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Sample records for model independent predictors

  1. Stroke Location Is an Independent Predictor of Cognitive Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Fanny; Sagnier, Sharmila; Asselineau, Julien; Bigourdan, Antoine; Guttmann, Charles R; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Poli, Mathilde; Renou, Pauline; Perez, Paul; Dousset, Vincent; Sibon, Igor; Tourdias, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    On top of functional outcome, accurate prediction of cognitive outcome for stroke patients is an unmet need with major implications for clinical management. We investigated whether stroke location may contribute independent prognostic value to multifactorial predictive models of functional and cognitive outcomes. Four hundred twenty-eight consecutive patients with ischemic stroke were prospectively assessed with magnetic resonance imaging at 24 to 72 hours and at 3 months for functional outcome using the modified Rankin Scale and cognitive outcome using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Statistical maps of functional and cognitive eloquent regions were derived from the first 215 patients (development sample) using voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping. We used multivariate logistic regression models to study the influence of stroke location (number of eloquent voxels from voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping maps), age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and stroke volume on modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. The second part of our cohort was used as an independent replication sample. In univariate analyses, stroke location, age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume were all predictive of poor modified Rankin Scale and MoCA. In multivariable analyses, stroke location remained the strongest independent predictor of MoCA and significantly improved the prediction compared with using only age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and stroke volume (area under the curve increased from 0.697-0.771; difference=0.073; 95% confidence interval, 0.008-0.155). In contrast, stroke location did not persist as independent predictor of modified Rankin Scale that was mainly driven by initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (area under the curve going from 0.840 to 0.835). Similar results were obtained in the replication sample. Stroke location is an independent predictor of cognitive outcome (MoCA) at 3

  2. Increased mean lung density: Another independent predictor of lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.sverzellati@unipr.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Randi, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.randi@marionegri.it [Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Spagnolo, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.spagnolo@unimore.it [Respiratory Disease Unit, Center for Rare Lung Disease, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Respiratory Disease, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, 44124 Modena (Italy); Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Radiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Silva, Mario, E-mail: mac.mario@hotmail.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin, E-mail: Jan-Martin.Kuhnigk@mevis.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); La Vecchia, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.lavecchia@marionegri.it [Department of Occupational Health, University of Milan, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.zompatori@unibo.it [Department of Radiology, Cardio-Thoracic Section, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Albertoni 15, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Pastorino, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.pastorino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between emphysema phenotype, mean lung density (MLD), lung function and lung cancer by using an automated multiple feature analysis tool on thin-section computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Both emphysema phenotype and MLD evaluated by automated quantitative CT analysis were compared between outpatients and screening participants with lung cancer (n = 119) and controls (n = 989). Emphysema phenotype was defined by assessing features such as extent, distribution on core/peel of the lung and hole size. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate independent associations of CT densitometric measurements and pulmonary function test (PFT) with lung cancer risk. Results: No emphysema feature was associated with lung cancer. Lung cancer risk increased with decreasing values of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) independently of MLD (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 2.63–10.97 for FEV{sub 1} < 60% vs. FEV{sub 1} ≥ 90%), and with increasing MLD independently of FEV{sub 1} (OR 3.00, 95% CI: 1.60–5.63 for MLD > −823 vs. MLD < −857 Hounsfield units). Conclusion: Emphysema per se was not associated with lung cancer whereas decreased FEV{sub 1} was confirmed as being a strong and independent risk factor. The cross-sectional association between increased MLD and lung cancer requires future validations.

  3. Predictors of physical independence at discharge after stroke rehabilitation in a Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brink, Antonia F.; Hajos, Tibor R. S.; van Bennekom, Coen; Nachtegaal, Janneke; Meulenbelt, Henk E.J.; Fleuren, Judith F. M.; Kouwenhoven, Mirjam; Luijkx, Marscha M.; Wijffels, Markus P.; Post, Marcel W. M.

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors, available at admission, of physical independence at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Secondary aims were to identify predictors of functional gain and length of stay (LOS). We included 1310 adult stroke patients who were admitted for

  4. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.; Biemans, I.; Verkroost, M.W.; Swieten, H.A. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. METHODS: Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the

  5. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noyez, L.; Biemans, I.; Verkroost, M.W.; Swieten, H.A. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. METHODS: Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the Cor

  6. Overhydration Is a Strong Predictor of Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients - Independently of Cardiac Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Jotterand Drepper

    Full Text Available Overhydration is a common problem in peritoneal dialysis patients and has been shown to be associated with mortality. However, it still remains unclear whether overhydration per se is predictive of mortality or whether it is mainly a reflection of underlying comorbidities. The purpose of our study was to assess overhydration in peritoneal dialysis patients using bioimpedance spectroscopy and to investigate whether overhydration is an independent predictor of mortality.We analyzed and followed 54 peritoneal dialysis patients between June 2008 and December 2014. All patients underwent bioimpedance spectroscopy measurement once and were allocated to normohydrated and overhydrated groups. Overhydration was defined as an absolute overhydration/extracellular volume ratio > 15%. Simultaneously, clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory data were assessed. Heart failure was defined either on echocardiography, as a reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, or clinically according to the New York Heart Association functional classification. Patient survival was documented up until December 31st 2014. Factors associated with mortality were identified and a multivariable Cox regression model was used to identify independent predictors of mortality.Apart from higher daily peritoneal ultrafiltration rate and cumulative diuretic dose in overhydrated patients, there were no significant differences between the 2 groups, in particular with respect to gender, body mass index, comorbidity and cardiac medication. Mortality was higher in overhydrated than in euvolemic patients. In the univariate analysis, increased age, overhydration, low diastolic blood pressure, raised troponin and NTproBNP, hypoalbuminemia, heart failure but not CRP were predictive of mortality. After adjustment, only overhydration, increased age and low diastolic blood pressure remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis.Overhydration remains an independent predictor of

  7. Alkaline Phosphatase: The Next Independent Predictor of the Poor 90-Day Outcome in Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Kasztelan-Szczerbinska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Determination of risk factors relevant to 90-day prognosis in AH. Comparison of the conventional prognostic models such as Maddrey’s modified discriminant function (mDF and Child-Pugh-Turcotte (CPT score with newer ones: the Glasgow Alcoholic Hepatitis Score (GAHS; Age, Bilirubin, INR, Creatinine (ABIC score, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD, and MELD-Na in the death prediction. Patients and Methods. The clinical and laboratory variables obtained at admission were assessed. The mDF, CPT, GAHS, ABIC, MELD, and MELD-Na scores’ different areas under the curve (AUCs and the best threshold values were compared. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors of the 90-day outcome. Results. One hundred sixteen pts fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Twenty (17.4% pts died and one underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT within 90 days of follow-up. No statistically significant differences in the models‘ performances were found. Multivariate logistic regression identified CPT score, alkaline phosphatase (AP level higher than 1.5 times the upper limit of normal (ULN, and corticosteroids (CS nonresponse as independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions. The CPT score, AP > 1.5 ULN, and the CS nonresponse had an independent impact on the 90-day survival in AH. Accuracy of all studied scoring systems was comparable.

  8. Independent predictors of all osteoporosis-related fractures in healthy postmenopausal women: the OFELY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrand, G; Munoz, F; Sornay-Rendu, E; DuBoeuf, F; Delmas, P D

    2003-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have identified clinical factors that predict the risk of hip fractures in elderly women independently of the level of bone mineral density (BMD), such as low body weight, history of fractures, and clinical risk factors for falls. Their relevance in predicting all fragility fractures in all postmenopausal women, including younger ones, is unknown. The objective of this study was to identify independent predictors of all osteoporosis-related fractures in healthy postmenopausal women. We prospectively followed for 5.3 +/- 1.1 years a cohort of 672 healthy postmenopausal women (mean age 59.1 +/- 9.8 years). Information on social and professional conditions, demographic data, current and past medical history, fracture history, medication use, alcohol consumption, caffeine consumption, daily calcium intake, cigarette smoking, family history of fracture, and past and recent physical activity was obtained. Anthropometric and total hip bone mineral density measurements were made. Incident falls and fractures were ascertained every year. We observed 81 osteoporotic fractures (annual incidence, 21 per 1000 women/year). The final model consisted of seven independent predictors of incident osteoporotic fractures: age > or = 65 years, odds ratio estimate (OR), 1.90 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-3.46], past falls, OR, 1.76 (CI 1.00-3.09), total hip bone mineral density (BMD) < or = 0.736 g/cm(2), OR, 3.15 (CI 1.75-5.66), left grip strength < or = 0.60 bar, OR, 2.05 (CI 1.15-3.64), maternal history of fracture, OR, 1.77 (CI 1.01-3.09), low physical activity, OR, 2.08 (CI 1.17-3.69), and personal history of fragility fracture, OR, 3.33 (CI 1.75-5.66). In contrast, body weight, weight loss, height loss, smoking, neuromuscular coordination assessed by three tests, and hormone replacement therapy were not independent predictors of all fragility fractures after adjustment for all variables. We found that some--but not all--previously reported

  9. Urinary albumin excretion. An independent predictor of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch-Johnsen, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S

    1999-01-01

    ischemic heart disease (IHD) in a population-based cohort. In 1983, urinary albumin and creatinine levels were measured, along with the conventional atherosclerotic risk factors, in 2085 consecutive participants without IHD, renal disease, urinary tract infection, or diabetes mellitus. The participants......Cross-sectional studies suggest that an increased urinary albumin excretion rate is associated with cardiovascular disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to analyze prospectively whether the urinary albumin-to -creatinine (A/C) ratio can independently predict......, 1.3 to 3.9, P=0.002), and the 10-year disease-free survival decreased from 97% to 91% (P

  10. Nonparametric Bayes modeling for case control studies with many predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Herring, Amy H; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Olshan, Andrew F; Dunson, David B

    2016-03-01

    It is common in biomedical research to run case-control studies involving high-dimensional predictors, with the main goal being detection of the sparse subset of predictors having a significant association with disease. Usual analyses rely on independent screening, considering each predictor one at a time, or in some cases on logistic regression assuming no interactions. We propose a fundamentally different approach based on a nonparametric Bayesian low rank tensor factorization model for the retrospective likelihood. Our model allows a very flexible structure in characterizing the distribution of multivariate variables as unknown and without any linear assumptions as in logistic regression. Predictors are excluded only if they have no impact on disease risk, either directly or through interactions with other predictors. Hence, we obtain an omnibus approach for screening for important predictors. Computation relies on an efficient Gibbs sampler. The methods are shown to have high power and low false discovery rates in simulation studies, and we consider an application to an epidemiology study of birth defects.

  11. Subcutaneous Tissue Thickness is an Independent Predictor of Image Noise in Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staniak, Henrique Lane; Sharovsky, Rodolfo [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, Alexandre Costa [Hospital das Clínicas - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Castro, Cláudio Campi de; Benseñor, Isabela M.; Lotufo, Paulo A. [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Faculdade de Medicina - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bittencourt, Márcio Sommer, E-mail: msbittencourt@mail.harvard.edu [Hospital Universitário - Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Few data on the definition of simple robust parameters to predict image noise in cardiac computed tomography (CT) exist. To evaluate the value of a simple measure of subcutaneous tissue as a predictor of image noise in cardiac CT. 86 patients underwent prospective ECG-gated coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and coronary calcium scoring (CAC) with 120 kV and 150 mA. The image quality was objectively measured by the image noise in the aorta in the cardiac CTA, and low noise was defined as noise < 30HU. The chest anteroposterior diameter and lateral width, the image noise in the aorta and the skin-sternum (SS) thickness were measured as predictors of cardiac CTA noise. The association of the predictors and image noise was performed by using Pearson correlation. The mean radiation dose was 3.5 ± 1.5 mSv. The mean image noise in CT was 36.3 ± 8.5 HU, and the mean image noise in non-contrast scan was 17.7 ± 4.4 HU. All predictors were independently associated with cardiac CTA noise. The best predictors were SS thickness, with a correlation of 0.70 (p < 0.001), and noise in the non-contrast images, with a correlation of 0.73 (p < 0.001). When evaluating the ability to predict low image noise, the areas under the ROC curve for the non-contrast noise and for the SS thickness were 0.837 and 0.864, respectively. Both SS thickness and CAC noise are simple accurate predictors of cardiac CTA image noise. Those parameters can be incorporated in standard CT protocols to adequately adjust radiation exposure.

  12. B-type natriuretic peptide is an independent predictor of endothelial function in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauriah, Maheshwar; Khan, Faisel; Lim, Tiong K; Elder, Douglas H; Godfrey, Valerie; Kennedy, Gwen; Belch, Jill J F; Booth, Nuala A; Struthers, Allan D; Lang, Chim C

    2012-09-01

    BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) has been reported to be elevated in preclinical states of vascular damage. To elucidate the relationship between plasma BNP and endothelial function, we have investigated the relationship between BNP and endothelial function in a cohort of subjects comprising healthy subjects as well as at-risk subjects with cardiovascular risk factors. To also clarify the relative contribution of different biological pathways to the individual variation in endothelial function, we have examined the relationship between a panel of multiple biomarkers and endothelial function. A total of 70 subjects were studied (mean age, 58.1±4.6 years; 27% had a history of hypertension and 18% had a history of hypercholesterolaemia). Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation was evaluated by the invasive ACH (acetylcholine)-induced forearm vasodilatation technique. A panel of biomarkers of biological pathways was measured: BNP, haemostatic factors PAI-1 (plasminogen-activator inhibitor 1) and tPA (tissue plasminogen activator), inflammatory markers, including cytokines [hs-CRP (high sensitive C-reactive protein), IL (interleukin)-6, IL-8, IL-18, TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) and MPO (myeloperoxidase] and soluble adhesion molecules [E-selectin and sCD40 (soluble CD40)]. The median BNP level in the study population was 26.9 pg/ml. Multivariate regression analyses show that age, the total cholesterol/HDL (high-density lipoprotein) ratio, glucose and BNP were independent predictors of endothelial function, and BNP remained an independent predictor (P=0.009) in a binary logistic regression analysis using FBF (forearm blood flow) as a dichotomous variable based on the median value. None of the other plasma biomarkers was independently related to ACH-mediated vasodilatation. In a strategy using several biomarkers to relate to endothelial function, plasma BNP was found to be an independent predictor of endothelial function as assessed by endothelium

  13. Early inflammatory markers are independent predictors of cardiac allograft vasculopathy in heart-transplant recipients.

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    Carlos A Labarrere

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of risk is essential to prevent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV and graft failure due to CAV (GFDCAV in heart transplant patients, which account for 30% of all deaths. Early CAV detection involves invasive, risky, and expensive monitoring approaches. We determined whether prediction of CAV and GFDCAV improves by adding inflammatory markers to a previously validated atherothrombotic (AT model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: AT and inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP were measured in heart biopsies and sera of 172 patients followed prospectively for 8.9±5.0 years. Models were estimated for 5- and 10-year risk using (1 the first post-transplant biopsy only, or (2 all biopsies obtained within 3 months. Multivariate models were adjusted for other covariates and cross-validated by bootstrapping. After adding IL-6 and CRP to the AT models, we evaluated the significance of odds ratios (ORs associated with the additional inflammatory variables and the degree of improvement in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC. When inflammatory markers were tested alone in prediction models, CRP (not IL-6 was a significant predictor of CAV and GFDCAV at 5 (CAV: p<0.0001; GFDCAV: p = 0.005 and 10 years (CAV: p<0.0001; GFDCAV: p = 0.003. Adding CRP (not IL-6 to the best AT models improved discriminatory power to identify patients destined to develop CAV (using 1st biopsy: p<0.001 and p = 0.001; using all 3-month biopsies: p<0.04 and p = 0.008 at 5- and 10-years, respectively and GFDCAV (using 1st biopsy: 0.92 vs. 0.95 and 0.86 vs. 0.89; using all 3-month biopsies: 0.94 vs. 0.96 and 0.88 vs. 0.89 at 5- and 10-years, respectively, as indicated by an increase in AUROC. CONCLUSIONS: Early inflammatory status, measured by a patient's CRP level (a non-invasive, safe and inexpensive test, independently predicts CAV and GFDCAV. Adding CRP to a previously established AT model

  14. Early Inflammatory Markers Are Independent Predictors of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy in Heart-Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarrere, Carlos A.; Woods, John R.; Hardin, James W.; Jaeger, Beate R.; Zembala, Marian; Deng, Mario C.; Kassab, Ghassan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identification of risk is essential to prevent cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) and graft failure due to CAV (GFDCAV) in heart transplant patients, which account for 30% of all deaths. Early CAV detection involves invasive, risky, and expensive monitoring approaches. We determined whether prediction of CAV and GFDCAV improves by adding inflammatory markers to a previously validated atherothrombotic (AT) model. Methods and Findings AT and inflammatory markers interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in heart biopsies and sera of 172 patients followed prospectively for 8.9±5.0 years. Models were estimated for 5- and 10-year risk using (1) the first post-transplant biopsy only, or (2) all biopsies obtained within 3 months. Multivariate models were adjusted for other covariates and cross-validated by bootstrapping. After adding IL-6 and CRP to the AT models, we evaluated the significance of odds ratios (ORs) associated with the additional inflammatory variables and the degree of improvement in the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). When inflammatory markers were tested alone in prediction models, CRP (not IL-6) was a significant predictor of CAV and GFDCAV at 5 (CAV: p<0.0001; GFDCAV: p = 0.005) and 10 years (CAV: p<0.0001; GFDCAV: p = 0.003). Adding CRP (not IL-6) to the best AT models improved discriminatory power to identify patients destined to develop CAV (using 1st biopsy: p<0.001 and p = 0.001; using all 3-month biopsies: p<0.04 and p = 0.008 at 5- and 10-years, respectively) and GFDCAV (using 1st biopsy: 0.92 vs. 0.95 and 0.86 vs. 0.89; using all 3-month biopsies: 0.94 vs. 0.96 and 0.88 vs. 0.89 at 5- and 10-years, respectively), as indicated by an increase in AUROC. Conclusions Early inflammatory status, measured by a patient's CRP level (a non-invasive, safe and inexpensive test), independently predicts CAV and GFDCAV. Adding CRP to a previously established AT model improves

  15. Regression mixture models : Does modeling the covariance between independent variables and latent classes improve the results?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamont, A.E.; Vermunt, J.K.; Van Horn, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Regression mixture models are increasingly used as an exploratory approach to identify heterogeneity in the effects of a predictor on an outcome. In this simulation study, we tested the effects of violating an implicit assumption often made in these models; that is, independent variables in the

  16. Is a sedentary lifestyle an independent predictor for hospital and early mortality after elective cardiac surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyez, L; Biemans, I; Verkroost, M; van Swieten, H

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluates whether a sedentary lifestyle is an independent predictor for increased mortality after elective cardiac surgery. Three thousand one hundred fifty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery between January 2007 and June 2012 completed preoperatively the Corpus Christi Heart Project questionnaire concerning physical activity (PA). Based on this questionnaire, 1815 patients were classified as active and 1335 patients were classified as sedentary. The endpoints of the study were hospital mortality and early mortality. The study population had a mean age of 69.7 ± 10.1 (19-95) years and a mean logistic EuroSCORE risk of 5.1 ± 5.6 (0.88-73.8). Sedentary patients were significantly older (p = 0.001), obese (p = 0.001), had a higher EuroSCORE risk (p = 0.001), and a higher percentage of complications. Hospital mortality (1.1 % versus 0.4 % (p = 0.014)) and early mortality (1.5 % versus 0.6 % (p = 0.006)) were significantly higher in the sedentary group compared with the active group. However, a sedentary lifestyle was not identified as an independent predictor for hospital mortality (p = 0.61) or early mortality (p = 0.70). Sedentary patients were older, obese and had a higher EuroSCORE risk. They had significantly more postoperative complications, higher hospital mortality and early mortality. Despite these results, sedentary behaviour could not be identified as an independent predictor for hospital or early mortality.

  17. Childhood ADHD and conduct disorder as independent predictors of male alcohol dependence at age 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    of alcohol misuse was examined. Method: Subjects were selected from a Danish birth cohort (9,125), which included 223 sons of alcoholic fathers (high risk) and 106 matched sons of nonalcoholic fathers (low risk). These subjects have been studied systematically over the past 40 years. They were evaluated...... childhood measures were correlated, a multiple regression showed that each independently predicted a measure of lifetime alcoholism severity. Conclusions: ADHD comorbid with CD was the strongest predictor of later alcohol dependence. (J. Stud. Alcohol Drugs 70: 169-177, 2009)....

  18. Model Independent Direct Detection Analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, A Liam; Katz, Emanuel; Lubbers, Nicholas; Xu, Yiming

    2012-01-01

    Following the construction of the general effective theory for dark matter direct detection in 1203.3542, we perform an analysis of the experimental constraints on the full parameter space of elastically scattering dark matter. We review the prescription for calculating event rates in the general effective theory and discuss the sensitivity of various experiments to additional nuclear responses beyond the spin-independent (SI) and spin-dependent (SD) couplings: an angular-momentum-dependent (LD) and spin-and-angular-momentum-dependent (LSD) response, as well as a distinction between transverse and longitudinal spin-dependent responses. We consider the effect of interference between different operators and in particular look at directions in parameter space where such cancellations lead to holes in the sensitivity of individual experiments. We explore the complementarity of different experiments by looking at the improvement of bounds when experiments are combined. Finally, our scan through parameter space sho...

  19. Left ventricular long axis function assessed during cine-cardiovascular magnetic resonance is an independent predictor of adverse cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, Vibhav; Chacko, Satish Jacob; Romano, Simone; Jue, Jennifer; Jariwala, Nikhil; Chung, Jaehoon; Farzaneh-Far, Afshin

    2016-06-07

    Left ventricular pump function requires a complex interplay involving myocardial fibers orientated in the longitudinal, oblique and circumferential directions. Long axis dysfunction appears to be an early marker for a number of pathological states. We hypothesized that mitral annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE) measured during cine-cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) reflects changes in long axis function and may be an early marker for adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The aims of this study were therefore: 1) To assess the feasibility and reproducibility of MAPSE measurements during routine cine-CMR; and 2) To assess whether MAPSE, as a surrogate for long axis function, is a predictor of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Four hundred consecutive patients undergoing CMR were prospectively enrolled. MAPSE was measured in the 4-chamber cine view. Patients were prospectively followed for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) - death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, hospitalization for heart failure or unstable angina, and late revascularization. Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to identify factors independently associated with MACE. Net reclassification improvement (NRI) was calculated to assess whether addition of MAPSE resulted in improved risk reclassification of MACE. Seventy-two MACE occurred during a median follow-up of 14.5 months. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, patients with lateral MAPSE cine-CMR is an independent predictor of MACE.

  20. Screen time and passive school travel as independent predictors of cardiorespiratory fitness in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandercock, Gavin R H; Ogunleye, Ayodele A

    2012-05-01

    The most prevalent sedentary behaviours in children and adolescents are engagement with small screen media (screen-time) and passive travel (by motorised vehicle). The objective of this research was to assess the independence of these behaviours from one another and from physical activity as predictors of cardiorespiratory fitness in youth. We measured cardiorespiratory fitness in n=6819 10-16 year olds (53% male) who self-reported their physical activity (7-day recall) school travel and screen time habits. Travel was classified as active (walking, cycling) or passive; screen time as 4 h. The multivariate odds of being fit were higher in active travel (Boys: OR 1.32, 95% CI: 1.09-1.59; Girls: OR 1.46, 1.15-1.84) than in passive travel groups. Boys reporting low screen time were more likely to be fit than those reporting >4 h (OR 2.11, 95% CI: 1.68-2.63) as were girls (OR 1.66, 95% CI: 1.24-2.20). These odds remained significant after additionally controlling for physical activity. Passive travel and high screen time are independently associated with poor cardiorespiratory fitness in youth, and this relationship is independent of physical activity levels. A lifestyle involving high screen time and habitual passive school travel appears incompatible with healthful levels of cardiorespiratory fitness in youth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. White matter hyperintensities are an independent predictor of physical decline in community-dwelling older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jacqueline J J; Delbaere, Kim; Close, Jacqueline C T; Sachdev, Perminder; Wen, Wei; Brodaty, Henry; Lord, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    Ageing is associated with physical disability, but little is known about the influence of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on physical function decline in older people. To investigate the role of WMHs as a predictor of decline in physical function in cognitively intact older people. 287 community-dwelling people aged 70-90 years underwent the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA) and assessments of total and regional WMH volumes, cognitive function and comorbidities. Participants underwent reassessment of the PPA 12 months later, and those in the top quartile for increases in PPA scores over the year were regarded as having declined physically. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that people with WMH volumes in the 4th quartile showed greater physical decline (odds ratio 3.02, 95% confidence interval 1.02-8.95) while controlling for age, baseline physical function, general health, physical activity and cognitive function. Subsequent univariate analyses indicated that WMHs in the deep fronto-parietal and periventricular parieto-occipital regions had the strongest associations with physical decline. These findings indicate that WMHs are an independent predictor of decline in physical function and suggest that interventions that focus on preventing the development or progression of white matter lesions may help preserve physical function in older people. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Small artery structure is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Buus, Niels Henril; Sihm, Inger

    2007-01-01

    Objective Structural abnormality of resistance arteries is a characteristic pathophysiological phenomenon in essential hypertension and can be assessed in vitro as an increase in the media : lumen ratio (M : L) of isolated small arteries. We have investigated whether M: L is a risk predictor...... in uncomplicated essential hypertensive patients. Recently, high M: L was demonstrated as a prognostic marker in patients at high cardiovascular risk, including normotensive type 2 diabetic patients. Since diabetes is associated with pressure-independent changes in M: L, the relevance of this finding to essential...... hypertension has been uncertain. Methods We conducted a follow-up survey of 159 essential hypertensive patients, who had previously been submitted to a M: L evaluation while participating in a clinical trial. They composed a homogeneous moderate-risk group, with no concomitant diseases, and represented 1661...

  3. Alcohol-attentional bias and motivational structure as independent predictors of social drinkers' alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadardi, Javad Salehi; Cox, W Miles

    2008-10-01

    Prior studies aimed at explaining cognitive-motivational reasons for drinking have focused on either cognitive or motivational factors, but not on both. This study examined the ability of both alcohol-attentional bias and motivational structure to predict alcohol consumption. Participants were university students (N=87) who completed a battery of tests, including the Personal Concerns Inventory (a measure of adaptive and maladaptive motivation), an alcohol Stroop test (a measure of alcohol-attentional bias), and an alcohol-use inventory. Regression, moderation, and mediation analyses showed that (a) maladaptive motivation and alcohol-attentional bias were positive predictors of alcohol consumption after participants' age, gender, and executive cognitive functioning had been controlled, and (b) maladaptive motivation and alcohol-attentional bias independently predicted alcohol consumption. The implications of the results for both theory and practice are discussed.

  4. Is preeclampsia an independent predictor of diastolic dysfunction? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirguis, George F; Aziz, Michael M; Boccia Liang, Claire; Williams, Shauna F; Apuzzio, Joseph J; Bilinski, Robyn; Mornan, Adenieki J D; Shah, Leena P

    2015-10-01

    To determine if preeclampsia is an independent predictor of diastolic dysfunction and what factors among patients with preeclampsia are associated with diastolic dysfunction. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients who delivered between 2008 and 2013 at a single institution who had a maternal echocardiogram during their pregnancy or within 5months of delivery. Patients with structural heart disease, ejection fraction less than 45%, pulmonary embolus, or age over 45years were excluded. Medical records were reviewed for medical and obstetric complications and echocardiogram findings. Demographic characteristics and rate of diastolic dysfunction were compared between patients with preeclampsia and without preeclampsia. Multivariate logistic regression was performed controlling for age, ethnicity, gestational age at delivery, diabetes, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), antihypertensive use and magnesium sulfate administration. Sixty-six patients were identified, of which 39 (59%) had preeclampsia. Past history of preeclampsia, IUGR in the current pregnancy, antihypertensive use and magnesium sulfate use were higher in the preeclampsia group. Fifteen patients (39%) in the preeclampsia group were African-American compared to 2 (3%) in the control group (ppreeclampsia were found to have diastolic dysfunction compared to 3 (11%) controls (OR=6.18, 95% CI 1.59,24.02; p=0.006). Logistic regression analysis did not reveal other independent predictors of diastolic dysfunction. In the patients with preeclampsia, history of preeclampsia with severe features and IUGR were not associated with diastolic dysfunction. Our study supports previous findings that preeclampsia is associated with diastolic dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 International Society for the Study of Hypertension in Pregnancy. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Gravity wave and model-independent axion

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jihn E

    2016-01-01

    In this short comment, we notice that the model-independent axion contribution to the graviton mass at just outside the Schwarzschild radius is completely negligible in GW150914. The model-independent axion contribution to the graviton mass at the order $10^{-22}\\,$eV might be possible for merger of black holes of mass of order $2\\times 10^{14}\\,$kg.

  6. Independent predictors of retrograde failure in CTO-PCI after successful collateral channel crossing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoriyasu; Muto, Makoto; Yamane, Masahisa; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Okamura, Atsunori; Igarashi, Yasumi; Fujita, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Shigeru; Oida, Akitsugu; Tsuchikane, Etsuo

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate factors for predicting retrograde CTO-PCI failure after successful collateral channel crossing. Successful guidewire/catheter collateral channel crossing is important for the retrograde approach in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO). A total of 5984 CTO-PCI procedures performed in 45 centers in Japan from 2009 to 2012 were studied. The retrograde approach was used in 1656 CTO-PCIs (27.7%). We investigated these retrograde procedures to evaluate factors for predicting retrograde CTO-PCI failure even after successful collateral channel crossing. Successful guidewire/catheter collateral crossing was achieved in 77.1% (n = 1,276) of 1656 retrograde CTO-PCI procedures. Retrograde procedural success after successful collateral crossing was achieved in 89.4% (n = 1,141). Univariate analysis showed that the predictors for retrograde CTO-PCI failure were in-stent occlusion (OR = 1.9829, 95%CI = 1.1783 - 3.3370 P = 0.0088), calcified lesions (OR = 1.9233, 95%CI = 1.2463 - 2.9679, P = 0.0027), and lesion tortuosity (OR = 1.5244, 95%CI = 1.0618 - 2.1883, P = 0.0216). On multivariate analysis, lesion calcification was an independent predictor of retrograde CTO-PCI failure after successful collateral channel crossing (OR = 1.3472, 95%CI = 1.0614 - 1.7169, P = 0.0141). The success rate of retrograde CTO-PCI following successful guidewire/catheter collateral channel crossing was high in this registry. Lesion calcification was an independent predictor of retrograde CTO-PCI failure after successful collateral channel crossing. Devices and techniques to overcome complex CTO lesion morphology, such as lesion calcification, are required to further improve the retrograde CTO-PCI success rate. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Bayesian modeling of measurement error in predictor variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Gerardus J.A.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that measurement error in predictor variables can be modeled using item response theory (IRT). The predictor variables, that may be defined at any level of an hierarchical regression model, are treated as latent variables. The normal ogive model is used to describe the relation between

  8. A tumor DNA complex aberration index is an independent predictor of survival in breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Rueda, Oscar M; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina; Turashvili, Gulisa; Shah, Sohrab; Lingjærde, Ole Christian; Yuan, Yinyin; Ng, Charlotte K; Dunning, Mark J; Dicks, Ed; Provenzano, Elena; Sammut, Stephen; McKinney, Steven; Ellis, Ian O; Pinder, Sarah; Purushotham, Arnie; Murphy, Leigh C; Kristensen, Vessela N; Brenton, James D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Aparicio, Samuel; Caldas, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Complex focal chromosomal rearrangements in cancer genomes, also called "firestorms", can be scored from DNA copy number data. The complex arm-wise aberration index (CAAI) is a score that captures DNA copy number alterations that appear as focal complex events in tumors, and has potential prognostic value in breast cancer. This study aimed to validate this DNA-based prognostic index in breast cancer and test for the first time its potential prognostic value in ovarian cancer. Copy number alteration (CNA) data from 1950 breast carcinomas (METABRIC cohort) and 508 high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas (TCGA dataset) were analyzed. Cases were classified as CAAI positive if at least one complex focal event was scored. Complex alterations were frequently localized on chromosome 8p (n = 159), 17q (n = 176) and 11q (n = 251). CAAI events on 11q were most frequent in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cases and on 17q in estrogen receptor negative (ER-) cases. We found only a modest correlation between CAAI and the overall rate of genomic instability (GII) and number of breakpoints (r = 0.27 and r = 0.42, p cancer specific survival (BCSS), overall survival (OS) and ovarian cancer progression free survival (PFS) were used as clinical end points in Cox proportional hazard model survival analyses. CAAI positive breast cancers (43%) had higher mortality: hazard ratio (HR) of 1.94 (95%CI, 1.62-2.32) for BCSS, and of 1.49 (95%CI, 1.30-1.71) for OS. Representations of the 70-gene and the 21-gene predictors were compared with CAAI in multivariable models and CAAI was independently significant with a Cox adjusted HR of 1.56 (95%CI, 1.23-1.99) for ER+ and 1.55 (95%CI, 1.11-2.18) for ER- disease. None of the expression-based predictors were prognostic in the ER- subset. We found that a model including CAAI and the two expression-based prognostic signatures outperformed a model including the 21-gene and 70-gene signatures but excluding CAAI. Inclusion of CAAI in the clinical

  9. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. METHODS: HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS). RESULTS: Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46) of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93); p = 0.03) when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. CONCLUSION: HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  10. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallagher William M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC on tissue microarrays (TMA consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS. Results Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46 of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93; p = 0.03 when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. Conclusion HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  11. Tumour-specific HMG-CoAR is an independent predictor of recurrence free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Donal J

    2010-04-01

    Abstract Background Our group previously reported that tumour-specific expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutharyl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) is associated with more favourable tumour parameters and a good prognosis in breast cancer. In the present study, the prognostic value of HMG-CoAR expression was examined in tumours from a cohort of patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods HMG-CoAR expression was assessed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tissue microarrays (TMA) consisting of 76 ovarian cancer cases, analysed using automated algorithms to develop a quantitative scoring model. Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were used to estimate the risk of recurrence free survival (RFS). Results Seventy-two tumours were suitable for analysis. Cytoplasmic HMG-CoAR expression was present in 65% (n = 46) of tumours. No relationship was seen between HMG-CoAR and age, histological subtype, grade, disease stage, estrogen receptor or Ki-67 status. Patients with tumours expressing HMG-CoAR had a significantly prolonged RFS (p = 0.012). Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that HMG-CoAR expression was an independent predictor of improved RFS (RR = 0.49, 95% CI (0.25-0.93); p = 0.03) when adjusted for established prognostic factors such as residual disease, tumour stage and grade. Conclusion HMG-CoAR expression is an independent predictor of prolonged RFS in primary ovarian cancer. As HMG-CoAR inhibitors, also known as statins, have demonstrated anti-neoplastic effects in vitro, further studies are required to evaluate HMG-CoAR expression as a surrogate marker of response to statin treatment, especially in conjunction with current chemotherapeutic regimens.

  12. Persistent Depressive Symptoms are Independent Predictors of Low-Grade Inflammation Onset Among Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Gazelato de Mello Franco

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Depressive symptoms are independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD among individuals with non-diagnosed CVD. The mechanisms underlying this association, however, remain unclear. Inflammation has been indicated as a possible mechanistic link between depression and CVD. Objectives: This study evaluated the association between persistent depressive symptoms and the onset of low-grade inflammation. Methods: From a database of 1,508 young (mean age: 41 years individuals with no CVD diagnosis who underwent at least two routine health evaluations, 134 had persistent depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory - BDI ≥ 10, BDI+ and 1,374 had negative symptoms at both time points (BDI-. All participants had been submitted to repeated clinical and laboratory evaluations at a regular follow-up with an average of 26 months from baseline. Low-grade inflammation was defined as plasma high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (CRP concentrations > 3 mg/L. The outcome was the incidence of low-grade inflammation evaluated by the time of the second clinical evaluation. Results: The incidence of low-grade inflammation was more frequently observed in the BDI+ group compared to the BDI- group (20.9% vs. 11.4%; p = 0.001. After adjusting for sex, age, waist circumference, body mass index, levels of physical activity, smoking, and prevalence of metabolic syndrome, persistent depressive symptoms remained an independent predictor of low-grade inflammation onset (OR = 1.76; 95% CI: 1.03-3.02; p = 0.04. Conclusions: Persistent depressive symptoms were independently associated with low-grade inflammation onset among healthy individuals.

  13. Preoperative White Matter Lesions Are Independent Predictors of Long-Term Survival after Internal Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niku Oksala

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs predict long-term survival of conservatively treated acute stroke patients with etiology other than carotid stenosis. In carotid endarterectomy patients, WMLs are associated with severe carotid stenosis and unstable plaques, with the risk of perioperative complications and with increased 30-day perioperative risk of death. However, no data exist on their effect on postoperative long-term survival, a factor important when considering the net benefit from carotid endarterectomy. Whether this effect is independent of classical risk factors and indications for surgery is not known either. We hypothesized that WMLs could be evaluated from preoperative routine computed tomography (CT scans and are predictors of postoperative survival, independent of classical cardiovascular risk factors, indication category and degree of carotid stenosis. Methods: A total of 353 of 481 (73.4% consecutive patients subjected to carotid endarterectomy due to different indications, i.e. asymptomatic stenosis (n = 28, 7.9%, amaurosis fugax (n = 52, 14.7%, transient ischemic attack (n = 135, 38.2% or ischemic stroke (n = 138, 39.1%, from prospective vascular registries during the years 2001-2010 with digital preoperative CT scans, were included in the study. WMLs were rated by a radiologist (Wahlund criteria in a blinded fashion. Internal carotid artery (ICA stenoses were angiographically graded (Results: WML severity could be assessed with a substantial intraobserver agreement (Spearman's rho 0.843, p Conclusions: WMLs in a preoperative CT scan provide a substantially reliable estimate of postoperative long-term survival of carotid endarterectomy patients independent of currently used criteria, i.e. cardiovascular risk factors, indication category and degree of ipsilateral ICA stenosis.

  14. Traditional predictors of academic performance in a medical school's independent study program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleca, C B

    1995-01-01

    To provide predictive information as an initial screening device for admission decisions, generalizable to the population of students opting for the Independent Study Program (ISP) at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. A stepwise multiple-regression technique was used to generate predictor-criterion relationships. A priority code was developed as an applicant screening device. The code is a numeric value based on a combination of applicant grade-point average (GPA) and Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) scores that provides a prediction of first-year performance in medical school. The study sample consisted of the 596 first-year students in the ISP track from 1980 through 1989. The measure of their academic performances was the average score on three National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject ("shelf") examinations in the basic sciences (anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry). The largest multiple correlations were found between averaged scores on the NBME subject examinations and undergraduate GPAs (R = 34.20; F = 16.79; p = .0001) and scores on the MCAT Biology Knowledge (R = 13.24; F = 47.64; p = .0001), MCAT Chemistry Knowledge (R = 7.86; F = 17.39; p = .0001), and MCAT Skills Analysis: Quantitative (R = 1.39; F = 3.93; p = .0479). The predictive value of traditional predictors of preclinical academic performance was established for the nontraditional program at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. Admission officers at other schools may find the priority code helpful as a sorting tool. It may further serve as an "early warning" system for students with marginal academic preparation.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus infection serves as an independent predictor of survival in patients with lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byung-Hoon; Tae, Chung Hyun; Ahn, Soo Min; Kang, So Young; Woo, Sook-Young; Kim, Seonwoo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2016-07-01

    The pathogenesis and clinicopathologic characteristics of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative lymphoepithelioma-like gastric carcinoma (LELC) are still unclear. In addition, it remains controversial whether EBV infection itself affects the prognosis of LELC. Between 1995 and 2011, 145 LELC patients (124 patients with EBV infection and 21 patients without EBV infection) underwent radical gastrectomy with D2 lymph node dissection. The clinicopathologic features and prognosis of EBV-negative LELC cases were compared with those of EBV-positive LELC cases. The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 55 months. Microsatellite instability (MSI) analysis was performed on 20 EBV-negative LELC cases. EBV-negative LELC accounted for 14.5 % of the total LELC cases. EBV-negative LELC was significantly associated with older age, female sex, advanced T stage, and advanced American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) tumor stage compared with EBV-positive LELC. In univariate analysis, patients with EBV-negative LELC had significantly shorter overall, disease-specific, and recurrence-free survival than those with EBV-positive LELC. The 5-year overall survival rates were 81.0 % for patients with EBV-negative LELC and 96.2 % for patients with EBV-positive LELC. In a Cox proportional hazards model, EBV infection, age, and AJCC tumor stage were identified as independent predictors of overall survival. MSI-high, MSI-low, and microsatellite-stable tumors accounted for 25, 10, and 65 % of EBV-negative LELC cases, respectively. MSI status did not affect the prognosis of EBV-negative LELC cases. EBV infection serves as an independent predictor of survival in patients with LELC. EBV-negative LELC exhibited clinicopathologic features and prognosis distinct from those of EBV-positive LELC.

  16. NT-pro-BNP is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, M.; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Schmidt, Erik Berg;

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have an increased mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. Previous data have...

  17. Luteinizing hormone and androstendione are independent predictors of ovulation after laparoscopic ovarian drilling: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayerhofer Klaus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to investigate luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, and androstenedione as predicitve markers for ovulation after laparoscopic ovarian drilling. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 100 clompihen-resistant patients with the polycystic ovary syndrome who underwent laparoscopic ovarian drilling at our department. The main outcome measure was spontaneous postoperative ovulation within three months after laparoscopic ovarian drilling. In order to predict spontaneous ovulation, we tested the following parameters by use of a univariate followed by a multivariate regression model: Preoperative serum levels of LH, FSH, testosterone, and androstenedione as well as patients' age and body mass index. In addition, we focused on pregnancy and life birth rates. Results Spontaneous ovulation was documented in 71/100 patients (71.0%. In a univariate and multivariate analysis, luteinizing hormone (OR 1.58, 95%CI: 1.30-1.92 and androstenedione (OR 3.03, 95%CI: 1.20-7.67, but not follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone were independent predictors of ovulation. Using a cut-off for luteinizing hormone and androstenedione of 12.1 IU/l and 3.26 ng/ml, respectively, spontaneous ovulation was observed in 63/70 (90.0% and 36/42 patients (85.7% with elevated and in 8/30 (26.7% and 35/58 (60.3% patients with low luteinizing hormone and androstenedione levels, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negatvie predictive values for luteinizing hormone and androstendione as predictors of spontaneous ovulation after ovarian drilling were 88.7% (95%CI: 79.0-95.0%, 75.9% (95%CI: 56.5-89.7%, 90.0% (95%CI: 80.5-95.8%, and 73.3% (95%CI: 54.1-87.7% for luteinizing hormone, and 50.7% (95%CI: 38.6-62.8%, 79.3% (95%CI: 60.3-92.0%, 85.7% (95%CI: 71.5-94.6%, and 39.7% (95%CI: 27.0-53.4% for androstenedione, respectively. Complete one-year follow-up was available for 74/100 patients (74%. We observed a

  18. Significant Independent Predictors of Vitamin D Deficiency in Inpatients and Outpatients of a Nephrology Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Bentli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Kidney disease was found to be a major risk factor for vitamin D deficiency in a population study of patients hospitalized. The aims of the study were to describe the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency inpatients and outpatients in a nephrology department during fall and to evaluate effect of assessing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD levels and previous supplementation of cholecalciferol on vitamin D status. Methods. We studied 280 subjects in total, between October and January. The subjects were recruited from the following two groups: (a inpatients and (b outpatients in nephrology unit. We examined previous documentary evidence of vitamin D supplementation of the patients. Results. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among these 280 patients was 62,1% (174 patients. Fifty-three patients (18.9% had severe vitamin D deficiency, 121 patients (43.2% moderate vitamin D deficiency, and 66 patients (23.6% vitamin D insufficiency. In logistic regression analysis female gender, not having vitamin D supplementation history, low serum albumin, and low blood urea nitrogen levels were significant independent predictors of vitamin D deficiency while no association of vitamin D deficiency with diabetes mellitus, serum creatinine, eGFR, and being hospitalized was found. Conclusion. Vitamin D deficiency, seems to be an important problem in both inpatients and outpatients of nephrology. Monitoring serum 25(OHD concentrations regularly and replacement of vitamin D are important. Women in Turkey are at more risk of deficiency and may therefore need to consume higher doses of vitamin D.

  19. Age and gender as independent predictors of violence under the influence of alcohol in Zurich, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mica, Ladislav; Oesterle, Linda; Werner, Clément M L; Simmen, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-08

    Violent behaviour associated with alcohol consumption is frequently reported by different media. Clinical data analysing the correlation between alcohol intoxication, age, gender and violence are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of age, gender and blood alcohol content on violent behaviour under the influence of alcohol under central European conditions. Three hundred patients admitted to the emergency department were included into this study in the time period from January 01. to December 31. 2009. The inclusion criteria were a blood alcohol content (BAC) of ≥10 mmol/l, any traumatic injury and an age ≥16 years. Violence was defined as an evitable act committed by others leading to patient's hospitalisation. The data were compared with Wilcoxon and χ2-test for proportions. The data were considered as significant if pviolence with no correlation to blood alcohol content found. Logistic regression analysis revealed male gender and young age as an independent predictor for violence. These results clarify the relationship between alcohol, age, gender and violence and have important implications for municipal-level alcohol policies.

  20. TRPM1 (melastatin) expression is an independent predictor of overall survival in clinical AJCC stage I and II melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brożyna, Anna A; Guo, Huazhang; Yang, Sun-Eun; Cornelius, Lynn; Linette, Gerald; Murphy, Michael; Sheehan, Christine; Ross, Jeffrey; Slominski, Andrzej; Carlson, J Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The expression of TRPM1 (melastatin) mRNA is an independent marker, as measured by radioactive in situ hybridization (RISH), of disease-free survival in primary cutaneous melanoma (PM). The aim of the study was to determine if chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) can reproduce results examining diagnostic and prognostic utility of TRPM1 mRNA expression in melanocytic proliferations as measured by RISH. The expression of TRPM1 mRNA was detected by CISH in melanocytic nevi (MN, n = 61), PM (n = 145) and metastatic melanomas (MMs, n = 15). A progressive loss of TRPM1 was found moving from MN to PM to MM. The histologic stepwise model of melanoma progression revealed that loss of TRPM1 occurred at the transition of RGP PM to VGP PM. As a diagnostic marker, TRPM1 gradient loss showed 93.8% sensitivity and 52.4% specificity for PM. Loss of TRPM1 mRNA correlated with melanoma aggressiveness markers and was independent predictor of disease-free and overall survival. The corresponding survival curves for degree of melanoma pigmentation matched those for degree of loss of TPRM1 mRNA. Loss of TRPM1 mRNA expression appears to be a crucial event in the progression of melanoma to a more malignant, metastatic phenotype. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Red blood cell distribution width is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with gram-negative bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Nam Su; Kim, Hye-Won; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Bean; Jeong, Su Jin; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chang Oh; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2012-08-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is known to be a predictor of severe morbidity and mortality in some chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure. However, to our knowledge, little is known about RDW as a predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia, a major nosocomial cause of intra-abdominal infections, urinary tract infections, and primary bacteremia. Therefore, we investigated whether RDW is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Clinical characteristics, laboratory parameters, and outcomes of 161 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia from November 2010 to March 2011 diagnosed at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, were retrospectively analyzed. The main outcome measure was 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality rate was significantly higher in the increased RDW group compared with the normal RDW group (P blood cell distribution width at the onset of bacteremia was an independent predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Also, 72-h RDW could be a predictor for all-cause mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

  2. Depression as an independent predictor of postoperative delirium in spine deformity patients undergoing elective spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Adogwa, Owoicho; Lydon, Emily; Sergesketter, Amanda; Kaakati, Rayan; Mehta, Ankit I; Vasquez, Raul A; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A; Karikari, Isaac O

    2017-08-01

    total, 66 patients (7.15%) had an episode of postoperative delirium, with depressed patients experiencing approximately a 2-fold higher rate of delirium (10.59% vs 5.84%). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, depression was an independent predictor of postoperative delirium after spine surgery in spinal deformity patients (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS The results of this study suggest that depression is an independent risk factor for postoperative delirium after elective spine surgery. Further studies are necessary to understand the effects of affective disorders on postoperative delirium, in hopes to better identify patients at risk.

  3. Independent Component Analysis in Multimedia Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kolenda, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Modeling of multimedia and multimodal data becomes increasingly important with the digitalization of the world. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of independent component analysis and blind sources separation methods for modeling and understanding of multimedia data, which...... largely refers to text, images/video, audio and combinations of such data. We review a number of applications within single and combined media with the hope that this might provide inspiration for further research in this area. Finally, we provide a detailed presentation of our own recent work on modeling...... combined text/image data for the purpose of cross-media retrieval....

  4. Independent Component Analysis in Multimedia Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    Modeling of multimedia and multimodal data becomes increasingly important with the digitalization of the world. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of independent component analysis and blind sources separation methods for modeling and understanding of multimedia data, which...... largely refers to text, images/video, audio and combinations of such data. We review a number of applications within single and combined media with the hope that this might provide inspiration for further research in this area. Finally, we provide a detailed presentation of our own recent work on modeling...... combined text/image data for the purpose of cross-media retrieval....

  5. PDCD6 is an independent predictor of progression free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Dan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Programmed cell death 6 (PDCD6 beside its known proapoptotic functions may be a player in survival pathways in cancer. The purpose of this study is to further explore the roles of PDCD6 in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Lentiviral vector with shRNA for PDCD6 was used to investigate the effects of PDCD6 knockdown on cell growth, cell cycle, apoptosis and motility in ovarian cancer cells. Two hundred twelve epithelial ovarian cancer tissues were analyzed for mRNA expression of PDCD6 using RT-PCR. Associations of its expression with clinical pathological factors, progression free and overall survival were evaluated. Results PDCD6 is highly expressed in metastatic ovarian cancer cells and positively regulates cell migration and invasion. Significantly, the level of PDCD6 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer correlates with clinical progression. Patients with medium or high levels of PDCD6 mRNA were at higher risk for disease progression, compared to those with low levels (HR, 1.29; P = 0.024 for medium levels; and HR, 1.57; P = 0.045 for high levels after adjusting for age, disease stage, tumor grade, histologic type and residual tumor size. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated similar results. However, no association was found between PDCD6 expression and overall survival. Conclusions PDCD6 seems to play an important role in ovarian cancer progression and it may be an independent predictor of progression free survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the molecular mechanisms of PDCD6 involve in ovarian cancer progression.

  6. Importance of predictor variables for models of chemical function

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Importance of random forest predictors for all classification models of chemical function. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Isaacs , K., M....

  7. Independent predictors of revision following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing: a retrospective cohort study using National Joint Registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, S S; Baker, P N; Mason, J; Porter, M L; Deehan, D J; Reed, M R

    2012-06-01

    Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing has been widely performed in the United Kingdom for over a decade. However, the literature reports conflicting views of the benefits: excellent medium- to long-term results with some brands in specific subgroups, but high failure rates and local soft-tissue reactions in others. The National Joint Registry for England and Wales (NJR) has collected data on all hip resurfacings performed since 2003. This retrospective cohort study recorded survival time to revision from a resurfacing procedure, exploring risk factors independently associated with failure. All patients with a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis who underwent resurfacing between 2003 and 2010 were included in the analyses. Cox's proportional hazard models were used to analyse the extent to which the risk of revision was related to patient, surgeon and implant covariates. A total of 27 971 hip resurfacings were performed during the study period, of which 1003 (3.59%) underwent revision surgery. In the final adjusted model, we found that women were at greater risk of revision than men (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.30, p = 0.007), but the risk of revision was independent of age. Of the implant-specific predictors, five brands had a significantly greater risk of revision than the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) (ASR: HR = 2.82, p operations performed by low-volume surgeons (HR = 1.36, p < 0.001). Once these influences had been removed, in 4873 male patients < 60 years old undergoing resurfacing with a BHR, the five-year estimated risk of revision was 1.59%. In summary, after adjustment for a range of covariates we found that there were significant differences in the rate of failure between brands and component sizes. Younger male patients had good five-year implant survival when the BHR was used.

  8. Childhood ADHD and conduct disorder as independent predictors of male alcohol dependence at age 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Joachim; Penick, Elizabeth C; Nickel, Elizabeth J

    2009-01-01

    The Danish Longitudinal Study on Alcoholism was designed to identify antecedent predictors of adult male alcoholism. The influence of premorbid behaviors consistent with childhood conduct disorder (CD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the development of alcohol misuse...

  9. Fasting plasma glucose is an independent predictor for severity of H1N1 pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiwen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pandemic influenza A (H1N1 virus emerged during 2009 and has spread worldwide. This virus can cause injuries to the lungs, liver, and heart. However, data regarding whether this influenza virus can affect pancreatic islets are limited. We investigated the effects of influenza A (H1N1 pneumonia on fasting plasma glucose (FPG and islet function, and evaluated possible correlations between biochemical test results and the severity of H1N1 pneumonia. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of patients either diagnosed with or suspected of having H1N1 pneumonia who were admitted to our hospital in 2009. Possible associations between FPG levels and H1N1 virus infection were assessed by logistic regression. Correlation and regression analyses were used to assess relationships between FPG and biochemical test results. Associations between admission days and significant data were assessed by single factor linear regression. To evaluate effects of H1N1 on pancreatic β-cell function, results of a resistance index (homa-IR, insulin function index (homa-β, and insulin sensitivity index (IAI were compared between a H1N1 group and a non-H1N1 group by t-tests. Results FPG was significantly positively associated with H1N1 virus infection (OR = 1.377, 95%CI: 1.062-1.786; p = 0.016. FPG was significantly correlated with AST (r = 0.215; p = 0.039, LDH (r = 0.400; p = 0.000, BUN (r = 0.28; p = 0.005, and arterial Oxygen Saturation (SaO2; r = -0.416; p = 0.000 in the H1N1 group. H1N1 patients who were hypoxemic (SaO22 in the H1N1 group with hypoxia (SaO22 levels in patients with high FPG levels (≥7 mmol/L were significantly lower than those of H1N1 patients with low FPG levels ( Conclusions FPG on admission could be an independent predictor for the severity of H1N1 pneumonia. Elevated FPG induced by H1N1 pneumonia is not a result of direct damage to pancreatic β-cells, but arises from various factors' combinations caused by H1N1

  10. Model-independent WIMP Characterisation using ISR

    CERN Document Server

    Bartels, Christoph; Langenfeld, Ulrich; List, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    The prospects of measuring the parameters of WIMP dark matter in a model independent way at the International Linear Collider are investigated. The signal under study is direct WIMP pair production with associated initial state radiation. The analysis is performed in full simulation of the ILD detector concept. With an integrated luminosity of L = 500 fb-1 and realistic beam polarizations the helicity structure of the WIMP couplings to electrons can be determined, and the masses and cross sections can be measured to the percent level. The systematic uncertainties are dominated by the polarization measurement and the luminosity spectrum.

  11. Model-independent tests of cosmic gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Eric V

    2011-12-28

    Gravitation governs the expansion and fate of the universe, and the growth of large-scale structure within it, but has not been tested in detail on these cosmic scales. The observed acceleration of the expansion may provide signs of gravitational laws beyond general relativity (GR). Since the form of any such extension is not clear, from either theory or data, we adopt a model-independent approach to parametrizing deviations to the Einstein framework. We explore the phase space dynamics of two key post-GR functions and derive a classification scheme, and an absolute criterion on accuracy necessary for distinguishing classes of gravity models. Future surveys will be able to constrain the post-GR functions' amplitudes and forms to the required precision, and hence reveal new aspects of gravitation.

  12. Urinary Sodium Concentration Is an Independent Predictor of All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in a Type 2 Diabetes Cohort Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gand, Elise; Ragot, Stéphanie; Bankir, Lise; Piguel, Xavier; Fumeron, Frédéric; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Marechaud, Richard; Roussel, Ronan; Hadjadj, Samy; Study group, SURDIAGENE

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Sodium intake is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. However, no study has specifically reported an association between cardiovascular mortality and urinary sodium concentration (UNa). We examined the association of UNa with mortality in a cohort of type 2 diabetes (T2D) patients. Methods. Patients were followed for all-cause death and cardiovascular death. Baseline UNa was measured from second morning spot urinary sample. We used Cox proportional hazard models to identify independent predictors of mortality. Improvement in prediction of mortality by the addition of UNa to a model including known risk factors was assessed by the relative integrated discrimination improvement (rIDI) index. Results. Participants (n = 1,439) were followed for a median of 5.7 years, during which 254 cardiovascular deaths and 429 all-cause deaths were recorded. UNa independently predicted all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. An increase of one standard deviation of UNa was associated with a decrease of 21% of all-cause mortality and 22% of cardiovascular mortality. UNa improved all-cause and cardiovascular mortality prediction beyond identified risk factors (rIDI = 2.8%, P = 0.04 and rIDI = 4.6%, P = 0.02, resp.). Conclusions. In T2D, UNa was an independent predictor of mortality (low concentration is associated with increased risk) and improved modestly its prediction in addition to traditional risk factors. PMID:28255559

  13. Urinary Sodium Concentration Is an Independent Predictor of All-Cause and Cardiovascular Mortality in a Type 2 Diabetes Cohort Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Jean Saulnier

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Sodium intake is associated with cardiovascular outcomes. However, no study has specifically reported an association between cardiovascular mortality and urinary sodium concentration (UNa. We examined the association of UNa with mortality in a cohort of type 2 diabetes (T2D patients. Methods. Patients were followed for all-cause death and cardiovascular death. Baseline UNa was measured from second morning spot urinary sample. We used Cox proportional hazard models to identify independent predictors of mortality. Improvement in prediction of mortality by the addition of UNa to a model including known risk factors was assessed by the relative integrated discrimination improvement (rIDI index. Results. Participants (n=1,439 were followed for a median of 5.7 years, during which 254 cardiovascular deaths and 429 all-cause deaths were recorded. UNa independently predicted all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. An increase of one standard deviation of UNa was associated with a decrease of 21% of all-cause mortality and 22% of cardiovascular mortality. UNa improved all-cause and cardiovascular mortality prediction beyond identified risk factors (rIDI = 2.8%, P=0.04 and rIDI = 4.6%, P=0.02, resp.. Conclusions. In T2D, UNa was an independent predictor of mortality (low concentration is associated with increased risk and improved modestly its prediction in addition to traditional risk factors.

