dry matter. These are not equivalent, due to the loss of dry matter as CO2 during the fermentation. The model is equally applicable to any biomass component used in indirect measurements of growth, such as protein. Use of the model to convert absolute mass ratio of the biomass profiles for the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus to a relative basis gave profiles that agreed well with the experimentally determined relative biomass profiles. This agreement was obtained for three different fermentations using the same set of parameter values in the model, namely a yield coefficient of m(protein/m(dry substrate = 0.2 g/g and a maintenance coefficient of zero, giving confidence in the reliability of the model. The model was then used to show that the measurement basis used can affect the form of the curve and therefore can also affect the conclusion drawn about the type of kinetics shown by the organism, with the extent of this effect depending on the length of time that growth occurs and the values of the yield and maintenance coefficients. This work shows that great care must be taken in drawing conclusions about growth kinetics in solid-state fermentation.

  13. Multiparameter Correction Intensity of Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data as AN Input for Rock Surface Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleček, V.; Kubíček, P.

    2016-06-01

    A large increase in the creation of 3D models of objects all around us can be observed in the last few years; thanks to the help of the rapid development of new advanced technologies for spatial data collection and robust software tools. A new commercially available airborne laser scanning data in Czech Republic, provided in the form of the Digital terrain model of the fifth generation as irregularly spaced points, enable locating the majority of rock formations. However, the positional and height accuracy of this type of landforms can reach huge errors in some cases. Therefore, it is necessary to start mapping using terrestrial laser scanning with the possibility of adding a point cloud data derived from ground or aerial photogrammetry. Intensity correction and noise removal is usually based on the distance between measured objects and the laser scanner, the incidence angle of the beam or on the radiometric and topographic characteristics of measured objects. This contribution represents the major undesirable effects that affect the quality of acquisition and processing of laser scanning data. Likewise there is introduced solutions to some of these problems.

  14. Modeling olive pollen intensity in the Mediterranean region through analysis of emission sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, J; Orlandi, F; Pérez-Badia, R; Aguilera, F; Ben Dhiab, A; Bouziane, H; Díaz de la Guardia, C; Galán, C; Gutiérrez-Bustillo, A M; Moreno-Grau, S; Msallem, M; Trigo, M M; Fornaciari, M

    2016-05-01

    Aerobiological monitoring of Olea europaea L. is of great interest in the Mediterranean basin because olive pollen is one of the most represented pollen types of the airborne spectrum for the Mediterranean region, and olive pollen is considered one of the major cause of pollinosis in this region. The main aim of this study was to develop an airborne-pollen map based on the Pollen Index across a 4-year period (2008-2011), to provide a continuous geographic map for pollen intensity that will have practical applications from the agronomical and allergological points of view. For this purpose, the main predictor variable was an index based on the distribution and abundance of potential sources of pollen emission, including intrinsic information about the general atmospheric patterns of pollen dispersal. In addition, meteorological variables were included in the modeling, together with spatial interpolation, to allow the definition of a spatial model of the Pollen Index from the main olive cultivation areas in the Mediterranean region. The results show marked differences with respect to the dispersal patterns associated to the altitudinal gradient. The findings indicate that areas located at an altitude above 300ma.s.l. receive greater amounts of olive pollen from shorter-distance pollen sources (maximum influence, 27km) with respect to areas lower than 300ma.s.l. (maximum influence, 59km).

  15. Spectral Line-Shape Model to Replace the Voigt Profile in Spectroscopic Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisak, Daniel; Ngo, Ngoc Hoa; Tran, Ha; Hartmann, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    The standard description of molecular line shapes in spectral databases and radiative transfer codes is based on the Voigt profile. It is well known that its simplified assumptions of absorber free motion and independence of collisional parameters from absorber velocity lead to systematic errors in analysis of experimental spectra, and retrieval of gas concentration. We demonstrate1,2 that the partially correlated quadratic speed-dependent hardcollision profile3. (pCqSDHCP) is a good candidate to replace the Voigt profile in the next generations of spectroscopic databases. This profile takes into account the following physical effects: the Doppler broadening, the pressure broadening and shifting of the line, the velocity-changing collisions, the speed-dependence of pressure broadening and shifting, and correlations between velocity- and phase/state-changing collisions. The speed-dependence of pressure broadening and shifting is incorporated into the pCqSDNGP in the so-called quadratic approximation. The velocity-changing collisions lead to the Dicke narrowing effect; however in many cases correlations between velocityand phase/state-changing collisions may lead to effective reduction of observed Dicke narrowing. The hard-collision model of velocity-changing collisions is also known as the Nelkin-Ghatak model or Rautian model. Applicability of the pCqSDHCP for different molecular systems was tested on calculated and experimental spectra of such molecules as H2, O2, CO2, H2O in a wide span of pressures. For all considered systems, pCqSDHCP is able to describe molecular spectra at least an order of magnitude better than the Voigt profile with all fitted parameters being linear with pressure. In the most cases pCqSDHCP can reproduce the reference spectra down to 0.2% or better, which fulfills the requirements of the most demanding remote-sensing applications. An important advantage of pCqSDHCP is that a fast algorithm for its computation was developedab4,5 and allows

  16. Complement factor B expression profile in a spontaneous uveitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipplies, Johanna K; Kirschfink, Michael; Amann, Barbara; Hauck, Stefanie M; Stangassinger, Manfred; Deeg, Cornelia A

    2010-12-01

    Equine recurrent uveitis serves as a spontaneous model for human autoimmune uveitis. Unpredictable relapses and ongoing inflammation in the eyes of diseased horses as well as in humans lead to destruction of the retina and finally result in blindness. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to inflammation and retinal degeneration are not well understood. An initial screening for differentially regulated proteins in sera of uveitic cases compared to healthy controls revealed an increase of the alternative pathway complement component factor B in ERU cases. To determine the activation status of the complement system, sera were subsequently examined for complement split products. We could demonstrate a significant higher concentration of the activation products B/Ba, B/Bb, Bb neoantigen, iC3b and C3d in uveitic condition compared to healthy controls, whereas for C5b-9 no differences were detected. Additionally, we investigated complement activation directly in the retina by immunohistochemistry, since it is the main target organ of this autoimmune disease. Interestingly, infiltrating cells co-expressed activated factor Bb neoantigen, complement split product C3d as well as CD68, a macrophage marker. In this study, we could demonstrate activation of the complement system both systemically as well as in the eye, the target organ of spontaneous recurrent uveitis. Based on these novel findings, we postulate a novel role for macrophages in connection with complement synthesis at the site of inflammation.

  17. Anomalies of Siberian High Intensity and Their Precursors in Climatic Models Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, Yuliya; Krupchatnikov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The Siberian High (SH) is a powerful pressure system that determines the weather regime during the wintertime for the huge part of Asia [Sazonov B.I., 1991]. Particularly, SH regulates an intensity and duration of frosts in Siberia. Moreover, this pressure system has a strong connection with another atmospheric centers of action of the Northern Hemisphere such as Arctic High, Icelandic Low, the Azores High [Morozova S.V., 2013]. SH variation is closely related to atmospheric dynamics processes and air temperature variations between surface and middle troposphere. The maintaining of SH mainly depends on downward through the troposphere airflow which variation is strongly affected by the Arctic oscillation (AO). Positive (negative) AO phase causes the remarkably weakening (strengthening) of the downward airflow that has strong effect on the SH behavior [Gong G. et al., 2002; Krupchatnikov V. N. et al., 2009; Martynova Yu.V. and V.N. Krupchatnikov, 2010]. SH is highly exposed to global climate change that increases standard deviation of SH intensity [Fei L.I. and G. A. O. Yong-Qi, 2015]. The changes of SH characteristics result from not only direct climate change effect (such as global temperature rise) but also feedback effect of another climate system parameters variation. Thus, these parameters can serve as precursors of the extremely SH intensity. It's important to remember that the changes of the just one component of this High-Low interaction system could affect whole system. This study is devoted to determination of the precursors of the anomaly SH behavior and estimation of changes of the determined connection in the climate change conditions. The research was provided on a base of climate system models and reanalysis data. Acknowledgements This work is partially supported by SB RAS project VIII.80.2.1, RFBR grants 14-05-00502, 16-35-00301, 16-05-00558. References Fei L.I. and G. A. O. Yong-Qi The Project Siberian High in CMIP5 Models // Atmospheric and

  18. Models and constraints for new physics at the energy, intensity, and cosmic frontiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barello, Gregory

    The modern era of particle physics is driven by experimental anomalies. Experimental efforts have become increasingly diverse and are producing enormous volumes of data. In such a highly data-driven scientific environment theoretical models are necessary to understand this data and to help inform the development of new experimental approaches. In this dissertation I present two significant contributions to this effort relevant to the energy, intensity, and cosmic frontiers of modern particle physics research. Part 1 of this dissertation discusses methods to understand modern dark matter direct detection results. In particular I present an analysis under the hypothesis of inelastic dark matter, which supposes that dark matter must scatter inelastically, i.e. that it must gain or loose mass during a collision with atomic nuclei. This hypothesis is attractive because it can alleviate otherwise contradictory results from a number of dark matter detection facilities. The main conclusion of this work is a presentation of the analytical tools, along with a mathematica package that can be used to run the analysis, and the discovery that there are regions of inelastic dark matter parameter space which are consistent with all current experimental results, and constraints. Part 2 of this dissertation discusses a phenomenon of modern interest called kinetic mixing which allows particles from the standard model to spontaneously transform into particles which experience a new, as of yet undiscovered, force. This phenomenon is relatively common and well motivated theoretically and has motivated significant experimental effort. In this work, I present an analysis of a general case of kinetic mixing, called nonabelian kinetic mixing. This work shows that, In general, kinetic mixing predicts the existence of a new particle and that, under certain conditions, this particle could be detected at modern particle colliders. Furthermore, the mass of this particle is related to the

  19. Application of Normal Distribution Model to Estimate Root Water Uptake Profile by an Isotopic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, T.; Matsuo, D.; Hirota, M.

