WorldWideScience

Sample records for model includes equilibrium

  1. Effect of including decay chains on predictions of equilibrium-type terrestrial food chain models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, G.

    1990-01-01

    Equilibrium-type food chain models are commonly used for assessing the radiological impact to man from environmental releases of radionuclides. Usually these do not take into account build-up of radioactive decay products during environmental transport. This may be a potential source of underprediction. For estimating consequences of this simplification, the equations of an internationally recognised terrestrial food chain model have been extended to include decay chains of variable length. Example calculations show that for releases from light water reactors as expected both during routine operation and in the case of severe accidents, the build-up of decay products during environmental transport is generally of minor importance. However, a considerable number of radionuclides of potential radiological significance have been identified which show marked contributions of decay products to calculated contamination of human food and resulting radiation dose rates. (author)

  2. An integrated computable general equilibrium model including multiple types and uses of water

    OpenAIRE

    Luckmann, Jonas Jens

    2015-01-01

    Water is a scarce resource in many regions of the world and competition for water is an increasing problem. To countervail this trend policies are needed regulating supply and demand for water. As water is used in many economic activities, water related management decisions usually have complex implications. Economic simulation models have been proven useful to ex-ante assess the consequences of policy changes. Specifically, Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models are very suitable to ana...

  3. A practical kinetic model that considers endproduct inhibition in anaerobic digestion processes by including the equilibrium constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoh, C Y; Cord-Ruwisch, R

    1996-09-05

    The classical Michaelis-Menten model is widely used as the basis for modeling of a number of biological systems. As the model does not consider the inhibitory effect of endproducts that accumulate in virtually all bioprocesses, it is often modified to prevent the overestimation of reaction rates when products have accumulated. Traditional approaches of model modification use the inclusion of irreversible, competitive, and noncompetitive inhibition factors. This article demonstrates that these inhibition factors are insufficient to predict product inhibition of reactions that are close the dynamic equilibrium. All models investigated were found to violate thermodynamic laws as they predicted positive reaction rates for reactions that were endergonic due to high endproduct concentrations. For modeling of biological processes that operate close to the dynamic equilibrium (e.g., anaerobic processes), it is critical to prevent the prediction of positive reaction rates when the reaction has already reached the dynamic equilibrium. This can be achieved by using a reversible kinetic model. However, the major drawback of the reversible kinetic model is the large number of empirical parameters it requires. These parameters are difficult to determine and prone to experimental error. For this reason, the reversible model is not practical in the modeling of biological processes.This article uses the fundamentals of steady-state kinetics and thermodynamics to establish an equation for the reversible kinetic model that is of practical use in bio-process modeling. The behavior of this equilibrium-based model is compared with Michaelis-Menten-based models that use traditional inhibition factors. The equilibrium-based model did not require any empirical inhibition factor to correctly predict when reaction rates must be zero due to the free energy change being zero. For highly exergonic reactions, the equilibrium-based model did not deviate significantly from the Michaelis

  4. Equilibrium models and variational inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Konnov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The concept of equilibrium plays a central role in various applied sciences, such as physics (especially, mechanics), economics, engineering, transportation, sociology, chemistry, biology and other fields. If one can formulate the equilibrium problem in the form of a mathematical model, solutions of the corresponding problem can be used for forecasting the future behavior of very complex systems and, also, for correcting the the current state of the system under control. This book presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts in economics, including several models from related sciences.- Presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts and also the present state of investigations in this field- Describes static and dynamic input-output models, Walras, Cassel-Wald, spatial price, auction market, oligopolistic equilibrium models, transportation and migration equilibrium models- Covers the basics of theory and solution methods both for the complementarity and variational inequality probl...

  5. An extended corresponding-states model for predicting thermodynamic properties of N2-Ar-O2 mixtures including vapor-liquid equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, W. P.; Jacobsen, R. T.; Lemmon, E. W.; Penoncello, S. G.; Beyerlein, S. W.

    1994-11-01

    A formulation developed previously for the prediction of the thermodynamic properties of single-phase states of binary and ternary mixtures in the nitrogen-argon-oxygen system has been revised to include the calculation of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) properties. The model is based on the theory of extended corresponding states with van der Waals mixing rules. Binary interaction parameters have been determined with single-phase P-p-T and vaporliquid equilibrium data to improve the accuracy of thermodynamic property predictions. The model accurately represents single-phase and vapor-liquid equilibrium properties over a wide range of compositions for binary and ternary mixtures. Comparisons of calculated properties to selected mixture data for both single-phase and VLE states are included.

  6. A Multiperiod Equilibrium Pricing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk Kwak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an equilibrium pricing model in a dynamic multiperiod stochastic framework with uncertain income. There are one tradable risky asset (stock/commodity, one nontradable underlying (temperature, and also a contingent claim (weather derivative written on the tradable risky asset and the nontradable underlying in the market. The price of the contingent claim is priced in equilibrium by optimal strategies of representative agent and market clearing condition. The risk preferences are of exponential type with a stochastic coefficient of risk aversion. Both subgame perfect strategy and naive strategy are considered and the corresponding equilibrium prices are derived. From the numerical result we examine how the equilibrium prices vary in response to changes in model parameters and highlight the importance of our equilibrium pricing principle.

  7. Micro Data and General Equilibrium Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Hansen, Lars Peter; Heckman, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Dynamic general equilibrium models are required to evaluate policies applied at the national level. To use these models to make quantitative forecasts requires knowledge of an extensive array of parameter values for the economy at large. This essay describes the parameters required for different...... economic models, assesses the discordance between the macromodels used in policy evaluation and the microeconomic models used to generate the empirical evidence. For concreteness, we focus on two general equilibrium models: the stochastic growth model extended to include some forms of heterogeneity...

  8. An equilibrium and kinetic modeling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models fitted well with the equilibrium data of the process studied. .... dosages. For the determination of adsorption isotherms, 4 g of bio- sorbent was used at five different .... The basic assumption of the Langmuir theory is that ad- sorption takes place at specific sites ...

  9. General Equilibrium Models: Improving the Microeconomics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Walter; Westhoff, Frank

    2009-01-01

    General equilibrium models now play important roles in many fields of economics including tax policy, environmental regulation, international trade, and economic development. The intermediate microeconomics classroom has not kept pace with these trends, however. Microeconomics textbooks primarily focus on the insights that can be drawn from the…

  10. Chemical equilibrium of ablation materials including condensed species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, C. W.; Brinkley, K. L.

    1975-01-01

    Equilibrium is determined by finding chemical composition with minimum free energy. Method of steepest descent is applied to quadratic representation of free-energy surface. Solution is initiated by selecting arbitrary set of mole fractions, from which point on free-energy surface is computed.

  11. Non-equilibrium modelling of distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, JA; Darton, R

    1997-01-01

    There are nasty conceptual problems in the classical way of describing distillation columns via equilibrium stages, and efficiencies or HETP's. We can nowadays avoid these problems by simulating the behaviour of a complete column in one go using a non-equilibrium model. Such a model has phase

  12. Non-equilibrium dog-flea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bruce J.

    2017-11-01

    We develop the open dog-flea model to serve as a check of proposed non-equilibrium theories of statistical mechanics. The model is developed in detail. Then it is applied to four recent models for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Comparison of the dog-flea solution with these different models allows checking claims and giving a concrete example of the theoretical models.

  13. Modelling of an homogeneous equilibrium mixture model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard-Champmartin, A.; Poujade, O.; Mathiaud, J.; Mathiaud, J.; Ghidaglia, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We present here a model for two phase flows which is simpler than the 6-equations models (with two densities, two velocities, two temperatures) but more accurate than the standard mixture models with 4 equations (with two densities, one velocity and one temperature). We are interested in the case when the two-phases have been interacting long enough for the drag force to be small but still not negligible. The so-called Homogeneous Equilibrium Mixture Model (HEM) that we present is dealing with both mixture and relative quantities, allowing in particular to follow both a mixture velocity and a relative velocity. This relative velocity is not tracked by a conservation law but by a closure law (drift relation), whose expression is related to the drag force terms of the two-phase flow. After the derivation of the model, a stability analysis and numerical experiments are presented. (authors)

  14. Adiabatic equilibrium models for direct containment heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilch, M.; Allen, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    Probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) studies are being extended to include a wider spectrum of reactor plants than was considered in NUREG-1150. There is a need for simple direct containment heating (DCH) models that can be used for screening studies aimed at identifying potentially significant contributors to overall risk in individual nuclear power plants. This paper presents two adiabatic equilibrium models suitable for the task. The first, a single-cell model, places a true upper bound on DCH loads. This upper bound, however, often far exceeds reasonable expectations of containment loads based on CONTAIN calculations and experiment observations. In this paper, a two cell model is developed that captures the major mitigating feature of containment compartmentalization, thus providing more reasonable estimates of the containment load

  15. Radiative-convective equilibrium model intercomparison project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Allison A.; Reed, Kevin A.; Satoh, Masaki; Stevens, Bjorn; Bony, Sandrine; Ohno, Tomoki

    2018-03-01

    RCEMIP, an intercomparison of multiple types of models configured in radiative-convective equilibrium (RCE), is proposed. RCE is an idealization of the climate system in which there is a balance between radiative cooling of the atmosphere and heating by convection. The scientific objectives of RCEMIP are three-fold. First, clouds and climate sensitivity will be investigated in the RCE setting. This includes determining how cloud fraction changes with warming and the role of self-aggregation of convection in climate sensitivity. Second, RCEMIP will quantify the dependence of the degree of convective aggregation and tropical circulation regimes on temperature. Finally, by providing a common baseline, RCEMIP will allow the robustness of the RCE state across the spectrum of models to be assessed, which is essential for interpreting the results found regarding clouds, climate sensitivity, and aggregation, and more generally, determining which features of tropical climate a RCE framework is useful for. A novel aspect and major advantage of RCEMIP is the accessibility of the RCE framework to a variety of models, including cloud-resolving models, general circulation models, global cloud-resolving models, single-column models, and large-eddy simulation models.

  16. Rumor Propagation Model: An Equilibrium Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto C. Piqueira

    2010-01-01

    information is analogous phenomena. Here, in an analogy with the SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed epidemiological model, the ISS (Ignorant-Spreader-Stifler rumor spreading model is studied. By using concepts from the Dynamical Systems Theory, stability of equilibrium points is established, according to propagation parameters and initial conditions. Some numerical experiments are conducted in order to validate the model.

  17. Measuring productivity differences in equilibrium search models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanot, Gauthier; Neumann, George R.

    1996-01-01

    Equilibrium search models require unobserved heterogeneity in productivity to fit observed wage distribution data, but provide no guidance about the location parameter of the heterogeneity. In this paper we show that the location of the productivity heterogeneity implies a mode in a kernel density...

  18. Modeling rocky coastline evolution and equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limber, P. W.; Murray, A. B.

    2010-12-01

    headland and sediment-filled bay sequence could persist in the absence of heterogeneous lithology, 2) headland spacing was not autogenic and was a function of the initial coastline shape, and 3) that the proportion of the equilibrium coastline that consisted of headlands (and bays) was analytically predictable and depended on sea cliff height and composition as well as rates of beach erosion and bare-rock sea cliff retreat. In the present contribution we include fluvial sediment sources, alongshore and cross-shore variations in sea cliff height (which, in turn, vary cliff sediment supply in time and space), lithologic heterogeneities, and submarine canyons that extend into the nearshore zone and intercept alongshore sediment transport (similar to the California coastline). These modifications alter the style of rocky coastline evolution and the final equilibrium coastline configuration. We compare numerical and analytical model results to real landscapes, focusing on the California coastline. Overall, we seek to establish simple relationships between physical parameters (sea cliff characteristics, sediment sources and sinks, and wave climate) that can be used to explain why some coastlines exhibit rocky headlands, and how extensive the headlands are (relative to beach-covered stretches).

  19. An equilibrium approach to modelling social interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Ignacio

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to put forward a statistical mechanics theory of social interaction, generalizing econometric discrete choice models. After showing the formal equivalence linking econometric multinomial logit models to equilibrium statical mechanics, a multi-population generalization of the Curie-Weiss model for ferromagnets is considered as a starting point in developing a model capable of describing sudden shifts in aggregate human behaviour. Existence of the thermodynamic limit for the model is shown by an asymptotic sub-additivity method and factorization of correlation functions is proved almost everywhere. The exact solution of the model is provided in the thermodynamical limit by finding converging upper and lower bounds for the system's pressure, and the solution is used to prove an analytic result regarding the number of possible equilibrium states of a two-population system. The work stresses the importance of linking regimes predicted by the model to real phenomena, and to this end it proposes two possible procedures to estimate the model's parameters starting from micro-level data. These are applied to three case studies based on census type data: though these studies are found to be ultimately inconclusive on an empirical level, considerations are drawn that encourage further refinements of the chosen modelling approach.

  20. Sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids including volume effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P.M.; Lyklema, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium of binary mixtures of charged colloids in the presence of small ions and for non-dilute conditions, by extending the work of Biben and Hansen (1994 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 A345). For a monocomponent system, they included a Carnahan-Starling

  1. Including investment risk in large-scale power market models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard; Meibom, P.

    2003-01-01

    can be included in large-scale partial equilibrium models of the power market. The analyses are divided into a part about risk measures appropriate for power market investors and a more technical part about the combination of a risk-adjustment model and a partial-equilibrium model. To illustrate...... the analyses quantitatively, a framework based on an iterative interaction between the equilibrium model and a separate risk-adjustment module was constructed. To illustrate the features of the proposed modelling approach we examined how uncertainty in demand and variable costs affects the optimal choice...

  2. Equilibrium statistical mechanics of lattice models

    CERN Document Server

    Lavis, David A

    2015-01-01

    Most interesting and difficult problems in equilibrium statistical mechanics concern models which exhibit phase transitions. For graduate students and more experienced researchers this book provides an invaluable reference source of approximate and exact solutions for a comprehensive range of such models. Part I contains background material on classical thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, together with a classification and survey of lattice models. The geometry of phase transitions is described and scaling theory is used to introduce critical exponents and scaling laws. An introduction is given to finite-size scaling, conformal invariance and Schramm—Loewner evolution. Part II contains accounts of classical mean-field methods. The parallels between Landau expansions and catastrophe theory are discussed and Ginzburg—Landau theory is introduced. The extension of mean-field theory to higher-orders is explored using the Kikuchi—Hijmans—De Boer hierarchy of approximations. In Part III the use of alge...

  3. Phase Equilibrium Modeling for Shale Production Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval Lemus, Diego Rolando

    calculation tools for phase equilibrium in porous media with capillary pressure and adsorption effects. Analysis using these tools have shown that capillary pressure and adsorption have non-negligible effects on phase equilibrium in shale. As general tools, they can be used to calculate phase equilibrium...... in other porous media as well. The compositional simulator with added capillary pressure effects on phase equilibrium can be used for evaluating the effects in dynamic and more complex scenarios....

  4. The equilibrium model of relationship maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Sandra L; Holmes, John G; Griffin, Dale W; Derrick, Jaye L

    2015-01-01

    A new equilibrium model of relationship maintenance is proposed. People can protect relationship bonds by practicing 3 threat-mitigation rules: Trying to accommodate when a partner is hurtful, ensuring mutual dependence, and resisting devaluing a partner who impedes one's personal goals. A longitudinal study of newlyweds revealed evidence for the equilibrium model, such that relationship well-being (as indexed by satisfaction and commitment) declining from its usual state predicted increased threat-mitigation; in turn, increasing threat mitigation from its usual state predicted increased relationship well-being. Longitudinal findings further revealed adaptive advantages to uncertain trust. First, the match between trust and partner-risk predicted the trajectory of threat mitigation over time. People who hesitated to trust a high-risk partner became more likely to mitigate threats over 3 years, but people who hesitated to trust a safe partner became less likely to mitigate threats. The match between threat mitigation and partner-risk also predicted when being less trusting eroded later relationship well-being. Namely, when women paired with high-risk partners became more likely to mitigate threats, being less trusting at marriage lost its capacity to erode later relationship well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Non-equilibrium Quasi-Chemical Nucleation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2018-04-01

    Quasi-chemical model, which is widely used for nucleation description, is revised on the basis of recent results in studying of non-equilibrium effects in reacting gas mixtures (Kolesnichenko and Gorbachev in Appl Math Model 34:3778-3790, 2010; Shock Waves 23:635-648, 2013; Shock Waves 27:333-374, 2017). Non-equilibrium effects in chemical reactions are caused by the chemical reactions themselves and therefore these contributions should be taken into account in the corresponding expressions for reaction rates. Corrections to quasi-equilibrium reaction rates are of two types: (a) spatially homogeneous (caused by physical-chemical processes) and (b) spatially inhomogeneous (caused by gas expansion/compression processes and proportional to the velocity divergency). Both of these processes play an important role during the nucleation and are included into the proposed model. The method developed for solving the generalized Boltzmann equation for chemically reactive gases is applied for solving the set of equations of the revised quasi-chemical model. It is shown that non-equilibrium processes lead to essential deviation of the quasi-stationary distribution and therefore the nucleation rate from its traditional form.

  6. Equilibrium Price Dispersion in a Matching Model with Divisible Money

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamiya, K.; Sato, T.

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to show that, for any given parameter values, an equilibrium with dispersed prices (two-price equilibrium) exists in a simple matching model with divisible money presented by Green and Zhou (1998).We also show that our two-price equilibrium is unique in certain

  7. Stability Analysis of Equilibrium States of an SEIR Tuberculosis Model

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examine the stability and equilibrium states of the extended model with respect to the basic reproduction number R0. We show that the disease-free equilibrium (DFE) is globally asymptotically stable if R0 ≤ 1 and that there exists at least one endemic equilibrium which is globally asymptotically stable if R0 > 1. Finally ...

  8. Mathematical models and equilibrium in irreversible microeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly M. Tsirlin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A set of equilibrium states in a system consisting of economic agents, economic reservoirs, and firms is considered. Methods of irreversible microeconomics are used. We show that direct sale/purchase leads to an equilibrium state which depends upon the coefficients of supply/demand functions. To reach the unique equilibrium state it is necessary to add either monetary exchange or an intermediate firm.

  9. Extraproximal approach to calculating equilibriums in pure exchange models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipin, A. S.

    2006-10-01

    Models of economic equilibrium are a powerful tool of mathematical modeling of various markets. However, according to many publications, there are as yet no universal techniques for finding equilibrium prices that are solutions to such models. A technique of this kind that is a natural implementation of the Walras idea of tatonnements (i.e., groping for equilibrium prices) is proposed, and its convergence is proved.

  10. Description of the General Equilibrium Model of Ecosystem Services (GEMES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis Warziniack; David Finnoff; Jenny Apriesnig

    2017-01-01

    This paper serves as documentation for the General Equilibrium Model of Ecosystem Services (GEMES). GEMES is a regional computable general equilibrium model that is composed of values derived from natural capital and ecosystem services. It models households, producing sectors, and governments, linked to one another through commodity and factor markets. GEMES was...

  11. Comparative evaluation of kinetic, equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models for biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buragohain, Buljit [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Chakma, Sankar; Kumar, Peeush [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Mahanta, Pinakeswar [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Moholkar, Vijayanand S. [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India)

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of biomass gasification has been an active area of research for past two decades. In the published literature, three approaches have been adopted for the modeling of this process, viz. thermodynamic equilibrium, semi-equilibrium and kinetic. In this paper, we have attempted to present a comparative assessment of these three types of models for predicting outcome of the gasification process in a circulating fluidized bed gasifier. Two model biomass, viz. rice husk and wood particles, have been chosen for analysis, with gasification medium being air. Although the trends in molar composition, net yield and LHV of the producer gas predicted by three models are in concurrence, significant quantitative difference is seen in the results. Due to rather slow kinetics of char gasification and tar oxidation, carbon conversion achieved in single pass of biomass through the gasifier, calculated using kinetic model, is quite low, which adversely affects the yield and LHV of the producer gas. Although equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models reveal relative insensitivity of producer gas characteristics towards temperature, the kinetic model shows significant effect of temperature on LHV of the gas at low air ratios. Kinetic models also reveal volume of the gasifier to be an insignificant parameter, as the net yield and LHV of the gas resulting from 6 m and 10 m riser is same. On a whole, the analysis presented in this paper indicates that thermodynamic models are useful tools for quantitative assessment of the gasification process, while kinetic models provide physically more realistic picture.

  12. Approach to chemical equilibrium in thermal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boal, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The experimentally measured (μ - , charged particle)/(μ - ,n) and (p,n/p,p') ratios for the emission of energetic nucleons are used to estimate the time evolution of a system of secondary nucleons produced in a direct interaction of a projectile or captured muon. The values of these ratios indicate that chemical equilibrium is not achieved among the secondary nucleons in noncomposite induced reactions, and this restricts the time scale for the emission of energetic nucleons to be about 0.7 x 10 -23 sec. It is shown that the reason why thermal equilibrium can be reached so rapidly for a particular nucleon species is that the sum of the particle spectra produced in multiple direct reactions looks surprisingly thermal. The rate equations used to estimate the reaction times for muon and nucleon induced reactions are then applied to heavy ion collisions, and it is shown that chemical equilibrium can be reached more rapidly, as one would expect

  13. Parameter Estimation for a Computable General Equilibrium Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    We introduce a maximum entropy approach to parameter estimation for computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. The approach applies information theory to estimating a system of nonlinear simultaneous equations. It has a number of advantages. First, it imposes all general equilibrium constraints...

  14. Parameter Estimation for a Computable General Equilibrium Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Robinson, Sherman; Tarp, Finn

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a maximum entropy approach to parameter estimation for computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. The approach applies information theory to estimating a system of non-linear simultaneous equations. It has a number of advantages. First, it imposes all general equilibrium constraints...

  15. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-08-16

    Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the literature. They also give better estimates of

  16. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobbs Gary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Results Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the

  17. Results of Equilibrium Resurfacing Monta Carlo Models on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjonnes, E. E.; Hansen, V. L.; Swenson, J. B.

    2008-03-01

    Previous equilibrium resurfacing tests failed to include increments between 10 and 0.03%. We tested this parameter space and found that there is no statistical evidence that equilibrium resurfacing cannot meet the two key observations of Venus' impact crater data set.

  18. Non-equilibrium scaling analysis of the Kondo model with voltage bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, Peter; Kehrein, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The quintessential description of Kondo physics in equilibrium is obtained within a scaling picture that shows the buildup of Kondo screening at low temperature. For the non-equilibrium Kondo model with a voltage bias, the key new feature are decoherence effects due to the current across the impurity. In the present paper, we show how one can develop a consistent framework for studying the non-equilibrium Kondo model within a scaling picture of infinitesimal unitary transformations (flow equations). Decoherence effects appear naturally in third order of the β-function and dominate the Hamiltonian flow for sufficiently large voltage bias. We work out the spin dynamics in non-equilibrium and compare it with finite temperature equilibrium results. In particular, we report on the behavior of the static spin susceptibility including leading logarithmic corrections and compare it with the celebrated equilibrium result as a function of temperature.

  19. Insights: Simple Models for Teaching Equilibrium and Le Chatelier's Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Joan M.

    1988-01-01

    Presents three models that have been effective for teaching chemical equilibrium and Le Chatelier's principle: (1) the liquid transfer model, (2) the fish model, and (3) the teeter-totter model. Explains each model and its relation to Le Chatelier's principle. (MVL)

  20. Estimating Dynamic Equilibrium Models using Macro and Financial Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent Jesper; Posch, Olaf; van der Wel, Michel

    We show that including financial market data at daily frequency, along with macro series at standard lower frequency, facilitates statistical inference on structural parameters in dynamic equilibrium models. Our continuous-time formulation conveniently accounts for the difference in observation...... frequency. We suggest two approaches for the estimation of structural parameters. The first is a simple regression-based procedure for estimation of the reduced-form parameters of the model, combined with a minimum-distance method for identifying the structural parameters. The second approach uses...... martingale estimating functions to estimate the structural parameters directly through a non-linear optimization scheme. We illustrate both approaches by estimating the stochastic AK model with mean-reverting spot interest rates. We also provide Monte Carlo evidence on the small sample behavior...

  1. Learning of Chemical Equilibrium through Modelling-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Poliana Flavia; Justi, Rosaria

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses students' learning process of chemical equilibrium from a modelling-based approach developed from the use of the "Model of Modelling" diagram. The investigation was conducted in a regular classroom (students 14-15 years old) and aimed at discussing how modelling-based teaching can contribute to students…

  2. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution using chemical equilibrium codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Pirhonen, V.

    1991-01-01

    Geochemical equilibrium codes are a modern tool in studying interaction between groundwater and solid phases. The most common used programs and application subjects are shortly presented in this article. The main emphasis is laid on the approach method of using calculated results in evaluating groundwater evolution in hydrogeological system. At present in geochemical equilibrium modelling also kinetic as well as hydrologic constrains along a flow path are taken into consideration

  3. Spectral line intensities of NeVII for non-equilibrium ionization plasma including dielectronic recombination processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Takako [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Safronova, U.

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the dielectronic recombination rate coefficients from Li-like Ne (Ne{sup 7+}) ions to Be-like Ne (Ne{sup 6+}) ions for selected excited states of Ne{sup 6+} ions. A collisional-radiative model (CRM) for Ne{sup 6+} ions is constructed to calculate the population density of each excited state in non-equilibrium ionization plasmas, including recombining processes. NeVII spectral line intensities and the radiative power loss are calculated with the CRM. A density effect caused by collisional excitation from the metastable state 2s2p {sup 3}P is found at an electron density of 10{sup 5} - 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. The collisional excitations between excited states become important at high electron temperature T{sub e} > or approx. 100 eV. (author)

  4. Equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strickler, D.J.; Miller, J.B.; Rothe, K.E.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1984-04-01

    The Toroidal Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) isproposed to be an ignition device with a low safety factor (q approx. = 2.0), rf or rf-assisted startup, long inductive burn pulse (approx. 300 s), and an elongated plasma cross section (kappa = 1.6) with moderate triangularity (delta = 0.3). System trade studies have been carried out to assist in choosing an appropriate candidate for TFCX conceptual design. This report describes an important element in these system studies - the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium modeling of the TFCX poloidal field (PF) coil system and its impact on the choice of machine size. Reference design points for the all-super-conducting toroidal field (TF) coil (TFCX-S) and hybrid (TFCX-H) options are presented that satisfy given PF system criteria, including volt-second requirements during burn, mechanical configuration constraints, maximum field constraints at the superconducting PF coils, and plasma shape parameters. Poloidal coil current waveforms for the TFCX-S and TFCX-H reference designs consistent with the equilibrium requirements of the plasma startup, heating, and burn phases of a typical discharge scenario are calculated. Finally, a possible option for quasi-steady-state operation is discussed

  5. The rational expectations equilibrium inventory model theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1989-01-01

    This volume consists of six essays that develop and/or apply "rational expectations equilibrium inventory models" to study the time series behavior of production, sales, prices, and inventories at the industry level. By "rational expectations equilibrium inventory model" I mean the extension of the inventory model of Holt, Modigliani, Muth, and Simon (1960) to account for: (i) discounting, (ii) infinite horizon planning, (iii) observed and unobserved by the "econometrician" stochastic shocks in the production, factor adjustment, storage, and backorders management processes of firms, as well as in the demand they face for their products; and (iv) rational expectations. As is well known according to the Holt et al. model firms hold inventories in order to: (a) smooth production, (b) smooth production changes, and (c) avoid stockouts. Following the work of Zabel (1972), Maccini (1976), Reagan (1982), and Reagan and Weitzman (1982), Blinder (1982) laid the foundations of the rational expectations equilibrium inve...

  6. Investigations in gasification of biomass mixtures using thermodynamic equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buragohain, Buljit; Mahanta, Pinakeswar; Moholkar, Vijayanand S. [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati - 781 039, Assam (India)

    2011-07-01

    Biomass gasifiers with power generation capacities exceeding 1 MW have large biomass consumption. Availability of a single biomass in such large quantities is rather difficult, and hence, mixtures of biomasses need to be used as feed-stock for these gasifiers. This study has assessed feasibility of biomass mixtures as fuel in biomass gasifiers for decentralized power generation using thermodynamic equilibrium and semi-equilibrium (with limited carbon conversion) model employing Gibbs energy minimization. Binary mixtures of common biomasses found in northeastern states of India such as rice husk, bamboo dust and saw dust have been taken for analysis. The potential for power generation from gasifier has been evaluated on the basis of net yield (in Nm3) and LHV (in MJ/Nm3) of the producer gas obtained from gasification of 100 g of biomass mixture. The results of simulations have revealed interesting trends in performance of gasifiers with operating parameters such as air ratio, temperature of gasification and composition of the biomass mixture. For all biomass mixtures, the optimum air ratio is {approx} 0.3 with gasification temperature of 800oC. Under total equilibrium conditions, and for engine-generator efficiency of 30%, the least possible fuel consumption is found to be 0.8 kg/kW-h. As revealed in the simulations with semi-equilibrium model, this parameter shows an inverse variation with the extent of carbon conversion. For low carbon conversions ({approx} 60% or so), the specific fuel consumption could be as high as 1.5 kg/kW-h. The results of this study have also been compared with previous literature (theoretical as well as experimental) and good agreement has been found. This study, thus, has demonstrated potential of replacement of a single biomass fuel in the gasifier with mixtures of different biomasses.

  7. Equilibrium in Generalized Cournot and Stackelberg Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulavsky, V.A.; Kalashnikov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    A model of an oligopolistic market with a homogeneous product is examined. Each subject of the model uses a conjecture about the market response to variations of its production volume. The conjecture value depends upon both the current total volume of production at the market and the subject's

  8. Fitting Equilibrium Search Models to Labour Market Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowlus, Audra J.; Kiefer, Nicholas M.; Neumann, George R.

    1996-01-01

    Specification and estimation of a Burdett-Mortensen type equilibrium search model is considered. The estimation is nonstandard. An estimation strategy asymptotically equivalent to maximum likelihood is proposed and applied. The results indicate that specifications with a small number of productiv...... of productivity types fit the data well compared to the homogeneous model....

  9. Assessing The Suitability Of Partial Equilibrium Modelling In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of applying partial equilibrium modeling for forest sector analysis in Tanzania. The aim of the evaluation is to determine the usefulness of this model framework in analyzing the impact of various policies on the development of the forest sector. The structure and ...

  10. Simple models of equilibrium and nonequilibrium phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebowitz, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This volume consists of two chapters of particular interest to researchers in the field of statistical mechanics. The first chapter is based on the premise that the best way to understand the qualitative properties that characterize many-body (i.e. macroscopic) systems is to study 'a number of the more significant model systems which, at least in principle are susceptible of complete analysis'. The second chapter deals exclusively with nonequilibrium phenomena. It reviews the theory of fluctuations in open systems to which they have made important contributions. Simple but interesting model examples are emphasised

  11. The lagRST Model: A Turbulence Model for Non-Equilibrium Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillard, Randolph P.; Oliver, A. Brandon; Olsen, Michael E.; Blaisdell, Gregory A.; Lyrintzis, Anastasios S.

    2011-01-01

    This study presents a new class of turbulence model designed for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows with separation. The model addresses deficiencies seen in the modeling of nonequilibrium turbulent flows. These flows generally have variable adverse pressure gradients which cause the turbulent quantities to react at a finite rate to changes in the mean flow quantities. This "lag" in the response of the turbulent quantities can t be modeled by most standard turbulence models, which are designed to model equilibrium turbulent boundary layers. The model presented uses a standard 2-equation model as the baseline for turbulent equilibrium calculations, but adds transport equations to account directly for non-equilibrium effects in the Reynolds Stress Tensor (RST) that are seen in large pressure gradients involving shock waves and separation. Comparisons are made to several standard turbulence modeling validation cases, including an incompressible boundary layer (both neutral and adverse pressure gradients), an incompressible mixing layer and a transonic bump flow. In addition, a hypersonic Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction with separation is assessed along with a transonic capsule flow. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWTBLI flows assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the baseline models, but the over prediction of the peak heat flux downstream of the reattachment shock that plagues many models is reduced.

  12. Electricity market equilibrium model with resource constraint and transmission congestion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, F.; Sheble, G.B.

    2010-01-01

    Electricity market equilibrium model not only helps Independent System Operator/Regulator analyze market performance and market power, but also provides Market Participants the ability to build optimal bidding strategies based on Microeconomics analysis. Supply Function Equilibrium (SFE) is attractive compared to traditional models and many efforts have been made on it before. However, most past research focused on a single-period, single-market model and did not address the fact that GENCOs hold a portfolio of assets in both electricity and fuel markets. This paper first identifies a proper SFE model, which can be applied to a multiple-period situation. Then the paper develops the equilibrium condition using discrete time optimal control considering fuel resource constraints. Finally, the paper discusses the issues of multiple equilibria caused by transmission network and shows that a transmission constrained equilibrium may exist, however the shadow price may not be zero. Additionally, an advantage from the proposed model for merchant transmission planning is discussed. (author)

  13. Electricity market equilibrium model with resource constraint and transmission congestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, F. [ABB, Inc., Santa Clara, CA 95050 (United States); Sheble, G.B. [Portland State University, Portland, OR 97207 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Electricity market equilibrium model not only helps Independent System Operator/Regulator analyze market performance and market power, but also provides Market Participants the ability to build optimal bidding strategies based on Microeconomics analysis. Supply Function Equilibrium (SFE) is attractive compared to traditional models and many efforts have been made on it before. However, most past research focused on a single-period, single-market model and did not address the fact that GENCOs hold a portfolio of assets in both electricity and fuel markets. This paper first identifies a proper SFE model, which can be applied to a multiple-period situation. Then the paper develops the equilibrium condition using discrete time optimal control considering fuel resource constraints. Finally, the paper discusses the issues of multiple equilibria caused by transmission network and shows that a transmission constrained equilibrium may exist, however the shadow price may not be zero. Additionally, an advantage from the proposed model for merchant transmission planning is discussed. (author)

  14. KEMOD: A mixed chemical kinetic and equilibrium model of aqueous and solid phase geochemical reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Iskra, G.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Szecsody, J.E.; Zachara, J.M.; Streile, G.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the development of a mixed chemical Kinetic and Equilibrium MODel in which every chemical species can be treated either as a equilibrium-controlled or as a kinetically controlled reaction. The reaction processes include aqueous complexation, adsorption/desorption, ion exchange, precipitation/dissolution, oxidation/reduction, and acid/base reactions. Further development and modification of KEMOD can be made in: (1) inclusion of species switching solution algorithms, (2) incorporation of the effect of temperature and pressure on equilibrium and rate constants, and (3) extension to high ionic strength.

  15. African wildlife and people : finding solutions where equilibrium models fail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poshiwa, X.

    2013-01-01

    Grazing systems, covering about half of the terrestrial surface, tend to be either equilibrial or non-equilibrial in nature, largely depending on the environmental stochasticity.The equilibrium model perspective stresses the importance of biotic feedbacks between herbivores and

  16. An applied general equilibrium model for Dutch agribusiness policy analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerlings, J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to develop a basic static applied general equilibrium (AGE) model to analyse the effects of agricultural policy changes on Dutch agribusiness. In particular the effects on inter-industry transactions, factor demand, income, and trade are of

  17. An Equilibrium Assembly Model Applied to Murine Polyomavirus

    OpenAIRE

    Keef, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Keef et al., Assembly Models for Papovaviridae based on Tiling Theory (submitted to J. Phys. Biol.), 2005 [1] we extended an equilibrium assembly model to the (pseudo–)T = 7 viral capsids in the family of Papovaviridae providing assembly pathways for the most likely or primary intermediates and computing their concentrations. Here this model is applied to Murine Polyomavirus based on the association energies provided by the VIPER web page Reddy et al.“Virus particle explorer (VIPER), a web...

  18. Dynamic processes of conceptual change: Analysis of constructing mental models of chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Hung; Chou, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate students' mental models of chemical equilibrium using dynamic science assessments. Research in chemical education has shown that students at various levels have misconceptions about chemical equilibrium. According to Chi's theory of conceptual change, the concept of chemical equilibrium has constraint-based features (e.g., random, simultaneous, uniform activities) that might prevent students from deeply understanding the nature of the concept of chemical equilibrium. In this study, we examined how students learned and constructed their mental models of chemical equilibrium in a cognitive apprenticeship context. Thirty 10th-grade students participated in the study: 10 in a control group and 20 in a treatment group. Both groups were presented with a series of hands-on chemical experiments. The students in the treatment group were instructed based on the main features of cognitive apprenticeship (CA), such as coaching, modeling, scaffolding, articulation, reflection, and exploration. However, the students in the control group (non-CA group) learned from the tutor without explicit CA support. The results revealed that the CA group significantly outperformed the non-CA group. The students in the CA group were capable of constructing the mental models of chemical equilibrium - including dynamic, random activities of molecules and interactions between molecules in the microworld - whereas the students in the non-CA group failed to construct similar correct mental models of chemical equilibrium. The study focuses on the process of constructing mental models, on dynamic changes, and on the actions of students (such as self-monitoring/self-correction) who are learning the concept of chemical equilibrium. Also, we discuss the implications for science education.

  19. Knowledge Management through the Equilibrium Pattern Model for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarirete, Akila; Noble, Elizabeth; Chikh, Azeddine

    Contemporary students are characterized by having very applied learning styles and methods of acquiring knowledge. This behavior is consistent with the constructivist models where students are co-partners in the learning process. In the present work the authors developed a new model of learning based on the constructivist theory coupled with the cognitive development theory of Piaget. The model considers the level of learning based on several stages and the move from one stage to another requires learners' challenge. At each time a new concept is introduced creates a disequilibrium that needs to be worked out to return back to its equilibrium stage. This process of "disequilibrium/equilibrium" has been analyzed and validated using a course in computer networking as part of Cisco Networking Academy Program at Effat College, a women college in Saudi Arabia. The model provides a theoretical foundation for teaching especially in a complex knowledge domain such as engineering and can be used in a knowledge economy.

  20. Gaussian random bridges and a geometric model for information equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengütürk, Levent Ali

    2018-03-01

    The paper introduces a class of conditioned stochastic processes that we call Gaussian random bridges (GRBs) and proves some of their properties. Due to the anticipative representation of any GRB as the sum of a random variable and a Gaussian (T , 0) -bridge, GRBs can model noisy information processes in partially observed systems. In this spirit, we propose an asset pricing model with respect to what we call information equilibrium in a market with multiple sources of information. The idea is to work on a topological manifold endowed with a metric that enables us to systematically determine an equilibrium point of a stochastic system that can be represented by multiple points on that manifold at each fixed time. In doing so, we formulate GRB-based information diversity over a Riemannian manifold and show that it is pinned to zero over the boundary determined by Dirac measures. We then define an influence factor that controls the dominance of an information source in determining the best estimate of a signal in the L2-sense. When there are two sources, this allows us to construct information equilibrium as a functional of a geodesic-valued stochastic process, which is driven by an equilibrium convergence rate representing the signal-to-noise ratio. This leads us to derive price dynamics under what can be considered as an equilibrium probability measure. We also provide a semimartingale representation of Markovian GRBs associated with Gaussian martingales and a non-anticipative representation of fractional Brownian random bridges that can incorporate degrees of information coupling in a given system via the Hurst exponent.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Turbulence and Two-Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Two-equation turbulence models are analyzed from the perspective of spectral closure theories. Kolmogorov theory provides useful information for models, but it is limited to equilibrium conditions in which the energy spectrum has relaxed to a steady state consistent with the forcing at large scales; it does not describe transient evolution between such states. Transient evolution is necessarily through nonequilibrium states, which can only be found from a theory of turbulence evolution, such as one provided by a spectral closure. When the departure from equilibrium is small, perturbation theory can be used to approximate the evolution by a two-equation model. The perturbation theory also gives explicit conditions under which this model can be valid, and when it will fail. Implications of the non-equilibrium corrections for the classic Tennekes-Lumley balance in the dissipation rate equation are drawn: it is possible to establish both the cancellation of the leading order Re1/2 divergent contributions to vortex stretching and enstrophy destruction, and the existence of a nonzero difference which is finite in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  2. Resilience: ecological and socio-spatial models evolve while understanding the equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru-Ionuţ Petrişor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to review the main models used in systems ecology, and applied to urban and territorial development, in tight connection with the developing understanding of equilibrium and stability. Initially, resilience was perceived as a component of stability (along with resistance, persistence, and variability, and later as a self-standing concept. As the understanding of equilibrium moves from homeostasis to homeoerhesis and practically to the carrying capacity, and stability finds different interpretations, ranging from constancy to dynamic equilibrium, the dynamics of ecological systems is modeled using adaptive instead of succession cycles. The new model is currently applied to other sciences, and also adapted to the man-dominated systems, including the urban ones. In this case, the understanding of resilience is even more divided among specialists, with particular interpretations resulting from partial or sectoral viewpoints. The analysis shows that more research is not a promising solution, but conceptual refinement is required instead.

  3. Application of a non-equilibrium drift flux model to two-phase blowdown experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, P.G.

    1976-08-01

    A vapor drift-flux model has been applied to the discharge of two-phase mixtures under choked flow conditions, including equilibrium as well as non-equilibrium vapor generation models. The system of four conservation equations is being solved, using the method of characteristics. Closed form expressions have been obtained for the propagation velocities from approximate solutions of the system's characteristic determinant. Treatment of the phase change front as a discontinuity, similar to the treatment of shocks in single phase gas dynamics, permitted very accurate solutions. Good agreement with experimental data is shown

  4. Chemical equilibrium relations used in the fireball model of relativistic heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    The fireball model of relativistic heavy-ion collision uses chemical equilibrium relations to predict cross sections for particle and composite productions. These relations are examined in a canonical ensemble model where chemical equilibrium is not explicitly invoked

  5. Two-temperature chemically non-equilibrium modelling of an air supersonic ICP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Morsli, Mbark; Proulx, Pierre [Laboratoire de Modelisation de Procedes Chimiques par Ordinateur Oppus, Departement de Genie Chimique, Universite de Sherbrooke (Ciheam) J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2007-08-21

    In this work, a non-equilibrium mathematical model for an air inductively coupled plasma torch with a supersonic nozzle is developed without making thermal and chemical equilibrium assumptions. Reaction rate equations are written, and two coupled energy equations are used, one for the calculation of the translational-rotational temperature T{sub hr} and one for the calculation of the electro-vibrational temperature T{sub ev}. The viscous dissipation is taken into account in the translational-rotational energy equation. The electro-vibrational energy equation also includes the pressure work of the electrons, the Ohmic heating power and the exchange due to elastic collision. Higher order approximations of the Chapman-Enskog method are used to obtain better accuracy for transport properties, taking advantage of the most recent sets of collisions integrals available in the literature. The results obtained are compared with those obtained using a chemical equilibrium model and a one-temperature chemical non-equilibrium model. The influence of the power and the pressure chamber on the chemical and thermal non-equilibrium is investigated.

  6. Modeling Inflation Using a Non-Equilibrium Equation of Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Inflation is a change in the prices of goods that takes place without changes in the actual values of those goods. The Equation of Exchange, formulated clearly in a seminal paper by Irving Fisher in 1911, establishes an equilibrium relationship between the price index P (also known as "inflation"), the economy's aggregate output Q (also known as "the real gross domestic product"), the amount of money available for spending M (also known as "the money supply"), and the rate at which money is reused V (also known as "the velocity of circulation of money"). This paper offers first a qualitative discussion of what can cause these factors to change and how those causes might be controlled, then develops a quantitative model of inflation based on a non-equilibrium version of the Equation of Exchange. Causal relationships are different from equations in that the effects of changes in the causal variables take time to play out-often significant amounts of time. In the model described here, wages track prices, but only after a distributed lag. Prices change whenever the money supply, aggregate output, or the velocity of circulation of money change, but only after a distributed lag. Similarly, the money supply depends on the supplies of domestic and foreign money, which depend on the monetary base and a variety of foreign transactions, respectively. The spreading of delays mitigates the shocks of sudden changes to important inputs, but the most important aspect of this model is that delays, which often have dramatic consequences in dynamic systems, are explicitly incorporated.macroeconomics, inflation, equation of exchange, non-equilibrium, Athena Project

  7. Solvation model for estimating the properties of (vapour + liquid) equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senol, Aynur

    2008-01-01

    A solvation energy relation (SERAS) has been developed for correlating the properties and (vapour + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) of associated systems capable of hydrogen bonding or dipole-dipole interaction. The model clarifies the simultaneous impact of hydrogen bonding, solubility and thermodynamic factors of activity coefficients derived from the UNIFAC-original model. The consistency test has been processed against binary VLE data for six isobaric systems of hydrogen bonding (I to III) and dipole-dipole interaction (IV to VI) types, and two isothermal systems of both types (VII and VIII). Systems II, III, and VIII show negative non-ideal deviations. The reliability analysis has been conducted on the performance of the SERAS model with 5- and 10-parameters. The model matches relatively well with the observed performance, yielding mean error of 9.7% for all the systems and properties considered

  8. Solvation model for estimating the properties of (vapour + liquid) equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senol, Aynur [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 34320 Avcilar, Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: senol@istanbul.ed.tr

    2008-08-15

    A solvation energy relation (SERAS) has been developed for correlating the properties and (vapour + liquid) equilibrium (VLE) of associated systems capable of hydrogen bonding or dipole-dipole interaction. The model clarifies the simultaneous impact of hydrogen bonding, solubility and thermodynamic factors of activity coefficients derived from the UNIFAC-original model. The consistency test has been processed against binary VLE data for six isobaric systems of hydrogen bonding (I to III) and dipole-dipole interaction (IV to VI) types, and two isothermal systems of both types (VII and VIII). Systems II, III, and VIII show negative non-ideal deviations. The reliability analysis has been conducted on the performance of the SERAS model with 5- and 10-parameters. The model matches relatively well with the observed performance, yielding mean error of 9.7% for all the systems and properties considered.