  14. A New Perspective for the Calibration of Computational Predictor Models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, Luis Guillermo

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a framework for calibrating computational models using data from sev- eral and possibly dissimilar validation experiments. The offset between model predictions and observations, which might be caused by measurement noise, model-form uncertainty, and numerical error, drives the process by which uncertainty in the models parameters is characterized. The resulting description of uncertainty along with the computational model constitute a predictor model. Two types of predictor models are studied: Interval Predictor Models (IPMs) and Random Predictor Models (RPMs). IPMs use sets to characterize uncer- tainty, whereas RPMs use random vectors. The propagation of a set through a model makes the response an interval valued function of the state, whereas the propagation of a random vector yields a random process. Optimization-based strategies for calculating both types of predictor models are proposed. Whereas the formulations used to calculate IPMs target solutions leading to the interval value function of minimal spread containing all observations, those for RPMs seek to maximize the models' ability to reproduce the distribution of obser- vations. Regarding RPMs, we choose a structure for the random vector (i.e., the assignment of probability to points in the parameter space) solely dependent on the prediction error. As such, the probabilistic description of uncertainty is not a subjective assignment of belief, nor is it expected to asymptotically converge to a fixed value, but instead it is a description of the model's ability to reproduce the experimental data. This framework enables evaluating the spread and distribution of the predicted response of target applications depending on the same parameters beyond the validation domain (i.e., roll-up and extrapolation).

  15. Calibration of Predictor Models Using Multiple Validation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for calibrating computational models using data from several and possibly dissimilar validation experiments. The offset between model predictions and observations, which might be caused by measurement noise, model-form uncertainty, and numerical error, drives the process by which uncertainty in the models parameters is characterized. The resulting description of uncertainty along with the computational model constitute a predictor model. Two types of predictor models are studied: Interval Predictor Models (IPMs) and Random Predictor Models (RPMs). IPMs use sets to characterize uncertainty, whereas RPMs use random vectors. The propagation of a set through a model makes the response an interval valued function of the state, whereas the propagation of a random vector yields a random process. Optimization-based strategies for calculating both types of predictor models are proposed. Whereas the formulations used to calculate IPMs target solutions leading to the interval value function of minimal spread containing all observations, those for RPMs seek to maximize the models' ability to reproduce the distribution of observations. Regarding RPMs, we choose a structure for the random vector (i.e., the assignment of probability to points in the parameter space) solely dependent on the prediction error. As such, the probabilistic description of uncertainty is not a subjective assignment of belief, nor is it expected to asymptotically converge to a fixed value, but instead it casts the model's ability to reproduce the experimental data. This framework enables evaluating the spread and distribution of the predicted response of target applications depending on the same parameters beyond the validation domain.

  16. Different Forces, Same Consequence: Conscientiousness and Competence Beliefs are Independent Predictors of Academic Effort and Achievement

    OpenAIRE

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Roberts, Brent W.; Schnyder, Inge; Niggli, Alois

    2015-01-01

    Conscientiousness and domain-specific competence beliefs are known to be highly important predictors of academic effort and achievement. Given their basis in distinct research traditions, however, these constructs have rarely been examined simultaneously. Three studies with 571, 415, and 1,535 students, respectively, found a moderate association between conscientiousness and competence beliefs, but competence beliefs meaningfully predicted both conscientiousness and academic effort, irrespect...

  17. Epstein-Barr virus DNA load in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an independent predictor of clinical course and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Carlo; Falisi, Erika; Young, Ken H; Pascarella, Michela; Perbellini, Omar; Carli, Giuseppe; Novella, Elisabetta; Rossi, Davide; Giaretta, Ilaria; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; De Rossi, Anita; D'Amore, Emanuele Stefano Giovanni; Rassu, Mario; Gaidano, Gianluca; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Ambrosetti, Achille; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2015-07-30

    The relation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA load and clinical course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unknown. We assessed EBV DNA load by quantitative PCR at CLL presentation in mononuclear cells (MNC) of 220 prospective patients that were enrolled and followed-up in two major Institutions. In 20 patients EBV DNA load was also assessed on plasma samples. Forty-one age-matched healthy subjects were tested for EBV DNA load on MNC. Findings were validated in an independent retrospective cohort of 112 patients with CLL. EBV DNA load was detectable in 59%, and high (≥2000 copies/µg DNA) in 19% of patients, but it was negative in plasma samples. EBV DNA load was significantly higher in CLL patients than in healthy subjects (P EBV load and clinical stage or biological variables, except for 11q deletion (P = .004), CD38 expression (P = .003), and NOTCH1 mutations (P = .05). High EBV load led to a 3.14-fold increase in the hazard ratio of death and to a shorter overall survival (OS; P = .001). Poor OS was attributable, at least in part, to shorter time-to-first-treatment (P = .0008), with no higher risk of Richter's transformation or second cancer. Multivariate analysis selected high levels of EBV load as independent predictor of OS after controlling for confounding clinical and biological variables. EBV DNA load at presentation is an independent predictor of OS in patients with CLL.

  18. Model-Independent and Quasi-Model-Independent Search for New Physics at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez-Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrerar, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillol, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerritop, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenarr, C; Cuevaso, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdeckerd, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokarisa, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldsteinc, J; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gonzlez, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraesda Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hillc, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Le Compte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Leeq, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manousakisa, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martinj, V; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNultyi, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemerk, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mrenna, S; Mulmenstdt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohosh, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademackerc, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojiman, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffarde, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thomg, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vzquezl, F; Velev, G; Vellidisa, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whitesone, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittichg, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yangm, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhengb, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2007-01-01

    Data collected in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron are searched for indications of new electroweak scale physics. Rather than focusing on particular new physics scenarios, CDF data are analyzed for discrepancies with respect to the standard model prediction. A model-independent approach (Vista) considers the gross features of the data, and is sensitive to new large cross section physics. A quasi-model-independent approach (Sleuth) searches for a significant excess of events with large summed transverse momentum, and is particularly sensitive to new electroweak scale physics that appears predominantly in one final state. This global search for new physics in over three hundred exclusive final states in 927 pb^-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV reveals no such significant indication of physics beyond the standard model.

  19. Model-independent and quasi-model-independent search for new physics at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; González, B. Álvarez; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Azzurri, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Baroiant, S.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Bednar, P.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Belloni, A.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berry, T.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bolshov, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooper, B.; Copic, K.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Crescioli, F.; Almenar, C. Cuenca; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; de Pedis, D.; Derwent, P. F.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Forrester, S.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Goldstein, J.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; da Costa, J. Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamilton, A.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Handler, R.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauser, J.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; Iyutin, B.; James, E.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeans, D.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Kerzel, U.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Klute, M.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Koay, S. A.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kusakabe, Y.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lai, S.; Lami, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, S. W.; Lefèvre, R.; Leonardo, N.; Leone, S.; Levy, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lu, R.-S.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Luci, C.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Mack, P.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manousakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, M.; Martin, V.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzemer, S.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Messina, A.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miles, J.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.; Fernandez, P. Movilla; Mrenna, S.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Griso, S. Pagan; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Piedra, J.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Reisert, B.; Rekovic, V.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rogers, E.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Salamanna, G.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Scheidle, T.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scott, A. L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Sherman, D.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sidoti, A.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soderberg, M.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spinella, F.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, H.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Tiwari, V.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Tourneur, S.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Veszpremi, V.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Würthwein, F.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, J.; Wagner, W.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wynne, S. M.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, T.; Yang, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zaw, I.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2008-07-01

    Data collected in run II of the Fermilab Tevatron are searched for indications of new electroweak scale physics. Rather than focusing on particular new physics scenarios, CDF data are analyzed for discrepancies with respect to the standard model prediction. A model-independent approach (Vista) considers the gross features of the data and is sensitive to new large cross section physics. A quasi-model-independent approach (Sleuth) searches for a significant excess of events with large summed transverse momentum and is particularly sensitive to new electroweak scale physics that appears predominantly in one final state. This global search for new physics in over 300 exclusive final states in 927pb-1 of p pmacr collisions at s=1.96TeV reveals no such significant indication of physics beyond the standard model.

  20. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, S; Conway, R; Creagh, D; Byrne, D G; Sheehy, N; Silke, B

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010-2014 were evaluated. The 50(th), 75(th), and 90(th) centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical significance of serum ferritin level as an independent predictor of insulin resistance in Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Won Joon; Oh, Chang-Mo; Kim, Min-Gi; Ham, Woo Taek; Choi, Joong-Myung; Ryoo, Jae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum ferritin level has been reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, which have significant relation with insulin resistance (IR). However, clinical association between serum ferritin level and IR remained unclear. Accordingly, this study was designed to evaluate the longitudinal effects of baseline serum ferritin level on the development of IR. An IR-free 22,057 healthy Korean men (HOMA-IRserum ferritin levels. Cox proportional hazards models were used to measure the hazard ratios (HRs) of baseline serum ferritin levels on IR. During 77,471.1 person-years of follow-up, 4494 incident cases of insulin resistance developed between 2006 and 2010 (overall development rate: 20.4%). The development rate of IR increased in proportion to the baseline serum ferritin levels (quartile 1: 16.7%, quartile 2: 18.5%, quartile 3: 19.9%, quartile 4: 25.5%, Pserum ferritin levels with the first quartile, were 1.11 (0.99-1.24), 1.19 (1.07-1.33) and 1.51 (1.35-1.68), respectively (P for trend serum ferritin level was independently associated with the future development of IR in Korean men. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Crop weather models of corn and soybeans for Agrophysical Units (APU's) in Iowa using monthly meteorological predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Models based on multiple regression were developed to estimate corn and soybean yield from weather data for agrophysical units (APU) in Iowa. The predictor variables are derived from monthly average temperature and monthly total precipitation data at meteorological stations in the cooperative network. The models are similar in form to the previous models developed for crop reporting districts (CRD). The trends and derived variables were the same and the approach to select the significant predictors was similar to that used in developing the CRD models. The APU's were selected to be more homogeneous with respect crop to production than the CRDs. The APU models are quite similar to the CRD models, similar explained variation and number of predictor variables. The APU models are to be independently evaluated and compared to the previously evaluated CRD models. That comparison should indicate the preferred model area for this application, i.e., APU or CRD.

  3. Relating masses and mixing angles. A model-independent model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollik, Wolfgang Gregor [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Saldana-Salazar, Ulises Jesus [CINVESTAV (Mexico)

    2016-07-01

    In general, mixing angles and fermion masses are seen to be independent parameters of the Standard Model. However, exploiting the observed hierarchy in the masses, it is viable to construct the mixing matrices for both quarks and leptons in terms of the corresponding mass ratios only. A closer view on the symmetry properties leads to potential realizations of that approach in extensions of the Standard Model. We discuss the application in the context of flavored multi-Higgs models.

  4. Stable direction recovery in single-index models with a diverging number of predictors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Large dimensional predictors are often introduced in regressions to attenuate the possible modeling bias. We consider the stable direction recovery in single-index models in which we solely assume the response Y is independent of the diverging dimensional predictors X when βτ 0 X is given, where β 0 is a p n × 1 vector, and p n →∞ as the sample size n →∞. We first explore sufficient conditions under which the least squares estimation β n0 recovers the direction β 0 consistently even when p n = o(√ n). To enhance the model interpretability by excluding irrelevant predictors in regressions, we suggest an e1-regularization algorithm with a quadratic constraint on magnitude of least squares residuals to search for a sparse estimation of β 0 . Not only can the solution β n of e1-regularization recover β 0 consistently, it also produces sufficiently sparse estimators which enable us to select "important" predictors to facilitate the model interpretation while maintaining the prediction accuracy. Further analysis by simulations and an application to the car price data suggest that our proposed estimation procedures have good finite-sample performance and are computationally efficient.

  5. Multiple Imputation of Predictor Variables Using Generalized Additive Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Roel; van Buuren, Stef; Spiess, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of multiple imputation methods to deviations from their distributional assumptions is investigated using simulations, where the parameters of scientific interest are the coefficients of a linear regression model, and values in predictor variables are missing at random. The performanc

  6. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is an independent predictor of urinary tract infections in an ambulatory cirrhotic population: a prospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Carrie; Kumar, Deepali; Carbonneau, Michelle; Keough, Adam; Ma, Mang; Tandon, Puneeta

    2014-07-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) is a risk factor for urinary tract infections (UTIs) in many patients without liver disease. It remains unclear whether a diagnosis of ASB in an outpatient with cirrhosis could be utilized to predict the subsequent development of a UTI. We undertook this study to determine the prevalence and incidence of ASB in an outpatient population and its association with UTI. We prospectively evaluated 108 adult outpatients with cirrhosis over a 6-month period. Monthly midstream urines (MSU) were performed to detect the occurrence of UTI and ASB (culture of ≥10(8) CFU/L of a urinary pathogen in the absence of UTI symptoms). Of 108 patients enrolled, 99 completed at least one MSU, for a total of 489 MSUs. Total follow-up was 44 person-years. The incidences of ASB and UTI were 181 and 250 per 1000 person-years, respectively. The prevalences of ASB and UTI on the first MSU were 5 and 1%, respectively. In total, 8% of patients developed an episode of ASB and 11% developed a UTI during the study period. Univariate predictors of UTI were female gender, primary biliary cirrhosis, number of previous UTIs and preceding ASB. Preceding ASB was the only independent predictor of UTI on multivariate analysis, with an odds ratio of 6.2 (1.1-34.3), P = 0.04. Cirrhotic patients have higher rates of ASB and UTI than reported in the general population. ASB is an independent predictor of UTI. Further studies are necessary to determine whether routine screening and antimicrobial treatment of ASB is warranted. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-12-23

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56-3.08; p B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15-41) versus 23 days (IQR 14-36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  8. Different forces, same consequence: conscientiousness and competence beliefs are independent predictors of academic effort and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Ulrich; Lüdtke, Oliver; Roberts, Brent W; Schnyder, Inge; Niggli, Alois

    2009-12-01

    Conscientiousness and domain-specific competence beliefs are known to be highly important predictors of academic effort and achievement. Given their basis in distinct research traditions, however, these constructs have rarely been examined simultaneously. Three studies with 571, 415, and 1,535 students, respectively, found a moderate association between conscientiousness and competence beliefs. Both conscientiousness and competence beliefs meaningfully predicted academic effort, irrespective of how academic effort was measured (single-measurement questionnaire or diary data). The associations of competence beliefs with academic effort were highly domain specific, whereas conscientiousness was predictive of academic effort across a wide range of academic subjects. Conscientiousness and competence beliefs were also associated with academic achievement. Figural and verbal reasoning ability, although associated with academic achievement, only loosely predicted academic effort.

  9. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Silvia; Cereda, Emanuele; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Klersy, Catherine; Cameletti, Barbara; Albertini, Riccardo; Magno, Daniela; Caraccia, Marilisa; Turri, Annalisa; Caccialanza, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL) are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%). The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001); it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS) than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41) versus 23 days (IQR 14–36); p = 0.014), and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027). Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation. PMID:28025528

  10. Cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 as an independent predictor for definitive chemoradiotherapy sensitivity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong-jiang; WANG Ren-ben; ZHU Kun-li; JIANG Shu-mei; ZHAO Wei; XU Xiao-qing; FENG Rui

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) undergoing definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) seem to have a disparity in therapeutic response.The identification of CRT sensitivity-related clinicopathological factors would be helpful for selecting patients most likely to benefit from CRT.Cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA21-1) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been reported as useful tumor markers for esophageal cancer.The aim of this study was to examine the predictive value of CYFRA21-1 in comparison with CEA and other clinicopathological factors in patients with ESCC treated with definitive CRT.Methods Pretreatment serum CYFRA21-1 and CEA levels were measured by immunoradiometric assays.The relationships between pretreatment clinicopathological factors and the efficacy of CRT were analyzed.Overall survival (OS) was estimated by univariate and multivariate analysis.Results The results from a univariate analysis indicated that the efficacy of CRT was significantly associated with the serum levels of CYFRA21-1 and CEA before treatment (P=0.001 and P=0.023,respectively).It also indicated that the efficacy of CRT was significantly associated with the pretreatment tumor location (P=0.041).By Logistic regression analysis,the independent predictive factor associated with efficacy of CRT was CYFRA21-1 (P=0.002).The OS of the patients with high CYFRA 21-1 levels was worse than that of those with low CYFRA21-1 levels (P=0.001).In multivariate analysis,a low level of CYFRA21-1 was the most significant independent predictor of good OS (P=0.007).Conclusions CEA and tumor location may be useful in predicting the sensitivity of ESCC to CRT.CYFRA21-1 may be an independent predictor for definitive CRT sensitivity in ESCC.

  11. Elevated Plasma Vitamin B12 Concentrations Are Independent Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality in Adult Patients at Nutritional Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cappello

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated plasma vitamin B12 concentrations were identified as predictors of mortality in patients with oncologic, hepatic and renal diseases, and in elderly and critically ill medical patients. The association between vitamin B12 concentrations and in-hospital mortality in adult patients at nutritional risk has not been assessed. Methods: In this five-year prospective study, we investigated whether high vitamin B12 concentrations (>1000 pg/mL are associated with in-hospital mortality in 1373 not-bed-ridden adult patients at nutritional risk (Nutrition Risk Index <97.5, admitted to medical and surgical departments. Results: Three hundred and ninety-six (28.8% patients presented vitamin B12 > 1000 pg/mL. Two hundred and four patients died in the hospital (14.9%. The adjusted odds ratio of in-hospital mortality in patients with high vitamin B12 was 2.20 (95% CI, 1.56–3.08; p < 0.001; it was independent of age, gender, body mass index, six-month previous unintentional weight loss, admission ward, presence of malignancy, renal function, C-reactive protein and prealbumin. Patients with high vitamin B12 also had a longer length of stay (LOS than those with normal concentrations (median 25 days, (IQR 15–41 versus 23 days (IQR 14–36; p = 0.014, and elevated vitamin B12 was an independent predictor of LOS (p = 0.027. Conclusions: An independent association between elevated vitamin B12 concentrations, mortality and LOS was found in our sample of hospitalized adult patients at nutritional risk. Although the underlying mechanisms are still unknown and any cause-effect relation cannot be inferred, clinicians should be aware of the potential negative impact of high vitamin B12 concentrations in hospitalized patients at nutritional risk and avoid inappropriate vitamin supplementation.

  12. Predictors of Retirement Satisfaction: A Path Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Yael

    1985-01-01

    Examined adjustment to retirement among 310 former industrial and service workers. Respondents had come to terms with retirement and enjoyed their more relaxed lifestyle. Dominant variables in the path model were retirees' satisfaction with specific aspects of retirement: giving up work, activities with family and friends, rest, and free time. (BH)

  13. Independent predictors of breastfeeding intention in a disadvantaged population of pregnant women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone David H

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding rates in Scotland are very low, particularly in the more disadvantaged areas. Despite a number of interventions to promote breastfeeding very few women actually intend to breastfeed their baby. The aim of this study was to identify personal and social factors independently associated with intention to breastfeed. Methods Nine hundred and ninety seven women from two socio-economically disadvantaged housing estates located on the outskirts of Glasgow participated in a study that aimed to increase the prevalence of breastfeeding. Self-administered questionnaires completed by each participant collected information in early pregnancy, prior to exposure to the study intervention, on feeding intention, previous feeding experience and socio-demographic data. Results Five factors were independently predictive of breastfeeding intention. These were previous breastfeeding experience, living with a partner, smoking, parity and maternal age. After adjusting for these five factors, neither deprivation nor receipt of milk tokens provided useful additional predictive information. Conclusion In this population of socially disadvantaged pregnant women we identified five variables that were independently predictive of breastfeeding intention. These variables could be useful in identifying women at greatest risk of choosing not to breastfeed. Appropriate promotional efforts could then be designed to give due consideration to individual circumstances.

  14. Sarcopenia is an Independent Predictor of Severe Postoperative Complications and Long-Term Survival After Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Huang, Dong-Dong; Pang, Wen-Yang; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Wang, Su-Lin; Lou, Neng; Ma, Liang-Liang; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the association between sarcopenia and long-term prognosis after gastric cancer surgery has not been investigated. Moreover, the association between sarcopenia and postoperative complications remains controversial. This large-scale retrospective study aims to ascertain the prevalence of sarcopenia and assess its impact on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. From December 2008 to April 2013, the clinical data of all patients who underwent elective radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer were collected prospectively. Only patients with available preoperative abdominal CT scan within 30 days of surgery were considered for analysis. Skeletal muscle mass was determined by abdominal (computed tomography) CT scan, and sarcopenia was diagnosed by the cut-off values obtained by means of optimum stratification. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluating risk factors of postoperative complications and long-term survival were performed. A total of 937 patients were included in this study, and 389 (41.5%) patients were sarcopenic based on the diagnostic cut-off values (34.9 cm2/m2 for women and 40.8 cm2/m2 for men). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications (OR = 3.010, P sarcopenia did not show significant association with operative mortality. Moreover, sarcopenia was an independent predictor for poorer overall survival (HR = 1.653, P sarcopenia remained an independent risk factor for overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I. Sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of severe postoperative complications after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Moreover, sarcopenia is independently associated with overall and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I. PMID:27043677

  15. Progranulin is a novel independent predictor of disease progression and overall survival in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Göbel

    Full Text Available Progranulin (Pgrn is a 88 kDa secreted protein with pleiotropic functions including regulation of cell cycle progression, cell motility, wound repair and tumorigenesis. Using microarray based gene expression profiling we have recently demonstrated that the gene for Pgrn, granulin (GRN, is significantly higher expressed in aggressive CD38(+ZAP-70(+ as compared to indolent CD38(-ZAP-70(- chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL cases. Here, we measured Pgrn plasma concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in the Essen CLL cohort of 131 patients and examined Pgrn for association with established prognostic markers and clinical outcome. We found that high Pgrn plasma levels were strongly associated with adverse risk factors including unmutated IGHV status, expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, poor risk cytogenetics (11q-, 17p- as detected by flourescence in situ hybridization (FISH and high Binet stage. Pgrn as well as the aforementioned risk factors were prognostic for time to first treatment and overall survival in this series. Importantly, these results could be confirmed in the independent multicentric CLL1 cohort of untreated Binet stage A patients (n = 163. Here, multivariate analysis of time to first treatment revealed that high risk Pgrn (HR = 2.06, 95%-CI = 1.13-3.76, p = 0.018, unmutated IGHV status (HR = 5.63, 95%-CI = 3.05-10.38, p<0.001, high risk as defined by the study protocol (HR = 2.06, 95%-CI = 1.09-3.89, p = 0.026 but not poor risk cytogenetics were independent prognostic markers. In summary our results suggest that Pgrn is a novel, robust and independent prognostic marker in CLL that can be easily measured by ELISA.

  16. How Many Separable Sources? Model Selection In Independent Components Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, Roger P.; Hansen, Lars Kai; Strother, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mixtures consisting solely of non-Gaussian sources, mixtures including two or more Gaussian components cannot be separated using standard independent components analysis methods that are based on higher order statistics and independent observations. The mixed Independent Components Analysi...... might otherwise be questionable. Failure of the Akaike Information Criterion in model selection also has relevance in traditional independent components analysis where all sources are assumed non-Gaussian.......Unlike mixtures consisting solely of non-Gaussian sources, mixtures including two or more Gaussian components cannot be separated using standard independent components analysis methods that are based on higher order statistics and independent observations. The mixed Independent Components Analysis....../Principal Components Analysis (mixed ICA/PCA) model described here accommodates one or more Gaussian components in the independent components analysis model and uses principal components analysis to characterize contributions from this inseparable Gaussian subspace. Information theory can then be used to select from...

  17. Retinoblastoma protein expression is an independent predictor of both radiation response and survival in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbaek, M; Alsner, J; Marcussen, N

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the predictive value of various clinical, biochemical, and histopathological parameters, with special emphasis on the expression of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB), on the radiation response in bladder cancer. In order to obtain a truly objective....... Expression of pRB was assessed by immunohistochemical staining as present or absent. Complete response to radiotherapy was obtained in 42 of 106 evaluable patients (40%). Predictive for CR to radiotherapy, in univariate analysis, was transurethral resection (as opposed to biopsy), B-haemoglobin, no upper...... urinary retention, and loss of pRB staining. Loss of pRB staining was the strongest independent predictor of radiation response in multivariate logistic regression analysis and absence of upper urinary retention was the only other significant factor. Loss of pRB was the only parameter showing...

  18. The high glycemic index diet was an independent predictor to explain changes in agouti-related protein in obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Dal Molin Netto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The high glycemic index diet was an independent predictor to explain changes in agouti-related protein in obese adolescents. Background & Aims: The role of diet glycemic index (GI in the control of orexigenic and anorexigenic factors of the energy balance is still not clear. The present study aimed to assess whether the habitual diet, according to different GI foods, exerts influence on regulation of energy balance markers and the effects of interdisciplinary intervention in obese adolescents. Methods: A total of 55 obese adolescents, aged from 14 to 19 years, were submited to one year of interdisciplinary therapy and were divided in two groups, according to the predominant dietary pattern of food intake: high-GI group (H-GI; n = 29 and moderate/low-GI group (M/L-GI; n = 26. Results: The concentration of orexigenic factor AgRP (p < 0.01, visceral fat (p=0.04 and visceral/subcutaneous ratio (p = 0.03 were higher in the group of H-GI when compared with M/L-GI group. Moreover, the habitual consumption of H-GI foods was an independent predictor to explain changes in AgRP concentrations. After one year of interdisciplinary therapy, the adolescents presented significant reductions in body weight, total body fat (%, visceral and subcutaneous fat and HOMA-IR, as well as a significant increase of fat free mass (%. Conclusions: Our results may suggest that habitual H-GI diet could upregulate orexigenic pathways, contributing to vicious cycle between undesirable diets, deregulates energy balance and predispose to obesity. One the other hand, one year of interdisciplinary therapy can significant improves metabolic profile and central obesity in adolescents.

  19. Personality traits, education, physical exercise, and childhood neurological function as independent predictors of adult obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Cheng

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether personality traits, education, physical exercise, parental socio-economic conditions, and childhood neurological function are independently associated with obesity in 50 year old adults in a longitudinal birth cohort study. METHOD: The sample consisted of 5,921 participants born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 7, 11, 33, 42, and 50 years with data on body mass index measured at 42 and 50 years. RESULTS: There was an increase of adult obesity from 14.2% at age 42 to 23.6% at 50 years. Cohort members who were reported by teachers on overall clumsiness as "certainly applied" at age 7 were more likely to become obese at age 50. In addition, educational qualifications, traits Conscientiousness and Extraversion, psychological distress, and physical exercise were all significantly associated with adult obesity. The associations remained to be significant after controlling for birth weight and gestation, maternal and paternal BMI, childhood BMI, childhood intelligence and behavioural adjustment, as well as diet. CONCLUSION: Neurological function in childhood, education, trait Conscientiousness, and exercise were all significantly and independently associated with adult obesity, each explained unique individual variability.

  20. Personality Traits, Education, Physical Exercise, and Childhood Neurological Function as Independent Predictors of Adult Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Helen; Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether personality traits, education, physical exercise, parental socio-economic conditions, and childhood neurological function are independently associated with obesity in 50 year old adults in a longitudinal birth cohort study. Method The sample consisted of 5,921 participants born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 7, 11, 33, 42, and 50 years with data on body mass index measured at 42 and 50 years. Results There was an increase of adult obesity from 14.2% at age 42 to 23.6% at 50 years. Cohort members who were reported by teachers on overall clumsiness as “certainly applied” at age 7 were more likely to become obese at age 50. In addition, educational qualifications, traits Conscientiousness and Extraversion, psychological distress, and physical exercise were all significantly associated with adult obesity. The associations remained to be significant after controlling for birth weight and gestation, maternal and paternal BMI, childhood BMI, childhood intelligence and behavioural adjustment, as well as diet. Conclusion Neurological function in childhood, education, trait Conscientiousness, and exercise were all significantly and independently associated with adult obesity, each explained unique individual variability. PMID:24250828

  1. Personality traits, education, physical exercise, and childhood neurological function as independent predictors of adult obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Helen; Furnham, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether personality traits, education, physical exercise, parental socio-economic conditions, and childhood neurological function are independently associated with obesity in 50 year old adults in a longitudinal birth cohort study. The sample consisted of 5,921 participants born in Great Britain in 1958 and followed up at 7, 11, 33, 42, and 50 years with data on body mass index measured at 42 and 50 years. There was an increase of adult obesity from 14.2% at age 42 to 23.6% at 50 years. Cohort members who were reported by teachers on overall clumsiness as "certainly applied" at age 7 were more likely to become obese at age 50. In addition, educational qualifications, traits Conscientiousness and Extraversion, psychological distress, and physical exercise were all significantly associated with adult obesity. The associations remained to be significant after controlling for birth weight and gestation, maternal and paternal BMI, childhood BMI, childhood intelligence and behavioural adjustment, as well as diet. Neurological function in childhood, education, trait Conscientiousness, and exercise were all significantly and independently associated with adult obesity, each explained unique individual variability.

  2. Recreational physical activity as an independent predictor of multivariable cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Welborn, Timothy A; Howat, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    The role of physical activity in preventing CVD has been highlighted by Professor Jerry Morris in the 1950's. We report outcome of a 15-year prospective study with the aim to identify whether physical activity showed cardiovascular benefit independent of common risk factors and of central obesity. Baseline data of 8662 subjects, with no previous history of heart disease, diabetes or stroke, were obtained from an age- and gender- stratified sample of adults in Australian capital cities and were linked with the National Death Index to determine the causes of death of 610 subjects who had died to 31 December 2004. The study consisted of 4175 males (age 42.3 ± 13.1 years) and 4487 females (age 42.8 ± 13.2 years). Fasting serum lipid levels, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and smoking habits at baseline were recorded. The Framingham Risk Scores of 15-year mortality due to CHD and CVD were calculated using established equations. Subjects were also asked if they engaged in vigorous exercise, less vigorous exercise or walk for recreation and exercise in the past 2 weeks. Subjects in the high recreational physical activity category were 0.16 (0.06-0.43; pRisk Score and central obesity (Waist circumference to Hip circumference Ratio), those in the high recreational physical activity group were 0.35 (0.13-0.98) times less likely compared to the low category for CVD mortality. Recreational physical activity independently predicted reduced cardiovascular mortality over fifteen years. A public health focus on increased physical activity and preventing obesity is required to reduce the risk of CVD and CHD.

  3. Recreational physical activity as an independent predictor of multivariable cardiovascular disease risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satvinder S Dhaliwal

    Full Text Available The role of physical activity in preventing CVD has been highlighted by Professor Jerry Morris in the 1950's. We report outcome of a 15-year prospective study with the aim to identify whether physical activity showed cardiovascular benefit independent of common risk factors and of central obesity. Baseline data of 8662 subjects, with no previous history of heart disease, diabetes or stroke, were obtained from an age- and gender- stratified sample of adults in Australian capital cities and were linked with the National Death Index to determine the causes of death of 610 subjects who had died to 31 December 2004. The study consisted of 4175 males (age 42.3 ± 13.1 years and 4487 females (age 42.8 ± 13.2 years. Fasting serum lipid levels, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and smoking habits at baseline were recorded. The Framingham Risk Scores of 15-year mortality due to CHD and CVD were calculated using established equations. Subjects were also asked if they engaged in vigorous exercise, less vigorous exercise or walk for recreation and exercise in the past 2 weeks. Subjects in the high recreational physical activity category were 0.16 (0.06-0.43; p<0.001 and 0.12 (0.03-0.48; p = 0.003 times as likely as subjects in the low category for CVD and CHD mortality respectively. After adjusting for both the Framingham Risk Score and central obesity (Waist circumference to Hip circumference Ratio, those in the high recreational physical activity group were 0.35 (0.13-0.98 times less likely compared to the low category for CVD mortality. Recreational physical activity independently predicted reduced cardiovascular mortality over fifteen years. A public health focus on increased physical activity and preventing obesity is required to reduce the risk of CVD and CHD.

  4. Supraphysiologic estradiol is an independent predictor of low birth weight in full-term singletons born after fresh embryo transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, N; Elias, R T; Christos, P J; Petrini, A C; Hancock, K; Lekovich, J P; Rosenwaks, Z

    2017-05-13

    Is supraphysiologic estradiol (E2) an independent predictor of low birth weight (LBW) in singletons born after fresh IVF-embryo transfer (ET) cycles? Our results suggest that E2 > 2500 pg/ml is an independent predictor for LBW in full-term singletons born to normal responder patients undergoing fresh IVF-ET cycles. The pathogenesis of LBW in IVF singletons remains unknown. However, recent studies have suggested that the hyperestrogenic milieu generated during ovarian stimulation may create a sub-optimal peri-implantation environment, leading to placental dysfunction, and therefore, LBW. Retrospective cohort study of normal responder patients, births between January 2005 and June 2014. A total of 6419 patients had live births after fresh IVF-ET during the study period, of which 2348 (36.6%) patients were excluded due to multiple gestation, vanishing twins or incomplete records. Perinatal outcomes recorded for all patients included birth weight, gestational age (GA) at delivery, mode of delivery and gender. Term birth, preterm birth (PTB) and LBW incidence proportions were plotted against E2 level on the day of trigger. The term LBW incidence proportion (i.e. singletons born at GA ≥ 37 weeks with birth weight births were included. The median age, BMI, E2 level and birth weight for the study cohort was 36 (33-39) years, 22.3 (20.4-25.0) kg/m2, 1554 (1112.7-2179) pg/ml and 3289 (2920-3628) g, respectively. The incidence proportion of LBW rose from 6.4% (E2 2001-2500 pg/ml) to 20.7% (E2 3501-4000 pg/ml), without a corresponding rise in the incidence proportion of PTB. The odds of term LBW with E2 > 2500 pg/ml were 6.1-7.9 times higher compared to the referent E2 group. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that E2 was an independent predictor for term LBW, even after adjusting for age, BMI, race, parity, infertility diagnosis, duration of ovarian stimulation, gonadotropin dosage and method of insemination (adjusted odds ratio 10.8, 95% CI 9

  5. Focal S100A4 protein expression is an independent predictor of development of metastatic disease in cystectomized bladder cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbæk, Mads; Alsner, Jan; Marcussen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    , compared with the pattern of relapses over a 10+ yr follow-up period. RESULTS: Focal S100A4 protein expression emerged as the only significant independent predictor of distant metastatic relapse and distant metastasis-free survival in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: There is a potential role......OBJECTIVE: The prognosis of patients with apparently localized, operable, muscle-invasive bladder cancer depends to a large extent on the presence or absence of subclinical, microscopic distant metastases at the time of surgery. Expression of the S100A4 protein has been shown to correlate...... with the risk of metastasis in both animal tumour-model systems and clinical investigations in other tumour types. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prognostic potential of S100A4 protein expression for predicting distant metastatic relapse in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. METHODS: We...

  6. Predictors of social integration for individuals with brain injury: An application of the ICF model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchman, Nicole; Sheehan, Lindsay; Rafajko, Sean; Haak, Christopher; Kazukauskas, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    People with brain injury often experience significant challenges to social and community engagement following injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors impacting social integration for adults with brain injury using the International Classification and Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a conceptual model. Adults with brain injury (n = 103) recruited through two US state brain injury associations participated in a survey study. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to examine the predictive impact of components of the ICF model on social integration outcomes. Specifically, demographic (age, gender, SES), disability (severity of functional limitations), personal (disability acceptance, social self-efficacy) and environmental (neighbourhood climate, stigma, social support network) factors were entered as four conceptual groups of predictors to examine the incremental contribution of the variance in social integration explained by each set. As hypothesized, the inclusion of each block of predictors significantly improved the model. The overall regression model explained 41% of the variance in social integration. Specifically, SES (β = 0.25), severity of functional limitations (β = 0.29) and social support network (β = 0.29) emerged as the strongest independent predictors. Findings from this study highlight the importance of adopting a biopsychosocial approach to understanding social integration for people with brain injury.

  7. Small artery structure is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events in essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiassen, Ole Norling; Buus, Niels Henril; Sihm, Inger

    2007-01-01

    in uncomplicated essential hypertensive patients. Recently, high M: L was demonstrated as a prognostic marker in patients at high cardiovascular risk, including normotensive type 2 diabetic patients. Since diabetes is associated with pressure-independent changes in M: L, the relevance of this finding to essential...... years of follow-up. Results Thirty patients suffered a documented predefined cardiovascular event during follow-up. Increased relative risk (RR) was associated withM: L>-0.083 (mean level of the hypertensive cohort), RRU2.34 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11-4.95], and with M: L>-0.098 (mean level...... of a normotensive control groupR2SD), RRU2.49 (95% CI 1.21-5.11). Both results remained significant (RRU2.19, 95% CI 1.04-4.64, and RRU2.20, 95% CI 1.06-4.56, respectively) when adjusted for Heart Score level (10-year mortality risk-estimate, integrating age, gender, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking...

  8. Pretherapy metabolic tumour volume is an independent predictor of outcome in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasanelli, Myriam; Meignan, Michel; Haioun, Corinne; Itti, Emmanuel [Paris-Est University, Nuclear Medicine and Lymphoid Malignancies Unit, Henri Mondor Hospital, Creteil (France); Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Casasnovas, Rene-Olivier [Nuclear Medicine and Hematology, Georges-Francois Leclerc Center, Le Bocage Hospital, Dijon (France); Biggi, Alberto; Gallamini, Andrea [Nuclear Medicine and Hematology, Santa Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo (Italy); Siegel, Barry A.; Cashen, Amanda F. [Washington University School of Medicine, Nuclear Medicine and Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vera, Pierre; Tilly, Herve [Nuclear Medicine and Hematology, Henri Becquerel Center, Rouen (France); Versari, Annibale [Nuclear Medicine, Santa Maria Nuova Hospital-IRCCS, Reggio Emilia (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    We investigated the prognostic value of total metabolic tumour volume (TMTV) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). TMTV was measured in 114 patients with newly diagnosed DLBCL who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at baseline before immunochemotherapy. TMTV was computed by summing the volumes of all lymphomatous lesions after applying the local SUVmax threshold of 41 % using semiautomatic software. Prognostic value was assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Median follow-up was 39 months. Average pretherapy TMTV was 509 ± 568 cm{sup 3}. The 3-year estimates of PFS were 77 % in the low metabolic burden group (TMTV ≤550 cm{sup 3}) and 60 % in the high metabolic burden group (TMTV >550 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.04), and prediction of OS was even better (87 % vs. 60 %, p = 0.0003). Cox regression showed independence of TMTV for OS prediction (p = 0.002) compared with other pretherapy indices of tumour burden, such as tumour bulk and the International Prognostic Index. Pretherapy TMTV is an independent predictor of outcome in patients with DLBCL. (orig.)

  9. Meta-Analysis of Microarray Data Identifies GAS6 Expression as an Independent Predictor of Poor Survival in Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Buehler

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seeking new biomarkers for epithelial ovarian cancer, the fifth most common cause of death from all cancers in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies, we performed a meta-analysis of three independent studies and compared the results in regard to clinicopathological parameters. This analysis revealed that GAS6 was highly expressed in ovarian cancer and therefore was selected as our candidate of choice. GAS6 encodes a secreted protein involved in physiological processes including cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and cell survival. We performed immunohistochemistry on various ovarian cancer tissues and found that GAS6 expression was elevated in tumour tissue samples compared to healthy control samples (. In addition, GAS6 expression was also higher in tumours from patients with residual disease compared to those without. Our data propose GAS6 as an independent predictor of poor survival, suggesting GAS6, both on the mRNA and on the protein level, as a potential biomarker for ovarian cancer. In clinical practice, the staining of a tumour biopsy for GAS6 may be useful to assess cancer prognosis and/or to monitor disease progression.

  10. C-reactive protein, waist circumference, and family history of heart attack are independent predictors of body iron stores in apparently healthy premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ortegón, M F; Arbeláez, A; Mosquera, M; Méndez, F; Aguilar-de Plata, C

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prediction of ferritin levels by variables related to cardiometabolic disease risk in a multivariate analysis. For this aim, 123 healthy women (72 premenopausal and 51 posmenopausal) were recruited. Data were collected through procedures of anthropometric measurements, questionnaires for personal/familial antecedents, and dietary intake (24-h recall), and biochemical determinations (ferritin, C reactive protein (CRP), glucose, insulin, and lipid profile) in blood serum samples obtained. Multiple linear regression analysis was used and variables with no normal distribution were log-transformed for this analysis. In premenopausal women, a model to explain log-ferritin levels was found with log-CRP levels, heart attack familial history, and waist circumference as independent predictors. Ferritin behaves as other cardiovascular markers in terms of prediction of its levels by documented predictors of cardiometabolic disease and related disorders. This is the first report of a relationship between heart attack familial history and ferritin levels. Further research is required to evaluate the mechanism to explain the relationship of central body fat and heart attack familial history with body iron stores values.

  11. Progression of Aortic Arch Calcification Over 1 Year Is an Independent Predictor of Mortality in Incident Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Jung; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Seung Jun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Dong Eun; Ko, Kwang Il; Koo, Hyang Mo; Kim, Chan Ho; Doh, Fa Mee; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Choi, Kyu Hun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds and Aims The presence and progression of vascular calcification have been demonstrated as important risk factors for mortality in dialysis patients. However, since the majority of subjects included in most previous studies were hemodialysis patients, limited information was available in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of aortic arch calcification (AoAC) and prognostic value of AoAC progression in PD patients. Methods We prospectively determined AoAC by chest X-ray at PD start and after 12 months, and evaluated the impact of AoAC progression on mortality in 415 incident PD patients. Results Of 415 patients, 169 patients (40.7%) had AoAC at baseline with a mean of 18.1±11.2%. The presence of baseline AoAC was an independent predictor of all-cause [Hazard ratio (HR): 2.181, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.336–3.561, P = 0.002] and cardiovascular mortality (HR: 3.582, 95% CI: 1.577–8.132, P = 0.002). Among 363 patients with follow-up chest X-rays at 12 months after PD start, the proportion of patients with AoAC progression was significantly higher in patients with baseline AoAC (64.2 vs. 5.3%, PAoAC progression was an independent predictor for all-cause (HR: 2.625, 95% CI: 1.150–5.991, P = 0.022) and cardiovascular mortality (HR: 4.008, 95% CI: 1.079–14.890, P = 0.038) in patients with AoAC at baseline. Conclusions The presence and progression of AoAC assessed by chest X-ray were independently associated with unfavorable outcomes in incident PD patients. Regular follow-up by chest X-ray could be a simple and useful method to stratify mortality risk in these patients. PMID:23144974

  12. Supervision in Factor Models Using a Large Number of Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrini, Lorenzo; Hillebrand, Eric Tobias

    In this paper we investigate the forecasting performance of a particular factor model (FM) in which the factors are extracted from a large number of predictors. We use a semi-parametric state-space representation of the FM in which the forecast objective, as well as the factors, is included.......g. a standard dynamic factor model with separate forecast and state equations....... in the state vector. The factors are informed of the forecast target (supervised) through the state equation dynamics. We propose a way to assess the contribution of the forecast objective on the extracted factors that exploits the Kalman filter recursions. We forecast one target at a time based...

  13. Hybrid Scheduling Model for Independent Grid Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shanthini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Grid computing facilitates the resource sharing through the administrative domains which are geographically distributed. Scheduling in a distributed heterogeneous environment is intrinsically very hard because of the heterogeneous nature of resource collection. Makespan and tardiness are two different measures of scheduling, and many of the previous researches concentrated much on reduction of makespan, which measures the machine utilization. In this paper, we propose a hybrid scheduling algorithm for scheduling independent grid tasks with the objective of reducing total weighted tardiness of grid tasks. Tardiness is to measure the due date performance, which has a direct impact on cost for executing the jobs. In this paper we propose BG_ATC algorithm which is a combination of best gap (BG search and Apparent Tardiness Cost (ATC indexing algorithm. Furthermore, we implemented these two algorithms in two different phases of the scheduling process. In addition to that, the comparison was made on results with various benchmark algorithms and the experimental results show that our algorithm outperforms the benchmark algorithms.

  14. Hybrid Scheduling Model for Independent Grid Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthini, J; Kalaikumaran, T; Karthik, S

    2015-01-01

    Grid computing facilitates the resource sharing through the administrative domains which are geographically distributed. Scheduling in a distributed heterogeneous environment is intrinsically very hard because of the heterogeneous nature of resource collection. Makespan and tardiness are two different measures of scheduling, and many of the previous researches concentrated much on reduction of makespan, which measures the machine utilization. In this paper, we propose a hybrid scheduling algorithm for scheduling independent grid tasks with the objective of reducing total weighted tardiness of grid tasks. Tardiness is to measure the due date performance, which has a direct impact on cost for executing the jobs. In this paper we propose BG_ATC algorithm which is a combination of best gap (BG) search and Apparent Tardiness Cost (ATC) indexing algorithm. Furthermore, we implemented these two algorithms in two different phases of the scheduling process. In addition to that, the comparison was made on results with various benchmark algorithms and the experimental results show that our algorithm outperforms the benchmark algorithms.

  15. Hyperhomocysteinemia is an independent predictor of long-term clinical outcomes in Chinese octogenarians with acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Z

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zhenhong Fu,1,* Geng Qian,1,* Hao Xue,1,* Jun Guo,1 Lian Chen,1 Xia Yang,1 Mingzhi Shen,2 Wei Dong,1 Yundai Chen11Department of Cardiology, Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Cardiology, Hainai Branch of Chinese People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Sanya, Hainan, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To evaluate the prognostic value of homocysteine (Hcy in Chinese acute coronary syndrome (ACS octogenarians.Methods: The study cohort comprised 660 consecutive ACS octogenarians who underwent coronary angiography. We classified the patients into three groups according to Hcy tertiles. Kaplan–Meier method was performed for survival and major adverse cardiac events (MACE rates. Multivariate Cox regression was performed to identify mortality predictors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to predict the cutoff value of Hcy for all-cause mortality.Results: The follow-up period was 28 (inter-quartile range: 16–38 months. Diastolic blood pressure, ratios of male, renal failure and old myocardial infarction in high plasma level Hcy (H-Hcy group were higher than those in low (L-Hcy and middle (M-Hcy plasma level of Hcy groups (P<0.05. The Hcy level was positively correlated with uric acid level (r=0.211, P=0.001 and Cystatin C (Cys C level (r=0.212, P=0.001 and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (r=−0.148, P=0.018. For the long-term outcomes, the cumulative survival rate of H-Hcy group was significantly lower than that of L-Hcy and M-Hcy groups (P=0.006. All-cause mortality and MACE of H-Hcy group were higher than those of L-Hcy and M-Hcy group (P=0.0001, P=0.0008. Hcy is an independent predictor for long-term all-cause mortality (odds ratio =2.26, 95% CI=1.23–4.16, P=0.023 and MACE (odds ratio =1.91, 95% CI=1.03–3.51, P=0.039. Receiver operating characteristic

  16. SHERLOCK: A quasi-model-independent new physics search strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuteson, Bruce

    2000-04-01

    We develop a quasi-model-independent prescription for searching for physics responsible for the electroweak symmetry breaking in the Standard Model, and show a preliminary version of what we find when this prescription is applied to the DZero data.

  17. Physician-scientists in obstetrics and gynecology: predictors of success in obtaining independent research funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeigwe, Ijeoma; Wang, Cynthia; Politch, Joseph A; Heffner, Linda J; Kuohung, Wendy

    2017-07-01

    Obstetrics and gynecology departments receive the smallest amount of National Institutes of Health research funding and have significantly lower application success rates compared to pediatric, internal medicine, and surgery departments. The development of mentored early career development training grants (K awards) has been one strategy implemented by the National Institutes of Health to help aspiring physician-scientists establish independent research careers. The purpose of this study is to describe the cohort of obstetrics and gynecology physician-scientists who were K08, K12, and K23 recipients from 1988 through 2015 and to identify predictors of success in obtaining independent federal funding, as defined by acquisition of an R01, R21, R34, U01, U54, P01, or P50 award. We hypothesized that sex, subspecialty, type of K award, and dual MD/PhD would impact success rates. K08, K12, and K23 recipients from 1988 through 2015 were identified from the National Institutes of Health Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools, the office of the National Institutes of Health Freedom of Information Act, and the website of the Reproductive Scientist Development Program. Data were stratified by sex, educational degree, subspecialty, and type of K award. Data were analyzed using the Pearson χ(2) and Fisher exact tests. The Kaplan-Meier estimator was used to determine rates of conversion to independent funding over time. A total of 388 K recipients were identified. Women accounted for 66% of K awards while men accounted for 34%. Among K recipients, 82% were MDs, while 18% were MD/PhDs. K12 awards accounted for 82% of all K awards, while K08 and K23 awards accounted for 10% and 8%, respectively. Subspecialists in maternal-fetal medicine and reproductive endocrinology and infertility received the highest proportion of K awards, followed by generalists and gynecologic oncologists. Altogether, the 3 subspecialty groups accounted for 68% of all K awards. R01 awards made up the

  18. Model selection and comparison for independents sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Kjær; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2014-01-01

    this method by considering the problem in a full Bayesian framework instead of the approximate formulation, on which the asymptotic MAP criterion is based. This leads to a new model selection and comparison method, the lp-BIC, whose computational complexity is of the same order as the asymptotic MAP criterion......In the signal processing literature, many methods have been proposed for estimating the number of sinusoidal basis functions from a noisy data set. The most popular method is the asymptotic MAP criterion, which is sometimes also referred to as the BIC. In this paper, we extend and improve....... Through simulations, we demonstrate that the lp-BIC outperforms the asymptotic MAP criterion and other state of the art methods in terms of model selection, de-noising and prediction performance. The simulation code is available online....

  19. Waist to height ratio is an independent predictor for the incidence of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichi Odagiri

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD and cardiovascular disease. The association between waist to height ratio (WheiR and CKD is unclear. This study evaluated the association between WheiR and CKD. DESIGN AND METHODS: In this longitudinal cohort study, 4841 Japanese workers (3686 males, 1155 females 18 to 67 years of age in 2008 were followed up until 2011. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m² (by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation for Japanese or dipstick proteinuria (≥1+. Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the relationship between WheiR and development of CKD. RESULTS: A total of 384 (7.9% participants (300 men and 84 women were found to have new CKD. The incidence of CKD was 13.7, 24.2, 37.9 and 43.7 per 1000 person-years of follow-up in the lowest, second, third and highest quartiles of WheiR, respectively. After adjustment for potential confounders, the adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval for CKD were 1.00 (reference, 1.23 (0.85, 1.78, 1.59 (1.11, 2.26 and 1.62 (1.13, 2.32 through the quartiles of WheiR, respectively. WheiR had a significant predictive value for the incidence of both proteinuria and low estimated glomerular filtration rate. After subdivision according to gender, the relationship between WheiR and the incidence of CKD was statistically significant in the unadjusted model. However, after adjusting for potential confounders, WheiR was significantly associated with the incidence of CKD in females, whereas it was not significant in males. CONCLUSIONS: WheiR, which is commonly used as an index of central obesity, is associated with CKD. There was a significant gender difference in the relationship between CKD and WheiR.

  20. Physical activity and weight loss are independent predictors of improved insulin sensitivity following energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Stefan G J A; Verhoef, Sanne P M; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2016-02-01

    The role of physical activity and the joint effect with sleep duration on insulin sensitivity (IS) during energy restriction followed by weight maintenance were determined. One hundred and two subjects (28 males) (mean ± SD age: 40 ± 9 years; BMI: 31.9 ± 3.0 kg/m(2) ) followed a very-low-energy diet for 8 weeks, followed by a 44-week period of weight maintenance. Body composition (three-compartment model based on body weight, total body water, and body volume), physical activity (accelerometry), sleep (questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations were assessed before the diet and at 8, 20, and 52 weeks after the start. Compared to baseline, IS was improved significantly after 8 weeks (P physical activity counts. Maintaining daily physical activity during energy restriction is as important as weight loss itself in the improvement of IS; there was no additional effect of change in sleep duration. During weight maintenance, improved IS is maintained better if physical activity returns to baseline or higher. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  1. Array independent MIMO channel models with analytical characteristics

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Yuan; Feng, Zhenghe

    2011-01-01

    The conventional analytical channel models for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) wireless radio channels are array dependent. In this paper, we present several array independent MIMO channel models that inherit the essence of analytical models. The key idea is to decompose the physical scattering channel into two parts using the manifold decomposition technique: one is the wavefield independent sampling matrices depending on the antenna arrays only; the other is the array independent physical channel that can be individually modeled in an analytical manner. Based on the framework, we firstly extend the conventional virtual channel representation (VCR), which is restricted to uniform linear arrays (ULAs) so far, to a general version applicable to arbitrary array configurations. Then, we present two array independent stochastic MIMO channel models based on the proposed new VCR as well as the Weichselberger model. These two models are good at angular power spectrum (APS) estimation and capacity prediction, r...

  2. Model independent spin determination at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhaeuser, Lisa

    2012-04-25

    By the end of the year 2011, both the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have recorded around 5 inverse femtobarns of data at an energy of 7 TeV. There are only vague hints from the already analysed data towards new physics at the TeV scale. However, one knows that around this scale, new physics should show up so that theoretical issues of the standard model of particle physics can be cured. During the last decades, extensions to the standard model that are supposed to solve its problems have been constructed, and the corresponding phenomenology has been worked out. As soon as new physics is discovered, one has to deal with the problem of determining the nature of the underlying model. A first hint is of course given by the mass spectrum and quantum numbers such as electric and colour charges of the new particles. However, there are two popular model classes, supersymmetric models and extradimensional models, which can exhibit almost equal properties at the accessible energy range. Both introduce partners to the standard model particles with the same charges and thus one needs an extended discrimination method. From the origin of these partners arises a relevant difference: The partners constructed in extradimensional models have the same spin as their standard model partners while in Supersymmetry they differ by spin 1/2. These different spins have an impact on the phenomenology of the two models. For example, one can exploit the fact that the total cross sections are affected, but this requires a very good knowledge of the couplings and masses involved. Another approach uses angular distributions depending on the particle spins. A prevailing method based on this idea uses the invariant mass distribution of the visible particles in decay chains. One can relate these distributions to the spin of the particle mediating the decay since it reflects itself in the highest power of the invariant mass s{sub ff} of the adjacent particles. In this thesis

  3. Model independent spin determination at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edelhaeuser, Lisa

    2012-04-25

    By the end of the year 2011, both the CMS and ATLAS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider have recorded around 5 inverse femtobarns of data at an energy of 7 TeV. There are only vague hints from the already analysed data towards new physics at the TeV scale. However, one knows that around this scale, new physics should show up so that theoretical issues of the standard model of particle physics can be cured. During the last decades, extensions to the standard model that are supposed to solve its problems have been constructed, and the corresponding phenomenology has been worked out. As soon as new physics is discovered, one has to deal with the problem of determining the nature of the underlying model. A first hint is of course given by the mass spectrum and quantum numbers such as electric and colour charges of the new particles. However, there are two popular model classes, supersymmetric models and extradimensional models, which can exhibit almost equal properties at the accessible energy range. Both introduce partners to the standard model particles with the same charges and thus one needs an extended discrimination method. From the origin of these partners arises a relevant difference: The partners constructed in extradimensional models have the same spin as their standard model partners while in Supersymmetry they differ by spin 1/2. These different spins have an impact on the phenomenology of the two models. For example, one can exploit the fact that the total cross sections are affected, but this requires a very good knowledge of the couplings and masses involved. Another approach uses angular distributions depending on the particle spins. A prevailing method based on this idea uses the invariant mass distribution of the visible particles in decay chains. One can relate these distributions to the spin of the particle mediating the decay since it reflects itself in the highest power of the invariant mass s{sub ff} of the adjacent particles. In this thesis

  4. Phase transition in the Sznajd model with independence

    CERN Document Server

    Sznajd-Weron, K; Timpanaro, A M

    2011-01-01

    We propose a model of opinion dynamics which describes two major types of social influence -- conformity and independence. Conformity in our model is described by the so called outflow dynamics (known as Sznajd model). According to sociologists' suggestions, we introduce also a second type of social influence, known in social psychology as independence. Various social experiments have shown that the level of conformity depends on the society. We introduce this level as a parameter of the model and show that there is a continuous phase transition between conformity and independence.

  5. Women's Endorsement of Models of Sexual Response: Correlates and Predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Wróbel, Beata; Kowalczyk, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have investigated endorsement of female sexual response models, and no single model has been accepted as a normative description of women's sexual response. The aim of the study was to establish how women from a population-based sample endorse current theoretical models of the female sexual response--the linear models and circular model (partial and composite Basson models)--as well as predictors of endorsement. Accordingly, 174 heterosexual women aged 18-55 years were included in a cross-sectional study: 74 women diagnosed with female sexual dysfunction (FSD) based on DSM-5 criteria and 100 non-dysfunctional women. The description of sexual response models was used to divide subjects into four subgroups: linear (Masters-Johnson and Kaplan models), circular (partial Basson model), mixed (linear and circular models in similar proportions, reflective of the composite Basson model), and a different model. Women were asked to choose which of the models best described their pattern of sexual response and how frequently they engaged in each model. Results showed that 28.7% of women endorsed the linear models, 19.5% the partial Basson model, 40.8% the composite Basson model, and 10.9% a different model. Women with FSD endorsed the partial Basson model and a different model more frequently than did non-dysfunctional controls. Individuals who were dissatisfied with a partner as a lover were more likely to endorse a different model. Based on the results, we concluded that the majority of women endorsed a mixed model combining the circular response with the possibility of an innate desire triggering a linear response. Further, relationship difficulties, not FSD, predicted model endorsement.

  6. Increased orosomucoid in urine is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes at 10 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendstrup, Mathilde; Christiansen, Merete Skovdal; Magid, Erik;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether increased urinary orosomucoid excretion rate (UOER) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) and type 1 diabetes (T1DM) at 10years of follow-up....

  7. Independent Predictors of Bleeding Complications in Patients Undergoing PCI With Concomitant Treatment With Bivalirudin in Clinical Practice Results From the Improver Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koeth, Oliver; Gulba, Dietrich; Huber, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Bleeding complications are associated with an adverse outcome after a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is performed. Traditional risk factors for bleeding complications are age, gender, underweight, hypertension, and renal impairment. The aim of our study was to identify the independent...... predictors of bleeding complications in patients undergoing a PCI with concomitant treatment with bivalirudin....