    2008-12-01

    To confirm usefulness of a diagnostic model for estimating root water uptake profile by an isotopic approach, isotopic measurements of plant xylem water, soil water and groundwater were conducted at seven Japanese red pine forest sites and then the model was applied to the measured results. The model assumes that depth profile of relative uptake rate can be approximated by the normal distribution function, and xylem water isotopic composition is computed from interpolated depth profile of isotopic composition of subsurface waters. The peak depth and distribution range of water uptake zone for a given species at a given site are inversely determined by direct search method (assuming depth interval of 5 cm up to 2 m) so as to minimize root mean square error throughout observation period. Estimated water uptake profiles showed that in six sites the uptake zone of Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) ranged from 5 to 60 cm depth, while it was changed to deeper depths in the other site where Quercus myrsinaefolia and Pleioblastus chino coexist. On the other hand, Populus sieboldi and Malus sieboldii take up water from depths deeper than those for Pinus densiflora within a community, although the two species are usually considered as shallow rooted plants. These results indicate water source partitioning under inter-species competition, and we conclude that the present model is capable of making clear the plant water use strategy. Estimated water uptake zone also provides useful information for improving/calibrating prognostic, physical models of root water uptake.

  20. A phenomenological model of the muon density profile on the ground of very inclined air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, H. P.; Billoir, P.; Deligny, O.; Hebbeker, T.

    2010-09-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays generate extensive air showers in Earth's atmosphere. A standard approach to reconstruct the energy of an ultra-high energy cosmic rays is to sample the lateral profile of the particle density on the ground of the air shower with an array of surface detectors. For cosmic rays with large inclinations, this reconstruction is based on a model of the lateral profile of the muon density observed on the ground, which is fitted to the observed muon densities in individual surface detectors. The best models for this task are derived from detailed Monte-Carlo simulations of the air shower development. We present a phenomenological parametrization scheme which allows to derive a model of the average lateral profile of the muon density directly from a fit to a set of individual Monte-Carlo simulated air showers. The model reproduces the detailed simulations with a high precision. As an example, we generate a muon density model which is valid in the energy range 10 18 eV < E < 10 20 eV and the zenith angle range 60°<θ<90°. We will further demonstrate a way to speed up the simulation of such muon profiles by three orders of magnitude, if only the muons in the shower are of interest.

  1. Profile-driven regression for modeling and runtime optimization of mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McClary, Dan; Syrotiuk, Violet; Kulahci, Murat

    2010-01-01

    of throughput in a mobile ad hoc network, a self-organizing collection of mobile wireless nodes without any fixed infrastructure. The intermediate models generated in profile-driven regression are used to fit an overall model of throughput, and are also used to optimize controllable factors at runtime. Unlike......Computer networks often display nonlinear behavior when examined over a wide range of operating conditions. There are few strategies available for modeling such behavior and optimizing such systems as they run. Profile-driven regression is developed and applied to modeling and runtime optimization...... others, the throughput model accounts for node speed. The resulting optimization is very effective; locally optimizing the network factors at runtime results in throughput as much as six times higher than that achieved with the factors at their default levels....

  2. Modeling and Experimental Tests of a Mechatronic Device to Measure Road Profiles Considering Impact Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza, A.; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    Vehicles travel at different speeds and, as a consequence, experience a broad spectrum of vibrations. One of the most important source of vehicle vibration is the road profile. Hence the knowledge of the characteristics of a road profile enables engineers to predict the dynamic behavior...... to highlight that the aim of this device is to independently measure two road profiles, without the influence of the vehicle dynamics where the mechanism is attached. Before the mechatronic mechanism is attached to a real vehicle, its dynamic behavior must be known. A theoretical analysis of the mechanism...... the mechanism components. By modeling impacts between a wheel and the road by Newton´s Law, the complete dynamics of the system can be predicted, and the operational range (velocity limits) of the mechanism can be defined based on the mathematical model. Key words: multibody dynamics, impact dynamics and road...

  3. Assessing the construct validity of five nutrient profiling systems using diet modeling with linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerfeuille, E; Vieux, F; Lluch, A; Darmon, N; Rolf-Pedersen, N

    2013-09-01

    Nutrient profiling classifies individual food products according to their nutrient content. According to the WHO (World Health Organization), validation is a key step in the development of a nutrient profiling system. The aim was to assess the construct validity of five European nutrient profiling systems (Choices, Keyhole, (AFSSA), European Commission (EC) system and FoodProfiler). Construct validity was assessed for each of the five-selected nutrient profiling systems by testing whether healthy foods (that is, identified as eligible by the system) make healthy diets, and unhealthy foods (that is, non-eligible) make unhealthy diets, using diet modeling. The AFSSA, EC and FoodProfiler systems were identified as valid, but differences in their levels of permissiveness suggested some misclassified food products. The two other systems failed the construct validity assessment. Among these three systems, the EC system is the less demanding in terms of nutritional information, it would, therefore, be the easiest to implement for regulating nutrition and health claims in Europe.

  4. Modeling the microbial growth and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Christian L; Mazutti, Marcio A; Salau, Nina P G

    2014-10-01

    Aiming to scale up and apply control and optimization strategies, currently is required the development of accurate plant models to forecast the process nonlinear dynamics. In this work, a mathematical model to predict the growth of the Kluyveromyces marxianus and temperature profile in a fixed-bed bioreactor for solid-state fermentation using sugarcane bagasse as substrate was built up. A parameter estimation technique was performed to fit the mathematical model to the experimental data. The estimated parameters and the model fitness were evaluated with statistical analyses. The results have shown the estimated parameters significance, with 95 % confidence intervals, and the good quality of process model to reproduce the experimental data.

  5. Driving forces behind the increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity.A dynamic epidemiologic model of trends in Danish cardiovascular drug utilization.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildemoes, Helle Wallach; Andersen, Morten

    followed with respect to out-of-hospital redemptions of cardiovascular prescription drugs in the period 1996-2005. The impact of population ageing on cardiovascular treatment intensity was investigated by comparing crude and age/gender standardised intensities. Epidemiologic model: We developed a three...... prevalence. Conclusions: Increasing cardiovascular treatment intensity was driven by increases in age/gender specific drug use - rather than by population ageing. Although the increased prevalence of use in all age groups reflects an increasing incidence, recruitment of long-term users is expected to add......Background: In many Western countries cardiovascular treatment intensity (DDD/1000 inhabitants/day, DDD/TID) has grown substantially during the last decades. Changed drug utilization pattern - rather than population ageing - was hypothesized to be the main driving force behind the growth...

  6. Effects of correlations between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise on intensity fluctuation for a saturation laser model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yue-Hong; Mei Dong-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of cross-correlations between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise on the laser intensity in a saturation laser model.It derives the analytic expressions of the intensity correlation function C(Υ)and the associated relaxation time T(C) in the case of a stable locked phase resulting from the cross-correlation λq between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise.Based on numerical computations it finds that the presence of cross correlations between the real and imaginary parts of quantum noise slow down the decay of intensity fluctuation,i.e.,it causes the increase of intensity fluctuation.

  7. The Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit-An Evolving Model for Health Care Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, John; Puthawala, Tauqir; Sutton, Brad S; Brown, Lorrel E; Pronovost, Peter J; DeFilippis, Andrew P

    2017-02-01

    Prior to the advent of the coronary care unit (CCU), patients having an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) were managed on the general medicine wards with reported mortality rates of greater than 30%. The first CCUs are believed to be responsible for reducing mortality attributed to AMI by as much as 40%. This drastic improvement can be attributed to both advances in medical technology and in the process of health care delivery. Evolving considerably since the 1960s, the CCU is now more appropriately labeled as a cardiac intensive care unit (CICU) and represents a comprehensive system designed for the care of patients with an array of advanced cardiovascular disease, an entity that reaches far beyond its early association with AMI. Grouping of patients by diagnosis to a common physical space, dedicated teams of health care providers, as well as the development and implementation of evidence-based treatment algorithms have resulted in the delivery of safer, more efficient care, and most importantly better patient outcomes. The CICU serves as a platform for an integrated, team-based patient care delivery system that addresses a broad spectrum of patient needs. Lessons learned from this model can be broadly applied to address the urgent need to improve outcomes and efficiency in a variety of health care settings.