  9. Numerical solution of dynamic equilibrium models under Poisson uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf; Trimborn, Timo

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple and powerful numerical algorithm to compute the transition process in continuous-time dynamic equilibrium models with rare events. In this paper we transform the dynamic system of stochastic differential equations into a system of functional differential equations...... of the retarded type. We apply the Waveform Relaxation algorithm, i.e., we provide a guess of the policy function and solve the resulting system of (deterministic) ordinary differential equations by standard techniques. For parametric restrictions, analytical solutions to the stochastic growth model and a novel...... solution to Lucas' endogenous growth model under Poisson uncertainty are used to compute the exact numerical error. We show how (potential) catastrophic events such as rare natural disasters substantially affect the economic decisions of households....

  10. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in a Gaussian trap model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diezemann, Gregor

    2007-01-01

    The violations of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem are analysed for a trap model with a Gaussian density of states. In this model, the system reaches thermal equilibrium for long times after a quench to any finite temperature and therefore all ageing effect are of a transient nature. For not too long times after the quench it is found that the so-called fluctuation-dissipation ratio tends to a non-trivial limit, thus indicating the possibility for the definition of a timescale-dependent effective temperature. However, different definitions of the effective temperature yield distinct results. In particular, plots of the integrated response versus the correlation function strongly depend on the way they are constructed. Also the definition of effective temperatures in the frequency domain is not unique for the model considered. This may have some implications for the interpretation of results from computer simulations and experimental determinations of effective temperatures

  11. Homogeneous non-equilibrium two-phase critical flow model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeder, J.J.; Vuxuan, N.

    1987-01-01

    An important aspect of nuclear and chemical reactor safety is the ability to predict the maximum or critical mass flow rate from a break or leak in a pipe system. At the beginning of such a blowdown, if the stagnation condition of the fluid is subcooled or slightly saturated thermodynamic non-equilibrium exists in the downstream, e.g. the fluid becomes superheated to a degree determined by the liquid pressure. A simplified non-equilibrium model, explained in this report, is valid for rapidly decreasing pressure along the flow path. It presumes that fluid has to be superheated by an amount governed by physical principles before it starts to flash into steam. The flow is assumed to be homogeneous, i.e. the steam and liquid velocities are equal. An adiabatic flow calculation mode (Fanno lines) is employed to evaluate the critical flow rate for long pipes. The model is found to satisfactorily describe critical flow tests. Good agreement is obtained with the large scale Marviken tests as well as with small scale experiments. (orig.)

  12. Modified Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model for Biomass Gasification: A Study of the Influence of Operating Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; Bruno, Juan Carlos; Coronas, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for biomass gasification processes developed in the equation solver program Engineering Equation Solver (EES) with an implemented user-friendly interface. It is based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and includes some modifications to be adapted......, and oxygen enrichment] on producer gas. The model predicts the behavior of different kinds of biomass and becomes a useful tool to simulate the biomass gasification process by allowing its integration in complete energy supply systems, such as co-generation plants....

  13. A new equilibrium trading model with asymmetric information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianzhang Bao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking arbitrage opportunities into consideration in an incomplete market, dealers will pricebonds based on asymmetric information. The dealer with the best offering price wins the bid. The riskpremium in dealer’s offering price is primarily determined by the dealer’s add-on rate of change tothe term structure. To optimize the trading strategy, a new equilibrium trading model is introduced.Optimal sequential estimation scheme for detecting the risk premium due to private inforamtion isproposed based on historical prices, and the best bond pricing formula is given with the accordingoptimal trading strategy. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the economic insights underthe certain stochastic term structure interest rate models.

  14. Continuum model of non-equilibrium solvation and solvent effect on ultra-fast processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiangyuan; Fu Kexiang; Zhu Quan

    2006-01-01

    In the past 50 years, non-equilibrium solvation theory for ultra-fast processes such as electron transfer and light absorption/emission has attracted particular interest. A great deal of research efforts was made in this area and various models which give reasonable qualitative descriptions for such as solvent reorganization energy in electron transfer and spectral shift in solution, were developed within the framework of continuous medium theory. In a series of publications by the authors, we clarified that the expression of the non-equilibrium electrostatic free energy that is at the dominant position of non-equilibrium solvation and serves as the basis of various models, however, was incorrectly formulated. In this work, the authors argue that reversible charging work integration was inappropriately applied in the past to an irreversible path linking the equilibrium or the non-equilibrium state. Because the step from the equilibrium state to the nonequilibrium state is factually thermodynamically irreversible, the conventional expression for non-equilibrium free energy that was deduced in different ways is unreasonable. Here the authors derive the non-equilibrium free energy to a quite different form according to Jackson integral formula. Such a difference throws doubts to the models including the famous Marcus two-sphere model for solvent reorganization energy of electron transfer and the Lippert-Mataga equation for spectral shift. By introducing the concept of 'spring energy' arising from medium polarizations, the energy constitution of the non-equilibrium state is highlighted. For a solute-solvent system, the authors separate the total electrostatic energy into different components: the self-energies of solute charge and polarized charge, the interaction energy between them and the 'spring energy' of the solvent polarization. With detailed reasoning and derivation, our formula for non-equilibrium free energy can be reached through different ways. Based on the

  15. Partial equilibrium model – Case study of the poultry market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Šobrová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with identifying the main determinants in the poultry agri-food chain in the Czech Republic and examines their relationships. The partial equilibrium model, defined as a seven-equation model in power form, is employed for this purpose. The analysis is based on both time-series and panel data of the main factors in the poultry market. The time-series as well as panel data contain annual data of selected variables for the period from 1995 to 2009. The analysis is focused on supply and demand of poultry meat, specifically on production, consumption and foreign trade in poultry meat in the Czech Republic. Firstly, the main factors influencing the poultry market are determined, then, an appropriate model is employed. The parameters of the model are estimated using the ordinary least squares method in statistical and econometric software. Estimated parameters confirm assumed relationships among the selected variables. Moreover, the long-term tendencies of the selected indicators are proven. Among other, the analysis proves an inertial consumption, the price level as the main factor influencing the consumption and one-way or mutual relationship among the selected variables. The statistical features of the model are satisfied as well – the estimated parameters are statistically significant, the model does not contain, neither the problem of autocorrelation of residuals nor the problem of heteroskedasticity.

  16. Modeling and Computation of Thermodynamic Equilibrium for Mixtures of Inorganic and Organic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboussat, A.; Amundson, N. R.; He, J.; Martynenko, A. V.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2007-05-01

    A series of modules has been developed in the atmospheric modeling community to predict the phase transition, crystallization and evaporation of inorganic aerosols. Modules for the computation of the thermodynamics of pure organic-containing aerosols have been developed more recently; however, the modeling of aerosols containing mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds has gathered less attention. We present here a model (UHAERO), that is flexible, efficient and rigorously computes the thermodynamic equilibrium of atmospheric particles containing inorganic and organic compounds. It is applied first to mixtures of inorganic electrolytes and dicarboxylic acids, and then to thermodynamic equilibria including crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation. The model does not rely on any a priori specification of the phases present in certain atmospheric conditions. The multicomponent phase equilibrium for a closed organic aerosol system at constant temperature and pressure and for specified feeds is the solution to the equilibrium problem arising from the constrained minimization of the Gibbs free energy. For mixtures of inorganic electrolytes and dissociated organics, organic salts appear at equilibrium in the aqueous phase. In the general case, liquid-liquid phase separations happen and electrolytes dissociate in both aqueous and organic liquid phases. The Gibbs free energy is modeled by the UNIFAC model for the organic compounds, the PSC model for the inorganic constituents and a Pitzer model for interactions. The difficulty comes from the accurate estimation of interactions in the modeling of the activity coefficients. An accurate and efficient method for the computation of the minimum of energy is used to compute phase diagrams for mixtures of inorganic and organic species. Numerical results show the efficiency of the model for mixtures of inorganic electrolytes and organic acids, which make it suitable for insertion in global three-dimensional air quality

  17. Computable general equilibrium model fiscal year 2013 capability development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-17

    This report documents progress made on continued developments of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) Computable General Equilibrium Model (NCGEM), developed in fiscal year 2012. In fiscal year 2013, NISAC the treatment of the labor market and tests performed with the model to examine the properties of the solutions computed by the model. To examine these, developers conducted a series of 20 simulations for 20 U.S. States. Each of these simulations compared an economic baseline simulation with an alternative simulation that assumed a 20-percent reduction in overall factor productivity in the manufacturing industries of each State. Differences in the simulation results between the baseline and alternative simulations capture the economic impact of the reduction in factor productivity. While not every State is affected in precisely the same way, the reduction in manufacturing industry productivity negatively affects the manufacturing industries in each State to an extent proportional to the reduction in overall factor productivity. Moreover, overall economic activity decreases when manufacturing sector productivity is reduced. Developers ran two additional simulations: (1) a version of the model for the State of Michigan, with manufacturing divided into two sub-industries (automobile and other vehicle manufacturing as one sub-industry and the rest of manufacturing as the other subindustry); and (2) a version of the model for the United States, divided into 30 industries. NISAC conducted these simulations to illustrate the flexibility of industry definitions in NCGEM and to examine the simulation properties of in more detail.

  18. First-principles models of equilibrium tellurium isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghnegahdar, M. A.; Schauble, E. A.; Fornadel, A. P.; Spry, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionation among representative Te-bearing species is estimated with first-principles thermodynamic calculations. Tellurium is a group 16 element (along with O, S, and Se) with eight stable isotopes ranging in mass from 120Te to 130Te, and six commonly-occurring oxidation states: -II, -I, 0, +II, +IV, and +VI. In its reduced form, Te(-II), tellurium has a unique crystal-chemical role as a bond partner for gold and silver in epithermal and orogenic gold deposits, which likely form when oxidized Te species (e.g., H2TeO3, TeO32-) or perhaps polytellurides (e.g., Te22-) interact with precious metals in hydrothermal solution. Te(IV) is the most common oxidation state at the Earth's surface, including surface outcrops of telluride ore deposits, where tellurite and tellurate minerals form by oxidation. In the ocean, dissolved tellurium tends to be scavenged by particulate matter. Te(VI) is more abundant than Te(IV) in the ocean water (1), even though it is thought to be less stable thermodynamically. This variety of valence states in natural systems and range of isotopic masses suggest that tellurium could exhibit geochemically useful isotope abundance variations. Tellurium isotope fractionations were determined for representative molecules and crystals of varying complexity and chemistry. Gas-phase calculations are combined with supermolecular cluster models of aqueous and solid species. These in turn are compared with plane-wave density functional theory calculations with periodic boundary conditions. In general, heavyTe/lightTe is predicted to be higher for more oxidized species, and lower for reduced species, with 130Te/125Te fractionations as large as 4‰ at 100οC between coexisting Te(IV) and Te(-II) or Te(0) compounds. This is a much larger fractionation than has been observed in naturally occurring redox pairs (i.e., Te (0) vs. Te(IV) species) so far, suggesting that disequilibrium processes may control

  19. Modeling equilibrium adsorption of organic micropollutants onto activated carbon

    KAUST Repository

    De Ridder, David J.

    2010-05-01

    Solute hydrophobicity, polarizability, aromaticity and the presence of H-bond donor/acceptor groups have been identified as important solute properties that affect the adsorption on activated carbon. However, the adsorption mechanisms related to these properties occur in parallel, and their respective dominance depends on the solute properties as well as carbon characteristics. In this paper, a model based on multivariate linear regression is described that was developed to predict equilibrium carbon loading on a specific activated carbon (F400) for solutes reflecting a wide range of solute properties. In order to improve prediction accuracy, groups (bins) of solutes with similar solute properties were defined and solute removals were predicted for each bin separately. With these individual linear models, coefficients of determination (R2) values ranging from 0.61 to 0.84 were obtained. With the mechanistic approach used in developing this predictive model, a strong relation with adsorption mechanisms is established, improving the interpretation and, ultimately, acceptance of the model. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. The meat market in Brazil: a partial equilibrium model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo da Silva e Souza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A partial equilibrium model for the meat market is fit to Brazilian data by three stages least squares. The model is consistent with the data and may be used for simulation purposes. In this context we compare model simulations for the near future with the OECD/ Aglink outlook. To illustrate using the model for simulations in policy assessments, we investigate the effect of a relative increase in corn price on the poultry and pork markets, coeteris paribus.Um modelo de equilíbrio parcial para o mercado brasileiro de carnes é ajustado por meio de mínimos quadrados em três estágios. O modelo mostra-se consistente com as observações e pode ser usado para simulações. Neste contexto, comparam-se simulações para o futuro próximo com as projeções da OECD/Aglink. Para ilustrar o emprego do modelo em simulações de políticas investiga-se o efeito de um aumento relativo no preço do milho nos mercados de carne suína e de frango, coeteris paribus.

  1. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999

  2. Social security as Markov equilibrium in OLG models: A note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin

    2011-01-01

    I refine and extend the Markov perfect equilibrium of the social security policy game in Forni (2005) for the special case of logarithmic utility. Under the restriction that the policy function be continuous, instead of differentiable, the equilibrium is globally well defined and its dynamics alw...

  3. Social security as Markov equilibrium in OLG models: A note

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez Eiras, Martin

    2011-01-01

    I refine and extend the Markov perfect equilibrium of the social security policy game in Forni (2005) for the special case of logarithmic utility. Under the restriction that the policy function be continuous, instead of differentiable, the equilibrium is globally well defined and its dynamics...

  4. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic modelling of the sorption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-04

    Jul 4, 2013 ... this adsorbent has potential to be applied in the remediation of. AMD. Equilibrium is reached at pH 4, and the trend of increas- ing adsorption for all of the metals levels off beyond that, where equilibrium dominates. Metals such as uranium, manganese, nickel, zinc and magnesium were removed efficiently.

  5. A Synthesis of Equilibrium and Historical Models of Landform Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, William H.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of two approaches that can be used in teaching geomorphology is described. The equilibrium approach explains landforms and landform change in terms of equilibrium between landforms and controlling processes. The historical approach draws on climatic geomorphology to describe the effects of Quaternary climatic and tectonic events on…

  6. Globalisation and Inequality : A Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Unequal Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Veneziani, Roberto; Yoshihara, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic general equilibrium model that generalises Roemer's [23] economy with a global capital market is analysed. An axiomatic analysis of the concept of unequal exchange (UE) between countries is developed at general dynamic equilibria. The class of UE definitions that satisfy three fundamental properties - including a correspondence between wealth, class and UE exploitation status - is completely characterised. It is shown that this class is nonempty and a definition of UE exploitation b...

  7. First principles modeling of hydrocarbons conversion in non-equilibrium plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deminsky, M.A.; Strelkova, M.I.; Durov, S.G.; Jivotov, V.K.; Rusanov, V.D.; Potapkin, B.V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    Theoretical justification of catalytic activity of non-equilibrium plasma in hydrocarbons conversion process is presented in this paper. The detailed model of highest hydrocarbons conversion includes the gas-phase reactions, chemistry of the growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), precursor of soot particles formation, neutral, charged clusters and soot particle formation, ion-molecular gas-phase and heterogeneous chemistry. The results of theoretical analysis are compared with experimental results. (authors)

  8. SEEPAGE MODEL FOR PA INCLUDING DRIFT COLLAPSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. Tsang

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the predictions and analyses performed using the seepage model for performance assessment (SMPA) for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal (Tptpmn) and lower lithophysal (Tptpll) lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Look-up tables of seepage flow rates into a drift (and their uncertainty) are generated by performing numerical simulations with the seepage model for many combinations of the three most important seepage-relevant parameters: the fracture permeability, the capillary-strength parameter 1/a, and the percolation flux. The percolation flux values chosen take into account flow focusing effects, which are evaluated based on a flow-focusing model. Moreover, multiple realizations of the underlying stochastic permeability field are conducted. Selected sensitivity studies are performed, including the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift from an independent drift-degradation analysis (BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]). The intended purpose of the seepage model is to provide results of drift-scale seepage rates under a series of parameters and scenarios in support of the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA). The SMPA is intended for the evaluation of drift-scale seepage rates under the full range of parameter values for three parameters found to be key (fracture permeability, the van Genuchten 1/a parameter, and percolation flux) and drift degradation shape scenarios in support of the TSPA-LA during the period of compliance for postclosure performance [Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone (BSC 2002 [DIRS 160819], Section I-4-2-1)]. The flow-focusing model in the Topopah Spring welded (TSw) unit is intended to provide an estimate of flow focusing factors (FFFs) that (1) bridge the gap between the mountain-scale and drift-scale models, and (2) account for variability in local percolation flux due to

  9. Equilibrium Wall Model Implementation in a Nodal Finite Element Flow Solver JENRE for Large Eddy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-13

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6040--17-9760 Equilibrium Wall-Model Implementation in a Nodal Finite Element Flow...DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Equilibrium Wall-Model Implementation in a Nodal Finite Element Flow Solver...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The equilibrium wall model is implemented in a nodal

  10. From equilibrium spin models to probabilistic cellular automata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, A.; Le Doussal, P.

    1989-01-01

    The general equivalence between D-dimensional probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) and (D + 1)-dimensional equilibrium spin models satisfying a disorder condition is first described in a pedagogical way and then used to analyze the phase diagrams, the critical behavior, and the universality classes of some automato. Diagrammatic representations of time-dependent correlation functions PCA are introduced. Two important classes of PCA are singled out for which these correlation functions simplify: (1) Quasi-Hamiltonian automata, which have a current-carrying steady state, and for which some correlation functions are those of a D-dimensional static model PCA satisfying the detailed balance condition appear as a particular case of these rules for which the current vanishes. (2) Linear (and more generally affine) PCA for which the diagrammatics reduces to a random walk problem closely related to (D + 1)-dimensional directed SAWs: both problems display a critical behavior with mean-field exponents in any dimension. The correlation length and effective velocity of propagation of excitations can be calculated for affine PCA, as is shown on an explicit D = 1 example. The authors conclude with some remarks on nonlinear PCA, for which the diagrammatics is related to reaction-diffusion processes, and which belong in some cases to the universality class of Reggeon field theory

  11. Modelling and simulation of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solidification in laser spot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pradeep; Patel, Virendra; Yadav, Anshul; Patel, Sushil; Kumar, Arvind

    2018-02-01

    In this work, rapid solidification in laser welding is studied by solving transient, coupled, governing equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation using a fixed-grid, finite volume methodology. The solidification process in laser welding occurs with high cooling rates involving rapid solidification kinetics. The non-equilibrium phase change is accounted at the solid-liquid interface of the weld pool and it is assumed that heterogeneous nucleation occurs instantaneously when the temperature in the melt pool reaches the nucleation temperature. Simulation results of laser welding with undercooling and without undercooling are compared. It is found that the melt pool width is larger in the case of undercooling case, however, the maximum temperature in the weld pool is higher in the case of without undercooling case.

  12. Grand unified models including extra Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiezhong

    1989-01-01

    The grand unified theories (GUT) of the simple Lie groups including extra Z bosons are discussed. Under authors's hypothesis there are only SU 5+m SO 6+4n and E 6 groups. The general discussion of SU 5+m is given, then the SU 6 and SU 7 are considered. In SU 6 the 15+6 * +6 * fermion representations are used, which are not same as others in fermion content, Yukawa coupling and broken scales. A conception of clans of particles, which are not families, is suggested. These clans consist of extra Z bosons and the corresponding fermions of the scale. The all of fermions in the clans are down quarks except for the standard model which consists of Z bosons and 15 fermions, therefore, the spectrum of the hadrons which are composed of these down quarks are different from hadrons at present

  13. Gravel beaches nourishment: Modelling the equilibrium beach profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, I; Aragonés, L; Villacampa, Y; Navarro-González, F J

    2018-04-01

    The erosion of the world's coasts and the shortage of sand to mitigate beach erosion are leading to the increasingly common use of gravel for coastal protection and beach nourishment. Therefore, in order to determine the amount of gravel required for such actions, it is important to know perfectly the equilibrium profile of gravel beaches. However, at present, this profile is obtained from formulas obtained mainly after channel tests, and therefore most of them do not adapt to the real profiles formed by gravel beaches in nature. In this article, 31 variables related to sedimentology, waves, morphology and marine vegetation present on the beaches are studied to determine which are the most influential in the profile. From the study carried out, it is obtained that these variables are the steepness and probability of occurrence of the wave perpendicular to the coast, the profile starting slope (between MWL and -2m), the energy reduction coefficient due to Posidonia oceanica as well as the width of the meadow. Using these variables, different numerical models were generated to predict accurately the gravel beach profile, which will lead to a saving in the volume of material used in the order of 1300m 3 /ml of beach with respect to current formulations, and a greater certainty that the beach nourishment carried out will have the desired effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of artificial neural network for vapor liquid equilibrium calculation of ternary system including ionic liquid: Water, ethanol and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazlali, Alireza; Koranian, Parvaneh [Arak University, Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beigzadeh, Reza [Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Masoud [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    A feed forward three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for VLE prediction of ternary systems including ionic liquid (IL) (water+ethanol+1-butyl-3- methyl-imidazolium acetate), in a relatively wide range of IL mass fractions up to 0.8, with the mole fractions of ethanol on IL-free basis fixed separately at 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 0.98. The output results of the ANN were the mole fraction of ethanol in vapor phase and the equilibrium temperature. The validity of the model was evaluated through a test data set, which were not employed in the training case of the network. The performance of the ANN model for estimating the mole fraction and temperature in the ternary system including IL was compared with the non-random-two-liquid (NRTL) and electrolyte non-random-two- liquid (eNRTL) models. The results of this comparison show that the ANN model has a superior performance in predicting the VLE of ternary systems including ionic liquid.

  15. Application of artificial neural network for vapor liquid equilibrium calculation of ternary system including ionic liquid: Water, ethanol and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazlali, Alireza; Koranian, Parvaneh; Beigzadeh, Reza; Rahimi, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    A feed forward three-layer artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for VLE prediction of ternary systems including ionic liquid (IL) (water+ethanol+1-butyl-3- methyl-imidazolium acetate), in a relatively wide range of IL mass fractions up to 0.8, with the mole fractions of ethanol on IL-free basis fixed separately at 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 0.98. The output results of the ANN were the mole fraction of ethanol in vapor phase and the equilibrium temperature. The validity of the model was evaluated through a test data set, which were not employed in the training case of the network. The performance of the ANN model for estimating the mole fraction and temperature in the ternary system including IL was compared with the non-random-two-liquid (NRTL) and electrolyte non-random-two- liquid (eNRTL) models. The results of this comparison show that the ANN model has a superior performance in predicting the VLE of ternary systems including ionic liquid

  16. Modeling Mathematical Programs with Equilibrium Constraints in Pyomo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, William E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Siirola, John Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-01

    We describe new capabilities for modeling MPEC problems within the Pyomo modeling software. These capabilities include new modeling components that represent complementar- ity conditions, modeling transformations for re-expressing models with complementarity con- ditions in other forms, and meta-solvers that apply transformations and numeric optimization solvers to optimize MPEC problems. We illustrate the breadth of Pyomo's modeling capabil- ities for MPEC problems, and we describe how Pyomo's meta-solvers can perform local and global optimization of MPEC problems.

  17. A Comparison of Simulated JWST Observations Derived from Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium Chemistry Models of Giant Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Sarah D.; Mandell, Avi M.; Hébrard, Eric; Batalha, Natasha E.; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Rugheimer, Sarah; Wakeford, Hannah R.

    2018-02-01

    We aim to see if the difference between equilibrium and disequilibrium chemistry is observable in the atmospheres of transiting planets by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). We perform a case study comparing the dayside emission spectra of three planets like HD 189733b, WASP-80b, and GJ 436b, in and out of chemical equilibrium at two metallicities each. These three planets were chosen because they span a large range of planetary masses and equilibrium temperatures, from hot and Jupiter-sized to warm and Neptune-sized. We link the one-dimensional disequilibrium chemistry model from Venot et al. (2012), in which thermochemical kinetics, vertical transport, and photochemistry are taken into account, to the one-dimensional, pseudo line-by-line radiative transfer model, Pyrat bay, developed especially for hot Jupiters, and then simulate JWST spectra using PandExo for comparing the effects of temperature, metallicity, and radius. We find the most significant differences from 4 to 5 μm due to disequilibrium from CO and CO2 abundances, and also H2O for select cases. Our case study shows a certain “sweet spot” of planetary mass, temperature, and metallicity where the difference between equilibrium and disequilibrium is observable. For a planet similar to WASP-80b, JWST’s NIRSpec G395M can detect differences due to disequilibrium chemistry with one eclipse event. For a planet similar to GJ 436b, the observability of differences due to disequilibrium chemistry is possible at low metallicity given five eclipse events, but not possible at the higher metallicity.

  18. A continuous stochastic model for non-equilibrium dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, M.; Gorji, M. H.

    2017-12-01

    While accurate simulations of dense gas flows far from the equilibrium can be achieved by direct simulation adapted to the Enskog equation, the significant computational demand required for collisions appears as a major constraint. In order to cope with that, an efficient yet accurate solution algorithm based on the Fokker-Planck approximation of the Enskog equation is devised in this paper; the approximation is very much associated with the Fokker-Planck model derived from the Boltzmann equation by Jenny et al. ["A solution algorithm for the fluid dynamic equations based on a stochastic model for molecular motion," J. Comput. Phys. 229, 1077-1098 (2010)] and Gorji et al. ["Fokker-Planck model for computational studies of monatomic rarefied gas flows," J. Fluid Mech. 680, 574-601 (2011)]. The idea behind these Fokker-Planck descriptions is to project the dynamics of discrete collisions implied by the molecular encounters into a set of continuous Markovian processes subject to the drift and diffusion. Thereby, the evolution of particles representing the governing stochastic process becomes independent from each other and thus very efficient numerical schemes can be constructed. By close inspection of the Enskog operator, it is observed that the dense gas effects contribute further to the advection of molecular quantities. That motivates a modelling approach where the dense gas corrections can be cast in the extra advection of particles. Therefore, the corresponding Fokker-Planck approximation is derived such that the evolution in the physical space accounts for the dense effects present in the pressure, stress tensor, and heat fluxes. Hence the consistency between the devised Fokker-Planck approximation and the Enskog operator is shown for the velocity moments up to the heat fluxes. For validation studies, a homogeneous gas inside a box besides Fourier, Couette, and lid-driven cavity flow setups is considered. The results based on the Fokker-Planck model are

  19. A metastable equilibrium model for the relative abundances of microbial phyla in a hot spring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Dick

    Full Text Available Many studies link the compositions of microbial communities to their environments, but the energetics of organism-specific biomass synthesis as a function of geochemical variables have rarely been assessed. We describe a thermodynamic model that integrates geochemical and metagenomic data for biofilms sampled at five sites along a thermal and chemical gradient in the outflow channel of the hot spring known as "Bison Pool" in Yellowstone National Park. The relative abundances of major phyla in individual communities sampled along the outflow channel are modeled by computing metastable equilibrium among model proteins with amino acid compositions derived from metagenomic sequences. Geochemical conditions are represented by temperature and activities of basis species, including pH and oxidation-reduction potential quantified as the activity of dissolved hydrogen. By adjusting the activity of hydrogen, the model can be tuned to closely approximate the relative abundances of the phyla observed in the community profiles generated from BLAST assignments. The findings reveal an inverse relationship between the energy demand to form the proteins at equal thermodynamic activities and the abundance of phyla in the community. The distance from metastable equilibrium of the communities, assessed using an equation derived from energetic considerations that is also consistent with the information-theoretic entropy change, decreases along the outflow channel. Specific divergences from metastable equilibrium, such as an underprediction of the relative abundances of phototrophic organisms at lower temperatures, can be explained by considering additional sources of energy and/or differences in growth efficiency. Although the metabolisms used by many members of these communities are driven by chemical disequilibria, the results support the possibility that higher-level patterns of chemotrophic microbial ecosystems are shaped by metastable equilibrium states that

  20. A Metastable Equilibrium Model for the Relative Abundances of Microbial Phyla in a Hot Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Jeffrey M.; Shock, Everett L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies link the compositions of microbial communities to their environments, but the energetics of organism-specific biomass synthesis as a function of geochemical variables have rarely been assessed. We describe a thermodynamic model that integrates geochemical and metagenomic data for biofilms sampled at five sites along a thermal and chemical gradient in the outflow channel of the hot spring known as “Bison Pool” in Yellowstone National Park. The relative abundances of major phyla in individual communities sampled along the outflow channel are modeled by computing metastable equilibrium among model proteins with amino acid compositions derived from metagenomic sequences. Geochemical conditions are represented by temperature and activities of basis species, including pH and oxidation-reduction potential quantified as the activity of dissolved hydrogen. By adjusting the activity of hydrogen, the model can be tuned to closely approximate the relative abundances of the phyla observed in the community profiles generated from BLAST assignments. The findings reveal an inverse relationship between the energy demand to form the proteins at equal thermodynamic activities and the abundance of phyla in the community. The distance from metastable equilibrium of the communities, assessed using an equation derived from energetic considerations that is also consistent with the information-theoretic entropy change, decreases along the outflow channel. Specific divergences from metastable equilibrium, such as an underprediction of the relative abundances of phototrophic organisms at lower temperatures, can be explained by considering additional sources of energy and/or differences in growth efficiency. Although the metabolisms used by many members of these communities are driven by chemical disequilibria, the results support the possibility that higher-level patterns of chemotrophic microbial ecosystems are shaped by metastable equilibrium states that depend on both the

  1. Research on spot power market equilibrium model considering the electric power network characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chengmin; Jiang, Chuanwen; Chen, Qiming

    2007-01-01

    Equilibrium is the optimum operational condition for the power market by economics rule. A realistic spot power market cannot achieve the equilibrium condition due to network losses and congestions. The impact of the network losses and congestion on spot power market is analyzed in this paper in order to establish a new equilibrium model considering the network loss and transmission constraints. The OPF problem formulated according to the new equilibrium model is solved by means of the equal price principle. A case study on the IEEE-30-bus system is provided in order to prove the effectiveness of the proposed approach. (author)

  2. A Comparison of the Computation Times of Thermal Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium Models of Droplet Field in a Two-Fluid Three-Field Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ik Kyu; Cho, Heong Kyu; Kim, Jong Tae; Yoon, Han Young; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2007-12-15

    A computational model for transient, 3 dimensional 2 phase flows was developed by using 'unstructured-FVM-based, non-staggered, semi-implicit numerical scheme' considering the thermally non-equilibrium droplets. The assumption of the thermally equilibrium between liquid and droplets of previous studies was not used any more, and three energy conservation equations for vapor, liquid, liquid droplets were set up. Thus, 9 conservation equations for mass, momentum, and energy were established to simulate 2 phase flows. In this report, the governing equations and a semi-implicit numerical sheme for a transient 1 dimensional 2 phase flows was described considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets. The comparison with the previous model considering the thermally non-equilibrium between liquid and liquid droplets was also reported.

  3. Dynamic Processes of Conceptual Change: Analysis of Constructing Mental Models of Chemical Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mei-Hung; Chou, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2002-01-01

    Investigates students' mental models of chemical equilibrium using dynamic science assessments. Reports that students at various levels have misconceptions about chemical equilibrium. Involves 10th grade students (n=30) in the study doing a series of hands-on chemical experiments. Focuses on the process of constructing mental models, dynamic…

  4. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  5. Electron-Impact Excitation Cross Sections for Modeling Non-Equilibrium Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Munafo, Alessandro; Wray, Alan; Carbon, Duane F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide a database for modeling hypersonic entry in a partially ionized gas under non-equilibrium, the electron-impact excitation cross sections of atoms have been calculated using perturbation theory. The energy levels covered in the calculation are retrieved from the level list in the HyperRad code. The downstream flow-field is determined by solving a set of continuity equations for each component. The individual structure of each energy level is included. These equations are then complemented by the Euler system of equations. Finally, the radiation field is modeled by solving the radiative transfer equation.

  6. Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ethayaraja; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K

    2011-05-18

    The equilibrium size of two largely different kinds of hollow objects behave qualitatively differently with respect to certain experimental conditions. Yet, we show that they can be described within the same theoretical framework. The objects we consider are 'minivesicles' of ionic and nonionic surfactant mixtures, and shells of Keplerate-type polyoxometalates. The finite-size of the objects in both systems is manifested by electrostatic interactions. We emphasize the importance of constant charge and constant potential boundary conditions. Taking these conditions into account, indeed, leads to the experimentally observed qualitatively different behavior of the equilibrium size of the objects.

  7. Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, Ethayaraja; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K, E-mail: w.k.kegel@uu.nl [Van' t Hoff Laboratory for Physical and Colloid Chemistry, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-05-18

    The equilibrium size of two largely different kinds of hollow objects behave qualitatively differently with respect to certain experimental conditions. Yet, we show that they can be described within the same theoretical framework. The objects we consider are 'minivesicles' of ionic and nonionic surfactant mixtures, and shells of Keplerate-type polyoxometalates. The finite-size of the objects in both systems is manifested by electrostatic interactions. We emphasize the importance of constant charge and constant potential boundary conditions. Taking these conditions into account, indeed, leads to the experimentally observed qualitatively different behavior of the equilibrium size of the objects.

  8. Analytical Model of Inlet Growth and Equilibrium Cross-Sectional Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-107 April 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Analytical Model of Inlet Growth and Equilibrium Cross...encompass a broader range of theoretical alternatives to investigate inlet stability. The quadratic formula provides quantitative estimates of equilibrium ...rework sediment. Escoffier (1940) theorized that stable inlets form when the maximum flow equals an equilibrium value based on sediment transport

  9. A Tightly Coupled Non-Equilibrium Magneto-Hydrodynamic Model for Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 12 May 2015 – 06 Oct 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Tightly Coupled Non- Equilibrium Magneto-Hydrodynamic...development a tightly coupled magneto-hydrodynamic model for Inductively Coupled Radio- Frequency (RF) Plasmas. Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE...effects are described based on a hybrid State-to-State (StS) approach. A multi-temperature formulation is used to account for thermal non- equilibrium

  10. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  11. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium concepts in forest genetic modelling: population- and individually-based approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, K.; Werf, van der D.C.

    2010-01-01

    The environment is changing and so are forests, in their functioning, in species composition, and in the species’ genetic composition. Many empirical and process-based models exist to support forest management. However, most of these models do not consider the impact of environmental changes and

  12. Seepage Model for PA Including Drift Collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, G.; Tsang, C.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M andO 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in niches and in the cross drift to

  13. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in

  14. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a

  15. An estimated equilibrium model of business formation and labor demand of entrepeneurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Praag, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper develops a theoretical model which explains businessformation and labor demand of entrepreneurs by thegiven distribution of risk attitude and entrepreneurial ability amongthe workforce. This results in an equilibrium modelwhich is converted into a structural econometric model of

  16. The Extended Generalized Cost Concept and its Application in Freight Transport and General Equilibrium Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.; Davydenko, I.; Ruijgrok, K.

    2009-01-01

    The integration of Spatial Equilibrium models and Freight transport network models is important to produce consistent scenarios for future freight transport demand. At various spatial scales, we see the changes in production, trade, logistics networking and transportation, being driven by

  17. Quasi-Three-Dimensional Mathematical Modeling of Morphological Processes Based on Equilibrium Sediment Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charafi, My. M.; Sadok, A.; Kamal, A.; Menai, A.

    A quasi-three-dimensional mathematical model has been developed to study the morphological processes based on equilibrium sediment transport method. The flow velocities are computed by a two-dimensional horizontal depth-averaged flow model (H2D) in combination with logarithmic velocity profiles. The transport of sediment particles by a flow water has been considered in the form of bed load and suspended load. The bed load transport rate is defined as the transport of particles by rolling and saltating along the bed surface and is given by the Van Rijn relationship (1987). The equilibrium suspended load transport is described in terms of an equilibrium sediment concentration profile (ce) and a logarithmic velocity (u). Based on the equilibrium transport, the bed change rate is given by integration of the sediment mass-balance equation. The model results have been compared with a Van Rijn results (equilibrium approach) and good agreement has been found.

  18. Fiscal and Monetary Policy in a General Equilibrium Model,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-27

    Costs in Financial Assets It would be desirable from the point of view of realism to include transactions costs in security trades. Doing so would...November), pp. 545-566. Diamond, Peter (1965), "National Debt in a Neoclassical Growth Model," American Economic Review, 55 (December), pp. 1126-1150

  19. Analytical modeling of equilibrium of strongly anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepikhin, N. D.; Pustovitov, V. D., E-mail: pustovit@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    Theoretical analysis of equilibrium of anisotropic plasma in tokamaks and stellarators is presented. The anisotropy is assumed strong, which includes the cases with essentially nonuniform distributions of plasma pressure on magnetic surfaces. Such distributions can arise at neutral beam injection or at ion cyclotron resonance heating. Then the known generalizations of the standard theory of plasma equilibrium that treat p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} (parallel and perpendicular plasma pressures) as almost constant on magnetic surfaces are not applicable anymore. Explicit analytical prescriptions of the profiles of p{sub ‖} and p{sub ⊥} are proposed that allow modeling of the anisotropic plasma equilibrium even with large ratios of p{sub ‖}/p{sub ⊥} or p{sub ⊥}/p{sub ‖}. A method for deriving the equation for the Shafranov shift is proposed that does not require introduction of the flux coordinates and calculation of the metric tensor. It is shown that for p{sub ⊥} with nonuniformity described by a single poloidal harmonic, the equation for the Shafranov shift coincides with a known one derived earlier for almost constant p{sub ⊥} on a magnetic surface. This does not happen in the other more complex case.

  20. Incorporation of the equilibrium temperature approach in a Soil and Water Assessment Tool hydroclimatological stream temperature model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xinzhong; Shrestha, Narayan Kumar; Ficklin, Darren L.; Wang, Junye

    2018-04-01

    Stream temperature is an important indicator for biodiversity and sustainability in aquatic ecosystems. The stream temperature model currently in the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) only considers the impact of air temperature on stream temperature, while the hydroclimatological stream temperature model developed within the SWAT model considers hydrology and the impact of air temperature in simulating the water-air heat transfer process. In this study, we modified the hydroclimatological model by including the equilibrium temperature approach to model heat transfer processes at the water-air interface, which reflects the influences of air temperature, solar radiation, wind speed and streamflow conditions on the heat transfer process. The thermal capacity of the streamflow is modeled by the variation of the stream water depth. An advantage of this equilibrium temperature model is the simple parameterization, with only two parameters added to model the heat transfer processes. The equilibrium temperature model proposed in this study is applied and tested in the Athabasca River basin (ARB) in Alberta, Canada. The model is calibrated and validated at five stations throughout different parts of the ARB, where close to monthly samplings of stream temperatures are available. The results indicate that the equilibrium temperature model proposed in this study provided better and more consistent performances for the different regions of the ARB with the values of the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency coefficient (NSE) greater than those of the original SWAT model and the hydroclimatological model. To test the model performance for different hydrological and environmental conditions, the equilibrium temperature model was also applied to the North Fork Tolt River Watershed in Washington, United States. The results indicate a reasonable simulation of stream temperature using the model proposed in this study, with minimum relative error values compared to the other two models

  1. General multi-group macroscopic modeling for thermo-chemical non-equilibrium gas mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Sahai, Amal; Vinokur, Marcel

    2015-04-07

    This paper opens a new door to macroscopic modeling for thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. In a game-changing approach, we discard conventional theories and practices stemming from the separation of internal energy modes and the Landau-Teller relaxation equation. Instead, we solve the fundamental microscopic equations in their moment forms but seek only optimum representations for the microscopic state distribution function that provides converged and time accurate solutions for certain macroscopic quantities at all times. The modeling makes no ad hoc assumptions or simplifications at the microscopic level and includes all possible collisional and radiative processes; it therefore retains all non-equilibrium fluid physics. We formulate the thermal and chemical non-equilibrium macroscopic equations and rate coefficients in a coupled and unified fashion for gases undergoing completely general transitions. All collisional partners can have internal structures and can change their internal energy states after transitions. The model is based on the reconstruction of the state distribution function. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe non-equilibrium state distributions. The logarithm of the distribution function in each group is expressed as a power series in internal energy based on the maximum entropy principle. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients succinctly to any order. The model's accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used and can be self-checked for accuracy and convergence. We show that the macroscopic internal energy transfer, similar to mass and momentum transfers, occurs through nonlinear collisional processes and is not a simple relaxation process described by, e.g., the Landau-Teller equation. Unlike the classical vibrational energy

  2. Monte Carlo modeling of Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor in adiabatic equilibrium state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanisz, Przemysław, E-mail: pstanisz@agh.edu.pl; Oettingen, Mikołaj, E-mail: moettin@agh.edu.pl; Cetnar, Jerzy, E-mail: cetnar@mail.ftj.agh.edu.pl

    2016-05-15

    includes burnup calculations in a two-batch fuel reloading pattern, assessment of the equilibrium fuel composition based on MOX with minor actinides, examination of power peaking with its evolution with burnup, and modeling of control rod operation for its influence on breeding gain and criticality.

  3. Modeling the economic costs of disasters and recovery: analysis using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W.; Li, N.; Wu, J.-D.; Hao, X.-L.

    2014-04-01

    Disaster damages have negative effects on the economy, whereas reconstruction investment has positive effects. The aim of this study is to model economic causes of disasters and recovery involving the positive effects of reconstruction activities. Computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is a promising approach because it can incorporate these two kinds of shocks into a unified framework and furthermore avoid the double-counting problem. In order to factor both shocks into the CGE model, direct loss is set as the amount of capital stock reduced on the supply side of the economy; a portion of investments restores the capital stock in an existing period; an investment-driven dynamic model is formulated according to available reconstruction data, and the rest of a given country's saving is set as an endogenous variable to balance the fixed investment. The 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake is selected as a case study to illustrate the model, and three scenarios are constructed: S0 (no disaster occurs), S1 (disaster occurs with reconstruction investment) and S2 (disaster occurs without reconstruction investment). S0 is taken as business as usual, and the differences between S1 and S0 and that between S2 and S0 can be interpreted as economic losses including reconstruction and excluding reconstruction, respectively. The study showed that output from S1 is found to be closer to real data than that from S2. Economic loss under S2 is roughly 1.5 times that under S1. The gap in the economic aggregate between S1 and S0 is reduced to 3% at the end of government-led reconstruction activity, a level that should take another four years to achieve under S2.

  4. Equilibrium in a random viewer model of television broadcasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bodil Olai; Keiding, Hans

    2014-01-01

    that they spend on programming, so that their advertising capacity depends on their own program outlays as well as on those of their competitors. A larger number of broadcasters will reduce overall capacity even when total program outlays are kept fixed, because the attention of viewers is split among a larger...... number of channels. The authors derive properties of equilibrium in an oligopolistic market with private broadcasters and show that the number of firms has a negative effect on overall advertising and viewer satisfaction. If there is a public channel that also sells advertisements but does not maximize...