  8. Functional limitations and somatic diseases are independent predictors for incident depressive disorders in seniors: Findings from a nationwide longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting; Wang, Yao-Hsien; Chiu, Hsien-Tsai; Wu, Chia-Rong; Handa, Yujiro; Liao, Yin-Lin; Hsu, Yi-Hsin Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Few nationwide comprehensive studies analyzed the factors leading to the onset of depression in correlation with medical disease and other related factors concerning geriatric depression. This study examined medical diseases with other factors which lead to depression among the elderly. This Taiwan-based longitudinal study examined a collection of 1467 seniors aged over 65. Subjects who fit this criteria were initially interviewed in 2003, and then four years later. Independent variables included baseline demographics, chronic medical illnesses, and the change of subjects' self-perceived health status, functional limitations including ADL, IADL and mobility limitation factors. The dependent variable was the symptoms of incident depression, as ascertained by the ten-item questionnaire during the later session. The logistic regression analyses were used to examine some of the predictors related to depressive disorders. The findings showed that heart conditions (adjusted OR=1.55, 95% CI: 1.12-2.15, p=0.008) and joint disorders (adjusted OR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.09-2.09, p=0.013), as well as functional limitations, particularly IADL (adjusted OR=1.81, 95% CI: 1.24-2.65, p=0.002) and ADL (adjusted OR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.27-2.47, p=0.001) were independently associated with the onset of depression among the elderly population. These findings indicated that when classifying symptoms of depression in geriatric patients with several underlying medical diseases, keen attention should be directed to the type of medical disorders and the functional deterioration in terms of daily activities and autonomic capabilities. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Stratifying empiric risk of schizophrenia among first degree relatives using multiple predictors in two independent Indian samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Triptish; Gettig, Elizabeth A; Gottesman, Irving I; Berliner, Jonathan; Mishra, N N; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L; Deshpande, Smita N

    2016-12-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) has an estimated heritability of 64-88%, with the higher values based on twin studies. Conventionally, family history of psychosis is the best individual-level predictor of risk, but reliable risk estimates are unavailable for Indian populations. Genetic, environmental, and epigenetic factors are equally important and should be considered when predicting risk in 'at risk' individuals. To estimate risk based on an Indian schizophrenia participant's family history combined with selected demographic factors. To incorporate variables in addition to family history, and to stratify risk, we constructed a regression equation that included demographic variables in addition to family history. The equation was tested in two independent Indian samples: (i) an initial sample of SZ participants (N=128) with one sibling or offspring; (ii) a second, independent sample consisting of multiply affected families (N=138 families, with two or more sibs/offspring affected with SZ). The overall estimated risk was 4.31±0.27 (mean±standard deviation). There were 19 (14.8%) individuals in the high risk group, 75 (58.6%) in the moderate risk and 34 (26.6%) in the above average risk (in Sample A). In the validation sample, risks were distributed as: high (45%), moderate (38%) and above average (17%). Consistent risk estimates were obtained from both samples using the regression equation. Familial risk can be combined with demographic factors to estimate risk for SZ in India. If replicated, the proposed stratification of risk may be easier and more realistic for family members. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Higher education is an age-independent predictor of white matter integrity and cognitive control in late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Kimberly G; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S; Grieve, Stuart M; Brickman, Adam M

    2013-09-01

    Socioeconomic status is an important predictor of cognitive development and academic achievement. Late adolescence provides a unique opportunity to study how the attainment of socioeconomic status (in the form of years of education) relates to cognitive and neural development, during a time when age-related cognitive and neural development is ongoing. During late adolescence it is possible to disambiguate age- and education-related effects on the development of these processes. Here we assessed the degree to which higher educational attainment was related to performance on a cognitive control task, controlling for age. We then used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess the degree to which white matter microstructure might mediate this relationship. When covarying age, significant associations were found between educational attainment and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and cingulum bundle (CB). Further, when covarying age, FA in these regions was associated with cognitive control. Finally, mediation analyses revealed that the age-independent association between educational attainment and cognitive control was completely accounted for by FA in these regions. The uncinate fasciculus, a late-myelinated control region not implicated in cognitive control, did not mediate this effect.

  11. Socioeconomic status is an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence among patients with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Srougi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Socioeconomic status (SES may influence cancer characteristics and behavior in several aspects. We analyzed PCa characteristics and behavior among low income uninsured men, and compare them to high income patients with health insurance in a developing country. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective case-control study was performed on 934 patients with clinically localized PCa who underwent radical prostatectomy between March, 1999 and July, 2009. Patients were divided in two groups, according to their SES. In group 1 (n=380, all had low income, low educational levels and couldn't afford medical insurance. In group 2 (n=554, all had higher income, higher education and had medical insurance. RESULTS: Patients from group 1 were older, had higher Gleason scores, higher rates of seminal vesicle and bladder neck involvement. The Kaplan Meier disease-free survival curve demonstrated that after a follow-up of four years, about 50% of uninsured patients had biochemical recurrence, versus 21% of insured patients (Log rank test: p < 0.001. A multivariate Cox regression analysis for the risk of disease recurrence demonstrated that only PSA levels, Gleason score, seminal vesicle involvement and SES were statistically significant variables. Patients with a low SES presented 1.8 times the risk of recurrence as compared to patients with a high SES. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with low SES were older, presented more aggressive PCa characteristics and a high rate of disease recurrence. A low SES constituted an independent predictor for disease recurrence.

  12. Elevated cell-free plasma DNA level as an independent predictor of mortality in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Simon, Daniel; Ikuta, Nilo; Klovan, Caroline; Dannebrock, Fernando Augusto; Oliveira de Oliveira, Carla; Regner, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in individuals less than 45 years old worldwide, and up to 50% of trauma fatalities are because of brain injury. Prediction of outcome is one of the major problems associated with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and research efforts have focused on the investigation of biomarkers with prognostic value after TBI. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether cell-free DNA concentrations correlated to short-term primary outcome (survival or death) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores after severe TBI. A total of 188 patients with severe TBI were enrolled in this prospective study; outcome variables comprised survival and neurological assessment using the GCS at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. Control blood samples were obtained from 25 healthy volunteers. Peripheral venous blood was collected at admission to the ICU. Plasma DNA was measured using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the β-globin gene. There was correlation between higher DNA levels and both fatal outcome and lower hospital admission GCS scores. Plasma DNA concentrations at the chosen cutoff point (≥171,381 kilogenomes-equivalents/L) predicted mortality with a specificity of 90% and a sensitivity of 43%. Logistic regression analysis showed that elevated plasma DNA levels were independently associated with death (pfree DNA concentration was a predictor of short-term mortality after severe TBI.

  13. Expression of group IIA phospholipase A2 is an independent predictor of favorable outcome for patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Huang, Chun-Jin; Yu, Guan-Zhen; Wang, Jie-Jun; Wang, Rui; Li, Yu-Mei; Wu, Qiong

    2013-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis in human gastrointestinal cancer. One of the well-studied isoforms of PLA2, group IIA PLA2 (PLA2G2A), appears to exert its protumorigenic or antitumorigenic effects in a tissue-specific manner. The present study was designed to determine the expression profile and prognostic value of PLA2G2A in gastric cancer in a large Chinese cohort. By using real-time polymerase chain reaction, the amount of PLA2G2A messenger RNA in 60 pairs of fresh gastric tumors and adjacent noncancerous mucosa was measured. The immunostaining of PLA2G2A in 866 gastric cancers with paired noncancerous tissues was assayed. No expression of PLA2G2A was found in normal gastric mucosa, and focal expression of PLA2G2A was noticed in intestinal metaplasia, whereas significantly increased expression of PLA2G2A was observed in the cytoplasm of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the extent of PLA2G2A expression was associated with tumor size (P gastric cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that PLA2G2A expression was an independent predictor of survival for patients with gastric cancer (P = .024). Expression of PLA2G2A seems to be protective for patients with gastric cancer (hazard ratio, 1.423; 95% confidence interval, 1.047-1.935), and it may be a target for achieving better treatment outcomes.

  14. Introducing nonlinear, multivariate 'Predictor Surfaces' for quantitative modeling of chemical systems with higher-order, coupled predictor variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Rebecca B; McConico, Morgan; Landry, Currie; Tran, Tho; Vogt, Frank

    2012-10-09

    Innovations in chemometrics are required for studies of chemical systems which are governed by nonlinear responses to chemical parameters and/or interdependencies (coupling) among these parameters. Conventional and linear multivariate models have limited use for quantitative and qualitative investigations of such systems because they are based on the assumption that the measured data are simple superpositions of several input parameters. 'Predictor Surfaces' were developed for studies of more chemically complex systems such as biological materials in order to ensure accurate quantitative analyses and proper chemical modeling for in-depth studies of such systems. Predictor Surfaces are based on approximating nonlinear multivariate model functions by multivariate Taylor expansions which inherently introduce the required coupled and higher-order predictor variables. As proof-of-principle for the Predictor Surfaces' capabilities, an application from environmental analytical chemistry was chosen. Microalgae cells are known to sensitively adapt to changes in environmental parameters such as pollution and/or nutrient availability and thus have potential as novel in situ sensors for environmental monitoring. These adaptations of the microalgae cells are reflected in their chemical signatures which were then acquired by means of FT-IR spectroscopy. In this study, the concentrations of three nutrients, namely inorganic carbon and two nitrogen containing ions, were chosen. Biological considerations predict that changes in nutrient availability produce a nonlinear response in the cells' biomass composition; it is also known that microalgae need certain nutrient mixes to thrive. The nonlinear Predictor Surfaces were demonstrated to be more accurate in predicting the values of these nutrients' concentrations than principal component regression. For qualitative chemical studies of biological systems, the Predictor Surfaces themselves are a novel tool as they visualize

  15. Left ventricular dyssynchrony assessed by gated SPECT phase analysis is an independent predictor of death in patients with advanced coronary artery disease and reduced left ventricular function not undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uebleis, Christopher; Hellweger, Stefan; Lehner, Sebastian; Haug, Alexander; Bartenstein, Peter; Cumming, Paul; Hacker, Marcus [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Laubender, Ruediger Paul [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Institute of Medical Informatics, Biometry, and Epidemiology (IBE), Munich (Germany); Becker, Alexander [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Medical Department I, Munich (Germany); Sohn, Hae-Young [Ludwig-Maximilians University, Medical Department Innenstadt, Munich (Germany); Van Kriekinge, Serge D.; Slomka, Piotr J. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); UCLA, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Left ventricular (LV) mechanical dyssynchrony (LVMD) was assessed by gated single-photon emission CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) as an independent predictor of death from any cause in patients with known coronary artery disease (CAD) and reduced LV function. Between 2001 and 2010, 135 patients (64 {+-} 11 years of age, 84 % men) with known CAD, reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF, 38 {+-} 15 %) and without an implanted cardiac resynchronization therapy device underwent gated MPI at rest. LV functional evaluation, which included phase analysis, was conducted to identify patients with LVMD. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were calculated for death of any cause during a mean follow-up of 2.0 {+-} 1.7 years. Uni- and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were calculated to identify independent predictors of death from any cause. Of the 135 patients, 30 (22 %) died during follow-up (18 cardiac deaths and 12 deaths from other causes). Kaplan-Meier curves showed a significantly shorter survival time in the patients with severely reduced LVEF (<30 %, n = 45) or with LVMD (n = 81, log-rank test P <0.005). Cox models identified LVMD, LVEF <30 % and a total perfusion deficit at rest of {>=}20 % as independent predictors of death from any cause. While patients with LVEF <30 % in conjunction with LVMD had similar survival times irrespective of whether they had early revascularization or medical therapy, those patients with LVEF {>=}30% and LVMD who underwent revascularization had significantly longer survival. In patients with known CAD and reduced LV function, dyssynchrony of the LV is an independent predictor of death from any cause. (orig.)

  16. ECOG is as independent predictor of the response to chemotherapy, overall survival and progression-free survival in carcinoma of unknown primary site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales-Álvarez, Rocío; Martin-Aguilar, Ana; Silva, Juan A.; De La Garza-Salazar, Jaime G.; Ruiz-García, Erika; López-Camarillo, César; Marchat, Laurence A.; La Vega, Horacio Astudillo-De

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether age, gender, functional status, histology, tumor location, number of metastases, and levels of the tumor markers, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and albumin, are poor prognostic factors for the response to chemotherapy in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site. A total of 149 patients diagnosed with carcinoma of unknown primary site that was histologically confirmed, and treated with chemotherapy in the Oncology Hospital, National Medical Center, ‘Century XXI’ IMSS, Mexico City, Mexico during the period between January 2002 to December 2009, were carefully selected for the present study. The analysis of 149 patients diagnosed with carcinoma of unknown primary site revealed that the liver was the organ with the highest frequency of metastases (33.5%). The objective response rates to chemotherapy were ~30.2%. Notably, ECOG was an important predictor of response to chemotherapy (P=0.008). The median progression-free survival was 7.1 months. Upon multivariate analysis, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Scale of Performance Status was observed as an independent predictor of progression (P<0.0001). The median overall survival was 14.2 months. The ECOG was also an independent predictor of mortality (P<0.0001). In conclusion, the data from the present study have demonstrated that ECOG is an independent predictor of a poor response to chemotherapy, lower overall survival and progression-free survival in carcinoma of unknown primary site. PMID:28515916

  17. The quest for conditional independence in prospectivity modeling: weights-of-evidence, boost weights-of-evidence, and logistic regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeben, Helmut; Semmler, Georg

    2016-09-01

    The objective of prospectivity modeling is prediction of the conditional probability of the presence T = 1 or absence T = 0 of a target T given favorable or prohibitive predictors B, or construction of a two classes 0,1 classification of T. A special case of logistic regression called weights-of-evidence (WofE) is geologists' favorite method of prospectivity modeling due to its apparent simplicity. However, the numerical simplicity is deceiving as it is implied by the severe mathematical modeling assumption of joint conditional independence of all predictors given the target. General weights of evidence are explicitly introduced which are as simple to estimate as conventional weights, i.e., by counting, but do not require conditional independence. Complementary to the regression view is the classification view on prospectivity modeling. Boosting is the construction of a strong classifier from a set of weak classifiers. From the regression point of view it is closely related to logistic regression. Boost weights-of-evidence (BoostWofE) was introduced into prospectivity modeling to counterbalance violations of the assumption of conditional independence even though relaxation of modeling assumptions with respect to weak classifiers was not the (initial) purpose of boosting. In the original publication of BoostWofE a fabricated dataset was used to "validate" this approach. Using the same fabricated dataset it is shown that BoostWofE cannot generally compensate lacking conditional independence whatever the consecutively processing order of predictors. Thus the alleged features of BoostWofE are disproved by way of counterexamples, while theoretical findings are confirmed that logistic regression including interaction terms can exactly compensate violations of joint conditional independence if the predictors are indicators.

  18. Stochastic kinetic models: Dynamic independence, modularity and graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Bowsher, Clive G

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic properties and independence structure of stochastic kinetic models (SKMs) are analyzed. An SKM is a highly multivariate jump process used to model chemical reaction networks, particularly those in biochemical and cellular systems. We identify SKM subprocesses with the corresponding counting processes and propose a directed, cyclic graph (the kinetic independence graph or KIG) that encodes the local independence structure of their conditional intensities. Given a partition $[A,D,B]$ of the vertices, the graphical separation $A\\perp B|D$ in the undirected KIG has an intuitive chemical interpretation and implies that $A$ is locally independent of $B$ given $A\\cup D$. It is proved that this separation also results in global independence of the internal histories of $A$ and $B$ conditional on a history of the jumps in $D$ which, under conditions we derive, corresponds to the internal history of $D$. The results enable mathematical definition of a modularization of an SKM using its implied dynamics. Gra...

  19. Evaluating predictors of dispersion: a comparison of Dominance Analysis and Bayesian Model Averaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Yiyun; Smithson, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Conventional measures of predictor importance in linear models are applicable only when the assumption of homoscedasticity is satisfied. Moreover, they cannot be adapted to evaluating predictor importance in models of heteroscedasticity (i.e., dispersion), an issue that seems not to have been systematically addressed in the literature. We compare two suitable approaches, Dominance Analysis (DA) and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA), for simultaneously evaluating predictor importance in models of location and dispersion. We apply them to the beta general linear model as a test-case, illustrating this with an example using real data. Simulations using several different model structures, sample sizes, and degrees of multicollinearity suggest that both DA and BMA largely agree on the relative importance of predictors of the mean, but differ when ranking predictors of dispersion. The main implication of these findings for researchers is that the choice between DA and BMA is most important when they wish to evaluate the importance of predictors of dispersion.

  20. Decreased Bone Mineral Density Is an Independent Predictor for the Development of Atherosclerosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyi Ye

    Full Text Available There is conflicting evidence regarding the association between decreased bone mineral density (BMD and atherosclerosis. To this end, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to clarify the association.To identify relevant studies, PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched up to November 2015. All observational and comparative studies directly investigating the relationship between decreased BMD and clinical consequences of atherosclerotic vascular abnormalities, including carotid artery calcification (CAC, cardiovascular disease (CAD, and coronary artery disease (CAD were obtained, without limitation of language or publication year.A total of 25 studies involving 10,299 patients were included. The incidence of atherosclerotic vascular abnormalities was significantly increased in low BMD patients, compared to patients with normal BMD (OR, 1.81, 95% CI [1.01, 2.19], p<0.00001. Similar results were also observed for postmenopausal women (OR, 2.23, 95% CI [1.72, 2.89], p<0.00001. Subgroup analyses of osteopenia, osteoporosis, and normal BMD also revealed that the combined ORs for the incidence of atherosclerotic vascular abnormalities increased as BMD decreased. Of note, after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI and other vascular risk factors, decreased BMD remained significantly associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic vascular abnormalities (OR, 2.96, 95% CI [2.25, 3.88], p < 0.00001.Based on the results of this study, decreased BMD is an independent predictor for the development of atherosclerosis in elderly individuals. Moreover, the risk of atherosclerotic vascular abnormalities increased as BMD decreased. Future studies focusing on individuals with different severities of atherosclerosis and comorbidities are of interest.

  1. MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression is an independent predictor of recurrence in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta von Boehmer

    Full Text Available The cancer-testis (CT family of antigens is expressed in a variety of malignant neoplasms. In most cases, no CT antigen is found in normal tissues, except in testis, making them ideal targets for cancer immunotherapy. A comprehensive analysis of CT antigen expression has not yet been reported in prostate cancer. MAGE-C2/CT-10 is a novel CT antigen. The objective of this study was to analyze extent and prognostic significance of MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression in prostate cancer. 348 prostate carcinomas from consecutive radical prostatectomies, 29 castration-refractory prostate cancer, 46 metastases, and 45 benign hyperplasias were immunohistochemically analyzed for MAGE-C2/CT10 expression using tissue microarrays. Nuclear MAGE-C2/CT10 expression was identified in only 3.3% primary prostate carcinomas. MAGE-C2/CT10 protein expression was significantly more frequent in metastatic (16.3% positivity and castration-resistant prostate cancer (17% positivity; p<0.001. Nuclear MAGE-C2/CT10 expression was identified as predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (p = 0.015, which was independent of preoperative PSA, Gleason score, tumor stage, and surgical margin status in multivariate analysis (p<0.05. MAGE-C2/CT10 expression in prostate cancer correlates with the degree of malignancy and indicates a higher risk for biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Further, the results suggest MAGE-C2/CT10 as a potential target for adjuvant and palliative immunotherapy in patients with prostate cancer.

  2. Independent predictors of poor vitamin K antagonist control in venous thromboembolism patients. Data from the EINSTEIN-DVT and PE studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Hilde A M; Gebel, Martin; Sahin, Kurtulus; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Meijer, Karina

    2015-11-25

    Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are used to prevent recurrent disease in patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Their efficacy and safety depend on individual time in therapeutic range (iTTR) and variability of International Normalised Ratios (INR). We aimed to identify independent predictors of poor VKA control > 28 days. In a prospective cohort of 3825 VTE patients, separate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of low iTTR (first quartile) and instability (iTTR median). Subsequently, the association between these predictors and clinical outcomes was investigated. Weight  28 days, which showed some similarities but did not fully overlap. Early VKA control was of additional value for prediction of both, but had to be interpreted in the context of VKA type.

  3. Genomic predictors for recurrence patterns of hepatocellular carcinoma: model derivation and validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hoon Kim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Typically observed at 2 y after surgical resection, late recurrence is a major challenge in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. We aimed to develop a genomic predictor that can identify patients at high risk for late recurrence and assess its clinical implications. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Systematic analysis of gene expression data from human liver undergoing hepatic injury and regeneration revealed a 233-gene signature that was significantly associated with late recurrence of HCC. Using this signature, we developed a prognostic predictor that can identify patients at high risk of late recurrence, and tested and validated the robustness of the predictor in patients (n = 396 who underwent surgery between 1990 and 2011 at four centers (210 recurrences during a median of 3.7 y of follow-up. In multivariate analysis, this signature was the strongest risk factor for late recurrence (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-3.7; p = 0.002. In contrast, our previously developed tumor-derived 65-gene risk score was significantly associated with early recurrence (p = 0.005 but not with late recurrence (p = 0.7. In multivariate analysis, the 65-gene risk score was the strongest risk factor for very early recurrence (<1 y after surgical resection (hazard ratio, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-2.6; p = 0.01. The potential significance of STAT3 activation in late recurrence was predicted by gene network analysis and validated later. We also developed and validated 4- and 20-gene predictors from the full 233-gene predictor. The main limitation of the study is that most of the patients in our study were hepatitis B virus-positive. Further investigations are needed to test our prediction models in patients with different etiologies of HCC, such as hepatitis C virus. CONCLUSIONS: Two independently developed predictors reflected well the differences between early and late recurrence of HCC at the molecular level and provided new

  4. Bayesian modeling of measurement error in predictor variables using item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Jean-Paul; Glas, Cees A.W.

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that measurement error in predictor variables can be modeled using item response theory (IRT). The predictor variables, that may be defined at any level of an hierarchical regression model, are treated as latent variables. The normal ogive model is used to describe the relation between t

  5. How many separable sources? Model selection in independent components analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Roger P; Hansen, Lars Kai; Strother, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Unlike mixtures consisting solely of non-Gaussian sources, mixtures including two or more Gaussian components cannot be separated using standard independent components analysis methods that are based on higher order statistics and independent observations. The mixed Independent Components Analysis/Principal Components Analysis (mixed ICA/PCA) model described here accommodates one or more Gaussian components in the independent components analysis model and uses principal components analysis to characterize contributions from this inseparable Gaussian subspace. Information theory can then be used to select from among potential model categories with differing numbers of Gaussian components. Based on simulation studies, the assumptions and approximations underlying the Akaike Information Criterion do not hold in this setting, even with a very large number of observations. Cross-validation is a suitable, though computationally intensive alternative for model selection. Application of the algorithm is illustrated using Fisher's iris data set and Howells' craniometric data set. Mixed ICA/PCA is of potential interest in any field of scientific investigation where the authenticity of blindly separated non-Gaussian sources might otherwise be questionable. Failure of the Akaike Information Criterion in model selection also has relevance in traditional independent components analysis where all sources are assumed non-Gaussian.

  6. Impact of correlation of predictors on discrimination of risk models in development and external populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Suman; Mazumdar, Madhu; Ferket, Bart

    2017-04-19

    The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of risk models is known to be influenced by differences in case-mix and effect size of predictors. The impact of heterogeneity in correlation among predictors has however been under investigated. We sought to evaluate how correlation among predictors affects the AUC in development and external populations. We simulated hypothetical populations using two different methods based on means, standard deviations, and correlation of two continuous predictors. In the first approach, the distribution and correlation of predictors were assumed for the total population. In the second approach, these parameters were modeled conditional on disease status. In both approaches, multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to predict disease risk in individuals. Each risk model developed in a population was validated in the remaining populations to investigate external validity. For both approaches, we observed that the magnitude of the AUC in the development and external populations depends on the correlation among predictors. Lower AUCs were estimated in scenarios of both strong positive and negative correlation, depending on the direction of predictor effects and the simulation method. However, when adjusted effect sizes of predictors were specified in the opposite directions, increasingly negative correlation consistently improved the AUC. AUCs in external validation populations were higher or lower than in the derivation cohort, even in the presence of similar predictor effects. Discrimination of risk prediction models should be assessed in various external populations with different correlation structures to make better inferences about model generalizability.

  7. THE THICKNESS OF THE INTIMA-MEDIA — A PREDICTOR OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND INDEPENDENT RISK FACTOR FOR CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gaisenok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intima-media thickness (IMT of carotid arteries is a noninvasive marker of changes in the vascular wall, easily determined by means of duplex scanning of carotid arteries. The article deals with the data of international studies, confirming the importance of IMT as a predictor of coronary heart disease and to identify independent risk factor for cardiovascular events.

  8. THE THICKNESS OF THE INTIMA-MEDIA — A PREDICTOR OF CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND INDEPENDENT RISK FACTOR FOR CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gaisenok

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intima-media thickness (IMT of carotid arteries is a noninvasive marker of changes in the vascular wall, easily determined by means of duplex scanning of carotid arteries. The article deals with the data of international studies, confirming the importance of IMT as a predictor of coronary heart disease and to identify independent risk factor for cardiovascular events.

  9. Application of Interval Predictor Models to Space Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy,Daniel P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops techniques for predicting the uncertainty range of an output variable given input-output data. These models are called Interval Predictor Models (IPM) because they yield an interval valued function of the input. This paper develops IPMs having a radial basis structure. This structure enables the formal description of (i) the uncertainty in the models parameters, (ii) the predicted output interval, and (iii) the probability that a future observation would fall in such an interval. In contrast to other metamodeling techniques, this probabilistic certi cate of correctness does not require making any assumptions on the structure of the mechanism from which data are drawn. Optimization-based strategies for calculating IPMs having minimal spread while containing all the data are developed. Constraints for bounding the minimum interval spread over the continuum of inputs, regulating the IPMs variation/oscillation, and centering its spread about a target point, are used to prevent data over tting. Furthermore, we develop an approach for using expert opinion during extrapolation. This metamodeling technique is illustrated using a radiation shielding application for space exploration. In this application, we use IPMs to describe the error incurred in predicting the ux of particles resulting from the interaction between a high-energy incident beam and a target.

  10. Phase transition in kinetic exchange opinion models with independence

    CERN Document Server

    Crokidakis, Nuno

    2014-01-01

    In this work we study the critical behavior of a three-state ($+1$, $-1$, $0$) opinion model with independence. Each agent has a probability $q$ to act as independent, i.e., he/she can choose his/her opinion independently of the opinions of the other agents. On the other hand, with the complementary probability $1-q$ the agent interacts with a randomly chosen individual through a kinetic exchange. Our analytical and numerical results show that the independence mechanism acts as a noise that induce an order-disorder transition at critical points $q_{c}$ that depend on the individuals' flexibility. For a special value of this flexibility the system undergoes a transition to an absorbing state with all opinions $0$.

  11. Model-independent inference on compact-binary observations

    OpenAIRE

    Mandel, Ilya; Farr, Will M.; Colonna, Andrea; Stevenson, Simon; Tiňo, Peter; Veitch, John

    2016-01-01

    The recent advanced LIGO detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes enhance the prospect of exploring binary evolution via gravitational-wave observations of a population of compact-object binaries. In the face of uncertainty about binary formation models, model-independent inference provides an appealing alternative to comparisons between observed and modelled populations. We describe a procedure for clustering in the multi-dimensional parameter space of observations t...

  12. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Is an Independent Predictor for In-Hospital Mortality in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giede-Jeppe, Antje; Bobinger, Tobias; Gerner, Stefan T; Sembill, Jochen A; Sprügel, Maximilian I; Beuscher, Vanessa D; Lücking, Hannes; Hoelter, Philip; Kuramatsu, Joji B; Huttner, Hagen B

    2017-01-01

    Stroke-associated immunosuppression and inflammation are increasingly recognized as factors that trigger infections and thus, potentially influence the outcome after stroke. Several studies demonstrated that elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a significant predictor of adverse outcomes in patients with ischemic stroke. However, little is known about the impact of NLR on short-term mortality in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This observational study included 855 consecutive ICH-patients. Patient demographics, clinical, laboratory, and in-hospital measures as well as neuroradiological data were retrieved from institutional databases. Functional 3-months-outcome was assessed and categorized as favorable (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] 0-3) and unfavorable (mRS 4-6). We (i) studied the natural course of NLR in ICH, (ii) analyzed parameters associated with NLR on admission (NLROA), and (iii) evaluated the clinical impact of NLR on mortality and functional outcome. The median NLROA of the entire cohort was 4.66 and it remained stable during the entire hospital stay. Patients with NLR ≥4.66 showed significant associations with poorer neurological status (National Institute of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS] 18 [9-32] vs. 10 [4-21]; p 2.606 - presented with a better clinical status (NIHSS 12 [5-21] vs. 15 [6-28]; p = 0.005), lower hematoma volumes on admission (10.6 [3.6-30.1] vs. 15.1 [5.7-42.3] mL; p = 0.004) and showed a better functional outcome (3 months mRS 0-3: 82/214 [38.3%] vs. 185/641 [28.9%]; p = 0.009). Patients associated with high NLR (≥8.508 = above 75th-percentile) showed the worst neurological status on admission (NIHSS 21 [12-32] vs. 12 [5-23]; p < 0.001), larger hematoma volumes (21.0 [8.6-48.8] vs. 12.2 [4.1-34.9] mL; p < 0.001), and higher proportions of unfavorable functional outcome at 3 months (mRS 4-6: 173/214 vs. 418/641; p < 0.001). Further, NLR was linked to more frequently occurring infectious complications (pneumonia 107/214 vs

  13. Model Independent Form Factors for Spin Independent Neutralino-Nucleon Scattering from Elastic Electron Scattering Data

    CERN Document Server

    Duda, G; Kemper, A; Duda, Gintaras; Gondolo, Paolo; Kemper, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of neutralino cross sections with various nuclei are of great interest to direct dark matter searches such as CDMS, EDELWEISS, ZEPLIN, and other experiments. These cross sections and direct detection rates are generally computed with standard, one or two parameter model-dependent nuclear form factors, which may not exactly mirror the actual form factor for the particular nucleus in question. As is well known, elastic electron scattering can allow for very precise determinations of nuclear form factors and hence nuclear charge densities for spherical or near-spherical nuclei. We use charge densities derived from elastic electron scattering data to calculate model independent form factors for various target nuclei important in dark matter searches, such as Si, Ge, S, Ca and others. We have found that for nuclear recoils in the range of 1-100 keV significant differences in cross sections and rates exist when the model independent form factors are used. DarkSUSY, a publicly-available adva...

  14. Severe right ventricular dysfunction is an independent predictor of pre- and post-transplant mortality among candidates for heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravis, Eleonore; Theron, Alexis; Mancini, Julien; Jaussaud, Nicolas; Morera, Pierre; Chalvignac, Virginie; Guidon, Catherine; Grisoli, Dominique; Gariboldi, Vlad; Riberi, Alberto; Habib, Gilbert; Mouly-Bandini, Annick; Collart, Frederic

    2017-03-01

    Heart transplantation is the gold-standard treatment for end-stage heart failure. However, the shortage of grafts has led to longer waiting times and increased mortality for candidates without priority. To study waiting-list and post-transplant mortality, and their risk factors among patients registered for heart transplantation without initial high emergency procedure. All patients registered on the heart transplantation waiting list (2004-2015) without initial high emergency procedure were included. Clinical, biological, echocardiographic and haemodynamic data were collected. Waiting list and 1-year post-transplant survival were analysed with a Kaplan-Meier model. Of 221 patients enrolled, 168 (76.0%) were men. Mean age was 50.0±12.0 years. Forty-seven patients died on the waiting list, resulting in mortality rates of 11.2±2.7% at 1 year, 31.9±5.4% at 2 years and 49.4±7.1% at 3 years. Median survival was 36.0±4.6 months. In the multivariable analysis, left ventricular ejection fractionright ventricular systolic dysfunction (HR: 2.89, 95% CI: 1.41-5.92; P=0.004) were associated with increased waiting-list mortality. The post-transplant survival rate was 73.1±4.4% at 1 year. Pretransplant severe right ventricular dysfunction and age>50 years were strong predictors of death after transplantation (HR: 5.38, 95% CI: 1.38-10.24 [P=0.020] and HR: 6.16, 95% CI: 1.62-9.32 [P=0.0130], respectively). Mortality among candidates for heart transplantation remains high. Patients at highest risk of waiting-list mortality have to be promoted, but without compromising post-transplant outcomes. For this reason, candidates with severe right ventricular dysfunction are of concern, because, for them, transplantation is hazardous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Lightweight Graphical Models for Selectivity Estimation Without Independence Assumptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzoumas, Kostas; Deshpande, Amol; Jensen, Christian S.

    2011-01-01

    ’s optimizers are frequently caused by missed correlations between attributes. We present a selectivity estimation approach that does not make the independence assumptions. By carefully using concepts from the field of graphical models, we are able to factor the joint probability distribution of all...

  16. Model Independent Naturalness Bounds on Magnetic Moments of Majorana Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Bell, Nicole F.; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.; Vogel, Petr; Wang, Peng

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the implications of neutrino masses for the magnitude of neutrino magnetic moments. By considering electroweak radiative corrections to the neutrino mass, we derive model-independent naturalness upper bounds on neutrino magnetic moments, generated by physics above the electroweak scale. For Majorana neutrinos, these bounds are weaker than present experimental limits if $\\mu_\

  17. Joint Bayesian variable and graph selection for regression models with network-structured predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christine B; Stingo, Francesco C; Vannucci, Marina

    2016-03-30

    In this work, we develop a Bayesian approach to perform selection of predictors that are linked within a network. We achieve this by combining a sparse regression model relating the predictors to a response variable with a graphical model describing conditional dependencies among the predictors. The proposed method is well-suited for genomic applications because it allows the identification of pathways of functionally related genes or proteins that impact an outcome of interest. In contrast to previous approaches for network-guided variable selection, we infer the network among predictors using a Gaussian graphical model and do not assume that network information is available a priori. We demonstrate that our method outperforms existing methods in identifying network-structured predictors in simulation settings and illustrate our proposed model with an application to inference of proteins relevant to glioblastoma survival.

  18. STOCHASTIC KINETIC MODELS: DYNAMIC INDEPENDENCE, MODULARITY AND GRAPHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowsher, Clive G

    2010-08-01

    The dynamic properties and independence structure of stochastic kinetic models (SKMs) are analyzed. An SKM is a highly multivariate jump process used to model chemical reaction networks, particularly those in biochemical and cellular systems. We identify SKM subprocesses with the corresponding counting processes and propose a directed, cyclic graph (the kinetic independence graph or KIG) that encodes the local independence structure of their conditional intensities. Given a partition [A, D, B] of the vertices, the graphical separation A ⊥ B|D in the undirected KIG has an intuitive chemical interpretation and implies that A is locally independent of B given A ∪ D. It is proved that this separation also results in global independence of the internal histories of A and B conditional on a history of the jumps in D which, under conditions we derive, corresponds to the internal history of D. The results enable mathematical definition of a modularization of an SKM using its implied dynamics. Graphical decomposition methods are developed for the identification and efficient computation of nested modularizations. Application to an SKM of the red blood cell advances understanding of this biochemical system.

  19. A Model Independent Approach to (p)Reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Özsoy, Ogan; Sinha, Kuver; Watson, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In this note we propose a model independent framework for inflationary (p)reheating. Our approach is analogous to the Effective Field Theory of Inflation, however here the inflaton oscillations provide an additional source of (discrete) symmetry breaking. Using the Goldstone field that non-linearly realizes time diffeormorphism invariance we construct a model independent action for both the inflaton and reheating sectors. Utilizing the hierarchy of scales present during the reheating process we are able to recover known results in the literature in a simpler fashion, including the presence of oscillations in the primordial power spectrum. We also construct a class of models where the shift symmetry of the inflaton is preserved during reheating, which helps alleviate past criticisms of (p)reheating in models of Natural Inflation. Extensions of our framework suggest the possibility of analytically investigating non-linear effects (such as rescattering and back-reaction) during thermalization without resorting t...

  20. Model independent control of lightly damped noise/vibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing

    2008-07-01

    Feedforward control is a popular strategy of active noise/vibration control. In well-damped noise/vibration systems, path transfer functions from actuators to sensors can be modeled by finite impulse response (FIR) filters with negligible errors. It is possible to implement noninvasive model independent feedforward control by a recently proposed method called orthogonal adaptation. In lightly damped noise/vibration systems, however, path transfer functions have infinite impulse responses (IIRs) that cause difficulties in design and implementation of broadband feedforward controllers. A major source of difficulties is model error if IIR path transfer functions are approximated by FIR filters. In general, active control performance deteriorates as model error increases. In this study, a new method is proposed to design and implement model independent feedforward controllers for broadband in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. It is shown analytically that the proposed method is able to drive the convergence of a noninvasive model independent feedforward controller to improve broadband control in lightly damped noise/vibration systems. The controller is optimized in the minimum H2 norm sense. Experiment results are presented to verify the analytical results.

  1. Higher Education Is an Age-Independent Predictor of White Matter Integrity and Cognitive Control in Late Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Kimberly G.; Korgaonkar, Mayuresh S.; Grieve, Stuart M.; Brickman, Adam M.

    2013-01-01

    Socioeconomic status is an important predictor of cognitive development and academic achievement. Late adolescence provides a unique opportunity to study how the attainment of socioeconomic status (in the form of years of education) relates to cognitive and neural development, during a time when age-related cognitive and neural development is…

  2. Investigating the Performance of Alternate Regression Weights by Studying All Possible Criteria in Regression Models with a Fixed Set of Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Niels; Jones, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    We describe methods for assessing all possible criteria (i.e., dependent variables) and subsets of criteria for regression models with a fixed set of predictors, x (where x is an n x 1 vector of independent variables). Our methods build upon the geometry of regression coefficients (hereafter called regression weights) in n-dimensional space. For a…

  3. Bayesian modeling of measurement error in predictor variables using item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Gerardus J.A.; Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on handling measurement error in predictor variables using item response theory (IRT). Measurement error is of great important in assessment of theoretical constructs, such as intelligence or the school climate. Measurement error is modeled by treating the predictors as unobserved

  4. Bayesian modeling of measurement error in predictor variables using item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Jean-Paul; Glas, Cees A.W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on handling measurement error in predictor variables using item response theory (IRT). Measurement error is of great important in assessment of theoretical constructs, such as intelligence or the school climate. Measurement error is modeled by treating the predictors as unobserved

  5. Data-Model Relationship in Text-Independent Speaker Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stapert Robert

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Text-independent speaker recognition systems such as those based on Gaussian mixture models (GMMs do not include time sequence information (TSI within the model itself. The level of importance of TSI in speaker recognition is an interesting question and one addressed in this paper. Recent works has shown that the utilisation of higher-level information such as idiolect, pronunciation, and prosodics can be useful in reducing speaker recognition error rates. In accordance with these developments, the aim of this paper is to show that as more data becomes available, the basic GMM can be enhanced by utilising TSI, even in a text-independent mode. This paper presents experimental work incorporating TSI into the conventional GMM. The resulting system, known as the segmental mixture model (SMM, embeds dynamic time warping (DTW into a GMM framework. Results are presented on the 2000-speaker SpeechDat Welsh database which show improved speaker recognition performance with the SMM.

  6. Serum uric acid and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are independent predictors of coronary artery disease in Asian Indian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayashankar, C A; Andrews, Henley Punnen; Vijayasarathi; Pinnelli, Venkata BharatKumar; Shashidharan, Basappaji; Nithin Kumar, H N; Vemulapalli, Swaapnika

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify the predictors of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM). About fifty Asian Indian patients with type 2 DM patients aged >40 years and fifty sex- and age-matched nondiabetic controls were enrolled for this study. Following complete medical history and baseline clinical data, laboratory investigations were performed to assess fasting and postprandial plasma glucose levels, lipid profile, blood urea, serum creatinine, and serum uric acid levels. Body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio, serum uric acid, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, very LDL cholesterol were significantly higher among diabetic patients compared to controls. On univariate analysis, serum LDL cholesterol (odds ratio [OR]: 29.67, P lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (OR: 21.12, P diabetes (OR: 4.65, P = 0.03) were identified as predictors of CVD among diabetic patients. On multivariate regression, only LDL cholesterol (OR: 1.51, P = 0.002) and serum uric acid (OR: 1.21, P = 0.01) were the independent predictors of CAD among diabetic patients. Significant positive correlation of serum uric acid with duration of diabetes (r = 0.38, P = 0.006), BMI (r = 0.35, P = 0.01), triglycerides (r = 0.356, P = 0.01), LDL cholesterol (r = 0.38, P = 0.007), HDL cholesterol (r = -0.514, P < 0.001), and hypertension (r = 0.524, P < 0.001) was observed. Serum LDL cholesterol and hyperuricemia may serve as independent predictors of CAD among Asian Indian subjects with type 2 DM.

  7. Model independent constraints on mass-varying neutrino scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Franca, Urbano; Lesgourgues, Julien; Pastor, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Models of dark energy in which neutrinos interact with the scalar field supposed to be responsible for the acceleration of the universe usually imply a variation of the neutrino masses on cosmological time scales. In this work we propose a parameterization for the neutrino mass variation that captures the essentials of those scenarios and allows to constrain them in a model independent way, that is, without resorting to any particular scalar field model. Using WMAP 5yr data combined with the matter power spectrum of SDSS and 2dFGRS, the limit on the present value of the neutrino mass is $m_0 \\equiv m_{\

  8. Online Statistical Modeling (Regression Analysis) for Independent Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Made Tirta, I.; Anggraeni, Dian; Pandutama, Martinus

    2017-06-01

    Regression analysis (statistical analmodelling) are among statistical methods which are frequently needed in analyzing quantitative data, especially to model relationship between response and explanatory variables. Nowadays, statistical models have been developed into various directions to model various type and complex relationship of data. Rich varieties of advanced and recent statistical modelling are mostly available on open source software (one of them is R). However, these advanced statistical modelling, are not very friendly to novice R users, since they are based on programming script or command line interface. Our research aims to developed web interface (based on R and shiny), so that most recent and advanced statistical modelling are readily available, accessible and applicable on web. We have previously made interface in the form of e-tutorial for several modern and advanced statistical modelling on R especially for independent responses (including linear models/LM, generalized linier models/GLM, generalized additive model/GAM and generalized additive model for location scale and shape/GAMLSS). In this research we unified them in the form of data analysis, including model using Computer Intensive Statistics (Bootstrap and Markov Chain Monte Carlo/ MCMC). All are readily accessible on our online Virtual Statistics Laboratory. The web (interface) make the statistical modeling becomes easier to apply and easier to compare them in order to find the most appropriate model for the data.

  9. Predictors of Discharge Disposition in Older Adults With Burns: A Study of the Burn Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tam N; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Martinez, Erin; Lezotte, Dennis; Rietschel, Carly; Holavanahalli, Radha; Kowalske, Karen; Esselman, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Older patients with burn injury have a greater likelihood for discharge to nursing facilities. Recent research indicates that older patients discharged to nursing facilities are two to three times as likely to die within a 3-year period relative to those discharged to home. In light of these poor long-term outcomes, we conducted this study to identify predictors for discharge to independent vs nonindependent living status in older patients hospitalized for burns. We retrospectively reviewed all older adults (age ≥ 55 years) who were prospectively enrolled in a longitudinal multicenter study of outcomes from 1993 to 2011. Patient, injury, and treatment outcomes data were analyzed. Recognizing that transfer to inpatient rehabilitation may have impacted final hospital discharge disposition: we assessed the likelihood of inpatient rehabilitation stay, based on identified predictors of inpatient rehabilitation. We subsequently performed a logistic regression analysis on the clustered, propensity-matched cohort to assess associations of burn and injury characteristics on the primary outcome of final discharge status. A total of 591 patients aged ≥55 years were treated and discharged alive from three participating U.S. burn centers during the study period. Mean burn size was 14.8% (SD 11.2%) and mean age was 66.7 years (SD 9.3 years). Ninety-three patients had an inpatient rehabilitation stay before discharge (15.7%). Significant factors predictive of inpatient rehabilitation included a burn >20% TBSA, mechanical ventilation, older age, range of motion deficits at acute care discharge, and study site. These factors were included in the propensity model. Four hundred seventy-one patients (80%) were discharged to independent living status. By matched propensity analysis, older age was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of discharge to nonindependent living (P patient factors. Furthermore, clinical practice variations among the three study sites also

  10. The model-independent analysis for Higgs boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M D NAIMUDDIN; SHIVALI MALHOTRA

    2016-09-01

    The discovery of a 125 GeV particle, announced by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations on July 04, 2012, is one of the most important events in the recent history of particle physics. This particle could be the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics or it could be the beginning of the long list of particles predicted by the physics beyond the Standard Model. Before we jump to make the final conclusion about this particle, it is imperative to study all the properties of this newly discovered particle. Since the model-dependentanalyses always have this danger of being biased, we can perform a model-independent search for the Higgs boson and also check if the 125 GeV particle is indeed the Standard Model Higgs boson or a particle belonging to the physics beyond the Standard Model.

  11. Predictors of adherence to physical activity in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders pilot study (LIFE-P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Jack Rejeski

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available W Jack Rejeski1, Michael E Miller2, Abby C King3, Stephanie A Studenski4, Jeffrey A Katula1, Roger A Fielding5, Nancy W Glynn4, Michael P Walkup2, Jamile A Ashmore6, For the LIFE Investigators (20061Department of Health and Exercise Science, Wake Forest University; 2Department of Biostatistics, Wake Forest University; 3Stanford University; 4University of Pittsburgh; 5Tuffs University; 6Cooper Institute Objectives: A prospective design was used to examine predictors of adherence to a physical activity intervention in older adults with compromised function.Methods: The sample included 213 men (31.1% and women (68.9% with an average age of 76.53 years.Results: The predictor variables accounted for 10% of the variance in percent attendance during adoption and transition, respectively. Adding percent attendance during adoption to the prediction of percent attendance during transition increased the explained variance in this phase to 21%. During maintenance, the predictors accounted for 13% of the variance in frequency of physical activity; this estimate increased to 46% when adding in percent attendance from the transition phase.Discussion: These results are encouraging in that the physical activity intervention appears to have been well tolerated by diverse subgroups of older adults. The role of prior behavior in predicting downstream adherence underscores the importance of developing proactive interventions for treating nonadherence in older adult populations.Keywords: Disability, Physical Activity, Older Adults, Adherence

  12. Model-independent confirmation of the $Z(4430)^-$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The decay $B^0\\to \\psi(2S) K^+\\pi^-$ is analyzed using $\\rm 3~fb^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data collected with the LHCb detector. A model-independent description of the $\\psi(2S) \\pi$ mass spectrum is obtained, using as input the $K\\pi$ mass spectrum and angular distribution derived directly from data, without requiring a theoretical description of resonance shapes or their interference. The hypothesis that the $\\psi(2S)\\pi$ mass spectrum can be described in terms of $K\\pi$ reflections alone is rejected with more than 8$\\sigma$ significance. This provides confirmation, in a model-independent way, of the need for an additional resonant component in the mass region of the $Z(4430)^-$ exotic state.

  13. A new interface element for connecting independently modeled substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Jonathan B.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1993-01-01

    A new interface element based on the hybrid variational formulation is presented and demonstrated. The element provides a means of connecting independently modeled substructures whose nodes along the common boundary need not be coincident. The interface element extends previous work to include connecting an arbitrary number of substructures, the use of closed and generally curved interfaces, and the use of multiple, possibly nested, interfaces. Several applications of the element are presented and aspects of the implementation are discussed.

  14. Predictor characteristics necessary for building a clinically useful risk prediction model: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Schummers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compelled by the intuitive appeal of predicting each individual patient’s risk of an outcome, there is a growing interest in risk prediction models. While the statistical methods used to build prediction models are increasingly well understood, the literature offers little insight to researchers seeking to gauge a priori whether a prediction model is likely to perform well for their particular research question. The objective of this study was to inform the development of new risk prediction models by evaluating model performance under a wide range of predictor characteristics. Methods Data from all births to overweight or obese women in British Columbia, Canada from 2004 to 2012 (n = 75,225 were used to build a risk prediction model for preeclampsia. The data were then augmented with simulated predictors of the outcome with pre-set prevalence values and univariable odds ratios. We built 120 risk prediction models that included known demographic and clinical predictors, and one, three, or five of the simulated variables. Finally, we evaluated standard model performance criteria (discrimination, risk stratification capacity, calibration, and Nagelkerke’s r2 for each model. Results Findings from our models built with simulated predictors demonstrated the predictor characteristics required for a risk prediction model to adequately discriminate cases from non-cases and to adequately classify patients into clinically distinct risk groups. Several predictor characteristics can yield well performing risk prediction models; however, these characteristics are not typical of predictor-outcome relationships in many population-based or clinical data sets. Novel predictors must be both strongly associated with the outcome and prevalent in the population to be useful for clinical prediction modeling (e.g., one predictor with prevalence ≥20 % and odds ratio ≥8, or 3 predictors with prevalence ≥10 % and odds ratios ≥4. Area

  15. Type D personality and depressive symptoms are independent predictors of impaired health status in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Angélique A; Pedersen, Susanne S.; Widdershoven, Jos W;

    2008-01-01

    To examine whether Type D personality exerts a stable, independent effect on health status in CHF over time, adjusted for depressive symptoms.......To examine whether Type D personality exerts a stable, independent effect on health status in CHF over time, adjusted for depressive symptoms....

  16. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  17. Modelling Central Bank Independence and Inflation: Deus Ex Machina?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumiter Florin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Central bank independence represents the core element of assessing the complex relationship between government and central bank, having at background the fundamental issue of a free monetary policy decision-making process from the hands of the political circle. However, central bank independence is a multilevel concept within some social, economic and behavioral implications both for the central banks and for the society at whole. Central bank independence is needed in order to establish an autonomous central bank with a high degree of freedom in choosing its’ instruments, objectives, techniques and tactics. Moreover, a high degree of transparency for the public disclosure and monitoring of central bank operation and transaction is needed for the social barometer of the central bank. Consequently the central bank must have a high degree of accountability and responsibility vis - á - vis of the most democratic institution, i.e. Parliament. In this article it is presented a comprehensive study regarding the complex relationship between central bank independence and inflation by modeling these two monetary policy panacea, in order to make a fine tuning regarding the causal relationship established in a heterodox manner.

  18. The independent spreaders involved SIR Rumor model in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhen; Tang, Shaoting; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies of rumor or information diffusion process in complex networks show that in contrast to traditional comprehension, individuals who participate in rumor spreading within one network do not always get the rumor from their neighbors. They can obtain the rumor from different sources like online social networks and then publish it on their personal sites. In our paper, we discuss this phenomenon in complex networks by adopting the concept of independent spreaders. Rather than getting the rumor from neighbors, independent spreaders learn it from other channels. We further develop the classic "ignorant-spreaders-stiflers" or SIR model of rumor diffusion process in complex networks. A steady-state analysis is conducted to investigate the final spectrum of the rumor spreading under various spreading rate, stifling rate, density of independent spreaders and average degree of the network. Results show that independent spreaders effectively enhance the rumor diffusion process, by delivering the rumor to regions far away from the current rumor infected regions. And though the rumor spreading process in SF networks is faster than that in ER networks, the final size of rumor spreading in ER networks is larger than that in SF networks.

  19. On background-independent renormalization of spin foam models

    CERN Document Server

    Bahr, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    In this article we discuss an implementation of renormalization group ideas to spin foam models, where there is no a priori length scale with which to define the flow. In the context of the continuum limit of these models, we show how the notion of cylindrical consistency of path integral measures gives a natural analogue of Wilson's RG flow equations for background-independent systems. We discuss the conditions for the continuum measures to be diffeomorphism-invariant, and consider both exact and approximate examples.

  20. RS-predictor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaretzki, Jed; Bergeron, Charles; Rydberg, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    This article describes RegioSelectivity-Predictor (RS-Predictor), a new in silico method for generating predictive models of P450-mediated metabolism for drug-like compounds. Within this method, potential sites of metabolism (SOMs) are represented as "metabolophores": A concept that describes...... vector that encodes regioselectivity trends across all cases in a training set. The resulting pathway-independent (O-dealkylation vs N-oxidation vs Csp(3) hydroxylation, etc.), isozyme-specific regioselectivity model may be used to predict potential metabolic liabilities. In the present work, cross...

  1. Exploratory regression analysis: a tool for selecting models and determining predictor importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Michael T; Oswald, Frederick L

    2011-06-01

    Linear regression analysis is one of the most important tools in a researcher's toolbox for creating and testing predictive models. Although linear regression analysis indicates how strongly a set of predictor variables, taken together, will predict a relevant criterion (i.e., the multiple R), the analysis cannot indicate which predictors are the most important. Although there is no definitive or unambiguous method for establishing predictor variable importance, there are several accepted methods. This article reviews those methods for establishing predictor importance and provides a program (in Excel) for implementing them (available for direct download at http://dl.dropbox.com/u/2480715/ERA.xlsm?dl=1) . The program investigates all 2(p) - 1 submodels and produces several indices of predictor importance. This exploratory approach to linear regression, similar to other exploratory data analysis techniques, has the potential to yield both theoretical and practical benefits.

  2. Modelling hierarchical and modular complex networks: division and independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D.-H.; Rodgers, G. J.; Kahng, B.; Kim, D.

    2005-06-01

    We introduce a growing network model which generates both modular and hierarchical structure in a self-organized way. To this end, we modify the Barabási-Albert model into the one evolving under the principles of division and independence as well as growth and preferential attachment (PA). A newly added vertex chooses one of the modules composed of existing vertices, and attaches edges to vertices belonging to that module following the PA rule. When the module size reaches a proper size, the module is divided into two, and a new module is created. The karate club network studied by Zachary is a simple version of the current model. We find that the model can reproduce both modular and hierarchical properties, characterized by the hierarchical clustering function of a vertex with degree k, C(k), being in good agreement with empirical measurements for real-world networks.

  3. Secret Key Generation for a Pairwise Independent Network Model

    CERN Document Server

    Nitinawarat, Sirin; Barg, Alexander; Narayan, Prakash; Reznik, Alex

    2010-01-01

    We consider secret key generation for a "pairwise independent network" model in which every pair of terminals observes correlated sources that are independent of sources observed by all other pairs of terminals. The terminals are then allowed to communicate publicly with all such communication being observed by all the terminals. The objective is to generate a secret key shared by a given subset of terminals at the largest rate possible, with the cooperation of any remaining terminals. Secrecy is required from an eavesdropper that has access to the public interterminal communication. A (single-letter) formula for secret key capacity brings out a natural connection between the problem of secret key generation and a combinatorial problem of maximal packing of Steiner trees in an associated multigraph. An explicit algorithm is proposed for secret key generation based on a maximal packing of Steiner trees in a multigraph; the corresponding maximum rate of Steiner tree packing is thus a lower bound for the secret ...

  4. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foda, O., E-mail: omar.foda@unimelb.edu.au [Dept. of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wheeler, M., E-mail: mwheeler@lpthe.jussieu.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique et Hautes Energies, CNRS UMR 7589 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie – Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2013-06-11

    We study lattice configurations related to S{sub n}, the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A{sub n} integrable vertex models, n∈{1,2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A{sub n} models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S{sub 2} (Caetano and Vieira, 2012, [1], Wheeler, (arXiv:1204.2089), [2]). Namely, 1.S{sub 2}, which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, {b_1} and {b_2}, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit {b_1}→∞, and/or {b_2}→∞, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the latter determinants is an A{sub 1} vertex-model partition function.

  5. Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ping LI; Mohetaboer MOMIN; Yong HUO; Chun-yan WANG; Yan ZHANG; Yan-jun GONG; Zhao-ping LIU; Xin-gang WANG; Bo ZHENG

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between renal function and clinical outcomes among patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (ASTEMI),who were treated with emergency percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).Methods:420 patients hospitalized in Peking University First Hospital,diagnosed with ASTEMI treated with emergency (PCI) from January 2001 to June 2011 were enrolled in this study.Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was used as a measure of renal function.We compared the clinical parameters and outcomes between ASTEMI patients combined renal insufficiency and the patients with normal renal function.Results:There was a significant increase in the concentrations of fibrinogen and D-Dimer (P<0.05) and a much higher morbidity of diabetes mellitus in the group of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD; eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) (P<0.01).CKD (eGFR<60 ml/(min·1.73 m2)) was an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI receiving PCI therapy rapidly (P=0.032,odds ratio (OR) 4.159,95% confidence interval (CI) 1.127-15.346).Conclusions:Renal insufficiency is an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality for patients hospitalized with ASTEMI treated with primary PCI.

  6. Model-independent inference on compact-binary observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Ilya; Farr, Will M.; Colonna, Andrea; Stevenson, Simon; Tiňo, Peter; Veitch, John

    2017-03-01

    The recent advanced LIGO detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes enhance the prospect of exploring binary evolution via gravitational-wave observations of a population of compact-object binaries. In the face of uncertainty about binary formation models, model-independent inference provides an appealing alternative to comparisons between observed and modelled populations. We describe a procedure for clustering in the multidimensional parameter space of observations that are subject to significant measurement errors. We apply this procedure to a mock data set of population-synthesis predictions for the masses of merging compact binaries convolved with realistic measurement uncertainties, and demonstrate that we can accurately distinguish subpopulations of binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and mixed neutron star-black hole binaries with tens of observations.

  7. Value of the distant future: Model-independent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows that the model-independent account of correlations in an interest rate process or a log-consumption growth process leads to declining long-term tails of discount curves. Under the assumption of an exponentially decaying memory in fluctuations of risk-free real interest rates, I derive the analytical expression for an apt value of the long run discount factor and provide a detailed comparison of the obtained result with the outcome of the benchmark risk-free interest rate models. Utilizing the standard consumption-based model with an isoelastic power utility of the representative economic agent, I derive the non-Markovian generalization of the Ramsey discounting formula. Obtained analytical results allowing simple calibration, may augment the rigorous cost-benefit and regulatory impact analysis of long-term environmental and infrastructure projects.

  8. Model-independent inference on compact-binary observations

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Ilya; Colonna, Andrea; Stevenson, Simon; Tiňo, Peter; Veitch, John

    2016-01-01

    The recent advanced LIGO detections of gravitational waves from merging binary black holes enhance the prospect of exploring binary evolution via gravitational-wave observations of a population of compact-object binaries. In the face of uncertainty about binary formation models, model-independent inference provides an appealing alternative to comparisons between observed and modelled populations. We describe a procedure for clustering in the multi-dimensional parameter space of observations that are subject to significant measurement errors. We apply this procedure to a mock data set of population-synthesis predictions for the masses of merging compact binaries convolved with realistic measurement uncertainties, and demonstrate that we can accurately distinguish subpopulations of binary neutron stars, binary black holes, and mixed black hole -- neutron star binaries.