  8. Designing Capital-Intensive Systems with Architectural and Operational Flexibility Using a Screening Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jijun; de Weck, Olivier; de Neufville, Richard; Robinson, Bob; MacGowan, David

    Development of capital intensive systems, such as offshore oil platforms or other industrial infrastructure, generally requires a significant amount of capital investment under various resource, technical, and market uncertainties. It is a very challenging task for development co-owners or joint ventures because important decisions, such as system architectures, have to be made while uncertainty remains high. This paper develops a screening model and a simulation framework to quickly explore the design space for complex engineering systems under uncertainty allowing promising strategies or architectures to be identified. Flexibility in systems’ design and operation is proposed as a proactive means to enable systems to adapt to future uncertainty. Architectural and operational flexibility can improve systems’ lifecycle value by mitigating downside risks and capturing upside opportunities. In order to effectively explore different flexible strategies addressing a view of uncertainty which changes with time, a computational framework based on Monte Carlo simulation is proposed in this paper. This framework is applied to study flexible development strategies for a representative offshore petroleum project. The complexity of this problem comes from multi-domain uncertainties, large architectural design space, and structure of flexibility decision rules. The results demonstrate that architectural and operational flexibility can significantly improve projects’ Expected Net Present Value (ENPV), reduce downside risks, and improve upside gains, compared to adopting an inflexible strategy appropriate to the view of uncertainty at the start of the project. In this particular case study, the most flexible strategy improves ENPV by 85% over an inflexible base case.

  9. The "Flipped Classroom" Model for Teaching in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tainter, Christopher R; Wong, Nelson L; Cudemus-Deseda, Gaston A; Bittner, Edward A

    2017-03-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) is a dynamic and complex learning environment. The wide range in trainee's experience, specialty training, fluctuations in patient acuity and volume, limitations in trainee duty hours, and additional responsibilities of the faculty contribute to the challenge in providing a consistent experience with traditional educational strategies. The "flipped classroom" is an educational model with the potential to improve the learning environment. In this paradigm, students gain exposure to new material outside class and then use class time to assimilate the knowledge through problem-solving exercises or discussion. The rationale and pedagogical foundations for the flipped classroom are reviewed, practical considerations are discussed, and an example of successful implementation is provided. An education curriculum was devised and evaluated prospectively for teaching point-of-care echocardiography to residents rotating in the surgical ICU. Preintervention and postintervention scores of knowledge, confidence, perceived usefulness, and likelihood of use the skills improved for each module. The quality of the experience was rated highly for each of the sessions. The flipped classroom education curriculum has many advantages. This pilot study was well received, and learners showed improvement in all areas evaluated, across several demographic subgroups and self-identified learning styles.

  10. Profiles of relative permittivity and electrical conductivity from unsaturated soil water content models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Porretta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of water diffusion in the vadose zone has been implemented for different types of soil textures in order to determine the soil water content (SWC profiles in dependence of depth and time. From these profiles, obtained for different soils, we derived the characteristic electrical parameters, such as relative permittivity (epsilonr and electrical conductivity (sigma, and their variation in time, employing empirical relations available in the scientific literature. The simulation through mathematical models has been performed taking into account different types of soils characterized by the percentage composition of sand, clay and silt in the textural triangle, which provides some physical and chemical properties that affect the water retention in the soil. The resulting simulated profiles of SWC and consequently permittivity and conductivity profiles, span over a certain range of values suggesting the best techniques and the limits in geophysical investigation. Moreover this a-prior knowledge helps in the elaboration and interpretation of permittivity and conductivity data obtained by the measurements. Permittivity and conductivity profiles are particularly useful in some environmental applications when the soil textures are (or supposed to be known as in the typical case of landfill leachate dispersion. Since the soil textures beneath or nearby a disposal waste are characterized by a SWC, the values of (epsilonr and (sigma at various depth can be directly inferred.

  11. The Wind Profile in the Coastal Boundary Layer: Wind Lidar Measurements and Numerical Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Vincent, Claire Louise; Gryning, Sven-Erik;

    2013-01-01

    . By replacing the roughness value for the land-use category in the model with a more representative mesoscale roughness, the observed bias in friction velocity was reduced. A higher-order PBL scheme simulated the wind profile from the west with a lower wind-speed bias at the top of the PBL. For easterly winds...

  12. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  13. Exploring metabolic syndrome serum profiling based on gas chromatography mass spectrometry and random forest models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhang; Vicente Gonçalves, Carlos M; Dai, Ling; Lu, Hong-mei; Huang, Jian-hua; Ji, Hongchao; Wang, Dong-sheng; Yi, Lun-zhao; Liang, Yi-zeng

    2014-05-27

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a constellation of the most dangerous heart attack risk factors: diabetes and raised fasting plasma glucose, abdominal obesity, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Analysis and representation of the variances of metabolic profiles is urgently needed for early diagnosis and treatment of MetS. In current study, we proposed a metabolomics approach for analyzing MetS based on GC-MS profiling and random forest models. The serum samples from healthy controls and MetS patients were characterized by GC-MS. Then, random forest (RF) models were used to visually discriminate the serum changes in MetS based on these GC-MS profiles. Simultaneously, some informative metabolites or potential biomarkers were successfully discovered by means of variable importance ranking in random forest models. The metabolites such as 2-hydroxybutyric acid, inositol and d-glucose, were defined as potential biomarkers to diagnose the MetS. These results obtained by proposed method showed that the combining GC-MS profiling with random forest models was a useful approach to analyze metabolites variances and further screen the potential biomarkers for MetS diagnosis.

  14. Self-Similar Models for the Mass Profiles of Early-type Lens Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Rusin, D; Keeton, C R

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a self-similar mass model for early-type galaxies, and constrain it using the aperture mass-radius relations determined from the geometries of 22 gravitational lenses. The model consists of two components: a concentrated component which traces the light distribution, and a more extended power-law component (rho propto r^-n) which represents the dark matter. We find that lens galaxies have total mass profiles which are nearly isothermal, or slightly steeper, on the several-kiloparsec radial scale spanned by the lensed images. In the limit of a single-component, power-law radial profile, the model implies n=2.07+/-0.13, consistent with isothermal (n=2). Models in which mass traces light are excluded at >99 percent confidence. An n=1 cusp (such as the Navarro-Frenk-White profile) requires a projected dark matter mass fraction of f_cdm = 0.22+/-0.10 inside 2 effective radii. These are the best statistical constraints yet obtained on the mass profiles of lenses, and provide clear evidence for a small ...

  15. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  16. Perfil de fisioterapeutas brasileiros que atuam em unidades de terapia intensiva A profile of Brazilian physical therapists in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Nozawa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo visou investigar o perfil dos fisioterapeutas que atuam nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTIs no Brasil, focalizando a direção do serviço, técnicas fisioterapêuticas empregadas e nível de autonomia em relação à ventilação mecânica invasiva e não-invasiva. Questionários foram enviados aos chefes dos serviços de fisioterapia de 1.192 hospitais registrados na Associação Médica de Terapia Intensiva, com retorno de 461 (39% UTIs. Em 88% destas, os serviços são chefiados por fisioterapeutas; em 78%, compostos por até oito fisioterapeutas; 44,4% dos fisioterapeutas trabalham em regime de 30 horas semanais e 46,1% têm contrato de trabalho. Há assistência fisioterapêutica durante 24 horas em 33,6% das UTIs; 88% delas mantêm assistência nos finais de semana. Quanto às técnicas fisioterapêuticas, todos realizam mobilização, posicionamento e aspiração; 91,5% atuam na ventilação não-invasiva, sendo que 43% trabalham com total autonomia. Em relação à ventilação mecânica invasiva, 80% realizam extubação; 79,2% realizam regulagem e desmame do ventilador; entretanto, só 22% têm total autonomia (78% necessitam de protocolo ou opinião da equipe médica. Os fisioterapeutas brasileiros atuam, em sua maioria, em instituições privadas e assistenciais, cujos serviços são chefiados por fisioterapeutas. Têm relativa autonomia quanto às técnicas fisioterapêuticas e o manuseio da ventilação mecânica não-invasiva mas, no caso da invasiva, atuam sob diretiva da equipe médica.The purpose of this study was to outline a profile of physical therapists who work in intensive care units (ICU in Brazil, focusing on service management, techniques used, and the degree of therapists' autonomy regarding invasive and non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Questionnaires were sent to the heads of physical therapy (PT services of 1,192 hospitals registered at the Brazilian Intensive Care Medicine Association and 461

  17. Clinical profile and predictors of mortality of severe pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus infection needing intensive care: A multi-centre prospective study from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Ramakrishna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This multi-center study from India details the profile and outcomes of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU with pandemic Influenza A (H1N1 2009 virus [P(H1N12009v] infection. Materials and Methods: Over 4 months, adult patients diagnosed to have P(H1N12009v infection by real-time RT-PCR of respiratory specimens and requiring ICU admission were followed up until death or hospital discharge. Sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA scores were calculated daily. Results: Of the 1902 patients screened, 464 (24.4% tested positive for P(H1N12009v; 106 (22.8% patients aged 35±11.9 (mean±SD years required ICU admission 5.8±2.7 days after onset of illness. Common symptoms were fever (96.2%, cough (88.7%, and breathlessness (85.9%. The admission APACHE-II and SOFA scores were 14.4±6.5 and 5.5±3.1, respectively. Ninety-six (90.6% patients required ventilation for 10.1±7.5 days. Of these, 34/96 (35.4% were non-invasively ventilated; 16/34 were weaned successfully whilst 18/34 required intubation. Sixteen patients (15.1% needed dialysis. The duration of hospitalization was 14.0±8.0 days. Hospital mortality was 49%. Mortality in pregnant/puerperal women was 52.6% (10/19. Patients requiring invasive ventilation at admission had a higher mortality than those managed with non-invasive ventilation and those not requiring ventilation (44/62 vs. 8/44, P<0.001. Need for dialysis was independently associated with mortality (P=0.019. Although admission APACHE-II and SOFA scores were significantly (P<0.02 higher in non-survivors compared with survivors on univariate analysis, individually, neither were predictive on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: In our setting, a high mortality was observed in patients admitted to ICU with severe P(H1N12009v infection. The need for invasive ventilation and dialysis were associated with a poor outcome.