  5. Modelling of Equilibrium Between Mantle and Core: Refractory, Volatile, and Highly Siderophile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Shofner, G.; Lee, C. -T.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophile elements have been used to constrain conditions of core formation and differentiation for the Earth, Mars and other differentiated bodies [1]. Recent models for the Earth have concluded that the mantle and core did not fully equilibrate and the siderophile element contents of the mantle can only be explained under conditions where the oxygen fugacity changes from low to high during accretion and the mantle and core do not fully equilibrate [2,3]. However these conclusions go against several physical and chemical constraints. First, calculations suggest that even with the composition of accreting material changing from reduced to oxidized over time, the fO2 defined by metal-silicate equilibrium does not change substantially, only by approximately 1 logfO2 unit [4]. An increase of more than 2 logfO2 units in mantle oxidation are required in models of [2,3]. Secondly, calculations also show that metallic impacting material will become deformed and sheared during accretion to a large body, such that it becomes emulsified to a fine scale that allows equilibrium at nearly all conditions except for possibly the length scale for giant impacts [5] (contrary to conclusions of [6]). Using new data for D(Mo) metal/silicate at high pressures, together with updated partitioning expressions for many other elements, we will show that metal-silicate equilibrium across a long span of Earth s accretion history may explain the concentrations of many siderophile elements in Earth's mantle. The modeling includes refractory elements Ni, Co, Mo, and W, as well as highly siderophile elements Au, Pd and Pt, and volatile elements Cd, In, Bi, Sb, Ge and As.

  6. The cosmic dust analyzer: Experimental evaluation of an impact ionization model. [considering thermal equilibrium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friichtenicht, J. F.; Roy, N. L.; Becker, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    A thermal equilibrium plasma model is used to process data from an impact ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer in order to convert the raw ion data to relative abundances of the elemental constituents of cosmic dust particles.

  7. Experimental testing of olivine-melt equilibrium models at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikov, S. P.; Sobolev, A. V.; Batanova, V. G.; Kargaltsev, A. A.; Borisov, A. A.

    2017-08-01

    Data are presented on the equilibrium compositions of olivine and melts in the products of 101 experiments performed at 1300-1600°C, atmospheric pressure, and controlled oxygen fugacity by means of new equipment at the Vernadsky Institute. It was shown that the available models of the olivine-melt equilibrium describe with insufficient adequacy the natural systems at temperatures over 1400°C. The most adequate is the model by Ford et al. (1983). However, this model overestimates systematically the equilibrium temperature with underestimating by 20-40°C at 1450-1600°C. These data point to the need for developing a new, improved quantitative model of the olivine-melt equilibrium for high-temperature magnesian melts, as well as to the possibility of these studies on the basis of the equipment presented.

  8. Equilibrium and transient conductivity for gadolium-doped ceria under large perturbations: II. Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Huayang; Ricote, Sandrine; Coors, W. Grover

    2014-01-01

    the computational implementation of a Nernst–Planck–Poisson (NPP) model to represent and interpret conductivity-relaxation measurements. Defect surface chemistry is represented with both equilibrium and finite-rate kinetic models. The experiments and the models are capable of representing relaxations from strongly......A model-based approach is used to interpret equilibrium and transient conductivity measurements for 10% gadolinium-doped ceria: Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 − δ (GDC10). The measurements were carried out by AC impedance spectroscopy on slender extruded GDC10 rods. Although equilibrium conductivity measurements...... provide sufficient information from which to derive material properties, it is found that uniquely establishing properties is difficult. Augmenting equilibrium measurements with conductivity relaxation significantly improves the evaluation of needed physical properties. This paper develops and applies...

  9. An equilibrium pricing model for weather derivatives in a multi-commodity setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yongheon; Oren, Shmuel S.

    2009-01-01

    Many industries are exposed to weather risk. Weather derivatives can play a key role in hedging and diversifying such risk because the uncertainty in a company's profit function can be correlated to weather condition which affects diverse industry sectors differently. Unfortunately the weather derivatives market is a classical example of an incomplete market that is not amenable to standard methodologies used for derivative pricing in complete markets. In this paper, we develop an equilibrium pricing model for weather derivatives in a multi-commodity setting. The model is constructed in the context of a stylized economy where agents optimize their hedging portfolios which include weather derivatives that are issued in a fixed quantity by a financial underwriter. The supply and demand resulting from hedging activities and the supply by the underwriter are combined in an equilibrium pricing model under the assumption that all agents maximize some risk averse utility function. We analyze the gains due to the inclusion of weather derivatives in hedging portfolios and examine the components of that gain attributable to hedging and to risk sharing. (author)

  10. Improving firm performance in out-of-equilibrium, deregulated markets using feedback simulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary, S.; Larsen, E.R.

    2000-01-01

    Deregulation has reshaped the utility sector in many countries around the world. Organisations in these deregulated industries must adopt new polices which guide strategic decisions, in an uncertain and unfamiliar environment, that determine the short- and long-term fate of their companies. Traditional economic equilibrium models do not adequately address the issues facing these organisations in the shift towards deregulated market competition. Equilibrium assumptions break down in the out-of-equilibrium transition to competitive markets, and therefore different underpinning assumptions must be adopted in order to guide management in these periods. Simulation models incorporating information feedback through behavioural policies fill the void left by equilibrium models and support strategic policy analysis in out-of-equilibrium markets. As an example, we present a feedback simulation model developed to examine firm and industry level performance consequences of new generation capacity investment policies in the deregulated UK electricity sector. The model explicitly captures behavioural decision polices of boundedly rational managers and avoids equilibrium assumptions. Such models are essential to help managers evaluate the performance impact of various strategic policies in environments in which disequilibrum behaviour dominates. (Author)

  11. Models of supply function equilibrium with applications to the electricity industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromi, J. Daniel

    Electricity market design requires tools that result in a better understanding of incentives of generators and consumers. Chapter 1 and 2 provide tools and applications of these tools to analyze incentive problems in electricity markets. In chapter 1, models of supply function equilibrium (SFE) with asymmetric bidders are studied. I prove the existence and uniqueness of equilibrium in an asymmetric SFE model. In addition, I propose a simple algorithm to calculate numerically the unique equilibrium. As an application, a model of investment decisions is considered that uses the asymmetric SFE as an input. In this model, firms can invest in different technologies, each characterized by distinct variable and fixed costs. In chapter 2, option contracts are introduced to a supply function equilibrium (SFE) model. The uniqueness of the equilibrium in the spot market is established. Comparative statics results on the effect of option contracts on the equilibrium price are presented. A multi-stage game where option contracts are traded before the spot market stage is considered. When contracts are optimally procured by a central authority, the selected profile of option contracts is such that the spot market price equals marginal cost for any load level resulting in a significant reduction in cost. If load serving entities (LSEs) are price takers, in equilibrium, there is no trade of option contracts. Even when LSEs have market power, the central authority's solution cannot be implemented in equilibrium. In chapter 3, we consider a game in which a buyer must repeatedly procure an input from a set of firms. In our model, the buyer is able to sign long term contracts that establish the likelihood with which the next period contract is awarded to an entrant or the incumbent. We find that the buyer finds it optimal to favor the incumbent, this generates more intense competition between suppliers. In a two period model we are able to completely characterize the optimal mechanism.

  12. Plasmoid solutions of the Hahm–Kulsrud–Taylor equilibrium model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, R. L. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia and Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Bhattacharjee, A.; Kulsrud, R. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Wright, A. M. [The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2013-08-15

    The Hahm–Kulsrud (HK) [T. S. Hahm and R. M. Kulsrud, Phys. Fluids 28, 2412 (1985)] solutions for a magnetically sheared plasma slab driven by a resonant periodic boundary perturbation illustrate fully shielded (current sheet) and fully reconnected (magnetic island) responses. On the global scale, reconnection involves solving a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium problem. In systems with a continuous symmetry, such MHD equilibria are typically found by solving the Grad–Shafranov equation, and in slab geometry the elliptic operator in this equation is the 2-D Laplacian. Thus, assuming appropriate pressure and poloidal current profiles, a conformal mapping method can be used to transform one solution into another with different boundary conditions, giving a continuous sequence of solutions in the form of partially reconnected magnetic islands (plasmoids) separated by Syrovatsky current sheets. The two HK solutions appear as special cases.

  13. Generalized equilibrium modeling: the methodology of the SRI-Gulf energy model. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazalet, E.G.

    1977-05-01

    The report provides documentation of the generalized equilibrium modeling methodology underlying the SRI-Gulf Energy Model and focuses entirely on the philosophical, mathematical, and computational aspects of the methodology. The model is a highly detailed regional and dynamic model of the supply and demand for energy in the US. The introduction emphasized the need to focus modeling efforts on decisions and the coordinated decomposition of complex decision problems using iterative methods. The conceptual framework is followed by a description of the structure of the current SRI-Gulf model and a detailed development of the process relations that comprise the model. The network iteration algorithm used to compute a solution to the model is described and the overall methodology is compared with other modeling methodologies. 26 references.

  14. Geomagnetic polarity reversals as a mechanism for the punctuated equilibrium model of biological evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, J.S.; Welsh, A.L.; Welsh, W.F.

    2003-01-01

    In contrast to what is predicted by classical Darwinian theory (phyletic gradualism), the fossil record typically displays a pattern of relatively sudden, dramatic changes as detailed by Eldregde and Gould's model of punctuated equilibrium. Evolutionary biologists have been at a loss to explain the ultimate source of the new mutations that drive evolution. One hypothesis holds that the abrupt speciation seen in the punctuated equilibrium model is secondary to an increased mutation rate resulting from periodically increased levels of ionizing radiation on the Earth's surface. Sporadic geomagnetic pole reversals, occurring every few million years on the average, are accompanied by alterations in the strength of the Earth's magnetic field and magnetosphere. This diminution may allow charged cosmic radiation to bombard Earth with less attenuation, thereby resulting in increased mutation rates. This episodic fluctuation in the magnetosphere is an attractive mechanism for the observed fossil record. Selected periods and epochs of geologic history for which data was available were reviewed for both geomagnetic pole reversal history and fossil record. Anomalies in either were scrutinized in greater depth and correlations were made. A 35 million year span (118-83 Ma) was identified during the Early/Middle Cretaceous period that was devoid of geomagnetic polarity reversals(the Cretaceous normal superchron). Examination of the fossil record (including several invertebrate and vertebrate taxons) during the Cretaceous normal superchron does not reveal any significant gap or slowing of speciation. Although increased terrestrial radiation exposure due to a diminution of the Earth's magnetosphere caused by a reversal of geomagnetic polarity is an attractive explanation for the mechanism of punctuated equilibrium, our investigation suggests that such polarity reversals cannot fully provide the driving force behind biological evolution. Further research is required to determine if

  15. Out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the thermal Casimir effect in a model polarizable material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David S; Démery, Vincent; Parsegian, V Adrian; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    Relaxation of the thermal Casimir or van der Waals force (the high temperature limit of the Casimir force) for a model dielectric medium is investigated. We start with a model of interacting polarization fields with a dynamics that leads to a frequency dependent dielectric constant of the Debye form. In the static limit, the usual zero frequency Matsubara mode component of the Casimir force is recovered. We then consider the out-of-equilibrium relaxation of the van der Waals force to its equilibrium value when two initially uncorrelated dielectric bodies are brought into sudden proximity. For the interaction between dielectric slabs, it is found that the spatial dependence of the out-of-equilibrium force is the same as the equilibrium one, but it has a time dependent amplitude, or Hamaker coefficient, which increases in time to its equilibrium value. The final relaxation of the force to its equilibrium value is exponential in systems with a single or finite number of polarization field relaxation times. However, in systems, such as those described by the Havriliak-Negami dielectric constant with a broad distribution of relaxation times, we observe a much slower power law decay to the equilibrium value.

  16. Modelling Chemical Equilibrium Partitioning with the GEMS-PSI Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulik, D.; Berner, U.; Curti, E

    2004-03-01

    Sorption, co-precipitation and re-crystallisation are important retention processes for dissolved contaminants (radionuclides) migrating through the sub-surface. The retention of elements is usually measured by empirical partition coefficients (Kd), which vary in response to many factors: temperature, solid/liquid ratio, total contaminant loading, water composition, host-mineral composition, etc. The Kd values can be predicted for in-situ conditions from thermodynamic modelling of solid solution, aqueous solution or sorption equilibria, provided that stoichiometry, thermodynamic stability and mixing properties of the pure components are known (Example 1). Unknown thermodynamic properties can be retrieved from experimental Kd values using inverse modelling techniques (Example 2). An efficient, advanced tool for performing both tasks is the Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) approach, implemented in the user-friendly GEM-Selector (GEMS) program package, which includes the Nagra-PSI chemical thermodynamic database. The package is being further developed at PSI and used extensively in studies relating to nuclear waste disposal. (author)

  17. Modelling Chemical Equilibrium Partitioning with the GEMS-PSI Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulik, D.; Berner, U.; Curti, E.

    2004-01-01

    Sorption, co-precipitation and re-crystallisation are important retention processes for dissolved contaminants (radionuclides) migrating through the sub-surface. The retention of elements is usually measured by empirical partition coefficients (Kd), which vary in response to many factors: temperature, solid/liquid ratio, total contaminant loading, water composition, host-mineral composition, etc. The Kd values can be predicted for in-situ conditions from thermodynamic modelling of solid solution, aqueous solution or sorption equilibria, provided that stoichiometry, thermodynamic stability and mixing properties of the pure components are known (Example 1). Unknown thermodynamic properties can be retrieved from experimental Kd values using inverse modelling techniques (Example 2). An efficient, advanced tool for performing both tasks is the Gibbs Energy Minimization (GEM) approach, implemented in the user-friendly GEM-Selector (GEMS) program package, which includes the Nagra-PSI chemical thermodynamic database. The package is being further developed at PSI and used extensively in studies relating to nuclear waste disposal. (author)

  18. Exploring the Use of Multiple Analogical Models when Teaching and Learning Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Allan G.; De Jong, Onno

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the multiple analogical models used to introduce and teach Grade 12 chemical equilibrium. We examine the teacher's reasons for using models, explain each model's development during the lessons, and analyze the understandings students derived from the models. A case study approach was used and the data were drawn from the…

  19. Optimal Data-Driven Estimation of Generalized Markov State Models for Non-Equilibrium Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Koltai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available There are multiple ways in which a stochastic system can be out of statistical equilibrium. It might be subject to time-varying forcing; or be in a transient phase on its way towards equilibrium; it might even be in equilibrium without us noticing it, due to insufficient observations; and it even might be a system failing to admit an equilibrium distribution at all. We review some of the approaches that model the effective statistical behavior of equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical systems, and show that both cases can be considered under the unified framework of optimal low-rank approximation of so-called transfer operators. Particular attention is given to the connection between these methods, Markov state models, and the concept of metastability, further to the estimation of such reduced order models from finite simulation data. All these topics bear an important role in, e.g., molecular dynamics, where Markov state models are often and successfully utilized, and which is the main motivating application in this paper. We illustrate our considerations by numerical examples.

  20. BGK-type models in strong reaction and kinetic chemical equilibrium regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaco, R; Bianchi, M Pandolfi; Soares, A J

    2005-01-01

    A BGK-type procedure is applied to multi-component gases undergoing chemical reactions of bimolecular type. The relaxation process towards local Maxwellians, depending on mass and numerical densities of each species as well as common velocity and temperature, is investigated in two different cases with respect to chemical regimes. These cases are related to the strong reaction regime characterized by slow reactions, and to the kinetic chemical equilibrium regime where fast reactions take place. The consistency properties of both models are stated in detail. The trend to equilibrium is numerically tested and comparisons for the two regimes are performed within the hydrogen-air and carbon-oxygen reaction mechanism. In the spatial homogeneous case, it is also shown that the thermodynamical equilibrium of the models recovers satisfactorily the asymptotic equilibrium solutions to the reactive Euler equations

  1. Global Stability of Multigroup SIRS Epidemic Model with Varying Population Sizes and Stochastic Perturbation around Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Fan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss multigroup SIRS (susceptible, infectious, and recovered epidemic models with random perturbations. We carry out a detailed analysis on the asymptotic behavior of the stochastic model; when reproduction number ℛ0>1, we deduce the globally asymptotic stability of the endemic equilibrium by measuring the difference between the solution and the endemic equilibrium of the deterministic model in time average. Numerical methods are employed to illustrate the dynamic behavior of the model and simulate the system of equations developed. The effect of the rate of immunity loss on susceptible and recovered individuals is also analyzed in the deterministic model.

  2. Non local thermodynamic equilibrium self-consistent average atom model for plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussurier, G.; Blancard, Ch.; Berthier, E.

    2000-01-01

    A time-dependent collisional-radiative average-atom model is presented to study statistical properties of highly-charged ion plasmas in off-equilibrium conditions. Atomic structure is described either with a screened-hydrogenic model including l-splitting, or by calculating one electron states in a self-consistent average-atom potential. Collisional and radiative excitation/deexcitation and ionization/recombination rats, as well as auto-ionization and dielectronic recombination rates, are formulated within the average-configuration framework. A good agreement with experiment is found for the charge-state distribution of a gold plasma at electron and density temperature equal to 6 x 10 20 cm -3 and 2200 eV. (author)

  3. Parametrizing coarse grained models for molecular systems at equilibrium

    KAUST Repository

    Kalligiannaki, Evangelia

    2016-10-18

    Hierarchical coarse graining of atomistic molecular systems at equilibrium has been an intensive research topic over the last few decades. In this work we (a) review theoretical and numerical aspects of different parametrization methods (structural-based, force matching and relative entropy) to derive the effective interaction potential between coarse-grained particles. All methods approximate the many body potential of mean force; resulting, however, in different optimization problems. (b) We also use a reformulation of the force matching method by introducing a generalized force matching condition for the local mean force in the sense that allows the approximation of the potential of mean force under both linear and non-linear coarse graining mappings (E. Kalligiannaki, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 2015). We apply and compare these methods to: (a) a benchmark system of two isolated methane molecules; (b) methane liquid; (c) water; and (d) an alkane fluid. Differences between the effective interactions, derived from the various methods, are found that depend on the actual system under study. The results further reveal the relation of the various methods and the sensitivities that may arise in the implementation of numerical methods used in each case.

  4. Equilibrium resurfacing of Venus: Results from new Monte Carlo modeling and implications for Venus surface histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjonnes, E. E.; Hansen, V. L.; James, B.; Swenson, J. B.

    2012-02-01

    Venus' impact crater population imposes two observational constraints that must be met by possible model surface histories: (1) near random spatial distribution of ˜975 craters, and (2) few obviously modified impact craters. Catastrophic resurfacing obviously meets these constraints, but equilibrium resurfacing histories require a balance between crater distribution and modification to be viable. Equilibrium resurfacing scenarios with small incremental resurfacing areas meet constraint 1 but not 2, whereas those with large incremental resurfacing areas meet constraint 2 but not 1. Results of Monte Carlo modeling of equilibrium resurfacing ( Strom et al., 1994) is widely cited as support for catastrophic resurfacing hypotheses and as evidence against hypotheses of equilibrium resurfacing. However, the Monte Carlo models did not consider intermediate-size incremental resurfacing areas, nor did they consider histories in which the era of impact crater formation outlasts an era of equilibrium resurfacing. We construct three suites of Monte Carlo experiments that examine incremental resurfacing areas not previously considered (5%, 1%, 0.7%, and 0.1%), and that vary the duration of resurfacing relative to impact crater formation time (1:1 [suite A], 5:6 [suite B], and 2:3 [suite C]). We test the model results against the two impact crater constraints. Several experiments met both constraints. The shorter the time period of equilibrium resurfacing, or the longer the time of crater formation following the cessation of equilibrium resurfacing, the larger the possible areas of incremental resurfacing that satisfy both constraints. Equilibrium resurfacing is statistically viable for suite A at 0.1%, suite B at 0.1%, and suite C for 1%, 0.7%, and 0.1% areas of incremental resurfacing.

  5. Non-existence of Steady State Equilibrium in the Neoclassical Growth Model with a Longevity Trend

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Mikkel Nørlem

    of steady state equilibrium when considering the empirically observed trend in longevity. We extend a standard continuous time overlapping generations model by a longevity trend and are thereby able to study the properties of mortality-driven population growth. This turns out to be exceedingly complicated...... to handle, and it is shown that in general no steady state equilibrium exists. Consequently analytical results and long run implications cannot be obtained in a setting with a realistic demographic setup....

  6. Modelling non-equilibrium thermodynamic systems from the speed-gradient principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khantuleva, Tatiana A; Shalymov, Dmitry S

    2017-03-06

    The application of the speed-gradient (SG) principle to the non-equilibrium distribution systems far away from thermodynamic equilibrium is investigated. The options for applying the SG principle to describe the non-equilibrium transport processes in real-world environments are discussed. Investigation of a non-equilibrium system's evolution at different scale levels via the SG principle allows for a fresh look at the thermodynamics problems associated with the behaviour of the system entropy. Generalized dynamic equations for finite and infinite number of constraints are proposed. It is shown that the stationary solution to the equations, resulting from the SG principle, entirely coincides with the locally equilibrium distribution function obtained by Zubarev. A new approach to describe time evolution of systems far from equilibrium is proposed based on application of the SG principle at the intermediate scale level of the system's internal structure. The problem of the high-rate shear flow of viscous fluid near the rigid plane plate is discussed. It is shown that the SG principle allows closed mathematical models of non-equilibrium processes to be constructed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most pote...

  8. Improving high-altitude emp modeling capabilities by using a non-equilibrium electron swarm model to monitor conduction electron evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusateri, Elise Noel

    An Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) can severely disrupt the use of electronic devices in its path causing a significant amount of infrastructural damage. EMP can also cause breakdown of the surrounding atmosphere during lightning discharges. This makes modeling EMP phenomenon an important research effort in many military and atmospheric physics applications. EMP events include high-energy Compton electrons or photoelectrons that ionize air and produce low energy conduction electrons. A sufficient number of conduction electrons will damp or alter the EMP through conduction current. Therefore, it is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict the EMP evolution and propagation in the air. It is common for EMP simulation codes to use an equilibrium ohmic model for computing the conduction current. Equilibrium ohmic models assume the conduction electrons are always in equilibrium with the local instantaneous electric field, i.e. for a specific EMP electric field, the conduction electrons instantaneously reach steady state without a transient process. An equilibrium model will work well if the electrons have time to reach their equilibrium distribution with respect to the rise time or duration of the EMP. If the time to reach equilibrium is comparable or longer than the rise time or duration of the EMP then the equilibrium model would not accurately predict the conduction current necessary for the EMP simulation. This is because transport coefficients used in the conduction current calculation will be found based on equilibrium reactions rates which may differ significantly from their non-equilibrium values. We see this deficiency in Los Alamos National Laboratory's EMP code, CHAP-LA (Compton High Altitude Pulse-Los Alamos), when modeling certain EMP scenarios at high altitudes, such as upward EMP, where the ionization rate by secondary electrons is over predicted by the equilibrium model, causing the EMP to short

  9. General and Partial Equilibrium Modeling of Sectoral Policies to Address Climate Change in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizer, William; Burtraw, Dallas; Harrington, Winston; Newell, Richard; Sanchirico, James; Toman, Michael

    2003-03-31

    This document provides technical documentation for work using detailed sectoral models to calibrate a general equilibrium analysis of market and non-market sectoral policies to address climate change. Results of this work can be found in the companion paper, "Modeling Costs of Economy-wide versus Sectoral Climate Policies Using Combined Aggregate-Sectoral Model".

  10. Developing a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model for the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A range of applied economic tools, such as time series models or econometric models that build on simple statistical properties, have been used to provide these types of analyses. However, there is now an increasing body of economic literature that attempts to build economic models based on a more comprehensive and ...

  11. Isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of (cyclic ethers + chlorohexane) mixtures: Experimental results and SAFT modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandres, I.; Giner, B.; Lopez, M.C.; Artigas, H.; Lafuente, C.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental data for the isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of mixtures formed by several cyclic ethers (tetrahydrofuran, tetrahydropyran, 1,3-dioxolane, and 1,4-dioxane) and chlorohexane at temperatures of (298.15 and 328.15) K are presented. Experimental results have been discussed in terms of both, molecular characteristics of pure compounds and potential intermolecular interaction between them using thermodynamic information of the mixtures obtained earlier. Furthermore, the influence of the temperature on the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of these mixtures has been explored and discussed. Transferable parameters of the SAFT-VR approach together with standard combining rules have been used to model the phase equilibrium of the mixtures and a description of the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of them that is in excellent agreement with the experimental data are provided

  12. Analysis of Equilibrium at the Euro Area Level from a New Model Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alin OPREANA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to address issues related to equilibrium at the Euro Area. Research methodology implies a wide range of methods and techniques that are used to analyze macroeconomic phenomena and processes at the Euro Area. Following the empirical analyses, namely exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling procedure, we propose a model of equilibrium in the Euro zone, an area characterized by the existence of market with turbulence and search frictions. Using this econometric modeling technique, we test and estimate causal relationships that combines a series of empirical data and quantitative causal hypotheses.

  13. Measuring Convergence using Dynamic Equilibrium Models: Evidence from Chinese Provinces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Lei; Posch, Olaf; van der Wel, Michel

    We propose a model to study economic convergence in the tradition of neoclassical growth theory. We employ a novel stochastic set-up of the Solow (1956) model with shocks to both capital and labor. Our novel approach identifies the speed of convergence directly from estimating the parameters whic...

  14. Developing a Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Model for the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    NCAER is planning the project in two phases: -Phase 1: Researchers will develop a model for India based on a review of the relevant literature and consultations. They will develop a database for estimating purposes. -Phase 2: Researchers will estimate the model, operationalize it, and validate it through alternative sets of ...

  15. The tropical water and energy cycles in a cumulus ensemble model. Part 1: Equilibrium climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, C. H.; Lau, K. M.; Tao, W. K.; Simpson, J.

    1994-01-01

    A cumulus ensemble model is used to study the tropical water and energy cycles and their role in the climate system. The model includes cloud dynamics, radiative processes, and microphysics that incorporate all important production and conversion processes among water vapor and five species of hydrometeors. Radiative transfer in clouds is parameterized based on cloud contents and size distributions of each bulk hydrometeor. Several model integrations have been carried out under a variety of imposed boundary and large-scale conditions. In Part 1 of this paper, the primary focus is on the water and heat budgets of the control experiment, which is designed to simulate the convective - radiative equilibrium response of the model to an imposed vertical velocity and a fixed sea surface temperature at 28 C. The simulated atmosphere is conditionally unstable below the freezing level and close to neutral above the freezing level. The equilibrium water budget shows that the total moisture source, M(sub s), which is contributed by surface evaporation (0.24 M(sub s)) and the large-scale advection (0.76 M(sub s)), all converts to mean surface precipitation bar-P(sub s). Most of M(sub s) is transported verticaly in convective regions where much of the condensate is generated and falls to surface (0.68 bar-P(sub s)). The remaining condensate detrains at a rate of 0.48 bar-P(sub s) and constitutes 65% of the source for stratiform clouds above the melting level. The upper-level stratiform cloud dissipates into clear environment at a rate of 0.14 bar-P(sub s), which is a significant moisture source comparable to the detrained water vapor (0.15 bar-P(sub s)) to the upper troposphere from convective clouds. In the lower troposphere, stratiform clouds evaporate at a rate of 0.41 bar-P(sub s), which is a more dominant moisture source than surface evaporation (0.22 bar-P(sub s)). The precipitation falling to the surface in the stratiform region is about 0.32 bar-P(sub s). The associated

  16. Olkiluoto surface hydrological modelling: Update 2012 including salt transport modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvonen, T.

    2013-11-01

    Posiva Oy is responsible for implementing a final disposal program for spent nuclear fuel of its owners Teollisuuden Voima Oyj and Fortum Power and Heat Oy. The spent nuclear fuel is planned to be disposed at a depth of about 400-450 meters in the crystalline bedrock at the Olkiluoto site. Leakages located at or close to spent fuel repository may give rise to the upconing of deep highly saline groundwater and this is a concern with regard to the performance of the tunnel backfill material after the closure of the tunnels. Therefore a salt transport sub-model was added to the Olkiluoto surface hydrological model (SHYD). The other improvements include update of the particle tracking algorithm and possibility to estimate the influence of open drillholes in a case where overpressure in inflatable packers decreases causing a hydraulic short-circuit between hydrogeological zones HZ19 and HZ20 along the drillhole. Four new hydrogeological zones HZ056, HZ146, BFZ100 and HZ039 were added to the model. In addition, zones HZ20A and HZ20B intersect with each other in the new structure model, which influences salinity upconing caused by leakages in shafts. The aim of the modelling of long-term influence of ONKALO, shafts and repository tunnels provide computational results that can be used to suggest limits for allowed leakages. The model input data included all the existing leakages into ONKALO (35-38 l/min) and shafts in the present day conditions. The influence of shafts was computed using eight different values for total shaft leakage: 5, 11, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 l/min. The selection of the leakage criteria for shafts was influenced by the fact that upconing of saline water increases TDS-values close to the repository areas although HZ20B does not intersect any deposition tunnels. The total limit for all leakages was suggested to be 120 l/min. The limit for HZ20 zones was proposed to be 40 l/min: about 5 l/min the present day leakages to access tunnel, 25 l/min from

  17. Models of direct reactions and quantum pre-equilibrium for nucleon scattering on spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, M.

    2006-01-01

    When a nucleon collides with a target nucleus, several reactions may occur: elastic and inelastic scatterings, charge exchange... In order to describe these reactions, different models are involved: the direct reactions, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus models. Our goal is to study, within a quantum framework and without any adjustable parameter, the direct and pre-equilibrium reactions for nucleons scatterings off double closed-shell nuclei. We first consider direct reactions: we are studying nucleon scattering with the Melbourne G-matrix, which represents the interaction between the projectile and one target nucleon, and with random phase approximation (RPA) wave functions which describe all target states. This is a fully microscopic approach since no adjustable parameters are involved. A second part is dedicated to the study of nucleon inelastic scattering for large energy transfer which necessarily involves the pre-equilibrium mechanism. Several models have been developed in the past to deal with pre-equilibrium. They start from the Born expansion of the transition amplitude which is associated to the inelastic process and they use several approximations which have not yet been tested. We have achieved some comparisons between second order cross sections which have been calculated with and without these approximations. Our results allow us to criticize some of these approximations and give several directions to improve the quantum pre-equilibrium models. (author)

  18. Computable general equilibrium model fiscal year 2014 capability development report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-05-11

    This report provides an overview of the development of the NISAC CGE economic modeling capability since 2012. This capability enhances NISAC's economic modeling and analysis capabilities to answer a broader set of questions than possible with previous economic analysis capability. In particular, CGE modeling captures how the different sectors of the economy, for example, households, businesses, government, etc., interact to allocate resources in an economy and this approach captures these interactions when it is used to estimate the economic impacts of the kinds of events NISAC often analyzes.

  19. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and evaporation under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massman, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme heating of soils during fires can have long-term and irreversible consequences and given the increasing use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing probability of wildfires associated with global warming, one approach to improving understanding of these consequences is to better understand and model the dynamics of the coupled heat, (liquid) moisture, and vapor transport in soils during extreme heating events. The present study describes a model developed to simulate non-equilibrium soil evaporation and the transport of heat, moisture, and water vapor under conditions during fires where the surface heating of the soil often ranges between 10,000 and 100,000 Wm-2 for several minutes to several hours. The Hertz-Knudsen equation is the basis for constructing the model's non-equilibrium evaporative source term. Model performance is tested against laboratory measurements of soil temperature and moisture changes. Testing the present model with different formulations for soil hydraulic conductivity, water retention curve, water activity, and the non-equilibrium evaporative source term, indicates that virtually all the model's successes result from the use of a temperature dependent condensation coefficient in the evaporative source term, a rather surprising and unexpected result. On the other hand, the model solution is not a completely faithful representation of the laboratory data. Nevertheless, this new non-equilibrium model circumvents many of the problems that plagued an equilibrium model developed for the same purpose (Massman 2012: Water Resources Research 48, WR011710) and provides a much more physically realistic simulation than the earlier model. Finally, the present model should provide insight into modeling of heat and mass transport and evaporation, not only during high temperature and low moisture conditions, but for modeling these soil processes under less extreme environmental conditions as well.

  20. Accounting for household heterogeneity in general equilibrium economic growth models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnikov, N.B.; O'Neill, B.C.; Dalton, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and evaluate a new method of aggregating heterogeneous households that allows for the representation of changing demographic composition in a multi-sector economic growth model. The method is based on a utility and labor supply calibration that takes into account time variations in demographic characteristics of the population. We test the method using the Population-Environment-Technology (PET) model by comparing energy and emissions projections employing the aggregate representation of households to projections representing different household types explicitly. Results show that the difference between the two approaches in terms of total demand for energy and consumption goods is negligible for a wide range of model parameters. Our approach allows the effects of population aging, urbanization, and other forms of compositional change on energy demand and CO 2 emissions to be estimated and compared in a computationally manageable manner using a representative household under assumptions and functional forms that are standard in economic growth models.

  1. Non-Equilibrium Modeling of Inductively Coupled RF Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    purpose of the present work is the development of a magneto -hydrodynamic NLTE model for an ICP torch. The flow model has to be simple enough to allow... elastic collisions with heavy-particles (Ωel), (ii) in- elastic electron induced excitation, ionization and disso- ciation processes (Ωin) and (iii) Joule...sections for elastic scattering do not depend on the inter- nal quantum states. In view of the last assumption, the di- mension of the transport

  2. Mathematical model for liquid-gas equilibrium in acetic acid fermentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero; Cantero

    1998-08-05

    An experimental study was conducted to propose an adequate mathematical model for liquid-gas equilibrium in acetic acid fermentations. Three operation scales (laboratory, pilot plant, and industrial plant) were employed to obtain the sets of experimental data. The proposed model, based in the UNIFAC method for the estimation of activity coefficients of a solution consisting of several components, takes into account the effect of temperature. However, in the set of equations, it has been necessary to put in the degree of equilibrium (epsilon). This coefficient adequately reflects the physical conditions of fermentation equipment. The experimental and numerical results help to define the fundamental mechanisms for liquid-gas equilibrium in these systems and demonstrate the model validity in the three tested scales. It was also found that in an industrial setting, closed systems are those with lowest evaporation losses. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  3. Modelling asphaltene precipitation equilibrium : influence of the experimental contact time and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, J.; Marugan, J.; Calles, J.A.; Gimenez-Aguirre, R. [Rey Juan Carlos Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Technology, Repsol-YPF Flow Assurance Laboratory; Pena, J.L. [Rey Juan Carlos Univ., Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Technology, Repsol-YPF Flow Assurance Laboratory; Centro Tecnologico Repsol-YPF, Madrid (Spain); Merino-Garcia, D. [Centro Tecnologico Repsol-YPF, Madrid (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    Asphaltene deposition creates flow assurance problems and economic losses for petroleum companies. Predictive models are therefore needed to prevent these problems. Most models found in the literature are based on equilibrium calculations and must be checked against experimental data of both onset and amount of asphaltenes separated. However, the samples must be equilibrated for a long time since the kinetics of asphaltene aggregation and precipitation are slow. This paper discussed the kinetics of asphaltene precipitation, based on results obtained from a problematic South American crude and its residue. The influence of temperature, chain length of the n-alkane solvent and n-alkane/oil mass ratio was evaluated. The solids were characterized by 1H NMR, elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to determine their chemical structure. Metal contents (mainly Fe, V and Ni) have been measured by atomic emission spectroscopy. The true equilibrium data will be used to validate equilibrium models from the literature.

  4. Regional disaster impact analysis: comparing Input-Output and Computable General Equilibrium models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koks, E.E.; Carrera, L.; Jonkeren, O.; Aerts, J.C.J.H.; Husby, T.G.; Thissen, M.; Standardi, G.; Mysiak, J.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of models have been applied to assess the economic losses of disasters, of which the most common ones are input-output (IO) and computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. In addition, an increasing number of scholars have developed hybrid approaches: one that combines both or either of

  5. The Matrix model, a driven state variables approach to non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the new approaches in non-equilibrium thermodynamics is the so-called matrix model of Jongschaap. In this paper some features of this model are discussed. We indicate the differences with the more common approach based upon internal variables and the more sophisticated Hamiltonian and GENERIC

  6. Multi-component vapor-liquid equilibrium model for LES and application to ECN Spray A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheis, J; Hickel, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present and evaluate a detailed multi-species two-phase thermodynamic equilibrium model for large-eddy simulations (LES) of liquid-fuel injection and mixing at high pressure. The model can represent the coexistence of supercritical states and multicomponent subcritical two-phase states. LES

  7. A general equilibrium model of ecosystem services in a river basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis Warziniack

    2014-01-01

    This study builds a general equilibrium model of ecosystem services, with sectors of the economy competing for use of the environment. The model recognizes that production processes in the real world require a combination of natural and human inputs, and understanding the value of these inputs and their competing uses is necessary when considering policies of resource...

  8. Computable general equilibrium modelling in the context of trade and environmental policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koesler, Simon Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the evaluation of environmental policies in the context of climate change. Its objectives are twofold. Its first part is devoted to the development of potent instruments for quantitative impact analysis of environmental policy. In this context, the main contributions include the development of a new computable general equilibrium (CGE) model which makes use of the new comprehensive and coherent World Input-Output Dataset (WIOD) and which features a detailed representation of bilateral and bisectoral trade flows. Moreover it features an investigation of input substitutability to provide modellers with adequate estimates for key elasticities as well as a discussion and amelioration of the standard base year calibration procedure of most CGE models. Building on these tools, the second part applies the improved modelling framework and studies the economic implications of environmental policy. This includes an analysis of so called rebound effects, which are triggered by energy efficiency improvements and reduce their net benefit, an investigation of how firms restructure their production processes in the presence of carbon pricing mechanisms, and an analysis of a regional maritime emission trading scheme as one of the possible options to reduce emissions of international shipping in the EU context.

  9. Quasi-equilibrium channel model of an constant current arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The rather simple method of calculation of electronic and gas temperature in the channel of arc of plasma generator is offered. This method is based on self-consistent two-temperature channel model of an electric arc. The method proposed enables to obtain radial allocation of gas and electronic temperatures in a non-conducting zone of an constant current arc, for prescribed parameters of discharge (current intensity and power of the discharge, with enough good precision. The results obtained can be used in model and engineering calculations to estimate gas and electronic temperatures in the channel of an arc plasma generator.

  10. Equilibrium Models of Galaxy Clusters with Cooling, Heating, and Conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggen, M.

    2003-08-01

    It is generally argued that most clusters of galaxies host cooling flows in which radiative cooling in the center causes a slow inflow. However, recent observations by Chandra and XMM conflict with the predicted cooling flow rates. Among other mechanisms, heating by a central active galactic nucleus and thermal conduction have been invoked in order to account for the small mass deposition rates. Here we present a family of hydrostatic models for the intracluster medium where radiative losses are exactly balanced by thermal conduction and heating by a central source. We describe the features of this simple model and fit its parameters to the density and temperature profiles of Hydra A.

  11. General equilibrium basic needs policy model, (updating part).

    OpenAIRE

    Kouwenaar A

    1985-01-01

    ILO pub-WEP pub-PREALC pub. Working paper, econometric model for the assessment of structural change affecting development planning for basic needs satisfaction in Ecuador - considers population growth, family size (households), labour force participation, labour supply, wages, income distribution, profit rates, capital ownership, etc.; examines nutrition, education and health as factors influencing productivity. Diagram, graph, references, statistical tables.

  12. Modelling whole blood oxygen equilibrium: comparison of nine different models fitted to normal human data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, J F; Goldstick, T K; Vida, L N; Honig, G R; Ernest, J T

    1985-01-01

    The ability of nine different models, prominent in the literature, to meaningfully characterize the oxygen-hemoglobin equilibrium curve (OHEC) of normal individuals was examined. Previously reported data (N = 33), obtained using the DCA-1 (Radiometer, Copenhagen), and new data (N = 8), obtained using the Hemox-Analyzer (TCS, Southampton, PA), from blood samples of normal, non-smoking volunteers were used and these devices were found to give statistically similar results. The OHECs were digitized and fitted to the models using least-squares techniques developed in this laboratory. The "goodness-of-fit" was determined by the root-mean-squared (RMS) error, the number of parameters, and the parameter redundancy, i.e., correlation between the parameters. The best RMS error did not necessarily indicate the best model. Most literature models consist of ratios of similar-order polynomials. These showed considerable parameter redundancy which made the curve fitting difficult. The best fits gave RMS errors as low as 0.2% saturation. The Hill model gave a good characterization over the saturation range 20%-98% with RMS errors of about 0.6% saturation. On the other hand, good characterizations over the entire range were given by several other models. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each model have been compared as well as the difficulties in fitting several of the models. No single model is best under all circumstances. The best model depends upon the particular circumstances for which it is to be utilized.

  13. Equilibrium stochastic dynamics of a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space: Derivation of an alternative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyay, A.

    2018-03-01

    An alternative equilibrium stochastic dynamics for a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space is derived. Such a dynamics can model the motion of a complex molecule in its conformation space when in equilibrium with a uniform heat bath. The derivation is done by a simple generalization of the formulation due to Zwanzig for a Brownian particle in homogeneous heat bath. We show that, if the system couples to different number of bath degrees of freedom at different conformations then the alternative model gets derived. We discuss results of an experiment by Faucheux and Libchaber which probably has indicated possible limitation of the Boltzmann distribution as equilibrium distribution of a Brownian particle in inhomogeneous space and propose experimental verification of the present theory using similar methods.

  14. Ordering phenomena and non-equilibrium properties of lattice gas models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiig, T.

    1994-03-01

    This report falls within the general field of ordering processes and non-equilibrium properties of lattice gas models. The theory of diffuse scattering of lattice gas models originating from a random distribution of clusters is considered. We obtain relations between the diffuse part of the structure factor S dif (q), the correlation function C(r), and the size distribution of clusters D(n). For a number of distributions we calculate S dif (q) exactly in one dimension, and discuss the possibility for a Lorentzian and a Lorentzian square lineshape to arise. We discuss the two- and three-dimensional oxygen ordering processes in the high T c superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x based on a simple anisotropic lattice gas model. We calculate the structural phase diagram by Monte Carlo simulation and compared the results with experimental data. The structure factor of the oxygen ordering properties has been calculated in both two and three dimensions by Monte Carlo simulation. We report on results obtained from large scale computations on the Connection Machine, which are in excellent agreement with recent neutron diffraction data. In addition we consider the effect of the diffusive motion of metal-ion dopants on the oxygen ordering properties on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x . The stationary properties of metastability in long-range interaction models are studied by application of a constrained transfer matrix (CTM) formalism. The model considered, which exhibits several metastable states, is an extension of the Blume Capel model to include weak long-range interactions. We show, that the decay rate of the metastable states is closely related to the imaginary part of the equilibrium free-energy density obtained from the CTM formalism. We discuss a class of lattice gas model for dissipative transport in the framework of a Langevin description, which is capable of producing power law spectra for the density fluctuations. We compare with numerical results obtained from simulations of a

  15. An experiment on radioactive equilibrium and its modelling using the ‘radioactive dice’ approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santostasi, Davide; Malgieri, Massimiliano; Montagna, Paolo; Vitulo, Paolo

    2017-07-01

    In this article we describe an educational activity on radioactive equilibrium we performed with secondary school students (17-18 years old) in the context of a vocational guidance stage for talented students at the Department of Physics of the University of Pavia. Radioactive equilibrium is investigated experimentally by having students measure the activity of 214Bi from two different samples, obtained using different preparation procedures from an uraniferous rock. Students are guided in understanding the mathematical structure of radioactive equilibrium through a modelling activity in two parts. Before the lab measurements, a dice game, which extends the traditional ‘radioactive dice’ activity to the case of a chain of two decaying nuclides, is performed by students divided into small groups. At the end of the laboratory work, students design and run a simple spreadsheet simulation modelling the same basic radioactive chain with user defined decay constants. By setting the constants to realistic values corresponding to nuclides of the uranium decay chain, students can deepen their understanding of the meaning of the experimental data, and also explore the difference between cases of non-equilibrium, transient and secular equilibrium.

  16. An Extension of the Miller Equilibrium Model into the X-Point Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. D.; King, R. W.; Stacey, W. M.

    2017-10-01

    The Miller equilibrium model has been extended to better model the flux surfaces in the outer region of the plasma and scrape-off layer, including the poloidally non-uniform flux surface expansion that occurs in the X-point region(s) of diverted tokamaks. Equations for elongation and triangularity are modified to include a poloidally varying component and grad-r, which is used in the calculation of the poloidal magnetic field, is rederived. Initial results suggest that strong quantitative agreement with experimental flux surface reconstructions and strong qualitative agreement with poloidal magnetic fields can be obtained using this model. Applications are discussed. A major new application is the automatic generation of the computation mesh in the plasma edge, scrape-off layer, plenum and divertor regions for use in the GTNEUT neutral particle transport code, enabling this powerful analysis code to be routinely run in experimental analyses. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  17. Phase equilibrium modeling of triglycerides in supercritical fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinophakun, T.; Phithakchokchai, B.