  9. Empowerment of Mustaḥiq Zakat Model Towards Business Independency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzah Hamzah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zakat has not been utilized intensively for the empowerment of mustaḥiq (zakat beneficiaries in the form of productive economic business. The objective of the research was to analyze the level of mustaḥiqs’ business independency; to analyze dominant factors that influenced mustaḥiqs’ business independency, and to formulate an appropriate strategy to develop the mustaḥiqs’ business independency. The research has been carried out on 254 mustaḥiqs in Bogor Regency (66 mustaḥiqs engaged in vegetable production at Cibungbulang District, 85 mustaḥiqs in skewer business at Tenjolaya District, and 103 mustaḥiqs in shoe business at Taman Sari District. A census sampling, data collection through a questionnaire, an in-depth interview and observation were carried out in 2013. Data were analyzed descriptively and statistically, using structural equation model (SEM. The results of the research showed that: (1 the strategy of mustaḥiq empowerment could be carried out through strengthening the intrinsic motivation, training technical aspects, assisting business capital and assistance. Empowerment can be conducted synergically by the government (arrangement, service, and counseling, private sectors/State Owned Business (BUMN, higher education and community.

  10. Colour-independent partition functions in coloured vertex models

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O

    2013-01-01

    We study lattice configurations related to S_n, the scalar product of an off-shell state and an on-shell state in rational A_n integrable vertex models, n = {1, 2}. The lattice lines are colourless and oriented. The state variables are n conserved colours that flow along the line orientations, but do not necessarily cover every bond in the lattice. Choosing boundary conditions such that the positions where the colours flow into the lattice are fixed, and where they flow out are summed over, we show that the partition functions of these configurations, with these boundary conditions, are n-independent. Our results extend to trigonometric A_n models, and to all n. This n-independence explains, in vertex-model terms, results from recent studies of S_2 [1, 2]. Namely, 1. S_2 which depends on two sets of Bethe roots, b_1 and b_2, and cannot (as far as we know) be expressed in single determinant form, degenerates in the limit b_1 -> infinity, and/or b_2 -> infinity, into a product of determinants, 2. Each of the la...

  11. Model-independent measurement of the top quark polarisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A., E-mail: jaas@ugr.es [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (CSIC-UC), Santander (Spain); Herrero-Hahn, R.V. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Granada, Granada (Spain)

    2013-01-08

    We introduce a new asymmetry in the decay t{yields}Wb{yields} Script-Small-L {nu}b, which is shown to be directly proportional to the polarisation of the top quark along a chosen axis, times a sum of W helicity fractions. The latter have already been precisely measured at the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. Therefore, this new asymmetry can be used to obtain a model-independent measurement of the polarisation of top quarks produced in any process at hadron or lepton colliders.

  12. Model-independent constraints on the cosmic opacity

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Alcaniz, J S

    2012-01-01

    We use current measurements of the expansion rate $H(z)$ and cosmic background radiation bounds on the spatial curvature of the Universe to impose cosmological model-independent constraints on cosmic opacity. To perform our analyses, we compare opacity-free distance modulus from $H(z)$ data with those from two supernovae Ia compilations, namely, the Union2 and Sloan Digital Sky Survey samples. The influence of different SNe Ia light-curve fitters (SALT2 and MLCS2K2) on the results is also discussed. We find that these fitters present a significant conflict, with the MLCS2K2 method being incompatible with a flat and transparent universe.

  13. Model independent analysis of nearly L\\'evy correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Novák, T.; Csörgő, T.; Eggers, H. C.; Kock, M.

    2016-01-01

    A model-independent method for the analysis of the two-particle short-range correlations is presented, that can be utilized to describe e.g. Bose-Einstein (HBT), dynamical (ridge) or other correlation functions, that have a nearly L\\'evy or streched exponential shape. For the special case of L\\'evy exponent alpha = 1, the earlier Laguerre expansions are recovered, for the alpha = 2 special case, a new expansion method is obtained for nearly Gaussian correlation functions. Multi-dimensional L\\...

  14. Model independent analysis of dark energy I: Supernova fitting result

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Y

    2004-01-01

    The nature of dark energy is a mystery to us. This paper uses the supernova data to explore the property of dark energy by some model independent methods. We first Talyor expanded the scale factor $a(t)$ to find out the deceleration parameter $q_0<0$. This result just invokes the Robertson-Walker metric. Then we discuss several different parameterizations used in the literature. We find that $\\Omega_{\\rm DE0}$ is almost less than -1 at $1\\sigma$ level. We also find that the transition redshift from deceleration phase to acceleration phase is $z_{\\rm T}\\sim 0.3$.

  15. A model independent description of the deutron asymptotic D state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, T. E. O.; Rosa-Clot, M.

    1982-04-01

    The asymptotic deutron D state is shown to result nearly model-independently from iterated OPEP yielding a predicted value η = (0.02633 ± 0.00035). Alternatively the result leads to a determination of the πN coupling constant [ f2 = (0.0792 ± 0.0012 )]. Attention is drawn to the implications for the size of quark bags. Analogous considerations of the deutron quadrupole moment permit the first direct determination of its non-potential part from experiment ΔQ = (0.005 ± 0.004) fm 2.

  16. Model independent analysis of nearly L\\'evy correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Novák, T; Eggers, H C; de Kock, M

    2016-01-01

    A model-independent method for the analysis of the two-particle short-range correlations is presented, that can be utilized to describe e.g. Bose-Einstein (HBT), dynamical (ridge) or other correlation functions, that have a nearly L\\'evy or streched exponential shape. For the special case of L\\'evy exponent alpha = 1, the earlier Laguerre expansions are recovered, for the alpha = 2 special case, a new expansion method is obtained for nearly Gaussian correlation functions. Multi-dimensional L\\'evy expansions are also introduced and their potential application to analyze rigde correlation data is discussed.

  17. Text-Independent Speaker Identification Using the Histogram Transform Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Zhanyu; Yu, Hong; Tan, Zheng-Hua;

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel probabilistic method for the task of text-independent speaker identification (SI). In order to capture the dynamic information during SI, we design a super-MFCCs features by cascading three neighboring Mel-frequency Cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) frames together....... These super-MFCC vectors are utilized for probabilistic model training such that the speaker’s characteristics can be sufficiently captured. The probability density function (PDF) of the aforementioned super-MFCCs features is estimated by the recently proposed histogram transform (HT) method. To recedes...

  18. Model independence in two dimensions and polarized cold dipolar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosniev, A G; Fedorov, D V; Jensen, A S; Zinner, N T

    2011-06-24

    We calculate the energy and wave functions of two particles confined to two spatial dimensions interacting via arbitrary anisotropic potentials with negative or zero net volume. The general rigorous analytic expressions are given in the weak coupling limit where universality or model independence are approached. The monopole part of anisotropic potentials is crucial in the universal limit. We illustrate the universality with a system of two arbitrarily polarized cold dipolar molecules in a bilayer. We discuss the transition to universality as a function of polarization and binding energy and compare analytic and numerical results obtained by the stochastic variational method. The universal limit is essentially reached for experimentally accessible strengths.

  19. The Optimal Linear Combination of Multiple Predictors Under the Generalized Linear Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Lu, Ying

    2009-11-15

    Multiple alternative diagnostic tests for one disease are commonly available to clinicians. It's important to use all the good diagnostic predictors simultaneously to establish a new predictor with higher statistical utility. Under the generalized linear model for binary outcomes, the linear combination of multiple predictors in the link function is proved optimal in the sense that the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of this combination is the largest among all possible linear combination. The result was applied to analysis of the data from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) with comparison to Su and Liu's approach.

  20. Model independent analysis on the slowing down of cosmic acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ming-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Possible slowing down of cosmic acceleration has attracted more and more attention. However, most analysis in previous work were commonly imposed in some parametrization models. In the present paper, we investigate this subject using the the Gaussian processes (GP), providing a model-independent analysis. We carry out the reconstruction by abundant data including luminosity distance from Union2, Union2.1 compilation and gamma-ray burst, and Hubble parameter from cosmic chronometer and baryon acoustic oscillation peaks. The GP reconstructions suggest that no slowing down of cosmic acceleration is approved within 95\\% C.L. from current observational data. We also test the influence of spatial curvature and Hubble constant, finding that spatial curvature does not present significant impact on the reconstructions. However, Hubble constant strongly influence the reconstructions especially at low redshift. In order to reveal the reason of inconsistence between our reconstruction and previous parametrization constra...

  1. Predictors of breast self - examination among female teachers in Ethiopia using health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhane, Negussie; Mamo, Abebe; Girma, Eshetu; Asfaw, Shifera

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer of women. It is the second leading cause of death in women worldwide. Approximately one out of eight women develops breast cancer all over the world. Majority of cases of cancer of the breast are detected by women themselves, stressing the importance of breast self-examination. The main objective of this study was to assess predictors of breast self-examination among female teachers in Kafa Zone, South West part of Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected 315 female teachers. Self administered a structured questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge about breast cancer and perception of teachers on breast self examination using the Champion's revised Health Belief Model sub scales used as data collection instrument. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent predictors of breast self -examination performance. Three hundred and fifteen female teachers were participated in this study. Their mean age was 33 SD [±7] years. Only 52 (16.5 %) participants ever heard about breast self examination and from those who heard about breast self examination 38 (73.07 %) of them ever performed breast self examination. After controlling for possible confounding factors, the result showed that knowledge towards breast self examination, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity and the net perceived benefit were found to be the major predictors of breast self examination. This study revealed that breast self examination performance among female teachers was very low. Therefore, behavior change communication and interventions that emphasize different domains that increase the perceived threat to breast cancer as well as on the benefits of breast self-examination to increase the perception of the teachers in an integrated manner may be the most effective strategies that should be considered by the health offices and educational offices. These

  2. Right ventricular dysfunction as an independent predictor of short- and long-term mortality in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Akkan, Dilek; Iversen, Kasper Karmark;

    2007-01-01

    by co-existing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). AIMS: To examine the prognostic information from TAPSE adjusted for the potential confounding effects of co-existing cardiovascular and COPD in a large series of patients admitted for new onset or worsening HF. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight...... in HF including left ventricular function. The co-existence of COPD is also associated with an adverse prognosis independent of the RV systolic function....

  3. Pulse pressure is not an independent predictor of outcome in type 2 diabetes patients with chronic kidney disease and anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, S; Claggett, B; Hansen, T W

    2015-01-01

    Pulse pressure (PP) remains an elusive cardiovascular risk factor with inconsistent findings. We clarified the prognostic value in patients with type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and anemia in the Trial to Reduce cardiovascular Events with Aranesp (darbepoetin alfa) Therapy. In 4038......, CKD and anemia, PP did not independently predict cardiovascular events or ESRD. This may reflect confounding by aggressive antihypertensive treatment, or PP may be too rough a risk marker in these high-risk patients....

  4. Independent predictors for lifetime and recent substance use disorders in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder: focus on anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Keming; Chan, Philip K; Verduin, Marcia L; Kemp, David E; Tolliver, Bryan K; Ganocy, Stephen J; Bilali, Sarah; Brady, Kathleen T; Findling, Robert L; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2010-01-01

    We set out to study independent predictor(s) for lifetime and recent substance use disorders (SUDs) in patients with rapid-cycling bipolar disorder (RCBD). Extensive Clinical Interview and Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview were used to ascertain DSM-IV Axis I diagnoses of RCBD, anxiety disorders, and SUDs. Data from patients enrolling into four similar clinical trials were used. Where appropriate, univariate analyses with t-test or chi-square were applied. Stepwise logistic regression was used to examine the relationship among predictor variables and lifetime and recent SUDs. Univariate analysis showed that patients with co-occurring anxiety disorders (n = 261) had significantly increased rates of lifetime (odds ratio [OR]= 2.1) and recent (OR = 1.9) alcohol dependence as well as lifetime (OR = 3.4) and recent (OR = 2.5) marijuana dependence compared to those without co-occurring anxiety disorder (n = 303). In logistic regression analyses, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) was associated with increased risk for lifetime SUDs (OR = 2.34), alcohol dependence (OR = 1.73), and marijuana dependence (OR = 3.36) and recent marijuana dependence (OR = 3.28). A history of physical abuse was associated with increased risk for lifetime SUDs (OR = 1.71) and recent marijuana dependence (OR = 3.47). Earlier onset of first mania/hypomania was associated with increased risk for lifetime SUDs (5% per year), and recent marijuana dependence (12% per year) and later treatment with a mood stabilizer were also associated with increased risk for recent SUDs (8% per year). Positive associations between GAD, later treatment with a mood stabilizer, and early childhood trauma and history of SUDs suggest that adequate treatment of comorbid anxiety, early treatment with a mood stabilizer, and prevention of childhood trauma may reduce the risk for the development of SUDs in patients with bipolar disorder.

  5. Model-Independent Simplified Limits on Resonances at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chivukula, R Sekhar; Mohan, Kirtimaan; Simmons, Elizabeth H

    2016-01-01

    In the earliest stages of evaluating new collider data, especially if a small excess may be present, it would be useful to have a method for comparing the data with entire classes of models, to get an immediate sense of which classes could conceivably be relevant. In this paper, we propose a method that applies when the new physics invoked to explain the excess corresponds to the production and decay of a single, relatively narrow, $s$-channel resonance. A simplifed model of the resonance allows us to convert an estimated signal cross section into model-independent bounds on the product of the branching ratios corresponding to production and decay. This quickly reveals whether a given class of models could possibly produce a signal of the required size at the LHC. Our work sets up a general framework, outlines how it operates for resonances with different numbers of production and decay modes, and analyzes cases of current experimental interest, including resonances decaying to dibosons, diphotons, dileptons,...

  6. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  7. Discontinuous Transition of a Multistage Independent Cascade Model on Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Takehisa

    2012-01-01

    We study a multistage independent cascade (MIC) model in complex networks. This model is parameterized by two probabilities: T1 is the probability that a node adopting a fad increases the awareness of a neighboring susceptible node until it abandons the fad, and T2 is the probability that an adopter directly causes a susceptible node to adopt the fad. We formulate a framework of tree approximation for the MIC model on an uncorrelated network with an arbitrary given degree distribution. As an application, we study this model on a random regular network with degree k=6 to show that it has a rich phase diagram including continuous and discontinuous transition lines for the percolation of fads as well as a continuous transition line for the percolation of susceptible nodes. In particular, the percolation transition of fads is discontinuous (continuous) when T1 is larger (smaller) than a certain value. Furthermore, the phase boundaries drastically change by assigning a finite fraction of initial adopters. We discu...

  8. Integrating Factor Analysis and a Transgenic Mouse Model to Reveal a Peripheral Blood Predictor of Breast Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevins Joseph R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic mouse tumor models have the advantage of facilitating controlled in vivo oncogenic perturbations in a common genetic background. This provides an idealized context for generating transcriptome-based diagnostic models while minimizing the inherent noisiness of high-throughput technologies. However, the question remains whether models developed in such a setting are suitable prototypes for useful human diagnostics. We show that latent factor modeling of the peripheral blood transcriptome in a mouse model of breast cancer provides the basis for using computational methods to link a mouse model to a prototype human diagnostic based on a common underlying biological response to the presence of a tumor. Methods We used gene expression data from mouse peripheral blood cell (PBC samples to identify significantly differentially expressed genes using supervised classification and sparse ANOVA. We employed these transcriptome data as the starting point for developing a breast tumor predictor from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by using a factor modeling approach. Results The predictor distinguished breast cancer patients from healthy individuals in a cohort of patients independent from that used to build the factors and train the model with 89% sensitivity, 100% specificity and an area under the curve (AUC of 0.97 using Youden's J-statistic to objectively select the model's classification threshold. Both permutation testing of the model and evaluating the model strategy by swapping the training and validation sets highlight its stability. Conclusions We describe a human breast tumor predictor based on the gene expression of mouse PBCs. This strategy overcomes many of the limitations of earlier studies by using the model system to reduce noise and identify transcripts associated with the presence of a breast tumor over other potentially confounding factors. Our results serve as a proof-of-concept for using an

  9. Sarcopenia is an Independent Predictor of Severe Postoperative Complications and Long-Term Survival After Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: Analysis from a Large-Scale Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Huang, Dong-Dong; Pang, Wen-Yang; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Wang, Su-Lin; Lou, Neng; Ma, Liang-Liang; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the association between sarcopenia and long-term prognosis after gastric cancer surgery has not been investigated. Moreover, the association between sarcopenia and postoperative complications remains controversial. This large-scale retrospective study aims to ascertain the prevalence of sarcopenia and assess its impact on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. From December 2008 to April 2013, the clinical data of all patients who underwent elective radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer were collected prospectively. Only patients with available preoperative abdominal CT scan within 30 days of surgery were considered for analysis. Skeletal muscle mass was determined by abdominal (computed tomography) CT scan, and sarcopenia was diagnosed by the cut-off values obtained by means of optimum stratification. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluating risk factors of postoperative complications and long-term survival were performed. A total of 937 patients were included in this study, and 389 (41.5%) patients were sarcopenic based on the diagnostic cut-off values (34.9 cm²/m² for women and 40.8 cm²/m² for men). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications (OR = 3.010, P sarcopenia did not show significant association with operative mortality. Moreover, sarcopenia was an independent predictor for poorer overall survival (HR = 1.653, P sarcopenia remained an independent risk factor for overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I. Sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of severe postoperative complications after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Moreover, sarcopenia is independently associated with overall and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I.

  10. An ENSO-Forecast Independent Statistical Model for the Prediction of Annual Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Frequency in April

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenny Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistical models for preseason prediction of annual Atlantic tropical cyclone (TC and hurricane counts generally include El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO forecasts as a predictor. As a result, the predictions from such models are often contaminated by the errors in ENSO forecasts. In this study, it is found that the latent heat flux (LHF over Eastern Tropical Pacific (ETP, defined as the region 0°–5°N, 115°–125°W in spring is negatively correlated with the annual Atlantic TC and hurricane counts. By using stepwise backward elimination regression, it is further shown that the March value of ETP LHF is a better predictor than the spring or summer ENSO index for Atlantic TC counts. Leave-one-out cross validation indicates that the annual Atlantic TC counts predicted by this ENSO-independent statistical model show a remarkable correlation with the actual TC counts (R=0.72; P value <0.01. For Atlantic hurricanes, the predictions using March ETP LHF and summer (July–September ENSO indices show only minor differences except in moderate to strong El Niño years. Thus, March ETP LHF is an excellent predictor for seasonal Atlantic TC prediction and a viable alternative to using ENSO index for Atlantic hurricane prediction.

  11. Radiative leptonic Bc decay in the relativistic independent quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, N.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Dash, P. C.; Kar, Susmita

    2008-12-01

    The radiative leptonic decay Bc-→μ-ν¯μγ is analyzed in its leading order in a relativistic independent quark model based on a confining potential in an equally mixed scalar-vector harmonic form. The branching ratio for this decay in the vanishing lepton mass limit is obtained as Br(Bc→μνμγ)=6.83×10-5, which includes the contributions of the internal bremsstrahlung and structure-dependent diagrams at the level of the quark constituents. The contributions of the bremsstrahlung and the structure-dependent diagrams, as well as their additive interference parts, are compared and found to be of the same order of magnitude. Finally, the predicted photon energy spectrum is observed here to be almost symmetrical about the peak value of the photon energy at Ẽγ≃(MBc)/(4), which may be quite accessible experimentally at LHC in near future.

  12. Model-independent constraints on the cosmic opacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, R.F.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, 58429-500, Campina Grande - PB (Brazil); Carvalho, J.C.; Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: holanda@uepb.edu.br, E-mail: carvalho@dfte.ufrn.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatório Nacional, 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2013-04-01

    We use current measurements of the expansion rate H(z) and cosmic background radiation bounds on the spatial curvature of the Universe to impose cosmological model-independent constraints on cosmic opacity. To perform our analyses, we compare opacity-free distance modulus from H(z) data with those from two type Ia supernovae compilations, namely, the Union2.1 plus the most distant spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia (SCP-0401 at z = 1.713) and two Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) subsamples. We find that a completely transparent universe is in full agreement with the Union 2.1 + SNe Ia SCP-0401 sample. For the SDSS compilations, such universe is compatible with observations at < 1.5σ level regardless the SNe Ia light-curve fitting used.

  13. Discrete symmetries and model-independent patterns of lepton mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, D

    2012-01-01

    In the context of discrete flavor symmetries, we elaborate a method that allows one to obtain relations between the mixing parameters in a model-independent way. Under very general conditions, we show that flavor groups of the von Dyck type, that are not necessarily finite, determine the absolute values of the entries of one column of the mixing matrix. We apply our formalism to finite subgroups of the infinite von Dyck groups, such as the modular groups, and find cases that yield an excellent agreement with the best fit values for the mixing angles. We explore the Klein group as the residual symmetry of the neutrino sector and explain the permutation property that appears between the elements of the mixing matrix in this case.

  14. Discrete symmetries and model-independent patterns of lepton mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, D.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    In the context of discrete flavor symmetries, we elaborate a method that allows one to obtain relations between the mixing parameters in a model-independent way. Under very general conditions, we show that flavor groups of the von Dyck type, that are not necessarily finite, determine the absolute values of the entries of one column of the mixing matrix. We apply our formalism to finite subgroups of the infinite von Dyck groups, such as the modular groups, and find cases that yield an excellent agreement with the best fit values for the mixing angles. We explore the Klein group as the residual symmetry of the neutrino sector and explain the permutation property that appears between the elements of the mixing matrix in this case.

  15. Is impaired kidney function an independent predictor of the risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected individuals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sylvie; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Partisani, Marialuisa; Gilquin, Jacques; Simon, Anne; Cotte, Laurent; Boccara, Franck; Costagliola, Dominique

    2014-08-24

    We examined whether impaired kidney function is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction in HIV-infected individuals without pre-existing coronary artery disease. The odds ratio for impaired kidney function fell from 1.22 (95% confidence interval 0.90-1.66) to 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.69-1.41) after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and HIV-related parameters, with hypertension, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking and the CD4 T-cell nadir as most influential confounders. In this setting, no association was found between impaired kidney function and the risk of myocardial infarction.

  16. The Ratio Between Visceral and Subcutaneous Abdominal Fat Assessed by Computed Tomography Is an Independent Predictor of Mortality and Cardiac Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeiras-Lopes, Ricardo; Sampaio, Francisco; Bettencourt, Nuno; Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo; Ferreira, Nuno; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Gama, Vasco

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is an important cardiovascular risk factor and the location of fat deposits seems to be an important determinant of its metabolic impact. Visceral adipose tissue (VAT) exerts a harmful effect on metabolic homeostasis, but few longitudinal studies have evaluated the prognostic impact of the ratio of VAT to subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT). This study aimed to evaluate whether the VAT/SAT ratio was associated with all-cause mortality and cardiac events. Registry-based retrospective cohort study. Eligible patients consisted of those without known heart disease referred to cardiac computed tomography (CT) angiography to evaluate suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We included all patients with available information on VAT and SAT areas and coronary artery calcium (CAC) score. We assessed the combined endpoint of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction or revascularization procedure at least 1 month after cardiac CT. The final population consisted of 713 participants (61% male; mean age, 57.7±10.2 years) followed up for a median of 1.3 years. The combined endpoint occurred in 66 patients; these patients showed a higher VAT/SAT ratio (1.06±0.74 vs 0.80±0.52, P=.0001). The VAT/SAT ratio was an independent predictor of death and cardiac events (HR = 1.43; 95%CI, 1.03-1.99), irrespective of cardiovascular risk factors, CAC, and the presence of CAD. The ratio between abdominal VAT/SAT was an independent predictor of death and coronary events, irrespective of cardiovascular risk factors, CAC, and the presence of CAD. This ratio is a CT-derived metric that may help to better identify patients with increased risk of death or cardiac events. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction are independent predictors of worsening of glucose tolerance during each stage of type 2 diabetes development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, C; Tataranni, P A; Bogardus, C; Pratley, R E

    2001-01-01

    Although prospective studies indicate that insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction predict type 2 diabetes, they provide limited information on the relative contributions of both abnormalities to worsening glucose tolerance at different developmental stages of the disease. We therefore assessed the predictive effect of insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction separately for the progression from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and from IGT to diabetes. Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (M) (hyperinsulinemic clamp), acute insulin secretory response (AIR) (25-g intravenous glucose tolerance test), and body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) were measured in 254 Pima Indians with NGT and in 145 Pima Indians with IGT, who were then followed for 0.5-13 years. After follow-ups of 4.4 +/- 3.1 and 5.5 +/- 3.4 years, 79 (31%) of the subjects with initial NGT had developed IGT, and 64 (44%) of the subjects with initial IGT had developed diabetes. In proportional-hazards analyses with adjustment for age, sex, and percent body fat, low M and low AIR were independent predictors of both the progression from NGT to IGT (relative hazards [95% CI] for 10th vs. 90th percentile: M 2.4 [1.2-4.7], P < 0.02; AIR 2.1 [1.1-4.1], P < 0.04) and from IGT to diabetes (M 2.5 [1.3-5.0], P < 0.01; AIR 1.8 [0.99-3.3], P = 0.055). During each stage of the development of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction are independent predictors of worsening glucose tolerance and are, therefore, both targets for the primary prevention of the disease.

  18. Model Independent Search For New Physics At The Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudalakis, Georgios [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles can not be the final theory. There are theoretical reasons to expect the appearance of new physics, possibly at the energy scale of few TeV. Several possible theories of new physics have been proposed, each with unknown probability to be confirmed. Instead of arbitrarily choosing to examine one of those theories, this thesis is about searching for any sign of new physics in a model-independent way. This search is performed at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The Standard Model prediction is implemented in all final states simultaneously, and an array of statistical probes is employed to search for significant discrepancies between data and prediction. The probes are sensitive to overall population discrepancies, shape disagreements in distributions of kinematic quantities of final particles, excesses of events of large total transverse momentum, and local excesses of data expected from resonances due to new massive particles. The result of this search, first in 1 fb-1 and then in 2 fb-1, is null, namely no considerable evidence of new physics was found.

  19. Model-Independent Jets plus Missing Energy Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwall, Johan; Le, My-Phuong; Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.

    2008-09-22

    We present a proposal for performing model-independent jets plus missing energy searches. Currently, these searches are optimized for mSUGRA and are consequently not sensitive to all kinematically-accessible regions of parameter space. We show that the reach of these searches can be broadened by setting limits on the differential cross section as a function of the total visible energy and the missing energy. These measurements only require knowledge of the relevant Standard Model backgrounds and can be subsequently used to limit any theoretical model of new physics. We apply this approach to an example where gluinos are pair-produced and decay to the LSP through a single-step cascade, and show how sensitivity to different gluino masses is altered by the presence of the decay chain. The analysis is closely based upon the current searches done at the Tevatron and our proposal requires only small modifications to the existing techniques. We find that within the MSSM, the gluino can be as light as 125 GeV. The same techniques are applicable to jets and missing energy searches at the Large Hadron Collider.

  20. Determining $H_0$ with a model-independent method

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Puxun; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    In this letter, by using the type Ia supernovae (SNIa) to provide the luminosity distance (LD) directly, which is dependent on the value of the Hubble constant $H_0= 100 h\\; {\\rm km\\; s^{-1}\\; Mpc^{-1}}$, and the angular diameter distance from galaxy clusters or baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) to give the derived LD according to the distance duality relation, we propose a model-independent method to determine $h$ from the fact that different observations should give the same LD at a redshift. Combining the Union 2.1 SNIa and galaxy cluster data, we obtain that at the $1\\sigma$ confidence level (CL) $h=0.589\\pm0.030$ for the sample of the elliptical $\\beta$ model for galaxy clusters, and $h=0.635\\pm0.029$ for that of the spherical $\\beta$ model. The former is smaller than the values from other observations, while the latter is consistent with the Planck result at the $1\\sigma$ CL and agrees very well with the value reconstructed directly from the $H(z)$ data. With the Union 2.1 SNIa and BAO measurements, a...

  1. Elevated baseline plasma phospholipid protein (PLTP) levels are an independent predictor of long-term all-cause mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus and known or suspected coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavusoglu, Erdal; Marmur, Jonathan D; Chhabra, Sandeep; Hojjati, Mohammad R; Yanamadala, Sunitha; Chopra, Vineet; Eng, Calvin; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the long-term prognostic significance of baseline plasma PLTP levels in a group of well-characterized male patients with diabetes mellitus and known or suspected coronary artery disease referred for coronary angiography. PLTP is a plasma protein that mediates the net transfer and exchange of phospholipids between lipoproteins. It has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and elevated plasma levels have been reported in patients with diabetes mellitus. Baseline plasma PLTP levels were measured in 154 male patients with diabetes mellitus who were referred for coronary angiography and followed prospectively for 5 years for the development of all-cause mortality. After adjustment for a variety of baseline clinical, angiographic and laboratory parameters, plasma PLTP levels (analyzed as a continuous variable) were an independent predictor of all-cause mortality at 5 years (HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.22-2.00; P = 0.0009). Furthermore, in 3 additional multivariate models that also included a wide variety of contemporary biomarkers with established prognostic efficacy (i.e., ST2, GDF-15, Cystatin C, Fibrinogen, and NT-proBNP), PLTP remained an independent predictor of all-cause mortality at 5 years. Elevated baseline plasma levels of PLTP are associated with an increased risk of long-term all-cause mortality in patients with diabetes and known or suspected coronary disease. Furthermore, this association is independent of a variety of clinical, angiographic, and laboratory variables, including a whole host of contemporary biomarkers with established prognostic efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The high glycemic index diet was an independent predictor to explain changes in agouti-related protein in obese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Molin Netto, Bárbara; Landi Masquio, Deborah Cristina; Da Silveira Campos, Raquel Munhoz; De Lima Sanches, Priscila; Campos Corgosinho, Flavia; Tock, Lian; Missae Oyama, Lila; Túlio de Mello, Marco; Tufik, Sergio; Dâmaso, Ana Raimunda

    2014-02-01

    La Dieta de alto índice glucémico es un predictor independiente para explicar los cambios en la proteína relacionada al agouti en adolescentes obesos. Introducción y objetivos: El papel de la dieta de índice glucémico (GI) en el control de los factores orexigénicos y anorexígenos del balance de energía todavía no está claro. El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar si la dieta habitual, de acuerdo con diferentes alimentos con IG, ejerce influencia sobre la regulación de los marcadores del balance de energía y los efectos de la intervención interdisciplinaria en adolescentes obesos. Métodos: Un total de 55 adolescentes obesos, con edades de 14 a 19 años, han sido sometidos a un año de tratamiento interdisciplinario y se dividieron en dos grupos, de acuerdo al patrón de dieta predominante de la ingesta de alimentos: el grupo IG alto (H-GI; n = 29) y GI moderada/bajo grupo (M/L-GI, n = 26). Resultados: La concentración de orexigenic factor de AgRP (p adolescentes presentan una reducción significativa en el peso corporal, la grasa corporal total (%), visceral y la grasa subcutánea y el HOMA-IR, así como un aumento significativo de la masa libre de grasa (%). Conclusiones: Nuestros resultados pueden sugerir que la dieta H-GI habitual podría upregulate vías orexigénicos, contribuyendo al círculo vicioso entre las dietas indeseables, desregula el equilibrio energético y predisponen a la obesidad. Uno por otro lado, un año de tratamiento interdisciplinario puede perfil metabólico mejora significativa y la obesidad central en los adolescentes.

  3. An information theoretic approach to select alternate subsets of predictors for data-driven hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, R.; Galelli, S.; Karakaya, G.; Ahipasaoglu, S. D.

    2016-11-01

    This work investigates the uncertainty associated to the presence of multiple subsets of predictors yielding data-driven models with the same, or similar, predictive accuracy. To handle this uncertainty effectively, we introduce a novel input variable selection algorithm, called Wrapper for Quasi Equally Informative Subset Selection (W-QEISS), specifically conceived to identify all alternate subsets of predictors in a given dataset. The search process is based on a four-objective optimization problem that minimizes the number of selected predictors, maximizes the predictive accuracy of a data-driven model and optimizes two information theoretic metrics of relevance and redundancy, which guarantee that the selected subsets are highly informative and with little intra-subset similarity. The algorithm is first tested on two synthetic test problems and then demonstrated on a real-world streamflow prediction problem in the Yampa River catchment (US). Results show that complex hydro-meteorological datasets are characterized by a large number of alternate subsets of predictors, which provides useful insights on the underlying physical processes. Furthermore, the presence of multiple subsets of predictors-and associated models-helps find a better trade-off between different measures of predictive accuracy commonly adopted for hydrological modelling problems.

  4. Hay fever in childhood, traits Neuroticism and Conscientiousness as independent predictors of the occurrence of hay fever in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Helen; Deighton, Jessica; Wolpert, Miranda; Chapman, Benjamin P; Kornilaki, Ekaterina N; Treglown, Luke; Furnham, Adrian

    2016-10-01

    The study investigated the associations between social and psychological factors in childhood and adulthood and the occurrence of adulthood hay fever in a longitudinal birth cohort study. A total of 5780 participants with data on parental social class, childhood hay fever up to age 7 years, childhood cognitive ability at age 11 years, educational qualifications at age 33 years, personality traits, occupational levels and adult hay fever (all measured at age 50 years) were included in the study. Using logistic regression analyses, results showed that childhood hay fever identified by medical doctors and traits Emotional Stability and Conscientiousness were significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of hay fever in adulthood.

  5. Modelling the role of the design context in the design process: a domain-independent approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reymen, Isabelle; Kroes, P.; Basten, T; Durling, D.; Shackleton, J.

    2002-01-01

    Domain-independent models of the design process are an important means for facilitating interdisciplinary communication and for supporting multidisciplinary design. Many so-called domain-independent models are, however, not really domain independent. We state that, to be domain independent, the

  6. A domain-independent descriptive design model and its application to structured reflection on design processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reymen, Isabelle; Hammer, D.K.; Kroes, P.A.; van Aken, Joan Ernst; van Aken, J.E.; Dorst, C.H.; Bax, M.F.T.; Basten, T

    2006-01-01

    Domain-independent models of the design process are an important means for facilitating interdisciplinary communication and for supporting multidisciplinary design. Many so-called domain-independent models are, however, not really domain independent. We state that to be domain independent, the

  7. Revisiting a model-independent dark energy reconstruction method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazkoz, Ruth; Salzano, Vincenzo; Sendra, Irene [Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Fisika Teorikoaren eta Zientziaren Historia Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    In this work we offer new insights into the model-independent dark energy reconstruction method developed by Daly and Djorgovski (Astrophys. J. 597:9, 2003; Astrophys. J. 612:652, 2004; Astrophys. J. 677:1, 2008). Our results, using updated SNeIa and GRBs, allow to highlight some of the intrinsic weaknesses of the method. Conclusions on the main dark energy features as drawn from this method are intimately related to the features of the samples themselves, particularly for GRBs, which are poor performers in this context and cannot be used for cosmological purposes, that is, the state of the art does not allow to regard them on the same quality basis as SNeIa. We find there is a considerable sensitivity to some parameters (window width, overlap, selection criteria) affecting the results. Then, we try to establish what the current redshift range is for which one can make solid predictions on dark energy evolution. Finally, we strengthen the former view that this model is modest in the sense it provides only a picture of the global trend and has to be managed very carefully. But, on the other hand, we believe it offers an interesting complement to other approaches, given that it works on minimal assumptions. (orig.)

  8. Predictors of Academic Performance of University Students: An Application of the Goal Efficacy Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomegah, Roger Yao

    2007-01-01

    This study utilized the goal-efficacy model to examine a) the extent to which index scores of student self-efficacy, self-set goals, assigned goals, and ability (four variables in the model) could predict academic performance of university students; and b) the best predictor of academic performance. The sample comprised 103 undergraduate students…

  9. Predictor Relationships between Values Held by Married Individuals, Resilience and Conflict Resolution Styles: A Model Suggestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Fatma; Dilmac, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to reveal the predictor relationships between the values held by married individuals, resilience and conflict resolution styles. The research adopts a relational screening model that is a sub-type of the general screening model. The sample of the research consists of 375 married individuals, of which 173 are…

  10. Independence Giving or Autonomy Taking? Childhood Predictors of Decision-Sharing Patterns Between Young Adolescents and Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Romich, Jennifer L.; Lundberg, Shelly; Tsang, Kwok Ping

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a study of whether young adolescents make decisions autonomously, share decisions with their parents, or have decisions made for them by parents. Using a sample of 2,632 12-and 13-year-olds from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 Child Survey we examine how childhood behavior and competence influence decision patterns in young adolescence. Individual models are used to test whether traits predict decision patterns, and sibling fixed-effects models allow us ...

  11. Independence Giving or Autonomy Taking? Childhood Predictors of Decision-Making Patterns Between Young Adolescents and Parents

    OpenAIRE

    Shelly Lundberg; Jennifer Romich; Kwok Ping Tsang

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on a study of whether young adolescents make decisions autonomously, share decisions with their parents, or have decisions made for them by parents. Using a sample of 2,620 12- and 13-year-olds from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth – Child Study we examine how childhood behavior and competence influence decision patterns in young adolescence. Individual models are used to test whether traits predict decision patterns and sibling fixed-effects models allow us to e...

  12. Are Face and Object Recognition Independent? A Neurocomputational Modeling Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Panqu; Gauthier, Isabel; Cottrell, Garrison

    2016-04-01

    Are face and object recognition abilities independent? Although it is commonly believed that they are, Gauthier et al. [Gauthier, I., McGugin, R. W., Richler, J. J., Herzmann, G., Speegle, M., & VanGulick, A. E. Experience moderates overlap between object and face recognition, suggesting a common ability. Journal of Vision, 14, 7, 2014] recently showed that these abilities become more correlated as experience with nonface categories increases. They argued that there is a single underlying visual ability, v, that is expressed in performance with both face and nonface categories as experience grows. Using the Cambridge Face Memory Test and the Vanderbilt Expertise Test, they showed that the shared variance between Cambridge Face Memory Test and Vanderbilt Expertise Test performance increases monotonically as experience increases. Here, we address why a shared resource across different visual domains does not lead to competition and to an inverse correlation in abilities? We explain this conundrum using our neurocomputational model of face and object processing ["The Model", TM, Cottrell, G. W., & Hsiao, J. H. Neurocomputational models of face processing. In A. J. Calder, G. Rhodes, M. Johnson, & J. Haxby (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of face perception. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2011]. We model the domain general ability v as the available computational resources (number of hidden units) in the mapping from input to label and experience as the frequency of individual exemplars in an object category appearing during network training. Our results show that, as in the behavioral data, the correlation between subordinate level face and object recognition accuracy increases as experience grows. We suggest that different domains do not compete for resources because the relevant features are shared between faces and objects. The essential power of experience is to generate a "spreading transform" for faces (separating them in representational space) that

  13. Determining H 0 using a model-independent method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pu-Xun; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Yu, Hong-Wei

    2017-02-01

    By using type Ia supernovae (SNIa) to provide the luminosity distance (LD) directly, which depends on the value of the Hubble constant H 0 = 100 h km • s-1 • Mpc-1, and the angular diameter distance from galaxy clusters or baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) to give the derived LD according to the distance duality relation, we propose a model-independent method to determine h from the fact that different observations should give the same LD at a given redshift. Combining the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) SNIa from the MLCS2k2 light curve fit and galaxy cluster data, we find that at the 1σ confidence level (CL), h = 0:5867 ± 0:0303 for the sample of the elliptical β model for galaxy clusters, and h = 0:6199 ± 0:0293 for that of the spherical β model. The former is smaller than the values from other observations, whereas the latter is consistent with the Planck result at the 2σ CL and agrees very well with the value reconstructed directly from the H( z) data. With the SDSS-II SNIa and BAO measurements, a tighter constraint, h = 0:6683 ± 0:0221, is obtained. For comparison, we also consider the Union 2.1 SNIa from the SALT2 light curve fitting. The results from the Union 2.1 SNIa are slightly larger than those from the SDSS-II SNIa, and the Union 2.1 SNIa + BAOs give the tightest value. We find that the values from SNIa + BAOs are quite consistent with those from the Planck and the BAOs, as well as the local measurement from Cepheids and very-low-redshift SNIa.

  14. Abnormal platelet count is an independent predictor of mortality in the elderly and is influenced by ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Lam, Anthony P.; Gundabolu, Krishna; Chrysofakis, Grigorios; Yu, Yiting; Mantzaris, Ioannis; Friedman, Ellen; Verma, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Even though alterations in platelet counts are presumed to be detrimental, their impact on the survival of patients has not been studied in large cohorts. The prevalence of thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis was examined in a large inner city outpatient population of 36,262 individuals aged ≥65 years old. A significant association with shorter overall survival was found for both thrombocytopenia (HR=1.45; 95% CI: 1.36–1.56) and thrombocytosis (HR=1.75; 95% CI: 1.56–1.97) when compared to the survival of patients with normal platelet counts. This effect persisted across all ethnic groups. However, African-Americans (non-Hispanic Blacks) with either thrombocytopenia or thrombocytosis were at significantly lower risk compared to non-Hispanic Caucasians (HR=0.82; 95% CI: 0.69–0.96 and HR=0.70; 95% CI: 0.53–0.94, respectively). Furthermore, Hispanics with thrombocytosis were found to have a lower mortality risk compared to non-Hispanic Caucasians with thrombocytosis (HR=0.60; 95% CI: 0.44–0.81). A value of thrombocytosis and thrombocytopenia are independently associated with shorter overall survival in elderly subjects and this effect is modified by ethnicity. Using different thresholds to define the association of thrombocytopenia and thrombocytosis with overall mortality risk among non-Hispanic Blacks may, therefore, be warranted. PMID:24510340

  15. Depressive symptoms as a predictor of quality of life in cerebral small vessel disease, acting independently of disability; a study in both sporadic SVD and CADASIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Rebecca L; Willis, Thomas A; Patel, Bhavini; Morris, Robin G; Markus, Hugh S

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) causes lacunar stroke, and more recently has been implicated as a cause of depression. Factors causing reduced quality of life (QoL) in SVD, including the relative contributions of disability and depressive symptoms, remain uncertain. Hypothesis Depressive symptoms are a major predictor of reduced QoL in SVD, acting independently of disability. Methods The Stroke-Specific QoL scale was completed by 100 patients with SVD (lacunar stroke with MRI lacunar infarct) and 55 controls. We repeated the protocol in 40 patients with the young onset genetic form of SVD, CADASIL, and 35 controls. Disability (modified Rankin Scale), [instrumental] activities of daily living (IADL, ADL), cognition (Mini Mental State Examination) and depressive symptoms (Geriatric Depression Scale, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale) were measured. Results QoL was significantly lower in SVD than controls: mean (SD), 196.8 (35.2) versus 226.8(15.3), pSVD. They account for greater reduction than disability, and the association is independent of disability. This relationship may reflect the proposed causal association between white matter disease and depression. Treatment of depressive symptoms might significantly improve QoL in SVD. PMID:22364606

  16. DEAR1 is a dominant regulator of acinar morphogenesis and an independent predictor of local recurrence-free survival in early-onset breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven T Lott

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer in young women tends to have a natural history of aggressive disease for which rates of recurrence are higher than in breast cancers detected later in life. Little is known about the genetic pathways that underlie early-onset breast cancer. Here we report the discovery of DEAR1 (ductal epithelium-associated RING Chromosome 1, a novel gene encoding a member of the TRIM (tripartite motif subfamily of RING finger proteins, and provide evidence for its role as a dominant regulator of acinar morphogenesis in the mammary gland and as an independent predictor of local recurrence-free survival in early-onset breast cancer. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Suppression subtractive hybridization identified DEAR1 as a novel gene mapping to a region of high-frequency loss of heterozygosity (LOH in a number of histologically diverse human cancers within Chromosome 1p35.1. In the breast epithelium, DEAR1 expression is limited to the ductal and glandular epithelium and is down-regulated in transition to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, an early histologic stage in breast tumorigenesis. DEAR1 missense mutations and homozygous deletion (HD were discovered in breast cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Introduction of the DEAR1 wild type and not the missense mutant alleles to complement a mutation in a breast cancer cell line, derived from a 36-year-old female with invasive breast cancer, initiated acinar morphogenesis in three-dimensional (3D basement membrane culture and restored tissue architecture reminiscent of normal acinar structures in the mammary gland in vivo. Stable knockdown of DEAR1 in immortalized human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs recapitulated the growth in 3D culture of breast cancer cell lines containing mutated DEAR1, in that shDEAR1 clones demonstrated disruption of tissue architecture, loss of apical basal polarity, diffuse apoptosis, and failure of lumen formation. Furthermore, immunohistochemical staining of a tissue

  17. The Use of Mixed Models for the Analysis of Mediated Data with Time-Dependent Predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Blood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear mixed models (LMMs are frequently used to analyze longitudinal data. Although these models can be used to evaluate mediation, they do not directly model causal pathways. Structural equation models (SEMs are an alternative technique that allows explicit modeling of mediation. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the performance of LMMs relative to SEMs in the analysis of mediated longitudinal data with time-dependent predictors and mediators. We simulated mediated longitudinal data from an SEM and specified delayed effects of the predictor. A variety of model specifications were assessed, and the LMMs and SEMs were evaluated with respect to bias, coverage probability, power, and Type I error. Models evaluated in the simulation were also applied to data from an observational cohort of HIV-infected individuals. We found that when carefully constructed, the LMM adequately models mediated exposure effects that change over time in the presence of mediation, even when the data arise from an SEM.

  18. High-Level HOOK3 Expression Is an Independent Predictor of Poor Prognosis Associated with Genomic Instability in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Melling

    Full Text Available Hook microtubule-tethering protein 3 (HOOK3 is an adaptor protein for microtubule-dependent intracellular vesicle and protein trafficking. In order to assess the role of HOOK3 in prostate cancer we analyzed HOOK3 expression by immunohistochemistry on a TMA containing more than 12,400 prostate cancers. Results were compared to tumor phenotype and PSA recurrence as well as aberrations possibly defining relevant molecular subtypes such as ERG status and deletions of 3p13, 5q21, 6q15 and PTEN. HOOK3 immunostaining was negative in normal luminal cells of prostate epithelium, whereas 53.3% of 10,572 interpretable cancers showed HOOK3 expression, which was considered low in 36.4% and high in 16.9% of cases. High-level HOOK3 expression was linked to advanced tumor stage, high Gleason score, high proliferation index, positive lymph node stage, and PSA recurrence (p<0.0001 each. The prognostic role of HOOK3 expression was independent of established clinico-pathological parameters both in preoperative and postoperative settings. Comparisons with molecular features were performed to draw conclusions on the potential function of HOOK3 in the prostate. A strong association with all examined deletions is consistent with a role of HOOK3 for maintaining genomic integrity by contributing to proper centrosome assembly. Finding HOOK3 expression in 74% of ERG positive but in only 38% of ERG negative cancers (p<0.0001 further suggests functional interactions between these genes. In conclusion, the results of our study identify HOOK3 as a strong candidate prognostic marker with a possible role in maintaining genomic integrity in prostate cancer, which may have potential for inclusion into clinical routine assays.

  19. Margin Size is an Independent Predictor of Local Tumor Progression After Ablation of Colon Cancer Liver Metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaodong; Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Petre, Elena N. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Gonen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Do, Kinh G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Brown, Karen T.; Covey, Anne M.; Brody, Lynn A.; Alago, William; Thornton, Raymond H. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Kemeny, Nancy E. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Section of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between the minimal margin size and local tumor progression (LTP) following CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CLM). An institutional review board-approved, HIPPA-compliant review identified 73 patients with 94 previously untreated CLM that underwent RFA between March 2003 and May 2010, resulting in an ablation zone completely covering the tumor 4-8 weeks after RFA dynamic CT. Comparing the pre- with the post-RFA CT, the minimal margin size was categorized to 0, 1-5, 6-10, and 11-15 mm. Follow-up included CT every 2-4 months. Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate the effect of the minimal margin size, tumor location, size, and proximity to a vessel on LTP. Forty-five of 94 (47.9 %) CLM progressed locally. Median LTP-free survival (LPFS) was 16 months. Two-year LPFS rates for ablated CLM with minimal margin of 0, 1-5 mm, 6-10 mm, 11-15 mm were 26, 46, 74, and 80 % (p < 0.011). Minimal margin (p = 0.002) and tumor size (p = 0.028) were independent risk factors for LTP. The risk for LTP decreased by 46 % for each 5-mm increase in minimal margin size, whereas each additional 5-mm increase in tumor size increased the risk of LTP by 22 %. An ablation zone with a minimal margin uniformly larger than 5 mm 4-8 weeks postablation CT is associated with the best local tumor control.

  20. Sarcopenia and inflammation are independent predictors of survival in male patients newly diagnosed with small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Se-Il; Park, Mi Jung; Song, Haa-Na; Kang, Myoung Hee; Park, Hee Jung; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Kim, Seok-Hyun; Kim, Moon Jin; Kang, Jung-Hun; Lee, Gyeong-Won

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia is suggested to be associated with cancer-related inflammation. We assessed the clinical outcome of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients according to sarcopenia and the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR). A total of 117 male SCLC patients treated with first-line chemo- or chemoradiotherapy were assessed based on a retrospective chart review. The mass of the pectoralis muscle was measured by computed tomography and normalized to height. Patients with the lowest quartile of muscle mass were considered to have sarcopenia. Patients were classified into four groups according to their sarcopenia and NLR statuses: sarcopenia/high NLR, sarcopenia/low NLR, non-sarcopenia/high NLR, and non-sarcopenia/low NLR. Sarcopenic patients had lower progression-free survival (PFS) than did non-sarcopenic patients (median 6.0 vs. 7.5 months, p = 0.009), but the difference in overall survival (OS) was not statistically significant (median 10.5 vs. 13.5 months, p = 0.052). However, the OS of sarcopenic patients with high NLR was significantly lower than that in all other groups (median 3.2 vs. 16.0 vs. 12.5 vs. 13.7 months, respectively, p sarcopenia with high NLR was an independent prognostic factor for shorter PFS and OS. Early discontinuation of treatment (20.0 vs. 10.3 %) and treatment-related mortality (50.0 vs. 8.4 %) occurred more frequently in these patients than in the other groups (p < 0.001). In SCLC, sarcopenic male patients with high NLR have a poor prognosis and do not tolerate standard treatment. Intensive supportive care is needed in these patients.

  1. Stricture length and etiology as preoperative independent predictors of recurrence after urethroplasty: A multivariate analysis of 604 urethroplasties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnaird, Adam S.; Levine, Max A.; Ambati, Druvtej; Zorn, Jeff D.; Rourke, Keith F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We determine the preoperative identifiable risk factors during staging that predict stricture recurrence after urethroplasty. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all urethroplasties performed at a Canadian tertiary referral centre from 2003 to 2012. Failure was defined as a recurrent stricture Multivariate analysis was calculated by Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: In total, 604 of 651 (93%) urethroplasties performed had adequate data with a mean follow-up of 52 months. Overall urethral patency was 90.7% with failures occurring between 2 weeks and 77 months postoperatively. The average time to recurrence was 11.7 months, with most patients with recurrence within 6 months (42/56; 75%). Multivariate regression identified Lichen sclerosus, iatrogenic, and infectious etiologies to be independently associated with stricture recurrence with hazard ratios (HR) (95% confidence interval) of 5.9 (2.1–16.5; p ≤ 0.001), 3.4 (1.2–10; p = 0.02), and 7.3 (2.3–23.7; p ≤ 0.001), respectively. Strictures ≥5cm recurred significantly more often (13.8% vs. 5.9%) with a HR 2.3 (1.2–4.5; p ≤ 0.01). Comorbidities, smoking, previous urethroplasty, stricture location and an age ≥50 were not associated with recurrence. Conclusion: Urethroplasty in general is an excellent treatment for urethral stricture with patency rates approaching 91%. While recurrences occur over 6 years after surgery, most (75%) recur within the first 6 months. Long segment strictures (≥5 cm), as well as Lichen sclerosus, infectious and iatrogenic etiologies, are associated with increased risk of recurrence. Limitations include the retrospective, single-centre nature of the study and the 7% loss to follow-up due to the centre being a regional referral one. PMID:24940453

  2. Final model independent result of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-12-15

    The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton x yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles (i.e. adding a further 0.17 ton x yr exposure) are presented. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5{sigma} C.L. Including also the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton x yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3{sigma} and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112{+-}0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144{+-}7) days and the measured period is (0.998{+-}0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. (orig.)

  3. Bayesian Variable Selection with Related Predictors

    CERN Document Server

    Chipman, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    In data sets with many predictors, algorithms for identifying a good subset of predictors are often used. Most such algorithms do not account for any relationships between predictors. For example, stepwise regression might select a model containing an interaction AB but neither main effect A or B. This paper develops mathematical representations of this and other relations between predictors, which may then be incorporated in a model selection procedure. A Bayesian approach that goes beyond the standard independence prior for variable selection is adopted, and preference for certain models is interpreted as prior information. Priors relevant to arbitrary interactions and polynomials, dummy variables for categorical factors, competing predictors, and restrictions on the size of the models are developed. Since the relations developed are for priors, they may be incorporated in any Bayesian variable selection algorithm for any type of linear model. The application of the methods here is illustrated via the Stoch...

  4. Is pre-existing dementia an independent predictor of outcome after stroke? A propensity score-matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Kapral, Moira K; Cote, Robert; Rochon, Paula A; Wang, Julie; Raptis, Stavroula; Mamdani, Muhammad; Black, Sandra E

    2012-11-01

    (CI) 0.74-1.05]; mortality at 30-days: RR 0.88 (95 % CI 0.75-1.03) and mortality at 1 year: RR 1.01 (95 % CI 0.92-1.11). Patients with pre-existing dementia had similar disability at discharge and home disposition. In the subgroup of patients who received thrombolysis, there were no differences between those with and without dementia in the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage (RR 1.27; 95 % CI 0.69-2.35) and no differences in mortality or disability at discharge. Pre-existing dementia is not independently associated with mortality, disability, or institutionalization after ischemic stroke. Pre-existing dementia may not necessarily preclude access to thrombolytic therapy and specialized stroke care.

  5. Committee of machine learning predictors of hydrological models uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayastha, Nagendra; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    In prediction of uncertainty based on machine learning methods, the results of various sampling schemes namely, Monte Carlo sampling (MCS), generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE), Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), shuffled complex evolution metropolis algorithm (SCEMUA), differential evolution adaptive metropolis (DREAM), particle swarm optimization (PSO) and adaptive cluster covering (ACCO)[1] used to build a predictive models. These models predict the uncertainty (quantiles of pdf) of a deterministic output from hydrological model [2]. Inputs to these models are the specially identified representative variables (past events precipitation and flows). The trained machine learning models are then employed to predict the model output uncertainty which is specific for the new input data. For each sampling scheme three machine learning methods namely, artificial neural networks, model tree, locally weighted regression are applied to predict output uncertainties. The problem here is that different sampling algorithms result in different data sets used to train different machine learning models which leads to several models (21 predictive uncertainty models). There is no clear evidence which model is the best since there is no basis for comparison. A solution could be to form a committee of all models and to sue a dynamic averaging scheme to generate the final output [3]. This approach is applied to estimate uncertainty of streamflows simulation from a conceptual hydrological model HBV in the Nzoia catchment in Kenya. [1] N. Kayastha, D. L. Shrestha and D. P. Solomatine. Experiments with several methods of parameter uncertainty estimation in hydrological modeling. Proc. 9th Intern. Conf. on Hydroinformatics, Tianjin, China, September 2010. [2] D. L. Shrestha, N. Kayastha, and D. P. Solomatine, and R. Price. Encapsulation of parameteric uncertainty statistics by various predictive machine learning models: MLUE method, Journal of Hydroinformatic, in press

  6. Prognostic investigations of B7-H1 and B7-H4 expression levels as independent predictor markers of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Hamid Reza; Rostamzadeh, Ayoob; Rahmani, Omid; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Omar; Yahaghi, Hamid; Ahmadi, Koroosh

    2016-06-01

    In order to evaluate the correlation of B7-H4 and B7-H1 with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we analyzed B7-H1 and B7-H4 expressions and their clinical significance by immunohistochemical method. Our result indicated that B7-H4-positive staining was detected in 58.13 % of RCC tissues (25 tissues tumors), and there were 18 tissues of patients without detectable B7-H4. Furthermore, 21 cases (48.83 %) were B7-H1-positive. Positive tumor expressions of B7-H4 and B7-H1 were markedly related to advanced TNM stage (P = 0.001; P = 0.014), high grade (P = 0.001; P = 002), and larger tumor size (P = 0.002; P = 024) in RCC tissues than patients with B7-H4-negative and B7-H1-negative in RCC tissues. The patients with B7-H1 and B7-H4-positive expressions were found to be markedly correlated with the overall survival of the patients (P < 0.05) and tended to have an increased risk of death when compared with negative expression groups. Univariate analysis showed that B7-H4 and B7-H1 expressions, TNM stage, high grade, and tumor size were significantly related to the prognosis of RCC. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that B7-H4 and B7-H1 expressions decreased overall survival. The adjusted HR for B7-H1 was 2.83 (95 % CI 1.210-2.971; P = 0.031) and also was 2.918 (95 % CI 1.243-3.102; P = 0.006) for B7-H4 that showed these markers were independent prognostic factors in RCC patients. The expressions of B7-H1 and B7-H4 in RCC patients indicate that these markers may be as a predictor of tumor development and death risk. Further investigations can be helpful to confirm B7-H1 and B7-H4 roles as an independent predictor of clinical RCC outcome.

  7. Neighborhood Predictors of Intimate Partner Violence: A Theory-Informed Analysis Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voith, Laura A; Brondino, Michael J

    2017-09-01

    Due to high prevalence rates and deleterious effects on individuals, families, and communities, intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health problem. Because IPV occurs in the context of communities and neighborhoods, research must examine the broader environment in addition to individual-level factors to successfully facilitate behavior change. Drawing from the Social Determinants of Health framework and Social Disorganization Theory, neighborhood predictors of IPV were tested using hierarchical linear modeling. Results indicated that concentrated disadvantage and female-to-male partner violence were robust predictors of women's IPV victimization. Implications for theory, practice, and policy, and future research are discussed. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  8. Taking the Error Term of the Factor Model into Account: The Factor Score Predictor Interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauducel, Andre

    2013-01-01

    The problem of factor score indeterminacy implies that the factor and the error scores cannot be completely disentangled in the factor model. It is therefore proposed to compute Harman's factor score predictor that contains an additive combination of factor and error variance. This additive combination is discussed in the framework of classical…

  9. [Socioeconomic and educational inequities as independent predictors for mortality in a developing country: A cohort study in San Francisco, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Romero, Tomás; Manríquez, Leopoldo; Paredes, Mario; Ortúzar, Esteban; Taylor, Alan; Román, Carolinne; Kirschbaum, Aída; Díaz, Carlos

    2007-11-01

    The socioeconomic position (SEP) and educational level of individuals have an inverse correlation with mortality in developed societies. To assess in a society undergoing a socioeconomic transition, the mortality risk associated to a low SEP (combination of education and income, scale 0-25 points, reference > 10 points) and low education (education years, reference > 8 years), adjusting for other known risk factors. In this prospective cohort study, a random sample of 920 subjects, living in San Francisco de Mostazal, Chile, aged more than 20 years (395 males) was examined for the first time in 1997-1999 and re-examined in 2005-2006. All had information about economic household income and level of education. A Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association between mortality and socioeconomic measures. The crude mortality hazard ratio (HR) was 3.34 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.88-3.87) and 6.05 (95% CI 5.04-7.26) for low SEP and low educational level, respectively. After adjusting for age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, smoking, alcohol intake and family history of cardiovascular disease, the figures were 1.23 (95% CI 1.04-1.43) and 1.54 (95% CI 1.23-1.85) for low SEP and low educational level, respectively. In a society in socioeconomic transition, low SEP and especially low educational level are risk factors for mortality even after adjusting for known mortality risk factors.