  18. Discriminative accuracy of genomic profiling comparing multiplicative and additive risk models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Khoury, Muin J; Liu, Tiebin; Janssens, A Cecile J W

    2011-02-01

    Genetic prediction of common diseases is based on testing multiple genetic variants with weak effect sizes. Standard logistic regression and Cox Proportional Hazard models that assess the combined effect of multiple variants on disease risk assume multiplicative joint effects of the variants, but this assumption may not be correct. The risk model chosen may affect the predictive accuracy of genomic profiling. We investigated the discriminative accuracy of genomic profiling by comparing additive and multiplicative risk models. We examined genomic profiles of 40 variants with genotype frequencies varying from 0.1 to 0.4 and relative risks varying from 1.1 to 1.5 in separate scenarios assuming a disease risk of 10%. The discriminative accuracy was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Predicted risks were more extreme at the lower and higher risks for the multiplicative risk model compared with the additive model. The discriminative accuracy was consistently higher for multiplicative risk models than for additive risk models. The differences in discriminative accuracy were negligible when the effect sizes were small (risk genotypes were common or when they had stronger effects. Unraveling the exact mode of biological interaction is important when effect sizes of genetic variants are moderate at the least, to prevent the incorrect estimation of risks.

  19. Multiple time scales in modeling the incidence of infections acquired in intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wolkewitz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When patients are admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU their risk of getting an infection will be highly depend on the length of stay at-risk in the ICU. In addition, risk of infection is likely to vary over calendar time as a result of fluctuations in the prevalence of the pathogen on the ward. Hence risk of infection is expected to depend on two time scales (time in ICU and calendar time as well as competing events (discharge or death and their spatial location. The purpose of this paper is to develop and apply appropriate statistical models for the risk of ICU-acquired infection accounting for multiple time scales, competing risks and the spatial clustering of the data. Methods A multi-center data base from a Spanish surveillance network was used to study the occurrence of an infection due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The analysis included 84,843 patient admissions between January 2006 and December 2011 from 81 ICUs. Stratified Cox models were used to study multiple time scales while accounting for spatial clustering of the data (patients within ICUs and for death or discharge as competing events for MRSA infection. Results Both time scales, time in ICU and calendar time, are highly associated with the MRSA hazard rate and cumulative risk. When using only one basic time scale, the interpretation and magnitude of several patient-individual risk factors differed. Risk factors concerning the severity of illness were more pronounced when using only calendar time. These differences disappeared when using both time scales simultaneously. Conclusions The time-dependent dynamics of infections is complex and should be studied with models allowing for multiple time scales. For patient individual risk-factors we recommend stratified Cox regression models for competing events with ICU time as the basic time scale and calendar time as a covariate. The inclusion of calendar time and stratification by ICU

  20. Turbulence intensity measurements using particle image velocimetry in diseased carotid artery models: effect of stenosis severity, plaque eccentricity, and ulceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Holdsworth, David W; Poepping, Tamie L

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision-making for the treatment of patients with diseased carotid artery is mainly based on the severity of the stenosis. However, stenosis severity alone is not a sensitive indicator, and other local factors for the assessment of stroke risk are required. Flow disturbance is of particular interest due to its proven association with increased thromboembolic activities. The objective of this study was to investigate the level of turbulence intensity (TI) with regards to certain geometrical features of the plaque - namely stenosis severity, eccentricity, and ulceration. A family of eight carotid-artery bifurcation models was examined using particle image velocimetry. Results showed a marked difference in turbulence intensity among these models; increasing degree of stenosis severity resulted in increased turbulence intensity, going from 0.12 m/s for mild stenosis to 0.37 m/s for severe stenosis (with concentric geometry). Moreover, independent of stenosis severity, eccentricity led to further elevations in turbulence intensity, increasing TI by 0.05-0.10 m/s over the counterpart concentric plaque. The presence of ulceration (in a 50% eccentric plaque) produced a larger portion of moderate turbulence intensity (~0.10 m/s) compared to the non-ulcerated model, more proximal to the bifurcation apex in the post-stenotic recirculation zone. The effect of plaque eccentricity and ulceration in enhancing the downstream turbulence has potential clinical implications for a more sensitive assessment of stroke risk beyond stenosis severity alone.

  1. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  2. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CHANNEL EQUILIBRIUM PROFILE AND ITS EFFECT ON FLOOD CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the morphology of Luoshan-Hankou reach at the middle Yangtze River, the one-dimensional, unsteady flow and sediment transport numerical model was adopted to study the generalized channel equilibrium profile. The variation of the longitudinal equilibrium profile, and the relation with the condition of the inflow water and sediment from the upper reach were analyzed. Meanwhile, the numerical simulation results were compared with the corresponding theoretical results. Finally, the equilibrium longitudinal slope variations and its impact on flood control were analyzed after the sediment transport process has changed.

  3. Fiber Bragg Grating Modeling, Characterization and Optimization with different index profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUNITA UGALE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modeling and characterization of an optical fiber grating for maximum reflectivity, minimum side lobe power wastage. Grating length and refractive index profile are the critical parameters in contributing to performance of fiber Bragg grating. The reflection spectra and side lobes strength were analyzed with different lengths and different refractive index profiles. podization techniques are used to get optimized reflection spectra. The simulations are based on solving coupled mode equations by transfer matrix method that describes the interaction of guided modes.

  4. Self-organization of hot plasmas the canonical profile transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Dnestrovskij, Yu N

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph the author presents the Canonical Profile Transport Model or CPTM as a rather general mathematical framework to simulate plasma discharges.The description of hot plasmas in a magnetic fusion device is a very challenging task and many plasma properties still lack a physical explanation. One important property is plasma self-organization.It is very well known from experiments that the radial profile of the plasma pressure and temperature remains rather unaffected by changes of the deposited power or plasma density. The attractiveness of the CPTM is that it includes the effect o

  5. Mathematical model of determination of die bearing length in design of aluminum profile extrusion die

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫洪; 王高潮; 夏巨谌; 李志刚

    2004-01-01

    Based on the finite element simulation of profile extrusion process, the effect of local extrusion ratio, die bearing area and the distance between extrusion cylindrical center and local die orfice center on mental flow velocity was investigated. The laws of deformed metalflow on profile extrusion process were obtained. The smaller the local extrusion ratio, the faster the metal flow velocity; the smaller the area of die bearing, the faster the metal flow velocity; the smaller the distance of position of local die orifice(the closer the distance of position of local die orifice from extrusion cylindrical axis), the faster the metal flow velocity. The effect of main parameters of die structure on metal flow velocity was integrated and the mathematical model of determination of die bearing length in design of aluminum profile extrusion die was proposed. The calculated results with proposed model were well compared with the experimental results. The proposed model can be applied to determine die bearing length in design of aluminum profile extrusion die.

  6. Model Predictive Control with Integral Action for Current Density Profile Tracking in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Z. O.; Wehner, W. P.; Schuster, E.; Boyer, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Active control of the toroidal current density profile may play a critical role in non-inductively sustained long-pulse, high-beta scenarios in a spherical torus (ST) configuration, which is among the missions of the NSTX-U facility. In this work, a previously developed physics-based control-oriented model is embedded in a feedback control scheme based on a model predictive control (MPC) strategy to track a desired current density profile evolution specified indirectly by a desired rotational transform profile. An integrator is embedded into the standard MPC formulation to reject various modeling uncertainties and external disturbances. Neutral beam powers, electron density, and total plasma current are used as actuators. The proposed MPC strategy incorporates various state and actuator constraints directly into the control design process by solving a constrained optimization problem in real-time to determine the optimal actuator requests. The effectiveness of the proposed controller in regulating the current density profile in NSTX-U is demonstrated in closed-loop nonlinear simulations. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. The Intensity-dependence of Tropical Cyclone Intensification in a Simplified Energetic System and a Full Physics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Several recent studies based on best track data for tropical cyclones (TCs) over the North Atlantic revealed a strong dependence of the TC intensification rate (IR) on TC intensity. The TC IR shows a maximum (i.e., most rapid intensification) when the TC intensity reaches about 35 - 40 m s-1. Physically, this intensity-dependence has been explained in terms of the inner-core inertial stability and the decreased potential for a TC to intensify as it approaches its maximum potential intensity (MPI). Here, we propose a new simplified dynamical system based on TC energetics. For this purpose, the TC system is considered as a Carnot heat engine as in earlier theoretical studies, and formulated on the grounds of major energy production and dissipation processes. This offers a way to explain the IR behavior of TCs in terms of its sensitivity to the physical processes involved, and to derive a physically-based relationship between TC intensification and intensity. This relationship is consistent with observations, and in quantitative agreement with that gained from empirical relations in an alternative dynamical system proposed by DeMaria(2009), which has been formulated analogously to the logistic growth equation (LGE). Results from idealized full-physics model simulations confirm the validity of several key assumptions implicitly involved in the simplified dynamical system and the intensity-dependence of the TC IR as well.