    2011-01-01

    To design a reactor and separator for a supercritical biodiesel process, phase equilibria of multi-component mixtures in supercritical fluids should be determined using group contribution with association equation of state (GCA-EOS) as a thermodynamics method. The model is considered for two systems of reactants and products. System 1 is comprised of methanol and triglycerides from two sources (palm and Jatropha oils); and System 2 is unconverted methanol, FAME (product) and glycerol (by-product). Pressure and temperature diagrams were developed at different mole fraction of methanol (x MeOH ). As x MeOH increased, the critical temperature (T c ) and pressure (p c ) increased. The increasing temperature causes the immiscibility region and the amount of methanol at the plait point to decrease. The maximum plait point pressure was observed at 19.20 MPa for palm and 19.33 MPa for Jatropha oil systems.

  18. Game equilibrium models I evolution and game dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    There are two main approaches towards the phenotypic analysis of frequency dependent natural selection. First, there is the approach of evolutionary game theory, which was introduced in 1973 by John Maynard Smith and George R. Price. In this theory, the dynamical process of natural selection is not modeled explicitly. Instead, the selective forces acting within a population are represented by a fitness function, which is then analysed according to the concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy or ESS. Later on, the static approach of evolutionary game theory has been complemented by a dynamic stability analysis of the replicator equations. Introduced by Peter D. Taylor and Leo B. Jonker in 1978, these equations specify a class of dynamical systems, which provide a simple dynamic description of a selection process. Usually, the investigation of the replicator dynamics centers around a stability analysis of their stationary solutions. Although evolutionary stability and dynamic stability both intend to charac...

  19. Global stability for infectious disease models that include immigration of infected individuals and delay in the incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Uggenti

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We begin with a detailed study of a delayed SI model of disease transmission with immigration into both classes. The incidence function allows for a nonlinear dependence on the infected population, including mass action and saturating incidence as special cases. Due to the immigration of infectives, there is no disease-free equilibrium and hence no basic reproduction number. We show there is a unique endemic equilibrium and that this equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable for all parameter values. The results include vector-style delay and latency-style delay. Next, we show that previous global stability results for an SEI model and an SVI model that include immigration of infectives and non-linear incidence but not delay can be extended to systems with vector-style delay and latency-style delay.

  20. Multi-Group Maximum Entropy Model for Translational Non-Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Vegnesh; Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the current work is to describe a new model for flows in translational non- equilibrium. Starting from the statistical description of a gas proposed by Boltzmann, the model relies on a domain decomposition technique in velocity space. Using the maximum entropy principle, the logarithm of the distribution function in each velocity sub-domain (group) is expressed with a power series in molecular velocity. New governing equations are obtained using the method of weighted residuals by taking the velocity moments of the Boltzmann equation. The model is applied to a spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook1(BGK) model collision operator and the relaxation of an initial non-equilibrium distribution to a Maxwellian is studied using the model. In addition, numerical results obtained using the model for a 1D shock tube problem are also reported.

  1. Energy taxes and wages in a general equilibrium model of production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, H.

    2000-01-01

    Energy taxes are responsible for a good deal of observed differences in energy prices across states and countries. They alter patterns of production and income distribution. The present paper examines the potential of energy taxes to lower wages in a general equilibrium model of production with capital, labour and energy inputs. (Author)

  2. Deviations from mass transfer equilibrium and mathematical modeling of mixer-settler contactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyerlein, A.L.; Geldard, J.F.; Chung, H.F.; Bennett, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents the mathematical basis for the computer model PUBG of mixer-settler contactors which accounts for deviations from mass transfer equilibrium. This is accomplished by formulating the mass balance equations for the mixers such that the mass transfer rate of nuclear materials between the aqueous and organic phases is accounted for. 19 refs

  3. Ginsburg criterion for an equilibrium superradiant model in the dynamic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trache, M.

    1991-10-01

    Some critical properties of an equilibrium superradiant model are discussed, taking into account the quantum fluctuations of the field variables. The critical region is calculated using the Ginsburg criterion, underlining the role of the atomic concentration as a control parameter of the phase transition. (author). 16 refs, 1 fig

  4. Modelling and simulation of liquid-vapor phase transition in compressible flows based on thermodynamical equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccanoni, Gloria; Kokh, Samuel; Allaire, Gregoire

    2012-01-01

    In the present work we investigate the numerical simulation of liquid-vapor phase change in compressible flows. Each phase is modeled as a compressible fluid equipped with its own equation of state (EOS). We suppose that inter-phase equilibrium processes in the medium operate at a short time-scale compared to the other physical phenomena such as convection or thermal diffusion. This assumption provides an implicit definition of an equilibrium EOS for the two-phase medium. Within this framework, mass transfer is the result of local and instantaneous equilibria between both phases. The overall model is strictly hyperbolic. We examine properties of the equilibrium EOS and we propose a discretization strategy based on a finite-volume relaxation method. This method allows to cope with the implicit definition of the equilibrium EOS, even when the model involves complex EOS's for the pure phases. We present two-dimensional numerical simulations that shows that the model is able to reproduce mechanism such as phase disappearance and nucleation. (authors)

  5. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 1. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the H-dependent axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloxime by various N- and S-donor ligands. D Sudarshan Reddy N Ravi Kumar Reddy V Sridhar S Satyanarayana. Inorganic and Analytical ...

  6. Phase equilibrium measurements and modelling of ternary system (carbon dioxide + ethanol + palmitic acid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso Comim, Sibele R. [EQA/UFSC, Chemical and Food Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, C.P. 476, CEP 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Franceschi, Elton; Borges, Gustavo R.; Corazza, Marcos L.; Vladimir Oliveira, J. [Department of Food Engineering, URI - Campus de Erechim, Av. Sete de Setembro, 1621, Erechim, RS 99700-000 (Brazil); Ferreira, Sandra R.S., E-mail: sandra@enq.ufsc.b [EQA/UFSC, Chemical and Food Engineering Department, Federal University of Santa Catarina, C.P. 476, CEP 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    This work reports phase equilibrium measurements for the ternary system (palmitic acid + ethanol + CO{sub 2}). The motivation of this research relies on the fact that palmitic acid is the major compound of several vegetable oils. Besides, equilibrium data for palmitic acid in carbon dioxide using ethanol as co-solvent are scarce in the literature. Phase equilibrium experiments were performed using a high-pressure variable-volume view cell over the temperature range of (303 to 343) K and pressures up to 20 MPa and mole fraction of palmitic acid from 0.0199 to 0.2930. Vapour-liquid and solid-fluid transitions were visually observed for the system studied. The Peng-Robinson equation of state, with the classical van der Waals quadratic mixing rule was employed for thermodynamic modelling of the system investigated with a satisfactory agreement between experimental and calculated values.

  7. Sudden transition from equilibrium stability to chaotic dynamics in a cautious tâtonnement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroni, Ilaria; Avellone, Alessandro; Panchuk, Anastasiia

    2015-01-01

    Tâtonnement processes are usually interpreted as auctions, where a fictitious agent sets the prices until an equilibrium is reached and the trades are made. The main purpose of such processes is to explain how an economy comes to its equilibrium. It is well known that discrete time price adjustment processes may fail to converge and may exhibit periodic or even chaotic behavior. To avoid large price changes, a version of the discrete time tâtonnement process for reaching an equilibrium in a pure exchange economy based on a cautious updating of the prices has been proposed two decades ago. This modification leads to a one dimensional bimodal piecewise smooth map, for which we show analytically that degenerate bifurcations and border collision bifurcations play a fundamental role for the asymptotic behavior of the model.

  8. Ion Association versus Ion Interaction Models in Examining Electrolyte Solutions: Application to Calcium Hydroxide Solubility Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M. Isabel; Borge, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous equilibrium of the solubility of calcium hydroxide in water is used to predict both its solubility product from solubility and solubility values from solubility product when inert salts, in any concentration, are present. Accepting the necessity of including activity coefficients to treat the saturated solution of calcium…

  9. Development of a bi-equilibrium model for biomass gasification in a downdraft bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Enrico; Barontini, Federica; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2016-02-01

    This work proposes a simple and accurate tool for predicting the main parameters of biomass gasification (syngas composition, heating value, flow rate), suitable for process study and system analysis. A multizonal model based on non-stoichiometric equilibrium models and a repartition factor, simulating the bypass of pyrolysis products through the oxidant zone, was developed. The results of tests with different feedstocks (corn cobs, wood pellets, rice husks and vine pruning) in a demonstrative downdraft gasifier (350kW) were used for validation. The average discrepancy between model and experimental results was up to 8 times less than the one with the simple equilibrium model. The repartition factor was successfully related to the operating conditions and characteristics of the biomass to simulate different conditions of the gasifier (variation in potentiality, densification and mixing of feedstock) and analyze the model sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modified Ammonia Removal Model Based on Equilibrium and Mass Transfer Principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanableh, A.; Imteaz, M.

    2010-01-01

    Yoon et al. 1 presented an approximate mathematical model to describe ammonia removal from an experimental batch reactor system with gaseous headspace. The development of the model was initially based on assuming instantaneous equilibrium between ammonia in the aqueous and gas phases. In the model, a 'saturation factor, β' was defined as a constant and used to check whether the equilibrium assumption was appropriate. The authors used the trends established by the estimated β values to conclude that the equilibrium assumption was not valid. The authors presented valuable experimental results obtained using a carefully designed system and the model used to analyze the results accounted for the following effects: speciation of ammonia between NH 3 and NH 4 + as a function of pH: temperature dependence of the reactions constants; and air flow rate. In this article, an alternative model based on the exact solution of the governing mass-balance differential equations was developed and used to describe ammonia removal without relying on the use of the saturation factor. The modified model was also extended to mathematically describe the pH dependence of the ammonia removal rate, in addition to accounting for the speciation of ammonia, temperature dependence of reactions constants, and air flow rate. The modified model was used to extend the analysis of the original experimental data presented by Yoon et al. 1 and the results matched the theory in an excellent manner

  11. Thermodynamic parameters of oxides by the example of periclase in representations of the equilibrium model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maevskii, K. K.; Kinelovskii, S. A.

    2017-12-01

    The results of numerical modeling of thermodynamic parameters of oxides are presented by the example of periclase MgO and its mixtures under shock wave loading. The mixture of components experiencing the phase transition is investigated: quartz, SiO2, silicon nitride Si3N4, aluminum nitride AlN. The calculation results obtained by thermodynamic equilibrium component (TEC) models are compared with both the experimental data and the simulation results obtained by other authors.

  12. Examining Policies to Reduce Homelessness Using a General Equilibrium Model of the Housing Market

    OpenAIRE

    Mansur, Erin; Quigley, John M.; Raphael, Steven; Smolensky, Eugene

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we use a general equilibrium simulation model to assess the potential impacts on homelessness of various housing-market policy interventions. We calibrate the model to the four largest metropolitan areas in California. We explore the welfare con- sequences and the effects on homelessness of three housing-market policy interventions: extending housing vouchers to all low-income households, subsidizing all landlords, and subsidizing those landlords who supply low-income housing. ...

  13. Climate change feedback on economic growth: Explorations with a dynamic general equilibrium model

    OpenAIRE

    Eboli, Fabio; Parrado, Ramiro; Roson, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Human-generated greenhouse gases depend on the level of economic activity. Therefore, most climate change studies are based on models and scenarios of economic growth. Economic growth itself, however, is likely to be affected by climate change impacts. These impacts affect the economy in multiple and complex ways: changes in productivity, resource endowments, production and consumption patterns. We use a new dynamic, multi-regional Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model of the world econo...

  14. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Souad, E-mail: souadhamada@yahoo.fr [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Louai, Fatima Zohra, E-mail: fz_louai@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Nait-Said, Nasreddine, E-mail: n_naitsaid@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Benabou, Abdelkader, E-mail: Abdelkader.Benabou@univ-lille1.fr [L2EP, Université de Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-07-15

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  15. Thermodynamics of binary mixtures of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and ketone. Experimental results and modelling of the (solid + liquid) equilibrium and the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium. The modified UNIFAC (Do) model characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domanska, Urszula [Faculty of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Division, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)]. E-mail: Ula@ch.pw.edu.pl; Lachwa, Joanna [Faculty of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Division, Warsaw University of Technology, Noakowskiego 3, 00-664 Warsaw (Poland)

    2005-07-15

    The (solid + liquid) equilibrium (SLE) of eight binary systems containing N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) with (2-propanone, or 2-butanone, or 2-pentanone, or 3-pentanone, or cyclopentanone, or 2-hexanone, or 4-methyl-2-pentanone, or 3-heptanone) were carried out by using a dynamic method from T = 200 K to the melting point of the NMP. The isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium data (VLE) have been measured for three binary mixtures of NMP with 2-propanone, 3-pentanone and 2-hexanone at pressure range from p = 0 kPa to p = 115 kPa. Data were obtained at the temperature T = 333.15 K for the first system and at T = 373.15 K for the second two systems. The experimental results of SLE have been correlated using the binary parameters Wilson, UNIQUAC ASM and two modified NRTL equations. The root-mean-square deviations of the solubility temperatures for all the calculated values vary from (0.32 K to 0.68 K) and depend on the particular equation used. The data of VLE were correlated with one to three parameters in the Redlich-Kister expansion. Binary mixtures of NMP with (2-propanone, or 2-butanone, or 2-pentanone, or 3-pentanone, or cyclopentanone, or 2-hexanone, or 4-methyl-2-pentanone, or 3-heptanone) have been investigated in the framework of the modified UNIFAC (Do) model. The reported new interaction parameters for NMP-group (c-CONCH{sub 3}) and carbonyl group ( C=O) let the model consistently described a set of thermodynamic properties, including (solid + liquid) equilibrium (vapour + liquid) equilibrium, excess Gibbs energy and molar excess enthalpies of mixing. Our experimental and literature data of binary mixtures containing NMP and ketones were compared with the results of prediction with the modified UNIFAC (Do) model.

  16. Thermodynamics of binary mixtures of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and ketone. Experimental results and modelling of the (solid + liquid) equilibrium and the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium. The modified UNIFAC (Do) model characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanska, Urszula; Lachwa, Joanna

    2005-01-01

    The (solid + liquid) equilibrium (SLE) of eight binary systems containing N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) with (2-propanone, or 2-butanone, or 2-pentanone, or 3-pentanone, or cyclopentanone, or 2-hexanone, or 4-methyl-2-pentanone, or 3-heptanone) were carried out by using a dynamic method from T = 200 K to the melting point of the NMP. The isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium data (VLE) have been measured for three binary mixtures of NMP with 2-propanone, 3-pentanone and 2-hexanone at pressure range from p = 0 kPa to p = 115 kPa. Data were obtained at the temperature T = 333.15 K for the first system and at T = 373.15 K for the second two systems. The experimental results of SLE have been correlated using the binary parameters Wilson, UNIQUAC ASM and two modified NRTL equations. The root-mean-square deviations of the solubility temperatures for all the calculated values vary from (0.32 K to 0.68 K) and depend on the particular equation used. The data of VLE were correlated with one to three parameters in the Redlich-Kister expansion. Binary mixtures of NMP with (2-propanone, or 2-butanone, or 2-pentanone, or 3-pentanone, or cyclopentanone, or 2-hexanone, or 4-methyl-2-pentanone, or 3-heptanone) have been investigated in the framework of the modified UNIFAC (Do) model. The reported new interaction parameters for NMP-group (c-CONCH 3 ) and carbonyl group ( C=O) let the model consistently described a set of thermodynamic properties, including (solid + liquid) equilibrium (vapour + liquid) equilibrium, excess Gibbs energy and molar excess enthalpies of mixing. Our experimental and literature data of binary mixtures containing NMP and ketones were compared with the results of prediction with the modified UNIFAC (Do) model

  17. A model for non-equilibrium, non-homogeneous two-phase critical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassel, Wageeh Sidrak; Ting, Daniel Kao Sun

    1999-01-01

    Critical two phase flow is a very important phenomena in nuclear reactor technology for the analysis of loss of coolant accident. Several recent papers, Lee and Shrock (1990), Dagan (1993) and Downar (1996) , among others, treat the phenomena using complex models which require heuristic parameters such as relaxation constants or interfacial transfer models. In this paper a mathematical model for one dimensional non equilibrium and non homogeneous two phase flow in constant area duct is developed. The model is constituted of three conservation equations type mass ,momentum and energy. Two important variables are defined in the model: equilibrium constant in the energy equation and the impulse function in the momentum equation. In the energy equation, the enthalpy of the liquid phase is determined by a linear interpolation function between the liquid phase enthalpy at inlet condition and the saturated liquid enthalpy at local pressure. The interpolation coefficient is the equilibrium constant. The momentum equation is expressed in terms of the impulse function. It is considered that there is slip between the liquid and vapor phases, the liquid phase is in metastable state and the vapor phase is in saturated stable state. The model is not heuristic in nature and does not require complex interface transfer models. It is proved numerically that for the critical condition the partial derivative of two phase pressure drop with respect to the local pressure or to phase velocity must be zero.This criteria is demonstrated by numerical examples. The experimental work of Fauske (1962) and Jeandey (1982) were analyzed resulting in estimated numerical values for important parameters like slip ratio, equilibrium constant and two phase frictional drop. (author)

  18. Stochastic modelling of two-phase flows including phase change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurisse, O.; Minier, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic modelling has already been developed and applied for single-phase flows and incompressible two-phase flows. In this article, we propose an extension of this modelling approach to two-phase flows including phase change (e.g. for steam-water flows). Two aspects are emphasised: a stochastic model accounting for phase transition and a modelling constraint which arises from volume conservation. To illustrate the whole approach, some remarks are eventually proposed for two-fluid models. (authors)

  19. Solid-Liquid equilibrium of n-alkanes using the Chain Delta Lattice Parameter model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    degrees of success.An attempt to describe the equilibrium between the high temperature form of a paraffinic solid solution, commonly known as rotator phase, and the liquid phase is performed. The Chain Delta Lattice Parameter model (CDLP) is developed allowing a successful description of the solid...... mixtures, is related with the values of the melting temperatures by a function common to the entire homologous series. When applied to systems with a symmetric behavior, this yields a correct description of both the enthalpic and entropic parts of the excess Gibbs free energy with the CDLP model......The formation of a solid phase in liquid mixtures with large paraffinic molecules is a phenomenon of interest in the petroleum, pharmaceutical, and biotechnological industries among onters. Efforts to model the solid-liquid equilibrium in these systems have been mainly empirical and with different...

  20. 30th International School of Mathematics "G Stampacchia" : Equilibrium Problems and Variational Models "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Giannessi, Franco; Maugeri, Antonino; Equilibrium Problems and Variational Models

    2000-01-01

    The volume, devoted to variational analysis and its applications, collects selected and refereed contributions, which provide an outline of the field. The meeting of the title "Equilibrium Problems and Variational Models", which was held in Erice (Sicily) in the period June 23 - July 2 2000, was the occasion of the presentation of some of these papers; other results are a consequence of a fruitful and constructive atmosphere created during the meeting. New results, which enlarge the field of application of variational analysis, are presented in the book; they deal with the vectorial analysis, time dependent variational analysis, exact penalization, high order deriva­ tives, geometric aspects, distance functions and log-quadratic proximal methodology. The new theoretical results allow one to improve in a remarkable way the study of significant problems arising from the applied sciences, as continuum model of transportation, unilateral problems, multicriteria spatial price models, network equilibrium...

  1. Thermodynamic parameters for mixtures of quartz under shock wave loading in views of the equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maevskii, K. K.; Kinelovskii, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The numerical results of modeling of shock wave loading of mixtures with the SiO 2 component are presented. The TEC (thermodynamic equilibrium component) model is employed to describe the behavior of solid and porous multicomponent mixtures and alloys under shock wave loading. State equations of a Mie–Grüneisen type are used to describe the behavior of condensed phases, taking into account the temperature dependence of the Grüneisen coefficient, gas in pores is one of the components of the environment. The model is based on the assumption that all components of the mixture under shock-wave loading are in thermodynamic equilibrium. The calculation results are compared with the experimental data derived by various authors. The behavior of the mixture containing components with a phase transition under high dynamic loads is described

  2. A Pseudo-Vertical Equilibrium Model for Slow Gravity Drainage Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Beatrix; Guo, Bo; Bandilla, Karl; Celia, Michael A.; Flemisch, Bernd; Helmig, Rainer

    2017-12-01

    Vertical equilibrium (VE) models are computationally efficient and have been widely used for modeling fluid migration in the subsurface. However, they rely on the assumption of instant gravity segregation of the two fluid phases which may not be valid especially for systems that have very slow drainage at low wetting phase saturations. In these cases, the time scale for the wetting phase to reach vertical equilibrium can be several orders of magnitude larger than the time scale of interest, rendering conventional VE models unsuitable. Here we present a pseudo-VE model that relaxes the assumption of instant segregation of the two fluid phases by applying a pseudo-residual saturation inside the plume of the injected fluid that declines over time due to slow vertical drainage. This pseudo-VE model is cast in a multiscale framework for vertically integrated models with the vertical drainage solved as a fine-scale problem. Two types of fine-scale models are developed for the vertical drainage, which lead to two pseudo-VE models. Comparisons with a conventional VE model and a full multidimensional model show that the pseudo-VE models have much wider applicability than the conventional VE model while maintaining the computational benefit of the conventional VE model.

  3. Validation of vibration-dissociation coupling models in hypersonic non-equilibrium separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoev, G.; Oblapenko, G.; Kunova, O.; Mekhonoshina, M.; Kustova, E.

    2018-03-01

    The validation of recently developed models of vibration-dissociation coupling is discussed in application to numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations in a two-temperature approximation for a binary N2/N flow. Vibrational-translational relaxation rates are computed using the Landau-Teller formula generalized for strongly non-equilibrium flows obtained in the framework of the Chapman-Enskog method. Dissociation rates are calculated using the modified Treanor-Marrone model taking into account the dependence of the model parameter on the vibrational state. The solutions are compared to those obtained using traditional Landau-Teller and Treanor-Marrone models, and it is shown that for high-enthalpy flows, the traditional and recently developed models can give significantly different results. The computed heat flux and pressure on the surface of a double cone are in a good agreement with experimental data available in the literature on low-enthalpy flow with strong thermal non-equilibrium. The computed heat flux on a double wedge qualitatively agrees with available data for high-enthalpy non-equilibrium flows. Different contributions to the heat flux calculated using rigorous kinetic theory methods are evaluated. Quantitative discrepancy of numerical and experimental data is discussed.

  4. Mechanism of alkalinity lowering and chemical equilibrium model of high fly ash silica fume cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Seiichi; Honda, Akira; Negishi, Kumi

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of alkalinity lowering of a High Fly ash Silica fume Cement (HFSC) under liquid/solid ratio conditions where the pH is largely controlled by the soluble alkali components (Region I) has been studied. This mechanism was incorporated in the chemical equilibrium model of HFSC. As a result, it is suggested that the dissolution and precipitation behavior of SO 4 2- partially contributes to alkalinity lowering of HFSC in Region I. A chemical equilibrium model of HFSC incorporating alkali (Na, K) adsorption, which was presumed as another contributing factor of the alkalinity lowering effect, was also developed, and an HFSC immersion experiment was analyzed using the model. The results of the developed model showed good agreement with the experiment results. From the above results, it was concluded that the alkalinity lowering of HFSC in Region I was attributed to both the dissolution and precipitation behavior of SO 4 2- and alkali adsorption, in addition to the absence of Ca(OH) 2 . A chemical equilibrium model of HFSC incorporating alkali and SO 4 2- adsorption was also proposed. (author)

  5. Post-CHF heat transfer: a non-equilibrium, relaxation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.C. Jr.; Zuber, N.

    1977-01-01

    Existing phenomenological models of heat transfer in the non-equilibrium, liquid-deficient, dispersed flow regime can sometimes predict the thermal behavior fairly well but are quite complex, requiring coupled simultaneous differential equations to describe the axial gradients of mass and energy along with those of droplet acceleration and size. In addition, empirical relations are required to express the droplet breakup and increased effective heat transfer due to holdup. This report describes the development of a different approach to the problem. It is shown that the non-equilibrium component of the total energy can be expressed as a first order, inhomogeneous relaxation equation in terms of one variable coefficient termed the Superheat Relaxation number. A demonstration is provided to show that this relaxation number can be correlated using local variables in such a manner to allow the single non-equilibrium equation to accurately calculate the effects of mass velocity and heat flux along with tube length, diameter, and critical quality for equilibrium qualities from 0.13 to over 3.0

  6. Ageing in the trap model as a relaxation further away from equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The ageing regime of the trap model, observed for a temperature T below the glass transition temperature T g , is a prototypical example of non-stationary out-of-equilibrium state. We characterize this state by evaluating its ‘distance to equilibrium’, defined as the Shannon entropy difference ΔS (in absolute value) between the non-equilibrium state and the equilibrium state with the same energy. We consider the time evolution of ΔS and show that, rather unexpectedly, ΔS(t) continuously increases in the ageing regime, if the number of traps is infinite, meaning that the ‘distance to equilibrium’ increases instead of decreasing in the relaxation process. For a finite number N of traps, ΔS(t) exhibits a maximum value before eventually converging to zero when equilibrium is reached. The time t* at which the maximum is reached however scales in a non-standard way as t * ∼N T g /2T , while the equilibration time scales as τ eq ∼N T g /T . In addition, the curves ΔS(t) for different N are found to rescale as ln t/ln t*, instead of the more familiar scaling t/t*. (paper)

  7. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  8. An Iterative Algorithm to Determine the Dynamic User Equilibrium in a Traffic Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, C.

    An iterative algorithm to determine the dynamic user equilibrium with respect to link costs defined by a traffic simulation model is presented. Each driver's route choice is modeled by a discrete probability distribution which is used to select a route in the simulation. After each simulation run, the probability distribution is adapted to minimize the travel costs. Although the algorithm does not depend on the simulation model, a queuing model is used for performance reasons. The stability of the algorithm is analyzed for a simple example network. As an application example, a dynamic version of Braess's paradox is studied.

  9. Analytical model for thermal boundary conductance and equilibrium thermal accommodation coefficient at solid/gas interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Hopkins, Patrick E

    2016-02-28

    We develop an analytical model for the thermal boundary conductance between a solid and a gas. By considering the thermal fluxes in the solid and the gas, we describe the transmission of energy across the solid/gas interface with diffuse mismatch theory. From the predicted thermal boundary conductances across solid/gas interfaces, the equilibrium thermal accommodation coefficient is determined and compared to predictions from molecular dynamics simulations on the model solid-gas systems. We show that our model is applicable for modeling the thermal accommodation of gases on solid surfaces at non-cryogenic temperatures and relatively strong solid-gas interactions (ε(sf) ≳ k(B)T).

  10. CO2, energy and economy interactions: A multisectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium model for Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yoonyoung

    While vast resources have been invested in the development of computational models for cost-benefit analysis for the "whole world" or for the largest economies (e.g. United States, Japan, Germany), the remainder have been thrown together into one model for the "rest of the world." This study presents a multi-sectoral, dynamic, computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for Korea. This research evaluates the impacts of controlling COsb2 emissions using a multisectoral CGE model. This CGE economy-energy-environment model analyzes and quantifies the interactions between COsb2, energy and economy. This study examines interactions and influences of key environmental policy components: applied economic instruments, emission targets, and environmental tax revenue recycling methods. The most cost-effective economic instrument is the carbon tax. The economic effects discussed include impacts on main macroeconomic variables (in particular, economic growth), sectoral production, and the energy market. This study considers several aspects of various COsb2 control policies, such as the basic variables in the economy: capital stock and net foreign debt. The results indicate emissions might be stabilized in Korea at the expense of economic growth and with dramatic sectoral allocation effects. Carbon dioxide emissions stabilization could be achieved to the tune of a 600 trillion won loss over a 20 year period (1990-2010). The average annual real GDP would decrease by 2.10% over the simulation period compared to the 5.87% increase in the Business-as-Usual. This model satisfies an immediate need for a policy simulation model for Korea and provides the basic framework for similar economies. It is critical to keep the central economic question at the forefront of any discussion regarding environmental protection. How much will reform cost, and what does the economy stand to gain and lose? Without this model, the policy makers might resort to hesitation or even blind speculation. With

  11. A novel multiphysic model for simulation of swelling equilibrium of ionized thermal-stimulus responsive hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hua; Wang Xiaogui; Yan Guoping; Lam, K.Y.; Cheng Sixue; Zou Tao; Zhuo Renxi

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a novel multiphysic mathematical model is developed for simulation of swelling equilibrium of ionized temperature sensitive hydrogels with the volume phase transition, and it is termed the multi-effect-coupling thermal-stimulus (MECtherm) model. This model consists of the steady-state Nernst-Planck equation, Poisson equation and swelling equilibrium governing equation based on the Flory's mean field theory, in which two types of polymer-solvent interaction parameters, as the functions of temperature and polymer-network volume fraction, are specified with or without consideration of the hydrogen bond interaction. In order to examine the MECtherm model consisting of nonlinear partial differential equations, a meshless Hermite-Cloud method is used for numerical solution of one-dimensional swelling equilibrium of thermal-stimulus responsive hydrogels immersed in a bathing solution. The computed results are in very good agreements with experimental data for the variation of volume swelling ratio with temperature. The influences of the salt concentration and initial fixed-charge density are discussed in detail on the variations of volume swelling ratio of hydrogels, mobile ion concentrations and electric potential of both interior hydrogels and exterior bathing solution

  12. Models of fluidized granular materials: examples of non-equilibrium stationary states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puglisi, Andrea [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique Batiment 210, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Cecconi, Fabio [INFM Center for Statistical Mechanics and Complexity and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale A Moro 2, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Vulpiani, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita ' La Sapienza' , INFM Center for Statistical Mechanics and Complexity (SMC), INFN Sezione di Roma-1 ' La Sapienza' , Piazzale A Moro 2, I-00185, Rome (Italy)

    2005-06-22

    We review some models of granular materials fluidized by means of external forces, such as random homogeneous forcing with damping, vibrating plates, flow in an inclined channel and flow in a double well potential. All these systems show the presence of density correlations and non-Gaussian velocity distributions. These models are useful in understanding the role of a kinetically defined 'temperature' (in this case the so-called granular temperature) in a non-equilibrium stationary state. In the homogeneously randomly driven gas the granular temperature is different from that of the driving bath. Moreover, two different granular materials mixed together may stay in a stationary state with different temperatures. At the same time, the granular temperature determines (as in equilibrium systems) the escape time in a double well potential.

  13. Nebula Models of Non-Equilibrium Mineralogy: Wark-Lovering Rims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Petaev, M.; Krot, A. N.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The meteorite record contains several examples of minerals that would not persist if allowed to come to equilibrium with a cooling gas of solar composition. This includes all minerals in CAIs and AOAs. Their survival is generally ascribed to physical removal of the object from the gas (isolation into a large parent object, or ejection by a stellar wind), but could also result from outward radial diffusion into cooler regions, which we discuss here. Accretion of CAIs into planetesimals has also been relied on to preserve them against loss into the sun. However, this suggestion faces several objections. Simple outward diffusion in turbulence has recently been modeled in some detail, and can preserve CAIs against loss into the sun [2]. Naturally, outward radial diffusion in turbulence is slower than immediate ejection by a stellar wind, which occurs on an orbital timescale. Here we ask whether these different transport mechanisms can be distinguished by nonequilibrium mineralogy, which provides a sort of clock. Our application here is to one aspect of CAI mineralogy - the Wark-Lovering rims (WLR); even more specifically, to alteration of one layer in the WLR sequence from melilite (Mel) to anorthite (An).

  14. A consistent model for the equilibrium thermodynamic functions of partially ionized flibe plasma with Coulomb corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, Mofreh R.

    2003-01-01

    Flibe (2LiF-BeF2) is a molten salt that has been chosen as the coolant and breeding material in many design studies of the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) chamber. Flibe plasmas are to be generated in the ICF chamber in a wide range of temperatures and densities. These plasmas are more complex than the plasma of any single chemical species. Nevertheless, the composition and thermodynamic properties of the resulting flibe plasmas are needed for the gas dynamics calculations and the determination of other design parameters in the ICF chamber. In this paper, a simple consistent model for determining the detailed plasma composition and thermodynamic functions of high-temperature, fully dissociated and partially ionized flibe gas is presented and used to calculate different thermodynamic properties of interest to fusion applications. The computed properties include the average ionization state; kinetic pressure; internal energy; specific heats; adiabatic exponent, as well as the sound speed. The presented results are computed under the assumptions of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and electro-neutrality. A criterion for the validity of the LTE assumption is presented and applied to the computed results. Other attempts in the literature are assessed with their implied inaccuracies pointed out and discussed

  15. Effects of Risk Aversion on Market Outcomes: A Stochastic Two-Stage Equilibrium Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazempour, Jalal; Pinson, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluates how different risk preferences of electricity producers alter the market-clearing outcomes. Toward this goal, we propose a stochastic equilibrium model for electricity markets with two settlements, i.e., day-ahead and balancing, in which a number of conventional and stochastic...... by its optimality conditions, resulting in a mixed complementarity problem. Numerical results from a case study based on the IEEE one-area reliability test system are derived and discussed....

  16. Discharge Fee Policy Analysis: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Model of Water Resources and Water Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Guohua Fang; Ting Wang; Xinyi Si; Xin Wen; Yu Liu

    2016-01-01

    To alleviate increasingly serious water pollution and shortages in developing countries, various kinds of policies have been implemented by local governments. It is vital to quantify and evaluate the performance and potential economic impacts of these policies. This study develops a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model to simulate the regional economic and environmental effects of discharge fees. Firstly, water resources and water environment factors are separated from the input and out...

  17. Why Enforcing its UNCAC Commitments Would be Good for Russia: A Computable General Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. BARRY

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Russia has ratified the UN Convention Against Corruption but has not successfully enforced it. This paper uses updated GTAP data to reconstruct a computable general equilibrium (CGE model to quantify the macroeconomic effects of corruption in Russia. Corruption is found to cost the Russian economy billions of dollars a year. A conclusion of the paper is that implementing and enforcing the UNCAC would be of significant economic benefit to Russia and its people.

  18. Assimilation of tourism satellite accounts and applied general equilibrium models to inform tourism policy analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Rossouw, Riaan; Saayman, Melville

    2011-01-01

    Historically, tourism policy analysis in South Africa has posed challenges to accurate measurement. The primary reason for this is that tourism is not designated as an 'industry' in standard economic accounts. This paper therefore demonstrates the relevance and need for applied general equilibrium (AGE) models to be completed and extended through an integration with tourism satellite accounts (TSAs) as a tool for policy makers (especially tourism policy makers) in South Africa. The paper sets...

  19. A framework for modelling gene regulation which accommodates non-equilibrium mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsendorf, Tobias; Wong, Felix; Eils, Roland; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2014-12-05

    Gene regulation has, for the most part, been quantitatively analysed by assuming that regulatory mechanisms operate at thermodynamic equilibrium. This formalism was originally developed to analyse the binding and unbinding of transcription factors from naked DNA in eubacteria. Although widely used, it has made it difficult to understand the role of energy-dissipating, epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, nucleosome remodelling and post-translational modification of histones and co-regulators, which act together with transcription factors to regulate gene expression in eukaryotes. Here, we introduce a graph-based framework that can accommodate non-equilibrium mechanisms. A gene-regulatory system is described as a graph, which specifies the DNA microstates (vertices), the transitions between microstates (edges) and the transition rates (edge labels). The graph yields a stochastic master equation for how microstate probabilities change over time. We show that this framework has broad scope by providing new insights into three very different ad hoc models, of steroid-hormone responsive genes, of inherently bounded chromatin domains and of the yeast PHO5 gene. We find, moreover, surprising complexity in the regulation of PHO5, which has not yet been experimentally explored, and we show that this complexity is an inherent feature of being away from equilibrium. At equilibrium, microstate probabilities do not depend on how a microstate is reached but, away from equilibrium, each path to a microstate can contribute to its steady-state probability. Systems that are far from equilibrium thereby become dependent on history and the resulting complexity is a fundamental challenge. To begin addressing this, we introduce a graph-based concept of independence, which can be applied to sub-systems that are far from equilibrium, and prove that history-dependent complexity can be circumvented when sub-systems operate independently. As epigenomic data become increasingly

  20. Energy, economy and equity interactions in a CGE [Computable General Equilibrium] model for Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, Farzana

    1997-01-01

    In the last three decades, Computable General Equilibrium modelling has emerged as an established field of applied economics. This book presents a CGE model developed for Pakistan with the hope that it will lay down a foundation for application of general equilibrium modelling for policy formation in Pakistan. As the country is being driven swiftly to become an open market economy, it becomes vital to found out the policy measures that can foster the objectives of economic planning, such as social equity, with the minimum loss of the efficiency gains from the open market resource allocations. It is not possible to build a model for practical use that can do justice to all sectors of the economy in modelling of their peculiar features. The CGE model developed in this book focuses on the energy sector. Energy is considered as one of the basic needs and an essential input to economic growth. Hence, energy policy has multiple criteria to meet. In this book, a case study has been carried out to analyse energy pricing policy in Pakistan using this CGE model of energy, economy and equity interactions. Hence, the book also demonstrates how researchers can model the fine details of one sector given the core structure of a CGE model. (UK)

  1. One-Dimensional Transport with Equilibrium Chemistry (OTEQ) - A Reactive Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    OTEQ is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of waterborne solutes in streams and rivers. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel. The solute transport model is based on OTIS, a model that considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage. The equilibrium submodel is based on MINTEQ, a model that considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, acid-base reactions, precipitation/dissolution, and sorption. Within OTEQ, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (waterborne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach. The model's ability to simulate pH, precipitation/dissolution, and pH-dependent sorption provides a means of evaluating the complex interactions between instream chemistry and hydrologic transport at the field scale. This report details the development and application of OTEQ. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, model applications, and installation instructions. OTEQ may be obtained over the Internet at http://water.usgs.gov/software/OTEQ.

  2. Electric Circuit Model Analogy for Equilibrium Lattice Relaxation in Semiconductor Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, John E.

    2018-01-01

    The design and analysis of semiconductor strained-layer device structures require an understanding of the equilibrium profiles of strain and dislocations associated with mismatched epitaxy. Although it has been shown that the equilibrium configuration for a general semiconductor strained-layer structure may be found numerically by energy minimization using an appropriate partitioning of the structure into sublayers, such an approach is computationally intense and non-intuitive. We have therefore developed a simple electric circuit model approach for the equilibrium analysis of these structures. In it, each sublayer of an epitaxial stack may be represented by an analogous circuit configuration involving an independent current source, a resistor, an independent voltage source, and an ideal diode. A multilayered structure may be built up by the connection of the appropriate number of these building blocks, and the node voltages in the analogous electric circuit correspond to the equilibrium strains in the original epitaxial structure. This enables analysis using widely accessible circuit simulators, and an intuitive understanding of electric circuits can easily be extended to the relaxation of strained-layer structures. Furthermore, the electrical circuit model may be extended to continuously-graded epitaxial layers by considering the limit as the individual sublayer thicknesses are diminished to zero. In this paper, we describe the mathematical foundation of the electrical circuit model, demonstrate its application to several representative structures involving In x Ga1- x As strained layers on GaAs (001) substrates, and develop its extension to continuously-graded layers. This extension allows the development of analytical expressions for the strain, misfit dislocation density, critical layer thickness and widths of misfit dislocation free zones for a continuously-graded layer having an arbitrary compositional profile. It is similar to the transition from circuit

  3. Plutonium and Minor Actinides Recycling in Standard BWR using Equilibrium Burnup Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Waris

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Plutonium (Pu and minor actinides (MA recycling in standard BWR with equilibrium burnup model has been studied. We considered the equilibrium burnup model as a simple time independent burnup method, which can manage all possible produced nuclides in any nuclear system. The equilibrium burnup code was bundled with a SRAC cell-calculation code to become a coupled cell-burnup calculation code system. The results show that the uranium enrichment for the criticality of the reactor, the amount of loaded fuel and the required natural uranium supply per year decrease for the Pu recycling and even much lower for the Pu & MA recycling case compared to those of the standard once-through BWR case. The neutron spectra become harder with the increasing number of recycled heavy nuclides in the reactor core. The total fissile rises from 4.77% of the total nuclides number density in the reactor core for the standard once-through BWR case to 6.64% and 6.72% for the Plutonium recycling case and the Pu & MA recycling case, respectively. The two later data may become the main basis why the required uranium enrichment declines and consequently diminishes the annual loaded fuel and the required natural uranium supply. All these facts demonstrate the advantage of plutonium and minor actinides recycling in BWR.

  4. Transfer coefficients to terrestrial food products in equilibrium assessment models for nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.

    1980-09-01

    Transfer coefficients have become virtually indispensible in the study of the fate of radioisotopes released from nuclear installations. These coefficients are used in equilibrium assessment models where they specify the degree of transfer in food chains of individual radioisotopes from soil to plant products and from feed or forage and drinking water to animal products and ultimately to man. Information on transfer coefficients for terrestrial food chain models is very piecemeal and occurs in a wide variety of journals and reports. To enable us to choose or determine suitable values for assessments, we have addressed the following aspects of transfer coefficients on a very broad scale: (1) definitions, (2) equilibrium assumption, which stipulates that transfer coefficients be restricted to equilibrium or steady rate conditions, (3) assumption of linearity, that is the idea that radioisotope concentrations in food products increase linearly with contamination levels in the soil or animal feed, (4) methods of determination, (5) variability, (6) generic versus site-specific values, (7) statistical aspects, (8) use, (9) sources of currently used values, (10) criteria for revising values, (11) establishment and maintenance of files on transfer coefficients, and (12) future developments. (auth)

  5. Communication: Introducing prescribed biases in out-of-equilibrium Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Purushottam D.

    2018-03-01

    Markov models are often used in modeling complex out-of-equilibrium chemical and biochemical systems. However, many times their predictions do not agree with experiments. We need a systematic framework to update existing Markov models to make them consistent with constraints that are derived from experiments. Here, we present a framework based on the principle of maximum relative path entropy (minimum Kullback-Leibler divergence) to update Markov models using stationary state and dynamical trajectory-based constraints. We illustrate the framework using a biochemical model network of growth factor-based signaling. We also show how to find the closest detailed balanced Markov model to a given Markov model. Further applications and generalizations are discussed.

  6. Progressive IRP Models for Power Resources Including EPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the view of optimizing regional power supply and demand, the paper makes effective planning scheduling of supply and demand side resources including energy efficiency power plant (EPP, to achieve the target of benefit, cost, and environmental constraints. In order to highlight the characteristics of different supply and demand resources in economic, environmental, and carbon constraints, three planning models with progressive constraints are constructed. Results of three models by the same example show that the best solutions to different models are different. The planning model including EPP has obvious advantages considering pollutant and carbon emission constraints, which confirms the advantages of low cost and emissions of EPP. The construction of progressive IRP models for power resources considering EPP has a certain reference value for guiding the planning and layout of EPP within other power resources and achieving cost and environmental objectives.

  7. Oscillation Susceptibility Analysis of the ADMIRE Aircraft along the Path of Longitudinal Flight Equilibriums in Two Different Mathematical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Ionita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The oscillation susceptibility of the ADMIRE aircraft along the path of longitudinal flight equilibriums is analyzed numerically in the general and in a simplified flight model. More precisely, the longitudinal flight equilibriums, the stability of these equilibriums, and the existence of bifurcations along the path of these equilibriums are researched in both models. Maneuvers and appropriate piloting tasks for the touch-down moment are simulated in both models. The computed results obtained in the models are compared in order to see if the movement concerning the landing phase computed in the simplified model is similar to that computed in the general model. The similarity we find is not a proof of the structural stability of the simplified system, what as far we know never been made, but can increase the confidence that the simplified system correctly describes the real phenomenon.