  10. Modelling the role of the design context in the design process: a domain-independent approach

    OpenAIRE

    Reymen, Isabelle; Kroes, P.; Basten, T; Durling, D.; Shackleton, J

    2002-01-01

    Domain-independent models of the design process are an important means for facilitating interdisciplinary communication and for supporting multidisciplinary design. Many so-called domain-independent models are, however, not really domain independent. We state that, to be domain independent, the models must abstract from domain-specific aspects, be based on the study of several design disciplines, and be useful for many design disciplines and for multidisciplinary design teams. This paper desc...

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is an independent predictor of death but not atherosclerotic events in patients with myocardial infarction: analysis of the Valsartan in Acute Myocardial Infarction Trial (VALIANT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawkins, Nathaniel M; Huang, Zhen; Pieper, Karen S

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). However, the impact on mode of death and risk of atherosclerotic events is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: We assessed the risk of death and major cardiovascular (CV) ev...

  12. Missing in action: Species competition is a neglected predictor variable in species distribution modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpakairi, Kudzai Shaun; Ndaimani, Henry; Tagwireyi, Paradzayi; Gara, Tawanda Winmore; Zvidzai, Mark; Madhlamoto, Daphine

    2017-01-01

    The central role of species competition in shaping community structure in ecosystems is well appreciated amongst ecologists. However species competition is a consistently missing variable in Species Distribution Modelling (SDM). This study presents results of our attempt to incorporate species competition in SDMs. We used a suit of predictor variables including Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), as well as distance from roads, settlements and water, fire frequency and distance from the nearest herbivore sighting (of selected herbivores) to model individual habitat preferences of five grazer species (buffalo, warthog, waterbuck, wildebeest and zebra) with the Ensemble SDM algorithm for Gonarezhou National Park, Zimbabwe. Our results showed that distance from the nearest animal sighting (a proxy for competition among grazers) was the best predictor of the potential distribution of buffalo, wildebeest and zebra but the second best predictor for warthog and waterbuck. Our findings provide evidence to that competition is an important predictor of grazer species' potential distribution. These findings suggest that species distribution modelling that neglects species competition may be inadequate in explaining the potential distribution of species. Therefore our findings encourage the inclusion of competition in SDM as well as potentially igniting discussions that may lead to improving the predictive power of future SDM efforts.

  13. Neurological deterioration in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke is an independent predictor of poor outcomes at 1 year: results from the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Yi; ZHAO Xing-quan; WANG Chun-xue; WANG Yi-long; LIU Gai-fen; WANG Yong-jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of clinical deterioration still exists in the acute phase despite the fact that patients with minor stroke may display less severe symptoms.The impact of this clinical deterioration on long-term outcomes is unknown.We characterized the clinical features of neurological deterioration (ND) in the acute phase of minor ischemic stroke (MIS) and investigated its impact on mid-and long-term outcomes.Methods This was a multi-centered,prospective clinical study involving patients with MIS (the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale,NIHSS <3) recruited from the China National Stroke Registry.Patients were included who had been hospitalized within 24 hours of stroke onset.Baseline characteristics,complication rates during hospitalization,etiology of stroke,as well as 3-,6-,and 12-month post-stroke outcomes were compared between patients with and without ND during the acute phase.Results A number of 368 (15.2%) out of 2424 patients included in the study exhibited ND in the acute phase.Compared to patients without ND,patients with ND had longer hospital stay,increased rate of baseline diabetes,and multiple complications.Multivariate Logistic regression indicated that ND in acute phase was an independent factor predictive of increased dependence (adjusted odds ratio =5.20,95% Cl,3.51-7.70,P <0.001) at 12-month post-stroke.Conclusions The risk of ND in the acute phase is high in patients with MIS.ND in the acute phase is an independent predictor for poor outcomes at 12 months post-stroke onset.

  14. Modeling the predictors of safety behavior in construction workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Phil; Gwak, Han-Seong; Lee, Dong-Eun

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model that quantifies the causal relations among safety variables (latent variables) and workers' safety behavior (indicator) using statistical data and hypotheses obtained from construction workers and existing literatures, respectively. The safety variables that affect workers' safety behaviors are identified from existing studies and operationalized to measure their causal relations with the workers' behaviors. The model identifies the directions and degrees of the effect of every latent variable on the other latent variables and the indicator. Survey questionnaires were administered to construction workers in South Korea. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, Cronbach's α and structural equation modeling were performed to test the causal hypotheses using SPSS 18.0 and AMOS 18.0. This study provides the theoretical model that predicts construction workers' safety behavior on construction sites using path diagram and analysis.

  15. High plasma levels of intact and cleaved soluble urokinase receptor reflect immune activation and are independent predictors of mortality in HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Piironen, Timo; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla

    2005-01-01

    ). In multivariate Cox analysis adjusting for CD4+ count, HIV RNA, beta2-microglobulin, hemoglobin and clinical stage, higher levels of suPAR(I-III) and suPAR(II-III) were independent predictors of increased mortality risk (P ...BACKGROUND: High blood levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR) measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) (bulk measurement of 3-domain and 2-domain suPAR [suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III)], and suPAR(I-III) ligand complexes) strongly predict mortality in HIV-1-infected patients. This study...... investigated plasma levels of suPAR(I-III), suPAR(II-III), and 1-domain suPAR [suPAR(I)] and their predictive value for survival in HIV patients. METHODS: Plasma suPAR was measured by ELISA and 3 different time-resolved fluorescence immunoassays detecting suPAR(I-III), suPAR(I-III) plus suPAR(II-III), and su...

  16. An independent pair-link model of simple fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneville, Richard

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to thermodynamics of simple fluids is presented. The partition function is first expressed in the reciprocal space, it is argued that the links (p,q) between 2 molecules can reasonably in the thermodynamical limit be considered as a set nearly independent objects characterized by the dynamical variables . It is then possible to derive an expression of the pair correlation function. The results, which are independent of the exact shape of the intermolecular potential, are applied to the simple case of hard sphere fluids.

  17. A predictor-corrector algorithm to estimate the fractional flow in oil-water models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savioli, Gabriela B [Laboratorio de IngenierIa de Reservorios, IGPUBA and Departamento de IngenierIa Quimica, Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Av. Las Heras 2214 Piso 3 C1127AAR Buenos Aires (Argentina); Berdaguer, Elena M Fernandez [Instituto de Calculo, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UBA-CONICET and Departamento de Matematica, Facultad de IngenierIa, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: gsavioli@di.fcen.uba.ar, E-mail: efernan@ic.fcen.uba.ar

    2008-11-01

    We introduce a predictor-corrector algorithm to estimate parameters in a nonlinear hyperbolic problem. It can be used to estimate the oil-fractional flow function from the Buckley-Leverett equation. The forward model is non-linear: the sought- for parameter is a function of the solution of the equation. Traditionally, the estimation of functions requires the selection of a fitting parametric model. The algorithm that we develop does not require a predetermined parameter model. Therefore, the estimation problem is carried out over a set of parameters which are functions. The algorithm is based on the linearization of the parameter-to-output mapping. This technique is new in the field of nonlinear estimation. It has the advantage of laying aside parametric models. The algorithm is iterative and is of predictor-corrector type. We present theoretical results on the inverse problem. We use synthetic data to test the new algorithm.

  18. A Comparison of Hourly Typhoon Rainfall Forecasting Models Based on Support Vector Machines and Random Forests with Different Predictor Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Hsiang; Tseng, Hung-Wei; Kuo, Chen-Min; Yang, Tao-Chang; Yu, Pao-Shan

    2016-04-01

    Typhoons with heavy rainfall and strong wind often cause severe floods and losses in Taiwan, which motivates the development of rainfall forecasting models as part of an early warning system. Thus, this study aims to develop rainfall forecasting models based on two machine learning methods, support vector machines (SVMs) and random forests (RFs), and investigate the performances of the models with different predictor sets for searching the optimal predictor set in forecasting. Four predictor sets were used: (1) antecedent rainfalls, (2) antecedent rainfalls and typhoon characteristics, (3) antecedent rainfalls and meteorological factors, and (4) antecedent rainfalls, typhoon characteristics and meteorological factors to construct for 1- to 6-hour ahead rainfall forecasting. An application to three rainfall stations in Yilan River basin, northeastern Taiwan, was conducted. Firstly, the performance of the SVMs-based forecasting model with predictor set #1 was analyzed. The results show that the accuracy of the models for 2- to 6-hour ahead forecasting decrease rapidly as compared to the accuracy of the model for 1-hour ahead forecasting which is acceptable. For improving the model performance, each predictor set was further examined in the SVMs-based forecasting model. The results reveal that the SVMs-based model using predictor set #4 as input variables performs better than the other sets and a significant improvement of model performance is found especially for the long lead time forecasting. Lastly, the performance of the SVMs-based model using predictor set #4 as input variables was compared with the performance of the RFs-based model using predictor set #4 as input variables. It is found that the RFs-based model is superior to the SVMs-based model in hourly typhoon rainfall forecasting. Keywords: hourly typhoon rainfall forecasting, predictor selection, support vector machines, random forests

  19. I Remember You: Independence and the Binomial Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Douglas W.; Rockhill, Beverly

    2006-01-01

    We focus on the problem of ignoring statistical independence. A binomial experiment is used to determine whether judges could match, based on looks alone, dogs to their owners. The experimental design introduces dependencies such that the probability of a given judge correctly matching a dog and an owner changes from trial to trial. We show how…

  20. Comparing Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood Predictors in Structural Equation Modeling of Children’s Lifestyle Index

    OpenAIRE

    Che Wan Jasimah bt Wan Mohamed Radzi; Huang Hui; Hashem Salarzadeh Jenatabadi

    2016-01-01

    Several factors may influence children’s lifestyle. The main purpose of this study is to introduce a children’s lifestyle index framework and model it based on structural equation modeling (SEM) with Maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian predictors. This framework includes parental socioeconomic status, household food security, parental lifestyle, and children’s lifestyle. The sample for this study involves 452 volunteer Chinese families with children 7–12 years old. The experimental results a...

  1. OPLS statistical model versus linear regression to assess sonographic predictors of stroke prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajargah, Kianoush Fathi; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mehdizadeh-Esfanjani, Robab; Savadi-Oskouei, Daryoush; Farhoudi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the comparable applicability of orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) statistical model vs traditional linear regression in order to investigate the role of trans cranial doppler (TCD) sonography in predicting ischemic stroke prognosis. The study was conducted on 116 ischemic stroke patients admitted to a specialty neurology ward. The Unified Neurological Stroke Scale was used once for clinical evaluation on the first week of admission and again six months later. All data was primarily analyzed using simple linear regression and later considered for multivariate analysis using PLS/OPLS models through the SIMCA P+12 statistical software package. The linear regression analysis results used for the identification of TCD predictors of stroke prognosis were confirmed through the OPLS modeling technique. Moreover, in comparison to linear regression, the OPLS model appeared to have higher sensitivity in detecting the predictors of ischemic stroke prognosis and detected several more predictors. Applying the OPLS model made it possible to use both single TCD measures/indicators and arbitrarily dichotomized measures of TCD single vessel involvement as well as the overall TCD result. In conclusion, the authors recommend PLS/OPLS methods as complementary rather than alternative to the available classical regression models such as linear regression.

  2. Test of the Fishbein and Ajzen models as predictors of health care workers' glove use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, P F

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of health care workers' glove use when there is a potential for blood exposure. The study hypothesis was that an extension of the theory of planned behavior would explain more of the variance in glove use behavior than the theory of reasoned action or theory of planned behavior. A random sample of nurses and laboratory workers (N = 527) completed a 26-item questionnaire with acceptable content validity and reliability estimates. Using structural equation modeling techniques, intention, attitude, and perceived risk were significant predictors of behavior. Perceived control and attitude were the significant determinants of intention. The theory of reasoned action was the most parsimonious model, explaining 70% of the variance in glove use behavior. The theory of planned behavior extension was a viable model to study behavior related to glove use and reducing workers' risks to bloodborne diseases.

  3. An Effect Size for Regression Predictors in Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloe, Ariel M.; Becker, Betsy Jane

    2012-01-01

    A new effect size representing the predictive power of an independent variable from a multiple regression model is presented. The index, denoted as r[subscript sp], is the semipartial correlation of the predictor with the outcome of interest. This effect size can be computed when multiple predictor variables are included in the regression model…

  4. Solid Predominant Histologic Subtype in Resected Stage I Lung Adenocarcinoma Is an Independent Predictor of Early, Extrathoracic, Multisite Recurrence and of Poor Postrecurrence Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Hideki; Kadota, Kyuichi; Chaft, Jamie E.; Buitrago, Daniel; Sima, Camelia S.; Lee, Ming-Ching; Huang, James; Travis, William D.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Rudin, Charles M.; Jones, David R.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the significance of the proposed International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) histologic subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma for patterns of recurrence and, among patients who recur following resection of stage I lung adenocarcinoma, for postrecurrence survival (PRS). Patients and Methods We reviewed patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone complete surgical resection from 1999 to 2009 (N = 1,120). Tumors were subtyped by using the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. The effects of the dominant subtype on recurrence and, among patients who recurred, on PRS were investigated. Results Of 1,120 patients identified, 188 had recurrent disease, 103 of whom died as a result of lung cancer. Among patients who recurred, 2-year PRS was 45%, and median PRS was 26.1 months. Compared with patients with nonsolid tumors, patients with solid predominant tumors had earlier (P = .007), more extrathoracic (P recurrences. Multivariable analysis of primary tumor factors revealed that, among patients who recurred, solid predominant histologic pattern in the primary tumor (hazard ratio [HR], 1.76; P = .016), age older than 65 years (HR, 1.63; P = .01), and sublobar resection (HR, 1.6; P = .01) were significantly associated with worse PRS. Presence of extrathoracic metastasis (HR, 1.76; P = .013) and age older than 65 years at the time of recurrence (HR, 1.7; P = .014) were also significantly associated with worse PRS. Conclusion In patients with stage I primary lung adenocarcinoma, solid predominant subtype is an independent predictor of early recurrence and, among those patients who recur, of worse PRS. Our findings provide a rationale for investigating adjuvant therapy and identify novel therapeutic targets for patients with solid predominant lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26261257

  5. The hemoglobin glycation index is not an independent predictor of the risk of microvascular complications in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachin, John M; Genuth, Saul; Nathan, David M; Rutledge, Brandy N

    2007-07-01

    The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) demonstrated that intensive therapy aimed at improved glucose control markedly reduced the risk of diabetes complications compared with conventional therapy. The principal determinant of risk was the history of glycemia. Recently, McCarter et al. (Diabetes Care 27:1259-1264, 2004) have presented analyses of the publicly available DCCT data using their hemoglobin glycation index (HGI), which is computed as the difference between the observed HbA1c (A1C) and that predicted from the level of blood glucose. In their analyses, the HGI level was a significant predictor of progression of retinopathy and nephropathy in the DCCT, which the authors claimed to support the hypothesis that the biological propensity for glycation, so-called biological variation in glycation, is another mechanism that determines risk of complications. However, we have criticized these analyses and conclusions because, from statistical principles, the glycation index must be positively correlated with the A1C level and thus may simply be a surrogate for A1C. Herein, we present the statistical properties of the glycation index to document its high correlation with A1C. We then replicate the analyses of McCarter et al. using both the HGI and the A1C together. Analyses show conclusively that the glycation index is not an independent risk factor for microvascular complications and that the effect of the glycation index on risk is wholly explained by the associated level of A1C. The HGI should not be used to estimate risk of complications or to guide therapy.

  6. In older men, higher plasma testosterone or dihydrotestosterone is an independent predictor for reduced incidence of stroke but not myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Bu B; Alfonso, Helman; Chubb, S A Paul; Hankey, Graeme J; Handelsman, David J; Golledge, Jonathan; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Flicker, Leon; Norman, Paul E

    2014-12-01

    Older men have lower T levels, but whether differences in circulating T or its metabolites dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or estradiol (E2) contribute to cardiovascular disease remains controversial. We tested the hypothesis that plasma T, DHT, and E2 are differentially associated with the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in older men. Plasma total T, DHT, and E2 were assayed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in early-morning samples from 3690 community-dwelling men aged 70-89 years. Outcomes of the first hospital admission or death due to MI or stroke were ascertained by data linkage. Mean follow-up was 6.6 years. Incident MI occurred in 344, stroke in 300, and neither in 3046 men. In a multivariate analysis adjusting for age and other risk factors, T, DHT, and E2 were not associated with incident MI [fully adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for T in quartile (Q) 4 vs Q1: 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.66-1.28; DHT: 0.83, 95% CI 0.59-1.15; E2: 0.84, 95% CI 0.62-1.15]. Higher T or DHT was associated with a lower incidence of stroke (T: Q4: Q1 fully adjusted HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.39-0.81, P = .002; DHT: 0.57, 95% CI 0.40-0.81, P = .002). E2 was not associated with stroke (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.54-1.08, P = .123). Higher plasma T or DHT is a biomarker for reduced risk of stroke but not MI. Androgen exposure may influence outcomes after rather than the incidence of MI, whereas androgens but not E2 are independent predictors of stroke risk. Randomized clinical trials are needed to clarify the impact of modifying T or DHT on the risk of stroke in aging men.

  7. Ki-67 Is an Independent Predictor of Metastasis and Cause-Specific Mortality for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoven, Bret [University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Yan, Yan [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ritter, Mark, E-mail: ritter@humonc.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Khor, Li-Yan [Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hammond, Elizabeth [LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jones, Christopher [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Amin, Mahul [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Ontario (Canada); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pollack, Alan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: The association of Ki-67 staining index (Ki67-SI) with overall survival (OS), disease-specific mortality (DSM), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF) was examined in men with favorable- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy (RT) alone or with short-term androgen deprivation (ADT) in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08. Methods and Materials: 468 patients (23.6%) on RTOG 94-08 had sufficient tissue for Ki67-SI analysis. The median follow-up time was 7.9 years. Ki67-SI was determined by immunohistochemistry and quantified manually and by image analysis. Correlative analysis versus clinical outcome was performed using the third quartile (≥Q3) cutpoint. A proportional hazards multivariable analysis (MVA) dichotomized covariates in accordance with trial stratification and randomization criteria. Results: In MVAs adjusted for all treatment covariates, high Ki67-SI (≥Q3) was correlated with increased DSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.48, P=.03), DM (HR 3.5, P=.002), and BF (HR 3.55, P<.0001). MVA revealed similar Ki67-associated hazard ratios in each separate treatment arm for DSM, DM, and BF; these reached significance only for DM in the RT-alone arm and for BF in both arms. Ki67-SI was not a significant predictor of intraprostatic recurrence assessed by repeated biopsy 2 years after treatment. Patients with a high or low Ki67-SI seemed to experience a similar relative benefit from the addition of ADT to radiation. Conclusions: High Ki67-SI independently predicts for increased DSM, DM, and protocol BF in primarily intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with RT with or without ADT on RTOG 94-08 but does not predict for local recurrence or for increased relative benefit from ADT. This and prior studies lend support for the use of Ki67-SI as a stratification factor in future trials.

  8. Model updating of complex structures using the combination of component mode synthesis and Kriging predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Wang, Dejun; Zhang, Shaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Updating the structural model of complex structures is time-consuming due to the large size of the finite element model (FEM). Using conventional methods for these cases is computationally expensive or even impossible. A two-level method, which combined the Kriging predictor and the component mode synthesis (CMS) technique, was proposed to ensure the successful implementing of FEM updating of large-scale structures. In the first level, the CMS was applied to build a reasonable condensed FEM of complex structures. In the second level, the Kriging predictor that was deemed as a surrogate FEM in structural dynamics was generated based on the condensed FEM. Some key issues of the application of the metamodel (surrogate FEM) to FEM updating were also discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method was demonstrated by updating the FEM of a real arch bridge with the measured modal parameters.

  9. Model Updating of Complex Structures Using the Combination of Component Mode Synthesis and Kriging Predictor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Updating the structural model of complex structures is time-consuming due to the large size of the finite element model (FEM. Using conventional methods for these cases is computationally expensive or even impossible. A two-level method, which combined the Kriging predictor and the component mode synthesis (CMS technique, was proposed to ensure the successful implementing of FEM updating of large-scale structures. In the first level, the CMS was applied to build a reasonable condensed FEM of complex structures. In the second level, the Kriging predictor that was deemed as a surrogate FEM in structural dynamics was generated based on the condensed FEM. Some key issues of the application of the metamodel (surrogate FEM to FEM updating were also discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed method was demonstrated by updating the FEM of a real arch bridge with the measured modal parameters.

  10. Automatic Gauge Control in Rolling Process Based on Multiple Smith Predictor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangyun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic rolling process is a high-speed system which always requires high-speed control and communication capabilities. Meanwhile, it is also a typical complex electromechanical system; distributed control has become the mainstream of computer control system for rolling mill. Generally, the control system adopts the 2-level control structure—basic automation (Level 1 and process control (Level 2—to achieve the automatic gauge control. In Level 1, there is always a certain distance between the roll gap of each stand and the thickness testing point, leading to the time delay of gauge control. Smith predictor is a method to cope with time-delay system, but the practical feedback control based on traditional Smith predictor cannot get the ideal control result, because the time delay is hard to be measured precisely and in some situations it may vary in a certain range. In this paper, based on adaptive Smith predictor, we employ multiple models to cover the uncertainties of time delay. The optimal model will be selected by the proposed switch mechanism. Simulations show that the proposed multiple Smith model method exhibits excellent performance in improving the control result even for system with jumping time delay.

  11. A model independent safeguard for unbinned Profile Likelihood

    CERN Document Server

    Priel, Nadav; Landsman, Hagar; Manfredini, Alessandro; Budnik, Ranny

    2016-01-01

    We present a general method to include residual un-modeled background shape uncertainties in profile likelihood based statistical tests for high energy physics and astroparticle physics counting experiments. This approach provides a simple and natural protection against undercoverage, thus lowering the chances of a false discovery or of an over constrained confidence interval, and allows a natural transition to unbinned space. Unbinned likelihood enhances the sensitivity and allows optimal usage of information for the data and the models. We show that the asymptotic behavior of the test statistic can be regained in cases where the model fails to describe the true background behavior, and present 1D and 2D case studies for model-driven and data-driven background models. The resulting penalty on sensitivities follows the actual discrepancy between the data and the models, and is asymptotically reduced to zero with increasing knowledge.

  12. Evaluation of Axonal Strain as a Predictor for Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries Using Finite Element Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Chiara; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-11-01

    Finite element (FE) models are often used to study the biomechanical effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Measures based on mechanical responses, such as principal strain or invariants of the strain tensor, are used as a metric to predict the risk of injury. However, the reliability of inferences drawn from these models depends on the correspondence between the mechanical measures and injury data, as well as the establishment of accurate thresholds of tissue injury. In the current study, a validated anisotropic FE model of the human head is used to evaluate the hypothesis that strain in the direction of fibers (axonal strain) is a better predictor of TBI than maximum principal strain (MPS), anisotropic equivalent strain (AESM) and cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM). An analysis of head kinematics-based metrics, such as head injury criterion (HIC) and brain injury criterion (BrIC), is also provided. Logistic regression analysis is employed to compare binary injury data (concussion/no concussion) with continuous strain/kinematics data. The threshold corresponding to 50% of injury probability is determined for each parameter. The predictive power (area under the ROC curve, AUC) is calculated from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The measure with the highest AUC is considered to be the best predictor of mTBI. Logistic regression shows a statistical correlation between all the mechanical predictors and injury data for different regions of the brain. Peaks of axonal strain have the highest AUC and determine a strain threshold of 0.07 for corpus callosum and 0.15 for the brainstem, in agreement with previously experimentally derived injury thresholds for reversible axonal injury. For a data set of mild TBI from the national football league, the strain in the axonal direction is found to be a better injury predictor than MPS, AESM, CSDM, BrIC and HIC.

  13. LTSmin: high-performance language-independent model checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kant, Gijs; Laarman, Alfons; Meijer, Jeroen; Pol, van de Jaco; Blom, Stefan; Dijk, van Tom; Baier, Christel; Tinelli, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the LTSmin model checker has been extended with support for several new modelling languages, including probabilistic (Mapa) and timed systems (Uppaal). Also, connecting additional language front-ends or ad-hoc state-space generators to LTSmin was simplified using custom C-code. From

  14. Estimating Independent Locally Shifted Random Utility Models for Ranking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Kar Yin; Koning, Alex J.; Franses, Philip Hans

    2011-01-01

    We consider the estimation of probabilistic ranking models in the context of conjoint experiments. By using approximate rather than exact ranking probabilities, we avoided the computation of high-dimensional integrals. We extended the approximation technique proposed by Henery (1981) in the context of the Thurstone-Mosteller-Daniels model to any…

  15. An independent verification and validation of the Future Theater Level Model conceptual model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, D.S. III; Kruse, K.L.; Martellaro, A.J.; Packard, S.L.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Turley, V.K.

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the methodology and results of independent verification and validation performed on a combat model in its design stage. The combat model is the Future Theater Level Model (FTLM), under development by The Joint Staff/J-8. J-8 has undertaken its development to provide an analysis tool that addresses the uncertainties of combat more directly than previous models and yields more rapid study results. The methodology adopted for this verification and validation consisted of document analyses. Included were detailed examination of the FTLM design documents (at all stages of development), the FTLM Mission Needs Statement, and selected documentation for other theater level combat models. These documents were compared to assess the FTLM as to its design stage, its purpose as an analytical combat model, and its capabilities as specified in the Mission Needs Statement. The conceptual design passed those tests. The recommendations included specific modifications as well as a recommendation for continued development. The methodology is significant because independent verification and validation have not been previously reported as being performed on a combat model in its design stage. The results are significant because The Joint Staff/J-8 will be using the recommendations from this study in determining whether to proceed with develop of the model.

  16. Model independence of constraints on particle dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griest, K.; Sadoulet, B.

    1989-03-01

    The connection between the annihilation, elastic, and production cross sections is reviewed, showing how a general lower limit on the interaction rate in a detector is obtained from the requirement that a particle be the dark matter. High energy production experiments further constrain models, making very light dark matter particles unlikely. Special attention is paid to the uncertainties, loopholes and model dependencies that go into the arguments and several examples are given. 12 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Addressing the Need for Independence in the CSE Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL; Sheldon, Frederick T [ORNL; Grimaila, Michael R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Information system security risk, defined as the product of the monetary losses associated with security incidents and the probability that they occur, is a suitable decision criterion when considering different information system architectures. Risk assessment is the widely accepted process used to understand, quantify, and document the effects of undesirable events on organizational objectives so that risk management, continuity of operations planning, and contingency planning can be performed. One technique, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES), is a methodology for estimating security costs to stakeholders as a function of possible risk postures. In earlier works, we presented a computational infrastructure that allows an analyst to estimate the security of a system in terms of the loss that each stakeholder stands to sustain, as a result of security breakdowns. Additional work has applied CSES to specific business cases. The current state-of-the-art of CSES addresses independent events. In typical usage, analysts create matrices that capture their expert opinion, and then use those matrices to quantify costs to stakeholders. This expansion generalizes CSES to the common real-world case where events may be dependent.

  18. Improving the precision of lake ecosystem metabolism estimates by identifying predictors of model uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kevin C.; Winslow, Luke A.; Read, Jordan S.; Read, Emily K.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Adrian, Rita; Hanson, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Diel changes in dissolved oxygen are often used to estimate gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) in aquatic ecosystems. Despite the widespread use of this approach to understand ecosystem metabolism, we are only beginning to understand the degree and underlying causes of uncertainty for metabolism model parameter estimates. Here, we present a novel approach to improve the precision and accuracy of ecosystem metabolism estimates by identifying physical metrics that indicate when metabolism estimates are highly uncertain. Using datasets from seventeen instrumented GLEON (Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network) lakes, we discovered that many physical characteristics correlated with uncertainty, including PAR (photosynthetically active radiation, 400-700 nm), daily variance in Schmidt stability, and wind speed. Low PAR was a consistent predictor of high variance in GPP model parameters, but also corresponded with low ER model parameter variance. We identified a threshold (30% of clear sky PAR) below which GPP parameter variance increased rapidly and was significantly greater in nearly all lakes compared with variance on days with PAR levels above this threshold. The relationship between daily variance in Schmidt stability and GPP model parameter variance depended on trophic status, whereas daily variance in Schmidt stability was consistently positively related to ER model parameter variance. Wind speeds in the range of ~0.8-3 m s–1 were consistent predictors of high variance for both GPP and ER model parameters, with greater uncertainty in eutrophic lakes. Our findings can be used to reduce ecosystem metabolism model parameter uncertainty and identify potential sources of that uncertainty.

  19. Macro Scale Independently Homogenized Subcells for Modeling Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinzler, Brina J.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical method has been developed to analyze the impact response of triaxially braided carbon fiber composites, including the penetration velocity and impact damage patterns. In the analytical model, the triaxial braid architecture is simulated by using four parallel shell elements, each of which is modeled as a laminated composite. Currently, each shell element is considered to be a smeared homogeneous material. The commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA is used to conduct the simulations, and a continuum damage mechanics model internal to LS-DYNA is used as the material constitutive model. To determine the stiffness and strength properties required for the constitutive model, a top-down approach for determining the strength properties is merged with a bottom-up approach for determining the stiffness properties. The top-down portion uses global strengths obtained from macro-scale coupon level testing to characterize the material strengths for each subcell. The bottom-up portion uses micro-scale fiber and matrix stiffness properties to characterize the material stiffness for each subcell. Simulations of quasi-static coupon level tests for several representative composites are conducted along with impact simulations.

  20. Using digital elevation models as an environmental predictor for soil clay contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) as an environmental predictor for soil clay content (SCC). It was based on the applicability of different DEMs, i.e., SRTM with 90-m resolution and airborne Light Detection...... and Ranging (LIDAR) (in 24- and 90-m resolution), using regression-tree analysis. Ten terrain parameters were generated from these DEMs. These terrain parameters were used along other environmental variables to statistically explain SCC content in Denmark. Results indicated that the SRTM tree model (T1: 90-m...

  1. Independence-Based Optimization of Epistemic Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-22

    model checking, Chaum’s Dining Cryptographers protocol [10] is described in Section 3. Sec- tion 4 recalls Shenoy and Shafer’s valuation algebra , which...future directions. Appendix A provides additional detail on the experiments. 2 Background: Epistemic Logic We begin by recalling some basic definitions...anonymous broadcast. This protocol, both in its basic form, as well as an extension that is more generally applicable, has previously been analysed using

  2. Towards Platform Independent Database Modelling in Enterprise Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Martyn Holland; Calinescu, Radu; Paige, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Enterprise software systems are prevalent in many organisations, typically they are data-intensive and manage customer, sales, or other important data. When an enterprise system needs to be modernised or migrated (e.g. to the cloud) it is necessary to understand the structure of this data and how it is used. We have developed a tool-supported approach to model database structure, query patterns, and growth patterns. Compared to existing work, our tool offers increased system support and exten...

  3. The Integrated Medical Model: Outcomes from Independent Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J.; Garcia, Y.; Griffin, D.; Arellano, J.; Boley, L.; Goodenow, D. A.; Kerstman, E.; Reyes, D.; Saile, L.; Walton, M.; hide

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) v4.0 underwent an extensive external review in preparation for transition to an operational status. In order to insure impartiality of the review process, the Exploration Medical Capabilities Element of NASA's Human Research Program convened the review through the Systems Review Office at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The review board convened by GSFC consisted of persons from both NASA and academia with expertise in the fields of statistics, epidemiology, modeling, software development, aerospace medicine, and project management (see Figure 1). The board reviewed software and code standards, as well as evidence pedigree associated with both the input and outcomes information. The board also assesses the models verification, validation, sensitivity to parameters and ability to answer operational questions. This talk will discuss the processes for designing the review, how the review progressed and the findings from the board, as well as summarize the IMM project responses to those findings. Overall, the board found that the IMM is scientifically sound, represents a necessary, comprehensive approach to identifying medical and environmental risks facing astronauts in long duration missions and is an excellent tool for communication between engineers and physicians. The board also found IMM and its customer(s) should convene an additional review of the IMM data sources and to develop a sustainable approach to augment, peer review, and maintain the information utilized in the IMM. The board found this is critically important because medical knowledge continues to evolve. Delivery of IMM v4.0 to the Crew Health and Safety (CHS) Program will occur in the 2017. Once delivered for operational decision support, IMM v4.0 will provide CHS with additional quantitative capability in to assess astronaut medical risks and required medical capabilities to help drive down overall mission risks.

  4. Nonparametric Independence Screening in Sparse Ultra-High Dimensional Additive Models

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Jianqing; Song, Rui

    2011-01-01

    A variable screening procedure via correlation learning was proposed Fan and Lv (2008) to reduce dimensionality in sparse ultra-high dimensional models. Even when the true model is linear, the marginal regression can be highly nonlinear. To address this issue, we further extend the correlation learning to marginal nonparametric learning. Our nonparametric independence screening is called NIS, a specific member of the sure independence screening. Several closely related variable screening procedures are proposed. Under the nonparametric additive models, it is shown that under some mild technical conditions, the proposed independence screening methods enjoy a sure screening property. The extent to which the dimensionality can be reduced by independence screening is also explicitly quantified. As a methodological extension, an iterative nonparametric independence screening (INIS) is also proposed to enhance the finite sample performance for fitting sparse additive models. The simulation results and a real data a...

  5. Age at quitting smoking as a predictor of risk of cardiovascular disease incidence independent of smoking status, time since quitting and pack-years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walls Helen L

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk prediction for CVD events has been shown to vary according to current smoking status, pack-years smoked over a lifetime, time since quitting and age at quitting. The latter two are closely and inversely related. It is not known whether the age at which one quits smoking is an additional important predictor of CVD events. The aim of this study was to determine whether the risk of CVD events varied according to age at quitting after taking into account current smoking status, lifetime pack-years smoked and time since quitting. Findings We used the Cox proportional hazards model to evaluate the risk of developing a first CVD event for a cohort of participants in the Framingham Offspring Heart Study who attended the fourth examination between ages 30 and 74 years and were free of CVD. Those who quit before the median age of 37 years had a risk of CVD incidence similar to those who were never smokers. The incorporation of age at quitting in the smoking variable resulted in better prediction than the model which had a simple current smoker/non-smoker measure and the one that incorporated both time since quitting and pack-years. These models demonstrated good discrimination, calibration and global fit. The risk among those quitting more than 5 years prior to the baseline exam and those whose age at quitting was prior to 44 years was similar to the risk among never smokers. However, the risk among those quitting less than 5 years prior to the baseline exam and those who continued to smoke until 44 years of age (or beyond was two and a half times higher than that of never smokers. Conclusions Age at quitting improves the prediction of risk of CVD incidence even after other smoking measures are taken into account. The clinical benefit of adding age at quitting to the model with other smoking measures may be greater than the associated costs. Thus, age at quitting should be considered in addition to smoking status, time since

  6. Model-independent plot of dynamic PET data facilitates data interpretation and model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Ole Lajord

    2012-02-21

    When testing new PET radiotracers or new applications of existing tracers, the blood-tissue exchange and the metabolism need to be examined. However, conventional plots of measured time-activity curves from dynamic PET do not reveal the inherent kinetic information. A novel model-independent volume-influx plot (vi-plot) was developed and validated. The new vi-plot shows the time course of the instantaneous distribution volume and the instantaneous influx rate. The vi-plot visualises physiological information that facilitates model selection and it reveals when a quasi-steady state is reached, which is a prerequisite for the use of the graphical analyses by Logan and Gjedde-Patlak. Both axes of the vi-plot have direct physiological interpretation, and the plot shows kinetic parameter in close agreement with estimates obtained by non-linear kinetic modelling. The vi-plot is equally useful for analyses of PET data based on a plasma input function or a reference region input function. The vi-plot is a model-independent and informative plot for data exploration that facilitates the selection of an appropriate method for data analysis.

  7. Spatial modelling of marine organisms in Forsmark and Oskarshamn. Including calculation of physical predictor variables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlen, Ida; Nikolopoulos, Anna; Isaeus, Martin (AquaBiota Water Research, Stockholm (SE))

    2007-06-15

    GIS grids (maps) of marine parameters were created using point data from previous site investigations in the Forsmark and Oskarshamn areas. The proportion of global radiation reaching the sea bottom in Forsmark and Oskarshamn was calculated in ArcView, using Secchi depth measurements and the digital elevation models for the respective area. The number of days per year when the incoming light exceeds 5 MJ/m2 at the bottom was then calculated using the result of the previous calculations together with measured global radiation. Existing modelled grid-point data on bottom and pelagic temperature for Forsmark were interpolated to create surface covering grids. Bottom and pelagic temperature grids for Oskarshamn were calculated using point measurements to achieve yearly averages for a few points and then using regressions with existing grids to create new maps. Phytoplankton primary production in Forsmark was calculated using point measurements of chlorophyll and irradiance, and a regression with a modelled grid of Secchi depth. Distribution of biomass of macrophyte communities in Forsmark and Oskarshamn was calculated using spatial modelling in GRASP, based on field data from previous surveys. Physical parameters such as those described above were used as predictor variables. Distribution of biomass of different functional groups of fish in Forsmark was calculated using spatial modelling based on previous surveys and with predictor variables such as physical parameters and results from macrophyte modelling. All results are presented as maps in the report. The quality of the modelled predictions varies as a consequence of the quality and amount of the input data, the ecology and knowledge of the predicted phenomena, and by the modelling technique used. A substantial part of the variation is not described by the models, which should be expected for biological modelling. Therefore, the resulting grids should be used with caution and with this uncertainty kept in mind. All

  8. Alcock-Paczynski Test with Model-independent BAO Data

    CERN Document Server

    Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological tests based on the statistical analysis of galaxy distributions are usually dependent on the evolution of the sources. An exception is the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) test, which is based on the changing ratio of angular to spatial/redshift size of (presumed) spherically-symmetric source distributions with distance. Intrinsic redshift distortions due to gravitational effects may also have an influence, but there is now a way to overcome them: with the inclusion in the AP test of an observational signature with a sharp feature, such as the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) peak. Redshift distortions affect only the amplitude of the peak, not its position. As we will show here, the use of this diagnostic, with newly acquired data on the anisotropic distribution of the BAO peaks from SDSS-III/BOSS-DR11 at average redshifts 0.57 and 2.34, strongly disfavours the current concordance (LCDM) model, which is discarded at the 3-sigma level. A statistically acceptable fit to the AP data with wCDM (the version ...

  9. Do depressive symptoms predict the incidence of myocardial infarction independent of hopelessness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pössel, Patrick; Mitchell, Amanda M; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Kaplan, George A; Kauhanen, Jussi; Valtonen, Maarit

    2015-01-01

    Depression and hopelessness predict myocardial infarction, but it is unclear whether depression and hopelessness are independent predictors of myocardial infarction incidents. Hopelessness, depression, and myocardial infarction incidence rate 18 years later were measured in 2005 men. Cox regressions were conducted with hopelessness and depression serving as individual predictors of myocardial infarction. Another Cox model examined whether the two predictors predict myocardial infarction when adjusting for each other. Depression and hopelessness predicted myocardial infarction in independent regressions, but when adjusting for each other, hopelessness, but not depression, predicted myocardial infarction incidents. Thus, these results suggest that depression and hopelessness are not independent predictors of myocardial infarction. © The Author(s) 2013.

  10. Nestin is an independent predictor of cancer-specific survival after radical cystectomy in patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-ichi Tabata

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between the expression of nestin, a class VI intermediate filament protein, and pathologic features or survival in patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB. METHODS: Nestin expression in tumor cells was immunohistochemically studied in 93 patients with UCB who underwent radical cystectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The associations with clinicopathologic parameters were evaluated. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the effect of nestin expression on survival. RESULTS: Nestin expression in cystectomy specimens was observed in 13 of 93 patients (14.0%. Nestin expression was associated with pathologic tumor stage (p = 0.006. Nestin-negative patients had better overall survival compared with nestin-positive patients (log-rank p = 0.0148. Univariable analysis indicated that nestin expression, lymphovascular invasion, and lymph node status were significantly associated with cancer-specific survival (hazard ratios, 2.78, 2.15, and 2.80, respectively. On multivariable analysis, nestin expression and lymph node status were independent prognostic factors in cancer-specific survival (hazard ratios, 2.45 and 2.65, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that nestin expression is a novel independent prognostic indicator for patients with UCB and a potentially useful marker to select patients who may be candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. Model Independent Foreground Power Spectrum Estimation using WMAP 5-year Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Tuhin; Jain, Pankaj; Souradeep, Tarun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose & implement on WMAP 5-year data, a model independent approach of foreground power spectrum estimation for multifrequency observations of CMB experiments. Recently a model independent approach of CMB power spectrum estimation was proposed by Saha et al. 2006. This methodology demonstrates that CMB power spectrum can be reliably estimated solely from WMAP data without assuming any template models for the foreground components. In the current paper, we extend this work to estimate the galactic foreground power spectrum using the WMAP 5 year maps following a self contained analysis. We apply the model independent method in harmonic basis to estimate the foreground power spectrum and frequency dependence of combined foregrounds. We also study the behaviour of synchrotron spectral index variation over different regions of the sky. We compare our results with those obtained from MEM foreground maps which are formed in pixel space. We find that relative to our model independent estimates...

  12. Lipoprotein(a) levels in familial hipercholesterolaemia: an important predictor for cardiovascular disease independent of the type of LDL-receptor mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine the relationship between lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a large cohort of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients. Lipoprotein(a) is considered a cardiovascular risk factor. Nevertheless, the role of Lp(a) as a predictor of CVD in FH has been...

  13. Expression of the outcome predictor in acute leukemia 1 (OPAL1) gene is not an independent prognostic factor in patients treated according to COALL or St Jude protocols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); W.E. Evans (William); R. Pieters (Rob); M.L. den Boer (Monique); M.H. Cheok (Meyling); K.M. Kazemier (Karin); D. Pei (Deqing); J.R. Downing (James); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); U. Göbel (Ulrich); U. Graubner (Ulrike)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractNew prognostic factors may result in better risk classification and improved treatment of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recently, high expression of a gene named OPAL1 (outcome predictor in acute leukemia) was reported to be associated with favorable prognosis in ALL.

  14. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  15. Independent scattering model and velocity dispersion in trabecular bone: comparison with a multiple scattering model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haïat, G; Naili, S

    2011-02-01

    Speed of sound measurements are used clinically to assess bone strength. Trabecular bone is an attenuating composite material in which negative values of velocity dispersion have been measured; this behavior remaining poorly explained physically. The aim of this work is to describe the ultrasonic propagation in trabecular bone modeled by infinite cylinders immersed in a saturating matrix and to derive the physical determinants of velocity dispersion. An original homogenization model accounting for the coupling of independent scattering and absorption phenomena allows the computation of phase velocity and of dispersion while varying bone properties. The first step of the model consists in the computation of the attenuation coefficient at all frequencies. The second step of the model corresponds to the application of the general Kramers-Krönig relationship to derive the frequency dependence of phase velocity. The model predicts negative values of velocity dispersion in agreement with experimental results obtained in phantoms mimicking trabecular bone. In trabecular bone, only negative values of velocity dispersion are predicted by the model, which span within the range of values measured experimentally. However, the comparison of the present results with results obtained in Haiat et al. (J Acoust Soc Am 124:4047-4058, 2008) assuming multiple scattering indicates that accounting for multiple scattering phenomena leads to a better prediction of velocity dispersion in trabecular bone.

  16. The Causal Meaning of Genomic Predictors and How It Affects Construction and Comparison of Genome-Enabled Selection Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Bruno D.; Morota, Gota; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Gianola, Daniel; Weigel, Kent; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The term “effect” in additive genetic effect suggests a causal meaning. However, inferences of such quantities for selection purposes are typically viewed and conducted as a prediction task. Predictive ability as tested by cross-validation is currently the most acceptable criterion for comparing models and evaluating new methodologies. Nevertheless, it does not directly indicate if predictors reflect causal effects. Such evaluations would require causal inference methods that are not typical in genomic prediction for selection. This suggests that the usual approach to infer genetic effects contradicts the label of the quantity inferred. Here we investigate if genomic predictors for selection should be treated as standard predictors or if they must reflect a causal effect to be useful, requiring causal inference methods. Conducting the analysis as a prediction or as a causal inference task affects, for example, how covariates of the regression model are chosen, which may heavily affect the magnitude of genomic predictors and therefore selection decisions. We demonstrate that selection requires learning causal genetic effects. However, genomic predictors from some models might capture noncausal signal, providing good predictive ability but poorly representing true genetic effects. Simulated examples are used to show that aiming for predictive ability may lead to poor modeling decisions, while causal inference approaches may guide the construction of regression models that better infer the target genetic effect even when they underperform in cross-validation tests. In conclusion, genomic selection models should be constructed to aim primarily for identifiability of causal genetic effects, not for predictive ability. PMID:25908318

  17. Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model Monthly Climate Data for the Continental United States.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset was created using the PRISM (Parameter-elevation Regressions on Independent Slopes Model) climate mapping system, developed by Dr. Christopher Daly,...

  18. The state of cold quark matter: a model-independent view

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Renxin

    2009-01-01

    From a model-independent point of view, we address the possibility that quark clustering could occur in cold quark matter at realistic baryon densities because of the likely strong coupling between quarks in compact stars.

  19. Assessment of Predictor-Corrector strategy for the Burridge-Knopoff model

    CERN Document Server

    Moschetta, Pierfrancesco

    2016-01-01

    A Predictor-Corrector strategy is employed for the numerical simulation of the one-dimensional Burridge-Knopoff model of earthquakes. This approach is totally explicit and allows to reproduce the main features of the model. The results achieved are compared with those of several previous works available in the literature, in order to state the effectiveness of the novel numerical strategy. Simulations are performed starting from the simplest cases and are aimed at studying the qualitative trends of the phenomena under analysis. By increasing the size of the associated differential system, it is possible to examine data on the basis of the Gutenberg-Richter statistical law. Finally, some tests are conducted to investigate the continuum limit of the discrete Burridge-Knopoff model towards a macroscopic dynamics.

  20. A New Symptom Model for Autism Cross-Validated in an Independent Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, A.; Van Lang, N. D. J.; De Jonge, M. V.; De Bildt, A. A.; Van Engeland, H.; Minderaa, R. B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Results from several studies indicated that a symptom model other than the DSM triad might better describe symptom domains of autism. The present study focused on a) investigating the stability of a new symptom model for autism by cross-validating it in an independent sample and b) examining the invariance of the model regarding three…

  1. Predictors and mediators of add-on mirtazapine-induced cognitive enhancement in schizophrenia--a path model investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Jan-Henry; Terevnikov, Viacheslav; Joffe, Marina; Tiihonen, Jari; Chukhin, Evgeny; Burkin, Mark; Joffe, Grigori

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate predictors and mediators of enhancing effect of adjunctive mirtazapine on cognition in schizophrenia. Patients with difficult-to-treat schizophrenia received either mirtazapine (n = 19) or placebo (n = 18) in a double-blind fashion for six weeks. Mirtazapine outperformed placebo on the Block Design and Stroop Dots. In the present subsidiary study, factors underlying this difference were explored with Path Analysis. Add-on mirtazapine had an independent enhancing effect on the Block Design-measured visuo-spatial functioning. Further, this effect was mediated via changes in positive, depressive and parkinsonism symptoms, but not in negative symptoms. This effect was predicted by higher doses of FGAs, longer duration of illness and lower initial Block Design scores. Path Analysis model fit was good. Mirtazapine may have direct and indirect favorable effects on visuo-spatial functioning, but further research is needed. Path analysis may be a feasible statistical method for further research of neurocognition in psychopharmacological interventions in schizophrenia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A stochastic model for optimizing composite predictors based on gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Murali

    2003-07-01

    This project was done to develop a mathematical model for optimizing composite predictors based on gene expression profiles from DNA arrays and proteomics. The problem was amenable to a formulation and solution analogous to the portfolio optimization problem in mathematical finance: it requires the optimization of a quadratic function subject to linear constraints. The performance of the approach was compared to that of neighborhood analysis using a data set containing cDNA array-derived gene expression profiles from 14 multiple sclerosis patients receiving intramuscular inteferon-beta1a. The Markowitz portfolio model predicts that the covariance between genes can be exploited to construct an efficient composite. The model predicts that a composite is not needed for maximizing the mean value of a treatment effect: only a single gene is needed, but the usefulness of the effect measure may be compromised by high variability. The model optimized the composite to yield the highest mean for a given level of variability or the least variability for a given mean level. The choices that meet this optimization criteria lie on a curve of composite mean vs. composite variability plot referred to as the "efficient frontier." When a composite is constructed using the model, it outperforms the composite constructed using the neighborhood analysis method. The Markowitz portfolio model may find potential applications in constructing composite biomarkers and in the pharmacogenomic modeling of treatment effects derived from gene expression endpoints.

  3. Work Engagement as a Predictor of Onset of Major Depressive Episode (MDE among Workers, Independent of Psychological Distress: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Imamura

    Full Text Available This study investigated work engagement as a baseline predictor of onset of major depressive episode (MDE.The study used a prospective cohort design, conforming to the STROBE checklist. Participants were recruited from the employee population of a private think tank company (N = 4,270, and 1,058 (24.8% of them completed a baseline survey, of whom 929 were included in this study. Work engagement and psychological distress at baseline were assessed as predictor variables. MDE was measured at baseline and at each of the follow-ups as the outcome, using the web-based, self-administered version of the Japanese WHO-CIDI 3.0 depression section based upon DSM-IV-TR/DSM-5 criteria. Cox discrete-time hazards analyses were conducted to estimate hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals CIs.Follow-up rates of participants (N = 929 were 78.4%, 67.2%, and 51.6% at 1-, 2-, and 3-year follow-ups, respectively. The association between work engagement at baseline and the onset of MDE was U-shaped. Compared with a group with low work engagement scores, groups with the middle and high scores showed significantly (HR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.05 to 0.64; p = 0.007 and marginally significantly (HR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.20 to 1.15, p = 0.099 lower risks of MDE, respectively, over the follow-ups, after adjusting for covariates. The pattern remained the same after additionally adjusting for psychological distress.The present study first demonstrated work engagement as an important predictor of the onset of MDE diagnosed according to an internationally standard diagnostic criteria of mental disorders.

  4. Kernel Density Independence Sampling based Monte Carlo Scheme (KISMCS) for inverse hydrological modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shafiei, M.; Gharari, S.; Pande, S.; Bhulai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Posterior sampling methods are increasingly being used to describe parameter and model predictive uncertainty in hydrologic modelling. This paper proposes an alternative to random walk chains (such as DREAM-zs). We propose a sampler based on independence chains with an embedded feature of standardiz

  5. Two-loop-induced neutrino masses: A model-independent perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Sierra, D Aristizabal

    2015-01-01

    We discuss Majorana neutrino mass generation mechanisms at the two-loop order. After briefly reviewing the systematic classification of one-loop realizations, we then focus on a general two-loop classification scheme which provides a model-independent catalog for neutrino mass models at the two-loop order

  6. QUANTIFYING THE CONTRIBUTION OF LANGUAGE MODELING TO WRITER­INDEPENDENT ON­LINE HANDWRITING RECOGNITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitrelli, J.F.; Ratzlaf, E.H.

    2004-01-01

    We describe experiments varying the degree of language­model constraint applied to writer­independent on­line handwriting recognition. Six types of models are used, varying statistical components and hard constraints which govern recognition search during the sequencing of characters to form valid t

  7. Model independent optical potential for protons at 155 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, I.

    1981-06-01

    Using the model independent procedure, 155 MeV proton optical potentials are deduced from the elastic scattering data. The nuclear interior of these potentials are less attractative than predicted by a phenomenological potentials. A comparison is done with a self consistent meson model.

  8. Sufficient conditions for rate-independent hysteresis in autoregressive identified models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Samir Angelo Milani; Aguirre, Luis Antonio

    2016-06-01

    This paper shows how hysteresis can be described using polynomial models and what are the sufficient conditions to be met by the model in order to have hysteresis. Such conditions are related to the model equilibria, to the forcing function and to certain term clusters in the polynomial models. The main results of the paper are used in the identification and analysis of nonlinear models estimated from data produced by a magneto-rheological damper (MRD) model with Bouc-Wen rate-independent hysteresis. A striking feature of the identified model is its simplicity and this could turn out to be a key factor in controller design.

  9. Structural equation model of intellectual change and continuity and predictors of intelligence in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, D P; Andres, D; Etezadi, J; Arbuckle, T; Schwartzman, A; Chaikelson, J

    1995-06-01

    This study examined the effects of abilities as a young adult, an engaged lifestyle, personality, age, and health on continuity and change in intellectual abilities from early to late adulthood. A battery of measures, including a verbal and nonverbal intelligence test, was given to 326 Canadian army veterans. Archival data provided World War Two enlistment scores on the same intelligence test for this sample: Results indicated relative stability of intellectual scores across 40 years, with increases in vocabulary and decreases in arithmetic, verbal analogies, and nonverbal skills. Young adult intelligence was the most important determinant of older adult performance. Predictors for verbal intelligence were consistent with an engagement model of intellectual maintenance but also indicated the importance of introversion-extraversion and age. Nonverbal intelligence in late life was predicted by young adult nonverbal scores, age, health, and introversion-extraversion.

  10. Nonparametric Independence Screening in Sparse Ultra-High Dimensional Additive Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Feng, Yang; Song, Rui

    2011-06-01

    A variable screening procedure via correlation learning was proposed in Fan and Lv (2008) to reduce dimensionality in sparse ultra-high dimensional models. Even when the true model is linear, the marginal regression can be highly nonlinear. To address this issue, we further extend the correlation learning to marginal nonparametric learning. Our nonparametric independence screening is called NIS, a specific member of the sure independence screening. Several closely related variable screening procedures are proposed. Under general nonparametric models, it is shown that under some mild technical conditions, the proposed independence screening methods enjoy a sure screening property. The extent to which the dimensionality can be reduced by independence screening is also explicitly quantified. As a methodological extension, a data-driven thresholding and an iterative nonparametric independence screening (INIS) are also proposed to enhance the finite sample performance for fitting sparse additive models. The simulation results and a real data analysis demonstrate that the proposed procedure works well with moderate sample size and large dimension and performs better than competing methods.

  11. Assessing the performance of the independence method in modeling spatial extreme rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feifei; Thibaud, Emeric; Leonard, Michael; Westra, Seth

    2015-09-01

    Spatial statistical methods are often employed to improve precision when estimating marginal distributions of extreme rainfall. Methods such as max-stable and copula models parameterize the spatial dependence and provide a continuous spatial representation. Alternatively, the independence method can be used to estimate marginal parameters without the need for parameterizing the spatial dependence, and this method has been under-utilized in hydrologic applications. This paper investigates the effectiveness of the independence method for marginal parameter estimation of spatially dependent extremes. Its performance is compared with three spatial dependence models (max-stable Brown-Resnick, max-stable Schlather, and Gaussian copula) by means of a simulation study. The independence method is statistically robust in estimating parameters and their associated confidence intervals for spatial extremes with various underlying dependence structures. The spatial dependence models perform comparably with the independence method when the spatial dependence structure is correctly specified; otherwise they exhibit considerably worse performance. We conclude that the independence method is more appealing for modeling the marginal distributions of spatial extremes (e.g., regional estimation of trends in rainfall extremes) due to its greater robustness and simplicity. The four statistical methods are illustrated using a spatial data set comprising 69 subdaily rainfall series from the Greater Sydney region, Australia.

  12. Model-independent estimations for the curvature from standard candles and clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhengxiang; Liao, Kai; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Model-independent estimations for the spatial curvature not only provide a test for the fundamental Copernican principle assumption, but also can effectively break the degeneracy between curvature and dark energy properties. In this paper, we propose to achieve model-independent constraints on the spatial curvature from observations of standard candles and standard clocks, without assuming any fiducial cosmology and other priors. We find that, for the popular Union2.1 type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia ) observations, the spatial curvature is constrained to be $\\Omega_K=-0.045_{-0.172}^{+0.176}$. For the latest joint light-curve analysis (JLA) of SNe Ia observations, we obtain $\\Omega_K=-0.140_{-0.158}^{+0.161}$. It is suggested that these results are in excellent agreement with the spatially flat Universe. Moreover, compared to other approaches aiming for model-independent estimations of spatial curvature, this method also achieves constraints with competitive precision.

  13. Comparing Bayesian and Maximum Likelihood Predictors in Structural Equation Modeling of Children’s Lifestyle Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Wan Jasimah bt Wan Mohamed Radzi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several factors may influence children’s lifestyle. The main purpose of this study is to introduce a children’s lifestyle index framework and model it based on structural equation modeling (SEM with Maximum likelihood (ML and Bayesian predictors. This framework includes parental socioeconomic status, household food security, parental lifestyle, and children’s lifestyle. The sample for this study involves 452 volunteer Chinese families with children 7–12 years old. The experimental results are compared in terms of root mean square error, coefficient of determination, mean absolute error, and mean absolute percentage error metrics. An analysis of the proposed causal model suggests there are multiple significant interconnections among the variables of interest. According to both Bayesian and ML techniques, the proposed framework illustrates that parental socioeconomic status and parental lifestyle strongly impact children’s lifestyle. The impact of household food security on children’s lifestyle is rejected. However, there is a strong relationship between household food security and both parental socioeconomic status and parental lifestyle. Moreover, the outputs illustrate that the Bayesian prediction model has a good fit with the data, unlike the ML approach. The reasons for this discrepancy between ML and Bayesian prediction are debated and potential advantages and caveats with the application of the Bayesian approach in future studies are discussed.

  14. How many predictors in species distribution models at the landscape scale? Land use versus LiDAR-derived canopy height

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ficetola, G.F.; Bonardi, A.; Mücher, C.A.; Gilissen, N.L.M.; Padoa-Schioppa, E.