  8. Error budget analysis of SCIAMACHY limb ozone profile retrievals using the SCIATRAN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rahpoe

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive error characterization of SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY limb ozone profiles has been established based upon SCIATRAN transfer model simulations. The study was carried out in order to evaluate the possible impact of parameter uncertainties, e.g. in albedo, stratospheric aerosol optical extinction, temperature, pressure, pointing, and ozone absorption cross section on the limb ozone retrieval. Together with the a posteriori covariance matrix available from the retrieval, total random and systematic errors are defined for SCIAMACHY ozone profiles. Main error sources are the pointing errors, errors in the knowledge of stratospheric aerosol parameters, and cloud interference. Systematic errors are of the order of 7%, while the random error amounts to 10–15% for most of the stratosphere. These numbers can be used for the interpretation of instrument intercomparison and validation of the SCIAMACHY V 2.5 limb ozone profiles in a rigorous manner.

  9. Impact of distribution intensity on perceived quality, brand awareness and brand loyality - structural model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ivan-Damir Anić; Edo Rajh

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical study was to determine the impacts of distribution intensity on perceived quality and brand awareness, and to analyze the effects of perceived quality and brand awareness on brand loyalty...

  10. Modeling Threshold of Stress Intensity Factor in Iodine Induced Stress Corrosion Crack of Zirconium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG; Xin-yuan; CHEN; Peng

    2013-01-01

    KISCC,which is the threshold of stress intensity factor of iodine induced stress corrosion crack(ISCC)of Zirconium,reflects the susceptibility of ISCC of zirconium.Once the stress intensity factor surpasses the threshold,the cracking propagation modality in material will transform to transgranular from intergranular immediately and the velocity of the cracking will increase rapidly.Four key factors that’s

  11. Simulation of fan topography and soil profile using a coupled soilscape-landscape evolution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welivitiya, Dimuth; Willgoose, Garry; Hancock, Greg

    2017-04-01

    In this study the evolution of a fluvial fan, its topography and soil profile grading under erosion and deposition and soil profile weathering was simulated using SSPAM coupled soil-landscape evolution model. A constant rainfall was simulated on a synthetic landform and a fluvial fan depositional structure was allowed to form at the latter part of the landform. At each time step the geomorphological and particle size distribution information of the fan was recorded. Using this recorded information, the evolutionary characteristics of the fan as well as the surface and subsurface sediment characteristics was examined and compared with experimental and field observation data. Different fan profile sections were also derived from the recorded data and analysed. The simulation produced a fluvial fan semicircular in shape, with concave up long profiles and convex up cross profiles. The surface sediment sizes of the simulated fan were coarsest near the fan apex and fines toward the fan toe with coarse grained sediment filaments extending radially from the fan apex. These geomorphological features and surface sediment distribution agrees well with field observations of natural fans. The results of the simulation also show that the fan develops as a result of the channel bringing sediments in to the fan and periodically changing its path due to steepening of channel gradient by sediment deposition. The position of the channel is fixed at the fan apex and the channel path constantly changes along any radial direction form the fan apex. This process is remarkably similar to the process of "Fan head trenching" described in literature which is the dominant process in fluvial fan development in the field. Finally, the analysis of fan cross-sections revealed complex sediment layering patterns in the fan profile. The simulation results of the SSSPAM coupled soilscape-landscape evolution model provide qualitatively correct geomorphological and sedimentary characterization of the

  12. Measurements and modeling of the wind profile up to 600 meters at a flat coastal site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This study shows long-term ABL wind profile features by comparing long-range wind lidar measurements and the output from a mesoscale model. The study is based on one-year pulsed lidar (Wind Cube 70) measurements of wind speed and direction from 100 to 600 meters with vertical resolution of 50...... as function of height. It is found that 1) WRF is generally under predicting both the profiles of the measured wind speed, direction and power density, 2) the scatter of observations to model results of the wind speed does not change significantly with height between 100 and 600 meters, and 3) the scale (A......) and shape (k) parameters of the Weibull dis-tribution above 100 m. The latter signifies that the model suggests a wider distri-bution in the wind speed compared to measurements....

  13. Modelling the long-term soil response to atmospheric deposition at intensively monitored forest plots in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinds, G.J.; Posch, M.; Vries, de W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic soil chemistry model SMART was applied to 121 intensive forest monitoring plots (mainly located in western and northern Europe) for which both element input (deposition) and element concentrations in the soil solution were available. After calibration of poorly known parameters, the mode

  14. Evaluation strategies for vertical profiles of physical properties simulated by multilayer snowpack models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Samuel; Hagenmuller, Pascal; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Multilayer snowpack models aim at representing processes responsible for the layering of a one-dimensional snowpack, and its time evolution. Their evaluation should ideally not only rely on observations of vertically integrated properties (depth, albedo, snow water equivalent, surface temperature) but also vertical profiles of properties such as density, liquid water content, specific surface area, penetration resistance etc. However, even at well-documented sites where meteorological conditions are monitored with the highest possible accuracy, the direct comparison of simulated and observed profiles has proven challenging. This is due, not only to intrinsic model errors and snow observation uncertainties, which are classically considered, but also to errors of the meteorological observations used to drive the snowpack models and snowpack heterogeneity. These sources of errors stratigraphic mismatches, i.e. a layer at the same depth in the simulated and observed snowpack may not necessarily correspond to the same stratigraphic horizon. In addition, such errors accumulate during the course of a snow season. Altogether, this makes it particularly difficult to disentangle errors due to the snowpack model itself (which is the primary goal of such comparisons) from other sources of errors. This presentation will review various approaches already developed (e.g. Lehning and Fierz, CRST 2001) and introduce yet-to-implement methods, with the aim to provide a framework allowing improved comparisons between observed and simulated snow profiles, which is a long-lasting need of the snow modelling community.

  15. Integrated modeling of temperature profiles in L-mode tokamak discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Tangri, V.; Pankin, A. Y.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Budny, R. V.

    2014-12-01

    Simulations of doublet III-D, the joint European tokamak, and the tokamak fusion test reactor L-mode tokamak plasmas are carried out using the PTRANSP predictive integrated modeling code. The simulation and experimental temperature profiles are compared. The time evolved temperature profiles are computed utilizing the Multi-Mode anomalous transport model version 7.1 (MMM7.1) which includes transport associated with drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes (the DRIBM model [T. Rafiq et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082511 (2010)]). The tokamak discharges considered involved a broad range of conditions including scans over gyroradius, ITER like current ramp-up, with and without neon impurity injection, collisionality, and low and high plasma current. The comparison of simulation and experimental temperature profiles for the discharges considered is shown for the radial range from the magnetic axis to the last closed flux surface. The regions where various modes in the Multi-Mode model contribute to transport are illustrated. In the simulations carried out using the MMM7.1 model it is found that: The drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes contribute to the anomalous transport primarily near the edge of the plasma; transport associated with the ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes contribute in the core region but decrease in the region of the plasma boundary; and neoclassical ion thermal transport contributes mainly near the center of the discharge.

  16. Integrated modeling of temperature profiles in L-mode tokamak discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Tangri, V. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Pankin, A. Y. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Voitsekhovitch, I. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Simulations of doublet III-D, the joint European tokamak, and the tokamak fusion test reactor L-mode tokamak plasmas are carried out using the PTRANSP predictive integrated modeling code. The simulation and experimental temperature profiles are compared. The time evolved temperature profiles are computed utilizing the Multi-Mode anomalous transport model version 7.1 (MMM7.1) which includes transport associated with drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes (the DRIBM model [T. Rafiq et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082511 (2010)]). The tokamak discharges considered involved a broad range of conditions including scans over gyroradius, ITER like current ramp-up, with and without neon impurity injection, collisionality, and low and high plasma current. The comparison of simulation and experimental temperature profiles for the discharges considered is shown for the radial range from the magnetic axis to the last closed flux surface. The regions where various modes in the Multi-Mode model contribute to transport are illustrated. In the simulations carried out using the MMM7.1 model it is found that: The drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes contribute to the anomalous transport primarily near the edge of the plasma; transport associated with the ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes contribute in the core region but decrease in the region of the plasma boundary; and neoclassical ion thermal transport contributes mainly near the center of the discharge.

  17. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveiczer Akos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, which are suitable for comparing differently parameterized models in terms of the quality and robustness of the fit but have not yet been used in cell growth-profile studies. Results Length increase data from representative individual fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells measured on time-lapse films have been reanalyzed using these model selection criteria. To fit the data, an extended version of a recently introduced linearized biexponential (LinBiExp model was developed, which makes possible a smooth, continuously differentiable transition between two linear segments and, hence, allows fully parametrized bilinear fittings. Despite relatively small differences, essentially all the quantitative selection criteria considered here indicated that the bilinear model was somewhat more adequate than the exponential model for fitting these fission yeast data. Conclusion A general quantitative framework was introduced to judge the adequacy of bilinear versus exponential models in the description of growth time-profiles. For single cell growth, because of the relatively limited data-range, the statistical evidence is not strong enough to favor one model clearly over the other and to settle the bilinear versus exponential dispute. Nevertheless, for the present individual cell growth data for fission yeast, the bilinear model seems more adequate according to all metrics, especially in the case of wee1Δ cells.