  8. Infrared polar brightenings on Jupiter. V - A thermal equilibrium model for the north polar hot spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halthore, Rangasayi; Burrows, Adam; Caldwell, John

    1988-01-01

    Voyager IRIS instrument records of the IR hydrocarbon emissions from Jupiter's north polar region are presently studied to determine the spatial and other characteristics of the north polar hot spot. Attention is given to a thermal equilibrium model that exploits the asymmetry found in 7.8-micron emission of stratospheric methane with respect to system III longitude in order to estimate stratospheric zonal wind velocity. This model accurately predicts the observed asymmetry in acetylene's 13.6-micron emission; this requires, however, enhanced acetylene abundance in the hot spot, as well as ethane depletion. Energetic charged particles are suggested to be the most probable cause of these effects.

  9. The performance of simulated annealing in parameter estimation for vapor-liquid equilibrium modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bonilla-Petriciolet

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the application and evaluation of the simulated annealing (SA optimization method in parameter estimation for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE modeling. We tested this optimization method using the classical least squares and error-in-variable approaches. The reliability and efficiency of the data-fitting procedure are also considered using different values for algorithm parameters of the SA method. Our results indicate that this method, when properly implemented, is a robust procedure for nonlinear parameter estimation in thermodynamic models. However, in difficult problems it still can converge to local optimums of the objective function.

  10. Solid-Liquid equilibrium of n-alkanes using the Chain Delta Lattice Parameter model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, João A.P.; Andersen, Simon Ivar; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1996-01-01

    -liquid equilibrium of n-alkanes ranging from n-C_20 to n-C_40.The model is further modified to achieve a more correct temperature dependence because it severely underestimates the excess enthalpy. It is shown that the ratio of excess enthalpy and entropy for n-alkane solid solutions, as happens for other solid...... mixtures, is related with the values of the melting temperatures by a function common to the entire homologous series. When applied to systems with a symmetric behavior, this yields a correct description of both the enthalpic and entropic parts of the excess Gibbs free energy with the CDLP model...

  11. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling of the Propyl Mercaptan plus Methane plus Water System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awan, Javeed; Thomsen, Kaj; Coquelet, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    In this work, vapor−liquid equilibrium (VLE) measurements of propyl mercaptan (PM) in pure water were performed at three different temperatures, (303, 323, and 365) K, with a pressure variation from (1 to 8) MPa. The total system pressure was maintained by CH4. The inlet mole fraction of propyl...... mercaptan in all experiments was the same, around 4.5·10−4 in the liquid phase. The objective was to provide experimental VLE data points of the propyl mercaptan + methane + water system for modeling since there is a lack of available data. These data will allow the industrial modeling of sulfur emission...

  12. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Malte; Lübeck, Sven

    2009-01-01

    This book describes two main classes of non-equilibrium phase-transitions: (a) static and dynamics of transitions into an absorbing state, and (b) dynamical scaling in far-from-equilibrium relaxation behaviour and ageing. The first volume begins with an introductory chapter which recalls the main concepts of phase-transitions, set for the convenience of the reader in an equilibrium context. The extension to non-equilibrium systems is made by using directed percolation as the main paradigm of absorbing phase transitions and in view of the richness of the known results an entire chapter is devoted to it, including a discussion of recent experimental results. Scaling theories and a large set of both numerical and analytical methods for the study of non-equilibrium phase transitions are thoroughly discussed. The techniques used for directed percolation are then extended to other universality classes and many important results on model parameters are provided for easy reference.

  13. Prediction of vapor-liquid equilibrium and PVTx properties of geological fluid system with SAFT-LJ EOS including multi-polar contribution. Part I: Application to H 2O-CO 2 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui; Dubessy, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Molecular based equations of state (EOS) are attractive because they can take into account the energetic contribution of the main types of molecular interactions. This study models vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) and PVTx properties of the H 2O-CO 2 binary system using a Lennard-Jones (LJ) referenced SAFT (Statistical Associating Fluid Theory) EOS. The improved SAFT-LJ EOS is defined in terms of the residual molar Helmholtz energy, which is a sum of four terms representing the contributions from LJ segment-segment interactions, chain-forming among the LJ segments, short-range associations and long-range multi-polar interactions. CO 2 is modeled as a linear chain molecule with a constant quadrupole moment, and H 2O is modeled as a spherical molecule with four association sites and a dipole moment. The multi-polar contribution to Helmholtz energy, including the dipole-dipole, dipole-quadrupole, and quadrupole-quadrupole contribution for H 2O-CO 2 system, is calculated using the theory of Gubbins and Twu (1978). Six parameters for pure H 2O and four parameters for pure CO 2 are needed in our model. The Van der Waals one-fluid mixing rule is used to calculate the Lennard-Jones energy parameter and volume parameter for the mixture. Two or three binary parameters are needed for CO 2-H 2O mixtures, which are evaluated from phase equilibrium data of the binary system. Comparison with the experimental data shows that our model represents the PVT properties of CO 2 better than other SAFT EOS without a quadrupole contribution. For the CO 2-H 2O system, our model agrees well with the vapor-liquid equilibrium data from 323-623 K. The average relative deviation for CO 2 solubility (expressed in mole fraction) in water is within 6%. Our model can also predict the PVTx properties of CO 2-H 2O mixtures up to 1073 K and 3000 bar. The good performance of this model indicates that: (1) taking account of the multi-polar contribution explicitly improves the agreement of calculated

  14. Chaos in a dynamic model of urban transportation network flow based on user equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Meng; Gao Ziyou

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the dynamical behavior of network traffic flow. We first build a two-stage mathematical model to analyze the complex behavior of network flow, a dynamical model, which is based on the dynamical gravity model proposed by Dendrinos and Sonis [Dendrinos DS, Sonis M. Chaos and social-spatial dynamic. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 1990] is used to estimate the number of trips. Considering the fact that the Origin-Destination (O-D) trip cost in the traffic network is hard to express as a functional form, in the second stage, the user equilibrium network assignment model was used to estimate the trip cost, which is the minimum cost of used path when user equilibrium (UE) conditions are satisfied. It is important to use UE to estimate the O-D cost, since a connection is built among link flow, path flow, and O-D flow. The dynamical model describes the variations of O-D flows over discrete time periods, such as each day and each week. It is shown that even in a system with dimensions equal to two, chaos phenomenon still exists. A 'Chaos Propagation' phenomenon is found in the given model.

  15. Cap-and-Trade Modeling and Analysis: Congested Electricity Market Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpaitoon, Tanachai

    This dissertation presents an equilibrium framework for analyzing the impact of cap-and-trade regulation on transmission-constrained electricity market. The cap-and-trade regulation of greenhouse gas emissions has gained momentum in the past decade. The impact of the regulation and its efficacy in the electric power industry depend on interactions of demand elasticity, transmission network, market structure, and strategic behavior of firms. I develop an equilibrium model of an oligopoly electricity market in conjunction with a market for tradable emissions permits to study the implications of such interactions. My goal is to identify inefficiencies that may arise from policy design elements and to avoid any unintended adverse consequences on the electric power sector. I demonstrate this modeling framework with three case studies examining the impact of carbon cap-and-trade regulation. In the first case study, I study equilibrium results under various scenarios of resource ownership and emission targets using a 24-bus IEEE electric transmission system. The second and third case studies apply the equilibrium model to a realistic electricity market, Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) 225-bus system with a detailed representation of the California market. In the first and second case studies, I examine oligopoly in electricity with perfect competition in the permit market. I find that under a stringent emission cap and a high degree of concentration of non-polluting firms, the electricity market is subject to potential abuses of market power. Also, market power can occur in the procurement of non-polluting energy through the permit market when non-polluting resources are geographically concentrated in a transmission-constrained market. In the third case study, I relax the competitive market structure assumption of the permit market by allowing oligopolistic competition in the market through a conjectural variation approach. A short-term equilibrium

  16. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  17. Comparing transient, accelerated, and equilibrium simulations of the last 30 000 years with the GENIE-1 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Lunt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We examine several aspects of the ocean-atmosphere system over the last 30 000 years, by carrying out simulations with prescribed ice sheets, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and orbital parameters. We use the GENIE-1 model with a frictional geostrophic ocean, dynamic sea ice, an energy balance atmosphere, and a land-surface scheme with fixed vegetation. A transient simulation, with boundary conditions derived from ice-core records and ice sheet reconstructions, is compared with equilibrium snapshot simulations, including the Last Glacial Maximum (21 000 years before present; 21 kyrBP, mid-Holocene (6 kyrBP and pre-industrial. The equilibrium snapshot simulations are all very similar to their corresponding time period in the transient simulation, indicating that over the last 30 000 years, the model's ocean-atmosphere system is close to equilibrium with its boundary conditions. However, our simulations neglect the transfer of fresh water from and to the ocean, resulting from the growth and decay of ice sheets, which would, in reality, lead to greater disequilibrium. Additionally, the GENIE-1 model exhibits a rather limited response in terms of its Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC over the 30 000 years; a more sensitive AMOC would also be likely to lead to greater disequilibrium. We investigate the method of accelerating the boundary conditions of a transient simulation and find that the Southern Ocean is the region most affected by the acceleration. The Northern Hemisphere, even with a factor of 10 acceleration, is relatively unaffected. The results are robust to changes to several tunable parameters in the model. They also hold when a higher vertical resolution is used in the ocean.

  18. Chemical equilibrium model for high- Tc and heavy fermion superconductors: the density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallio, A.; Hissa, J.; Hayrynen, T.; Braysy, V.; Sakkinen, T.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical equilibrium model is based on the idea of correlated electron pairs, which in singlet state can exist as quasimolecules in the superfluid and normal states of a superconductor. These preformed pairs are bosons which can undergo a Bose-Einstein condensation in analogy with the superfluidity of 4 He+ 3 He-mixture. The bosons (B ++ ) and the fermions (h + ) are in chemical equilibrium with respect to the reaction B ++ ↔ 2h + , at any temperature. The mean densities of bosons and fermions (quasiholes) n B (T) and n h (T) are determined from the thermodynamics of the equilibrium reaction in terms of a single function f(T). By thermodynamics the function f(T) is connected to equilibrium constant φ(T) by 1-f(T) = [1 + φ(T)] -1/2 . Using a simple power law, known to be valid near T = 0, for the chemical constant φ(T) α/t 2γ , t = T/T*, the mean density of quasiholes is given in closed form. This enables one to calculate the corresponding density of states (DOS) D(E) N s /N(0), by solving an integral equation. The NIS- tunneling conductivity near T = 0, given by D(E) compares well with the most recent experiments: D(E) ∼ E γ , for small E and a finite maximum of right size, corresponding to 'finite quasiparticle lifetime'. The corresponding SIS-tunneling conductivity is obtained from a simple convolution and is also in agreement with recent break junction experiments of Hancotte et al. The position of the maximum can be used to obtain the scaling temperature T*, which comes close to the one measured by Hall coefficient in the normal state. A simple explanation for the spingap effect in NMR is given. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  19. Equilibrium based analytical model for estimation of pressure magnification during deflagration of hydrogen air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karanam, Aditya; Sharma, Pavan K.; Ganju, Sunil; Singh, Ram Kumar [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (India). Reactor Safety Div.

    2016-12-15

    During postulated accident sequences in nuclear reactors, hydrogen may get released from the core and form a flammable mixture in the surrounding containment structure. Ignition of such mixtures and the subsequent pressure rise are an imminent threat for safe and sustainable operation of nuclear reactors. Methods for evaluating post ignition characteristics are important for determining the design safety margins in such scenarios. This study presents two thermo-chemical models for determining the post ignition state. The first model is based on internal energy balance while the second model uses the concept of element potentials to minimize the free energy of the system with internal energy imposed as a constraint. Predictions from both the models have been compared against published data over a wide range of mixture compositions. Important differences in the regions close to flammability limits and for stoichiometric mixtures have been identified and explained. The equilibrium model has been validated for varied temperatures and pressures representative of initial conditions that may be present in the containment during accidents. Special emphasis has been given to the understanding of the role of dissociation and its effect on equilibrium pressure, temperature and species concentrations.

  20. Sweatshop Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Chau, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a capability-augmented model of on the job search, in which sweatshop conditions stifle the capability of the working poor to search for a job while on the job. The augmented setting unveils a sweatshop equilibrium in an otherwise archetypal Burdett-Mortensen economy, and reconciles a number of oft noted yet perplexing features of sweatshop economies. We demonstrate existence of multiple rational expectation equilibria, graduation pathways out of sweatshops in complete abs...

  1. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberg Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  2. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  3. Replica Ornstein-Zernike Theory Applied for Studying the Equilibrium Distribution of Electrolytes across Model Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Lukšič, Miha

    2018-01-24

    By means of replica Ornstein-Zernike theory (supplemented in a few cases by Monte Carlo simulations) we examined the distribution of an annealed primitive model +1:-1 electrolyte in a mixture with uncharged hard spheres, or another model +1:-1 or +2:-1 electrolyte inside and outside the quenched vesicles, decorated by a model membrane, and across the membrane phase. We explored the influence of the size and charge of the annealed fluid on the partition equilibrium, as well as the effect of the vesicle size and membrane interaction parameters (repulsive barrier height, attractive depth, and membrane width). A hydrophobic cation, present in the mixture with NaCl, slightly enhanced the concentration of sodium ions inside the model vesicle, compared to pure NaCl solution. The replica theory was in good agreement with computer simulations and as such adequate for studying partitioning of small and hydrophobic ions or hydrophobic solutes across model membranes.

  4. Evaluation of the crack plane equilibrium model for predicting plastic fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Smith, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Crack Plane Equilibium (CPE) model is a simple model for predicting the initiation of crack growth in ductile materials. The CPE model is evaluated for center-crack tension specimens and for pipe specimens containing part-through circumferential cracks emanating from the inside surface of the pipe. The model is based upon requiring equilibrium between the applied loads and an assumed stress distribution in the uncracked ligament near the crack tip. Required fracture parameters are the ultimate tensile strength and a process zone size at the crack tip that is determined from simple fracture tests. Crack growth initiation for the crack and specimen geometries studied is predicted with sufficient accuracy to warrant extending the CPE model for investigating other geometries and for predicting stable crack growth and the onset of unstable crack growth

  5. Microscopic Simulation and Macroscopic Modeling for Thermal and Chemical Non-Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen; Panesi, Marco; Vinokur, Marcel; Clarke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the accurate microscopic simulation and macroscopic modeling of extreme non-equilibrium phenomena, such as encountered during hypersonic entry into a planetary atmosphere. The state-to-state microscopic equations involving internal excitation, de-excitation, dissociation, and recombination of nitrogen molecules due to collisions with nitrogen atoms are solved time-accurately. Strategies to increase the numerical efficiency are discussed. The problem is then modeled using a few macroscopic variables. The model is based on reconstructions of the state distribution function using the maximum entropy principle. The internal energy space is subdivided into multiple groups in order to better describe the non-equilibrium gases. The method of weighted residuals is applied to the microscopic equations to obtain macroscopic moment equations and rate coefficients. The modeling is completely physics-based, and its accuracy depends only on the assumed expression of the state distribution function and the number of groups used. The model makes no assumption at the microscopic level, and all possible collisional and radiative processes are allowed. The model is applicable to both atoms and molecules and their ions. Several limiting cases are presented to show that the model recovers the classical twotemperature models if all states are in one group and the model reduces to the microscopic equations if each group contains only one state. Numerical examples and model validations are carried out for both the uniform and linear distributions. Results show that the original over nine thousand microscopic equations can be reduced to 2 macroscopic equations using 1 to 5 groups with excellent agreement. The computer time is decreased from 18 hours to less than 1 second.

  6. Simple suggestions for including vertical physics in oil spill models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Asaro, Eric; University of Washington, Seatle, WA

    2001-01-01

    Current models of oil spills include no vertical physics. They neglect the effect of vertical water motions on the transport and concentration of floating oil. Some simple ways to introduce vertical physics are suggested here. The major suggestion is to routinely measure the density stratification of the upper ocean during oil spills in order to develop a database on the effect of stratification. (Author)

  7. Liquid-liquid extraction equilibrium for pyruvic acid recovery: experimental data and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharm Pal

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Physical extraction studies of pyruvic acid from dilute aqueous solutions (0.025 kmol·m-3 to 0.200 kmol·m-3 using several pure solvents (tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP, 1-decanol, 1-octanol, toluene, Methyl-isobutylketone (MIBK, and n-heptane and their binary mixtures are reported in this work. All the batch extraction experiments were carried out at isothermal conditions (T=303±1K and the results are reported in terms of distribution coefficient (K D. The results obtained by the equilibrium studies of the different extraction system were correlated with solvatochromic parameters of the solvents. A linear solvation energy relationship (LSER model was applied to interpret the extraction equilibrium which specifically considers physical interactions. The values of the LSER model parameters for the extraction system were optimized by regression technique and the model equations have been proposed. Experimental and model values were in good agreement (RMSD < 0.1.Reported outcomes are useful in the selection of a suitable extraction system and understanding the extraction mechanism for the separation of pyruvic acid from dilute aqueous solutions.

  8. Structuring energy supply and demand networks in a general equilibrium model to simulate global warming control strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, S.; Veselka, T.D.; Cirillo, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Global warming control strategies which mandate stringent caps on emissions of greenhouse forcing gases can substantially alter a country's demand, production, and imports of energy products. Although there is a large degree of uncertainty when attempting to estimate the potential impact of these strategies, insights into the problem can be acquired through computer model simulations. This paper presents one method of structuring a general equilibrium model, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program/Global Climate Change (ENPEP/GCC), to simulate changes in a country's energy supply and demand balance in response to global warming control strategies. The equilibrium model presented in this study is based on the principle of decomposition, whereby a large complex problem is divided into a number of smaller submodules. Submodules simulate energy activities and conversion processes such as electricity production. These submodules are linked together to form an energy supply and demand network. Linkages identify energy and fuel flows among various activities. Since global warming control strategies can have wide reaching effects, a complex network was constructed. The network represents all energy production, conversion, transportation, distribution, and utilization activities. The structure of the network depicts interdependencies within and across economic sectors and was constructed such that energy prices and demand responses can be simulated. Global warming control alternatives represented in the network include: (1) conservation measures through increased efficiency; and (2) substitution of fuels that have high greenhouse gas emission rates with fuels that have lower emission rates. 6 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  9. SIMULASI PENGELUARAN PEMERINTAH DAN DAMPAKNYA TERHADAP KINERJAEKONOMI MAKRO: SUATU MODEL COMPUTABLE GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Maipita

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the impact of increased government spending on macroeconomic performance, using AGEFIS; a Computable General Equilibrium Model. Simulations carried out with the three scenarios in the sector Construction, Electricity, and Land Transportation. The simulation results shows that, in general, an increase in government spending have a positive impact on macroeconomic performance and increase household income. increase in government spending in the Construction sector provides better impact on increasing household income compared with other sectors, while in the electricity sector have no effect

  10. Effective equilibrium picture in the x y model with exponentially correlated noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoluzzi, Matteo; Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Maggi, Claudio

    2018-02-01

    We study the effect of exponentially correlated noise on the x y model in the limit of small correlation time, discussing the order-disorder transition in the mean field and the topological transition in two dimensions. We map the steady states of the nonequilibrium dynamics into an effective equilibrium theory. In the mean field, the critical temperature increases with the noise correlation time τ , indicating that memory effects promote ordering. This finding is confirmed by numerical simulations. The topological transition temperature in two dimensions remains untouched. However, finite-size effects induce a crossover in the vortices proliferation that is confirmed by numerical simulations.

  11. Phase equilibrium of North Sea oils with polar chemicals: Experiments and CPA modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    This work consists of a combined experimental and modeling study for oil - MEG - water systems, of relevance to petroleum applications. We present new experimental liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the mutual solubility of two North Sea oils + MEG and North Sea oils + MEG + water systems...... in the temperature range 303.15-323.15 K and at atmospheric pressure. These new data are for North Sea oils which are substantially heavier and with higher aromatic/naphthenic content compared to previous studies. The new data compare favorably with previously reported measurements for other North Sea oils. The data...

  12. Sudden transition from equilibrium stability to chaotic dynamics in a cautious tâtonnement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroni, I.; Avellone, A.; Panchuk, A.

    2016-01-01

    Discrete time price adjustment processes may fail to converge and may exhibit periodic or even chaotic behavior. To avoid large price changes, a version of the discrete time tâtonnement process for reaching an equilibrium in a pure exchange economy based on a cautious updating of the prices has been proposed two decades ago. This modification leads to a one dimensional bimodal piecewise smooth map, for which we show analytically that degenerate bifurcations and border collision bifurcations play a fundamental role for the asymptotic behavior of the model. (paper)

  13. Core-state models for fuel management of equilibrium and transition cycles in pressurized water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragones, J.M.; Martinez-Val, J.M.; Corella, M.R.

    1977-08-01

    Fuel management requires that mass, energy, and reactivity balance be satisfied in each reload cycle. Procedures for selection of alternatives, core-state models, and fuel cost calculations have been developed for both equilibrium and transition cycles. Effective cycle lengths and fuel cycle variables--namely, reload batch size, schedule of incore residence for the fuel, feed enrichments, energy sharing cycle by cycle, and discharge burnup and isotopics--are the variables being considered for fuel management planning with a given energy generation plan, fuel design, recycling strategy, and financial assumptions.

  14. Non-equilibrium modeling of the PMSE Overshoot Effect revisited: A comprehensive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biebricher, Alexander; Havnes, Ove

    2012-06-01

    Numerical investigations of the Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE) Overshoot Effect have to date been undertaken under the premise of plasma neutrality and current equilibrium at any time. We find it necessary to revisit the calculations without these restrictions, since electrons and ions are attached to and absorbed by mesospheric dust particles at vastly different rates under PMSE conditions. We find that differences to earlier modeling might be so significant as to warrant further investigation. Furthermore, we conduct comprehensive studies of the PMSE Overshoot Effect and put the results in the context of experimental realities.

  15. Assessment of syngas composition variability in a pilot-scale downdraft biomass gasifier by an extended equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Marco; Barontini, Federica; Nicolella, Cristiano; Tognotti, Leonardo

    2013-07-01

    A new simplified approach based on equilibrium modeling is proposed in this work to describe the correlations among syngas species experimentally observed in a pilot scale downdraft biomass gasifier operated with different feedstocks (biomass pellets and vine prunings). The modeling approach is based on experimental evidence on the presence of devolatilization products in the syngas and fluctuations of syngas composition during stationary operation, accounted for by introducing two empirical parameters, a by-pass index and a permeability index. The simplified model correctly reproduces the correlations among the main syngas species (including methane and ethylene) resulting from experimental data of pilot tests with different feedstocks and under a wide range of operating conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A multicomponent ion-exchange equilibrium model for chabazite columns treating ORNL wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perona, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Planned near-term and long-term upgrades of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) will use chabazite columns to remove 90 Sr and 137 Cs from process wastewater. A valid equilibrium model is required for the design of these columns and for evaluating their performance when influent wastewater composition changes. The cations exchanged, in addition to strontium and cesium, are calcium, magnesium, and sodium. A model was developed using the Wilson equation for the calculation of the solid-phase activity coefficients. The model was tested against chabazite column runs on two different wastewaters and found to be valid. A sensitivity analysis was carried out for the projected wastewater compositions, in which the model was used to predict changes in relative separation factors for strontium and cesium subject to changes in calcium, magnesium, and sodium concentrations

  17. Integrated environmental assessment of future energy scenarios based on economic equilibrium models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igos, E.; Rugani, B.; Rege, S.; Benetto, E.; Drouet, L.; Zachary, D.; Haas, T.

    2014-01-01

    The future evolution of energy supply technologies strongly depends on (and affects) the economic and environmental systems, due to the high dependency of this sector on the availability and cost of fossil fuels, especially on the small regional scale. This paper aims at presenting the modeling system and preliminary results of a research project conducted on the scale of Luxembourg to assess the environmental impact of future energy scenarios for the country, integrating outputs from partial and computable general equilibrium models within hybrid Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) frameworks. The general equilibrium model for Luxembourg, LUXGEM, is used to evaluate the economic impacts of policy decisions and other economic shocks over the time horizon 2006-2030. A techno-economic (partial equilibrium) model for Luxembourg, ETEM, is used instead to compute operation levels of various technologies to meet the demand for energy services at the least cost along the same timeline. The future energy demand and supply are made consistent by coupling ETEM with LUXGEM so as to have the same macro-economic variables and energy shares driving both models. The coupling results are then implemented within a set of Environmentally-Extended Input-Output (EE-IO) models in historical time series to test the feasibility of the integrated framework and then to assess the environmental impacts of the country. Accordingly, a dis-aggregated energy sector was built with the different ETEM technologies in the EE-IO to allow hybridization with Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) and enrich the process detail. The results show that the environmental impact slightly decreased overall from 2006 to 2009. Most of the impacts come from some imported commodities (natural gas, used to produce electricity, and metalliferous ores and metal scrap). The main energy production technology is the combined-cycle gas turbine plant 'Twinerg', representing almost 80% of the domestic electricity production in Luxembourg

  18. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  19. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  20. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  1. Equilibrium Model of Discrete Dynamic Supply Chain Network with Random Demand and Advertisement Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guitao Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The advertisement can increase the consumers demand; therefore it is one of the most important marketing strategies in the operations management of enterprises. This paper aims to analyze the impact of advertising investment on a discrete dynamic supply chain network which consists of suppliers, manufactures, retailers, and demand markets associated at different tiers under random demand. The impact of advertising investment will last several planning periods besides the current period due to delay effect. Based on noncooperative game theory, variational inequality, and Lagrange dual theory, the optimal economic behaviors of the suppliers, the manufactures, the retailers, and the consumers in the demand markets are modeled. In turn, the supply chain network equilibrium model is proposed and computed by modified project contraction algorithm with fixed step. The effectiveness of the model is illustrated by numerical examples, and managerial insights are obtained through the analysis of advertising investment in multiple periods and advertising delay effect among different periods.

  2. On the stability of equilibrium for a reformulated foreign trade model of three countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassios, Ioannis K.; Kalogeropoulos, Grigoris

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we study the stability of equilibrium for a foreign trade model consisting of three countries. As the gravity equation has been proven an excellent tool of analysis and adequately stable over time and space all over the world, we further enhance the problem to three masses. We use the basic Structure of Heckscher-Ohlin-Samuelson model. The national income equals consumption outlays plus investment plus exports minus imports. The proposed reformulation of the problem focus on two basic concepts: (1) the delay inherited in our economic variables and (2) the interaction effect along the three economies involved. Stability and stabilizability conditions are investigated while numerical examples provide further insight and better understanding. Finally, a generalization of the gravity equation is somehow obtained for the model.

  3. Systematic validation of non-equilibrium thermochemical models using Bayesian inference

    KAUST Repository

    Miki, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. The validation process proposed by Babuška et al. [1] is applied to thermochemical models describing post-shock flow conditions. In this validation approach, experimental data is involved only in the calibration of the models, and the decision process is based on quantities of interest (QoIs) predicted on scenarios that are not necessarily amenable experimentally. Moreover, uncertainties present in the experimental data, as well as those resulting from an incomplete physical model description, are propagated to the QoIs. We investigate four commonly used thermochemical models: a one-temperature model (which assumes thermal equilibrium among all inner modes), and two-temperature models developed by Macheret et al. [2], Marrone and Treanor [3], and Park [4]. Up to 16 uncertain parameters are estimated using Bayesian updating based on the latest absolute volumetric radiance data collected at the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) installed inside the NASA Ames Research Center. Following the solution of the inverse problems, the forward problems are solved in order to predict the radiative heat flux, QoI, and examine the validity of these models. Our results show that all four models are invalid, but for different reasons: the one-temperature model simply fails to reproduce the data while the two-temperature models exhibit unacceptably large uncertainties in the QoI predictions.

  4. Final Technical Report: "Representing Endogenous Technological Change in Climate Policy Models: General Equilibrium Approaches"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Sue Wing

    2006-04-18

    The research supported by this award pursued three lines of inquiry: (1) The construction of dynamic general equilibrium models to simulate the accumulation and substitution of knowledge, which has resulted in the preparation and submission of several papers: (a) A submitted pedagogic paper which clarifies the structure and operation of computable general equilibrium (CGE) models (C.2), and a review article in press which develops a taxonomy for understanding the representation of technical change in economic and engineering models for climate policy analysis (B.3). (b) A paper which models knowledge directly as a homogeneous factor, and demonstrates that inter-sectoral reallocation of knowledge is the key margin of adjustment which enables induced technical change to lower the costs of climate policy (C.1). (c) An empirical paper which estimates the contribution of embodied knowledge to aggregate energy intensity in the U.S. (C.3), followed by a companion article which embeds these results within a CGE model to understand the degree to which autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) is attributable to technical change as opposed to sub-sectoral shifts in industrial composition (C.4) (d) Finally, ongoing theoretical work to characterize the precursors and implications of the response of innovation to emission limits (E.2). (2) Data development and simulation modeling to understand how the characteristics of discrete energy supply technologies determine their succession in response to emission limits when they are embedded within a general equilibrium framework. This work has produced two peer-reviewed articles which are currently in press (B.1 and B.2). (3) Empirical investigation of trade as an avenue for the transmission of technological change to developing countries, and its implications for leakage, which has resulted in an econometric study which is being revised for submission to a journal (E.1). As work commenced on this topic, the U.S. withdrawal

  5. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  6. Equilibrium, kinetic and reactive transport models for Pu: employing numerical methods to uncover the nature of the intrinsic colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Batchelor, Bill

    2000-01-01

    Future missions for the Department of Defense include processing plutonium for vitrification and conversion to mixed oxide fuels for commercial use. Such processing could result in the production of Pu-containing waste and unplanned releases of Pu to the environment. Some releases related to plutonium processing have occurred in the past. However, scientists are currently not able to explain the observed behavior of plutonium in natural systems. For example, classical filtration theory predicts that plutonium transport within groundwater should be limited to a few tens of meters. Experimental observations, however, show that plutonium is present in groundwater at distances orders of magnitude farther away from its source than predicted. Before adequate disposal practices can be designed for plutonium, its behavior in these systems must be better understood. The overall goal of this project is to develop equilibrium, kinetic and reactive transport models that describe the behavior of Pu in aqueous systems and to apply these models to natural and engineered systems

  7. Exclusive queueing model including the choice of service windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2018-01-01

    In a queueing system involving multiple service windows, choice behavior is a significant concern. This paper incorporates the choice of service windows into a queueing model with a floor represented by discrete cells. We contrived a logit-based choice algorithm for agents considering the numbers of agents and the distances to all service windows. Simulations were conducted with various parameters of agent choice preference for these two elements and for different floor configurations, including the floor length and the number of service windows. We investigated the model from the viewpoint of transit times and entrance block rates. The influences of the parameters on these factors were surveyed in detail and we determined that there are optimum floor lengths that minimize the transit times. In addition, we observed that the transit times were determined almost entirely by the entrance block rates. The results of the presented model are relevant to understanding queueing systems including the choice of service windows and can be employed to optimize facility design and floor management.

  8. Development of a global computable general equilibrium model coupled with detailed energy end-use technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Shinichiro; Masui, Toshihiko; Matsuoka, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Detailed energy end-use technology information is considered within a CGE model. • Aggregated macro results of the detailed model are similar to traditional model. • The detailed model shows unique characteristics in the household sector. - Abstract: A global computable general equilibrium (CGE) model integrating detailed energy end-use technologies is developed in this paper. The paper (1) presents how energy end-use technologies are treated within the model and (2) analyzes the characteristics of the model’s behavior. Energy service demand and end-use technologies are explicitly considered, and the share of technologies is determined by a discrete probabilistic function, namely a Logit function, to meet the energy service demand. Coupling with detailed technology information enables the CGE model to have more realistic representation in the energy consumption. The proposed model in this paper is compared with the aggregated traditional model under the same assumptions in scenarios with and without mitigation roughly consistent with the two degree climate mitigation target. Although the results of aggregated energy supply and greenhouse gas emissions are similar, there are three main differences between the aggregated and the detailed technologies models. First, GDP losses in mitigation scenarios are lower in the detailed technology model (2.8% in 2050) as compared with the aggregated model (3.2%). Second, price elasticity and autonomous energy efficiency improvement are heterogeneous across regions and sectors in the detailed technology model, whereas the traditional aggregated model generally utilizes a single value for each of these variables. Third, the magnitude of emissions reduction and factors (energy intensity and carbon factor reduction) related to climate mitigation also varies among sectors in the detailed technology model. The household sector in the detailed technology model has a relatively higher reduction for both energy

  9. Gasification of biomass in a fixed bed downdraft gasifier--a realistic model including tar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Niladri Sekhar; Ghosh, Sudip; De, Sudipta

    2012-03-01

    This study presents a model for fixed bed downdraft biomass gasifiers considering tar also as one of the gasification products. A representative tar composition along with its mole fractions, as available in the literature was used as an input parameter within the model. The study used an equilibrium approach for the applicable gasification reactions and also considered possible deviations from equilibrium to further upgrade the equilibrium model to validate a range of reported experimental results. Heat balance was applied to predict the gasification temperature and the predicted values were compared with reported results in literature. A comparative study was made with some reference models available in the literature and also with experimental results reported in the literature. Finally a predicted variation of performance of the gasifier by this validated model for different air-fuel ratio and moisture content was also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, E Atlee

    2000-01-01

    Ideal as an elementary introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics, this volume covers both classical and quantum methodology for open and closed systems. Introductory chapters familiarize readers with probability and microscopic models of systems, while additional chapters describe the general derivation of the fundamental statistical mechanics relationships. The final chapter contains 16 sections, each dealing with a different application, ordered according to complexity, from classical through degenerate quantum statistical mechanics. Key features include an elementary introduction t

  11. A Review of Equation of State Models, Chemical Equilibrium Calculations and CERV Code Requirements for SHS Detonation Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Becker-Kistiakowsky-Wilson (BKW) 2. Jacobs-Cowperthwaite-Zwisler ( JCZ ) 3. Hayes 4. Davis 5. Williamsburg 6. JWL 7. HOM the JWL and HOM EOS...have often been used in hydrocode/CFD simulations. On the other hand, the BKW and JCZ equations remain the EOS of choice in chemical equilibrium code...development for condensed explosives. Various databases have been constructed for the BKW and JCZ equations of state. These include: BKWC

  12. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  13. A Kinetic Ladle Furnace Process Simulation Model: Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone Model Using FactSage Macro Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ende, Marie-Aline; Jung, In-Ho

    2017-02-01

    The ladle furnace (LF) is widely used in the secondary steelmaking process in particular for the de-sulfurization, alloying, and reheating of liquid steel prior to the casting process. The Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone model using the FactSage macro processing code was applied to develop a kinetic LF process model. The slag/metal interactions, flux additions to slag, various metallic additions to steel, and arcing in the LF process were taken into account to describe the variations of chemistry and temperature of steel and slag. The LF operation data for several steel grades from different plants were accurately described using the present kinetic model.

  14. Entropy analysis on non-equilibrium two-phase flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karwat, H.; Ruan, Y.Q. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    A method of entropy analysis according to the second law of thermodynamics is proposed for the assessment of a class of practical non-equilibrium two-phase flow models. Entropy conditions are derived directly from a local instantaneous formulation for an arbitrary control volume of a structural two-phase fluid, which are finally expressed in terms of the averaged thermodynamic independent variables and their time derivatives as well as the boundary conditions for the volume. On the basis of a widely used thermal-hydraulic system code it is demonstrated with practical examples that entropy production rates in control volumes can be numerically quantified by using the data from the output data files. Entropy analysis using the proposed method is useful in identifying some potential problems in two-phase flow models and predictions as well as in studying the effects of some free parameters in closure relationships.

  15. Regional eddy vorticity transport and the equilibrium vorticity budgets of a numerical model ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. E.; Holland, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    A mean vorticity budget analysis is presented of Holland's (1978) numerical ocean general circulation experiment. The stable budgets are compared with classical circulation theory to emphasize the ways in which the mesoscale motions of the model alter (or leave unaltered) classical vorticity balances. The basinwide meridional transports of vorticity by the mean flow and by the mesoscale flow in the mean are evaluated to establish the role(s) of the mesoscale in the larger scale equilibrium vorticity transports. The vorticity equation for this model fluid system is presented and the budget analysis method is described. Vorticity budgets over the selected regions and on a larger scale are given, and a summary of budget results is provided along with remarks about the utility of this type of analysis.

  16. An equilibrium model for tungsten fuzz in an eroding plasma environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerner, R.P.; Baldwin, M.J.; Stangeby, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    A model equating the growth rate of tungsten fuzz on a plasma-exposed surface to the erosion rate of the fuzzy surface is developed to predict the likelihood of tungsten fuzz formation in the steady-state environment of toroidal confinement devices. To date this question has not been answered because the operational conditions in existing magnetic confinement machines do not necessarily replicate those expected in future fusion reactors (i.e. high-fluence operation, high temperature plasma-facing materials and edge plasma relatively free of condensable impurities). The model developed is validated by performing plasma exposure experiments at different incident ion energies (thereby varying the erosion rate) and measuring the resultant fuzz layer thickness. The results indicate that if the conditions exist for fuzz development in a steady-state plasma (surface temperature and energetic helium flux), then the erosion rate will determine the equilibrium thickness of the surface fuzz layer.

  17. The Analysis of Pricing Power of Preponderant Metal Mineral Resources under the Perspective of Intergenerational Equity and Social Preferences: An Analytical Framework Based on Cournot Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirui Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper combines intergenerational equity equilibrium and social preferences equilibrium with Cournot equilibrium solving the technological problem of intergenerational equity and strategic value compensation confirmation, achieving the effective combination between sustainable development concept and value evaluation, thinking and expanding the theoretical framework for the lack of pricing power of mineral resources. The conclusion of the theoretical model and the numerical simulation shows that intergenerational equity equilibrium and social preferences equilibrium enhance international trade market power of preponderant metal mineral resources owing to the production of intergenerational equity compensation value and strategic value. However, the impact exerted on Cournot market power by social preferences is inconsistent: that is, changes of altruistic Cournot equilibrium and reciprocal inequity Cournot equilibrium are consistent, while inequity aversion Cournot equilibrium has the characteristic of loss aversion, namely, under the consideration of inequity aversion Cournot competition, Counot-Nash equilibrium transforms monotonically with sympathy and jealousy of inequity aversion.

  18. Phase equilibrium data and thermodynamic modelling of the system (propane + DMF + methanol) at high pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charin, Rafael M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Polytechnic Center (DTQ/ST/UFPR), Jardim das Americas, Curitiba 82530-990, PR (Brazil); Department of Food Engineering, URI - Campus de Erechim, Av. Sete de Setembro, 1621, Erechim 99700-000, RS (Brazil); Corazza, Marcos L.; Ndiaye, Papa M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Polytechnic Center (DTQ/ST/UFPR), Jardim das Americas, Curitiba 82530-990, PR (Brazil); Rigo, Aline A.; Mazutti, Marcio A. [Department of Food Engineering, URI - Campus de Erechim, Av. Sete de Setembro, 1621, Erechim 99700-000, RS (Brazil); Vladimir Oliveira, J., E-mail: vladimir@uricer.edu.b [Department of Food Engineering, URI - Campus de Erechim, Av. Sete de Setembro, 1621, Erechim 99700-000, RS (Brazil)

    2011-03-15

    Reported in this work are phase equilibrium data at high pressures for the binary and ternary systems formed by {l_brace}propane + N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) + methanol{r_brace}. Phase equilibrium measurements were performed in a high-pressure, variable-volume view cell, following the static synthetic method for obtaining the experimental bubble and dew points transition data over the temperature range of (363 to 393) K, pressures up to 11.5 MPa and overall mole fraction of the lighter component varying from 0.1 to 0.995. For the systems investigated, vapour-liquid (VLE), liquid-liquid (LLE) and vapour-liquid-liquid (VLLE) phase transitions were visually recorded. Results show that the systems investigated present UCST (upper critical solution temperature) phase transition curves with an UCEP (upper critical end point) at a temperature higher than the propane critical temperature. The experimental data were modelled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state with the Wong-Sandler and the classical quadratic mixing rules, affording a satisfactory representation of the experimental data.

  19. THERMAL NON-EQUILIBRIUM REVISITED: A HEATING MODEL FOR CORONAL LOOPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikić, Zoran; Winebarger, Amy R.; Mok, Yung

    2013-01-01

    The location and frequency of events that heat the million-degree corona are still a matter of debate. One potential heating scenario is that the energy release is effectively steady and highly localized at the footpoints of coronal structures. Such an energy deposition drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions in the hydrodynamic equations in longer loops. This heating scenario was considered and discarded by Klimchuk et al. on the basis of their one-dimensional simulations as incapable of reproducing observational characteristics of loops. In this paper, we use three-dimensional simulations to generate synthetic emission images, from which we select and analyze six loops. The main differences between our model and that of Klimchuk et al. concern (1) dimensionality, (2) resolution, (3) geometrical properties of the loops, (4) heating function, and (5) radiative function. We find evidence, in this small set of simulated loops, that the evolution of the light curves, the variation of temperature along the loops, the density profile, and the absence of small-scale structures are compatible with the characteristics of observed loops. We conclude that quasi-steady footpoint heating that drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions cannot yet be ruled out as a viable heating scenario for EUV loops

  20. Molecular finite-size effects in stochastic models of equilibrium chemical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianci, Claudia; Smith, Stephen; Grima, Ramon

    2016-02-28

    The reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a standard modelling approach for understanding stochastic and spatial chemical kinetics. An inherent assumption is that molecules are point-like. Here, we introduce the excluded volume reaction-diffusion master equation (vRDME) which takes into account volume exclusion effects on stochastic kinetics due to a finite molecular radius. We obtain an exact closed form solution of the RDME and of the vRDME for a general chemical system in equilibrium conditions. The difference between the two solutions increases with the ratio of molecular diameter to the compartment length scale. We show that an increase in the fraction of excluded space can (i) lead to deviations from the classical inverse square root law for the noise-strength, (ii) flip the skewness of the probability distribution from right to left-skewed, (iii) shift the equilibrium of bimolecular reactions so that more product molecules are formed, and (iv) strongly modulate the Fano factors and coefficients of variation. These volume exclusion effects are found to be particularly pronounced for chemical species not involved in chemical conservation laws. Finally, we show that statistics obtained using the vRDME are in good agreement with those obtained from Brownian dynamics with excluded volume interactions.

  1. Path sets size, model specification, or model estimation: Which one matters most in predicting stochastic user equilibrium traffic flow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Haghani

    2016-06-01

    Further investigations with respect to the relative importance of STA model estimation (or equivalently, parameter calibration and model specification (or equivalently, error term formulation are also conducted. A paired combinatorial logit (PCL assignment model with an origin–destination-specific-parameter, along with a heuristic method of model estimation (calibration, is proposed. The proposed model cannot only accommodate the correlation between path utilities, but also accounts for the fact that travelling between different origin–destination (O–D pairs can correspond to different levels of stochasticity and choice randomness. Results suggest that the estimation of the stochastic user equilibrium (SUE models can affect the outcome of the flow prediction far more meaningfully than the complexity of the choice model (i.e., model specification.

  2. Criticality of the random field Ising model in and out of equilibrium: A nonperturbative functional renormalization group description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Ivan; Tarjus, Gilles; Tissier, Matthieu

    2018-03-01

    We show that, contrary to previous suggestions based on computer simulations or erroneous theoretical treatments, the critical points of the random-field Ising model out of equilibrium, when quasistatically changing the applied source at zero temperature, and in equilibrium are not in the same universality class below some critical dimension dD R≈5.1 . We demonstrate this by implementing a nonperturbative functional renormalization group for the associated dynamical field theory. Above dD R, the avalanches, which characterize the evolution of the system at zero temperature, become irrelevant at large distance, and hysteresis and equilibrium critical points are then controlled by the same fixed point. We explain how to use computer simulation and finite-size scaling to check the correspondence between in and out of equilibrium criticality in a far less ambiguous way than done so far.

  3. Statistical equilibrium calculations for silicon in early-type model stellar atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamp, L.W.

    1976-02-01

    Line profiles of 36 multiplets of silicon (Si) II, III, and IV were computed for a grid of model atmospheres covering the range from 15,000 to 35,000 K in effective temperature and 2.5 to 4.5 in log (gravity). The computations involved simultaneous solution of the steady-state statistical equilibrium equations for the populations and of the equation of radiative transfer in the lines. The variables were linearized, and successive corrections were computed until a minimal accuracy of 1/1000 in the line intensities was reached. The common assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) was dropped. The model atmospheres used also were computed by non-LTE methods. Some effects that were incorporated into the calculations were the depression of the continuum by free electrons, hydrogen and ionized helium line blocking, and auto-ionization and dielectronic recombination, which later were found to be insignificant. Use of radiation damping and detailed electron (quadratic Stark) damping constants had small but significant effects on the strong resonance lines of Si III and IV. For weak and intermediate-strength lines, large differences with respect to LTE computations, the results of which are also presented, were found in line shapes and strengths. For the strong lines the differences are generally small, except for the models at the hot, low-gravity extreme of the range. These computations should be useful in the interpretation of the spectra of stars in the spectral range B0--B5, luminosity classes III, IV, and V

  4. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  5. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors.