    2014-01-01

    At the local spatial scale, land-use variables are often employed as predictors for ecological niche models (ENMs). Remote sensing can provide additional synoptic information describing vegetation structure in detail. However, there is limited knowledge on which environmental variables and how many

  15. Spatial autocorrelation in predictors reduces the impact of positional uncertainty in occurrence data on species distribution modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naimi, B.; Skidmore, A.K.; Groen, T.A.; Hamm, N.A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Aim To investigate the impact of positional uncertainty in species occurrences on the predictions of seven commonly used species distribution models (SDMs), and explore its interaction with spatial autocorrelation in predictors. Methods A series of artificial datasets covering 155 scenarios includin

  16. Selection properties of Type II maximum likelihood (empirical bayes) linear models with individual variance components for predictors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamil, T.; Braak, ter C.J.F.

    2012-01-01

    Maximum Likelihood (ML) in the linear model overfits when the number of predictors (M) exceeds the number of objects (N). One of the possible solution is the Relevance vector machine (RVM) which is a form of automatic relevance detection and has gained popularity in the pattern recognition machine l

  17. Modeling predictors of risky drug use behavior among male street laborers in urban Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Huy; Dunne, Michael P; Debattista, Joseph

    2013-05-07

    The application of theoretical frameworks for modeling predictors of drug risk among male street laborers remains limited. The objective of this study was to test a modified version of the IMB (Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model), which includes psychosocial stress, and compare this modified version with the original IMB model in terms of goodness-of-fit to predict risky drug use behavior among this population. In a cross-sectional study, social mapping technique was conducted to recruit 450 male street laborers from 135 street venues across 13 districts of Hanoi city, Vietnam, for face-to-face interviews. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to analyze data from interviews. Overall measures of fit via SEM indicated that the original IMB model provided a better fit to the data than the modified version. Although the former model was able to predict a lesser variance than the latter (55% vs. 62%), it was of better fit. The findings suggest that men who are better informed and motivated for HIV prevention are more likely to report higher behavioral skills, which, in turn, are less likely to be engaged in risky drug use behavior. This was the first application of the modified IMB model for drug use in men who were unskilled, unregistered laborers in urban settings. An AIDS prevention program for these men should not only distribute information and enhance motivations for HIV prevention, but consider interventions that could improve self-efficacy for preventing HIV infection. Future public health research and action may also consider broader factors such as structural social capital and social policy to alter the conditions that drive risky drug use among these men.

  18. Approaches in highly parameterized inversion - GENIE, a general model-independent TCP/IP run manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffels, Christopher T.; Schreuder, Willem A.; Doherty, John E.; Karanovic, Marinko; Tonkin, Matthew J.; Hunt, Randall J.; Welter, David E.

    2012-01-01

    GENIE is a model-independent suite of programs that can be used to generally distribute, manage, and execute multiple model runs via the TCP/IP infrastructure. The suite consists of a file distribution interface, a run manage, a run executer, and a routine that can be compiled as part of a program and used to exchange model runs with the run manager. Because communication is via a standard protocol (TCP/IP), any computer connected to the Internet can serve in any of the capacities offered by this suite. Model independence is consistent with the existing template and instruction file protocols of the widely used PEST parameter estimation program. This report describes (1) the problem addressed; (2) the approach used by GENIE to queue, distribute, and retrieve model runs; and (3) user instructions, classes, and functions developed. It also includes (4) an example to illustrate the linking of GENIE with Parallel PEST using the interface routine.

  19. mRM - multiscale Routing Model for Scale-Independent Streamflow Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thober, Stephan; Kumar, Rohini; Samaniego, Luis; Mai, Juliane; Rakovec, Oldrich; Cuntz, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Routing streamflow through a river network is a basic step within any distributed hydrologic model. It integrates the generated runoff and allows comparison with observed discharge at the outlet of a catchment. The Muskingum routing is a textbook river routing scheme that has been implemented in Earth System Models (e.g., WRF-HYDRO), stand-alone routing schemes (e.g., RAPID) , and hydrologic models (e.g., the mesoscale Hydrologic Model - mHM). Two types of implementations are mostly used. In the first one, the spatial routing resolution is fixed to that of the elevation model irrespective of the hydrologic modeling resolution. This implementation suffers from a high computational demand. In the second one, the spatial resolution is always applied at the hydrologic modelling resolution. This approach requires a scale-independent model behaviour which is often not evaluated. Here, we present the multiscale Routing Model (mRM) that provides a flexible choice of the routing resolution independent of the hydrologic modelling resolution. It incorporates a triangular unit hydrograph for overland flow routing and a Muskingum routing scheme for river routing. mRM provides a scale-independent model behaviour by exploiting the Multiscale Parameter Regionalisation (MPR) included in the open-source mHM (www.ufz.de/mhm). MPR reflects the structure of the landscape within the parametrisation of hydrologic processes. Effective model parameters are derived by upscaling of high-resolution (i.e., landscape resolution) parameters to the hydrologic modelling/routing resolution as proposed in Samaniego et al. 2010 and Kumar et al. 2013. mRM is coupled in this work to the state-of-the-art land surface model Noah-MP. Simulated streamflow is derived for the Ohio River (≈~525 000 km^2) during the period 1990-2000 at resolutions of 0.0625

  20. A comparison of acoustic and observed sediment classifications as predictor variables for modelling biotope distributions in Galway Bay, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Jack P. J.; Kennedy, Robert; Ren, Lei; Nash, Stephen; Hartnett, Michael; Brown, Colin

    2017-10-01

    The INFOMAR (Integrated Mapping For the Sustainable Development of Ireland's Marine Resource) initiative has acoustically mapped and classified a significant proportion of Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), and is likely to be an important tool in Ireland's efforts to meet the criteria of the MSFD. In this study, open source and relic data were used in combination with new grab survey data to model EUNIS level 4 biotope distributions in Galway Bay, Ireland. The correct prediction rates of two artificial neural networks (ANNs) were compared to assess the effectiveness of acoustic sediment classifications versus sediments that were visually classified by an expert in the field as predictor variables. To test for autocorrelation between predictor variables the RELATE routine with Spearman rank correlation method was used. Optimal models were derived by iteratively removing predictor variables and comparing the correct prediction rates of each model. The models with the highest correct prediction rates were chosen as optimal. The optimal models each used a combination of salinity (binary; 0 = polyhaline and 1 = euhaline), proximity to reef (binary; 0 = within 50 m and 1 = outside 50 m), depth (continuous; metres) and a sediment descriptor (acoustic or observed) as predictor variables. As the status of benthic habitats is required to be assessed under the MSFD the Ecological Status (ES) of the subtidal sediments of Galway Bay was also assessed using the Infaunal Quality Index. The ANN that used observed sediment classes as predictor variables could correctly predict the distribution of biotopes 67% of the time, compared to 63% for the ANN using acoustic sediment classes. Acoustic sediment ANN predictions were affected by local sediment heterogeneity, and the lack of a mixed sediment class. The all-round poor performance of ANNs is likely to be a result of the temporally variable and sparsely distributed data within the study area.

  1. Constitutive equations for the Doi-Edwards model without independent alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Hansen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    We present two representations of the Doi-Edwards model without Independent Alignment explicitly expressed in terms of the Finger strain tensor, its inverse and its invariants. The two representations provide explicit expressions for the stress prior to and after Rouse relaxation of chain stretch...

  2. Model-Independent Calculation of Radiative Neutron Capture on Lithium-7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rupak, Gautam; Higa, Renato

    2011-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture on lithium-7 is calculated model independently using a low-energy halo effective field theory. The cross section is expressed in terms of scattering parameters directly related to the S-matrix elements. It depends on the poorly known p-wave effective range parameter r(1

  3. The Independent School Financial Model Is Broken: Here's How We Fix It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, John S.

    2012-01-01

    All of those who work in independent schools have read a variety of material regarding strategies to improve their financial model. But as the author sees it, in the current economic conditions, there are really only two possible solutions for improving financial structures. They can no longer rely on their traditional strategy of increasing…

  4. A Family Therapy Model For Preserving Independence in Older Persons: Utilization of the Family of Procreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, William H.; Keller, James F.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a family therapy model that utilizes the Bowen theory systems framework. The framework is adapted to the family of procreation, which takes on increased importance in the lives of the elderly. Family therapy with the aged can create more satisfying intergenerational relationships and preserve independence. (Author)

  5. Model independent X-ray standing wave analysis of periodic multilayer structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakunin, S.N.; Makhotkin, I.A.; Chuev, M.A.; Pashaev, E.M.; Zoethout, E.; Louis, E.; Kruijs, van de R.W.E.; Seregin, S.Y.; Subbotin, I.A.; Novikov, D.; Bijkerk, F.; Kovalchuk, M.V.

    2014-01-01

    We present a model independent approach for the reconstruction of the atomic concentration profile in a nanoscale layered structure, as measured using the X-ray fluorescence yield modulated by an X-ray standing wave (XSW). The approach is based on the direct regularized solution of the system of lin

  6. Model independent X-ray standing wave analysis of periodic multilayer structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakunin, S. N.; Makhotkin, I. A.; van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; Chuev, M. A.; Pashaev, E.M.; Zoethout, E.; E. Louis,; Seregin, Yu; Subbotin, I.A.; Novikov, D. V.; F. Bijkerk,; Kovalchuk, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    We present a model independent approach for the analysis of X-ray fluorescence yield modulated by an X-ray standing wave (XSW), that allow a fast reconstruction of the atomic distribution function inside a sample without fitting procedure. The approach is based on the direct regularized solution of

  7. Comparing Three Methods to Create Multilingual Phone Models for Vocabulary Independent Speech Recognition Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Glass, et al.: Multilingual Spoken Language Under- ( multilingual clusters) and 5280 monolingual clusters. This standing in the MIT VOYAGER System...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010392 TITLE: Comparing Three Methods to Create Multilingual Phone...METHODS TO CREATE MULTILINGUAL PHONE MODELS FOR VOCABULARY INDEPENDENT SPEECH RECOGNITION TASKS Joachim Kdhler German National Research Center for

  8. Model of Independency Mother in Caring for Preterm Infant Based on Experiential Learning Care (ELC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudah, Noer; Nursalam; Meriana; Sulistyono, Agus

    2015-01-01

    The role of parents has done less during the preterm infant care in hospitals caused dependence in caring for the baby. The objective of the research was to development a model of independence of the mother in the care of preterm infants with experiential learning approach based theory of goal attainment. Research's design used analytic…

  9. Quark and Lepton Mass Matrix Model with Only Six Family-Independent Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We propose a unified mass matrix model for quarks and leptons, in which sixteen observables of mass ratios and mixings of the quarks and neutrinos are described by using no family number-dependent parameters except for the charged lepton masses and only six family number-independent free parameters. The model is constructed by extending the so-called ``Yukawaon" model to a seesaw type model with the smallest number of possible family number-independent free parameters. As a result, once the six parameters is fixed by the quark mixing and the mass ratios of quarks and neutrinos, no free parameters are left in the lepton mixing matrix. The results are in excellent agreement with the neutrino mixing data. We predict $\\delta_{CP}^\\ell =-68^\\circ$ for the leptonic $CP$ violating phase and $\\langle m\\rangle\\simeq 21$ meV for the effective Majorana neutrino mass.

  10. Model-Independent Global Search for New High-pT Physics at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration, CDF

    2007-12-01

    Data collected in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron are searched for indications of new electroweak scale physics. Rather than focusing on particular new physics scenarios, CDF data are analyzed for discrepancies with respect to the standard model prediction. A model-independent approach (Vista) considers the gross features of the data, and is sensitive to new large cross section physics. A quasi-model-independent approach (Sleuth) searches for a significant excess of events with large summed transverse momentum, and is particularly sensitive to new electroweak scale physics that appears predominantly in one final state. This global search for new physics in over three hundred exclusive final states in 927 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV reveals no such significant indication of physics beyond the standard model.

  11. Model-Independent Global Search for New High-pT Physics at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez-Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrerar, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillol, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerritop, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenarr, C; Cuevaso, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdeckerd, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; García, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokarisa, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldsteinc, J; Golossanov, A; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gonzlez, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraesda Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hillc, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Le Compte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Leeq, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Mäki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manousakisa, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martinj, V; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNultyi, R; Mehta, A; Mehtälä, P; Menzemerk, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mrenna, S; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohosh, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademackerc, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojiman, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffarde, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thomg, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; Van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquezl, F; Velev, G; Vellidisa, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whitesone, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittichg, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yangm, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhengb, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2007-01-01

    Data collected in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron are searched for indications of new electroweak scale physics. Rather than focusing on particular new physics scenarios, CDF data are analyzed for discrepancies with respect to the standard model prediction. A model-independent approach (Vista) considers the gross features of the data, and is sensitive to new large cross section physics. A quasi-model-independent approach (Sleuth) searches for a significant excess of events with large summed transverse momentum, and is particularly sensitive to new electroweak scale physics that appears predominantly in one final state. This global search for new physics in over three hundred exclusive final states in 927 pb^-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV reveals no such significant indication of physics beyond the standard model.

  12. Model independent WIMP Searches in full Simulation of the ILD Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Bartels, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    In this study the ILC's capabilities for detecting WIMPs and measure their properties are investigated. The signal events are detected by associated production of Initial State Radiation (ISR). A model independent formulation of the signal cross section is used. The cross section is normalized by inference from the observed abundance of cosmological Dark Matter (DM). The study is performed in full simulation of the ILD00 detector model. The prospects of determining the WIMP parameters individually and simultaneously are presented.

  13. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume 1. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M.L.; Hutzler, M.J.

    1979-04-01

    This report is Volume I of a six-volume series documenting the Integrating Model of the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES) as it existed on January 1, 1978. It offers a review of entire PIES system, including the basic components of the Integrating Model, which are described in detail in Volume IV of this series. In particular, this volume addresses the problem that PIES solves and the major features and applications of PIES.

  14. A Quasi-Model-Independent Search for New High $p_{T}$ Physics at DZero

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Alves, G A; Amos, N; Anderson, E W; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L R; Bacon, Trevor C; Baden, A; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Todorova-Nová, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G C; Blessing, S; Böhnlein, A; Bozhko, N; Borcherding, F; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G M; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W S; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Cochran, J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; Davis, K; De, K; Del Signore, K; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D S; Denisov, S P; Desai, S V; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; DiLoreto, G; Doulas, S; Draper, P; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Fehér, S; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, Frank; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Yu; Flattum, E M; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M R; Frame, K C; Fuess, S; Gallas, E J; Galjaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, P I; González-Solis, J L; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Grinstein, S; Groer, L S; Grünendahl, S; Sen-Gupta, A; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S L; Hagopian, V; Hahn, K S; Hall, R E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Heuring, T C; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoftun, J S; Hou, S; Huang, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jerger, S A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D E; Karmgard, D J; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Klopfenstein, C; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskii, A V; Kotcher, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovskii, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M A; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G L; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J T; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L H; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Martin, R D; Mauritz, K M; May, B; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McDonald, J; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Meng, X C; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W B; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N V; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M A; Da Motta, H; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Negroni, S; Norman, D; Nunnemann, T; Oesch, L H; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Papageorgiou, K; Para, A; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Perkins, J; Peters, M; Peters, O; Petroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piekarz, H; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quintas, P Z; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rockwell, T; Roco, M T; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R C; Santoro, A F S; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M A; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sirotenko, V I; Slattery, P F; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G A; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbruck, G; Stephens, R W; Stichelbaut, F; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thompson, J; Toback, D; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Van Gemmeren, P; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Volkov, A A; Vorobev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wightman, J A; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Wirjawan, J V D; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Yu, Z; Zanabria, M E; Zheng, H; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2001-01-01

    We apply a quasi-model-independent strategy ("Sleuth") to search for new high p_T physics in approximately 100 pb^-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.8 TeV collected by the DZero experiment during 1992-1996 at the Fermilab Tevatron. We systematically analyze many exclusive final states and demonstrate sensitivity to a variety of models predicting new phenomena at the electroweak scale. No evidence of new high p_T physics is observed.

  15. Quasi-Model-Independent Search for New High pT Physics at D0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Doulas, S.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hou, S.; Huang, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Meng, X. C.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Norman, D.; Nunnemann, T.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Papageorgiou, K.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramberg, E.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wightman, J. A.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2001-04-01

    We apply a quasi-model-independent strategy (``Sleuth'') to search for new high pT physics in ~100 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV collected by the D0 experiment during 1992-1996 at the Fermilab Tevatron. We systematically analyze many exclusive final states and demonstrate sensitivity to a variety of models predicting new phenomena at the electroweak scale. No evidence of new high pT physics is observed.

  16. Sleuth at CDF: A Quasi-model-independent search for new electroweak scale physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudalakis, Georgios; /MIT, LNS

    2007-10-01

    These proceedings describe Sleuth, a quasi-model-independent search strategy targeting new electroweak scale physics, and its application to 927 pb{sup -1} of CDF II data. Exclusive final states are analyzed for an excess of data beyond the Standard Model prediction at large summed scalar transverse momentum. This analysis of high-pT data represents one of the most encompassing searches so far conducted for new physics at the energy frontier.

  17. Plasma triglycerides, an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease in men: a prospective study based on a population with prevalent metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat, Altan; Sari, Ibrahim; Yazici, Mehmet; Can, Günay; Hergenç, Gülay; Avci, Günsel S

    2006-03-22

    We aimed to assess whether fasting plasma triglycerides independently predicted future fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) in a population having a high prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. In the Turkish Adult Risk Factor Study, a population-based survey, 2682 men and women 20 years of age or over with fasting triglyceride values available and free of CVD at baseline examination in 1990, were prospectively followed up till 2003/04. Triglyceride concentrations were measured by the enzymatic dry chemistry method and stratified into sex-specific quintiles. Information on the mode of death was obtained from first-degree relatives and/or health personnel of local health office. Diagnosis of coronary heart disease and stroke among survivors was based on history, physical examination of the cardiovascular system and Minnesota coding of resting electrocardiograms. A total of 120 fatal and 221 new nonfatal CVD occurred among adults (mean age 43+/-14) during a mean 9.3 years of follow-up. CVD was significantly and independently predicted by the top versus the bottom fasting triglyceride quintile in logistic regression analyses when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, lipid-lowering medication, status of smoking and of glucose regulation (relative risk [RR] in men and all adults 2.38 and 1.79, respectively, p both triglycerides are predictive of future CVD among men with an HR of 1.4, independent of age, diabetes, lipid-lowering medication, traditional risk factors including total cholesterol or HDL-C, in a population in which metabolic syndrome prevails. A modest independent risk increment in women did not reach significance.

  18. Obesity Is an Independent Predictor of Poor Survival in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Retrospective Analysis of a Patient Cohort Whose Treatment Included High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. von Drygalski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify predictors of long-term survival in metastatic breast cancer (MBC. A cohort of 96 patients, who received high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support (HD-ASCT as part of their treatment, was analyzed. Percent long-term survival at 10 years was 24.5% (CI 17.2–34.9% when metastasis was diagnosed and 14.4% (CI 8.7–23.9% when MBC was diagnosed. Survival was impacted significantly by body mass index (BMI. Median overall survival from initial diagnosis or from time of metastasis for patients with BMIs ≤30 and >30 (obese was 7.1 (CI 4.4–8.7 and 3.2 years (2.41–6.75, respectively, or 3.2 or 2.3 years (all =0.02. Also, obesity was the only independent patient-related predictor of time to metastasis and of survival. While obesity is linked with poor outcomes in earlier stages of breast cancer, this has not been previously reported for MBC.

  19. Expanding Model Independent Approaches for Measuring the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Prouve, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Model independent approaches to measuring the CKM angle $\\gamma$ in $B\\rightarrow DK$ decays at LHCb are explored. In particular, we consider the case where the $D$ meson decays into a final state with four hadrons. Using four-body final states such as $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, $K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ in addition to traditional 2 and 3 body states and has the potential to significantly improve to the overall constraint on $\\gamma$. There is a significant systematic uncertainty associated with modelling the complex phase of the $D$ decay amplitude across the five-dimensional phase space of the four body decay. It is therefore important to replace these model-dependent quantities with model-independent parameters as input for the $\\gamma$ measurement. These model independent parameters have been measured using quantum-correlated $\\psi(3770) \\rightarrow D^0 \\overline{D^0}$ decays collected by the CLEO-c experiment, and, for $D\\rightarrow K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, with $D^0-\\overline{D^0...

  20. A model-independent "General Search" for new physics with the ATLAS detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo Maria

    2014-06-02

    The LHC particle collider accelerates bunches of colliding protons at an energy never reached before, and a completely new landscape of new physics has been opened. In this scenario the number of possible physics processes and signatures becomes virtually infinite, making the setup of dedicated analyses impossible. Moreover it is important being able to reveal new physics signals even in regions of the phase-space where it is less lucky to be found, or where suitable theoretical models are missing. In this Thesis a new model-independent “General Search” for the ATLAS experiment has been conceived. In fact, at the time this project started, no model-independent search was set for ATLAS. In the end the new analysis has been run over the first data at 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment, and the results presented. The data have shown a very good agreement with the Standard Model expectation, and no evidence of new physics has been observed. But the strategy and methodology of the new model-independent Ge...

  1. Telomere length is a biomarker of cumulative oxidative stress, biologic age, and an independent predictor of survival and therapeutic treatment requirement associated with smoking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Savel'yeva, Ekaterina L; Moskvina, Svetlana N; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2011-11-01

    population groups described in this study including elderly support the hypothesis that telomere length is a predictor of survival and therapeutic treatment requirement associated with smoking behavior.

  2. High fluorescence in situ hybridization percentage of deletion 11q in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an independent predictor of adverse outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Preetesh; Keating, Michael; Thompson, Phillip A; Trinh, Long; Wang, Xuemei; Wierda, William; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Burger, Jan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Estrov, Zeev; Abruzzo, Lynne; O'Brien, Susan

    2015-06-01

    We have analyzed patients with previously untreated chronic lymphocytic leukemia with del11q fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) abnormality (n = 196) in this study. Detection of the 11q22.3 used a multicolor FISH technique. Patients with del11q fell into two major FISH subsets-sole del11q (n = 64) and del11q with del13q (n = 132). FISH subsets were compared using the median del11q FISH% (>58%, high vs. ≤58%, low). Overall survival (OS) and time to first treatment (TTFT) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier plots (log rank). Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the association between FISH% of del11q and outcomes. Patients with sole del11q were similar to del11q with del13q in terms of TTFT and OS. Patients with high FISH% of del11q had significantly shorter OS and TTFT as compared with patients with low FISH%, particularly in sole del11q; this negative impact of high FISH% of del11q on OS and TTFT was diminished with coexistent del13q. In multivariate analysis, high FISH% of del11q was a significant predictor for shorter OS and TTFT. A comparison of these del11q subsets with a separate cohort of (n = 673) previously untreated patients with sole del13q showed that the high FISH% del11q cohort had a significantly shorter TTFT and OS. In addition, bulky disease by physical examination or computed tomography imaging was infrequent at presentation in patients with del11q. High FISH% of del11q can reliably discriminate higher risk patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Presence of coexistent del13q should be accounted for while prognosticating patients with del11q.

  3. Model Independent Searches for New Physics at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Piper, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The standard model is a successful but limited theory. There is significant theoretical motivation to believe that new physics may appear at the energy scale of a few TeV, the lower end of which is currently probed by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The methods used to search for physics beyond the standard model in a model independent way and the results of these searches based on 1.0 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector and 2.0 fb^-1 at the CDF detector are presented.

  4. QMC approach based on the Bogoliubov independent quark model of the nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Bohr, Henrik; Panda, Prafulla K; Providencia, Constanca; da Providencia, Joao

    2015-01-01

    The quark-meson coupling model due to Guichon is formulated on the basis of the independent quark model of the nucleon proposed by Bogoliubov and is applied to the phenomenological descriptions of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter. For symmetric matter, the model predicts, at saturation density, the incompressibility $K=335.17$ MeV, the quark effective mass $m_q^*=238.5$ MeV, and the effective nucleon mass $M^*= 0.76 M,$ where $M$ is the nucleon mass in vacuum. Neutron star massesabove two solar masses are obtained.

  5. Complete Evaluation of Available Laboratory-scale Data for the Independence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Troy Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kress, Joel David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bhat, Kabekode Ghanasham [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Year 1 Objectives (August 2016 – December 2016) – The original Independence model is a sequentially regressed set of parameters from numerous data sets in the Aspen Plus modeling framework. The immediate goal with the basic data model is to collect and evaluate those data sets relevant to the thermodynamic submodels (pure substance heat capacity, solvent mixture heat capacity, loaded solvent heat capacities, and volatility data). These data are informative for the thermodynamic parameters involved in both vapor-liquid equilibrium, and in the chemical equilibrium of the liquid phase.

  6. Model-Independent Reconstruction of the Expansion History of the Universe from Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Benitez-Herrera, S; Hillebrandt, W; Mignone, C; Bartelmann, M; Weller, J

    2011-01-01

    Based on the largest homogeneously reduced set of Type Ia supernova luminosity data currently available -- the Union2 sample -- we reconstruct the expansion history of the Universe in a model-independent approach. Our method tests the geometry of the Universe directly without reverting to any assumptions made on its energy content. This allows us to constrain Dark Energy models and non-standard cosmologies in a straightforward way. The applicability of the presented method is not restricted to testing cosmological models. It can be a valuable tool for pointing out systematic errors hidden in the supernova data and planning future Type Ia supernova cosmology campaigns.

  7. A method for independent modelling in support of regulatory review of dose assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dverstorp, Björn; Xu, Shulan

    2017-03-22

    Several countries consider geological disposal facilities as the preferred option for spent nuclear fuel due to their potential to provide isolation from the surface environment on very long timescales. In 2011 the Swedish Nuclear Fuel & Waste Management Co. (SKB) submitted a license application for construction of a spent nuclear fuel repository. The disposal method involves disposing spent fuel in copper canisters with a cast iron insert at about 500 m depth in crystalline basement rock, and each canister is surrounded by a buffer of swelling bentonite clay. SKB's license application is supported by a post-closure safety assessment, SR-Site. SR-Site has been reviewed by the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) for five years. The main method for review of SKB's license application is document review, which is carried out by SSM's staff and supported by SSM's external experts. The review has proven a challenging task due to its broad scope, complexity and multidisciplinary nature. SSM and its predecessors have, for several decades, been developing independent models to support regulatory reviews of post-closure safety assessments for geological repositories. For the review of SR-Site, SSM has developed a modelling approach with a structured application of independent modelling activities, including replication modelling, use of alternative conceptual models and bounding calculations, to complement the traditional document review. This paper describes this scheme and its application to biosphere and dose assessment modelling. SSM's independent modelling has provided important insights regarding quality and reasonableness of SKB's rather complex biosphere modelling and has helped quantifying conservatisms and highlighting conceptual uncertainty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebi, Sadegh; Aliakbary, Sadegh; Habibi, Jafar

    2013-12-01

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named "Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks," outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  9. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motallebi, Sadegh, E-mail: motallebi@ce.sharif.edu; Aliakbary, Sadegh, E-mail: aliakbary@ce.sharif.edu; Habibi, Jafar, E-mail: jhabibi@sharif.edu [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named “Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks,” outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  10. Modeling zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis incidence in central Tunisia from 2009-2015: Forecasting models using climate variables as predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmoudi, Khouloud; Bellali, Hedia; Ben-Alaya, Nissaf; Saez, Marc; Malouche, Dhafer; Chahed, Mohamed Kouni

    2017-08-01

    Transmission of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) depends on the presence, density and distribution of Leishmania major rodent reservoir and the development of these rodents is known to have a significant dependence on environmental and climate factors. ZCL in Tunisia is one of the most common forms of leishmaniasis. The aim of this paper was to build a regression model of ZCL cases to identify the relationship between ZCL occurrence and possible risk factors, and to develop a predicting model for ZCL's control and prevention purposes. Monthly reported ZCL cases, environmental and bioclimatic data were collected over 6 years (2009-2015). Three rural areas in the governorate of Sidi Bouzid were selected as the study area. Cross-correlation analysis was used to identify the relevant lagged effects of possible risk factors, associated with ZCL cases. Non-parametric modeling techniques known as generalized additive model (GAM) and generalized additive mixed models (GAMM) were applied in this work. These techniques have the ability to approximate the relationship between the predictors (inputs) and the response variable (output), and express the relationship mathematically. The goodness-of-fit of the constructed model was determined by Generalized cross-validation (GCV) score and residual test. There were a total of 1019 notified ZCL cases from July 2009 to June 2015. The results showed seasonal distribution of reported ZCL cases from August to January. The model highlighted that rodent density, average temperature, cumulative rainfall and average relative humidity, with different time lags, all play role in sustaining and increasing the ZCL incidence. The GAMM model could be applied to predict the occurrence of ZCL in central Tunisia and could help for the establishment of an early warning system to control and prevent ZCL in central Tunisia.

  11. Blind Separation of Acoustic Signals Combining SIMO-Model-Based Independent Component Analysis and Binary Masking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiekata Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A new two-stage blind source separation (BSS method for convolutive mixtures of speech is proposed, in which a single-input multiple-output (SIMO-model-based independent component analysis (ICA and a new SIMO-model-based binary masking are combined. SIMO-model-based ICA enables us to separate the mixed signals, not into monaural source signals but into SIMO-model-based signals from independent sources in their original form at the microphones. Thus, the separated signals of SIMO-model-based ICA can maintain the spatial qualities of each sound source. Owing to this attractive property, our novel SIMO-model-based binary masking can be applied to efficiently remove the residual interference components after SIMO-model-based ICA. The experimental results reveal that the separation performance can be considerably improved by the proposed method compared with that achieved by conventional BSS methods. In addition, the real-time implementation of the proposed BSS is illustrated.

  12. Ion-biomolecule collisions studied within the independent atom model including geometric screening corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdde, H. J.; Achenbach, A.; Kalkbrenner, T.; Jankowiak, H. C.; Kirchner, T.

    2016-05-01

    A recently introduced model to account for geometric screening corrections in an independent-atom-model description of ion-molecule collisions is applied to proton collisions from amino acids and DNA and RNA nucleobases. The correction coefficients are obtained from using a pixel counting method (PCM) for the exact calculation of the effective cross sectional area that emerges when the molecular cross section is pictured as a structure of (overlapping) atomic cross sections. This structure varies with the relative orientation of the molecule with respect to the projectile beam direction and, accordingly, orientation-independent total cross sections are obtained from averaging the pixel count over many orientations. We present net capture and net ionization cross sections over wide ranges of impact energy and analyze the strength of the screening effect by comparing the PCM results with Bragg additivity rule cross sections and with experimental data where available. Work supported by NSERC, Canada.

  13. Gauge Independent Reduction of a Solvable Model with Gribov-Like Ambiguity

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, R

    1996-01-01

    We present a gauge independent Lagrangian method of abstracting the reduced space of a solvable model with Gribov-like ambiguity, recently proposed by Friedberg, Lee, Pang and Ren. The reduced space is found to agree with the explicit solutions obtained by these authors. Complications related to gauge fixing are analysed. The Gribov ambiguity manifests by a nonuniqueness in the canonical transformations mapping the hamiltonian in the afflicted gauge with that obtained gauge independently. The operator ordering problem in this gauge is investigated and a prescription is suggested so that the results coincide with the usual hamiltonian formalism using the Schrödinger representation. Finally, a Dirac analysis of the model is elaborated. In this treatment it is shown how the existence of a nontrivial canonical set in the ambiguity-ridden gauge yields the connection with the previous hamiltonian formalism.

  14. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  15. Model-independent analysis of the Fermilab Tevatron turn-by-turn beam position monitor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Valishev, A.A.; Lebedev, V.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Coherent transverse beam oscillations in the Tevatron were analyzed with the model-independent analysis (MIA) technique. This allowed one to obtain the model-independent values of coupled betatron amplitudes, phase advances, and dispersion function around the ring from a single dipole kick measurement. In order to solve the MIA mode mixing problem which limits the accuracy of determination of the optical functions, we have developed a new technique of rotational MIA mode untangling. The basic idea is to treat each beam position monitor (BPM) as two BPMs separated in a ring by exactly one turn. This leads to a simple criterion of MIA mode separation: the betatron phase advance between any BPM and its counterpart shifted by one turn should be equal to the betatron tune and therefore should not depend on the BPM position in the ring. Furthermore, we describe a MIA-based technique to locate vibrating magnets in a storage ring.

  16. A simple model for predicting lung cancer occurrence in a lung cancer screening program: The Pittsburgh Predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David O; Weissfeld, Joel

    2015-07-01

    A user-friendly method for assessing lung cancer risk may help standardize selection of current and former smokers for screening. We evaluated a simple 4-factor model, the Pittsburgh Predictor, against two well-known, but more complicated models for predicting lung cancer risk. Trained against outcomes observed in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), the Pittsburgh Predictor used four risk factors, duration of smoking, smoking status, smoking intensity, and age, to predict 6-year lung cancer incidence. After calibrating the Bach and PLCOM2012 models to outcomes observed in the low-dose computed tomography arm of the NLST, we compared model calibration, discrimination, and clinical usefulness (net benefit) in the NLST and Pittsburgh Lung Screening Study (PLuSS) populations. The Pittsburgh Predictor, Bach, and PLCOM2012 represented risk equally well, except for the tendency of PLCOM2012 to overestimate risk in subjects at highest risk. Relative to the Pittsburgh Predictor, Bach and PLCOM2012 increased the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve by 0.007-0.009 and 0.012-0.021 units, respectively, depending on study population. Across a clinically relevant span of 6-year lung cancer risk thresholds (0.01-0.05), Bach and PLCOM2012 increased net benefit by less than 0.1% in NLST and 0.3% in PLuSS. In exchange for a small reduction in prediction accuracy, a simpler lung cancer risk prediction model may facilitate standardized procedures for advising and selecting patients with respect to lung cancer screening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Serum uric acid is a GFR-independent long-term predictor of acute and chronic renal insufficiency: the Jerusalem Lipid Research Clinic cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kark, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Kidney disease is commonly accompanied by hyperuricemia. However, the contribution of serum uric acid (SUA) to kidney injury is debated. Our objective was to assess the long-term prediction of renal failure by SUA. Methods. Visit 2 participants in the Jerusalem Lipid Research Clinic cohort with normal baseline kidney function were followed for 24–28 years. SUA levels were assessed for associations with acute renal failure (ARF) and chronic renal failure (CRF) as defined by hospital discharge records, and mortality, ascertained through linkage with the national population registry. Results. Among 2449 eligible participants (1470 men, 979 women aged 35–78 years in 1976–79), SUA was positively linked with male sex, serum creatinine and components of the metabolic syndrome but was lower in smokers and in diabetic subjects. The 22- to 25-year incidence of hospital-diagnosed kidney failure (145 first events, 67% CRF) and the 24- to 28-year mortality (587 events) were higher in subject with hyperuricemia (>6.5 mg/dL in men and >5.3 mg/dL in women, reflecting the upper quintiles), independent of baseline kidney function and covariates. Hyperuricemia conferred adjusted hazard ratios of 1.36 (P = 0.003), 2.14 (P < 0.001) and 2.87 (P = 0.003) for mortality, CRF and ARF, respectively. Conclusions. SUA predicts renal failure incidence and all-cause mortality independently of demographic and clinical covariates. These results lend support to the undertaking of clinical trials to examine the effect of uric acid-lowering strategies on kidney outcomes. PMID:21220750

  18. Above-Threshold Poles in Model-Independent Form Factor Parametrizations

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The model-independent parametrization for exclusive hadronic form factors commonly used for semileptonic decays is generalized to allow for the inclusion of above-threshold resonant poles of known mass and width. We discuss the interpretation of such poles, particularly with respect to the analytic structure of the relevant two-point Green's function in which they reside. Their presence has a remarkably small effect on the parametrization, as we show explicitly for the case of $D \\to \\pi e^+ \

  19. Model independent approaches to reionization in the analysis of upcoming CMB data

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Loris P. L.; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2008-01-01

    On large angular scales, CMB polarization depends mostly on the evolution of the ionization level of the IGM during reionization. In order to avoid biasing parameter estimates, an accurate and model independent approach to reionization is needed when analyzing high precision data, like those expected from the Planck experiment. In this paper we consider two recently proposed methods of fitting for reionization and we discuss their respective advantages. We test both methods by performing a Mo...

  20. Formalizing dimension and response violations of local independence in the unidimensional Rasch model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Ida; Andrich, David

    2008-01-01

    Local independence in the Rasch model can be violated in two generic ways that are generally not distinguished clearly in the literature. In this paper we distinguish between a violation of unidimensionality, which we call trait dependence, and a specific violation of statistical independence, which we call response dependence, both of which violate local independence. Distinct algebraic formulations for trait and response dependence are developed as violations of the dichotomous Rasch model, data are simulated with varying degrees of dependence according to these formulations, and then analysed according to the Rasch model assuming no violations. Relative to the case of no violation it is shown that trait and response dependence result in opposite effects on the unit of scale as manifested in the range and standard deviation of the scale and the standard deviation of person locations. In the case of trait dependence the scale is reduced; in the case of response dependence it is increased. Again, relative to the case of no violation, the two violations also have opposite effects on the person separation index (analogous to Cronbach's alpha reliability index of traditional test theory in value and construction): it decreases for data with trait dependence; it increases for data with response dependence. A standard way of accounting for dependence is to combine the dependent items into a higher-order polytomous item. This typically results in a decreased person separation index index and Cronbach's alpha, compared with analysing items as discrete, independent items. This occurs irrespective of the kind of dependence in the data, and so further contributes to the two violations not being distinguished clearly. In an attempt to begin to distinguish between them statistically this paper articulates the opposite effects of these two violations in the dichotomous Rasch model.

  1. Model-independent approach for dark matter phenomenology: Signatures in linear colliders and cosmic positron experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shigeki Matsumoto; Nobuchika Okada

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the phenomenology of dark matter at the ILC and cosmic positron experiments based on model-independent approach. We have found a strong correlation between dark matter signatures at the ILC and those in the indirect detection experiments of dark matter. Once the dark matter is discovered in the positron experiments such as the PAMELA, its nature will be investigated in detail at the ILC.

  2. Model Independent Measurement of Form Factors in the Decay $D^+\\to K^-\\pi^+ e^+\

    CERN Document Server

    Shepherd, M R; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Gong, D T; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Smith, A; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Ernst, J; Severini, H; Dytman, S A; Love, W; Savinov, V; Aquines, O; Li, Z; López, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Méndez, H; Ramírez, J; Huang, G S; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Sanghi, B; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Butt, J; Li, J; Menaa, N; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, K; Csorna, S E; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Briere, R A; Brock, I; Chen, J; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Potlia, V; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Lowrey, N; Naik, P; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; White, E J

    2006-01-01

    We present model independent measurements of the helicity basis form factors in the decay D+ -> K- pi+ e+ nu_e obtained from about 2800 decays reconstructed from a 281 pb^{-1} data sample collected at the psi(3770) center-of-mass energy with the CLEO-c detector. We confirm the existence of a previously observed spin-zero K- pi+ component interfering with the K*0bar amplitude. We see no evidence for additional d- or f-wave contributions.

  3. Model independent determination of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and proton radius

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara

    2014-01-01

    We obtain a model independent expression for the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift. This expression includes the leading logarithmic ${\\cal O}(m_{\\mu}\\alpha^6)$ terms, as well as the leading ${\\cal O}(m_{\\mu}\\alpha^5 \\frac{m_{\\mu}^2}{m_{\\rho}^2})$ hadronic effects. The latter are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model independent determination. In this paper we give the missing piece for their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis and the experimental measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: $r_p=0.8433(17)$ fm. This number is at 6.4$\\sigma$ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The accuracy of our result is limited by uncomputed terms of ${\\cal O}(m_{\\mu}\\alpha^5\\frac{m_{\\mu}^3}{m_{\\rho}^3},m_{\\mu}\\alpha^6)$. This parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model independent determination of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects.

  4. Model-independent determination of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and the proton radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Dept. of Physics and IFAE, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    We obtain a model-independent expression for the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. This expression includes the leading logarithmic O(m{sub μ}α{sup 6}) terms, as well as the leading O(m{sub μ}α{sup 5}(m{sub μ}{sup 2})/(m{sub ρ}{sup 2})) hadronic effects. The latter are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model-independent determination. In this paper we give the missing piece for their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis, and the experimental measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: r{sub p}=0.8412(15) fm. This number is at 6.8σ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The accuracy of our result is limited by uncomputed terms of O(m{sub μ}α{sup 5}(m{sub μ}{sup 3})/(m{sub ρ}{sup 3}),m{sub μ}α{sup 6}). This parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model-independent estimate of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects. (orig.)

  5. Multivariate zero-inflated modeling with latent predictors: Modeling feedback behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, Gerardus J.A.

    2013-01-01

    In educational studies, the use of computer-based assessments leads to the collection of multiple outcomes to assess student performance. The student-specific outcomes are correlated and often measured in different scales, such as continuous and count outcomes. A multivariate zero-inflated model

  6. Weak leptonic decay of light and heavy pseudoscalar mesons in an independent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N.; Dash, P.C. (Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar-751004 (India))

    1993-04-01

    Weak leptonic decays of light and heavy pseudoscalar mesons are studied in a field-theoretic framework based on the independent quark model with a scalar-vector harmonic potential. Defining the quark-antiquark momentum distribution amplitude obtainable from the bound quark eigenmodes of the model with the assumption of a strong correlation between quark-antiquark momenta inside the decaying meson in its rest frame, we derive the partial decay width with correct kinematical factors from which we extract an expression for the pseudoscalar decay constants [ital f][sub [ital M

  7. Radiative decay of mesons in an independent-quark potential model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N.; Dash, P.C. (Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India)); Panda, A.R. (Department of Physics, Kendrapara College, Kendrapara, Orissa (India))

    1992-11-01

    We investigate in a potential model of independent quarks the {ital M}1 transitions among the low-lying vector ({ital V}) and pseudoscalar ({ital P}) mesons. We perform a static'' calculation of the partial decay widths of twelve possible {ital M}1 transitions such as {ital V}{r arrow}{ital P}{gamma} and {ital P}{r arrow}{ital V}{gamma} within the traditional picture of photon emission by a confined quark and/or antiquark. The model accounts well for the observed decay widths.

  8. Opinion dynamics: Kinetic modelling with mass media, application to the Scottish independence referendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudin, Laurent; Salvarani, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    We consider a kinetic model describing some mechanisms of opinion formation in the framework of referendums, where the individuals, who can interact between themselves and modify their opinion by means of spontaneous self-thinking, are moreover under the influence of mass media. We study, at the numerical level, both the transient and the asymptotic regimes. In particular, we point out that a plurality of media, with different orientations, is a key ingredient to allow pluralism and prevent consensus. The forecasts of the model are compared to some surveys related to the Scottish independence referendum of 2014.

  9. Model-independent search for new physics at D0 experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Md Naimuddin

    2012-11-01

    Finding the evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model is one of the primary goals of RunII of the Tevatron. Many dedicated searches for new physics are ongoing at the Tevatron but in order to broaden the scope and maximize the chances of finding the new physics, we also search in a model-independent way. The results of such searches for indications of new physics at the electroweak scale are presented using data collected using the D0 detector from $p\\bar{p}$-interactions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV.

  10. Strange quark polarization of the nucleon: a parameter-independent prediction of the chiral potential model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X B; Chen, X S; Wang, F

    2001-07-02

    We perform a one-loop calculation of the strange quark polarization (Deltas) of the nucleon in an SU(3) chiral potential model. We find that if the intermediate quark excited states are summed over in a proper way, i.e., summed up to a given energy instead of given radial and orbital quantum numbers, Deltas turns out to be almost independent of all the model parameters: quark masses and potential strengths. The contribution from the quark-antiquark pair creation and annihilation " Z" diagrams is found to be significant. Our numerical results agree quite reasonably with experiments and lattice QCD calculations.

  11. Expression of connective tissue growth factor in tumor tissues is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu-Ying Liu; Yan-Chun Han; Shu-Hua Wu; Zeng-Hua Lv

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), also known as CCN2, in gastric carcinoma (GC), and the correlation between the expression of CTGF, dinicopathologic features and clinical outcomes of patients with GC.METHODS: One hundred and twenty-two GC patients were included in the present study. All patients were followed up for at least 5 years. Proteins of CTGF were detected using the Powervision two-step immunostaining method.RESULTS: Of the specimens from 122 GC patients analyzed for CTGF expression, 58 (58/122, 47.5%) had a high CTGF expression in cytoplasm of gastric carcinoma cells and 64 (64/122, 52.5%) had a low CTGF expression. Patients with a high CTGF expression showed a higher incidence of lymph node metastasis than those with a low CTGF expression {P = 0.032). Patients with a high CTGF expression had significantly lower 5-year survival rate than those with a low CTGF expression (27.6% vs 46.9%, P = 0.0178), especially those staging I + H + m (35.7% vs 65.2%, P = 0.0027).CONCLUSION: GC patients with an elevated CTGF expression have more lymph node metastases and a shorter survival time. CTGF seems to be an independent prognostic factor for the successful differentiation of high-risk GC patients staging I + n + m. Over-expression of CTGF in human GC cells results in an increased aggressive ability.

  12. p16INK4a Expression and Absence of Activated B-RAF Are Independent Predictors of Chemosensitivity in Melanoma Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J. Gallagher

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic cutaneous melanoma is highly resistant to cytotoxic drugs, and this contributes to poor prognosis. In vivo studies on the chemosensitivity of metastatic melanoma are rare and hampered by poor response rates to systemic chemotherapeutics. Patients who undergo isolated limb infusion (ILI with cytotoxic drugs show high response rates and are, therefore, a good cohort for studying chemosensitivity in vivo. We used tumors from patients who underwent ILI to study the role of melanoma tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes on melanoma chemosensitivity. Prospectively acquired tumors from 30 patients who subsequently underwent ILI with melphalan and actinomycin-D for metastatic melanoma were investigated for mRNA expression levels of p14ARF, p16INK4a, and MITFm. The mutation status of B-RAF, N-RAS, and PTEN were also determined. A high percentage of tumors had activating mutations in either B-RAF (15/30 or N-RAS (10/30 and only two tumors carried altered PTEN. High expression of p16INK4a and absence of an activating B-RAF mutation independently predicted response to treatment. Further, inducible expression of p16INK4a sensitized a melanoma cell line to death induced by melphalan or actinomycin-D. This study shows that high expression of p16INK4a or the absence of activated B-RAF correlates with in vivo response of melanoma to cytotoxic drugs.

  13. Computational models as predictors of HIV treatment outcomes for the Phidisa cohort in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Revell

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Selecting the optimal combination of HIV drugs for an individual in resourcelimited settings is challenging because of the limited availability of drugs and genotyping.Objective: The evaluation as a potential treatment support tool of computational models that predict response to therapy without a genotype, using cases from the Phidisa cohort in South Africa.Methods: Cases from Phidisa of treatment change following failure were identified that had the following data available: baseline CD4 count and viral load, details of failing and previous antiretroviral drugs, drugs in new regimen and time to follow-up. The HIV Resistance Response Database Initiative’s (RDI’s models used these data to predict the probability of a viral load < 50 copies/mL at follow-up. The models were also used to identify effective alternative combinations of three locally available drugs.Results: The models achieved accuracy (area under the receiver–operator characteristic curve of 0.72 when predicting response to therapy, which is less accurate than for an independent global test set (0.80 but at least comparable to that of genotyping with rules-based interpretation. The models were able to identify alternative locally available three-drug regimens that were predicted to be effective in 69% of all cases and 62% of those whose new treatment failed in the clinic.Conclusion: The predictive accuracy of the models for these South African patients together with the results of previous studies suggest that the RDI’s models have the potential to optimise treatment selection and reduce virological failure in different patient populations, without the use of a genotype.Keywords: HIV therapy; mathematical modelling; treatment; genotype

  14. Impact imaging of aircraft composite structure based on a model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lei; Liu, Bin; Yuan, Shenfang; Su, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    The spatial-wavenumber filtering technique is an effective approach to distinguish the propagating direction and wave mode of Lamb wave in spatial-wavenumber domain. Therefore, it has been gradually studied for damage evaluation in recent years. But for on-line impact monitoring in practical application, the main problem is how to realize the spatial-wavenumber filtering of impact signal when the wavenumber of high spatial resolution cannot be measured or the accurate wavenumber curve cannot be modeled. In this paper, a new model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter based impact imaging method is proposed. In this method, a 2D cross-shaped array constructed by two linear piezoelectric (PZT) sensor arrays is used to acquire impact signal on-line. The continuous complex Shannon wavelet transform is adopted to extract the frequency narrowband signals from the frequency wideband impact response signals of the PZT sensors. A model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter is designed based on the spatial-wavenumber filtering technique. Based on the designed filter, a wavenumber searching and best match mechanism is proposed to implement the spatial-wavenumber filtering of the frequency narrowband signals without modeling, which can be used to obtain a wavenumber-time image of the impact relative to a linear PZT sensor array. By using the two wavenumber-time images of the 2D cross-shaped array, the impact direction can be estimated without blind angle. The impact distance relative to the 2D cross-shaped array can be calculated by using the difference of time-of-flight between the frequency narrowband signals of two different central frequencies and the corresponding group velocities. The validations performed on a carbon fiber composite laminate plate and an aircraft composite oil tank show a good impact localization accuracy of the model-independent spatial-wavenumber filter based impact imaging method.

  15. A robust independent component analysis (ICA) model for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jingqi; Mitra, Sunanda; Liu, Zheng; Nutter, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The coupling of carefully designed experiments with proper analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data provides us with a powerful as well as noninvasive tool to help us understand cognitive processes associated with specific brain regions and hence could be used to detect abnormalities induced by a diseased state. The hypothesisdriven General Linear Model (GLM) and the data-driven Independent Component Analysis (ICA) model are the two most commonly used models for fMRI data analysis. A hybrid ICA-GLM model combines the two models to take advantages of benefits from both models to achieve more accurate mapping of the stimulus-induced activated brain regions. We propose a modified hybrid ICA-GLM model with probabilistic ICA that includes a noise model. In this modified hybrid model, a probabilistic principle component analysis (PPCA)-based component number estimation is used in the ICA stage to extract the intrinsic number of original time courses. In addition, frequency matching is introduced into the time course selection stage, along with temporal correlation, F-test based model fitting estimation, and time course combination, to produce a more accurate design matrix for GLM. A standard fMRI dataset is used to compare the results of applying GLM and the proposed hybrid ICA-GLM in generating activation maps.

  16. Military target detection using spectrally modeled algorithms and independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Kailash Chandra; Arora, Manoj K.; Singh, Dharmendra; Yadav, Deepti

    2013-02-01

    Most military targets of strategic importance are very small in size. Though some of them may get spatially resolved, most cannot be detected due to lack of adequate spectral resolution. Hyperspectral data, acquired over hundreds of narrow contiguous wavelength bands, are extremely suitable for most military target detection applications. Target detection, however, still remains complicated due to a host of other issues. These include, first, the heavy volume of hyperspectral data, which leads to computational complexities; second, most materials in nature exhibit spectral variability and remain unpredictable; and third, most target detection algorithms are based on spectral modeling and availability of a priori target spectra is an essential requirement, a condition difficult to meet in practice. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a new evolving technique that aims at finding components that are statistically independent or as independent as possible. It does not have any requirement of a priori availability of target spectra and is an attractive alternative. This paper, presents a study of military target detection using four spectral matching algorithms, namely, orthogonal subspace projection (OSP), constrained energy minimisation, spectral angle mapper and spectral correlation mapper, four anomaly detection algorithms, namely, OSP anomaly detector (OSPAD), Reed-Xiaoli anomaly detector (RXD), uniform target detector (UTD), a combination of RXD-UTD. The performances of these spectrally modeled algorithms are then also compared with ICA using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The superior performance of ICA indicates that it may be considered a viable alternative for military target detection.

  17. A statistically based seasonal precipitation forecast model with automatic predictor selection and its application to central and south Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlitz, Lars; Vorogushyn, Sergiy; Apel, Heiko; Gafurov, Abror; Unger-Shayesteh, Katy; Merz, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    The study presents a statistically based seasonal precipitation forecast model, which automatically identifies suitable predictors from globally gridded sea surface temperature (SST) and climate variables by means of an extensive data-mining procedure and explicitly avoids the utilization of typical large-scale climate indices. This leads to an enhanced flexibility of the model and enables its automatic calibration for any target area without any prior assumption concerning adequate predictor variables. Potential predictor variables are derived by means of a cell-wise correlation analysis of precipitation anomalies with gridded global climate variables under consideration of varying lead times. Significantly correlated grid cells are subsequently aggregated to predictor regions by means of a variability-based cluster analysis. Finally, for every month and lead time, an individual random-forest-based forecast model is constructed, by means of the preliminary generated predictor variables. Monthly predictions are aggregated to running 3-month periods in order to generate a seasonal precipitation forecast. The model is applied and evaluated for selected target regions in central and south Asia. Particularly for winter and spring in westerly-dominated central Asia, correlation coefficients between forecasted and observed precipitation reach values up to 0.48, although the variability of precipitation rates is strongly underestimated. Likewise, for the monsoonal precipitation amounts in the south Asian target area, correlations of up to 0.5 were detected. The skill of the model for the dry winter season over south Asia is found to be low. A sensitivity analysis with well-known climate indices, such as the El Niño- Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the East Atlantic (EA) pattern, reveals the major large-scale controlling mechanisms of the seasonal precipitation climate for each target area. For the central Asian target areas, both

  18. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  19. Two components of the new ESPEN diagnostic criteria for malnutrition are independent predictors of lung function in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingadottir, Arora Ros; Beck, Anne Marie; Baldwin, Christine; Weekes, C Elizabeth; Geirsdottir, Olof Gudny; Ramel, Alfons; Gislason, Thorarinn; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg

    2017-06-08

    Low fat free mass index (FFMI) is a component of the ESPEN diagnosis criteria of malnutrition, that only when accompanied with weight loss is considered to be a determinant of malnutrition. Our aims were to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) applying the ESPEN criteria, and to examine the ability of different components of the criteria to predict COPD severity, length of stay (LOS), hospital readmissions within 30 days and mortality. Subjects were COPD patients (n = 121) admitted to Landspitali University Hospital from March 2015 to March 2016. Patients were screened for nutritional risk using Icelandic screening tool (ISS) and NRS-2002. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Lung function was measured by spirometry. The prevalence of malnutrition according to the ESPEN criteria was 21%. The association between nutritional assessment, applying different components of the ESPEN criteria, and COPD severity was highly significant, with the highest risk being associated with low FFMI OR (95% CI) 4.77 (2.03, 11.20; p 7 days in subjects with low FFMI (OR 2.46 95% CI 0.92, 6.59; p = 0.074) and increased risk of 6 and 9 months' mortality (OR 2.72 95% CI 0.88, 8.39, P = 0.082 and OR 2.72 95% CI 0.94, 7.87, P = 0.065, respectively) in subjects diagnosed as malnourished by the ESPEN criteria. This study describes the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized COPD patients using the ESPEN criteria from 2015. Our findings suggest that FFMI could be used independently of weight loss for the diagnosis of malnutrition in COPD patients, although there remain some problems associated with its measurement in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  20. Model-independent analysis of B-$\\overline{B}$ mixing and CP violation in B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Goto, T; Okada, Y; Tanaka, M

    1996-01-01

    We present a framework to analyze effects of new physics beyond the standard model on B-\\bar B mixing and CP violation in B decays in a model-independent manner. Assuming that tree level decay amplitudes are dominated by the standard model ones, new physics contribution to the B-\\bar B mixing can be extracted from several measurements at B factories. Using this framework, we show the present constraint on new physics contribution to the B-\\bar B mixing, and illustrate constraints expected to be given by future experiments at B factories. We also point out a possibility that CP asymmetries in B\\rightarrow\\psi K_S, B\\rightarrow\\pi\\pi, and B\\rightarrow DK modes look consistent with the standard model, even if a large new physics contribution is present in the B-\\bar B mixing.

  1. Validation of a Grid Independent Spray Model and Fuel Chemistry Mechanism for Low Temperature Diesel Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yoshikawa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Spray and combustion submodels used in a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code, KIVACHEMKIN, were validated for Low Temperature Combustion (LTC in a diesel engine by comparing measured and model predicted fuel spray penetrations, and in-cylinder distributions of OH and soot. The conditions considered were long ignition delay, early and late fuel injection cases. It was found that use of a grid independent spray model, called the GASJET model, with an improved n-heptane chemistry mechanism can well predict the heat release rate, not only of the main combustion stage, but also of the cool flame stage. Additionally, the GASJET model appropriately predicts the distributions of OH and soot in the cylinder even when the resolution of the computational mesh is decreased by half, which significantly reduces the required computational time.

  2. An improved nonlinear model of HEMTs with independent transconductance tail-off fitting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Linsheng

    2011-01-01

    We present an improved large-signal device model of GaAs/GaN HEMTs, amenable for use in commercial nonlinear simulators. The proposed model includes a new exponential function to independently control the transconductance compression/tail-offbehaviors. The main advantage of this model is to provide a simple and coherent description of the bias-dependent drain current (I-V) that is valid in all regions of operation. All aspects of the model are validated for 0.25-μm gate-length GaAs and GaN HEMT processes. The simulation results of DC/pulsed I-V, RF large-signal power and intermodulation distortion products show excellent agreement with the measured data.

  3. Model-independent determination on $H_0$ using the latest $H(z)$ data

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Deng

    2016-01-01

    We perform the improved constraints on the Hubble constant $H_0$ by using the model-independent method, Gaussian Processes. Utilizing the latest 36 $H(z)$ measurements, we obtain $H_0=69.21\\pm3.72$ km s$^{-1}$ Mpc$^{-1}$, which is consistent with the Planck 2015 and Riess et al. 2016 analysis at $1\\sigma$ confidence level, and reduces the uncertainty from $6.5\\%$ (Busti et al. 2014) to $5.4\\%$. Different from the results of Busti et al. 2014 by only using 19 $H(z)$ measurements, our reconstruction results of $H(z)$ and the derived values of $H_0$ are independent of the choice of covariance functions.