  18. From acute to chronic back pain: Using linear mixed models to explore changes in pain intensity, disability, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendayan, Rebecca; Ramírez-Maestre, Carmen; Ferrer, Emilio; López, Alicia; Esteve, Rosa

    2017-07-01

    This longitudinal study investigated the pattern of change in pain intensity, disability, and depression in 232 chronic pain patients who were followed up for 2 years since pain onset. Most studies that have investigated changes in these variables over time have used participants who had already been in pain for more than 3 months. Few studies have followed up individuals from the acute phase onward and such studies used traditional statistical methods that cannot identify transition points over time or measure inter-individual variability. We followed up individuals with chronic pain from pain onset up to 18 months and we examined their pain intensity, disability and depression trajectories using a modelling approach that allows to account for between and within-individual variability. We compared three patterns of change based on theoretical criterions: a simple linear growth model; a spline model with a 3-month transition point; and a spline model with a 6-month transition point. Time with pain was selected as time metric to characterise the change in these variables in the transition from acute to chronic pain. Sex and age differences were also examined. The results showed that the pain intensity trajectory was best represented by the spline model with a 3-month transition point, whereas disability and depression were best explained by linear growth models. There were sex differences at intercept level in all the models. There were age differences at baseline for pain intensity. No sex or age differences were found for the slope. Pain intensity decreased in the first 3 months but underwent no further change. Disability and depression slightly but constantly decreased over time. Although women and older individuals are more likely to report higher pain intensity or pain-related disability in the first three months with pain, no differences by sex or age appear to be associated with the changes in pain intensity, depression and disability through the process of

  19. Variability of O3 and NO2 profile shapes during DISCOVER-AQ: Implications for satellite observations and comparisons to model-simulated profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Clare Marie; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Crawford, James H.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Diskin, Glenn; Thornhill, K. Lee; Loughner, Christopher; Lee, Pius; Strode, Sarah A.

    2016-12-01

    interruptions to this connection from complex meteorology, chemical environments, or orography. The regional CMAQ model captured the shape factors for O3, and moderately well captured the NO2 shape factors, for the conditions associated with the Maryland campaign, suggesting that a regional air quality model may adequately specify a priori profile shapes for remote sensing retrievals. CMAQ shape factor profiles were not as well represented for the other regions.

  20. Two-dimensional coupled mathematical modeling of fluvial processes with intense sediment transport and rapid bed evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE ZhiYuan; CAO ZhiXian; LI Xin; CHE Tao

    2008-01-01

    Alluvial rivers may experience intense sediment transport and rapid bed evolution under a high flow regime, for which traditional decoupled mathematical river mod-els based on simplified conservation equations are not applicable. A two-dimen-sional coupled mathematical model is presented, which is generally applicable to the fluvial processes with either intense or weak sediment transport. The governing equations of the model comprise the complete shallow water hydrodynamic equa-tions closed with Manning roughness for boundary resistance and empirical rela-tionships for sediment exchange with the erodible bed. The second-order Total-Variation-Diminishing version of the Weighted-Average-Flux method, along with the HLLC approximate Riemann Solver, is adapted to solve the governing equations, which can properly resolve shock waves and contact discontinuities. The model is applied to the pilot study of the flooding due to a sudden outburst of a real glacial-lake.

  1. Two-dimensional coupled mathematical modeling of fluvial processes with intense sediment transport and rapid bed evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Alluvial rivers may experience intense sediment transport and rapid bed evolution under a high flow regime,for which traditional decoupled mathematical river mod-els based on simplified conservation equations are not applicable. A two-dimen-sional coupled mathematical model is presented,which is generally applicable to the fluvial processes with either intense or weak sediment transport. The governing equations of the model comprise the complete shallow water hydrodynamic equa-tions closed with Manning roughness for boundary resistance and empirical rela-tionships for sediment exchange with the erodible bed. The second-order Total-Variation-Diminishing version of the Weighted-Average-Flux method,along with the HLLC approximate Riemann Solver,is adapted to solve the governing equations,which can properly resolve shock waves and contact discontinuities. The model is applied to the pilot study of the flooding due to a sudden outburst of a real glacial-lake.

  2. Prospects for Measuring Neutron-Star Masses and Radii with X-Ray Pulse Profile Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Chakrabarty, Deepto

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the amplitudes and shapes of the X-ray pulsations observed from hot, rotating neutron stars provides a direct method for measuring neutron-star properties. This technique constitutes an important part of the science case for the forthcoming NICER and proposed LOFT X-ray missions. In this paper, we determine the number of distinct observables that can be derived from pulse profile modeling and show that using only bolometric pulse profiles is insufficient for breaking the degeneracy between inferred neutron-star radius and mass. However, we also show that for moderately spinning (300-800 Hz) neutron stars, analysis of pulse profiles in two different energy bands provides additional constraints that allow a unique determination of the neutron-star properties. Using the fractional amplitudes of the fundamental and the first harmonic of the pulse profile in addition to the amplitude and phase difference of the spectral color oscillations, we quantify the signal-to-noise ratio necessary to achieve a speci...

  3. Modelling Chromospheric Line Profiles in NGC2808: Evidence of Mass Loss from RGB Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mauas, P J D; Pasquini, L

    2006-01-01

    In this study we test the possibility that the asymmetry in the profiles of the H-alpha and Ca II K lines in red giant stars is due to the presence of an active chromosphere rather than to mass loss. To this end, we compare line profiles computed using relevant model chromospheres to profiles of the H-alpha and Ca II K lines observed in five red giant stars of the globular cluster NGC 2808. The spectra were taken with FLAMES during Science Verification, using the UVES mode at high resolution (R=43,000) for the H-alpha line, and GIRAFFE in MEDUSA mode (R=20,000) for the Ca II K line. We find that the observed profiles are better described if a negative (outward) velocity field is included in the model chromospheres. This leads to mass loss rates of a few 10**(-9) solar masses per year, very close to the requirements of the stellar evolution theory.

  4. Multi-dimensional profiling of medical students' cognitive models about learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Lawson, Michael J

    2006-02-01

    In current constructivist paradigms, learners' previous subject-matter knowledge, or cognitive models, provide the foundations for the construction of new knowledge. Learners' cognitive models about learning also mediate students' capacities to learn in their chosen topics of study. The diverse backgrounds of students entering medicine suggest that they might come to medical studies equipped with a wide variety of cognitive models about learning. Some current theories tend to reduce students' cognitions about learning to parsimonious representations, such as surface-deep approaches or mastery-performance goals. It is possible that such reduced representations underrepresent, or misrepresent, the complexity of students' cognitive models about learning. Good quality teaching needs to take account of learners' cognitive models, not just about subject matter, but also about learning. This study investigated the diversity and complexity of medical students' cognitive models about learning. A total of 7 graduate entry, clinical-year medical students volunteered for in-depth interviews about learning. NUD*IST text analysis software and correspondence analysis were employed to identify dimensions and to profile students' responses. The correspondence analysis identified a significant 4-dimensional solution that illustrates the contributions of multiple variables to students' cognitive models about learning. Individual profiles highlight diversity between participants. This study provides evidence that students' cognitive models about learning are complex and highly differentiated. Representations of what students know about learning need to take account of such complexity in order to inform instructional practice more adequately.

  5. CPHmodels-3.0--remote homology modeling using structure-guided sequence profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl

    2010-07-01

    CPHmodels-3.0 is a web server predicting protein 3D structure by use of single template homology modeling. The server employs a hybrid of the scoring functions of CPHmodels-2.0 and a novel remote homology-modeling algorithm. A query sequence is first attempted modeled using the fast CPHmodels-2.0 profile-profile scoring function suitable for close homology modeling. The new computational costly remote homology-modeling algorithm is only engaged provided that no suitable PDB template is identified in the initial search. CPHmodels-3.0 was benchmarked in the CASP8 competition and produced models for 94% of the targets (117 out of 128), 74% were predicted as high reliability models (87 out of 117). These achieved an average RMSD of 4.6 A when superimposed to the 3D structure. The remaining 26% low reliably models (30 out of 117) could superimpose to the true 3D structure with an average RMSD of 9.3 A. These performance values place the CPHmodels-3.0 method in the group of high performing 3D prediction tools. Beside its accuracy, one of the important features of the method is its speed. For most queries, the response time of the server is web server is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/CPHmodels/.

  6. Neural Network-Based Model for Landslide Susceptibility and Soil Longitudinal Profile Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, F.; Barari, Amin; Choobbasti, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create an empirical model for assessing the landslide risk potential at Savadkouh Azad University, which is located in the rural surroundings of Savadkouh, about 5 km from the city of Pol-Sefid in northern Iran. The soil longitudinal profile of the city of Babol......, located 25 km from the Caspian Sea, also was predicted with an artificial neural network (ANN). A multilayer perceptron neural network model was applied to the landslide area and was used to analyze specific elements in the study area that contributed to previous landsliding events. The ANN models were...... studies in landslide susceptibility zonation....