  6. Chemical equilibrium modeling of organic acids, pH, aluminum, and iron in Swedish surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstedt, Carin S; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Köhler, Stephan J

    2010-11-15

    A consistent chemical equilibrium model that calculates pH from charge balance constraints and aluminum and iron speciation in the presence of natural organic matter is presented. The model requires input data for total aluminum, iron, organic carbon, fluoride, sulfate, and charge balance ANC. The model is calibrated to pH measurements (n = 322) by adjusting the fraction of active organic matter only, which results in an error of pH prediction on average below 0.2 pH units. The small systematic discrepancy between the analytical results for the monomeric aluminum fractionation and the model results is corrected for separately for two different fractionation techniques (n = 499) and validated on a large number (n = 3419) of geographically widely spread samples all over Sweden. The resulting average error for inorganic monomeric aluminum is around 1 µM. In its present form the model is the first internally consistent modeling approach for Sweden and may now be used as a tool for environmental quality management. Soil gibbsite with a log *Ks of 8.29 at 25°C together with a pH dependent loading function that uses molar Al/C ratios describes the amount of aluminum in solution in the presence of organic matter if the pH is roughly above 6.0.

  7. Computable general equilibrium models for sustainability impact assessment: Status quo and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer, Christoph; Loeschel, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Sustainability Impact Assessment (SIA) of economic, environmental, and social effects triggered by governmental policies has become a central requirement for policy design. The three dimensions of SIA are inherently intertwined and subject to trade-offs. Quantification of trade-offs for policy decision support requires numerical models in order to assess systematically the interference of complex interacting forces that affect economic performance, environmental quality, and social conditions. This paper investigates the use of computable general equilibrium (CGE) models for measuring the impacts of policy interference on policy-relevant economic, environmental, and social (institutional) indicators. We find that operational CGE models used for energy-economy-environment (E3) analyses have a good coverage of central economic indicators. Environmental indicators such as energy-related emissions with direct links to economic activities are widely covered, whereas indicators with complex natural science background such as water stress or biodiversity loss are hardly represented. Social indicators stand out for very weak coverage, mainly because they are vaguely defined or incommensurable. Our analysis identifies prospects for future modeling in the field of integrated assessment that link standard E3-CGE-models to themespecific complementary models with environmental and social focus. (author)

  8. A nested-LES wall-modeling approach for computation of high Reynolds number equilibrium and non-equilibrium wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yifeng; Akhavan, Rayhaneh

    2014-11-01

    A nested-LES wall-modeling approach for high Reynolds number, wall-bounded turbulence is presented. In this approach, a coarse-grained LES is performed in the full-domain, along with a nested, fine-resolution LES in a minimal flow unit. The coupling between the two domains is achieved by renormalizing the instantaneous LES velocity fields to match the profiles of kinetic energies of components of the mean velocity and velocity fluctuations in both domains to those of the minimal flow unit in the near-wall region, and to those of the full-domain in the outer region. The method is of fixed computational cost, independent of Reτ , in homogenous flows, and is O (Reτ) in strongly non-homogenous flows. The method has been applied to equilibrium turbulent channel flows at 1000 shear-driven, 3D turbulent channel flow at Reτ ~ 2000 . In equilibrium channel flow, the friction coefficient and the one-point turbulence statistics are predicted in agreement with Dean's correlation and available DNS and experimental data. In shear-driven, 3D channel flow, the evolution of turbulence statistics is predicted in agreement with experimental data of Driver & Hebbar (1991) in shear-driven, 3D boundary layer flow.

  9. Impacts of integration of Brazil with the European Union through a general equilibrium model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezequiel Insaurriaga Megiato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the bilateral trade between Brazil and the European Union (EU in the period 2002–2012, examining the trade opportunities based on a full integration process. It employs a computable general equilibrium model from the Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP, aiming at identifying the sectors that would benefit most from the agreement, according to their technological intensity. The results show that Brazil benefits most from the agreement in terms of welfare and would also increase the country's exports of primary products. However, it would cause a decrease in production and exports of products with higher technological intensity, increasing the country's imports from the EU, in line with their comparative advantages.

  10. EVALUATION OF BIOMASS AND COAL CO-GASIFICATION OF BRAZILIAN FEEDSTOCK USING A CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Abstract Coal and biomass are energy sources with great potential for use in Brazil. Coal-biomass co-gasification enables the combination of the positive characteristics of each fuel, besides leading to a cleaner use of coal. The present study evaluates the potential of co-gasification of binary coal-biomass blends using sources widely available in Brazil. This analysis employs computational simulations using a reliable thermodynamic equilibrium model. Favorable operational conditions at high temperatures are determined in order to obtain gaseous products suitable for energy cogeneration and chemical synthesis. This study shows that blends with biomass ratios of 5% and equivalence ratios ≤ 0.3 lead to high cold gas efficiencies. Suitable gaseous products for chemical synthesis were identified at biomass ratios ≤ 35% and moisture contents ≥ 40%. Formation of undesirable nitrogen and sulfur compounds was also analyzed.

  11. Prediction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons toxicity using equilibrium partitioning approach and narcosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ololade, I A

    2010-09-01

    The study underscores the use of equilibrium partitioning (EqP) to determine bioavailability and the narcosis theory to estimate toxicity of PAHs to benthic invertebrates. Eight PAHs (anthracene, azuleno(2,1-b)thiophene, benz(a)anthracene, carbazole, dibenzothiophene, benz(a)azulene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and phenanthrene) were identified with phenanthrene and carbazole recording the highest (6.29 microg/g) and least (0.06 microg/g) concentrations at both seasons. Based on EqP and Narcosis model, the sum of PAHs toxic unit (SigmaTU), at both sites is <1, suggesting no likelihood of PAHs toxicity to benthic invertebrates. The study suggests continuous PAH monitoring especially with aquatic species due to their transfer to human via food chain.

  12. Resilience of traffic networks: From perturbation to recovery via a dynamic restricted equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogal, Maria; O'Connor, Alan; Caulfield, Brian; Martinez-Pastor, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    When a disruptive event takes place in a traffic network some important questions arise, such as how stressed the traffic network is, whether the system is able to respond to this stressful situation, or how long the system needs to recover a new equilibrium position after suffering this perturbation. Quantifying these aspects allows the comparison of different systems, to scale the degree of damage, to identify traffic network weaknesses, and to analyse the effect of user knowledge about the traffic network state. The indicator that accounts for performance and recovery pattern under disruptive events is known as resilience. This paper presents a methodology to assess the resilience of a traffic network when a given perturbation occurs, from the beginning of the perturbation to the total system recovery. To consider the dynamic nature of the problem, a new dynamic equilibrium-restricted assignment model is presented to simulate the network performance evolution, which takes into consideration important aspects, such as the cost increment due to the perturbation, the system impedance to alter its previous state and the user stress level. Finally, this methodology is used to evaluate the resilience indices of a real network. - Highlights: • Method to assess the resilience of a traffic network suffering progressive impacts. • It simulates the dynamic response during the perturbation and system recovery. • The resilience index is based on the travel costs and the stress level of users. • It considers the capacity of adaptation of the system to the new situations. • The model evaluates redundancy, adaptability, ability to recover, etc.

  13. Computable General Equilibrium Model Fiscal Year 2013 Capability Development Report - April 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC); Rivera, Michael K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC)

    2014-04-01

    This report documents progress made on continued developments of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center (NISAC) Computable General Equilibrium Model (NCGEM), developed in fiscal year 2012. In fiscal year 2013, NISAC the treatment of the labor market and tests performed with the model to examine the properties of the solutions computed by the model. To examine these, developers conducted a series of 20 simulations for 20 U.S. States. Each of these simulations compared an economic baseline simulation with an alternative simulation that assumed a 20-percent reduction in overall factor productivity in the manufacturing industries of each State. Differences in the simulation results between the baseline and alternative simulations capture the economic impact of the reduction in factor productivity. While not every State is affected in precisely the same way, the reduction in manufacturing industry productivity negatively affects the manufacturing industries in each State to an extent proportional to the reduction in overall factor productivity. Moreover, overall economic activity decreases when manufacturing sector productivity is reduced. Developers ran two additional simulations: (1) a version of the model for the State of Michigan, with manufacturing divided into two sub-industries (automobile and other vehicle manufacturing as one sub-industry and the rest of manufacturing as the other subindustry); and (2) a version of the model for the United States, divided into 30 industries. NISAC conducted these simulations to illustrate the flexibility of industry definitions in NCGEM and to examine the simulation properties of in more detail.

  14. Equilibrium-eulerian les model for turbulent poly-dispersed particle-laden flow

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    An efficient Eulerian method for poly-dispersed particles in turbulent flows is implemented, verified and validated for a channel flow. The approach couples a mixture model with a quadrature-based moment method for the particle size distribution in a LES framework, augmented by an approximate deconvolution method to reconstructs the unfiltered velocity. The particle velocity conditioned on particle size is calculated with an equilibrium model, valid for low Stokes numbers. A population balance equation is solved with the direct quadrature method of moments, that efficiently represents the continuous particle size distribution. In this first study particulate processes are not considered and the capability of the model to properly describe particle transport is investigated for a turbulent channel flow. First, single-phase LES are validated through comparison with DNS. Then predictions for the two-phase system, with particles characterised by Stokes numbers ranging from 0.2 to 5, are compared with Lagrangian DNS in terms of particle velocity and accumulation at the walls. Since this phenomenon (turbophoresis) is driven by turbulent fluctuations and depends strongly on the particle Stokes number, the approximation of the particle size distribution, the choice of the sub-grid scale model and the use of an approximate deconvolution method are important to obtain good results. Our method can be considered as a fast and efficient alternative to classical Lagrangian methods or Eulerian multi-fluid models in which poly-dispersity is usually neglected.

  15. Thermochemical Equilibrium Model of Synthetic Natural Gas Production from Coal Gasification Using Aspen Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Barrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of synthetic or substitute natural gas (SNG from coal is a process of interest in Colombia where the reserves-to-production ratio (R/P for natural gas is expected to be between 7 and 10 years, while the R/P for coal is forecasted to be around 90 years. In this work, the process to produce SNG by means of coal-entrained flow gasifiers is modeled under thermochemical equilibrium with the Gibbs free energy approach. The model was developed using a complete and comprehensive Aspen Plus model. Two typical technologies used in entrained flow gasifiers such as coal dry and coal slurry are modeled and simulated. Emphasis is put on interactions between the fuel feeding technology and selected energy output parameters of coal-SNG process, that is, energy efficiencies, power, and SNG quality. It was found that coal rank does not significantly affect energy indicators such as cold gas, process, and global efficiencies. However, feeding technology clearly has an effect on the process due to the gasifying agent. Simulations results are compared against available technical data with good accuracy. Thus, the proposed model is considered as a versatile and useful computational tool to study and optimize the coal to SNG process.

  16. Combining the GW formalism with the polarizable continuum model: A state-specific non-equilibrium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, Ivan; Jacquemin, Denis; Blase, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    We have implemented the polarizable continuum model within the framework of the many-body Green's function GW formalism for the calculation of electron addition and removal energies in solution. The present formalism includes both ground-state and non-equilibrium polarization effects. In addition, the polarization energies are state-specific, allowing to obtain the bath-induced renormalisation energy of all occupied and virtual energy levels. Our implementation is validated by comparisons with ΔSCF calculations performed at both the density functional theory and coupled-cluster single and double levels for solvated nucleobases. The present study opens the way to GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations in disordered condensed phases of interest in organic optoelectronics, wet chemistry, and biology.

  17. Combining the GW formalism with the polarizable continuum model: A state-specific non-equilibrium approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchemin, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.duchemin@cea.fr [INAC, SP2M/L-Sim, CEA/UJF Cedex 09, 38054 Grenoble (France); Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire CEISAM - UMR CNR 6230, Université de Nantes, 2 Rue de la Houssinière, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 1 rue Descartes, 75005 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Blase, Xavier [CNRS, Inst. NÉEL, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst. NÉEL, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-04-28

    We have implemented the polarizable continuum model within the framework of the many-body Green’s function GW formalism for the calculation of electron addition and removal energies in solution. The present formalism includes both ground-state and non-equilibrium polarization effects. In addition, the polarization energies are state-specific, allowing to obtain the bath-induced renormalisation energy of all occupied and virtual energy levels. Our implementation is validated by comparisons with ΔSCF calculations performed at both the density functional theory and coupled-cluster single and double levels for solvated nucleobases. The present study opens the way to GW and Bethe-Salpeter calculations in disordered condensed phases of interest in organic optoelectronics, wet chemistry, and biology.

  18. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  19. Internalisation of external costs in the Polish power generation sector: A partial equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudelko, Mariusz

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a methodical framework, which is the basis for the economic analysis of the mid-term planning of development of the Polish energy system. The description of the partial equilibrium model and its results are demonstrated for different scenarios applied. The model predicts the generation, investment and pricing of mid-term decisions that refer to the Polish electricity and heat markets. The current structure of the Polish energy sector is characterised by interactions between the supply and demand sides of the energy sector. The supply side regards possibilities to deliver fuels from domestic and import sources and their conversion through transformation processes. Public power plants, public CHP plants, industry CHP plants and municipal heat plants represent the main producers of energy in Poland. Demand is characterised by the major energy consumers, i.e. industry and construction, transport, agriculture, trade and services, individual consumers and export. The relationships between the domestic electricity and heat markets are modelled taking into account external costs estimates. The volume and structure of energy production, electricity and heat prices, emissions, external costs and social welfare of different scenarios are presented. Results of the model demonstrate that the internalisation of external costs through the increase in energy prices implies significant improvement in social welfare

  20. SHARC, a model for calculating atmospheric and infrared radiation under non-equilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, R. L.; Duff, J. W.; Gruninger, J. H.; Bernstein, L. S.; Sharma, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    A new computer model, SHARC, has been developed by the Air Force for calculating high-altitude atmospheric IR radiance and transmittance spectra with a resolution of better than 1/cm. Comprehensive coverage of the 2 to 40 microns (250/cm to 5,000/cm) wavelength region is provided for arbitrary lines of sight in the 50-300 km altitude regime. SHARC accounts for the deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in vibrational state populations by explicitly modeling the detailed production, loss, and energy transfer process among the important molecular vibrational states. The calculated vibrational populations are found to be similar to those obtained from other non-LTE codes. The radiation transport algorithm is based on a single-line equivalent width approximation along with a statistical correction for line overlap. This approach is reasonably accurate for most applications and is roughly two orders of magnitude faster than the traditional LBL methods which explicitly integrate over individual line shapes. In addition to quiescent atmospheric processes, this model calculates the auroral production and excitation of CO2, NO, and NO(+) in localized regions of the atmosphere. Illustrative comparisons of SHARC predictions to other models and to data from the CIRRIS, SPIRE, and FWI field experiments are presented.

  1. SHARC, a model for calculating atmospheric infrared radiation under non-equilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, R. L.; Duff, J. W.; Gruninger, J. H.; Bernstein, L. S.; Matthew, M. W.; Adler-Golden, S. M.; Robertson, D. C.; Sharma, R. D.; Brown, J. H.; Healey, R. J.

    A new computer model, SHARC, has been developed by the U.S. Air Force for calculating high-altitude atmospheric IR radiance and transmittance spectra with a resolution of better than 1 cm 4. Comprehensive coverage of the 2 to 40 μm (250 to 5,000 cm-1) wavelength region is provided for arbitrary lines of sight in the 50-300 km altitude regime. SHARC accounts for the deviation from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) in state populations by explicitly modeling the detailed production, loss, and energy transfer processes among the contributing molecular vibrational states. The calculated vibrational populations are found to be similar to those obtained from other non-LTE codes. The radiation transport algorithm is based on a single-line equivalent width approximation along with a statistical correction for line overlap. This approach calculates LOS radiance values which are accurate to ±10% and is roughly two orders of magnitude faster than the traditional LBL methods which explicitly integrate over individual line shapes. In addition to quiescent atmospheric processes, this model calculates the auroral production and excitation of CO2, NO, and NO+ in localized regions of the atmosphere. Illustrative comparisons of SHARC predictions to other models and to data from the CIRRIS, SPIRE and FWI field experiments are presented.

  2. Evaluation of trace metals bioavailability in Japanese river waters using DGT and a chemical equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuping; Naito, Wataru; Hanai, Yoshimichi; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2013-09-15

    To develop efficient and effective methods of assessing and managing the risk posed by metals to aquatic life, it is important to determine the effects of water chemistry on the bioavailability of metals in surface water. In this study, we employed the diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) to determine the bioavailability of metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb) in Japanese water systems. The DGT results were compared with a chemical equilibrium model (WHAM 7.0) calculation to examine its robustness and utility to predict dynamic metal speciation. The DGT measurements showed that biologically available fractions of metals in the rivers impacted by mine drainage and metal industries were relatively high compared with those in urban rivers. Comparison between the DGT results and the model calculation indicated good agreement for Zn. The model calculation concentrations for Ni and Cu were higher than the DGT concentrations at most sites. As for Pb, the model calculation depended on whether the precipitated iron(III) hydroxide or precipitated aluminum(III) hydroxide was assumed to have an active surface. Our results suggest that the use of WHAM 7.0 combined with the DGT method can predict bioavailable concentrations of most metals (except for Pb) with reasonable accuracy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Dynamic spatial equilibrium models for social cost benefit analysis of transport projects and policies: implementations for the Netherlands and Hungary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavasszy, L.A.; Varga, A.; Koike, A.

    2008-01-01

    During the late 80’s the so-called SCGE (Spatial Computable General Equilibrium) models were introduced within the research community. These models were cross-sectional in nature and were most interesting from the perspective of showing the consequences of changes in interregional interactions; in

  4. SHARC (Strategic High-Altitude Radiance Code). A computer model for calculating atmospheric radiation under non-equilibrium conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.; Ratkowski, A.J.; Sundberg, R.L.; Duff, J.W.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1989-02-01

    The Strategic High-Altitude Radiance Code (SHARC ) is a new computer code that calculates atmospheric radiation for paths from 60 to 300 km altitude in the 2-40 micro spectral region. It models radiation due to NLTE (Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium) molecular emissions which are the dominant sources at these altitudes. The initial version of SHARC, which is described in this paper, includes the five strongest IR radiators, CO/sub 2/, NO, O/sub 3/, H/sub 2/O and CO. Calculation of excited state populations is accomplished by interfacing a Monte Carlo model for radiative excitation and energy transfer with a highly flexible chemical kinetics module derived from the Sandia CHEMKIN Code. An equivalent-width, line-by-line approach for the radiation transport gives a spectral resolution of about 0.50/cm. The radiative-transport calculation includes the effects of combined Doppler-Lorentz (Voigt) line shapes. Particular emphasis was placed on modular construction and supporting data files so that models and model parameters can be modified or upgraded as additional data become available. The initial version of SHARC is now ready for distribution.

  5. Equilibrium model for agglomeration phenomena in solid polydispersions subject to adsorption from liquid solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzasalma, Stefano A.

    1997-06-01

    A general thermodynamic-electrochemical model, supported by an experimental titration procedure, is proposed to determine the number of solid aggregates of a polydispersed (and/or colloidal) system in a liquid medium subject to simultaneous agglomeration phenomena and adsorption of H+ and/or OH- ions from solution and endowed with an interparticle potential which is not strongly attractive. In a previous work [D. Beruto, S. Mezzasalma, and D. Baldovino, J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 2 91, 323 (1995)] adsorptions of protons and/or oxidryles onto the solid surfaces of monomodal silicon nitride aqueous dispersions were obtained by titration measurements made with a metal-oxide-semiconductor ion-sensitive field-effect transistor pH-meter device and employed to obtain the number of solid aggregates from the thermodynamic equilibrium state of the slurries, derived from the total Gibbs function. More generally, to apply the same titration procedure to liquid dispersions involving many solid phases, it is shown here that a simple partition criterion can be defined to obtain the experimental adsorption data related to each solid phase of the polydispersed system. Theoretically, the equilibrium state is achieved from the total Gibbs free function of the slurries with respect to each single solid aggregate species and to the ``mixed'' aggregates, containing all solid phases. To this end, following the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek theory, Coulombic charge-charge interactions and dispersion-force effects, other than general multipole contributions among mixed clusters, are considered as not too strong perturbations of the ideal Gibbs free energy. By inserting the titration data in the physico-chemical condition theoretically derived, it is possible to obtain all numbers of solid aggregates as a function of the electrolyte concentration (pH) in the liquid solution.

  6. A numerical model of non-equilibrium thermal plasmas. I. Transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Li, He-Ping; Murphy, Anthony B.; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2013-03-01

    A self-consistent and complete numerical model for investigating the fundamental processes in a non-equilibrium thermal plasma system consists of the governing equations and the corresponding physical properties of the plasmas. In this paper, a new kinetic theory of the transport properties of two-temperature (2-T) plasmas, based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation using a modified Chapman-Enskog method, is presented. This work is motivated by the large discrepancies between the theories for the calculation of the transport properties of 2-T plasmas proposed by different authors in previous publications. In the present paper, the coupling between electrons and heavy species is taken into account, but reasonable simplifications are adopted, based on the physical fact that me/mh ≪ 1, where me and mh are, respectively, the masses of electrons and heavy species. A new set of formulas for the transport coefficients of 2-T plasmas is obtained. The new theory has important physical and practical advantages over previous approaches. In particular, the diffusion coefficients are complete and satisfy the mass conversation law due to the consideration of the coupling between electrons and heavy species. Moreover, this essential requirement is satisfied without increasing the complexity of the transport coefficient formulas. Expressions for the 2-T combined diffusion coefficients are obtained. The expressions for the transport coefficients can be reduced to the corresponding well-established expressions for plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium for the case in which the electron and heavy-species temperatures are equal.

  7. The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer with non-equilibrium model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    Full Text Available The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer is studied when the fluid and solid phase are not in local thermal equilibrium. The modified Darcy model is used for the momentum equation and a two-field model is used for energy equation each representing the fluid and solid phases separately. The effect of thermal non-equilibrium on the onset of double diffusive convection is discussed. The critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding wave number for the exchange of stability and over-stability are obtained, and the onset criterion for stationary and oscillatory convection is derived analytically and discussed numerically.

  8. The Use of VMD Data/Model to Test Different Thermodynamic Models for Vapour-Liquid Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; Azquierdo-Gil, M.A.; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2004-01-01

    Vacuum membrane distillation (VMD) has been studied as a separation process to remove volatile organic compounds from aqueous streams. A vapour pressure difference across a microporous hydrophobic membrane is the driving force for the mass transport through the membrane pores (this transport take...... values; membrane type: PTFE/PP/PVDF; feed flow rate; feed temperature. A comparison is made between different thermodynamic models for calculating the vapour-liquid equilibrium at the membrane/pore interface. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  9. Development of effect assessment methodology for the deployment of fast reactor cycle system with dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotani, Hiroki; Ono, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) is a widely used computable general equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Purdue University. Although the GTAP-E, an energy environmental version of the GTAP model, is useful for surveying the energy-economy-environment-trade linkage is economic policy analysis, it does not have the decomposed model of the electricity sector and its analyses are comparatively static. In this study, a recursive dynamic CGE model with a detailed electricity technology bundle with nuclear power generation including FR was developed based on the GTAP-E to evaluate the long-term socioeconomic effects of FR deployment. The capital stock changes caused by international investments and some dynamic constraints of the FR deployment and operation (e.g., load following capability and plutonium mass balance) were incorporated in the analyses. The long-term socioeconomic effects resulting from the deployment of economic competitive FR with innovative technologies can be assessed; the cumulative effects of the FR deployment on GDP calculated using this model costed over 40 trillion yen in Japan and 400 trillion yen worldwide, which were several times more than the cost of the effects calculated using the conventional cost-benefit analysis tool, because of ripple effects and energy substitutions among others. (author)

  10. Strategic forward contracting in electricity markets: modelling and analysis by equilibrium method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, T.S.; Zhang, S.H.; Wong, K.P.; Yu, C.W.; Chung, C.Y.

    2004-01-01

    Contractual arrangement plays an important role in mitigating market power in electricity markets. The issue of whether rational generators would voluntarily enter contract markets through a strategic incentive is examined, and the factors which could affect this strategic contracting behaviour. A two-stage game model is presented to formulate the competition of generators in bid-based pool spot markets and contract markets, as well as the interaction between these two markets. The affine supply function equilibrium (SFE) method is used to model competitive bidding for the spot market, while the contract market is modelled with the general conjectural variation method. The proposed methodology allows asymmetric, multiple strategic generators having capacity constraints and affine marginal costs with non-zero intercepts to be taken into account. It is shown that the presence of forward contract markets will complicate the solution to the affine SFE, and a new methodology is developed in this regard. Strategic contracting behaviours are analysed in the context of asymmetric, multiple strategic generators. A numerical example is used to verify theoretical results. It is shown that the observability of contract markets plays an important role in fostering generators' strategic contracting incentive, and that this contracting behaviour could also be affected by generators' cost parameters and demand elasticity. (author)

  11. Evaluation of indoor radon equilibrium factor using CFD modeling and resulting annual effective dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, R.; Oufni, L.

    2018-04-01

    The equilibrium factor is an important parameter for reasonably estimating the population dose from radon. However, the equilibrium factor value depended mainly on the ventilation rate and the meteorological factors. Therefore, this study focuses on investigating numerically the influence of the ventilation rate, temperature and humidity on equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny. The numerical results showed that ventilation rate, temperature and humidity have significant impacts on indoor equilibrium factor. The variations of equilibrium factor with the ventilation, temperature and relative humidity are discussed. Moreover, the committed equivalent doses due to 218Po and 214Po radon short-lived progeny were evaluated in different tissues of the respiratory tract of the members of the public from the inhalation of indoor air. The annual effective dose due to radon short lived progeny from the inhalation of indoor air by the members of the public was investigated.

  12. Including spatial data in nutrient balance modelling on dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; van Middelaar, Corina; Stoof, Cathelijne; Oenema, Jouke; Stoorvogel, Jetse; de Boer, Imke

    2017-04-01

    The Annual Nutrient Cycle Assessment (ANCA) calculates the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) balance at a dairy farm, while taking into account the subsequent nutrient cycles of the herd, manure, soil and crop components. Since January 2016, Dutch dairy farmers are required to use ANCA in order to increase understanding of nutrient flows and to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. A nutrient balance calculates the difference between nutrient inputs and outputs. Nutrients enter the farm via purchased feed, fertilizers, deposition and fixation by legumes (nitrogen), and leave the farm via milk, livestock, manure, and roughages. A positive balance indicates to which extent N and/or P are lost to the environment via gaseous emissions (N), leaching, run-off and accumulation in soil. A negative balance indicates that N and/or P are depleted from soil. ANCA was designed to calculate average nutrient flows on farm level (for the herd, manure, soil and crop components). ANCA was not designed to perform calculations of nutrient flows at the field level, as it uses averaged nutrient inputs and outputs across all fields, and it does not include field specific soil characteristics. Land management decisions, however, such as the level of N and P application, are typically taken at the field level given the specific crop and soil characteristics. Therefore the information that ANCA provides is likely not sufficient to support farmers' decisions on land management to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. This is particularly a problem when land management and soils vary between fields. For an accurate estimate of nutrient flows in a given farming system that can be used to optimize land management, the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs (and thus the effect of land management and soil variation) could be essential. Our aim was to determine the effect of the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs on modelled nutrient flows and nutrient use efficiencies

  13. Single-Phase Bundle Flows Including Macroscopic Turbulence Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Yoon, Han Young [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seok Jong; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To deal with various thermal hydraulic phenomena due to rapid change of fluid properties when an accident happens, securing mechanistic approaches as much as possible may reduce the uncertainty arising from improper applications of the experimental models. In this study, the turbulence mixing model, which is well defined in the subchannel analysis code such as VIPRE, COBRA, and MATRA by experiments, is replaced by a macroscopic k-e turbulence model, which represents the aspect of mathematical derivation. The performance of CUPID with macroscopic turbulence model is validated against several bundle experiments: CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. In this study, the macroscopic k-e model has been validated for the application to subchannel analysis. It has been implemented in the CUPID code and validated against CNEN 4x4 and PNL 7x7 rod bundle tests. The results showed that the macroscopic k-e turbulence model can estimate the experiments properly.

  14. GEM-E3: A computable general equilibrium model applied for Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, O. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Frei, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Paul Scherrer Inst. (Switzerland)

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of the European Research Project GEM-E3-ELITE, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the Centre for European Economic Research (Germany), were to further develop the general equilibrium model GEM-E3 (Capros et al., 1995, 1997) and to conduct policy analysis through case studies. GEM-E3 is an applied general equilibrium model that analyses the macro-economy and its interaction with the energy system and the environment through the balancing of energy supply and demand, atmospheric emissions and pollution control, together with the fulfillment of overall equilibrium conditions. PSI's research objectives within GEM-E3-ELITE were to implement and apply GEM-E3 for Switzerland. The first objective required in particular the development of a Swiss database for each of GEM-E3 modules (economic module and environmental module). For the second objective, strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated for Switzerland. In order to develop the economic, PSI collaborated with the Laboratory of Applied Economics (LEA) of the University of Geneva and the Laboratory of Energy Systems (LASEN) of the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). The Swiss Federal Statistical Office (SFSO) and the Institute for Business Cycle Research (KOF) of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) contributed also data. The Swiss environmental database consists mainly of an Energy Balance Table and of an Emission Coefficients Table. Both were designed using national and international official statistics. The Emission Coefficients Table is furthermore based on know-how of the PSI GaBE Project. Using GEM-E3 Switzerland, two strategies to reduce the Swiss CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated: a carbon tax ('tax only' strategy), and the combination of a carbon tax with the buying of CO{sub 2} emission permits ('permits and tax' strategy). In the first strategy, Switzerland would impose the necessary carbon tax to achieve

  15. GEM-E3: A computable general equilibrium model applied for Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, O.; Frei, C.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of the European Research Project GEM-E3-ELITE, funded by the European Commission and coordinated by the Centre for European Economic Research (Germany), were to further develop the general equilibrium model GEM-E3 (Capros et al., 1995, 1997) and to conduct policy analysis through case studies. GEM-E3 is an applied general equilibrium model that analyses the macro-economy and its interaction with the energy system and the environment through the balancing of energy supply and demand, atmospheric emissions and pollution control, together with the fulfillment of overall equilibrium conditions. PSI's research objectives within GEM-E3-ELITE were to implement and apply GEM-E3 for Switzerland. The first objective required in particular the development of a Swiss database for each of GEM-E3 modules (economic module and environmental module). For the second objective, strategies to reduce CO 2 emissions were evaluated for Switzerland. In order to develop the economic, PSI collaborated with the Laboratory of Applied Economics (LEA) of the University of Geneva and the Laboratory of Energy Systems (LASEN) of the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). The Swiss Federal Statistical Office (SFSO) and the Institute for Business Cycle Research (KOF) of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) contributed also data. The Swiss environmental database consists mainly of an Energy Balance Table and of an Emission Coefficients Table. Both were designed using national and international official statistics. The Emission Coefficients Table is furthermore based on know-how of the PSI GaBE Project. Using GEM-E3 Switzerland, two strategies to reduce the Swiss CO 2 emissions were evaluated: a carbon tax ('tax only' strategy), and the combination of a carbon tax with the buying of CO 2 emission permits ('permits and tax' strategy). In the first strategy, Switzerland would impose the necessary carbon tax to achieve the reduction target, and use the tax

  16. CryoGRIDequi - a new equilibrium permafrost model applied for Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisnås, K.; Etzelmuller, B.; Farbrot, H.; Westermann, S.; Schuler, T.

    2011-12-01

    The thermal regime of permafrost is likely to change significantly in response to the predicted climate warming, with associated warming and degradation of permafrost. Knowledge about the spatial distribution and temperatures of permafrost is therefore crucial to understand the associated geomorphological and bio-chemical consequences. Based on spatially distributed equilibrium models (CryoGRIDequi) this presentation will focus on the effect of snow cover and organic material on the regional distribution of permafrost in Norway. In Norway, the good availability of spatially distributed data on meteorological variables, vegetation, petrophysics and sediment cover allows for an implementation of soil models with relatively high resolution, in our case 1km2. CryoGRIDequi comprises implementations of both the TTOP-model and the Kudryavtsev approach. The model defines temperature at the top of permafrost from air temperatures based on seasonal n-factors, parameterizing the vegetation and snow cover, and the conductivity ratio between frozen and thawed states in the active layer. The models are run with operationally gridded temperature- and snow data from the period 1960-2010, provided by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and the Norwegian Water and Energy Directorate (senorge.no). Parameterization of the model is based on data from several air/ground and snow depth stations established in various mountain sites. The modeling results are validated with 140 sites all over Norway measuring ground surface temperature, 20 shallow boreholes equipped with temperature monitoring logger devices and maps of palsa- and rock glacier locations. The modeled permafrost distribution is in good agreement with observations. Sporadic permafrost under organic cover, which is absent in previous regional modeling procedures, is now well reproduced. According to the model results, approximately 6% of the total mainland area in Norway is presently underlain by permafrost. Of the total

  17. Extraction of benzene and cyclohexane using [BMIM][N(CN)2] and their equilibrium modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Marhaina; Bustam, M. Azmi; Man, Zakaria

    2017-12-01

    The separation of aromatic compound from aliphatic mixture is one of the essential industrial processes for an economically green process. In order to determine the separation efficiency of ionic liquid (IL) as a solvent in the separation, the ternary diagram of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide [BMIM][N(CN)2] with benzene and cyclohexane was studied at T=298.15 K and atmospheric pressure. The solute distribution coefficient and solvent selectivity derived from the equilibrium data were used to evaluate if the selected ionic liquid can be considered as potential solvent for the separation of benzene from cyclohexane. The experimental tie line data was correlated using non-random two liquid model (NRTL) and Margules model. It was found that the solute distribution coefficient is (0.4430-0.0776) and selectivity of [BMIM][N(CN)2] for benzene is (53.6-13.9). The ternary diagram showed that the selected IL can perform the separation of benzene and cyclohexane as it has extractive capacity and selectivity. Therefore, [BMIM][N(CN)2] can be considered as a potential extracting solvent for the LLE of benzene and cyclohexane.

  18. Modeling of thermodynamic non-equilibrium flows around cylinders and in channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Avick; Gopalakrishnan, Shiva

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations for two different types of flash-boiling flows, namely shear flow (flow through a de-Laval nozzle) and free shear flow (flow past a cylinder) are carried out in the present study. The Homogenous Relaxation Model (HRM) is used to model the thermodynamic non-equilibrium process. It was observed that the vaporization of the fluid stream, which was initially maintained at a sub-cooled state, originates at the nozzle throat. This is because the fluid accelerates at the vena-contracta and subsequently the pressure falls below the saturation vapor pressure, generating a two-phase mixture in the diverging section of the nozzle. The mass flow rate at the nozzle was found to decrease with the increase in fluid inlet temperature. A similar phenomenon also occurs for the free shear case due to boundary layer separation, causing a drop in pressure behind the cylinder. The mass fraction of vapor is maximum at rear end of the cylinder, where the size of the wake is highest. As the back pressure is reduced, severe flashing behavior was observed. The numerical simulations were validated against available experimental data. The authors gratefully acknowledge funding from the public-private partnership between DST, Confederation of Indian Industry and General Electric Pvt. Ltd.

  19. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  20. Numerical modeling of an alloy droplet deposition with non-equilibrium solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanuj, Vimal

    Droplet deposition is a process of extensive relevance to the microfabrication industry. Various bonding and film deposition methods utilize single or multiple droplet impingements on a substrate with subsequent splat formation through simultaneous spreading and solidification. Splat morphology and solidification characteristics play vital roles in determining the final outcome. Experimental methods have limited reach in studying such phenomena owing to the extremely small time and length scales involved. Fundamental understanding of the governing principles of fluid flow, heat transfer and phase change provide effective means of studying such processes through computational techniques. The present study aims at numerically modeling and analyzing the phenomenon of splat formation and phase change in an alloy droplet deposition process. Phase change in alloys occurs non-isothermally and its formulation poses mathematical challenges. A highly non-linear flow field in conjunction with multiple interfaces and convection-diffusion governed phase transition are some of the highlighting features involved in the numerical formulation. Moreover, the non-equilibrium solidification behavior in eutectic systems is of prime concern. The peculiar phenomenon requires special treatments in terms of modeling solid phase species diffusion, liquid phase enrichment during solute partitioning and isothermal eutectic transformation. The flow field is solved using a two-step projection algorithm coupled with enhanced interface modeling schemes. The free surface tracking and reconstruction is achieved through two approaches: VOF-PLIC and CLSVOF to achieve optimum interface accuracy with minimal computational resources. The energy equation is written in terms of enthalpy with an additional source term to account for the phase change. The solidification phenomenon is modeled using a coupled temperature-solute scheme that reflects the microscopic effects arising due to dendritic growth

  1. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  2. A structural model for the in vivo human cornea including collagen-swelling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi; Petsche, Steven J; Pinsky, Peter M

    2015-08-06

    A structural model of the in vivo cornea, which accounts for tissue swelling behaviour, for the three-dimensional organization of stromal fibres and for collagen-swelling interaction, is proposed. Modelled as a binary electrolyte gel in thermodynamic equilibrium, the stromal electrostatic free energy is based on the mean-field approximation. To account for active endothelial ionic transport in the in vivo cornea, which modulates osmotic pressure and hydration, stromal mobile ions are shown to satisfy a modified Boltzmann distribution. The elasticity of the stromal collagen network is modelled based on three-dimensional collagen orientation probability distributions for every point in the stroma obtained by synthesizing X-ray diffraction data for azimuthal angle distributions and second harmonic-generated image processing for inclination angle distributions. The model is implemented in a finite-element framework and employed to predict free and confined swelling of stroma in an ionic bath. For the in vivo cornea, the model is used to predict corneal swelling due to increasing intraocular pressure (IOP) and is adapted to model swelling in Fuchs' corneal dystrophy. The biomechanical response of the in vivo cornea to a typical LASIK surgery for myopia is analysed, including tissue fluid pressure and swelling responses. The model provides a new interpretation of the corneal active hydration control (pump-leak) mechanism based on osmotic pressure modulation. The results also illustrate the structural necessity of fibre inclination in stabilizing the corneal refractive surface with respect to changes in tissue hydration and IOP. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. Thematic report: Macroeconomic models including specifically social and environmental aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kratena, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    WWWforEurope Deliverable No. 8, 30 pages A significant reduction of the global environmental consequences of European consumption and production activities are the main objective of the policy simulations carried out in this paper. For this purpose three different modelling approaches have been chosen. Two macroeconomic models following the philosophy of consistent stock-flow accounting for the main institutional sectors (households, firms, banks, central bank and government) are used for...

  4. A model for a countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium reactions. The methanol synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Kuczynski, M.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical background for a novel, countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium gas reactions is presented. A one-dimensional, steady-state reactor model is developed. The influence of the various process parameters on the reactor performance is discussed. The physical

  5. Inference in Non-Linear Panels with Partially Missing Observations: The Case of the Equilibrium Search Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bent J.; M. Kiefer, Nicholas

    1996-01-01

    A thorough econometric analysis of the pure equilibrium search model is given. Minimal data requirements for estimation are unemployment durations, wages, and employment durations. An assessment of the information contribution of each data element is given. The results define the range of potential...

  6. Observation of non-chemical equilibrium effect on Ar-CO2-H2 thermal plasma model by changing pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mamun, Sharif Abdullah; Tanaka, Yasunori; Uesugi, Yoshihiko

    2009-01-01

    The authors developed a two-dimensional one-temperature chemical non-equilibrium (1T-NCE) model of Ar-CO 2 -H 2 inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTP) to investigate the effect of pressure variation. The basic concept of one-temperature model is the assumption and treatment of the same energy conservation equation for electrons and heavy particles. The energy conservation equations consider reaction heat effects and energy transfer among the species produced as well as enthalpy flow resulting from diffusion. Assuming twenty two (22) different particles in this model and by solving mass conservation equations for each particle, considering diffusion, convection and net production terms resulting from hundred and ninety eight (198) chemical reactions, chemical non-equilibrium effects were taken into account. Transport and thermodynamic properties of Ar-CO 2 -H 2 thermal plasmas were self-consistently calculated using the first-order approximation of the Chapman-Enskog method. Finally results obtained at atmospheric pressure (760 Torr) and at reduced pressure (500, 300 Torr) were compared with results from one-temperature chemical equilibrium (1T-CE) model. And of course, this comparison supported discussion of chemical non-equilibrium effects in the inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTP).

  7. Government social assistance transfers, income inequality and poverty in South Africa: a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) - Microsimulation (MS) Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gomo, Charity

    2015-01-01

    Although social assistance transfers have grown at a faster pace in recent years after independence in South Africa, income inequality still remains one of the highest in the world. This thesis uses a top-down, bottom-up model which combines an econometrically-estimated microsimulation model of labor supply, a detailed tax-benefit module, and a computable general equilibrium model, in order to analyze the impact of government social assistance on income inequality and poverty in South Africa.

  8. Identifying Clusters with Mixture Models that Include Radial Velocity Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnatowicz, Alexis; Ybarra, Jason E.

    2018-01-01

    The study of stellar clusters plays an integral role in the study of star formation. We present a cluster mixture model that considers radial velocity data in addition to spatial data. Maximum likelihood estimation through the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm is used for parameter estimation. Our mixture model analysis can be used to distinguish adjacent or overlapping clusters, and estimate properties for each cluster.Work supported by awards from the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges (VFIC) Undergraduate Science Research Fellowship and The Research Experience @Bridgewater (TREB).

  9. Discharge Fee Policy Analysis: A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE Model of Water Resources and Water Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Fang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To alleviate increasingly serious water pollution and shortages in developing countries, various kinds of policies have been implemented by local governments. It is vital to quantify and evaluate the performance and potential economic impacts of these policies. This study develops a Computable General Equilibrium (CGE model to simulate the regional economic and environmental effects of discharge fees. Firstly, water resources and water environment factors are separated from the input and output sources of the National Economic Production Department. Secondly, an extended Social Accounting Matrix (SAM of Jiangsu province is developed to simulate various scenarios. By changing values of the discharge fees (increased by 50%, 100% and 150%, three scenarios are simulated to examine their influence on the overall economy and each industry. The simulation results show that an increased fee will have a negative impact on Gross Domestic Product (GDP. However, waste water may be effectively controlled. Also, this study demonstrates that along with the economic costs, the increase of the discharge fee will lead to the upgrading of industrial structures from a situation of heavy pollution to one of light pollution which is beneficial to the sustainable development of the economy and the protection of the environment.

  10. Modelling and experimentation of the SO2 remotion through a plasma out of thermal equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno S, H.; Pacheco P, M.; Pacheco S, J.; Cruz A, A.

    2005-01-01

    In spite of the measures that have taken for the decrease of the emitted pollution by mobile sources ( T oday it doesn't Circulate , implementation of catalysts in those exhaust pipes,...), the pollution in the Valley of Mexico area overcomes the limits fixed by Mexican standards several days each year. It is foreseen that for 2020 those emissions of pollutants will be increase considerably, as example we can mention to the sulfur oxides which will be increase a 48% with regard to 1998. The purpose of this work is of proposing a technique for the degradation of the sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) that consists in introducing this gas to a plasma out of thermal equilibrium where its were formed key radicals (O, OH) for its degradation. The proposed reactor has the advantage of combining the kindness of the dielectric barrier discharge and of corona discharge, besides working to atmospheric pressure and having small dimensions. The first obtained results of the modelling of the degradation of the SO 2 in plasma as well as those experimentally obtained are presented. (Author)

  11. Implementation of Equilibrium-Price Model to the Estimation of Import Inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadulla Hasanli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at investigating the the import inflationary processes as a result of feedbacks of mutual economic relations of World countries. It is used Equilibrium Price Model to estimate the import inflationary processes in CIS countries. The study investigates the further results regarding the import inflationary processes in the CIS countries on the scenario of increasing the Value Added norm in Russia. As well as by standpoint of economic growth and price stability, the recent revaluation of US dollar in the World and its impacts to total output of other countries have been investigated in details. In other words due to revaluation of the US dollar, if the final product decreases in USA, this decreasing impact how to be transmitted to the world countries have been estimated by the Input-Output Table in this study as well. The work is fulfilled on the Input-Output data for the year 2011. This study assumes theoretical and practical importance in defining the monetary policy.