  4. An Early Underwater Artificial Vision Model in Ocean Investigations via Independent Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Rui; Liu, Fang; He, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Underwater vision is one of the dominant senses and has shown great prospects in ocean investigations. In this paper, a hierarchical Independent Component Analysis (ICA) framework has been established to explore and understand the functional roles of the higher order statistical structures towards the visual stimulus in the underwater artificial vision system. The model is inspired by characteristics such as the modality, the redundancy reduction, the sparseness and the independence in the early human vision system, which seems to respectively capture the Gabor-like basis functions, the shape contours or the complicated textures in the multiple layer implementations. The simulation results have shown good performance in the effectiveness and the consistence of the approach proposed for the underwater images collected by autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). PMID:23863855

  5. An Early Underwater Artificial Vision Model in Ocean Investigations via Independent Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo He

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Underwater vision is one of the dominant senses and has shown great prospects in ocean investigations. In this paper, a hierarchical Independent Component Analysis (ICA framework has been established to explore and understand the functional roles of the higher order statistical structures towards the visual stimulus in the underwater artificial vision system. The model is inspired by characteristics such as the modality, the redundancy reduction, the sparseness and the independence in the early human vision system, which seems to respectively capture the Gabor-like basis functions, the shape contours or the complicated textures in the multiple layer implementations. The simulation results have shown good performance in the effectiveness and the consistence of the approach proposed for the underwater images collected by autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs.

  6. Dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines in a novel acute mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana D Sotnikova

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain dopamine is critically involved in movement control, and its deficiency is the primary cause of motor symptoms in Parkinson disease. Here we report development of an animal model of acute severe dopamine deficiency by using mice lacking the dopamine transporter. In the absence of transporter-mediated recycling mechanisms, dopamine levels become entirely dependent on de novo synthesis. Acute pharmacological inhibition of dopamine synthesis in these mice induces transient elimination of striatal dopamine accompanied by the development of a striking behavioral phenotype manifested as severe akinesia, rigidity, tremor, and ptosis. This phenotype can be reversed by administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, or by nonselective dopamine agonists. Surprisingly, several amphetamine derivatives were also effective in reversing these behavioral abnormalities in a dopamine-independent manner. Identification of dopamine transporter- and dopamine-independent locomotor actions of amphetamines suggests a novel paradigm in the search for prospective anti-Parkinsonian drugs.

  7. Model-independent determination of the axial mass parameter in quasielastic antineutrino-nucleon scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Bhubanjyoti; Tropiano, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the charged current quasielestic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleus interaction is important for precision studies of neutrino oscillations. The theoretical description of the interaction depends on the combination of a nuclear model with the knowledge of form factors. While the former has received considerable attention, the latter, in particular the axial form factor, is implemented using the historical dipole model. Instead, we use a model-independent approach, presented in a previous study, to analyze the muon antineutrino CCQE mineral oil data published by the MiniBooNE collaboration. We combine the cross section for scattering of antineutrinos off protons in carbon and hydrogen, using the same axial form factor for both. The extracted value of the axial mass parameter $m_A = 0.84^{+0.12}_{-0.04} \\pm {0.11} \\, {\\rm GeV}$ is in very good agreement with the model-independent value extracted from MiniBooNE's neutrino data. Going beyond a one-parameter description of the axial form factor, we extract valu...

  8. Continuous motion decoding from EMG using independent component analysis and adaptive model training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Xiong, Caihua; Chen, Wenbin

    2014-01-01

    Surface Electromyography (EMG) is popularly used to decode human motion intention for robot movement control. Traditional motion decoding method uses pattern recognition to provide binary control command which can only move the robot as predefined limited patterns. In this work, we proposed a motion decoding method which can accurately estimate 3-dimensional (3-D) continuous upper limb motion only from multi-channel EMG signals. In order to prevent the muscle activities from motion artifacts and muscle crosstalk which especially obviously exist in upper limb motion, the independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the independent source EMG signals. The motion data was also transferred from 4-manifold to 2-manifold by the principle component analysis (PCA). A hidden Markov model (HMM) was proposed to decode the motion from the EMG signals after the model trained by an adaptive model identification process. Experimental data were used to train the decoding model and validate the motion decoding performance. By comparing the decoded motion with the measured motion, it is found that the proposed motion decoding strategy was feasible to decode 3-D continuous motion from EMG signals.

  9. Post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (≥65years old): A study of 453 consecutive elderly spine surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Wang, Timothy Y; Back, Adam G; Lydon, Emily; Reddy, Gireesh B; Karikari, Isaac O; Gottfried, Oren N

    2017-03-02

    In the last decade, costs of U.S. healthcare expenditures have been soaring, with billions of dollars spent on hospital readmissions. Identifying causes and risk factors can reduce soaring readmission rates and help lower healthcare costs. The aim of this is to determine if post-operative delirium in the elderly is an independent risk factor for 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery. The medical records of 453 consecutive elderly (≥65years old) patients undergoing spine surgery at Duke University Medical Center from 2008 to 2010 were reviewed. We identified 17 (3.75%) patients who experienced post-operative delirium according to DSM-V criteria. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and post-operative complication rates were collected for each patient. Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium had an increased length of hospital stay (10.47days vs. 5.70days, p=0.009). Complication rates were similar between the cohorts with the post-operative delirium patients having increased UTI and superficial surgical site infections. In total, 12.14% of patients were re-admitted within 30-days of discharge, with post-operative delirium patients experiencing approximately a 4-fold increase in 30-day readmission rates (Delirium: 41.18% vs. No Delirium: 11.01%, p=0.002). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (p=0.03). Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium after spine surgery is an independent risk factor for unplanned readmission within 30-days of discharge. Preventable measures and early awareness of post-operative delirium in the elderly may help reduce readmission rates.

  10. A model independent S/W framework for search-based software testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungsup; Baik, Jongmoon; Lim, Sung-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    In Model-Based Testing (MBT) area, Search-Based Software Testing (SBST) has been employed to generate test cases from the model of a system under test. However, many types of models have been used in MBT. If the type of a model has changed from one to another, all functions of a search technique must be reimplemented because the types of models are different even if the same search technique has been applied. It requires too much time and effort to implement the same algorithm over and over again. We propose a model-independent software framework for SBST, which can reduce redundant works. The framework provides a reusable common software platform to reduce time and effort. The software framework not only presents design patterns to find test cases for a target model but also reduces development time by using common functions provided in the framework. We show the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed framework with two case studies. The framework improves the productivity by about 50% when changing the type of a model.

  11. Cosmological Parameter Estimation from SN Ia data: a Model-Independent Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Benitez-Herrera, S; Maturi, M; Hillebrandt, W; Bartelmann, M; Röpke, F; .,

    2013-01-01

    We perform a model independent reconstruction of the cosmic expansion rate based on type Ia supernova data. Using the Union 2.1 data set, we show that the Hubble parameter behaviour allowed by the data without making any hypothesis about cosmological model or underlying gravity theory is consistent with a flat LCDM universe having H_0 = 70.43 +- 0.33 and Omega_m=0.297 +- 0.020, weakly dependent on the choice of initial scatter matrix. This is in closer agreement with the recently released Planck results (H_0 = 67.3 +- 1.2, Omega_m = 0.314 +- 0.020) than other standard analyses based on type Ia supernova data. We argue this might be an indication that, in order to tackle subtle deviations from the standard cosmological model present in type Ia supernova data, it is mandatory to go beyond parametrized approaches.

  12. A quasi-model-independent search for new high p{_}T physics at DO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knuteson, Bruce O.

    2000-12-11

    We present a new quasi-model-independent strategy (''Sleuth'') for searching for physics beyond the standard model. We define final states to be studied, and construct a rule that identifies a set of relevant variables for any particular final state. A novel algorithm searches for regions of excess in those variables and quantifies the significance of any detected excess. This strategy is applied to search for new high p{_}T physics in approximately 100 pb{sup -1} of proton-anti-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.8 TeV collected by the D0 experiment during 1992-1996 at the Fermilab Tevatron. We systematically analyze many exclusive final states, and demonstrate sensitivity to a variety of models predicting new phenomena at the electroweak scale. No evidence of new high p{_}T physics is observed.

  13. Model-Independent Indirect Detection Constraints on Hidden Sector Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Elor, Gilly; Slatyer, Tracy R; Xue, Wei

    2015-01-01

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded "hidden sector", annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e+e- and antiprotons) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross section by up to an order of magnitude in either directi...

  14. Supervising Model of Independent Enterprise Group (Study of Community Development PT Badak NGL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermansyah Hermansyah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to arrange an empowerment model of enterprise group through the program of Community Development in order to be independent and ready to compete, which is begun from the empirical study of the success of Cipta Busana Cooperative.. This research uses the descriptive analysis by using a case study on one enterprise supervised by PT Badak NGL that is Koperasi Cipta Busana (Kocibu. Kocibu is chosen to be the object of research due to its success to achieve the target to be the independent supervised enterprise in the fourth year. The data analysis method used in this research is the explorative analysis. Based on the research, there are some results such as that Kocibu is one of the supervised Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises of PT Badak NGL that could develop and be independent through several supporting programs. Some of key successes of Kocibu are as follows: a high commitment, a good leader, and intensive supervising programs. Besides, a good marketing system also contributes to the key of success. There are some aspects that naturally contribute to the Kocibu improvement and emerge naturally as follows: the leader figure and the high commitment from the stakeholders. While, the aspects emerged by design are: the supervising and training programs, the evaluation, the determination of rules, and the business targets. Hopefully, after this research has been conducted, the aspects appeared naturaly would be realized so early that the success of the public empowerment program will be able to increase. 

  15. Using causal models to distinguish between neurogenesis-dependent and -independent effects on behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, Stanley E

    2012-05-07

    There has been a substantial amount of research on the relationship between hippocampal neurogenesis and behaviour over the past 15 years, but the causal role that new neurons have on cognitive and affective behavioural tasks is still far from clear. This is partly due to the difficulty of manipulating levels of neurogenesis without inducing off-target effects, which might also influence behaviour. In addition, the analytical methods typically used do not directly test whether neurogenesis mediates the effect of an intervention on behaviour. Previous studies may have incorrectly attributed changes in behavioural performance to neurogenesis because the role of known (or unknown) neurogenesis-independent mechanisms was not formally taken into consideration during the analysis. Causal models can tease apart complex causal relationships and were used to demonstrate that the effect of exercise on pattern separation is via neurogenesis-independent mechanisms. Many studies in the neurogenesis literature would benefit from the use of statistical methods that can separate neurogenesis-dependent from neurogenesis-independent effects on behaviour.

  16. Model of the co-operative trade alliance for independent retail networks in Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Záboj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the contribution is proposal of the model of co-operative trade alliance for independent trade alliances with fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG in Czech Republic. Reason of the choice of this topic is sustain of variety of retail formats in Czech market in connection with position small and medium sized trade firms in comparison with transnational trade chains. Independent trade firms face to much bigger competitors operating supermarkets and hypermarkets, namely not even in size of sales area, width and depth of the assortment but also in possibility of negotiation of more profitable trade conditions with their suppliers. Effort of these independent trade firms, which operate mostly just in local or maximally regional market, is then mutual co-operation in form of consumer co-operatives, associations, alliances and networks. These groupings then mainly through common trade negotiation and purchase get for much more advantageous delivery and payment conditions from their suppliers. Besides they can participate in mutual financing of using of promotion instruments. Partial aim of the paper is investigation of opinion and willingness of Czech trade alliances with FMCG to utilize the opportunity of mutual co-operation in common trade alliance. Next partial goal is identification of the factors affecting formation of joint co-operative grouping and its structure, eventually definition of entry conditions which should be fulfilled by individual members.The system approach will be used to realize the given objective. This approach appears as the most suitable in consideration of anticipated structure and character of supposed model. The result will be then proposal of model of mutual co-operation between individual trade alliances.

  17. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia is an Independent Predictor of Poor Global Outcome in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury up to 5 Years after Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesinger, Matthew R.; Kumar, Raj G.; Wagner, Amy K.; Puyana, Juan C.; Peitzman, Andrew P.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Sperry, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Long-term outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI) correlate with initial head injury severity and other acute factors. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is a common complication in TBI. Little information exists regarding the significance of infectious complications on long-term outcomes post-TBI. We sought to characterize risks associated with HAP on outcomes 5 years post-TBI. Methods Ddata from the merger of an institutional trauma registry and the TBI Model Systems outcome data. Individuals with severe head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale≥4), who survived to rehabilitation were analyzed. Primary outcome was Glasgow Outcome Scaled-Extended (GOSE) at 1, 2, and 5 years. GOSE was dichotomized into LOW (GOSEPneumonia TBI PMID:25757128

  18. THE RATE-INDEPENDENT CONSTITUTIVE MODELING FOR POROUS AND MULTI-PHASE NANOCRYSTALLINE MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jianqiu; Li Yuanling; Zhang Zhenzhong

    2007-01-01

    To determine the time-independent constitutive modeling for porous and multiphase nanocrystalline materials and understand the effects of grain size and porosity on their mechanical behavior, each phase was treated as a mixture of grain interior and grain boundary, and pores were taken as a single phase, then Budiansky's self-consistent method was used to calculate the Young's modulus of porous, possible multi-phase, nanocrystalline materials, the prediction being in good agreement with the results in the literature. Further, the established method is extended tosimulate the constitutive relations of porous and possible multi-phase nanocrystalline materials with small plastic deformation in conjunction with the secant-moduli approach and iso-strain assumption. Comparisons between the experimental grain size and porosity dependent mechanical data and the corresponding predictions using the established model show that it appears to be capable of describing the time-independent mechanical behaviors for porous and multi-phase nanocrystalline materials in a small plastic strain range. Further discussion on the modification factor, the advantages and limitations of the model developed were present.

  19. Numerical approach to model independently reconstruct f (R ) functions through cosmographic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizza, Liberato

    2015-06-01

    The challenging issue of determining the correct f (R ) among several possibilities is revised here by means of numerical reconstructions of the modified Friedmann equations around the redshift interval z ∈[0 ,1 ] . Frequently, a severe degeneracy between f (R ) approaches occurs, since different paradigms correctly explain present time dynamics. To set the initial conditions on the f (R ) functions, we involve the use of the so-called cosmography of the Universe, i.e., the technique of fixing constraints on the observable Universe by comparing expanded observables with current data. This powerful approach is essentially model independent, and correspondingly we got a model-independent reconstruction of f (R (z )) classes within the interval z ∈[0 ,1 ]. To allow the Hubble rate to evolve around z ≤1 , we considered three relevant frameworks of effective cosmological dynamics, i.e., the Λ CDM model, the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization, and a polynomial approach to dark energy. Finally, cumbersome algebra permits passing from f (z ) to f (R ), and the general outcome of our work is the determination of a viable f (R ) function, which effectively describes the observed Universe dynamics.

  20. Model-independent indirect detection constraints on hidden sector dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei

    2016-06-01

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded ``hidden sector'', annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e+e- and bar p p) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter by up to an order of magnitude in either direction (although the effect can be much smaller). We find that generally the bound from the Fermi dwarfs is most constraining for annihilations to photon-rich final states, while AMS-02 is most constraining for electron and muon final states; however in certain instances the CMB bounds overtake both, due to their approximate independence on the details of the hidden sector cascade. We provide the full set of cascade spectra considered here as publicly available code with examples at http://web.mit.edu/lns/research/CascadeSpectra.html.

  1. Nonparametric Independence Screening in Sparse Ultra-High Dimensional Varying Coefficient Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Ma, Yunbei; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The varying-coefficient model is an important class of nonparametric statistical model that allows us to examine how the effects of covariates vary with exposure variables. When the number of covariates is large, the issue of variable selection arises. In this paper, we propose and investigate marginal nonparametric screening methods to screen variables in sparse ultra-high dimensional varying-coefficient models. The proposed nonparametric independence screening (NIS) selects variables by ranking a measure of the nonparametric marginal contributions of each covariate given the exposure variable. The sure independent screening property is established under some mild technical conditions when the dimensionality is of nonpolynomial order, and the dimensionality reduction of NIS is quantified. To enhance the practical utility and finite sample performance, two data-driven iterative NIS methods are proposed for selecting thresholding parameters and variables: conditional permutation and greedy methods, resulting in Conditional-INIS and Greedy-INIS. The effectiveness and flexibility of the proposed methods are further illustrated by simulation studies and real data applications.

  2. Model independent evidence for dark energy evolution from Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Varun; Starobinsky, Alexei A

    2014-01-01

    Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) allow us to determine the expansion history of the Universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAO's in the SDSS DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of $H(z)$ at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model independent manner by means of an improved version of the $Om$ diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of $H(z) = 222 \\pm 7$ km/sec/Mpc at $z = 2.34$, when taken in tandem with measurements of $H(z)$ at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic $Omh^2$ from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely $Omh^2 \\approx 0.122 \\pm 0.01$, which is equivalent to $\\Omega_{0m}h^2$ for the spatially flat $\\Lambda$CDM model, is in tension with the value $\\Omega_{0m}h^2 = 0.1426 \\pm 0.0025$ determined for $\\Lambda$CDM from P...

  3. A numerical approach to model independently reconstruct $f(R)$ functions through cosmographic data

    CERN Document Server

    Pizza, Liberato

    2014-01-01

    The challenging issue of determining the correct $f(R)$ among several possibilities is here revised by means of numerical reconstructions of the modified Friedmann equations around the redshift interval $z\\in[0,1]$. Frequently, a severe degeneracy between $f(R)$ approaches occurs, since different paradigms correctly explain present time dynamics. To set the initial conditions on the $f(R)$ functions, we involve the use of the so called cosmography of the Universe, i.e. the technique of fixing constraints on the observable Universe by comparing expanded observables with current data. This powerful approach is essentially model independent and correspondingly we got a model independent reconstruction of $f(z)$ classes within the interval $z\\in[0,1]$. To allow the Hubble rate to evolve around $z\\leq1$, we considered three relevant frameworks of effective cosmological dynamics, i.e. the $\\Lambda$CDM model, the CPL parametrization and a polynomial approach to dark energy. Finally cumbersome algebra permits to pass...

  4. Model-independent determination of doublet and quartet cross sections in Nd fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Ramachandran, G

    2001-01-01

    A model-independent theoretical formalism is outlined to describe Nd fusion in terms of irreducible tensor amplitudes labelled by the initial channel spins s=((1)/(2)),((3)/(2)). A comprehensive form for the initial spin density matrix rho is given in the channel spin representation, when both the beam and target are polarized. It is then suggested that an incisive study of Nd fusion may be carried out employing a polarized beam on a polarized target, leading to the determination of the differential cross sections for the doublet and quartet states individually.

  5. Literature Reviews on Modeling Internal Geometry of Textile Composites and Rate-Independent Continuum Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su-Yuen, Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Textile composite materials have good potential for constructing composite structures where the effects of three-dimensional stresses are critical or geometric complexity is a manufacturing concern. There is a recent interest in advancing competence within Langley Research Center for modeling the degradation of mechanical properties of textile composites. In an initial effort, two critical areas are identified to pursue: (1) Construction of internal geometry of textile composites, and (2) Rate-independent continuum damage mechanics. This report documents reviews on the two subjects. Various reviewed approaches are categorized, their assumptions, methods, and progress are briefed, and then critiques are presented. Each review ends with recommended research.

  6. Model-Independent Analysis of CP Violation in Charmed Meson Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Dhir, Rohit; Oh, Sechul

    2015-01-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of CP violation, inspired by recent experimental observations, in charmed meson decays. The topological diagram approach is used to study direct CP asymmetries for singly Cabibbo-suppressed two-body hadronic decays of charmed mesons. We extract the magnitudes and relative phases of the corresponding topological amplitudes from available experimental information. In order to get more precise and reliable estimates of direct CP asymmetries, we take into account contributions from all possible strong penguin amplitudes, including the internal $b$-quark penguin contributions. We also study flavor SU(3) symmetry breaking effects in these decay modes and consequently, predict direct CP asymmetries of unmeasured modes.

  7. Model-independent combination of diphoton constraints at 750 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Soo [IFT-UAM/CSIC, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Rolbiecki, Krzysztof [University of Warsaw, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Ruiz de Austri, Roberto [IFIC-UV/CSIC, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    Motivated by the recent diphoton excess reported by both the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, we provide a model-independent combination of diphoton results obtained at √(s) = 8 and 13 TeV at the LHC. We consider resonant s-channel production of a spin-0 and spin-2 particle with a mass of 750 GeV that subsequently decays to two photons. The size of the excess reported by ATLAS appears to be in a slight tension with other measurements under the spin-2 particle hypothesis. (orig.)

  8. Independent component feature-based human activity recognition via Linear Discriminant Analysis and Hidden Markov Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Md; Lee, J J; Kim, T S

    2008-01-01

    In proactive computing, human activity recognition from image sequences is an active research area. This paper presents a novel approach of human activity recognition based on Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) of Independent Component (IC) features from shape information. With extracted features, Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is applied for training and recognition. The recognition performance using LDA of IC features has been compared to other approaches including Principle Component Analysis (PCA), LDA of PC, and ICA. The preliminary results show much improved performance in the recognition rate with our proposed method.

  9. Decay patterns of multi-quasiparticle bands—a model independent test of chiral symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear chiral systems exhibit chiral symmetry bands, built on left-handed and right-handed angular momentum nucleon configurations. The experimental search for such chiral systems revealed a number of suitable candidates, however an unambiguous identification of nuclear chiral symmetry is still outstanding. In this work it is shown that the decay patterns of chiral bands built on multi-quasiparticle configurations are different from those involving different single-particle configurations. It is suggested to use the observed decay patterns of chiral candidates as a new model-independent test of chiral symmetry.

  10. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume IV. Model documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M L; Allen, B J; Gale, J E; Lutz, M S; O& #x27; Hara, N E; Wood, R K

    1979-02-01

    This volume is the fourth in a series of seven documenting the PIES Integrating Model. It contains detailed descriptions of the basic assumptions behind each of the components of PIES and how they interact with one another. Chapter II of this volume presents the methodology used to integrate supply and demand. It includes a discussion of both the interface between the Demand Model and the equilibrating mechanism and the various supply models via the equilibrating algorithm used by PIES. Chapters III through IX describe each supply submodel in turn: coal, oil, and natural gas supply, utilities, refineries, advanced technologies, and transportation. Code and data documentation are covered elsewhere in this series (Volumes V and VI respectively). PIES is an evolving system. As this document was being prepared, many parts of the model were being modified. This document describes the PIES Integrating Model as of January 1, 1978.

  11. Domain Independent Vocabulary Generation and Its Use in Category-based Small Footprint Language Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIM, K.-H.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The work in this paper pertains to domain independent vocabulary generation and its use in category-based small footprint Language Model (LM. Two major constraints of the conventional LMs in the embedded environment are memory capacity limitation and data sparsity for the domain-specific application. This data sparsity adversely affects vocabulary coverage and LM performance. To overcome these constraints, we define a set of domain independent categories using a Part-Of-Speech (POS tagged corpus. Also, we generate a domain independent vocabulary based on this set using the corpus and knowledge base. Then, we propose a mathematical framework for a category-based LM using this set. In this LM, one word can be assigned assign multiple categories. In order to reduce its memory requirements, we propose a tree-based data structure. In addition, we determine the history length of a category n-gram, and the independent assumption applying to a category history generation. The proposed vocabulary generation method illustrates at least 13.68% relative improvement in coverage for a SMS text corpus, where data are sparse due to the difficulties in data collection. The proposed category-based LM requires only 215KB which is 55% and 13% compared to the conventional category-based LM and the word-based LM, respectively. It successively improves the performance, achieving 54.9% and 60.6% perplexity reduction compared to the conventional category-based LM and the word-based LM in terms of normalized perplexity.

  12. Mental Health Changes and Its Predictors in Adolescents using the Path Analytic Model: A 7-Year Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Soltanian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This 7-year observational study examines the hours of TV-watching, phone conversation with friends, using the internet, and physical activity as predictors of mental health among adolescents in south of Iran.At the baseline (in 2005, the participants were 2584 high school students in the 9th to 11th grade. At the baseline, 30% of the available participants (n = 775 were selected in the follow-up (2012 using convenience sampling method. This study used the path analysis to examine the predictors of mental health and to obtain direct, indirect and total effects of the independent variables.At the baseline (2005, female gender, internet use, maternal education, physical activity and father's education were associated with mental health (p<0.05. Baseline mental health, internet use and physical activity predicted mental health of the participants in the follow up (p<0.05.The findings of the study revealed that better mental health in later life is associated with better mental health at baseline, male gender, higher physical activity and phone communication with friends, and less use of the internet and TV.

  13. Quasi-degenerate Neutrino mass models and their significance: A model independent investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, S

    2016-01-01

    The prediction of possible ordering of neutrino masses relies mostly on the model selected. Alienating the $\\mu-\\tau$ interchange symmetry from discrete flavour symmetry based models, turns the neutrino mass matrix less predictive. But this inspires one to seek the answer from other phenomenological frameworks. We need a proper parametrization of the neutrino mass matrices concerning individual hierarchies. In the present work, we attempt to study the six different cases of Quasi-degenerate (QDN) neutrino models. The related mass matrices, $m_{LL}^{\

  14. Salivary protein levels as a predictor of perceived astringency in model systems and solid foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Erin E; Ziegler, Gregory R; Hayes, John E

    2016-09-01

    Salivary protein difference value (SP D-value) is a quantitative measure of salivary protein replenishment, which reportedly relates to individual differences in perceived astringency. This in vitro measure is calculated as the difference in total salivary protein before (S1) and after (S2) stimulation with tannic acid, with a greater absolute value (S2-S1) indicating less protein replenishment. Others report that this measure predicts perceived astringency and liking of liquid model systems and beverages containing added polyphenols. Whether this relationship generalizes to astringent compounds other than polyphenols, or to solid foods is unknown. Here, the associations between SP D-values and perceived astringency and overall liking/disliking for alum and tannic acid (experiment 1) as well as solid chocolate-flavored compound coating with added tannic acid or grape seed extract (GSE) (experiment 2) were examined. In both experiments, participants (n=84 and 81, respectively) indicated perceived intensity of astringency, bitterness, sweetness, and sourness, and degree of liking of either aqueous solutions, or solid chocolate-flavored compound coating with added astringents. Data were analyzed via linear regression, and as discrete groups for comparison to prior work. Three discrete groups were formed based on first and third quartile splits of the SP D-value distribution: low (LR), medium (MR), and high responding (HR) individuals. In experiment 1, significantly higher mean astringency ratings were observed for the HR as compared to the LR/MR groups for alum and tannic acid, confirming and extending prior work. In experiment 2, significantly higher mean astringency ratings were also observed for HR as compared to LR groups in solid chocolate-flavored compound containing added tannic acid or GSE. Significant differences in liking were found between HR and LR groups for alum and tannic acid in water, but no significant differences in liking were observed for

  15. MODEL-INDEPENDENT EVIDENCE FOR DARK ENERGY EVOLUTION FROM BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahni, V. [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Shafieloo, A. [Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Starobinsky, A. A., E-mail: varun@iucaa.ernet.in, E-mail: arman@apctp.org, E-mail: alstar@landau.ac.ru [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Moscow 119334 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-01

    Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) allow us to determine the expansion history of the universe, thereby shedding light on the nature of dark energy. Recent observations of BAOs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR9 and DR11 have provided us with statistically independent measurements of H(z) at redshifts of 0.57 and 2.34, respectively. We show that these measurements can be used to test the cosmological constant hypothesis in a model-independent manner by means of an improved version of the Om diagnostic. Our results indicate that the SDSS DR11 measurement of H(z) = 222 ± 7 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} at z = 2.34, when taken in tandem with measurements of H(z) at lower redshifts, imply considerable tension with the standard ΛCDM model. Our estimation of the new diagnostic Omh {sup 2} from SDSS DR9 and DR11 data, namely, Omh {sup 2} ≈ 0.122 ± 0.01, which is equivalent to Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} for the spatially flat ΛCDM model, is in tension with the value Ω{sub 0m} h {sup 2} = 0.1426 ± 0.0025 determined for ΛCDM from Planck+WP. This tension is alleviated in models in which the cosmological constant was dynamically screened (compensated) in the past. Such evolving dark energy models display a pole in the effective equation of state of dark energy at high redshifts, which emerges as a smoking gun test for these theories.

  16. Sustainable fisheries in shallow lakes: an independent empirical test of the Chinese mitten crab yield model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haijun; Liang, Xiaomin; Wang, Hongzhu

    2017-07-01

    Next to excessive nutrient loading, intensive aquaculture is one of the major anthropogenic impacts threatening lake ecosystems. In China, particularly in the shallow lakes of mid-lower Changjiang (Yangtze) River, continuous overstocking of the Chinese mitten crab ( Eriocheir sinensis) could deteriorate water quality and exhaust natural resources. A series of crab yield models and a general optimum-stocking rate model have been established, which seek to benefit both crab culture and the environment. In this research, independent investigations were carried out to evaluate the crab yield models and modify the optimum-stocking model. Low percentage errors (average 47%, median 36%) between observed and calculated crab yields were obtained. Specific values were defined for adult crab body mass (135 g/ind.) and recapture rate (18% and 30% in lakes with submerged macrophyte biomass above and below 1 000 g/m2) to modify the optimum-stocking model. Analysis based on the modified optimum-stocking model indicated that the actual stocking rates in most lakes were much higher than the calculated optimum-stocking rates. This implies that, for most lakes, the current stocking rates should be greatly reduced to maintain healthy lake ecosystems.

  17. Data-driven model-independent searches for long-lived particles at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccaro, Andrea; Curtin, David; Lubatti, H. J.; Russell, Heather; Shelton, Jessie

    2016-12-01

    Neutral long-lived particles (LLPs) are highly motivated by many beyond the Standard Model scenarios, such as theories of supersymmetry, baryogenesis, and neutral naturalness, and present both tremendous discovery opportunities and experimental challenges for the LHC. A major bottleneck for current LLP searches is the prediction of Standard Model backgrounds, which are often impossible to simulate accurately. In this paper, we propose a general strategy for obtaining differential, data-driven background estimates in LLP searches, thereby notably extending the range of LLP masses and lifetimes that can be discovered at the LHC. We focus on LLPs decaying in the ATLAS muon system, where triggers providing both signal and control samples are available at LHC run 2. While many existing searches require two displaced decays, a detailed knowledge of backgrounds will allow for very inclusive searches that require just one detected LLP decay. As we demonstrate for the h →X X signal model of LLP pair production in exotic Higgs decays, this results in dramatic sensitivity improvements for proper lifetimes ≳10 m . In theories of neutral naturalness, this extends reach to glueball masses far below the b ¯b threshold. Our strategy readily generalizes to other signal models and other detector subsystems. This framework therefore lends itself to the development of a systematic, model-independent LLP search program, in analogy to the highly successful simplified-model framework of prompt searches.

  18. Sustainable fisheries in shallow lakes: an independent empirical test of the Chinese mitten crab yield model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haijun; Liang, Xiaomin; Wang, Hongzhu

    2016-08-01

    Next to excessive nutrient loading, intensive aquaculture is one of the major anthropogenic impacts threatening lake ecosystems. In China, particularly in the shallow lakes of mid-lower Changjiang (Yangtze) River, continuous overstocking of the Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) could deteriorate water quality and exhaust natural resources. A series of crab yield models and a general optimum-stocking rate model have been established, which seek to benefit both crab culture and the environment. In this research, independent investigations were carried out to evaluate the crab yield models and modify the optimum-stocking model. Low percentage errors (average 47%, median 36%) between observed and calculated crab yields were obtained. Specific values were defined for adult crab body mass (135 g/ind.) and recapture rate (18% and 30% in lakes with submerged macrophyte biomass above and below 1 000 g/m2) to modify the optimum-stocking model. Analysis based on the modified optimum-stocking model indicated that the actual stocking rates in most lakes were much higher than the calculated optimum-stocking rates. This implies that, for most lakes, the current stocking rates should be greatly reduced to maintain healthy lake ecosystems.

  19. Phenomenology of the Basis-Independent CP-Violating Two-Higgs Doublet Model [Dissertation

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Deva

    2009-01-01

    The Two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) is a model of low-energy particle interactions that is identical to the Standard Model except for the addition of an extra Higgs doublet. This extended Higgs sector would appear in experiments as the presence of multiple Higgs particles, both neutral and charged. The neutral states may either be eigenstates of CP (in the CP-conserving 2HDM), or be mixtures of CP eigenstates (in the CP-violating 2HDM). In order to understand how to measure the couplings of these new particles, this document presents the theory of the CP-violating 2HDM in a basis-independent formalism and explicitly identifies the physical parameters of the model, including a discussion of tan(beta)-like parameters. The CP-conserving limit, decoupling limit, and the custodial limit of the model are presented. In addition, phenomenological constraints from the oblique parameters (S, T, and U) are discussed. A survey of the parameter space of this model shows that the 2HDM is consistent with a large range of pos...

  20. Bilinear modeling of EMG signals to extract user-independent features for multiuser myoelectric interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Takamitsu; Morimoto, Jun

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we propose a multiuser myoelectric interface that can easily adapt to novel users. When a user performs different motions (e.g., grasping and pinching), different electromyography (EMG) signals are measured. When different users perform the same motion (e.g., grasping), different EMG signals are also measured. Therefore, designing a myoelectric interface that can be used by multiple users to perform multiple motions is difficult. To cope with this problem, we propose for EMG signals a bilinear model that is composed of two linear factors: 1) user dependent and 2) motion dependent. By decomposing the EMG signals into these two factors, the extracted motion-dependent factors can be used as user-independent features. We can construct a motion classifier on the extracted feature space to develop the multiuser interface. For novel users, the proposed adaptation method estimates the user-dependent factor through only a few interactions. The bilinear EMG model with the estimated user-dependent factor can extract the user-independent features from the novel user data. We applied our proposed method to a recognition task of five hand gestures for robotic hand control using four-channel EMG signals measured from subject forearms. Our method resulted in 73% accuracy, which was statistically significantly different from the accuracy of standard nonmultiuser interfaces, as the result of a two-sample t -test at a significance level of 1%.

  1. Semiparametrically efficient inference based on signed ranks in symmetric independent component models

    CERN Document Server

    Ilmonen, Pauliina; 10.1214/11-AOS906

    2012-01-01

    We consider semiparametric location-scatter models for which the $p$-variate observation is obtained as $X=\\Lambda Z+\\mu$, where $\\mu$ is a $p$-vector, $\\Lambda$ is a full-rank $p\\times p$ matrix and the (unobserved) random $p$-vector $Z$ has marginals that are centered and mutually independent but are otherwise unspecified. As in blind source separation and independent component analysis (ICA), the parameter of interest throughout the paper is $\\Lambda$. On the basis of $n$ i.i.d. copies of $X$, we develop, under a symmetry assumption on $Z$, signed-rank one-sample testing and estimation procedures for $\\Lambda$. We exploit the uniform local and asymptotic normality (ULAN) of the model to define signed-rank procedures that are semiparametrically efficient under correctly specified densities. Yet, as is usual in rank-based inference, the proposed procedures remain valid (correct asymptotic size under the null, for hypothesis testing, and root-$n$ consistency, for point estimation) under a very broad range of ...

  2. Model-independent constraints on hadronic form factors with above-threshold poles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprini, Irinel; Grinstein, Benjamín; Lebed, Richard F.

    2017-08-01

    Model-independent constraints on hadronic form factors, in particular those describing exclusive semileptonic decays, can be derived from the knowledge of field correlators calculated in perturbative QCD, using analyticity and unitarity. The location of poles corresponding to below-threshold resonances, i.e., stable states that cannot decay into a pair of hadrons from the crossed channel of the form factor, must be known a priori, and their effect, accounted for through the use of Blaschke factors, is to reduce the strength of the constraints in the semileptonic region. By contrast, above-threshold resonances appear as poles on unphysical Riemann sheets, and their presence does not affect the original model-independent constraints. We discuss the possibility that the above-threshold poles can provide indirect information on the form factors on the first Riemann sheet, either through information from their residues or by constraining the discontinuity function. The bounds on form factors can be improved by imposing, in an exact way, the additional information in the extremal problem. The semileptonic K →π ℓν and D →π ℓν decays are considered as illustrations.

  3. Leptonic decay of light vector mesons in an independent quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N. (Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar-751004 (India)); Dash, P.C. (Department of Physics, P. N. College, Khurda, Orissa (India)); Panda, A.R. (Department of Physics, Kendrapara College, Kendrapara, Orissa (India))

    1993-02-01

    Leptonic decay widths of light vector mesons are calculated in a framework based on the independent quark model with a scalar-vector harmonic potential. Assuming a strong correlation to exist between the quark-antiquark momenta inside the meson, so as to make their total momentum identically zero in the center-of-mass frame of the meson, we extract the quark and antiquark momentum distribution amplitudes from the bound quark eigenmode. Using the model parameters determined from earlier studies, we arrive at the leptonic decay widths of ([rho],[omega],[phi]) as (6.26 keV, 0.67 keV, 1.58 keV) which are in very good agreement with the respective experimental data (6.77[plus minus]0.32 keV, 0.6[plus minus]0.02 keV, 1.37[plus minus]0.05 keV).

  4. Independent power producer parallel operation modeling in transient network simulations for interconnected distributed generation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Fabricio A.M.; Camacho, Jose R. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, School of Electrical Engineering, Rural Electricity and Alternative Sources Lab, PO Box 593, 38400.902 Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Chaves, Marcelo L.R.; Guimaraes, Geraldo C. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, School of Electrical Engineering, Power Systems Dynamics Group, PO Box: 593, 38400.902 Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The main task in this paper is to present a performance analysis of a distribution network in the presence of an independent power producer (IP) synchronous generator with its speed governor and voltage regulator modeled using TACS -Transient Analysis of Control Systems, for distributed generation studies. Regulators were implemented through their transfer functions in the S domain. However, since ATP-EMTP (Electromagnetic Transient Program) works in the time domain, a discretization is necessary to return the TACS output to time domain. It must be highlighted that this generator is driven by a steam turbine, and the whole system with regulators and the equivalent of the power authority system at the common coupling point (CCP) are modeled in the ''ATP-EMTP -Alternative Transients Program''. (author)

  5. Inflexibility and independence: Phase transitions in the majority-rule model

    CERN Document Server

    Crokidakis, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study opinion formation in a population participating of a public debate with two distinct choices. We considered three distinct mechanisms of social interactions and individuals' behavior: conformity, non-conformity and inflexibility. The conformity is ruled by the majority-rule dynamics, whereas the non-conformity is introduced in the population as an independent behavior, implying the failure to attempted group influence. Finally, the inflexible agents are introduced in the population with a given density. These individuals present a singular behavior, in a way that their stubbornness makes them reluctant to change their opinions. We consider these effects separately and all together, with the aim to analyze the critical behavior of the system. We performed numerical simulations for distinct population sizes, and our results suggest that the different formulations of the model undergo order-disorder phase transitions in the same universality class of the Ising model. Some of our results are...

  6. Inflexibility and independence: Phase transitions in the majority-rule model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crokidakis, Nuno; de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo Castro

    2015-12-01

    In this work we study opinion formation in a population participating in a public debate with two distinct choices. We consider three distinct mechanisms of social interactions and individuals' behavior: conformity, nonconformity, and inflexibility. The conformity is ruled by the majority-rule dynamics, whereas the nonconformity is introduced in the population as an independent behavior, implying the failure of attempted group influence. Finally, the inflexible agents are introduced in the population with a given density. These individuals present a singular behavior, in a way that their stubbornness makes them reluctant to change their opinions. We consider these effects separately and all together, with the aim to analyze the critical behavior of the system. We perform numerical simulations in some lattice structures and for distinct population sizes. Our results suggest that the different formulations of the model undergo order-disorder phase transitions in the same universality class as the Ising model. Some of our results are complemented by analytical calculations.

  7. Model-independent measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutíerrez, P; Gutíerrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Korablev, V M; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lévêque, J; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; vanden Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; SWang, M H L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-01-01

    We present the first model-independent measurement of the helicity of $W$ bosons produced in top quark decays, based on a 1 fb$^{-1}$ sample of candidate $t\\bar{t}$ events in the dilepton and lepton plus jets channels collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron $p\\bar{p}$ Collider. We reconstruct the angle $\\theta^*$ between the momenta of the down-type fermion and the top quark in the $W$ boson rest frame for each top quark decay. A fit of the resulting \\costheta distribution finds that the fraction of longitudinal $W$ bosons $f_0 = 0.390 \\pm 0.177 \\hbox{(stat.)} \\pm 0.104 \\hbox{(syst.)}$ and the fraction of right-handed $W$ bosons $f_+ = 0.171 \\pm 0.102 \\hbox{(stat.)} \\pm 0.058 \\hbox{(syst.)}$, which is consistent at the 27% C.L. with the standard model.

  8. Gauge-origin-independent magnetizabilities of solvated molecules using the polarizable continuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Marchesan, Domenico; Ruud, Kenneth; Frediani, Luca; Coriani, Sonia

    2005-11-01

    We present an implementation of the polarizable continuum model in its integral equation formulation for the calculation of the magnetizabilities of solvated molecules. The gauge-origin independence of the calculated magnetizabilities and the fast basis set convergence are ensured through the use of London atomic orbitals. Our implementation can use Hartree-Fock and multiconfigurational self-consistent-field (MCSCF) wave functions as well as density-functional theory including hybrid functionals such as B3LYP. We present the results of dielectric continuum effects on water and pyridine using MCSCF wave functions, as well as dielectric medium effects on the magnetizability of the aromatic amino acids as a model for how a surrounding protein environment affects the magnetizability of these molecules. It is demonstrated that the dielectric medium effects on the magnetizability anisotropies of the aromatic amino acids may be substantial, being as large as 25% in the case of tyrosine.

  9. Independent air dehumidification with membrane-based total heat recovery: Modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, C.H.; Zhang, L.Z.; Pei, L.X. [Key Laboratory of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Fresh air ventilation is helpful for the control of epidemic respiratory disease like Swine flu (H1N1). Fresh air dehumidification systems with energy recovery measures are the key equipments to realize this goal. As a solution, an independent air dehumidification system with membrane-based total heat recovery is proposed. A prototype is built in laboratory. A detailed model is proposed and a cell-by-cell simulation technique is used in simulation to evaluate performances. The results indicate that the model can predict the system accurately. The effects of varying operating conditions like air-flow rates, temperature, and air relative humidity on the air dehumidification rates, cooling powers, electric power consumption, and thermal coefficient of performance are evaluated. The prototype has a COP of 6.8 under nominal operating conditions with total heat recovery. The performance is rather robust to outside weather conditions with a membrane-based total heat exchanger. (author)

  10. A multi-class predictor based on a probabilistic model: application to gene expression profiling-based diagnosis of thyroid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Shinzaburo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although microscopic diagnosis has been playing the decisive role in cancer diagnostics, there have been cases in which it does not satisfy the clinical need. Differential diagnosis of malignant and benign thyroid tissues is one such case, and supplementary diagnosis such as that by gene expression profile is expected. Results With four thyroid tissue types, i.e., papillary carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, follicular adenoma, and normal thyroid, we performed gene expression profiling with adaptor-tagged competitive PCR, a high-throughput RT-PCR technique. For differential diagnosis, we applied a novel multi-class predictor, introducing probabilistic outputs. Multi-class predictors were constructed using various combinations of binary classifiers. The learning set included 119 samples, and the predictors were evaluated by strict leave-one-out cross validation. Trials included classical combinations, i.e., one-to-one, one-to-the-rest, but the predictor using more combination exhibited the better prediction accuracy. This characteristic was consistent with other gene expression data sets. The performance of the selected predictor was then tested with an independent set consisting of 49 samples. The resulting test prediction accuracy was 85.7%. Conclusion Molecular diagnosis of thyroid tissues is feasible by gene expression profiling, and the current level is promising towards the automatic diagnostic tool to complement the present medical procedures. A multi-class predictor with an exhaustive combination of binary classifiers could achieve a higher prediction accuracy than those with classical combinations and other predictors such as multi-class SVM. The probabilistic outputs of the predictor offer more detailed information for each sample, which enables visualization of each sample in low-dimensional classification spaces. These new concepts should help to improve the multi-class classification including that of cancer tissues.

  11. An independent quark model study of weak leptonic decays of pseudoscalar mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, S. N.; Nanda, P. K.; Sahoo, S.; Panda, S.

    2015-05-01

    An independent quark model with a relativistic power-law potential is used to study the weak leptonic decays of light and heavy pseudoscalar mesons. The partial decay width and the decay constant for the weak leptonic decay are derived from the quark-antiquark momentum distribution amplitude which is obtained from the bound quark eigenfunction with the assumption of a strong correlation existing between quark-antiquark momenta inside the decaying meson in its rest frame. The model parameters are first determined from the application of the model to study the ground state hyperfine splitting of ρ, K, D, Ds, B, Bs and Bc mesons. The same model with no adjustable parameters is then used to evaluate the decay constants fM and the decay widths of pseudoscalar mesons. The model predictions agree quite well with the available experimental data as well as with those of several other models. The decay constant for pion and kaon are obtained as fπ = 132 MeV and fk = 161 MeV which closely agree with experimental values. But in case of heavier mesons for which experimental data are not yet available, the present model gives its predictions as fBC > fBS > fB, fDS > fD, fD > fB and fπ > fB which are in conformity with most of other model predictions. The model predictions of the corresponding decay widths and the branching ratios for the (l\\bar {ν }l) and (τ \\bar {ν }τ ) decay modes are in close agreement with the available experimental data.

  12. Teamwork skills, shared mental models, and performance in simulated trauma teams: an independent group design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westli Heidi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-technical skills are seen as an important contributor to reducing adverse events and improving medical management in healthcare teams. Previous research on the effectiveness of teams has suggested that shared mental models facilitate coordination and team performance. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether demonstrated teamwork skills and behaviour indicating shared mental models would be associated with observed improved medical management in trauma team simulations. Methods Revised versions of the 'Anesthetists' Non-Technical Skills Behavioural marker system' and 'Anti-Air Teamwork Observation Measure' were field tested in moment-to-moment observation of 27 trauma team simulations in Norwegian hospitals. Independent subject matter experts rated medical management in the teams. An independent group design was used to explore differences in teamwork skills between higher-performing and lower-performing teams. Results Specific teamwork skills and behavioural markers were associated with indicators of good team performance. Higher and lower-performing teams differed in information exchange, supporting behaviour and communication, with higher performing teams showing more effective information exchange and communication, and less supporting behaviours. Behavioural markers of shared mental models predicted effective medical management better than teamwork skills. Conclusions The present study replicates and extends previous research by providing new empirical evidence of the significance of specific teamwork skills and a shared mental model for the effective medical management of trauma teams. In addition, the study underlines the generic nature of teamwork skills by demonstrating their transferability from different clinical simulations like the anaesthesia environment to trauma care, as well as the potential usefulness of behavioural frequency analysis in future research on non-technical skills.

  13. Gauge fixing and renormalisation scale independence of tunneling rate in abelian Higgs model and in the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lalak, Zygmunt; Olszewski, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    We explicitly show perturbative gauge fixing independence of the tunneling rate to a stable radiatively induced vacuum in the abelian Higgs model. We work with a class of $R_\\xi$ gauges in the presence of both dimensionless and dimensionful gauge fixing parameters. We show that Nielsen identities survive the inclusion of higher order oparators and compute the tunnelling rate to the vacua modified by the nonrenormalisable operators in a gauge invariant manner. We also discuss implications of this method for the complete Standard Model.

  14. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  15. Dynamic modeling and characteristics analysis of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Yao, Zhiyuan; Zhou, Shengli; Lv, Qibao; Liu, Zhen

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an integrated model is developed to analyze the fundamental characteristics of a modal-independent linear ultrasonic motor with double piezoelectric vibrators. The energy method is used to model the dynamics of the two piezoelectric vibrators. The interface forces are coupled into the dynamic equations of the two vibrators and the moving platform, forming a whole machine model of the motor. The behavior of the force transmission of the motor is analyzed via the resulting model to understand the drive mechanism. In particular, the relative contact length is proposed to describe the intermittent contact characteristic between the stator and the mover, and its role in evaluating motor performance is discussed. The relations between the output speed and various inputs to the motor and the start-stop transients of the motor are analyzed by numerical simulations, which are validated by experiments. Furthermore, the dead-zone behavior is predicted and clarified analytically using the proposed model, which is also observed in experiments. These results are useful for designing servo control scheme for the motor.

  16. Two-parameter Failure Model Improves Time-independent and Time-dependent Failure Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huddleston, R L

    2004-01-27

    A new analytical model for predicting failure under a generalized, triaxial stress state was developed by the author and initially reported in 1984. The model was validated for predicting failure under elevated-temperature creep-rupture conditions. Biaxial data for three alloy steels, Types 304 and 316 stainless steels and Inconel 600, demonstrated two to three orders of magnitude reduction in the scatter of predicted versus observed creep-rupture times as compared to the classical failure models of Mises, Tresca, and Rankine. In 1990, the new model was incorporated into American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code Case N47-29 for design of components operating under creep-rupture conditions. The current report provides additional validation of the model for predicting failure under time-independent conditions and also outlines a methodology for predicting failure under cyclic, time-dependent, creep-fatigue conditions. The later extension of the methodology may have the potential to improve failure predictions there as well. These results are relevant to most design applications, but they have special relevance to high-performance design applications such as components for high-pressure equipment, nuclear reactors, and jet engines.

  17. Robust modeling of differential gene expression data using normal/independent distributions: a Bayesian approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Ganjali

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of identifying differentially expressed genes under different conditions using gene expression microarray data, in the presence of outliers, is discussed. For this purpose, the robust modeling of gene expression data using some powerful distributions known as normal/independent distributions is considered. These distributions include the Student's t and normal distributions which have been used previously, but also include extensions such as the slash, the contaminated normal and the Laplace distributions. The purpose of this paper is to identify differentially expressed genes by considering these distributional assumptions instead of the normal distribution. A Bayesian approach using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method is adopted for parameter estimation. Two publicly available gene expression data sets are analyzed using the proposed approach. The use of the robust models for detecting differentially expressed genes is investigated. This investigation shows that the choice of model for differentiating gene expression data is very important. This is due to the small number of replicates for each gene and the existence of outlying data. Comparison of the performance of these models is made using different statistical criteria and the ROC curve. The method is illustrated using some simulation studies. We demonstrate the flexibility of these robust models in identifying differentially expressed genes.

  18. Development of Boundary Condition Independent Reduced Order Thermal Models using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghupathy, Arun; Ghia, Karman; Ghia, Urmila

    2008-11-01

    Compact Thermal Models (CTM) to represent IC packages has been traditionally developed using the DELPHI-based (DEvelopment of Libraries of PHysical models for an Integrated design) methodology. The drawbacks of this method are presented, and an alternative method is proposed. A reduced-order model that provides the complete thermal information accurately with less computational resources can be effectively used in system level simulations. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), a statistical method, can be used to reduce the order of the degree of freedom or variables of the computations for such a problem. POD along with the Galerkin projection allows us to create reduced-order models that reproduce the characteristics of the system with a considerable reduction in computational resources while maintaining a high level of accuracy. The goal of this work is to show that this method can be applied to obtain a boundary condition independent reduced-order thermal model for complex components. The methodology is applied to the 1D transient heat equation.

  19. Extreme learning machines: a new approach for modeling dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration with and without water quality variables as predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddam, Salim; Kisi, Ozgur

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, several extreme learning machine (ELM) models, including standard extreme learning machine with sigmoid activation function (S-ELM), extreme learning machine with radial basis activation function (R-ELM), online sequential extreme learning machine (OS-ELM), and optimally pruned extreme learning machine (OP-ELM), are newly applied for predicting dissolved oxygen concentration with and without water quality variables as predictors. Firstly, using data from eight United States Geological Survey (USGS) stations located in different rivers basins, USA, the S-ELM, R-ELM, OS-ELM, and OP-ELM were compared against the measured dissolved oxygen (DO) using four water quality variables, water temperature, specific conductance, turbidity, and pH, as predictors. For each station, we used data measured at an hourly time step for a period of 4 years. The dataset was divided into a training set (70%) and a validation set (30%). We selected several combinations of the water quality variables as inputs for each ELM model and six different scenarios were compared. Secondly, an attempt was made to predict DO concentration without water quality variables. To achieve this goal, we used the year numbers, 2008, 2009, etc., month numbers from (1) to (12), day numbers from (1) to (31) and hour numbers from (00:00) to (24:00) as predictors. Thirdly, the best ELM models were trained using validation dataset and tested with the training dataset. The performances of the four ELM models were evaluated using four statistical indices: the coefficient of correlation (R), the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), the root mean squared error (RMSE), and the mean absolute error (MAE). Results obtained from the eight stations indicated that: (i) the best results were obtained by the S-ELM, R-ELM, OS-ELM, and OP-ELM models having four water quality variables as predictors; (ii) out of eight stations, the OP-ELM performed better than the other three ELM models at seven stations while the R

  20. Prospective independent validation of IMPACT modeling as a prognostic tool in severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczykowski, David M; Puccio, Ava M; Scruggs, Bobby J; Bauer, Joshua S; Hricik, Allison J; Beers, Sue R; Okonkwo, David O

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials in traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been fraught with failure due in part to heterogeneity in pathology and insensitive outcome measurements. The International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) prognostic model has been purposed as a means of risk adjustment and outcome prediction for use in trial design and analysis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the IMPACT model in predicting 6-month functional outcome and mortality using prospectively collected data at a large, Level 1 neurotrauma center. This population-based cohort study included all TBI patients ≥14 years of age admitted with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≤8 (severe TBI) to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center between July 1994 and May 2009. Clinical data were prospectively collected and linked to 6-month functional outcome (Glasgow Outcome Scale [GOS]) and mortality. The discriminatory power and calibration of the three iterations of the IMPACT model (core, extended, and lab) were assessed using multiple regression analyses and indicated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). A sample of 587 patients was available for analysis; the mean age was 37.8±17 years. The median 6-month GOS was 3 (IQR 3); 6-month mortality was 41%. The prognostic models were composed of age, motor score, and pupillary reactivity (core model), Marshall grade on head CT and secondary insults (extended), and laboratory values (lab); all of these displayed good prediction ability for unfavorable outcome and mortality (unfavorable outcome AUC=0.76, 0.79, 0.76; mortality AUC=0.78, 0.83, 0.83, respectively). All model iterations displayed adequate calibration for predicting unfavorable outcome and mortality. Prospective, independent validation supports the IMPACT prognostic model's prediction of patient 6-month functional status and mortality after severe TBI. The IMPACT prognostic model is an effective

  1. Genotype delimitation in the Nod-independent model legume Aeschynomene evenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Jean-François; Cartieaux, Fabienne; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Brown, Spencer; Boursot, Marc; Giraud, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Research on the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis has been so far focused on two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, which use a sophisticated infection process involving infection thread formation. However, in 25% of the legumes, the bacterial entry occurs more simply in an intercellular fashion. Among them, some semi-aquatic Aeschynomene species present the distinctive feature to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on both roots and stems following elicitation by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia that do not produce Nod factors. This interaction is believed to represent a living testimony of the ancestral state of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis. To decipher the molecular mechanisms of this unique Nod-independent nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, we previously identified A. evenia C. Wright as an appropriate model legume, because it displays all the requisites for molecular and genetic approaches. To advance the use of this new model legume species, here we characterized the intraspecific diversity found in A. evenia. For this, the accessions available in germplasm banks were collected and subjected to morphological investigations, genotyping with RAPD and SSR markers, molecular phylogenies using ITS and single nuclear gene sequences, and cross-compatibility tests. These combined analyses revealed an important intraspecific differentiation that led us to propose a new taxonomic classification for A. evenia comprising two subspecies and four varieties. The A. evenia ssp. evenia contains var. evenia and var. pauciciliata whereas A. evenia ssp. serrulata comprises var. serrulata and var. major. This study provides information to exploit efficiently the diversity encountered in A. evenia and proposes subsp. evenia as the most appropriate subspecies for future projects aimed at identifying plant determinants of the Nod-independent symbiotic process.

  2. Genotype delimitation in the Nod-independent model legume Aeschynomene evenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Arrighi

    Full Text Available Research on the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis has been so far focused on two model legumes, Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus, which use a sophisticated infection process involving infection thread formation. However, in 25% of the legumes, the bacterial entry occurs more simply in an intercellular fashion. Among them, some semi-aquatic Aeschynomene species present the distinctive feature to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on both roots and stems following elicitation by photosynthetic bradyrhizobia that do not produce Nod factors. This interaction is believed to represent a living testimony of the ancestral state of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis. To decipher the molecular mechanisms of this unique Nod-independent nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, we previously identified A. evenia C. Wright as an appropriate model legume, because it displays all the requisites for molecular and genetic approaches. To advance the use of this new model legume species, here we characterized the intraspecific diversity found in A. evenia. For this, the accessions available in germplasm banks were collected and subjected to morphological investigations, genotyping with RAPD and SSR markers, molecular phylogenies using ITS and single nuclear gene sequences, and cross-compatibility tests. These combined analyses revealed an important intraspecific differentiation that led us to propose a new taxonomic classification for A. evenia comprising two subspecies and four varieties. The A. evenia ssp. evenia contains var. evenia and var. pauciciliata whereas A. evenia ssp. serrulata comprises var. serrulata and var. major. This study provides information to exploit efficiently the diversity encountered in A. evenia and proposes subsp. evenia as the most appropriate subspecies for future projects aimed at identifying plant determinants of the Nod-independent symbiotic process.

  3. Model-independent indirect detection constraints on hidden sector dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elor, Gilly; Rodd, Nicholas L.; Slatyer, Tracy R.; Xue, Wei [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,77 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    If dark matter inhabits an expanded “hidden sector”, annihilations may proceed through sequential decays or multi-body final states. We map out the potential signals and current constraints on such a framework in indirect searches, using a model-independent setup based on multi-step hierarchical cascade decays. While remaining agnostic to the details of the hidden sector model, our framework captures the generic broadening of the spectrum of secondary particles (photons, neutrinos, e{sup +}e{sup −} and p-barp) relative to the case of direct annihilation to Standard Model particles. We explore how indirect constraints on dark matter annihilation limit the parameter space for such cascade/multi-particle decays. We investigate limits from the cosmic microwave background by Planck, the Fermi measurement of photons from the dwarf galaxies, and positron data from AMS-02. The presence of a hidden sector can change the constraints on the dark matter by up to an order of magnitude in either direction (although the effect can be much smaller). We find that generally the bound from the Fermi dwarfs is most constraining for annihilations to photon-rich final states, while AMS-02 is most constraining for electron and muon final states; however in certain instances the CMB bounds overtake both, due to their approximate independence on the details of the hidden sector cascade. We provide the full set of cascade spectra considered here as publicly available code with examples at http://web.mit.edu/lns/research/CascadeSpectra.html.