  7. Model equations for the Eiffel Tower profile: historical perspective and new results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidman, Patrick; Pinelis, Iosif

    2004-07-01

    Model equations for the shape of the Eiffel Tower are investigated. One model purported to be based on Eiffel's writing does not give a tower with the correct curvature. A second popular model not connected with Eiffel's writings provides a fair approximation to the tower's skyline profile of 29 contiguous panels. Reported here is a third model derived from Eiffel's concern about wind loads on the tower, as documented in his communication to the French Civil Engineering Society on 30 March 1885. The result is a nonlinear, integro-differential equation which is solved to yield an exponential tower profile. It is further verified that, as Eiffel wrote, "in reality the curve exterior of the tower reproduces, at a determined scale, the same curve of the moments produced by the wind". An analysis of the actual tower profile shows that it is composed of two piecewise continuous exponentials with different growth rates. This is explained by specific safety factors for wind loading that Eiffel & Company incorporated in the design of the free-standing tower. To cite this article: P. Weidman, I. Pinelis, C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  8. Multi-Organ Contribution to the Metabolic Plasma Profile Using Hierarchical Modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Torell

    Full Text Available Hierarchical modelling was applied in order to identify the organs that contribute to the levels of metabolites in plasma. Plasma and organ samples from gut, kidney, liver, muscle and pancreas were obtained from mice. The samples were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC TOF-MS at the Swedish Metabolomics centre, Umeå University, Sweden. The multivariate analysis was performed by means of principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS. The main goal of this study was to investigate how each organ contributes to the metabolic plasma profile. This was performed using hierarchical modelling. Each organ was found to have a unique metabolic profile. The hierarchical modelling showed that the gut, kidney and liver demonstrated the greatest contribution to the metabolic pattern of plasma. For example, we found that metabolites were absorbed in the gut and transported to the plasma. The kidneys excrete branched chain amino acids (BCAAs and fatty acids are transported in the plasma to the muscles and liver. Lactic acid was also found to be transported from the pancreas to plasma. The results indicated that hierarchical modelling can be utilized to identify the organ contribution of unknown metabolites to the metabolic profile of plasma.

  9. Novel use of noninvasive high-intensity focused ultrasonography for intercostal nerve neurolysis in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Amitabh; Loh, Jeffrey; Gutta, Narendra B; Ezell, Paula C; Monette, Sébastien; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Maybody, Majid; Solomon, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive thermal ablation technique. High-intensity focused ultrasound has been used in small-animal models to lesion neural tissue selectively. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of HIFU in a large-animal model for ablation of nerves similar in size to human nerves. Twelve acute magnetic resonance-guided HIFU ablation lesions were created in intercostal nerves in a swine model. In a second pig, as a control, 4 radiofrequency ablation and 4 alcohol lesions were performed on intercostal nerves under ultrasound guidance. Preprocedural and postprocedural magnetic resonance imaging was then performed to evaluate radiologically the lesion size created by HIFU. Animals were euthanized 1 hour postprocedure, and necropsy was performed to collect tissue samples for histopathologic analysis. On gross and histological examination of the intercostal nerve, acute HIFU nerve lesions showed evidence of well-demarcated, acute, focally extensive thermal necrosis. Four intercostal nerves ablated with HIFU were sent for histopathologic analysis, with 2 of 4 lesions showing pathologic damage to the intercostal nerve. Similar results were shown with radiofrequency ablation technique, whereas the intercostal nerves appeared histologically intact with alcohol ablation. High-intensity focused ultrasound may be used as a noninvasive neurolytic technique in swine. High-intensity focused ultrasound may have potential as a neuroablation technique for patients with chronic and cancer pain.

  10. Modelling profile and shape evolution during hot rolling of steel strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambrano, P. C.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Profile and shape control are required to assure the dimensional quality of rolled strip. Occurrence of waves either at the edges or centre of strips is attributed to inconsistency between the entry and exit cross-section profiles of the stock within a given rolling pass. The exit profile of the strip can be computed by considering that the such profile is the complement of that of the roll-gap, which is affected by wear, thermal expansion and distortion of the work rolls A computer model was developed to predict the profile of the roll-gap taking into account the thermal gradient within the work roll and the distortion caused by the acting forces. It was possible to establish a good correlation between the profiles of strips obtained from trials carried out on site, and the predictions of the model. The model allows for the prediction of the onset of shape defects from changes in the profile of rolled strips.

    Se requiere del control del perfil y forma para asegurar la calidad dimensional de la cinta laminada. La presencia de ondulaciones, ya sea en la orilla o al centro de la cinta, se atribuye a la inconsistencia entre el perfil de la sección transversal de la pieza a la entrada y a la salida, en un dado paso. El perfil de salida de la cinta se puede calcular al suponer que dicho perfil es el complemento del entrehierro, que es afectado por desgaste, expansión térmica y distorsión de los rodillos de trabajo. Un modelo matemático se desarrolló para predecir el perfil del entrehierro tomando en cuenta el gradiente térmico en el rodillo de trabajo y la distorsión producida por las fuerzas actuantes. Fue posible encontrar una buena correlación entre los perfiles de cintas obtenidos a partir de pruebas en planta y las predicciones del modelo. El modelo permite predecir el origen de defectos de forma a partir de cambios en el perfil de cintas laminadas.

  11. Advanced Forward Modeling and Inversion of Stokes Profiles Resulting from the Joint Action of the Hanle and Zeeman Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    2008-08-01

    A big challenge in solar and stellar physics in the coming years will be to decipher the magnetism of the solar outer atmosphere (chromosphere and corona) along with its dynamic coupling with the magnetic fields of the underlying photosphere. To this end, it is important to develop rigorous diagnostic tools for the physical interpretation of spectropolarimetric observations in suitably chosen spectral lines. Here we present a computer program for the synthesis and inversion of Stokes profiles caused by the joint action of atomic level polarization and the Hanle and Zeeman effects in some spectral lines of diagnostic interest, such as those of the He I 10830 Å and 5876 Å (or D3) multiplets. It is based on the quantum theory of spectral line polarization, which takes into account in a rigorous way all the relevant physical mechanisms and ingredients (optical pumping, atomic level polarization, level crossings and repulsions, Zeeman, Paschen-Back, and Hanle effects). The influence of radiative transfer on the emergent spectral line radiation is taken into account through a suitable slab model. The user can either calculate the emergent intensity and polarization for any given magnetic field vector or infer the dynamical and magnetic properties from the observed Stokes profiles via an efficient inversion algorithm based on global optimization methods. The reliability of the forward modeling and inversion code presented here is demonstrated through several applications, which range from the inference of the magnetic field vector in solar active regions to determining whether or not it is canopy-like in quiet chromospheric regions. This user-friendly diagnostic tool called "HAZEL" (from HAnle and ZEeman Light) is offered to the astrophysical community, with the hope that it will facilitate new advances in solar and stellar physics.

  12. MODELLING THE POSITION OF CELL PROFILES ALLOWING FOR BOTH INHOMOGENEITY AND INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Stougaard Nielsen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available It is of interest to consider models for point processes that allow for interaction between the points as well as for inhomogeneity in the intensity of the points. Markov point process models are very useful to describe point interaction and can also be used to describe inhomogeneity. A particular type of inhomogeneous Markov point processes obtained by transforming a homogeneous Markov point process will be considered. The position of cell proles in a 2D section of the mucous membrane in the stomach of a rat will be examined using this model.

  13. Modelling of composition and stress profiles in low temperature surface engineered stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    stresses are introduced in the developing case, arising from the volume expansion that accompanies the dissolution of high interstitial contents in expanded austenite. Modelling of the composition and stress profiles developing during low temperature surface engineering from the processing parameters...... temperature, time and gas composition is a prerequisite for targeted process optimization. A realistic model to simulate the developing case has to take the following influences on composition and stress into account: - a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient - trapping of nitrogen by chromium atoms...... - the effect of residual stress on diffusive flux - the effect of residual stress on solubility of interstitials - plastic accommodation of residual stress. The effect of all these contributions on composition and stress profiles will be addressed....

  14. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Mukhtarov

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulation. The latter is probably connected with the influence of the diurnal fluctuations in the local temperature on the chemistry involved in the electron loss rate, as well as the diurnal variations of the main ionizing agent (NO in the D-region. That is why the Ne(h-profiles in the midlatitude D-region are modelled separately for morning and afternoon hours.

  15. The Optimal Design Method and Standardized Mathematical Model of Tooth Profile Modification of Spur Gear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Mei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports a tooth profile modification method of spur gear. After establishing a standardized mathematical model for optimized tooth profile and simulating meshing process with ANSYS finite element analysis, we obtained 625 groups of gear models with different modification parameters. The group with minimum transmission errors owns the optimal parameters. Genetic algorithm was adopted in the entire process for the purpose of reducing the variation of transmission errors in meshing process. The arc and parabolic modification were doing the same processing. After comparing the transmission errors fluctuation produced by the meshing process of gear of nonmodification with arc modification and parabolic modification, we found that the best modification effects of arc modification and parabolic modification were both reduced by 90%. The modification method makes the gear drive process more stable and efficient, and it is also promising in general application for gear drive.