  12. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Carbon Dioxide + Ethanol: Experimental Measurements with Acoustic Method and Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mehl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase behavior of systems composed by supercritical carbon dioxide and ethanol is of great interest, especially in the processes involving supercritical extraction in which ethanol is used as a cosolvent. The development of an apparatus, which is able to perform the measurements of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE at high pressure using a combination of the visual and the acoustic methods, was successful and was proven to be suited for determining the isothermal VLE data of this system. The acoustic method, based on the variation of the amplitude of an ultra-sound signal passing through a mixture during a phase transition, was applied to investigate the phase equilibria of the system carbon dioxide + ethanol at temperatures ranging from 298.2 K to 323.2 K and pressures from 3.0 MPa to 9.0 MPa. The VLE data were correlated with Peng-Robinson equation of state combined with two different mixing rules and the SAFT equations of state as well. The compositions calculated with the models are in good agreement with the experimental data for the isotherms evaluated.

  13. Performance prediction and validation of equilibrium modeling for gasification of cashew nut shell char

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkata Ramanan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cashew nut shell, a waste product obtained during deshelling of cashew kernels, had in the past been deemed unfit as a fuel for gasification owing to its high occluded oil content. The oil, a source of natural phenol, oozes upon gasification, thereby clogging the gasifier throat, downstream equipment and associated utilities with oil, resulting in ineffective gasification and premature failure of utilities due to its corrosive characteristics. To overcome this drawback, the cashew shells were de-oiled by charring in closed chambers and were subsequently gasified in an autothermal downdraft gasifier. Equilibrium modeling was carried out to predict the producer gas composition under varying performance influencing parameters, viz., equivalence ratio (ER, reaction temperature (RT and moisture content (MC. The results were compared with the experimental output and are presented in this paper. The model is quite satisfactory with the experimental outcome at the ER applicable to gasification systems, i.e., 0.15 to 0.30. The results show that the mole fraction of (i H2, CO and CH4 decreases while (N2 + H2O and CO2 increases with ER, (ii H2 and CO increases while CH4, (N2 + H2O and CO2 decreases with reaction temperature, (iii H2, CH4, CO2 and (N2 + H2O increases while CO decreases with moisture content. However at an equivalence ratio less than 0.15, the model predicts an unrealistic composition and is observed to be non valid below this ER.

  14. Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory Applied in Hydrogen Bond Number Studies of Water. 1. Assessment of the Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Model for Liquid Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, S B C; Spickermann, C; Kirchner, B

    2009-06-09

    Different cluster sets containing only 2-fold coordinated water, 2- and 3-fold coordinated water, and 2-fold, 3-fold, and tetrahedrally coordinated water molecules were investigated by applying second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and density functional theory based on generalized gradient approximation functionals in the framework of the quantum cluster equilibrium theory. We found an improvement of the calculated isobars at low temperatures if tetrahedrally coordinated water molecules were included in the set of 2-fold hydrogen-bonded clusters. This was also reflected in a reduced parameter for the intercluster interaction. If all parameters were kept constant and only the electronic structure methods were varied, large basis set dependencies in the liquid state for the density functional theory results were found. The behavior of the intercluster parameter was also examined for the case that cooperative effects were neglected. The values were 3 times as large as in the calculations including the total electronic structure. Furthermore, these effects are more severe in the tetrahedrally coordinated clusters. Different populations were considered, one weighted by the total number of clusters and one depending on the monomers.

  15. Unsteady panel method for complex configurations including wake modeling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, Lourens H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The calculation of unsteady air loads is an essential step in any aeroelastic analysis. The subsonic doublet lattice method (DLM) is used extensively for this purpose due to its simplicity and reliability. The body models available with the popular...

  16. Equilibrium modeling of mono and binary sorption of Cu(II and Zn(II onto chitosan gel beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaj Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work are in-depth experimental studies of Cu(II and Zn(II ion removal on chitosan gel beads from both one- and two-component water solutions at the temperature of 303 K. The optimal process conditions such as: pH value, dose of sorbent and contact time were determined. Based on the optimal process conditions, equilibrium and kinetic studies were carried out. The maximum sorption capacities equaled: 191.25 mg/g and 142.88 mg/g for Cu(II and Zn(II ions respectively, when the sorbent dose was 10 g/L and the pH of a solution was 5.0 for both heavy metal ions. One-component sorption equilibrium data were successfully presented for six of the most useful three-parameter equilibrium models: Langmuir-Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Koble-Corrigan, Hill and Toth. Extended forms of Langmuir-Freundlich, Koble-Corrigan and Sips models were also well fitted to the two-component equilibrium data obtained for different ratios of concentrations of Cu(II and Zn(II ions (1:1, 1:2, 2:1. Experimental sorption data were described by two kinetic models of the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order. Furthermore, an attempt to explain the mechanisms of the divalent metal ion sorption process on chitosan gel beads was undertaken.

  17. A thermal lens model including the Soret effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, Humberto; Sira, Eloy; Rahn, Kareem; Garcia-Sucre, Maximo

    2009-01-01

    In this letter we generalize the thermal lens model to account for the Soret effect in binary liquid mixtures. This formalism permits the precise determination of the Soret coefficient in a steady-state situation. The theory is experimentally verified using the measured values in the ethanol/water mixtures. The time evolution of the Soret signal has been used to derive mass-diffusion times from which mass-diffusion coefficients were calculated. (Author)

  18. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  19. A stochastic model of gene expression including splicing events

    OpenAIRE

    Penim, Flávia Alexandra Mendes

    2014-01-01

    Tese de mestrado, Bioinformática e Biologia Computacional, Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2014 Proteins carry out the great majority of the catalytic and structural work within an organism. The RNA templates used in their synthesis determines their identity, and this is dictated by which genes are transcribed. Therefore, gene expression is the fundamental determinant of an organism’s nature. The main objective of this thesis was to develop a stochastic computational model a...

  20. Modeling the hot-dense plasma of the solar interior in and out of thermal equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsuan

    within any solar model code. In the present work we have carried the technique of the MHD-based OPAL emulator to the CEFF-based OPAL emulator and successfully accomplished this goal. At the same time, we went beyond the earlier work by adding more terms. In particular, the previous MHD-based OPAL emulator was restricted to the approximation of a hydrogen plasma; our work is extended to the more realistic H-He mixture. In a separate part of the present work, we have examined a non-equilibrium effect in the solar interior. The effect is located in the zone of the sharp transition between the differential rotation in the convection zone and the solid-sphere rotation in the radiation zone beneath it. This transition was discovered by helioseismology in the 1980s, and the transition zone is called the solar tachocline. The tachocline is subject to strong shear and in many theories of the solar dynamo it plays important role. Being inspired by the well-known Soret effect, which states the mass diffusion drive by a temperature gradient, we have examined if there could also be mass diffusion by a shear flow. If such an effect were to exist, it would have potential applications to the solar tachocline and dynamo. We have run a so-called reverse non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (RNEMD) simulation. As a test, we first confirmed the Soret effect by the simulation, then we tested for a shear- driven analogous effect. As a result, we did not see the shear-driven Soret effect in our simulation. We do observe the normal Soret effect due to the temperature gradient caused by the numerical scheme we used.

  1. Modeling and numerical analysis of non-equilibrium two-phase flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rascle, P.; El Amine, K.

    1997-01-01

    We are interested in the numerical approximation of two-fluid models of nonequilibrium two-phase flows described by six balance equations. We introduce an original splitting technique of the system of equations. This technique is derived in a way such that single phase Riemann solvers may be used: moreover, it allows a straightforward extension to various and detailed exchange source terms. The properties of the fluids are first approached by state equations of ideal gas type and then extended to real fluids. For the construction of numerical schemes , the hyperbolicity of the full system is not necessary. When based on suitable kinetic unwind schemes, the algorithm can compute flow regimes evolving from mixture to single phase flows and vice versa. The whole scheme preserves the physical features of all the variables which remain in the set of physical states. Several stiff numerical tests, such as phase separation and phase transition are displayed in order to highlight the efficiency of the proposed method. The document is a PhD thesis divided in 6 chapters and two annexes. They are entitled: 1. - Introduction (in French), 2. - Two-phase flow, modelling and hyperbolicity (in French), 3. - A numerical method using upwind schemes for the resolution of two-phase flows without exchange terms (in English), 4. - A numerical scheme for one-phase flow of real fluids (in English), 5. - An upwind numerical for non-equilibrium two-phase flows (in English), 6. - The treatment of boundary conditions (in English), A.1. The Perthame scheme (in English) and A.2. The Roe scheme (in English)

  2. Parton recombination model including resonance production. RL-78-040

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.; Hwa, R.C.; Matsuda, S.

    1978-05-01

    Possible effects of resonance production on the meson inclusive distribution in the fragmentation region are investigated in the framework of the parton recombination model. From a detailed study of the data on vector-meson production, a reliable ratio of the vector-to-pseudoscalar rates is determined. Then the influence of the decay of the vector mesons on the pseudoscalar spectrum is examined, and the effect found to be no more than 25% for x > 0.5. The normalization of the non-strange antiquark distributions are still higher than those in a quiescent proton. The agreement between the calculated results and data remain very good. 36 references

  3. Development of an anesthetized rat model of exercise hyperpnoea: An integrative model of respiratory control using an equilibrium diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Tadayoshi; Manabe, Kou; Ueda, Shinya; Nakahara, Hidehiro

    2018-03-06

    What is the central question of this study? The lack of useful small animal models for studying exercise hyperpnoea makes it difficult to investigate the underlying mechanisms of exercise-induced ventilatory abnormalities in various disease states. What is the main finding and its importance? We developed an anesthetized rat model for studying exercise hyperpnoea, using respiratory equilibrium diagram for quantitative characterization of the respiratory chemoreflex feedback system. This experimental model will provide an opportunity to clarify the major determinant mechanisms of exercise hyperpnoea, and will be useful for understanding the mechanisms responsible for abnormal ventilatory responses to exercise in disease models. Exercise-induced ventilatory abnormalities in various disease states seem to arise from pathological changes of the respiratory regulation. Although experimental studies in small animals are essential to investigate the pathophysiologic basis in various disease models, the lack of integrated framework for quantitatively characterizing respiratory regulation during exercise prevents us from resolving these problems. The purpose of this study was to develop an anesthetized rat model for studying exercise hyperpnoea for quantitative characterization of the respiratory chemoreflex feedback system. In 24 anesthetized rats, we induced muscle contraction by stimulating bilateral distal sciatic nerves at low and high voltage to mimic exercise. We recorded breath-by-breath respiratory gas analysis data, and cardiorespiratory responses while running two protocols to characterize the controller and plant of the respiratory chemoreflex. The controller was characterized by determining the linear relationship between end-tidal CO 2 pressure (P ETCO2 ) and minute ventilation (V E ), and the plant by the hyperbolic relationship between V E and P ETCO2 . During exercise, the controller curve shifted upward without change in controller gain, accompanying

  4. Extending PSA models including ageing and asset management - 15291

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martorell, S.; Marton, I.; Carlos, S.; Sanchez, A.I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new approach to Ageing Probabilistic Safety Assessment (APSA) modelling, which is intended to be used to support risk-informed decisions on the effectiveness of maintenance management programs and technical specification requirements of critical equipment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) within the framework of the Risk Informed Decision Making according to R.G. 1.174 principles. This approach focuses on the incorporation of not only equipment ageing but also effectiveness of maintenance and efficiency of surveillance testing explicitly into APSA models and data. This methodology is applied to a motor-operated valve of the auxiliary feed water system (AFWS) of a PWR. This simple example of application focuses on a critical safety-related equipment of a NPP in order to evaluate the risk impact of considering different approaches to APSA and the combined effect of equipment ageing and maintenance and testing alternatives along NPP design life. The risk impact of several alternatives in maintenance strategy is discussed

  5. A Simple Model to Access Equilibrium Constants of Reactions Type A ⇋ B Using Monte Carlo Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Farias, L. A. M. Cardoso, N. M. Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model to describe equilibrium properties of homogeneous re-versible chemical reactions is proposed and applied to an A ⇋ B type reaction. Forthis purpose the equilibrium properties are analyzed by usual Monte Carlo simula-tion. It is shown that the equilibrium constant (Ke for this kind of reaction exhibitsdistinct characteristics for Eba 1, where Eba is the ratio be-tween the reverse and forward activation energies. For Eba 1 and increase(decrease the temperature our results recover the principle of Le Chˆtelier applied ato temperature effects. The special and interesting case is obtained for Eba = 1 sinceKe = 1 for all range of temperature. Another important parameter in our analysisis θA , defined as temperature measured with relation the activation energy of theforward reaction. For fixed values of Eba and for θA ≫ 1 the equilibrium constantapproaches 1, showing that all transitions are equally likely, no matter the differencein the energy barriers. The data obtained in our simulations show the well knownrelationship between Ke , Eb , Ea and kB T . Finally we argue that this theoreticalmodel can be applied to a family of homogeneous chemical reactions characterizedby the same Eba and θA showing the broad application of this stochastic model tostudy chemical reactions. Some of these results will be discussed in terms of collisiontheory.

  6. A facilitated diffusion model constrained by the probability isotherm: a pedagogical exercise in intuitive non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Brian

    2017-06-01

    This paper seeks to develop a more thermodynamically sound pedagogy for students of biological transport than is currently available from either of the competing schools of linear non-equilibrium thermodynamics (LNET) or Michaelis-Menten kinetics (MMK). To this end, a minimal model of facilitated diffusion was constructed comprising four reversible steps: cis- substrate binding, cis → trans bound enzyme shuttling, trans -substrate dissociation and trans → cis free enzyme shuttling. All model parameters were subject to the second law constraint of the probability isotherm, which determined the unidirectional and net rates for each step and for the overall reaction through the law of mass action. Rapid equilibration scenarios require sensitive 'tuning' of the thermodynamic binding parameters to the equilibrium substrate concentration. All non-equilibrium scenarios show sigmoidal force-flux relations, with only a minority of cases having their quasi -linear portions close to equilibrium. Few cases fulfil the expectations of MMK relating reaction rates to enzyme saturation. This new approach illuminates and extends the concept of rate-limiting steps by focusing on the free energy dissipation associated with each reaction step and thereby deducing its respective relative chemical impedance. The crucial importance of an enzyme's being thermodynamically 'tuned' to its particular task, dependent on the cis- and trans- substrate concentrations with which it deals, is consistent with the occurrence of numerous isoforms for enzymes that transport a given substrate in physiologically different circumstances. This approach to kinetic modelling, being aligned with neither MMK nor LNET, is best described as intuitive non-equilibrium thermodynamics, and is recommended as a useful adjunct to the design and interpretation of experiments in biotransport.

  7. Nuclear fuel cycle cost estimation and sensitivity analysis of unit costs on the basis of an equilibrium model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the difference in the value of the nuclear fuel cycle cost calculated by the deterministic and probabilistic methods on the basis of an equilibrium model. Calculating using the deterministic method, the direct disposal cost and Pyro-SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor nuclear fuel cycle cost, including the reactor cost, were found to be 66.41 mills/kWh and 77.82 mills/kWh, respectively (1 mill = one thousand of a dollar, i.e., 10−3 $. This is because the cost of SFR is considerably expensive. Calculating again using the probabilistic method, however, the direct disposal cost and Pyro-SFR nuclear fuel cycle cost, excluding the reactor cost, were found be 7.47 mills/kWh and 6.40 mills/kWh, respectively, on the basis of the most likely value. This is because the nuclear fuel cycle cost is significantly affected by the standard deviation and the mean of the unit cost that includes uncertainty. Thus, it is judged that not only the deterministic method, but also the probabilistic method, would also be necessary to evaluate the nuclear fuel cycle cost. By analyzing the sensitivity of the unit cost in each phase of the nuclear fuel cycle, it was found that the uranium unit price is the most influential factor in determining nuclear fuel cycle costs.

  8. Influence of temperature on the single-stage ATAD process predicted by a thermal equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiehong; Zhu, Jun; Kong, Feng; Zhang, Chunyong

    2015-06-01

    Autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) is a promising biological process that will produce an effluent satisfying the Class A requirements on pathogen control and land application. The thermophilic temperature in an ATAD reactor is one of the critical factors that can affect the satisfactory operation of the ATAD process. This paper established a thermal equilibrium model to predict the effect of variables on the auto-rising temperature in an ATAD system. The reactors with volumes smaller than 10 m(3) could not achieve temperatures higher than 45 °C under ambient temperature of -5 °C. The results showed that for small reactors, the reactor volume played a key role in promoting auto-rising temperature in the winter. Thermophilic temperature achieved in small ATAD reactors did not entirely depend on the heat release from biological activities during degrading organic matters in sludges, but was related to the ambient temperature. The ratios of surface area-to-effective volume less than 2.0 had less impact on the auto-rising temperature of an ATAD reactor. The influence of ambient temperature on the auto-rising reactor temperature decreased with increasing reactor volumes. High oxygen transfer efficiency had a significant influence on the internal temperature rise in an ATAD system, indicating that improving the oxygen transfer efficiency of aeration devices was a key factor to achieve a higher removal rate of volatile solids (VS) during the ATAD process operation. Compared with aeration using cold air, hot air demonstrated a significant effect on maintaining the internal temperature (usually 4-5 °C higher). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy recovery from human faeces via gasification: A thermodynamic equilibrium modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onabanjo, T; Patchigolla, K; Wagland, S T; Fidalgo, B; Kolios, A; McAdam, E; Parker, A; Williams, L; Tyrrel, S; Cartmell, E

    2016-06-15

    Non-sewered sanitary systems (NSS) are emerging as one of the solutions to poor sanitation because of the limitations of the conventional flush toilet. These new sanitary systems are expected to safely treat faecal waste and operate without external connections to a sewer, water supply or energy source. The Nano Membrane Toilet (NMT) is a unique domestic-scale sanitary solution currently being developed to treat human waste on-site. This toilet will employ a small-scale gasifier to convert human faeces into products of high energy value. This study investigated the suitability of human faeces as a feedstock for gasification. It quantified the recoverable exergy potential from human faeces and explored the optimal routes for thermal conversion, using a thermodynamic equilibrium model. Fresh human faeces were found to have approximately 70-82 wt.% moisture and 3-6 wt.% ash. Product gas resulting from a typical dry human faeces (0 wt.% moisture) had LHV and exergy values of 17.2 MJ/kg and 24 MJ/kg respectively at optimum equivalence ratio of 0.31, values that are comparable to wood biomass. For suitable conversion of moist faecal samples, near combustion operating conditions are required, if an external energy source is not supplied. This is however at 5% loss in the exergy value of the gas, provided both thermal heat and energy of the gas are recovered. This study shows that the maximum recoverable exergy potential from an average adult moist human faeces can be up to 15 MJ/kg, when the gasifier is operated at optimum equivalence ratio of 0.57, excluding heat losses, distribution or other losses that result from operational activities.

  10. Nonideal equilibrium dissolution of trichloroethene from a decane-based nonaqueous phase liquid mixture: Experimental and modeling investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, John E.; Dugan, Pamela J.

    2002-07-01

    Batch equilibrium solubility studies were conducted to examine the solubilization behavior of a chlorinated solvent, trichloroethene (TCE), from a fuel-based nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mixture. An alkane (n-decane) was used as a model compound because it is often a primary compound in jet fuel. The NAPL phase mole fractions of the chlorinated solvent in the mixture (XTCEN) that were investigated are typical of in situ values found at industrial and military waste sites (0.0001 >= XTCEN UNIFAC method greatly underpredicts the γTCEN in this surrogate fuel. A NAPL-mixture equilibrium-dissolution model was developed that incorporates the observed nonideal dissolution. This model indicates that nonideal NAPL dissolution is 4 times faster than ideal dissolution for a hypothetical NAPL mixture with an initial XTCEN = 0.001. The magnitude of this effect becomes more important as the initial value of the XTCEN is decreased.

  11. Interactions between chloride and sulfate or silica removals from wastewater using an advanced lime-aluminum softening process: equilibrium modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, Ahmed; Batchelor, Bill

    2007-05-01

    Interactions among chloride, sulfate, and silica removals from recycled industrial wastewater using an ultra-high lime with aluminum process (UHLA) were studied. An equilibrium model that is able to accurately predict the chemical behavior and interactions between chloride and sulfate or silica with UHLA at various initial conditions and chemical reagents was developed. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to identify the precipitated solids formed in the UHLA process. Model predictions indicated that simultaneous removal of sulfate and chloride can be best described by the formation of a solid solution containing calcium chloroaluminate, calcium sulfoaluminate (ettringite), calcium monosulfate, tricalcium hydroxyaluminate, and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate. However, simultaneous removal of silica and chloride can be best described by precipitation of calcium silicate and calcium aluminosilicate in addition to a solid solution containing calcium chloroaluminate, tricalcium hydroxyaluminate, and tetracalcium hydroxyaluminate. The XRD results indicated the presence of the same solids assumed by the equilibrium model.

  12. Microscopic modeling of direct pre-equilibrium emission from neutron induced reactions on even and odd actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dupuis M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct inelastic scattering to discrete excitations and pre-equilibrium emission are described within a microscopic model. Nuclear structure information are obtained in the (Quasi Random Phase Approximation ((QRPA framework implemented with the Gogny force. The relevant optical and transition potentials are build considering the JLM folding model. Various successful applications are shown for (n,n, (n,n', (n,xn and (n,xnγ reactions for spherical and axially deformed even-even or odd targets. The rearrangement corrections to transition potentials and the contribution of unnatural parity excitations to pre-equilibrium emission are discussed. Our model predictions for (n,n'γ reactions, for intra- and inter-band transitions in 238U, and for the 239Pu(n,2n cross section are analyzed.

  13. Dynamic Data-Driven Reduced-Order Models of Macroscale Quantities for the Prediction of Equilibrium System State for Multiphase Porous Medium Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, C.; McClure, J. E.; Armstrong, R. T.; Mostaghimi, P.; Hu, Y.; Miller, C. T.

    2017-12-01

    Microscale simulation of multiphase flow in realistic, highly-resolved porous medium systems of a sufficient size to support macroscale evaluation is computationally demanding. Such approaches can, however, reveal the dynamic, steady, and equilibrium states of a system. We evaluate methods to utilize dynamic data to reduce the cost associated with modeling a steady or equilibrium state. We construct data-driven models using extensions to dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) and its connections to Koopman Operator Theory. DMD and its variants comprise a class of equation-free methods for dimensionality reduction of time-dependent nonlinear dynamical systems. DMD furnishes an explicit reduced representation of system states in terms of spatiotemporally varying modes with time-dependent oscillation frequencies and amplitudes. We use DMD to predict the steady and equilibrium macroscale state of a realistic two-fluid porous medium system imaged using micro-computed tomography (µCT) and simulated using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We apply Koopman DMD to direct numerical simulation data resulting from simulations of multiphase fluid flow through a 1440x1440x4320 section of a full 1600x1600x5280 realization of imaged sandstone. We determine a representative set of system observables via dimensionality reduction techniques including linear and kernel principal component analysis. We demonstrate how this subset of macroscale quantities furnishes a representation of the time-evolution of the system in terms of dynamic modes, and discuss the selection of a subset of DMD modes yielding the optimal reduced model, as well as the time-dependence of the error in the predicted equilibrium value of each macroscale quantity. Finally, we describe how the above procedure, modified to incorporate methods from compressed sensing and random projection techniques, may be used in an online fashion to facilitate adaptive time-stepping and parsimonious storage of system states over time.

  14. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: Part 2 – Including organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Topping

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the inclusion of organic particulate material within the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM framework described in the companion paper applied to inorganic aerosol components. The performance of ADDEM is analysed in terms of its capability to reproduce the behaviour of various organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems using recently published bulk data. Within the modelling architecture already described two separate thermodynamic models are coupled in an additive approach and combined with a method for solving the Kohler equation in order to develop a tool for predicting the water content associated with an aerosol of known inorganic/organic composition and dry size. For development of the organic module, the widely used group contribution method UNIFAC is employed to explicitly deal with the non-ideality in solution. The UNIFAC predictions for components of atmospheric importance were improved considerably by using revised interaction parameters derived from electro-dynamic balance studies. Using such parameters, the model was found to adequately describe mixed systems including 5–6 dicarboxylic acids, down to low relative humidity conditions. By comparison with electrodynamic balance data, it was also found that the model was capable of capturing the behaviour of aqueous aerosols containing Suwannee River Fulvic acid, a structure previously used to represent the functionality of complex oxidised macromolecules often found in atmospheric aerosols. The additive approach for modelling mixed inorganic/organic systems worked well for a variety of mixtures. As expected, deviations between model predictions and measurements increase with increasing concentration. Available surface tension models, used in evaluating the Kelvin term, were found to reproduce measured data with varying success. Deviations from experimental data increased with increased organic compound complexity. For components only slightly

  15. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: Part 2 Including organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the inclusion of organic particulate material within the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM) framework described in the companion paper applied to inorganic aerosol components. The performance of ADDEM is analysed in terms of its capability to reproduce the behaviour of various organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems using recently published bulk data. Within the modelling architecture already described two separate thermodynamic models are coupled in an additive approach and combined with a method for solving the Kohler equation in order to develop a tool for predicting the water content associated with an aerosol of known inorganic/organic composition and dry size. For development of the organic module, the widely used group contribution method UNIFAC is employed to explicitly deal with the non-ideality in solution. The UNIFAC predictions for components of atmospheric importance were improved considerably by using revised interaction parameters derived from electro-dynamic balance studies. Using such parameters, the model was found to adequately describe mixed systems including 5-6 dicarboxylic acids, down to low relative humidity conditions. By comparison with electrodynamic balance data, it was also found that the model was capable of capturing the behaviour of aqueous aerosols containing Suwannee River Fulvic acid, a structure previously used to represent the functionality of complex oxidised macromolecules often found in atmospheric aerosols. The additive approach for modelling mixed inorganic/organic systems worked well for a variety of mixtures. As expected, deviations between model predictions and measurements increase with increasing concentration. Available surface tension models, used in evaluating the Kelvin term, were found to reproduce measured data with varying success. Deviations from experimental data increased with increased organic compound complexity. For components only slightly soluble in water

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic modeling of contaminant immobilization by activated carbon amended to sediments in the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakowska, M.I.; Kupryianchyk, D.; Koelmans, A.A.; Grotenhuis, J.T.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Addition of activated carbons (AC) to polluted sediments and soils is an attractive remediation technique aiming at reducing pore water concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). In this study, we present (pseudo-)equilibrium as well as kinetic parameters for sorption of a series of

  17. A non-equilibrium phase transition in a dissipative forest model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, Joachim A.

    2009-01-01

    The shape of the biostress force for a stressed Lotka-Volterra network is for the first time derived from Lindblad's dissipative dynamics. Numerical solutions for stressed prey-predator systems with limited resources show a threshold. A non-equilibrium phase transition to a phase with ecosystem dying after a few enforced oscillations (waldsterben phase) occurs.

  18. WAGEM: an applied general equilibrium model for agricultural and environmental policy analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komen, M.H.C.; Peerlings, J.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Agricultural and environmental policy changes have potentially large effects on Dutch agriculture and economy as a whole. The effects could be on inter-industry transactions, factor demand, income, trade, and environmental quality. The clear structure and flexibility make applied general equilibrium

  19. Equilibrium selection in alternating-offers bargaining models: the evolutionary computing approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D.B. van Bragt; E.H. Gerding (Enrico); J.A. La Poutré (Han)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractA systematic validation of evolutionary techniques in the field of bargaining is presented. For this purpose, the dynamic and equilibrium-selecting behavior of a multi-agent system consisting of adaptive bargaining agents is investigated. The agents' bargaining strategies are updated by

  20. On radial stationary solutions to a model of non-equilibrium growth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Escudero, C.; Hakl, Robert; Peral, I.; Torres, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 3 (2013), s. 437-453 ISSN 0956-7925 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : non-equilibrium growth * radial solutions * variational methods Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.081, year: 2013 http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=8897362

  1. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Equilibria of the axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloximes by imidazole, 1-methyl imidazole, histidine, histamine, glycine, ethyl glycine ester, thiourea and urea have been spectrophotometrically measured in aqueous solutions of ionic strength 1.0 M (KCl) at 25°C as a function of H. The equilibrium constants are in the ...

  2. Veto players and equilibrium uniqueness in the Baron–Ferejohn model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Celik, Levent; Karabay, Bilgehan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 1 (2016), s. 33-52 ISSN 0040-5833 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP402/12/0666 Institutional support: PRVOUK-P23 Keywords : multilateral bargaining * equilibrium uniqueness * veto players Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.606, year: 2016

  3. Modeling of Shale Gas Adsorption and its Influence on Phase Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval Lemus, Diego Rolando; Yan, Wei; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    2018-01-01

    Natural gas and oil produced from shale accounts for a signicant portion in the global production. Due to the large surface area and high organic content in shale formations, adsorption plays a major role in the storage of the hydrocarbons within the rock and their phase equilibrium. This study...

  4. A stochastic model of chemical equilibrium: case study of the reversible first-order reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolc, Milan

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 136, 5-6 (1999), s. 647-661 ISSN 0001-5407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : chemical equilibrium * first-order reaction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.477, year: 1999

  5. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 11-14: Collisions; Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies; Rotational Dynamics; and Fluid Mechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  6. The application of equilibrium models to incidence situations using the example of the exposure pathway human milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, Martin; Karcher, Klaus; Nosske, Dietmar [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    The radiation exposure after a short-term release of radioactive substances is often calculated assuming equilibrium conditions. An example is that of the German Incident Calculation Bases for nuclear power plants with pressurized water reactors. Here, the contamination of human milk is calculated using transfer factors. Applying this equilibrium model to incident situations raises the question whether baby's radiation exposure is adequately assessed. This contribution shows that compliance with the relevant dose limits of paragraph 49 of the German Radiation Protection Ordinance is ensured for design basis accidents on the assumption that the hypothetical breastfeeding period starts at the beginning of the activity release. Comparative analyses were performed against the biokinetic models applied by ICRP for radiation protection purposes, taking the reference nuclides {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 131}I, {sup 241}Am and long-lived plutonium isotopes as examples. (orig.)

  7. Modeling two-phase flow in a micro-model with local thermal non-equilibrium on the Darcy scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuske, Philipp; Ronneberger, Olaf; Karadimitriou, Nikolaos K.; Helmig, Rainer; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2015-01-01

    Loosening local equilibrium assumptions in two-phase flow in porous media gives rise to new, unknown variables. More specifically, when loosening the local thermal equilibrium assumption, one has to describe the heat transfer between multiple phases, present at the same mathematical point. In this

  8. Ionization and thermal equilibrium models for O star winds based on time-independent radiation-driven wind theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Ab initio ionization and thermal equilibrium models are calculated for the winds of O stars using the results of steady state radiation-driven wind theory to determine the input parameters. Self-consistent methods are used for the roles of H, He, and the most abundant heavy elements in both the statistical and the thermal equilibrium. The model grid was chosen to encompass all O spectral subtypes and the full range of luminosity classes. Results of earlier modeling of O star winds by Klein and Castor (1978) are reproduced and used to motivate improvements in the treatment of the hydrogen equilibrium. The wind temperature profile is revealed to be sensitive to gross changes in the heavy element abundances, but insensitive to other factors considered such as the mass-loss rate and velocity law. The reduced wind temperatures obtained in observing the luminosity dependence of the Si IV lambda 1397 wind absorption profile are shown to eliminate any prospect of explaining the observed O VI lambda 1036 line profiles in terms of time-independent radiation-driven wind theory.

  9. Ionization and thermal equilibrium models for O star winds based on time-independent radiation-driven wind theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drew, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Ab initio ionization and thermal equilibrium models are calculated for the winds of O stars using the results of steady state radiation-driven wind theory to determine the input parameters. Self-consistent methods are used for the roles of H, He, and the most abundant heavy elements in both the statistical and the thermal equilibrium. The model grid was chosen to encompass all O spectral subtypes and the full range of luminosity classes. Results of earlier modeling of O star winds by Klein and Castor (1978) are reproduced and used to motivate improvements in the treatment of the hydrogen equilibrium. The wind temperature profile is revealed to be sensitive to gross changes in the heavy element abundances, but insensitive to other factors considered such as the mass-loss rate and velocity law. The reduced wind temperatures obtained in observing the luminosity dependence of the Si IV lambda 1397 wind absorption profile are shown to eliminate any prospect of explaining the observed O VI lambda 1036 line profiles in terms of time-independent radiation-driven wind theory. 55 refs

  10. A curved multi-component aerosol hygroscopicity model framework: 2 Including organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, D. O.; McFiggans, G. B.; Coe, H.

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the inclusion of organic particulate material within the Aerosol Diameter Dependent Equilibrium Model (ADDEM) framework described in the companion paper applied to inorganic aerosol components. The performance of ADDEM is analysed in terms of its capability to reproduce the behaviour of various organic and mixed inorganic/organic systems using recently published bulk data. Within the modelling architecture already described two separate thermodynamic models are coupled in an additive approach and combined with a method for solving the Köhler equation in order to develop a tool for predicting the water content associated with an aerosol of known inorganic/organic composition and dry size. For development of the organic module, the widely used group contribution method UNIFAC is employed to explicitly deal with the non-ideality in solution. The UNIFAC predictions for components of atmospheric importance were improved considerably by using revised interaction parameters derived from electro-dynamic balance studies. Using such parameters, the model was found to adequately describe mixed systems including 5-6 dicarboxylic acids, down to low relative humidity conditions. The additive approach for modelling mixed inorganic/organic systems worked well for a variety of mixtures. As expected, deviations between predicted and measured data increase with increasing concentration. Available surface tension models, used in evaluating the Kelvin term, were found to reproduce measured data with varying success. Deviations from experimental data increased with increased organic compound complexity. For components only slightly soluble in water, significant deviations from measured surface tension depression behaviour were predicted with both model formalisms tested. A Sensitivity analysis showed that such variation is likely to lead to predicted growth factors within the measurement uncertainty for growth factor taken in the sub-saturated regime. Greater

  11. Utilizing Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics and Reactive Transport to Model CH4 Production from the Nankai Trough Gas Hydrate Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Qorbani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing search for new sources of energy has brought natural gas hydrate (NGH reservoirs to the forefront of attention in both academia and the industry. The amount of gas reserves trapped within these reservoirs surpasses all of the conventional fossil fuel sources explored so far, which makes it of utmost importance to predict their production potential and safety. One of the challenges facing those attempting to analyse their behaviour is that the large number of involved phases make NGHs unable to ever reach equilibrium in nature. Field-scale experiments are expensive and time consuming. However, computer simulations have now become capable of modelling different gas production scenarios, as well as production optimization analyses. In addition to temperature and pressure, independent thermodynamic parameters for hydrate stabilization include the hydrate composition and concentrations for all co-existing phases. It is therefore necessary to develop and implement realistic kinetic models accounting for all significant routes for dissociation and reformation. The reactive transport simulator makes it easy to deploy nonequilibrium thermodynamics for the study of CH4 production from hydrate-bearing sediments by considering each hydrate-related transition as a separate pseudo reaction. In this work, we have used the expanded version of the RetrasoCodeBright (RCB reactive transport simulator to model exploitation of the methane hydrate (MH reservoir located in the Nankai Trough, Japan. Our results showed that higher permeabilities in the horizontal direction dominated the pressure drop propagation throughout the hydrate layers and affected their hydrate dissociation rates. Additionally, the comparison of the vertical well versus the horizontal well pattern indicated that hydrate dissociation was slightly higher in the vertical well scenario compared to the horizontal.

  12. ''Statistical treatment of the spectral properties of plasmas in local thermodynamical equilibrium using a screened hydrogenic model''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faussurier, G.

    1996-01-01

    A new screened hydrogenic model is presented. The screening constants depend both on the principal n and orbital l quantum numbers. They have been obtained from numerical fits over a large data base containing ionization potentials and one-electron excitation energies of ions. A rapid and original method to compute the bound-bound and bound-free oscillator strengths is proposed. The discrete spectrum and the series continuum are connected by continuity, and the sum rules are respected. The screened hydrogenic average atom is well-adapted to describe multicharged ion plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Using the key principle of statistical mechanics, it is shown first that this model is properly defined and thermodynamically coherent. Secondly, a new method of detailed ionization stage accounting of a LTE plasma is explained. It can be used to reconstruct the distribution of integer charge states in such a plasma from any average atom model. The l -splitting allows one-electron transitions between two subshells with the same principal quantum number n. They may be of great importance when the Rosseland opacity is computed. Though, methods of classical statistical mechanics are required to calculate the distribution of the configurations around the average atom one and so to improve the spectral opacities. The splitting in integer ionic stages can be easily included. The formalism is tested by comparisons with theoretical and experimental results published in the literature. From the photoabsorption spectra encountered, the main results are the correct estimations of both the Rosseland opacity and the detailed charge degrees accounting. (author)

  13. Energy recovery from human faeces via gasification: A thermodynamic equilibrium modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onabanjo, T.; Patchigolla, K.; Wagland, S.T.; Fidalgo, B.; Kolios, A.; McAdam, E.; Parker, A.; Williams, L.; Tyrrel, S.; Cartmell, E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • On dry basis, typical human faeces contain 83 wt.% organic fraction and 17 wt.% ash. • The LHV of dry human faeces ranged from 19 to 22 MJ/kg, values similar to wood biomass. • Syngas from dry human faeces had LHV of 15–17 MJ/kg at equivalence ratio of ∼0.31. • Energy is best recovered from moist human faeces at equivalence ratio above 0.6. • Recoverable exergy potential from moist human faeces can be up to 15 MJ/kg. - Abstract: Non-sewered sanitary systems (NSS) are emerging as one of the solutions to poor sanitation because of the limitations of the conventional flush toilet. These new sanitary systems are expected to safely treat faecal waste and operate without external connections to a sewer, water supply or energy source. The Nano Membrane Toilet (NMT) is a unique domestic-scale sanitary solution currently being developed to treat human waste on-site. This toilet will employ a small-scale gasifier to convert human faeces into products of high energy value. This study investigated the suitability of human faeces as a feedstock for gasification. It quantified the recoverable exergy potential from human faeces and explored the optimal routes for thermal conversion, using a thermodynamic equilibrium model. Fresh human faeces were found to have approximately 70–82 wt.% moisture and 3–6 wt.% ash. Product gas resulting from a typical dry human faeces (0 wt.% moisture) had LHV and exergy values of 17.2 MJ/kg and 24 MJ/kg respectively at optimum equivalence ratio of 0.31, values that are comparable to wood biomass. For suitable conversion of moist faecal samples, near combustion operating conditions are required, if an external energy source is not supplied. This is however at 5% loss in the exergy value of the gas, provided both thermal heat and energy of the gas are recovered. This study shows that the maximum recoverable exergy potential from an average adult moist human faeces can be up to 15 MJ/kg, when the gasifier is operated at

  14. Economic analysis of energy supply and national economy on the basis of general equilibrium models. Applications of the input-output decomposition analysis and the Computable General Equilibrium models shown by the example of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Jong-Hwan.

    1993-01-01

    Firstly, this study investigaties the causes of sectoral growth and structural changes in the Korean economy. Secondly, it develops the borders of a consistent economic model in order to investigate simultaneously the different impacts of changes in energy and in the domestic economy. This is done any both the Input-Output-Decomposition analysis and a Computable General Equilibrium model (CGE Model). The CGE Model eliminates the disadvantages of the IO Model and allows the investigation of the interdegenerative of the various energy sectors with the economy. The Social Accounting Matrix serves as the data basis of the GCE Model. Simulated experiments have been comet out with the help of the GCE Model, indicating the likely impact of an oil price shock in the economy-sectorally and generally. (orig.) [de

  15. Vapor-Liquid equilibrium in DEEA/H2O/CO2 system; Experiments and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Zaidy, Syed Amjad Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Experiment data for vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) of CO2 were conducted for DEEA 5M and 2M.The study was performed in two VLE apparatuses from 40 to 120 °C with atmospheric VLE apparatus and high pressure VLE apparatus. The extended UNIQUAC model framework was applied and the model parameters were fitted with experimental data with partial pressure of CO2 for atmospheric VLE and total pressure with high pressure VLE apparatus. Modfit was applied for further optimization. The model prediction...

  16. A chemical model for generating the sources of mare basalts - Combined equilibrium and fractional crystallization of the lunar magmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Neal, Clive R.

    1992-01-01

    A chemical model for simulating the sources of the lunar mare basalts was developed by considering a modified mafic cumulate source formed during the combined equilibrium and fractional crystallization of a lunar magma ocean (LMO). The parameters which influence the initial LMO and its subsequent crystallization are examined, and both trace and major elements are modeled. It is shown that major elements tightly constrain the composition of mare basalt sources and the pathways to their creation. The ability of this LMO model to generate viable mare basalt source regions was tested through a case study involving the high-Ti basalts.

  17. The thermal non-equilibrium porous media modelling for CFD study of woven wire matrix of a Stirling regenerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, S.C.; Barreno, I.; Tutar, M.; Esnaola, J.A.; Barrutia, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A numerical procedure to derive porous media’s coefficients is proposed. • The local thermal non-equilibrium porous media model is more suitable for regenerators. • The regenerator temperature profiles can be better fitted to a logarithmic curve. • The wound woven wire matrix provides lower performance compared to stacked. • The numerical characterization methodology is useful for the multi-D Stirling engine models. - Abstract: Different numerical methods can be applied to the analysis of the flow through the Stirling engine regenerator. One growing approach is to model the regenerator as porous medium to simulate and design the full Stirling engine in three-dimensional (3-D) manner. In general, the friction resistance coefficients and heat transfer coefficient are experimentally obtained to describe the flow and thermal non-equilibrium through a porous medium. A finite volume method (FVM) based non-thermal equilibrium porous media modelling approach characterizing the fluid flow and heat transfer in a representative small detailed flow domain of the woven wire matrix is proposed here to obtain the porous media coefficients without further requirement of experimental studies. The results are considered to be equivalent to those obtained from the detailed woven wire matrix for the pressure drop and heat transfer. Once the equivalence between the models is verified, this approach is extended to model oscillating regeneration cycles through a full size regenerator porous media for two different woven wire matrix configurations of stacked and wound types. The results suggest that the numerical modelling approach proposed here can be applied with confidence to model the regenerator as a porous media in the multi-dimensional (multi-D) simulations of Stirling engines

  18. Non-equilibrium Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Martinás

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A microeconomic, agent based framework to dynamic economics is formulated in a materialist approach. An axiomatic foundation of a non-equilibrium microeconomics is outlined. Economic activity is modelled as transformation and transport of commodities (materials owned by the agents. Rate of transformations (production intensity, and the rate of transport (trade are defined by the agents. Economic decision rules are derived from the observed economic behaviour. The non-linear equations are solved numerically for a model economy. Numerical solutions for simple model economies suggest that the some of the results of general equilibrium economics are consequences only of the equilibrium hypothesis. We show that perfect competition of selfish agents does not guarantee the stability of economic equilibrium, but cooperativity is needed, too.

  19. Measurement and Modelling of Phase Equilibrium of Oil - Water - Polar Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup

    with the measurement of newexperimental data, but through the development of new experimental equipment for the study ofmulti-phase equilibrium. In addition to measurement of well-defined systems, LLE have beenmeasured for North Sea oils with MEG and water. The work can be split up into two parts: Experimental: VLE......-waterflooding process act primarily as thickeners. The main purpose of this work, focusing on the phase equilibrium of complex systems containingthermodynamic gas hydrate inhibitors, is to give a solid contribution in bridging the existing gaps inwhat experimental data is concerned. This was achieved not just...... systems presented, confirming the quality of theequipment. The equipment is used for measurement of VLE for several systems of interest; methane+ water, methane + methanol, methane + methanol + water and methane + MEG. Details dealing with the design, assembling and testing of new experimental equipment...