  4. A Multidimensional Rasch Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Based on the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretz, Christopher R; Kean, Jacob; Heinemann, Allen W; Kozlowski, Allan J; Bode, Rita K; Gebhardt, Eveline

    2016-07-15

    A number of studies have evaluated the psychometric properties of the Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) using Rasch analysis, although none has done so using the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems National Database, a longitudinal database that captures demographic and outcome information on persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury across the United States. In the current study, we examine the psychometric properties of the FIM as represented by persons within this database and demonstrate that the FIM comprises three subscales representing cognitive, self-care, and mobility domains. These subscales were analyzed simultaneously using a multivariate Rasch model in combination with a time dependent concurrent calibration scheme with the goal of creating a raw score-to-logit transformation that can be used to improve the accuracy of parametric statistical analyses. The bowel and bladder function items were removed because of misfit with the motor and cognitive items. Some motor items exhibited step disorder, which was addressed by collapsing Categories 1-3 for Toileting, Stairs, Locomotion, Tub/Shower Transfers; Categories 1 and 2 for Toilet and Bed Transfers; and Categories 2 and 3 for Grooming. The strong correlations (r = 0.82-0.96) among the three subscales suggest they should be modeled together. Coefficient alpha of 0.98 indicates high internal consistency. Keyform maps are provided to enhance clinical interpretation and application of study results.

  5. Identifying cardiac syncope based on clinical history: a literature-based model tested in four independent datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janneke Berecki-Gisolf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop and test a literature-based model for symptoms that associate with cardiac causes of syncope. METHODS AND RESULTS: Seven studies (the derivation sample reporting ≥2 predictors of cardiac syncope were identified (4 Italian, 1 Swiss, 1 Canadian, and 1 from the United States. From these, 10 criteria were identified as diagnostic predictors. The conditional probability of each predictor was calculated by summation of the reported frequencies. A model of conditional probabilities and a priori probabilities of cardiac syncope was constructed. The model was tested in four datasets of patients with syncope (the test sample from Calgary (n=670; 21% had cardiac syncope, Amsterdam (n=503; 9%, Milan (n=689; 5% and Rochester (3877; 11%. In the derivation sample ten variables were significantly associated with cardiac syncope: age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, brief or absent prodrome, supine syncope, effort syncope, and absence of nausea, diaphoresis and blurred vision. Fitting the test datasets to the full model gave C-statistics of 0.87 (Calgary, 0.84 (Amsterdam, 0.72 (Milan and 0.71 (Rochester. Model sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 68% for Calgary, 86% and 67% for Amsterdam, 76% and 59% for Milan, and 73% and 52% for Rochester. A model with 5 variables (age, gender, structural heart disease, low number of spells, and lack of prodromal symptoms was as accurate as the total set. CONCLUSION: A simple literature-based Bayesian model of historical criteria can distinguish patients with cardiac syncope from other patients with syncope with moderate accuracy.

  6. Electromagnetic polarisabilities of the proton in an independent particle potential model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N. [Utkal Univ., Bhubaneswer (India). P.G. Dept. of Phys.; Dash, B.K. [Utkal Univ., Bhubaneswer (India). P.G. Dept. of Phys.; Das, P. [Department of Physics, Kendrapara College, Kendrapara-754211 (India); Panda, A.R. [Department of Physics, Kendrapara College, Kendrapara-754211 (India)

    1996-08-19

    We consider the electric and magnetic polarisabilities of the proton including the valence quark as well as pion dressing effects in an independent quark model with an effective scalar-vector harmonic potential which renders the solvability of relativistic Dirac equations for confined quarks, and has in fact acted as an alternative to the cloudy bag model (CBM). This model which has been applied successfully to a variety of hadronic problems is also observed here to yield the electromagnetic polarisabilities of the proton satisfactorily without any free parameters. The electric and magnetic polarisabilities, including valence quark core and pion cloud effects, obtained here as anti {alpha}{sub P}=14.074.10{sup -4} fm{sup 3} and anti {beta}{sub P}=3.155.10{sup -4} fm{sup 3}, are well within the uncertainties of their experimental measurements of (10.9{+-}2.2{+-}1.4).10{sup -4} fm{sup 3} and (3.3{+-}2.2{+-}1.4).10{sup -4} fm{sup 3}, respectively and are also in agreement with other model estimations. (orig.).

  7. Weak electric and magnetic form factors for semileptonic baryon decays in an independent-quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barik, N.; Dash, B.K.; Das, M.

    1985-10-01

    Weak electric and magnetic form factors for semileptonic baryon decays are calculated in a relativistic quark model based on the Dirac equation with the independent-quark confining potential of the form (1+..gamma../sup 0/)V(r). The values obtained for (g/sub 2//g/sub 1/), for various decay modes in a model with V(r) = a'r/sup 2/, are roughly of the same order as those predicted in the MIT bag model. However in a similar model with V(r) = (a/sup nu+1/r/sup ..nu../+V/sub 0/), the (g/sub 2//g/sub 1/) values agree with the nonrelativistic results of Donoghue and Holstein. Incorporating phenomenologically the effect of nonzero g/sub 2/ in the ratio (g/sub 1//f/sub 1/), we have estimated the values for (f/sub 2//f/sub 1/) for various semileptonic transitions. It is observed that SU(3)-symmetry breaking does not generate significant departures in (f/sub 2//f/sub 1/) values from the corresponding Cabibbo values.

  8. Model independent determination of the solar neutrino spectrum with and without MSW

    CERN Document Server

    Hata, N; Hata, Naoya; Langacker, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Besides the opportunity for discovering new neutrino physics, solar neutrino measurements provide a sensitive probe of the solar interior, and thus a rigorous test of solar model predictions. We present model independent determinations of the neutrino spectrum by using relevant flux components as free parameters subject only to the luminosity constraint. (1) Without the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect, the best fit for the combined data is poor. Furthermore, the data indicate a severe suppression of the ^7Be flux relative to the ^8B, contradicting both standard and nonstandard solar models in general; the pp flux takes its maximum value allowed by the luminosity constraint. This pathology consistently appears even if we ignore any one of the three data. (2) In the presence of the two-flavor MSW effect, the current constraint on the initial ^8B flux is weak, but consistent with the SSM and sufficient to exclude nonstandard models with small ^8B fluxes. No meaningful constraint is obtained for the oth...

  9. A THERMOMECHANICAL DAMAGE APPROACH TO CONSTITUTIVE MODELS FOR RATE-INDEPENDENT DISSIPATIVE GEOMATERIALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Guo; Chenggang Zhao; Dajun Yuan; Mengshu Wang

    2008-01-01

    This paper builds the for mulations of hyperplastic damage theory for rate-independent geomaterials to describe the bulk and the likely damage behavior of granular materials.Using 2 kinematic internal variables and the conjugates,dissipative and yield function can be reasonably intlloduoed.A systematic constitutive presentation of 32 possible ways within the thermodynam-ical damage framework is presented,which entirely formulates the constitutive behavior through two scalar thermodynamic potentials.Combining the four common thermodynamical energyfunc-tions.two independent kinematic internal variables and the accordingly generalized stress are introduced to describe the damage behavior and structural rearrangement of the granules for any bulk deformation.A few Legendre transformations are used to establish the links between energy functions so that the complex incremental response of geomaterials can be entirely established from these four energy functions.The constitutive relations are built with the thermodynamics laws,which account for the important structural aspects of geomateriais.Some examples are pro-vided in the appendix to validate the applicability and implementation of the framework.This theory is based on previous work by Houlsby et a1.,and extends to the multi-mechanisms de-scription.This framework paves a way in developing models for specific geomateriais with an examinable basis.

  10. MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2)-dependent and independent models of blister formation in pemphigus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Li, Hong; Sano, Yasuyo; Gaestel, Matthias; Park, Jin Mo; Payne, Aimee S.

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies to the keratinocyte adhesion protein desmoglein (Dsg) 3. Previous studies suggest that PV pathogenesis involves p38 mitogen activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, p38 is a difficult protein to study and therapeutically target because it has four isoforms and multiple downstream effectors. In the current study, we identify MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2) as a downstream effector of p38 signaling in PV and describe MK2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of blister formation using passive transfer of human anti-Dsg IgG4 mAbs to neonatal mice. In human keratinocytes, PV mAbs activate MK2 in a dose-dependent manner. MK2 is also activated in human pemphigus skin blisters, causing translocation of MK2 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Small molecule inhibition of MK2 and silencing of MK2 expression block PV mAb-induced Dsg3 endocytosis in human keratinocytes. Additionally, small molecule inhibition and genetic deletion of p38α and MK2 inhibit spontaneous, but not induced, suprabasal blisters by PV mAbs in mouse passive transfer models. Collectively, these data suggest that MK2 is a key downstream effector of p38 that can modulate PV autoantibody pathogenicity. MK2 inhibition may be a valuable adjunctive therapy for control of pemphigus blistering. PMID:23657501

  11. Voxel-level reproducibility assessment of modality independent elastography in a pre-clinical murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Katelyn M.; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-03-01

    Changes in tissue mechanical properties, measured non-invasively by elastography methods, have been shown to be an important diagnostic tool, particularly for cancer. Tissue elasticity information, tracked over the course of therapy, may be an important prognostic indicator of tumor response to treatment. While many elastography techniques exist, this work reports on the use of a novel form of elastography that uses image texture to reconstruct elastic property distributions in tissue (i.e., a modality independent elastography (MIE) method) within the context of a pre-clinical breast cancer system.1,2 The elasticity results have previously shown good correlation with independent mechanical testing.1 Furthermore, MIE has been successfully utilized to localize and characterize lesions in both phantom experiments and simulation experiments with clinical data.2,3 However, the reproducibility of this method has not been characterized in previous work. The goal of this study is to evaluate voxel-level reproducibility of MIE in a pre-clinical model of breast cancer. Bland-Altman analysis of co-registered repeat MIE scans in this preliminary study showed a reproducibility index of 24.7% (scaled to a percent of maximum stiffness) at the voxel level. As opposed to many reports in the magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) literature that speak to reproducibility measures of the bulk organ, these results establish MIE reproducibility at the voxel level; i.e., the reproducibility of locally-defined mechanical property measurements throughout the tumor volume.

  12. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange.

  13. MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2)-dependent and -independent models of blister formation in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Li, Hong; Sano, Yasuyo; Gaestel, Matthias; Mo Park, Jin; Payne, Aimee S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies to the keratinocyte adhesion protein desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). Previous studies suggest that PV pathogenesis involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, p38 is a difficult protein to study and therapeutically target because it has four isoforms and multiple downstream effectors. In this study, we identify MAPKAP (mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein) kinase 2 (MK2) as a downstream effector of p38 signaling in PV and describe MK2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of blister formation using passive transfer of human anti-Dsg IgG4 mAbs to neonatal mice. In human keratinocytes, PV mAbs activate MK2 in a dose-dependent manner. MK2 is also activated in human pemphigus skin blisters, causing translocation of MK2 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Small-molecule inhibition of MK2 and silencing of MK2 expression block PV mAb-induced Dsg3 endocytosis in human keratinocytes. In addition, small-molecule inhibition and genetic deletion of p38α and MK2 inhibit spontaneous but not induced suprabasal blisters by PV mAbs in mouse passive transfer models. Collectively, these data suggest that MK2 is a key downstream effector of p38 that can modulate PV autoantibody pathogenicity. MK2 inhibition may be a valuable adjunctive therapy for control of pemphigus blistering.

  14. Integrating model of the Project Independence Evaluation System. Volume V. Code documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, M L; Allen, B J; Lutz, M S; Gale, J E; O& #x27; Hara, N E; Wood, R K

    1978-07-01

    This volume is a description of the Project Independence Evaluation System as a computer system. It is intended for readers wanting a basic understanding of the computer implementation of PIES rather than an understanding of the modeling methodology. It can assist those who wish to run PIES on the EIA computer facility or to use PIES on their own facilities, or to analyze the PIES computer processing. The document contains: an overview of the computer implementation; a description of the data and naming conventions used in PIES; a functional description of PIES data processing; PIES hardware and software requirements; and an operational description of the PIES processing flow. This overview defines the scope of PIES in this report and thus governs the computer system descriptions that follow. It also provides an historical view of the development of PIES.

  15. Total hadronic cross section and the elastic slope: An almost model-independent connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagundes, D.A., E-mail: fagundes@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Menon, M.J., E-mail: menon@ifi.unicamp.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP, Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    An almost model-independent parametrization for the ratio of the total cross section to the elastic slope, as function of the center of mass energy, is introduced. The analytical result is based on the approximate relation of this quantity with the ratio R of the elastic to total cross section and empirical fits to the R data from proton-proton scattering above 10 GeV, under the conditions of asymptotic unitarity and the black-disk limit. This parametrization may be useful in studies of extensive air showers and the determination of the proton-proton total cross section from proton-air production cross section in cosmic-ray experiments.

  16. A model-independent determination of the inclusive semileptonic decay fraction of B mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križnič, P.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1993-12-01

    With the ARGUS detector at the e +e - storage ring DORIS II, we have determined decay fraction and electron momentum spectrum of the inclusive decay mode B → eνX. Usinng lepton tags from the second B meson. in 209 000 γ(4 S) → BoverlineB decays, we could determine the spectrum for all electron momenta pe > 0.6 GeV/ c. Including the small extrapolation to pe > 0, we find the model-independent decay fraction B(B → eνX) = (9.6 ± 0.5 ± 0.4)%. Adding D meson tags, our result is (9.7 ± 0.5 ± 0.4)%.

  17. Model-independent search for the decay B+→l+νlγ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Latour, E.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; da Costa, J. Firmino; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Clarke, C. K.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Henderson, S. W.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D. M.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Pegna, D. Lopes; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.

    2009-12-01

    We present a search for the radiative leptonic decay B+→ℓ+νℓγ, where ℓ=e, μ, using a data sample of 465×106 BB¯ pairs collected by the BABAR experiment. In this analysis, we fully reconstruct the hadronic decay of one of the B mesons in Υ(4S)→B+B- decays, then search for evidence of B+→ℓ+νℓγ in the rest of the event. We observe no significant evidence of signal decays and report model-independent branching fraction upper limits of B(B+→e+νeγ)<17×10-6, B(B+→μ+νμγ)<24×10-6, and B(B+→ℓ+νℓγ)<15.6×10-6 (ℓ=e or μ), all at the 90% confidence level.

  18. Constructing a cosmological model-independent Hubble diagram of type Ia supernovae with cosmic chronometers

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhengxiang; Yu, Hongwei; Zhu, Zong-Hong; Alcaniz, J S

    2015-01-01

    We apply two methods to reconstruct the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ as a function of redshift from 15 measurements of the expansion rate obtained from age estimates of passively evolving galaxies. These reconstructions enable us to derive the luminosity distance to a certain redshift $z$, calibrate the light-curve fitting parameters accounting for the (unknown) intrinsic magnitude of type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) and construct cosmological model-independent Hubble diagrams of SNe Ia. In order to test the compatibility between the reconstructed functions of $H(z)$, we perform a statistical analysis considering the latest SNe Ia sample, the so-called JLA compilation. We find that, while one of the reconstructed functions leads to a value of the local Hubble parameter $H_0$ in excellent agreement with the one reported by the Planck collaboration, the other requires a higher value of $H_0$, which is consistent with recent measurements of this quantity from Cepheids and other local distance indicators.

  19. Unpolarized structure functions and the parton distributions for nucleon in an independent quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Barik; R N Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Considering the nucleon as consisting entirely of its valence quarks confined independently in a scalar-vector harmonic potential; unpolarized structure functions 1(,2) and 2(x,2) are derived in the Bjorken limit under certain simplifying assumptions; from which valence quark distribution functions (,2) and (,2) are appropriately extracted satisfying the normalization constraints. QCD-evolution of these input distributions from a model scale of 2=0.07 GeV2 to a higher $Q^{2}$ scale of $Q^{2}_{0} = 15$ GeV2 yields (, $Q^{2}_{0}$) and (, $Q^{2}_{0}$) in good agreement with experimental data. The gluon and sea-quark distributions such as (,$Q^{2}_{0}$) and (, $Q^{2}_{0}$) are dynamically generated with a reasonable qualitative agreement with the available data; using the leading order renormalization group equations with appropriate valence-quark distributions as the input.

  20. A comparative study of independent particle model based approaches for thermal averages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subrata Banik; Tapta Kanchan Roy; M Durga Prasad

    2013-09-01

    A comparative study is done on thermal average calculation by using the state specific vibrational self-consistent field method (ss-VSCF), the virtual vibrational self-consistent field (v-VSCF) method and the thermal self-consistent field (t-SCF) method. The different thermodynamic properties and expectation values are calculated using these three methods and the results are compared with full configuration interaction method (FVCI). We find that among these three independent particle model based methods, the ss-VSCF method provides most accurate results in the thermal averages followed by t-SCF and the v-VSCF is the least accurate. However, the ss-VSCF is found to be computationally very expensive for the large molecules. The t-SCF gives better accuracy compared to the v-VSCF counterpart especially at higher temperatures.

  1. Constraints to the EOS of ultradense matter with model-independent astrophysical observations

    CERN Document Server

    Lavagetto, G; D'Ai', A; Vidaña, I; Robba, N R

    2006-01-01

    The recent discovery of burst oscillations at 1122 Hz in the x-ray transient XTE J1739-285, together with the measurement of the mass of the binary millisecond pulsar PSR J0751+1807 (2.1 +- 0.2 solar masses) can finally allow us to put strong, model-independent observational constraints to the equation of state of compact stars. We show that the measurement of the moment of inertia of PSR J0737+3039A, together with these constraints, could allow to discriminate further the details of the inner structure of neutron stars. Moreover, we show that if XTE J1739-285 is constituted of nucleonic matter, any equation of state allows only a narrow range of very high masses, and this could explain why up to now compact stars spinning faster than a millisecond have been so difficult to detect.

  2. Model independent X-ray standing wave analysis of periodic multilayer structures

    CERN Document Server

    Yakunin, S N; Chuev, M A; Pashaev, E M; Zoethout, E; Louis, E; van de Kruijs, R W E; Seregin, S Yu; Subbotin, I A; Novikov, D V; Bijkerk, F; Kovalchuk, M V

    2013-01-01

    We present a model independent approach for the reconstruction of the atomic concentration profile in a nanoscale layered structure, as measured using the X-ray fluorescence yield modulated by an X-ray standing wave (XSW). The approach is based on the direct regularized solution of the system of linear equations that characterizes the fluorescence yield. The suggested technique was optimized for, but not limited to, the analysis of periodic layered structures where the XSW is formed under Bragg conditions. The developed approach was applied to the reconstruction of the atomic concentration profiles for LaN/BN multilayers with 50 periods of 35 A thick layers. The object is especially difficult to analyse with traditional methods, as the estimated thickness of the interface region between the constituent materials is comparable to the individual layer thicknesses. However, using the suggested technique it was possible to reconstruct the La atomic profile, showing that the La atoms stay localized within the LaN ...

  3. Model-independent tracking of criticality signals in nuclear multifragmentation data

    CERN Document Server

    Frankland, J D; Mignon, A; Begemann-Blaich, M L; Bittiger, R; Borderie, B; Bougault, R; Charvet, J L; Cussol, D; Dayras, R; Durand, D; Escano-Rodriguez, C; Galíchet, E; Guinet, D; Lautesse, P; Lefèvre, A; Legrain, R; Le Neindre, N; López, O; Lukasik, J; Lynen, U; Manduci, L; Marie, J; Müller, W F J; Orth, H; Pârlog, M; Pichon, M; Rivet, M F; Rosato, E; Roy, R; Saija, A; Schwarz, C; Sfienti, C; Tamain, B; Trautmann, W; Trczinski, A; Turzó, K; Van Lauwe, A; Vigilante, M; Volant, C; Wieleczko, J P; Zwieglinski, B; ccsd-00001474, ccsd

    2004-01-01

    We look for signals of criticality in multifragment production in heavy-ion collisions using model-independent universal fluctuations theory. The phenomenon is studied as a function of system size, bombarding energy, and impact parameter in a wide range of INDRA data. For very central collisions (b/b_max < 0.1) we find evidence that the largest fragment in each event, Z_max, plays the role of an order parameter, defining two different "phases" at low and high incident energy, respectively, according to the scaling properties of its fluctuations. Data for a wide range of system masses and incident energies collapse on to an approximately universal scaling function in each phase for the most central collisions. The forms of the scaling functions for the two phases are established, and their dependence on the total mass and the bombarding energy is mapped out. Data suggest that these phases are linked to the disappearance of heavy residues in central collisions.

  4. Pair approximation for the q -voter model with independence on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejewski, Arkadiusz

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the q -voter model with stochastic noise arising from independence on complex networks. Using the pair approximation, we provide a comprehensive, mathematical description of its behavior and derive a formula for the critical point. The analytical results are validated by carrying out Monte Carlo experiments. The pair approximation prediction exhibits substantial agreement with simulations, especially for networks with weak clustering and large average degree. Nonetheless, for the average degree close to q , some discrepancies originate. It is the first time we are aware of that the presented approach has been applied to the nonlinear voter dynamics with noise. Up till now, the analytical results have been obtained only for a complete graph. We show that in the limiting case the prediction of pair approximation coincides with the known solution on a fully connected network.

  5. Vascular Dynamics Aid a Coupled Neurovascular Network Learn Sparse Independent Features: A Computational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Ryan T; Chhabria, Karishma; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vascular dynamics are generally thought to be controlled by neural activity in a unidirectional fashion. However, both computational modeling and experimental evidence point to the feedback effects of vascular dynamics on neural activity. Vascular feedback in the form of glucose and oxygen controls neuronal ATP, either directly or via the agency of astrocytes, which in turn modulates neural firing. Recently, a detailed model of the neuron-astrocyte-vessel system has shown how vasomotion can modulate neural firing. Similarly, arguing from known cerebrovascular physiology, an approach known as "hemoneural hypothesis" postulates functional modulation of neural activity by vascular feedback. To instantiate this perspective, we present a computational model in which a network of "vascular units" supplies energy to a neural network. The complex dynamics of the vascular network, modeled by a network of oscillators, turns neurons ON and OFF randomly. The informational consequence of such dynamics is explored in the context of an auto-encoder network. In the proposed model, each vascular unit supplies energy to a subset of hidden neurons of an autoencoder network, which constitutes its "projective field." Neurons that receive adequate energy in a given trial have reduced threshold, and thus are prone to fire. Dynamics of the vascular network are governed by changes in the reconstruction error of the auto-encoder network, interpreted as the neuronal demand. Vascular feedback causes random inactivation of a subset of hidden neurons in every trial. We observe that, under conditions of desynchronized vascular dynamics, the output reconstruction error is low and the feature vectors learnt are sparse and independent. Our earlier modeling study highlighted the link between desynchronized vascular dynamics and efficient energy delivery in skeletal muscle. We now show that desynchronized vascular dynamics leads to efficient training in an auto-encoder neural network.

  6. PTEN phosphatase-independent maintenance of glandular morphology in a predictive colorectal cancer model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagan, Ishaan C; Deevi, Ravi K; Fatehullah, Aliya; Topley, Rebecca; Eves, Joshua; Stevenson, Michael; Loughrey, Maurice; Arthur, Kenneth; Campbell, Frederick Charles

    2013-11-01

    Organotypic models may provide mechanistic insight into colorectal cancer (CRC) morphology. Three-dimensional (3D) colorectal gland formation is regulated by phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) coupling of cell division cycle 42 (cdc42) to atypical protein kinase C (aPKC). This study investigated PTEN phosphatase-dependent and phosphatase-independent morphogenic functions in 3D models and assessed translational relevance in human studies. Isogenic PTEN-expressing or PTEN-deficient 3D colorectal cultures were used. In translational studies, apical aPKC activity readout was assessed against apical membrane (AM) orientation and gland morphology in 3D models and human CRC. We found that catalytically active or inactive PTEN constructs containing an intact C2 domain enhanced cdc42 activity, whereas mutants of the C2 domain calcium binding region 3 membrane-binding loop (M-CBR3) were ineffective. The isolated PTEN C2 domain (C2) accumulated in membrane fractions, but C2 M-CBR3 remained in cytosol. Transfection of C2 but not C2 M-CBR3 rescued defective AM orientation and 3D morphogenesis of PTEN-deficient Caco-2 cultures. The signal intensity of apical phospho-aPKC correlated with that of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1) in the 3D model. Apical NHERF-1 intensity thus provided readout of apical aPKC activity and associated with glandular morphology in the model system and human colon. Low apical NHERF-1 intensity in CRC associated with disruption of glandular architecture, high cancer grade, and metastatic dissemination. We conclude that the membrane-binding function of the catalytically inert PTEN C2 domain influences cdc42/aPKC-dependent AM dynamics and gland formation in a highly relevant 3D CRC morphogenesis model system.

  7. PTEN Phosphatase-Independent Maintenance of Glandular Morphology in a Predictive Colorectal Cancer Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaan C. Jagan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Organotypic models may provide mechanistic insight into colorectal cancer (CRC morphology. Three-dimensional (3D colorectal gland formation is regulated by phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN coupling of cell division cycle 42 (cdc42 to atypical protein kinase C (aPKC. This study investigated PTEN phosphatase-dependent and phosphatase-independent morphogenic functions in 3D models and assessed translational relevance in human studies. Isogenic PTEN-expressing or PTEN-deficient 3D colorectal cultures were used. In translational studies, apical aPKC activity readout was assessed against apical membrane (AM orientation and gland morphology in 3D models and human CRC. We found that catalytically active or inactive PTEN constructs containing an intact C2 domain enhanced cdc42 activity, whereas mutants of the C2 domain calcium binding region 3 membrane-binding loop (M-CBR3 were ineffective. The isolated PTEN C2 domain (C2 accumulated in membrane fractions, but C2 M-CBR3 remained in cytosol. Transfection of C2 but not C2 M-CBR3 rescued defective AM orientation and 3D morphogenesis of PTEN-deficient Caco-2 cultures. The signal intensity of apical phospho-aPKC correlated with that of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1 in the 3D model. Apical NHERF-1 intensity thus provided readout of apical aPKC activity and associated with glandular morphology in the model system and human colon. Low apical NHERF-1 intensity in CRC associated with disruption of glandular architecture, high cancer grade, and metastatic dissemination. We conclude that the membrane-binding function of the catalytically inert PTEN C2 domain influences cdc42/aPKC-dependent AM dynamics and gland formation in a highly relevant 3D CRC morphogenesis model system.

  8. Field dependence–independence and instructional-design effects on learners’ performance with a computer-modeling tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angeli, Charoula; Valanides, Nicos; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Angeli, C., Valanides, N., & Kirschner, P. A. (2009). Field dependence–independence and instructional-design effects on learners’ performance with a computer-modeling tool. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 1355–1366.

  9. Predictors of breast self - examination among female teachers in Ethiopia using health belief model

    OpenAIRE

    Birhane, Negussie; Mamo, Abebe; Girma, Eshetu; Asfaw, Shifera

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer of women. It is the second leading cause of death in women worldwide. Approximately one out of eight women develops breast cancer all over the world. Majority of cases of cancer of the breast are detected by women themselves, stressing the importance of breast self-examination. The main objective of this study was to assess predictors of breast self-examination among female teachers in Kafa Zone, South West part of Ethiopia. Methods ...

  10. Factors associated with IADL independence: implications for OT practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Szu-Wei; Chippendale, Tracy

    2017-03-01

    Globally, the population is aging. Instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) are an important component of independent function and impact the ability of older adults to age in place. Therefore, factors associated with IADL independence warrant further study. To explore the association of age, depressive symptoms and leisure participation with IADL independence, and the relative importance of these three factors in predicting IADL independence. A cross-sectional design using an existing data set was employed. Older adults age 60 and older (n = 98) who resided in senior housing or their own home/apartment were included in the study. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was employed. The second model predicting IADL independence using age, depressive symptoms and level of leisure participation was significant (F(3,96) = 15.57, p age alone (R(2) adjusted = 18.00%). Age was the strongest of the three predictors, accounting for 11.40% of the variance in IADL independence. Depressive symptoms and participation in leisure activities were also significant predictors, their unique contributions being 7.30 and 4.30%, respectively. Age, depressive symptoms and leisure participation are all significant predictors of IADL independence among older adults. Therefore, according to our preliminary findings, leisure participation and non-pharmacological interventions for depressive symptoms warrant attention in practice in relation to IADL independence.

  11. Gold price analysis based on ensemble empirical model decomposition and independent component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Lu; He, Kaijian; Lai, Kin Keung

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, the increasing level of volatility of the gold price has received the increasing level of attention from the academia and industry alike. Due to the complexity and significant fluctuations observed in the gold market, however, most of current approaches have failed to produce robust and consistent modeling and forecasting results. Ensemble Empirical Model Decomposition (EEMD) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) are novel data analysis methods that can deal with nonlinear and non-stationary time series. This study introduces a new methodology which combines the two methods and applies it to gold price analysis. This includes three steps: firstly, the original gold price series is decomposed into several Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) by EEMD. Secondly, IMFs are further processed with unimportant ones re-grouped. Then a new set of data called Virtual Intrinsic Mode Functions (VIMFs) is reconstructed. Finally, ICA is used to decompose VIMFs into statistically Independent Components (ICs). The decomposition results reveal that the gold price series can be represented by the linear combination of ICs. Furthermore, the economic meanings of ICs are analyzed and discussed in detail, according to the change trend and ICs' transformation coefficients. The analyses not only explain the inner driving factors and their impacts but also conduct in-depth analysis on how these factors affect gold price. At the same time, regression analysis has been conducted to verify our analysis. Results from the empirical studies in the gold markets show that the EEMD-ICA serve as an effective technique for gold price analysis from a new perspective.

  12. Acoustic Model Training Using Pseudo-Speaker Features Generated by MLLR Transformations for Robust Speaker-Independent Speech Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Arata Itoh; Sunao Hara; Norihide Kitaoka; Kazuya Takeda

    2012-01-01

    A novel speech feature generation-based acoustic model training method for robust speaker-independent speech recognition is proposed. For decades, speaker adaptation methods have been widely used. All of these adaptation methods need adaptation data. However, our proposed method aims to create speaker-independent acoustic models that cover not only known but also unknown speakers. We achieve this by adopting inverse maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR) transformation-based feature gene...

  13. Existence, numerical convergence and evolutionary relaxation for a rate-independent phase-transformation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Sebastian; Mielke, Alexander

    2016-04-28

    We revisit the model for a two-well phase transformation in a linearly elastic body that was introduced and studied in Mielke et al. (2002 Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 162: , 137-177). This energetic rate-independent system is posed in terms of the elastic displacement and an internal variable that gives the phase portion of the second phase. We use a new approach based on mutual recovery sequences, which are adjusted to a suitable energy increment plus the associated dissipated energy and, thus, enable us to pass to the limit in the construction of energetic solutions. We give three distinct constructions of mutual recovery sequences which allow us (i) to generalize the existence result in Mielke et al. (2002), (ii) to establish the convergence of suitable numerical approximations via space-time discretization and (iii) to perform the evolutionary relaxation from the pure-state model to the relaxed-mixture model. All these results rely on weak converge and involve the H-measure as an essential tool.

  14. Model-independent limits and constraints on extended theories of gravity from cosmic reconstruction techniques

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cruz-Dombriz, Álvaro; Luongo, Orlando; Reverberi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The onset of dark energy domination depends on the particular gravitational theory driving the cosmic evolution. Model independent techniques are crucial to test both the present $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological paradigm and alternative theories, making the least possible number of assumptions about the Universe. In this paper we investigate whether cosmography is able to distinguish between different gravitational theories, by determining bounds on model parameters for three different extensions of General Relativity, i.e. $k-$essence, $F(T)$ and $f(R)$ theories. We expand each class of theories in powers of redshift $z$ around the present time, making no additional assumptions. This procedure is an extension of previous work and can be seen as the most general approach for testing extended theories of gravity with cosmography. In the case of $F(T)$ and $f(R)$ theories, we show that some assumptions on model parameters often made in previous works are superfluous or unjustified. We use data from the Union2.1 SN cat...

  15. Linear least squares compartmental-model-independent parameter identification in PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thie, J A; Smith, G T; Hubner, K F

    1997-02-01

    A simplified approach involving linear-regression straight-line parameter fitting of dynamic scan data is developed for both specific and nonspecific models. Where compartmental-model topologies apply, the measured activity may be expressed in terms of: its integrals, plasma activity and plasma integrals--all in a linear expression with macroparameters as coefficients. Multiple linear regression, as in spreadsheet software, determines parameters for best data fits. Positron emission tomography (PET)-acquired gray-matter images in a dynamic scan are analyzed: both by this method and by traditional iterative nonlinear least squares. Both patient and simulated data were used. Regression and traditional methods are in expected agreement. Monte-Carlo simulations evaluate parameter standard deviations, due to data noise, and much smaller noise-induced biases. Unique straight-line graphical displays permit visualizing data influences on various macroparameters as changes in slopes. Advantages of regression fitting are: simplicity, speed, ease of implementation in spreadsheet software, avoiding risks of convergence failures or false solutions in iterative least squares, and providing various visualizations of the uptake process by straight line graphical displays. Multiparameter model-independent analyses on lesser understood systems is also made possible.

  16. Use of generalised Procrustes analysis for the photogrammetric block adjustment by independent models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosilla, Fabio; Beinat, Alberto

    The paper reviews at first some aspects of the generalised Procrustes analysis (GP) and outlines the analogies with the block adjustment by independent models. On this basis, an innovative solution of the block adjustment problem by Procrustes algorithms and the related computer program implementation are presented and discussed. The main advantage of the new proposed method is that it avoids the conventional least squares solution. For this reason, linearisation algorithms and the knowledge of a priori approximate values for the unknown parameters are not required. Once the model coordinates of the tie points are available and at least three control points are known, the Procrustes algorithms can directly provide, without further information, the tie point ground coordinates and the exterior orientation parameters. Furthermore, some numerical block adjustment solutions obtained by the new method in different areas of North Italy are compared to the conventional solution. The very simple data input process, the less memory requirements, the low computing time and the same level of accuracy that characterise the new algorithm with respect to a conventional one are verified with these tests. A block adjustment of 11 models, with 44 tie points and 14 control points, takes just a few seconds on an Intel PIII 400 MHz computer, and the total data memory required is less than twice the allocated space for the input data. This is because most of the computations are carried out on data matrices of limited size, typically 3×3.

  17. Influence maximization in social networks under an independent cascade-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiyao; Jin, Yuehui; Lin, Zhen; Cheng, Shiduan; Yang, Tan

    2016-02-01

    The rapid growth of online social networks is important for viral marketing. Influence maximization refers to the process of finding influential users who make the most of information or product adoption. An independent cascade-based model for influence maximization, called IMIC-OC, was proposed to calculate positive influence. We assumed that influential users spread positive opinions. At the beginning, users held positive or negative opinions as their initial opinions. When more users became involved in the discussions, users balanced their own opinions and those of their neighbors. The number of users who did not change positive opinions was used to determine positive influence. Corresponding influential users who had maximum positive influence were then obtained. Experiments were conducted on three real networks, namely, Facebook, HEP-PH and Epinions, to calculate maximum positive influence based on the IMIC-OC model and two other baseline methods. The proposed model resulted in larger positive influence, thus indicating better performance compared with the baseline methods.

  18. A Quasi-Model-Independent Search for New Physics at Large Transverse Momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Alves, G A; Amos, N; Anderson, E W; Baarmand, M M; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L R; Bacon, Trevor C; Baden, A; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Todorova-Nová, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G C; Blessing, S; Böhnlein, A; Bozhko, N; Borcherding, F; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G M; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W S; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Chung, M; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Cochran, J; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; Davis, K; De, K; Del Signore, K; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D S; Denisov, S P; Desai, S V; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; DiLoreto, G; Doulas, S; Draper, P; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fahland, T; Fehér, S; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, Frank; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Yu; Flattum, E M; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M R; Frame, K C; Fuess, S; Gallas, E J; Galjaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Gómez, G; Goncharov, P I; González-Solis, J L; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Graham, G; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Grinstein, S; Groer, L S; Grünendahl, S; Sen-Gupta, A; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S L; Hagopian, V; Hahn, K S; Hall, R E; Hanlet, P; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Heuring, T C; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoftun, J S; Hou, S; Huang, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jerger, S A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D E; Karmgard, D J; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Klopfenstein, C; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskii, A V; Kotcher, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovskii, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M A; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G L; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J T; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L H; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Martin, R D; Mauritz, K M; May, B; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McDonald, J; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Meng, X C; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W B; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N V; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M A; Da Motta, H; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Negroni, S; Norman, D; Nunnemann, T; Oesch, L H; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Pan, L J; Papageorgiou, K; Para, A; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Paterno, M; Patwa, A; Pawlik, B; Perkins, J; Peters, M; Peters, O; Petroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piekarz, H; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quintas, P Z; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Ramberg, E; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Rha, J; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rockwell, T; Roco, M T; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R C; Santoro, A F S; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Sen, N; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M A; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Singh, H; Singh, J B; Sirotenko, V I; Slattery, P F; Smith, E; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G A; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbruck, G; Stephens, R W; Stichelbaut, F; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Thompson, J; Toback, D; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Van Gemmeren, P; Vaniev, V; Van Kooten, R; Varelas, N; Volkov, A A; Vorobev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wightman, J A; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Wirjawan, J V D; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Yu, Z; Zanabria, M E; Zheng, H; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2001-01-01

    We apply a quasi-model-independent strategy ("Sleuth") to search for new high p_T physics in approximately 100 pb^-1 of ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.8 TeV collected by the DZero experiment during 1992-1996 at the Fermilab Tevatron. Over thirty-two e mu X, W+jets-like, Z+jets-like, and 3(lepton/photon)X exclusive final states are systematically analyzed for hints of physics beyond the standard model. Simultaneous sensitivity to a variety of models predicting new phenomena at the electroweak scale is demonstrated by testing the method on a particular signature in each set of final states. No evidence of new high p_T physics is observed in the course of this search, and we find that 89% of an ensemble of hypothetical similar experimental runs would have produced a final state with a candidate signal more interesting than the most interesting observed in these data.

  19. Quasi-model-independent search for new physics at large transverse momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, K.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Doulas, S.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kharchilava, A.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Nunnemann, T.; O'neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Papageorgiou, K.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramberg, E.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sabirov, B. M.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Toback, D.; Tripathi, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wightman, J. A.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2001-07-01

    We apply a quasi-model-independent strategy (``SLEUTH'') to search for new high pT physics in ~100 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV collected by the DØ experiment during 1992-1996 at the Fermilab Tevatron. Over 32 eμX, W+jets-like, Z+jets-like, and (l/γ)(l/γ)(l/γ)X exclusive final states are systematically analyzed for hints of physics beyond the standard model. Simultaneous sensitivity to a variety of models predicting new phenomena at the electroweak scale is demonstrated by testing the method on a particular signature in each set of final states. No evidence of new high pT physics is observed in the course of this search, and we find that 89% of an ensemble of hypothetical similar experimental runs would have produced a final state with a candidate signal more interesting than the most interesting observed in these data.

  20. A hierarchical model for probabilistic independent component analysis of multi-subject fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Tang, Li

    2013-12-01

    An important goal in fMRI studies is to decompose the observed series of brain images to identify and characterize underlying brain functional networks. Independent component analysis (ICA) has been shown to be a powerful computational tool for this purpose. Classic ICA has been successfully applied to single-subject fMRI data. The extension of ICA to group inferences in neuroimaging studies, however, is challenging due to the unavailability of a pre-specified group design matrix. Existing group ICA methods generally concatenate observed fMRI data across subjects on the temporal domain and then decompose multi-subject data in a similar manner to single-subject ICA. The major limitation of existing methods is that they ignore between-subject variability in spatial distributions of brain functional networks in group ICA. In this article, we propose a new hierarchical probabilistic group ICA method to formally model subject-specific effects in both temporal and spatial domains when decomposing multi-subject fMRI data. The proposed method provides model-based estimation of brain functional networks at both the population and subject level. An important advantage of the hierarchical model is that it provides a formal statistical framework to investigate similarities and differences in brain functional networks across subjects, for example, subjects with mental disorders or neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's as compared to normal subjects. We develop an EM algorithm for model estimation where both the E-step and M-step have explicit forms. We compare the performance of the proposed hierarchical model with that of two popular group ICA methods via simulation studies. We illustrate our method with application to an fMRI study of Zen meditation.

  1. Overview of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast Version 3 (UCERF3) Time-Independent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, E. H.; Arrowsmith, R.; Biasi, G. P.; Bird, P.; Dawson, T. E.; Felzer, K. R.; Jackson, D. D.; Johnson, K. M.; Jordan, T. H.; Madugo, C. M.; Michael, A. J.; Milner, K. R.; Page, M. T.; Parsons, T.; Powers, P.; Shaw, B. E.; Thatcher, W. R.; Weldon, R. J.; Zeng, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We present the time-independent component of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 3 (UCERF3), where the primary achievements have been to relax fault segmentation and include multi-fault ruptures, both limitations of UCERF2. The rates of all earthquakes are solved for simultaneously, and from a broader range of data, using a system-level 'grand inversion' that is both conceptually simple and extensible. The inverse problem is large and underdetermined, so a range of models is sampled using an efficient simulated annealing algorithm. The approach is more derivative than prescriptive (e.g., magnitude-frequency distributions are no longer assumed), so new analysis tools were developed for exploring solutions. Epistemic uncertainties were also accounted for using 1440 alternative logic tree branches, necessitating access to supercomputers. The most influential uncertainties include alternative deformation models (fault slip rates), a new smoothed seismicity algorithm, alternative values for the total rate of M≥5 events, and different scaling relationships, virtually all of which are new. As a notable first, three deformation models are based on kinematically consistent inversions of geodetic and geologic data, also providing slip-rate constraints on faults previously excluded due to lack of geologic data. The grand inversion constitutes a system-level framework for testing hypotheses and balancing the influence of different experts. For example, we demonstrate serious challenges with the Gutenberg-Richter hypothesis for individual faults. UCERF3 is still an approximation of the system, however, and the range of models is limited (e.g., constrained to stay close to UCERF2). Nevertheless, UCERF3 removes the apparent UCERF2 over-prediction of M6.5-7 earthquake rates, and also includes types of multi-fault ruptures seen in nature. While UCERF3 fits the data better than UCERF2 overall, there may be areas that warrant further site

  2. Predictors and patterns of problematic Internet game use using a decision tree model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Mi Jung; Jeong, Jo-Eun; Chun, Ji-Won; Cho, Hyun; Jung, Dong Jin; Choi, In Young; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Background and aims Problematic Internet game use is an important social issue that increases social expenditures for both individuals and nations. This study identified predictors and patterns of problematic Internet game use. Methods Data were collected from online surveys between November 26 and December 26, 2014. We identified 3,881 Internet game users from a total of 5,003 respondents. A total of 511 participants were assigned to the problematic Internet game user group according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Internet gaming disorder criteria. From the remaining 3,370 participants, we used propensity score matching to develop a normal comparison group of 511 participants. In all, 1,022 participants were analyzed using the chi-square automatic interaction detector (CHAID) algorithm. Results According to the CHAID algorithm, six important predictors were found: gaming costs (50%), average weekday gaming time (23%), offline Internet gaming community meeting attendance (13%), average weekend and holiday gaming time (7%), marital status (4%), and self-perceptions of addiction to Internet game use (3%). In addition, three patterns out of six classification rules were explored: cost-consuming, socializing, and solitary gamers. Conclusion This study provides direction for future work on the screening of problematic Internet game use in adults.

  3. Talent predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Lorenzo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of talent predictors is the initial point for building diagnosis and encouragement procedures in this field. The meaning of word predictor is to anticipate the future, to divine. Early prediction of high performance is complex problem no resolute by the science yet. There are many discrepancies about what measure and how to do. The article analyze the art state in this problematic because the excellence is determined by the interaction between internal and environmental factors.

  4. A Capacity-Restraint Transit Assignment Model When a Predetermination Method Indicates the Invalidity of Time Independence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The statistical independence of time of every two adjacent bus links plays a crucial role in deciding the feasibility of using many mathematical models to analyze urban transit networks. Traditional research generally ignores the time independence that acts as the ground of their models. Assumption is usually made that time independence of every two adjacent links is sound. This is, however, actually groundless and probably causes problematic conclusions reached by corresponding models. Many transit assignment models such as multinomial probit-based models lose their effects when the time independence is not valid. In this paper, a simple method to predetermine the time independence is proposed. Based on the predetermination method, a modified capacity-restraint transit assignment method aimed at engineering practice is put forward and tested through a small contrived network and a case study in Nanjing city, China, respectively. It is found that the slope of regression equation between the mean and standard deviation of normal distribution acts as the indicator of time independence at the same time. Besides, our modified assignment method performs better than the traditional one with more reasonable results while keeping the property of simplicity well.

  5. The Job Demands-Resources model as predictor of work identity and work engagement: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roslyn De Braine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Research shows that engaged employees experience high levels of energy and strong identification with their work, hence this study’s focus on work identity and dedication.Research purpose: This study explored possible differences in the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R as predictor of overall work engagement, dedication only and work-based identity, through comparative predictive analyses.Motivation for the study: This study may shed light on the dedication component of work engagement. Currently no literature indicates that the JD-R model has been used to predict work-based identity.Research design: A census-based survey was conducted amongst a target population of 23134 employees that yielded a sample of 2429 (a response rate of about 10.5%. The Job Demands- Resources scale (JDRS was used to measure job demands and job resources. A work-based identity scale was developed for this study. Work engagement was studied with the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES. Factor and reliability analyses were conducted on the scales and general multiple regression models were used in the predictive analyses.Main findings: The JD-R model yielded a greater amount of variance in dedication than in work engagement. It, however, yielded the greatest amount of variance in work-based identity, with job resources being its strongest predictor.Practical/managerial implications: Identification and work engagement levels can be improved by managing job resources and demands.Contribution/value-add: This study builds on the literature of the JD-R model by showing that it can be used to predict work-based identity.

  6. Value at risk estimation using independent component analysis-generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ICA-GARCH) models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Edmond H C; Yu, Philip L H; Li, W K

    2006-10-01

    We suggest using independent component analysis (ICA) to decompose multivariate time series into statistically independent time series. Then, we propose to use ICA-GARCH models which are computationally efficient to estimate the multivariate volatilities. The experimental results show that the ICA-GARCH models are more effective than existing methods, including DCC, PCA-GARCH, and EWMA. We also apply the proposed models to compute value at risk (VaR) for risk management applications. The backtesting and the out-of-sample tests validate the performance of ICA-GARCH models for value at risk estimation.

  7. Parton Distributions in Nucleon on the Basis of a Relativistic Independent Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Barik, N

    2001-01-01

    At a low resolution scale with $Q^2={\\mu}^2$ corresponding to the nucleon bound state; deep inelastic unpolarized structure functions $F_1(x,{\\mu}^2)$ and $F_2(x,{\\mu}^2)$ are derived with correct support using the symmetric part of the hadronic tensor under some simplifying assumptions in the Bjorken limit. For doing this; the nucleon in its ground state has been represented by a suitably constructed momentum wave packet of its valence quarks in their appropriate SU(6) spin flavor configuration with the momentum probability amplitude taken phenomenologically in reference to the independent quark model of scalar-vector harmonic potential. The valence quark distribution functions $u_v(x,{\\mu}^2)$ and $d_v(x,{\\mu}^2)$, extracted from the structure function $F_1(x,{\\mu}^2)$ in a parton model interpretation, satisfy normalization constraints as well as the momentum sum-rule requirements at a bound state scale of ${\\mu}^2=0.1 GeV^2$. QCD evolution of these distribution functions taken as the inputs; yields at $Q_0...

  8. Rational Design of Methodology-Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Haiyang; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-12

    A nonbonded dummy model for metal ions is highly imperative for the computation of complex biological systems with for instance multiple metal centers. Here we present nonbonded dummy parameters of 11 divalent metallic cations, namely, Mg(2+), V(2+), Cr(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Sn(2+), and Hg(2+), that are optimized to be compatible with three widely used water models (TIP3P, SPC/E, and TIP4P-EW). The three sets of metal parameters reproduce simultaneously the solvation free energies (ΔGsol), the ion-oxygen distance in the first solvation shell (IOD), and coordination numbers (CN) in explicit water with a relative error less than 1%. The main sources of errors to ΔGsol that arise from the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions are corrected rationally, which ensures the independence of the proposed parameters on the methodology used in the calculation. This work will be of great value for the computational study of metal-containing biological systems.

  9. Hemispheric specialization and independence for word recognition: a comparison of three computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weems, Scott A; Reggia, James A

    2004-06-01

    Two findings serve as the hallmark for hemispheric specialization during lateralized lexical decision. First is an overall word advantage, with words being recognized more quickly and accurately than non-words (the effect being stronger in response latency). Second, a right visual field advantage is observed for words, with little or no hemispheric differences in the ability to identify non-words. Several theories have been proposed to account for this difference in word and non-word recognition, some by suggesting dual routes of lexical access and others by incorporating separate, and potentially independent, word and non-word detection mechanisms. We compare three previously proposed cognitive theories of hemispheric interactions (callosal relay, direct access, and cooperative hemispheres) through neural network modeling, with each network incorporating different means of interhemispheric communication. When parameters were varied to simulate left hemisphere specialization for lexical decision, only the cooperative hemispheres model showed both a consistent left hemisphere advantage for word recognition but not non-word recognition, as well as an overall word advantage. These results support the theory that neural representations of words are more strongly established in the left hemisphere through prior learning, despite open communication between the hemispheres during both learning and recall.

  10. Stable 1-Norm Error Minimization Based Linear Predictors for Speech Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giacobello, Daniele; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm;

    2014-01-01

    In linear prediction of speech, the 1-norm error minimization criterion has been shown to provide a valid alternative to the 2-norm minimization criterion. However, unlike 2-norm minimization, 1-norm minimization does not guarantee the stability of the corresponding all-pole filter and can generate...... of the shift operator associated with the particular prediction problem considered. The second method uses the alternative Cauchy bound to impose a convex constraint on the predictor in the 1-norm error minimization. These methods are compared with two existing methods: the Burg method, based on the 1-norm...... minimization of the forward and backward prediction error, and the iteratively reweighted 2-norm minimization known to converge to the 1-norm minimization with an appropriate selection of weights. The evaluation gives proof of the effectiveness of the new methods, performing as well as unconstrained 1-norm...

  11. Uniform California earthquake rupture forecast, version 3 (UCERF3): the time-independent model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Edward H.; Biasi, Glenn P.; Bird, Peter; Dawson, Timothy E.; Felzer, Karen R.; Jackson, David D.; Johnson, Kaj M.; Jordan, Thomas H.; Madden, Christopher; Michael, Andrew J.; Milner, Kevin R.; Page, Morgan T.; Parsons, Thomas; Powers, Peter M.; Shaw, Bruce E.; Thatcher, Wayne R.; Weldon, Ray J.; Zeng, Yuehua; ,

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present the time-independent component of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 3 (UCERF3), which provides authoritative estimates of the magnitude, location, and time-averaged frequency of potentially damaging earthquakes in California. The primary achievements have been to relax fault segmentation assumptions and to include multifault ruptures, both limitations of the previous model (UCERF2). The rates of all earthquakes are solved for simultaneously, and from a broader range of data, using a system-level "grand inversion" that is both conceptually simple and extensible. The inverse problem is large and underdetermined, so a range of models is sampled using an efficient simulated annealing algorithm. The approach is more derivative than prescriptive (for example, magnitude-frequency distributions are no longer assumed), so new analysis tools were developed for exploring solutions. Epistemic uncertainties were also accounted for using 1,440 alternative logic tree branches, necessitating access to supercomputers. The most influential uncertainties include alternative deformation models (fault slip rates), a new smoothed seismicity algorithm, alternative values for the total rate of M≥5 events, and different scaling relationships, virtually all of which are new. As a notable first, three deformation models are based on kinematically consistent inversions of geodetic and geologic data, also providing slip-rate constraints on faults previously excluded because of lack of geologic data. The grand inversion constitutes a system-level framework for testing hypotheses and balancing the influence of different experts. For example, we demonstrate serious challenges with the Gutenberg-Richter hypothesis for individual faults. UCERF3 is still an approximation of the system, however, and the range of models is limited (for example, constrained to stay close to UCERF2). Nevertheless, UCERF3 removes the apparent UCERF2 overprediction of

  12. Model-independent analyses of non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps using Minkowski functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchert, Thomas; France, Martin J.; Steiner, Frank

    2017-05-01

    Despite the wealth of Planck results, there are difficulties in disentangling the primordial non-Gaussianity of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the secondary and the foreground non-Gaussianity (NG). For each of these forms of NG the lack of complete data introduces model-dependences. Aiming at detecting the NGs of the CMB temperature anisotropy δ T , while paying particular attention to a model-independent quantification of NGs, our analysis is based upon statistical and morphological univariate descriptors, respectively: the probability density function P(δ T) , related to v0, the first Minkowski Functional (MF), and the two other MFs, v1 and v2. From their analytical Gaussian predictions we build the discrepancy functions {{ Δ }k} (k  =  P, 0, 1, 2) which are applied to an ensemble of 105 CMB realization maps of the Λ CDM model and to the Planck CMB maps. In our analysis we use general Hermite expansions of the {{ Δ }k} up to the 12th order, where the coefficients are explicitly given in terms of cumulants. Assuming hierarchical ordering of the cumulants, we obtain the perturbative expansions generalizing the second order expansions of Matsubara to arbitrary order in the standard deviation {σ0} for P(δ T) and v0, where the perturbative expansion coefficients are explicitly given in terms of complete Bell polynomials. The comparison of the Hermite expansions and the perturbative expansions is performed for the Λ CDM map sample and the Planck data. We confirm the weak level of non-Gaussianity (1-2)σ of the foreground corrected masked Planck 2015 maps.

  13. A comparison of absolute performance of different correlative and mechanistic species distribution models in an independent area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Farzin; Kumar, Lalit; Ahmadi, Mohsen

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the comparative abilities of six different bioclimatic models in an independent area, utilizing the distribution of eight different species available at a global scale and in Australia. Global scale and Australia. We tested a variety of bioclimatic models for eight different plant species employing five discriminatory correlative species distribution models (SDMs) including Generalized Linear Model (GLM), MaxEnt, Random Forest (RF), Boosted Regression Tree (BRT), Bioclim, together with CLIMEX (CL) as a mechanistic niche model. These models were fitted using a training dataset of available global data, but with the exclusion of Australian locations. The capabilities of these techniques in projecting suitable climate, based on independent records for these species in Australia, were compared. Thus, Australia is not used to calibrate the models and therefore it is as an independent area regarding geographic locations. To assess and compare performance, we utilized the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUC), true skill statistic (TSS), and fractional predicted areas for all SDMs. In addition, we assessed satisfactory agreements between the outputs of the six different bioclimatic models, for all eight species in Australia. The modeling method impacted on potential distribution predictions under current climate. However, the utilization of sensitivity and the fractional predicted areas showed that GLM, MaxEnt, Bioclim, and CL had the highest sensitivity for Australian climate conditions. Bioclim calculated the highest fractional predicted area of an independent area, while RF and BRT were poor. For many applications, it is difficult to decide which bioclimatic model to use. This research shows that variable results are obtained using different SDMs in an independent area. This research also shows that the SDMs produce different results for different species; for example, Bioclim may not be good for one species but works better

  14. Model independent signatures of new physics in $B \\to D \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C S

    2016-01-01

    We present the fully general, model independent study of a few rare semileptonic $B$ decays that get dominant contributions from $W$-annihilation and $W$-exchange diagrams, in particular $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\ell^+\\ell^-$, where $\\ell = e,\\mu$. We consider the most general Lagrangian for the decay, and define three angular asymmetries in the Gottfried-Jackson frame, which are sensitive to new physics. Especially a non-zero forward-backward asymmetry within the frame would give the very first hint of possible new physics. These observations are also true for related decay modes, such as $B^+ \\to D^+ \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ and $B^0 \\to D^0 \\ell^+ \\ell^-$. Moreover, these asymmetry signatures are not affected by either $B^0$-$\\bar{B}^0$ or $D^0$-$\\bar{D}^0$ mixings. Then, this implies that both $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ and $B^0 \\to D^0 \\ell^+ \\ell^-$ as well as their CP conjugate modes can all be considered together in our search for signature of new physics. Hence, it would be of great importance to look for and...

  15. Nonmesonic weak decay of Lambda-hypernuclei within independent-particle shell-model

    CERN Document Server

    Krmpotić, Franjo; Hussein, Mahir S

    2012-01-01

    After a short introduction to the nonmesonic weak decay (NMWD) $\\Lambda N\\go nN$ of $\\Lambda$-hypernuclei we discuss the long-standing puzzle on the ratio $\\Gamma_n/\\Gamma_p$, and some recent experimental evidences that signalized towards its final solution. Two versions of the Independent-Particle-Shell-Model (IPSM) are employed to account for the nuclear structure of the final residual nuclei. They are: (a) IPSM-a, where no correlation, except for the Pauli principle, is taken into account, and (b) IPSM-b, where the highly excited hole states are considered to be quasi-stationary and are described by Breit-Wigner distributions, whose widths are estimated from the experimental data. We evaluate the coincidence spectra in $^{4}_\\Lambda$He, $^{5}_\\Lambda$He, $^{12}_\\Lambda$C, $^{16}_\\Lambda$O, and $^{28}_\\Lambda$Si, as a function of the sum of kinetic energies $E_{nN}=E_n+E_N$ for $N=n,p$. The recent Brookhaven National Laboratory experiment E788 on $^4_\\Lambda$He, is interpreted within the IPSM . We found tha...

  16. A model-independent approach to infer hierarchical codon substitution dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görnerup, Olof; Jacobi, Martin Nilsson

    2010-04-23

    Codon substitution constitutes a fundamental process in molecular biology that has been studied extensively. However, prior studies rely on various assumptions, e.g. regarding the relevance of specific biochemical properties, or on conservation criteria for defining substitution groups. Ideally, one would instead like to analyze the substitution process in terms of raw dynamics, independently of underlying system specifics. In this paper we propose a method for doing this by identifying groups of codons and amino acids such that these groups imply closed dynamics. The approach relies on recently developed spectral and agglomerative techniques for identifying hierarchical organization in dynamical systems. We have applied the techniques on an empirically derived Markov model of the codon substitution process that is provided in the literature. Without system specific knowledge of the substitution process, the techniques manage to "blindly" identify multiple levels of dynamics; from amino acid substitutions (via the standard genetic code) to higher order dynamics on the level of amino acid groups. We hypothesize that the acquired groups reflect earlier versions of the genetic code. The results demonstrate the applicability of the techniques. Due to their generality, we believe that they can be used to coarse grain and identify hierarchical organization in a broad range of other biological systems and processes, such as protein interaction networks, genetic regulatory networks and food webs.

  17. A model-independent approach to infer hierarchical codon substitution dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobi Martin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Codon substitution constitutes a fundamental process in molecular biology that has been studied extensively. However, prior studies rely on various assumptions, e.g. regarding the relevance of specific biochemical properties, or on conservation criteria for defining substitution groups. Ideally, one would instead like to analyze the substitution process in terms of