  16. Novel mathematical model for predicting the dissolution profile of spherical particles under non-sink conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agata, Yasuyoshi; Iwao, Yasunori; Miyagishima, Atsuo; Itai, Shigeru

    2010-04-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model was designed to predict dissolution patterns under non-sink conditions. Sulfamethoxazole was used as a model drug, and its physico-chemical properties such as solubility, density, and intrinsic dissolution rate constant etc., were investigated in order to apply these experimental values to the proposed model. Dissolution tests were employed as a way of validating the mathematical model, and it was found that the predictions given by the model were surprisingly accurate for all particle sizes. In addition, a simulation focused on forecasting the fraction of the drug that was dissolved at a certain time point when various initial particle diameters were used was also particularly valuable. Therefore, these results demonstrated that the model enables dissolution profiles to be analyzed under non-sink conditions.

  17. A stochastic model for optimizing composite predictors based on gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Murali

    2003-07-01

    This project was done to develop a mathematical model for optimizing composite predictors based on gene expression profiles from DNA arrays and proteomics. The problem was amenable to a formulation and solution analogous to the portfolio optimization problem in mathematical finance: it requires the optimization of a quadratic function subject to linear constraints. The performance of the approach was compared to that of neighborhood analysis using a data set containing cDNA array-derived gene expression profiles from 14 multiple sclerosis patients receiving intramuscular inteferon-beta1a. The Markowitz portfolio model predicts that the covariance between genes can be exploited to construct an efficient composite. The model predicts that a composite is not needed for maximizing the mean value of a treatment effect: only a single gene is needed, but the usefulness of the effect measure may be compromised by high variability. The model optimized the composite to yield the highest mean for a given level of variability or the least variability for a given mean level. The choices that meet this optimization criteria lie on a curve of composite mean vs. composite variability plot referred to as the "efficient frontier." When a composite is constructed using the model, it outperforms the composite constructed using the neighborhood analysis method. The Markowitz portfolio model may find potential applications in constructing composite biomarkers and in the pharmacogenomic modeling of treatment effects derived from gene expression endpoints.

  18. Gaussian versus top-hat profile assumptions in integral plume models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, G. A.

    Numerous integral models describing the behaviour of buoyant plumes released into stratified crossflows have been presented in the literature. One of the differences between these models is the form assumed for the self-similar profile: some models assume a top-hat form while others assume a Gaussian. The differences between these two approaches are evaluated by (a) comparing the governing equations on which Gaussian and top-hat models are based; (b) comparing some typical plume predictions generated by each type of model over a range of model parameters. It is shown that, while the profile assumption does lead to differences in the equations which govern plume variables, the effects of these differences on actual plume predictions is small over the range of parameters of practical interest. Since the predictions of Gaussian and top-hat models are essentially equivalent, it can thus be concluded that the additional physical information incorporated into a Gaussian formulation plays only a minor role in mean plume behaviour, and that the tophat approach, which requires the numerical solution of a simpler set of equations, is adequate for most situations where an integral approach would be used.

  19. A decision-making model of development intensity based on similarity relationship between land attributes intervened by urban design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a dynamic model intervened by urban design for the decision-making of land development intensity, which expresses the inherent interaction mechanism between lands based on the evaluation of land attributes and their similarity relationship. Each land unit is described with several factors according to their condition and potential for development, such as land function, accessibility, historical site control, landscape control, and so on. Then, the dynamic reference relationship between land units is established according to the similarity relationship between their factors. That means lands with similar conditions tend to have similar development intensities, which expresses the rule of the spontaneous urban development. Therefore, the development intensities of the pending lands can be calculated by the confirmed ones. Furthermore, the system can be actively intervened by adjusting the parameters according to urban design or planning intentions. And the reaction of the system offers effective support and reference for reasonable decision. The system with multiple intervention input is not only a credible tool for deriving development intensities, but also a platform to activate urban design conception. Above all, the system as a socio-technical tool integrates the optimization of form, function and environment, and embodies the principle of impersonality, justice and flexibility in the decision of land development intensity.

  20. Pulsive feedback control of a quarter car model forced by a road profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litak, G. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Technical University of Lublin, Nadbystrzycka 36, PL-20-618 Lublin (Poland)]. E-mail: g.litak@pollub.pl; Borowiec, M. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Technical University of Lublin, Nadbystrzycka 36, PL-20-618 Lublin (Poland); Ali, M. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Mathematical Science, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Saha, L.M. [Zakhir Husain College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110002 (India); Friswell, M.I. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, University of Bristol, Queens Building, Bristol BS8 1TR (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    We examine the strange chaotic attractor and its unstable periodic orbits for a one degree of freedom nonlinear oscillator with a non-symmetric potential that models a quarter car forced by the road profile. We propose an efficient method of chaos control that stabilizes these orbits using a pulsive feedback technique. A discrete set of pulses is able to transfer the system from one periodic state to another.

  1. Predicting absorption and pharmacokinetic profile of carbamazepine from controlled-release tablet formulation in humans using rabbit model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homšek Irena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled-release (CR pharmaceutical formulations offer several advantages over the conventional, immediate release dosage forms of the same drug, including reduced dosing frequency, decreased incidence and/or intensity of adverse effects, greater selectivity of pharmacological activity, reduced drug plasma fluctuation, and better compliance. After a drug product has been registered, and is already on market, minor changes in formulation might be needed. At the same time, the product has to remain effective and safe for patients that could be confirmed via plasma drug concentrations and pharmacokinetic characteristics. It is challenging to predict human absorption and pharmacokinetic characteristics of a drug based on the in vitro dissolution test and the animal pharmacokinetic data. Therefore, the objective of this study was to establish correlation of the pharmacokinetic parameters of carbamazepine (CBZ CR tablet formulation between the rabbit and the human model, and to establish in vitro in vivo correlation (IVIVC based on the predicted fractions of absorbed CBZ. Although differences in mean plasma concentration profiles were notified, the data concerning the predicted fraction of drug absorbed were almost superimposable. Accordingly, it can be concluded that rabbits may be representative as an in vivo model for predicting the pharmacokinetics of the CR formulation of CBZ in humans.

  2. Application of high-resolution domestic electricity load profiles in network modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Mendaza, Iker Diaz de Cerio; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing development towards electrification of the energy consumption together with large deployment of renewable energy sources creates new challenges of variability and fluctuation of the electricity supply and increases complexity of the network operation. In order to capture all the parti......The ongoing development towards electrification of the energy consumption together with large deployment of renewable energy sources creates new challenges of variability and fluctuation of the electricity supply and increases complexity of the network operation. In order to capture all......-minute resolution. The load profiles of the household appliances are created using a bottom-up model, which uses the 1-minute cycle power use characteristics of a single appliance as the main building block. The profiles of heavy electric appliances, such as heat pump, are not included in the above......-mentioned model, as they are closely related to the thermal properties of a building. Therefore, two type of single family houses equipped with heat pump are simulated in EnergyPlus with 1-minute time step. The PV generation profile is obtained from a model developed in Matlab environment. In the second part...

  3. Realistic modeling of the pulse profile of PSR J0737-3039A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, B. B. P.; Kim, C.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Ferdman, R. D. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Kramer, M.; Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Possenti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomica di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, Strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy)

    2014-05-20

    The Double Pulsar, PSR J0737-3039A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be ∼30° and ∼10 neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J0737-3039A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars (Δ{sub S}) is estimated to be ∼(138° ± 5°) at the current epoch and will likely remain constant until tidal interactions become important in ∼85 Myr, at merger.

  4. Realistic Modeling of the Pulse Profile of PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A

    CERN Document Server

    Perera, B B P; McLaughlin, M A; Ferdman, R D; Kramer, M; Stairs, I H; Freire, P C C; Possenti, A

    2014-01-01

    The Double Pulsar, PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be $30^\\circ$ and $10$ neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J$0737$$-$$3039$A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars ($\\Delta_S$)...

  5. New model for gain control of signal intensity to object distance in echolocating bats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørum, Ulrik; Brinkløv, Signe; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    Echolocating bats emit ultrasonic calls and listen for the returning echoes to orient and localize prey in darkness. The emitted source level, SL (estimated signal intensity 10 cm from the mouth), is adjusted dynamically from call to call in response to sensory feedback as bats approach objects. ...

  6. Teaching Intensive Interaction to Paid Carers: Using the "Communities of Practice" Model to Inform Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Kelly; Bradley, Samantha; Johnson, Gemma; Mrozik, Jennifer H.; Appiah, Afua; Nagra, Maninder K.

    2016-01-01

    The engagement of people with learning disabilities in social communication is crucial to the development of relationships with others, a sense of social inclusion and self-worth. Intensive Interaction is an approach that can help carers develop their skills to engage people with severe and profound learning disabilities in personally relevant…

  7. Program Intensity and Service Delivery Models in the Schools: SLP Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandel, Jayne; Loeb, Diane Frome

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: School-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) routinely work with team members to make recommendations regarding an intervention program's intensity and method of service delivery for children with speech and language impairments. In this study, student, SLP, and workplace characteristics that may influence SLPs' recommendations were…

  8. A Path Model of Effective Technology-Intensive Inquiry-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Stanislav; Kocijancic, Slavko

    2016-01-01

    Individual aptitude, attitudes, and behavior in inquiry-based learning (IBL) settings may affect work and learning performance outcomes during activities using different technologies. To encourage multifaceted learning, factors in IBL settings must be statistically significant and effective, and not cognitively or psychomotor intensive. We…