  20. Thermal Behavior of Cd During Sludge Incineration: Experiments and Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingyong; Zhuo, Zhongxu; Sun, Shuiyu; Xie, Wuming; Lu, Shaoyou; Sun, Jian; Kuo, Jiahong; Yujie, Wang

    2016-12-01

      Experiments and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were performed to investigate the behavior of Cd during sewage sludge incineration. The chemical equilibrium calculations indicated that chlorine significantly increased the volatilization of Cd in the form of CdCl2. In addition, SiO2-containing materials can function as sorbents for stabilizing Cd. The effect of PVC added to the sludge on the migration of Cd in the sludge was greater than that of NaCl. As the temperature increased, both organic and inorganic chlorides reduced the Cd distribution in the bottom ash. The chloride concentration, and the incineration time exhibited insignificant changes in Cd emission. With the addition of either NaCl or PVC into the sludge, the phases of Cd present in the bottom slag were primarily present in the form of silica-alumina oxides or multi-metal oxide, which could inhabit the Cd volatilization.

  1. On the use of stochastic differential geometry for non-equilibrium thermodynamic modeling and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo

    2013-07-01

    We discuss the relevance of geometric concepts in the theory of stochastic differential equations for applications to the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics of small systems. In particular, we show how the Eells-Elworthy-Malliavin covariant construction of the Wiener process on a Riemann manifold provides a physically transparent formulation of optimal control problems of finite-time thermodynamic transitions. Based on this formulation, we turn to an evaluative discussion of recent results on optimal thermodynamic control and their interpretation.

  2. Ternary Vapor–Liquid Equilibrium Measurements and Modeling of Ethylene Glycol (1) + Water (2) + Methane (3) Systems at 6 and 12.5 MPa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruger, Francois J.; Danielsen, Marie V.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M.

    2018-01-01

    Novel technologies in the field of subsea gasprocessing include the development of natural gas dehydration facilities, which may operate at high pressure due to their proximity to reservoirs. For the qualification and design of these processing units, ternary vapor−liquid equilibrium data...... are required to validate the thermodynamic models used in the design process. For this purpose, 16 new ternary data points were measured for ethylene glycol (1) + water (2) + methane (3) at 6.0 and 12.5 MPa with temperatures ranging from 288to 323 K and glycol content above 90 wt %. Glycol in gas (y1),water...

  3. EQUILIBRIUM MODELLING AND SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES FOR THE BIOSORPTION OF ZN+2 IONS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION USING IMMOBILIZED SPIRULINA PLATENSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gaur ، R. Dehankhar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption equilibrium of zinc ions to Spirulina platensis both in free and immobilized forms were studied in batch system with respect to pH, metal ion concentration, algal dosages and time. The maximum adsorption was observed at pH=8, optimum metal ion concentration and algal dose were 100 mg/L and 1g/100mL, respectively. Biosorption equilibrium was established in 90 minutes. The maximum attainable biosorption was found to be 97.1% for Spirulina platensis. The equilibrium adsorption capacities of adsorbents used for zinc ions were measured and extrapolated using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms models. Langmuir model was found to be in better correlation with experimental data. The maximum Langmuir constants Q◦ (mg/g and b were 92.93 and 0.0012, respectively for Spirulina platensis embedded in calcium alginate matrix. The immobilized Spirulina platensis in calcium of alginate matrix was the best biosorbent. 0.1 M EDTA was used as an eluant, which allowed the reuse of biomass in three biosorption-desorption cycles without considerable loss in biosorption capacity. 89-95 % zinc ions were desorbed with EDTA. The functional groups involved in zinc biosorption were identified by using Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analysis of algae revealed the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl, amino, amide and imine groups, which were responsible for biosorption of zinc ions.

  4. GEODAT. Development of thermodynamic data for the thermodynamic equilibrium modeling of processes in deep geothermal formations. Combined report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moog, Helge C.; Regenspurg, Simona; Voigt, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    The concept for geothermal energy application for electricity generation can be differentiated into three compartments: In the geologic compartment cooled fluid is pressed into a porous or fractured rock formation, in the borehole compartment a hot fluid is pumped to the surface and back into the geothermal reservoir, in the aboveground facility the energy is extracted from the geothermal fluid by heat exchangers. Pressure and temperature changes influence the thermodynamic equilibrium of a system. The modeling of a geothermal system has therefore to consider besides the mass transport the heat transport and consequently changing solution compositions and the pressure/temperature effected chemical equilibrium. The GEODAT project is aimed to simulate the reactive mass transport in a geothermal reservoir in the North German basin (Gross Schoenebeck). The project was performed by the cooperation of three partners: Geoforschungsinstitut Potsdam, Bergakademie Freiberg and GRS.

  5. An effective continuum approach for modeling non-equilibrium structural evolution of protein nanofiber networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Englander, Ongi; Paravastu, Anant; Oates, William S

    2011-08-07

    We quantify the formation and evolution of protein nanofibers using a new phase field modeling framework and compare the results to transmission electron microscopy measurements (TEM) and time-dependent growth measurements given in the literature. The modeling framework employs a set of effective continuum equations combined with underlying nanoscale forces and chemical potential relations governing protein nanofiber formation in solution. Calculations based on the theoretical framework are implemented numerically using a nonlinear finite element phase field modeling approach that couples homogenized protein molecular structure via a vector order parameter with chemical potential relations that describe interactions between the nanofibers and the surrounding solution. Homogenized, anisotropic molecular and chemical flux relations are found to be critical in obtaining nanofiber growth from seed particles or a random monomer bath. In addition, the model predicts both sigmoidal and first-order growth kinetics for protein nanofibers for unseeded and seeded models, respectively. These simulations include quantitative predictions on time scales of typical protein self-assembly behavior which qualitatively match TEM measurements of the RADA16-I protein and growth rate measurements for amyloid nanofibers from the literature. For comparisons with experiments, the numerical model performs multiple nanofiber protein evolution simulations with a characteristic length scale of ∼2.4 nm and characteristic time scale of ∼9.1 h. These results provide a new modeling tool that couples underlying monomer structure with self-assembling nanofiber behavior that is compatible with various external loadings and chemical environments.

  6. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibrium for water + poly(Ethylene glycol + salt aqueous two-phase systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.G. Sé

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The NRTL (nonrandom, two-liquid model, expressed in mass fraction instead of mole fraction, was used to correlate liquid-liquid equilibria for aqueous two-phase polymer-salt solutions. New interaction energy parameters for this model were determined using reported data on the water + poly(ethylene glycol + salt systems, with different molecular masses for PEG and the salts potassium phosphate, sodium sulfate, sodium carbonate and magnesium sulfate. The correlation of liquid-liquid equilibrium is quite satisfactory.

  7. Empirical phylogenies and species abundance distributions are consistent with pre-equilibrium dynamics of neutral community models with gene flow

    KAUST Repository

    Bonnet-Lebrun, Anne-Sophie

    2017-03-17

    Community characteristics reflect past ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Here, we investigate whether it is possible to obtain realistically shaped modelled communities - i.e., with phylogenetic trees and species abundance distributions shaped similarly to typical empirical bird and mammal communities - from neutral community models. To test the effect of gene flow, we contrasted two spatially explicit individual-based neutral models: one with protracted speciation, delayed by gene flow, and one with point mutation speciation, unaffected by gene flow. The former produced more realistic communities (shape of phylogenetic tree and species-abundance distribution), consistent with gene flow being a key process in macro-evolutionary dynamics. Earlier models struggled to capture the empirically observed branching tempo in phylogenetic trees, as measured by the gamma statistic. We show that the low gamma values typical of empirical trees can be obtained in models with protracted speciation, in pre-equilibrium communities developing from an initially abundant and widespread species. This was even more so in communities sampled incompletely, particularly if the unknown species are the youngest. Overall, our results demonstrate that the characteristics of empirical communities that we have studied can, to a large extent, be explained through a purely neutral model under pre-equilibrium conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. The representation of non-equilibrium soil types in earth system models and its impact on carbon cycle projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugelius, G.; Ahlström, A.; Canadell, J.; Koven, C. D.; Jackson, R. B.; Luo, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Soils hold the largest reactive pool of carbon (C) on earth. Global soil organic C stocks (0-200 cm depth plus full peatland depth) are estimated to 2200 Pg C (adapted from Hugelius et al., 2014, Köchy et al., 2015 and Batjes, 2016). Soil C stocks in Earth system models (ESMs) can be generated by running the model over a longer time period until soil C pools are in or near steady-state. Inherent in this concept is the idea that soil C stocks are in (quasi)equilibrium as determined by the balance of net ecosystem input to soil organic matter and its turnover. The rate of turnover is sometimes subdivided into several pools and the rates are affected by various environmental factors. Here we break down the empirically based estimates of global soil C pools into equilibrium-type soils which current (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5; CMIP5) generation ESMs are set-up to represent and non-equilibrium type soils which are generally not represented in current ESMs. We define equilibrium soils as those where pedogenesis (and associated soil C formation) is not significantly limited by the environmental factors perennial soil freezing, waterlogging/anoxia or limited unconsolidated soil substrate. This is essentially all permafrost-free mineral soils that are not in a wetland or alpine setting. On the other hand, non-equlibrium soils are defined as permafrost soils, peatlands and alpine soils with a limited fine-soil matrix. Based on geospatial analyses of state-of-the-art datasets on soil C stocks, we estimate that the global soil C pool is divided roughly equally between equilibrium and non-equlibrium type soils. We discuss the ways in which this result affects C cycling in ESMs and projections of soil C sensitivity under a changing climate. ReferencesBatjes N.H. (2016) Geoderma, 269, 61-68, doi: 10.1016/j.geoderma.2016.01.034 Hugelius G. et al. (2014) Biogeosciences, 11, 6573-6593, doi:10.5194/bg-11-6573-2014 Köchy M. et al. (2015) Soil 1, 351-365. DOI: doi

  9. Adsorption of Remazol Brilliant Blue R using ZnO fine powder: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ada, Kezban; Ergene, Aysun; Tan, Sema; Yalçin, Emine

    2009-06-15

    Zinc oxide powders with six-sided flake-like particles were prepared by homogeneous precipitation from boiling aqueous solutions that contained excess urea and 0.075 (Z075) and 0.300 (Z300)M Zn(2+). The average sizes of the particles are 37 and 46 microm, while the average sizes of the crystals are approximately 45 for Z075 and Z300 at 1000 degrees C. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies were carried out for the adsorption of RBBR dye from aqueous solution using both types of ZnO in the form of fine powders. The effects of pH, initial dye concentration, contact time and temperature of solution on the adsorption were studied. Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models were used to describe the adsorption of RBBR onto ZnO powders. The Langmuir and D-R isotherm models fit the equilibrium data better than the Temkin isotherm model. The monomolecular adsorption capacity of Z075 and Z300 was determined to be 190 and 345 mg g(-1) for RBBR, respectively. The Lagergren first-order, Ritchie second-order kinetic and intra-particle diffusion models were used for the adsorption of the dye onto ZnO powders. The Ritchie second-order model was suitable for describing the adsorption kinetics for the removal of RBBR from aqueous solution onto Z075 and Z300. Thermodynamic parameters, such as the Gibbs free energy (DeltaG(#)), enthalpy (DeltaH(#)), entropy (DeltaS(#)) and equilibrium constant of activation (K(#)) were calculated. These parameters showed that the adsorption process of RBBR onto Z075 and Z300 was an endothermic process of a chemical nature under the studied conditions.

  10. On the relationship between MHD equilibrium bifurcations and linear stability theory for models of line-tied coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeou, Z.; Neukirch, T.

    2002-10-01

    We present the results of an investigation of the relationship between the predictions made by linear MHD stability theory for instabilities of straight flux tube models of line-tied coronal loops and the bifurcations of the underlying MHD equilibria. It is found that contrary to the naive assumption that there should be a one-to-one correspondence between instability points and bifurcation points, such an one-to-one correspondence does not always exist. Using the Gold-Hoyle equilibrium as an illustrative example it is shown that additional axisymmetric bifurcations exist if the equilibrium bifurcations are calculated with Grad-Shafranov theory. In this case the onset of the m = 0-instability (sausage mode) corresponds to the second and not the first bifurcation point of the equilibrium sequence. No additional bifurcations have been found when Euler potentials are used, and in this case the first bifurcation coincides with the onset condition for the m = 0-instability. A possible reason for this difference are the different boundary conditions.

  11. Models of Non-Stationary Thermodynamic Processes in Rocket Engines Taking into Account a Chemical Equilibrium of Combustion Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Aliev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the two approach-based techniques for calculating the non-stationary intra-chamber processes in solid-propellant rocket engine (SPRE. The first approach assumes that the combustion products are a mechanical mix while the other one supposes it to be the mix, which is in chemical equilibrium. To enhance reliability of solution of the intra ballistic tasks, which assume a chemical equilibrium of combustion products, the computing algorithms to calculate a structure of the combustion products are changed. The algorithm for solving a system of the nonlinear equations of chemical equilibrium, when determining the iterative amendments, uses the orthogonal QR method instead of a method of Gauss. Besides, a possibility to apply genetic algorithms in a task about a structure of combustion products is considered.It is shown that in the tasks concerning the prediction of non-stationary intra ballistic characteristics in a solid propellant rocket engine, application of models of mechanical mix and chemically equilibrium structure of combustion products leads to qualitatively and quantitatively coinciding results. The maximum difference in parameters is 5-10%, at most. In tasks concerning the starting operation of a solid sustainer engine with high-temperature products of combustion difference in results is more essential, and can reach 20% and more.A technique to calculate the intra ballistic parameters, in which flotation of combustion products is considered in the light of a spatial statement, requires using the high-performance computer facilities. For these tasks it is offered to define structure of products of combustion and its thermo-physical characteristics, using the polynoms coefficients of which should be predefined.

  12. Development of a Chemical Equilibrium Model for a Molten Core-Concrete Interaction Analysis Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jae Uk; Lee, Dae Young; Park, Chang Hwan [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This molten core could interact with the reactor cavity region which consists of concrete. In this process, components of molten core react with components of concrete through a lot of chemical reactions. As a result, many kinds of gas species are generated and those move up forming rising bubbles into the reactor containment atmosphere. These rising bubbles are the carrier of the many kinds of the aerosols coming from the MCCI (Molten Core Concrete Interaction) layers. To evaluate the amount of the aerosols released from the MCCI layers, the amount of the gas species generated from those layers should be calculated. The chemical equilibrium state originally implies the final state of the multiple chemical reactions; therefore, investigating the equilibrium composition of molten core can be applicable to predict the gas generation status. The most common way for finding the chemical equilibrium state is a minimization of total Gibbs free energy of the system. In this paper, the method to make good guess of initial state is suggested and chemical reaction results are compared with results of CSSI report No 164. Total mass of system and the number of atoms of each element are conserved. The tendency of calculation results is similar with results presented in CSNI Report except a few species. These differences may be caused by absence of Gibbs energy data of the species such as Fe{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, U(OH){sub 3}, UO(OH), UO{sub 2}(OH), U{sub 3}O{sub 7}, La, Ce.

  13. Equilibrium Dialysis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    context of antimicrobial therapy in malnutrition. Dialysis has in the past presented technical problems, being complicated and time-consuming. A new dialysis system based on the equilibrium technique has now become available, and it is the principles and practical application of this apparatus (Kontron Diapack; Kontron.

  14. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  15. Strategic Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, E.E.C.

    2000-01-01

    An outcome in a noncooperative game is said to be self-enforcing, or a strategic equilibrium, if, whenever it is recommended to the players, no player has an incentive to deviate from it.This paper gives an overview of the concepts that have been proposed as formalizations of this requirement and of

  16. Assessing market structures in resource markets. An empirical analysis of the market for metallurgical coal using various equilibrium models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenczik, Stefan; Panke, Timo [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Energy Economics

    2015-05-15

    The prevalent market structures found in many resource markets consist of a high concentration on the supply side and a low demand elasticity. Market results are therefore frequently assumed to be an outcome of strategic interaction between producers. Common models to investigate the market outcomes and underlying market structures are games representing competitive markets, strategic Cournot competition and Stackelberg structures taking into account a dominant player acting first followed by one or more followers. Besides analysing a previously neglected scenario of the latter kind, we add to the literature by expanding the application of mathematical models by applying an Equilibrium Problem with Equilibrium Constraints (EPEC), which is used to model multi-leader-follower games, to a spatial market. We apply our model by investigating the prevalent market setting in the international market for metallurgical coal between 2008 and 2010, whose market structure provides arguments for a wide variety of market structures. Using different statistical measures and comparing model with actual market outcomes, we find that two previously neglected settings perform best: First, a setting in which the four largest metallurgical coal exporting firms compete against each other as Stackelberg leaders, while the remainders act as Cournot followers. Second, a setting with BHPB acting as sole Stackelberg leader.

  17. Assessing market structures in resource markets. An empirical analysis of the market for metallurgical coal using various equilibrium models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenczik, Stefan; Panke, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent market structures found in many resource markets consist of a high concentration on the supply side and a low demand elasticity. Market results are therefore frequently assumed to be an outcome of strategic interaction between producers. Common models to investigate the market outcomes and underlying market structures are games representing competitive markets, strategic Cournot competition and Stackelberg structures taking into account a dominant player acting first followed by one or more followers. Besides analysing a previously neglected scenario of the latter kind, we add to the literature by expanding the application of mathematical models by applying an Equilibrium Problem with Equilibrium Constraints (EPEC), which is used to model multi-leader-follower games, to a spatial market. We apply our model by investigating the prevalent market setting in the international market for metallurgical coal between 2008 and 2010, whose market structure provides arguments for a wide variety of market structures. Using different statistical measures and comparing model with actual market outcomes, we find that two previously neglected settings perform best: First, a setting in which the four largest metallurgical coal exporting firms compete against each other as Stackelberg leaders, while the remainders act as Cournot followers. Second, a setting with BHPB acting as sole Stackelberg leader.

  18. An ab initio chemical reaction model for the direct simulation Monte Carlo study of non-equilibrium nitrogen flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, T K; Bhandarkar, U V; Puranik, B P

    2017-08-28

    A new ab initio based chemical model for a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) study suitable for simulating rarefied flows with a high degree of non-equilibrium is presented. To this end, Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) cross sections for N 2 +N 2 →N 2 +2N are calculated and published using a global complete active space self-consistent field-complete active space second order perturbation theory N 4 potential energy surface and quasi-classical trajectory algorithm for high energy collisions (up to 30 eV). CID cross sections are calculated for only a selected set of ro-vibrational combinations of the two nitrogen molecules, and a fitting scheme based on spectroscopic weights is presented to interpolate the CID cross section for all possible ro-vibrational combinations. The new chemical model is validated by calculating equilibrium reaction rate coefficients that can be compared well with existing shock tube and computational results. High-enthalpy hypersonic nitrogen flows around a cylinder in the transition flow regime are simulated using DSMC to compare the predictions of the current ab initio based chemical model with the prevailing phenomenological model (the total collision energy model). The differences in the predictions are discussed.

  19. Experimental determination and thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibrium and protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems containing biodegradable salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, Brenda; Malpiedi, Luciana Pellegrini; Tubío, Gisela; Nerli, Bibiana; Alcântara Pessôa Filho, Pedro de

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Binodal data of systems (water + polyethyleneglycol + sodium) succinate are reported. ► Pitzer model describes the phase equilibrium of systems formed by polyethyleneglycol and biodegradable salts satisfactorily. ► This simple thermodynamic framework was able to predict the partitioning behaviour of model proteins acceptably well. - Abstract: Phase diagrams of sustainable aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) formed by polyethyleneglycols (PEGs) of different average molar masses (4000, 6000, and 8000) and sodium succinate are reported in this work. Partition coefficients (Kps) of seven model proteins: bovine serum albumin, catalase, beta-lactoglobulin, alpha-amylase, lysozyme, pepsin, urease and trypsin were experimentally determined in these systems and in ATPSs formed by the former PEGs and other biodegradable sodium salts: citrate and tartrate. An extension of Pitzer model comprising long and short-range term contributions to the excess Gibbs free energy was used to describe the (liquid + liquid) equilibrium. Comparison between experimental and calculated tie line data showed mean deviations always lower than 3%, thus indicating a good correlation. The partition coefficients were modeled by using the same thermodynamic approach. Predicted and experimental partition coefficients correlated quite successfully. Mean deviations were found to be lower than the experimental uncertainty for most of the assayed proteins.

  20. A non-equilibrium model for soil heating and moisture transport during extreme surface heating: The soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMV-Model Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Massman

    2015-01-01

    Increased use of prescribed fire by land managers and the increasing likelihood of wildfires due to climate change require an improved modeling capability of extreme heating of soils during fires. This issue is addressed here by developing and testing the soil (heat-moisture-vapor) HMVmodel, a 1-D (one-dimensional) non-equilibrium (liquid- vapor phase change)...

  1. Equilibrium modeling of removal of drimarine yello HG-3GL dye from aqueous solutions by low cost agricultural waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatti, S.N.H.N.; Sadaf, S.; Sadaf, S.; Farrukh, Z.; Noreen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Pollution control is one of the leading issues of society today. The present study was designed to remove the Drimarine Yellow HF-3GL dye from aqueous solutions through biosorption. Sugarcane bagasse was used as biosorbent in native, acetic acid treated and immobilized form. Batch study was conducted to optimize different system variables like pH of solution, medium temperature, biosorbent concentration, initial dye concentration and contact time. Maximum dye removal was observed at pH 2, biosorbent dose of 0.05 g/50 mL and 40 degree C temperature. The equilibrium was achieved in 45-90 min. Different kinetic and equilibrium models were applied to the experimental results. The biosorption kinetic data was found to follow the pseudo second order kinetic model. Freundlich adsorption isotherm model showed a better fitness to the equilibrium data. The value of Gibbs free energy revealed that biosorption of Drimarine Yellow HF-3GL dye by native and pretreated sugarcane bagasse was a spontaneous process. Presence of salt and heavy metal ions in aqueous solution enhanced the biosorption capacity while presence of surfactants decreased the biosorption potential of biosorbent. Dye was desorbed by 1M NaOH solution. Fixed bed column study of Drimarine Yellow HF-3GL was carried out to optimize different parameters like bed height, flow rate and initial dye concentration. It was observed that biosorption capacity increases with increase in initial dye concentration and bed height but decreases with the increase in flow rate. The data of column study was explained very well by BDST model. FT-IR analysis confirmed the involvement of various functional groups, mainly hydroxyl, carboxyl and amine groups. The results proved that sugarcane bagasse waste biomass can be used as a favorable biosorbent for the removal of dyes from aqueous solutions. (author)

  2. How do the Richest 1% Own 50% of the National Wealth in an Integrated Walrasian Equilibrium and Neoclassical Growth Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Bin Zhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a dynamic economic model of heterogeneous households to explain economic mechanisms of how the richest one per cent of the population own 50% of national wealth. We explain inequality in a purely competitive economic environment with endogenous wealth and human capital accumulation. The production technologies and economic structure follow the Uzawa two-sector model. In this study a household’s disposable income is the traditional disposable income (which is the income that a household earns each period of time after taxes and transfers in the Solow model and many empirical studies plus the value of the household’s wealth. By applying Zhang’s concept of disposable income and utility function, we describe consumers’ wealth accumulation and consumption behavior. We show how wealth accumulation, human capital accumulation, and division of labor, and time distribution interact with each other under perfect competition. We simulate the model with three groups of the people, the rich, the middle, and the poor whose shares of the population are, respectively, the 1 %, 69%, and 20%. We demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point at which the rich 1% own more than half of the national wealth and the poor 20% less than 10% of the national wealth. The rich household works only 4 hours a day and the poor household 11 hours a day. We show how the system moves to the equilibrium from an initial state and confirm that the equilibrium point is stable. We also demonstrate how changes in the total factor productivity of the capital goods sector, the rich’s human capital utilization efficiency, the rich’s efficiency of learning through consuming, and the rich’s propensities to save, to consume, and to enjoy leisure, affect growth and inequality.

  3. Modeling High Altitude EMP using a Non-Equilibrium Electron Swarm Model to Monitor Conduction Electron Evolution (LA-UR-15-26151)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusateri, E. N.; Morris, H. E.; Nelson, E.; Ji, W.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events in the atmosphere are important physical phenomena that occur through both man-made and natural processes, such as lightning, and can be disruptive to surrounding electrical systems. Due to the disruptive nature of EMP, it is important to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation with computational models. In EMP, low-energy conduction electrons are produced from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. These conduction electrons continue to interact with the surrounding air and alter the EMP waveform. Many EMP simulation codes use an equilibrium ohmic model for computing the conduction current. The equilibrium model works well when the equilibration time is short compared to the rise time or duration of the EMP. However, at high altitude, the conduction electron equilibration time can be comparable to or longer than the rise time or duration of the EMP. This matters, for example, when calculating the EMP propagating upward toward a satellite. In these scenarios, the equilibrium ionization rate becomes very large for even a modest electric field. The ohmic model produces an unphysically large number of conduction electrons that prematurely and abruptly short the EMP in the simulation code. An electron swarm model, which simulates the time evolution of conduction electrons, can be used to overcome the limitations exhibited by the equilibrium ohmic model. We have developed and validated an electron swarm model in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure previously in Pusateri et al. (2015). This swarm model has been integrated into CHAP-LA, a state-of-the-art EMP code developed by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which previously calculated conduction current using an ohmic model. We demonstrate the EMP damping behavior caused by the ohmic model at high altitudes and show improvements on high altitude EMP modeling obtained by employing the swarm model.

  4. Equilibrium sorption of cobalt, cesium, and strontium on Bandelier Tuff: analysis of alternative mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polzer, W.L.; Fuentes, H.R.; Essington, E.H.; Roensch, F.R.

    1985-01-01

    Sorption isotherms are derived from batch equilibrium data for cobalt, cesium and strontium on Bandelier Tuff. Experiments were conducted at an average temperature of 23 0 C and equilibrium was defined at 48 hours. The solute concentrations ranged from 0 to 500 mg/L. The radioactive isotopes 60 Co, 137 Cs, and 85 Sr were used to trace the sorption of the stable solutes. The Linear, Langmuir, Freundlich and a Modified Freundlich isotherm equations are evaluated. The Modified Freundlich isotherm equation is validated as a preferred general mathematical tool for representing the sorption of the three solutes. The empirical constants derived from the Modified Freundlich isotherm equation indicate that under dynamic flow conditions strontium will move most rapidly and cobalt least rapidly. On the other hand, chemical dispersion will be greatest for cesium and least for strontium. Hill Plots of the sorption data suggest that in the region of low saturation sorption of all three solutes is impeded by interactions among sorption sites; cobalt exhibits the greatest effect of interactions and strontium shows only a minimal effect. In the saturation region of 50% or more, sorption of cobalt is enhanced slightly by interactions among sorption sites whereas sorption of cesium and strontium appears to be independent of site interactions. 9 references, 4 figures, 2 tables

  5. BALANCED SCORECARDS EVALUATION MODEL THAT INCLUDES ELEMENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM USING AHP MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jovanović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is oriented on improvement of environmental management system (EMS using BSC (Balanced Scorecard model that presents strategic model of measurem ents and improvement of organisational performance. The research will present approach of objectives and environmental management me trics involvement (proposed by literature review in conventional BSC in "Ad Barska plovi dba" organisation. Further we will test creation of ECO-BSC model based on business activities of non-profit organisations in order to improve envir onmental management system in parallel with other systems of management. Using this approach we may obtain 4 models of BSC that includ es elements of environmen tal management system for AD "Barska plovidba". Taking into acc ount that implementation and evaluation need long period of time in AD "Barska plovidba", the final choice will be based on 14598 (Information technology - Software product evaluation and ISO 9126 (Software engineering - Product quality using AHP method. Those standards are usually used for evaluation of quality software product and computer programs that serve in organisation as support and factors for development. So, AHP model will be bas ed on evolution criteria based on suggestion of ISO 9126 standards and types of evaluation from two evaluation teams. Members of team & will be experts in BSC and environmental management system that are not em ployed in AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation. The members of team 2 will be managers of AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation (including manage rs from environmental department. Merging results based on previously cr eated two AHP models, one can obtain the most appropriate BSC that includes elements of environmental management system. The chosen model will present at the same time suggestion for approach choice including ecological metrics in conventional BSC model for firm that has at least one ECO strategic orientation.

  6. A self-consistent model of a thermally balanced quiescent prominence in magnetostatic equilibrium in a uniform gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, I.; Low, B.C.

    1977-01-01

    A theoretical model of quiescent prominences in the form of an infinite vertical sheet is presented. Self-consistent solutions are obtained by integrating simultaneously the set of nonlinear equations of magnetostatic equilibrium and thermal balance. The basic features of the models are: (1) The prominence matter is confined to a sheet and supported against gravity by a bowed magnetic field. (2) The thermal flux is channelled along magnetic field lines. (3) The thermal flux is everywhere balanced by Low's (1975) hypothetical heat sink which is proportional to the local density. (4) A constant component of the magnetic field along the length of the prominence shields the cool plasma from the hot surrounding. It is assumed that the prominence plasma emits more radiation than it absorbes from the radiation fields of the photosphere, chromosphere and corona, and the above hypothetical heat sink is interpreted to represent the amount of radiative loss that must be balanced by a nonradiative energy input. Using a central density and temperature of 10 11 particles cm -3 and 5000 K respectively, a magnetic field strength between 2 to 10 gauss and a thermal conductivity that varies linearly with temperature, the physical properties implied by the model are discussed. The analytic treatment can also be carried out for a class of more complex thermal conductivities. These models provide a useful starting point for investigating the combined requirements of magnetostatic equilibrium and thermal balance in the quiescent prominence. (Auth.)

  7. Modeling generator power plant portfolios and pollution taxes in electric power supply chain networks: a transportation network equilibrium transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai Wu; Nagurney, A.; University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; Zugang Liu; Stranlund, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Global climate change and fuel security risks have encouraged international and regional adoption of pollution/carbon taxes. A major portion of such policy interventions is directed at the electric power industry with taxes applied according to the type of fuel used by the power generators in their power plants. This paper proposes an electric power supply chain network model that captures the behavior of power generators faced with a portfolio of power plant options and subject to pollution taxes. We demonstrate that this general model can be reformulated as a transportation network equilibrium model with elastic demands and qualitatively analyzed and solved as such. The connections between these two different modeling schemas is done through finite-dimensional variational inequality theory. The numerical examples illustrate how changes in the pollution/carbon taxes affect the equilibrium electric power supply chain network production outputs, the transactions between the various decision-makers the demand market prices, as well as the total amount of carbon emissions generated. (author)

  8. cDF Theory Software for mesoscopic modeling of equilibrium and transport phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-12-01

    The approach is based on classical Density Functional Theory ((cDFT) coupled with the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) transport kinetics model and quantum mechanical description of short-range interaction and elementary transport processes. The model we proposed and implemented is fully atomistic, taking into account pairwise short-range and manybody long-range interactions. But in contrast to standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, where long-range manybody interactions are evaluated as a sum of pair-wise atom-atom contributions, we include them analytically based on wellestablished theories of electrostatic and excluded volume interactions in multicomponent systems. This feature of the PNP/cDFT approach allows us to reach well beyond the length-scales accessible to MD simulations, while retaining the essential physics of interatomic interactions from first principles and in a parameter-free fashion.

  9. Equilibrium geochemical modeling of a seasonal thermal energy storage aquifer field test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottlemyre, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    A geochemical mathematical modeling study designed to investigate the well plugging problems encountered at the Auburn University experimental field tests is summarized. The results, primarily of qualitative interest, include: (1) loss of injectivity was probably due to a combination of native particulate plugging and clay swelling and dispersion; (2) fluid-fluid incompatibilities, hydrothermal reactions, and oxidation reactions were of insignificant magnitude or too slow to have contributed markedly to the plugging; and (3) the potential for and contributions from temperature-induced dissolved gas solubility reductions, capillary boundary layer viscosity increases, and microstructural deformation cannot be deconvolved from the available data.

  10. Development of a multi-species mass transport model for concrete with account to thermodynamic phase equilibriums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosokawa, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Kazuo; Johannesson, Björn

    2011-01-01

    by the penetration of seawater into the concrete cover. The mass transport part of the model is solved using a non-linear finite element approach adopting a modified Newton–Raphson technique for minimizing the residual error at each time step of the calculation. The chemical equilibrium part of the problem is solved...... by using the PHREEQC program. The coupling between the transport part and chemical part of the problem is tackled by using a sequential operator splitting technique and the calculation results are verified by comparing the elemental spacial distribution in concrete measured by the electron probe...

  11. Biosorption of Cu (II onto chemically modified waste mycelium of Aspergillus awamori: Equilibrium, kinetics and modeling studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKA VELKOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The biosorption potential of chemically modified waste mycelium of industrial xylanase-producing strain Aspergillus awamori for Cu (II removal from aqueous solutions was evaluated. The influence of pH, contact time and initial Cu (II concentration on the removal efficiency was evaluated. Maximum biosorption capacity was reached by sodium hydroxide treated waste fungal mycelium at pH 5.0. The Langmuir adsorption equation matched very well the adsorption equilibrium data in the studied conditions. The process kinetic followed the pseudo-firs order model.

  12. A porous flow approach to model thermal non-equilibrium applicable to melt migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Harro; Marquart, Gabriele; Grebe, Michael

    2018-01-01

    We develop an approach for heat exchange between a fluid and a solid phase of a porous medium where the temperatures of the fluid and matrix are not in thermal equilibrium. The formulation considers moving of the fluid within a resting or deforming porous matrix in an Eulerian coordinate system. The approach can be applied, for example, to partially molten systems or to brine transport in porous rocks. We start from an existing theory for heat exchange where the energy conservation equations for the fluid and the solid phases are separated and coupled by a heat exchange term. This term is extended to account for the full history of heat exchange. It depends on the microscopic geometry of the fluid phase. For the case of solid containing hot, fluid-filled channels, we derive an expression based on a time-dependent Fourier approach for periodic half-waves. On the macroscopic scale, the temporal evolution of the heat exchange leads to a convolution integral along the flow path of the solid, which simplifies considerably in case of a resting matrix. The evolution of the temperature in both phases with time is derived by inserting the heat exchange term into the energy equations. We explore the effects of thermal non-equilibrium between fluid and solid by considering simple cases with sudden temperature differences between fluid and solid as initial or boundary conditions, and by varying the fluid velocity with respect to the resting porous solid. Our results agree well with an analytical solution for non-moving fluid and solid. The temperature difference between solid and fluid depends on the Peclet number based on the Darcy velocity. For Peclet numbers larger than 1, the temperature difference after one diffusion time reaches 5 per cent of \\tilde{T} or more (\\tilde{T} is a scaling temperature, e.g. the initial temperature difference). Thus, our results imply that thermal non-equilibrium can play an important role for melt migration through partially molten systems

  13. Modeling the Equilibrium Bus Line Choice Behavior and Transit System Design with Oblivious Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Lin Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In most of transportation literature, users are assumed to be perfectly rational in minimizing their own travel costs or perceived travel costs. However, users may not be perfectly rational in implementing their choices in reality. There exists a kind of boundedly rational users, that is, oblivious users. These oblivious users make their route choices by simple criteria, for example, selecting the shortest (or the most direct route only based on physical distance or simply following routes recommended by a GPS system. This paper investigates how the existence of oblivious users affects the equilibrium bus line choice behavior in a public transit system. And we propose a method to design a more realistic system.

  14. Modeling of phase equilibrium of North Sea oils with water and MEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The complex phase equilibrium between reservoir fluids and associating compounds like water and glycols has become very important as the increasing global energy demand pushes the oil industry to use advanced methods to increase oil recovery, such as increasing the use of various chemicals......, such as water and ethylene glycol (MEG). Using these new correlations for prediction of all binary interactions, the CPA EoS satisfactorily describes the mutual solubility of the “binary systems” reservoir fluid and MEG and promising results are also obtained with CPA for ternary mixtures (reservoir fluid + water...... to ensure a constant and safe production. The CPA equation of state has been successfully applied in the past to well defined systems and gas condensates containing associating compounds. It has also been extended to reservoir fluids in presence of water and polar chemicals using modified correlations...

  15. Fractionation of lemon essential oil by solvent extraction: Phase equilibrium for model systems at T = 298.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshima, Cristina C.; Capellini, Maria C.; Geremias, Ivana M.; Aracava, Keila K.; Gonçalves, Cintia B.; Rodrigues, Christianne E.C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Deterpenation of lemon oil by solvent extraction using hydrous ethanol. ► Limonene, γ-terpinene, β-pinene, and citral were used to simulate the oil. ► Citral shows a higher distribution coefficient than the hydrocarbons. ► Terpenic hydrocarbons exhibit very similar phase separation behaviour. ► NRTL and UNIQUAC models provided a good description of the phase equilibrium. - Abstract: The fractioning of lemon essential oil can be performed by liquid–liquid extraction using hydrous ethanol as a solvent. A quaternary mixture composed of limonene, γ-terpinene, β-pinene, and citral was used to simulate lemon essential oil. In this paper, we present (liquid + liquid) equilibrium data that were experimentally determined for systems containing essential oil compounds, ethanol, and water at T = 298.2 K. The experimental data were correlated using the NRTL and UNIQUAC models, and the mean deviations between calculated and experimental data were less than 0.0053 in all systems, indicating the accuracy of these molecular models in describing our systems. The results show that as the water content in the solvent phase increased, the values of the distribution coefficients decreased, regardless of the type of compound studied. However, the oxygenated compound always showed the highest distribution coefficient among the components of the essential oil, thus making deterpenation of the lemon essential oil a feasible process.

  16. Determination of equilibrium electron temperature and times using an electron swarm model with BOLSIG+ calculated collision frequencies and rate coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusateri, Elise N.; Morris, Heidi E.; Nelson, Eric M.; Ji, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) events produce low-energy conduction electrons from Compton electron or photoelectron ionizations with air. It is important to understand how conduction electrons interact with air in order to accurately predict EMP evolution and propagation. An electron swarm model can be used to monitor the time evolution of conduction electrons in an environment characterized by electric field and pressure. Here a swarm model is developed that is based on the coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) described by Higgins et al. (1973), hereinafter HLO. The ODEs characterize the swarm electric field, electron temperature, electron number density, and drift velocity. Important swarm parameters, the momentum transfer collision frequency, energy transfer collision frequency, and ionization rate, are calculated and compared to the previously reported fitted functions given in HLO. These swarm parameters are found using BOLSIG+, a two term Boltzmann solver developed by Hagelaar and Pitchford (2005), which utilizes updated cross sections from the LXcat website created by Pancheshnyi et al. (2012). We validate the swarm model by comparing to experimental effective ionization coefficient data in Dutton (1975) and drift velocity data in Ruiz-Vargas et al. (2010). In addition, we report on electron equilibrium temperatures and times for a uniform electric field of 1 StatV/cm for atmospheric heights from 0 to 40 km. We show that the equilibrium temperature and time are sensitive to the modifications in the collision frequencies and ionization rate based on the updated electron interaction cross sections

  17. Coupled Model of Heat and Mass Balance for Droplet Growth in Wet Steam Non-Equilibrium Homogeneous Condensation Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Han

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of the complexity of wet steam two-phase condensation flow, many problems remain to be solved. The important part of condensation theory—the calculation of the water droplet growth model in the transition zone—is not ideal; thus, it is necessary to develop a water droplet growth model with full-scale range. On the basis of the heat and mass transfer equilibrium in droplet growth, a coupled model of heat and mass balance for droplet growth is proposed. To verify the accuracy of this model, the differences and applicable ranges of various models were analysed using the experimental data of Peters and Meyer and two widely used models. In the free molecular flow region, the heat and mass balance model coincides with the Young low-pressure correction model. In the transition region, the heat and mass balance model agrees well with the experimental values of Peters and Meyer. In the continuous flow region, the heat and mass balance model coincides with the Gyarmathy model. Therefore, the heat and mass balance model can be used to accurately describe the growth process of water droplets in the arbitrary range of Knudsen numbers.

  18. Analysis of a No Equilibrium Linear Resistive-Capacitive-Inductance Shunted Junction Model, Dynamics, Synchronization, and Application to Digital Cryptography in Its Fractional-Order Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sifeu Takougang Kingni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear resistive-capacitive-inductance shunted junction (LRCLSJ model obtained by replacing the nonlinear piecewise resistance of a nonlinear resistive-capacitive-inductance shunted junction (NRCLSJ model by a linear resistance is analyzed in this paper. The LRCLSJ model has two or no equilibrium points depending on the dc bias current. For a suitable choice of the parameters, the LRCLSJ model without equilibrium point can exhibit regular and fast spiking, intrinsic and periodic bursting, and periodic and chaotic behaviors. We show that the LRCLSJ model displays similar dynamical behaviors as the NRCLSJ model. Moreover the coexistence between periodic and chaotic attractors is found in the LRCLSJ model for specific parameters. The lowest order of the commensurate form of the no equilibrium LRCLSJ model to exhibit chaotic behavior is found to be 2.934. Moreover, adaptive finite-time synchronization with parameter estimation is applied to achieve synchronization of unidirectional coupled identical fractional-order form of chaotic no equilibrium LRCLSJ models. Finally, a cryptographic encryption scheme with the help of the finite-time synchronization of fractional-order chaotic no equilibrium LRCLSJ models is illustrated through a numerical example, showing that a high level security device can be produced using this system.

  19. Immunity by equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Gérard

    2016-08-01

    The classical model of immunity posits that the immune system reacts to pathogens and injury and restores homeostasis. Indeed, a century of research has uncovered the means and mechanisms by which the immune system recognizes danger and regulates its own activity. However, this classical model does not fully explain complex phenomena, such as tolerance, allergy, the increased prevalence of inflammatory pathologies in industrialized nations and immunity to multiple infections. In this Essay, I propose a model of immunity that is based on equilibrium, in which the healthy immune system is always active and in a state of dynamic equilibrium between antagonistic types of response. This equilibrium is regulated both by the internal milieu and by the microbial environment. As a result, alteration of the internal milieu or microbial environment leads to immune disequilibrium, which determines tolerance, protective immunity and inflammatory pathology.

  20. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface...... profile and its relevance to predicting coastal response to changing environmental conditions, the processes and dynamics involved in shoreface equilibrium are still not fully understood. Here, we apply a process-based empirical sediment transport model, combined with morphodynamic principles to provide...... new insight into equilibrium shoreface profile development and shape. The quantitative model is based on field measurements and shows that a balance between onshore sediment transport due to oscillatory wave motion, and offshore sediment transport due to gravity, produces profile shapes...

  1. SHARC, a comprehensive non-equilibrium infrared radiation model for the upper atmosphere. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, R.L.; Duff, J.W.; Bernstein, L.S.; Gruninger, J.H.; Matthew, M.W.

    1993-06-21

    A new, first-principles computer model, SHARC, has been developed by the Air Force for the rapid and accurate calculation of non-LTE upper atmospheric infrared radiance and transmittance spectra with a resolution of better than 1/cm. Comprehensive coverage of the 2 micrometers to 40 micrometers (250/cm to 5,000/cm) wavelength region is provided for arbitrary lines of sight in the 50 - 300 km altitude range, accounting for the detailed production, loss, and energy transfer processes among the molecular vibrational states. Auroral production and excitation of CO2, NO, and NO+ are included in addition to quiescent atmospheric processes. Calculated vibrational temperatures are found to be similar to results from other non-LTE codes, and SHARC`s equivalent-width spectral algorithm provides very good agreement with much more time-consuming exact line-by-line methods.

  2. Modeling MHD Equilibrium and Dynamics with Non-Axisymmetric Resistive Walls in LTX and HBT-EP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, C.; Levesque, J.; Boyle, D. P.; Hughes, P.

    2017-10-01

    In experimental magnetized plasmas, currents in the first wall, vacuum vessel, and other conducting structures can have a strong influence on plasma shape and dynamics. These effects are complicated by the 3D nature of these structures, which dictate available current paths. Results from simulations to study the effect of external currents on plasmas in two different experiments will be presented: 1) The arbitrary geometry, 3D extended MHD code PSI-Tet is applied to study linear and non-linear plasma dynamics in the High Beta Tokamak (HBT-EP) focusing on toroidal asymmetries in the adjustable conducting wall. 2) Equilibrium reconstructions of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) in the presence of non-axisymmetric eddy currents. An axisymmetric model is used to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium, using the PSI-Tri code, along with a set of fixed 3D eddy current distributions in the first wall and vacuum vessel [C. Hansen et al., PoP Apr. 2017]. Simulations of detailed experimental geometries are enabled by use of the PSI-Tet code, which employs a high order finite element method on unstructured tetrahedral grids that are generated directly from CAD models. Further development of PSI-Tet and PSI-Tri will also be presented. This work supported by US DOE contract DE-SC0016256.

  3. Cluster emission at pre-equilibrium stage in Heavy Nuclear Reactions. A Model considering the Thermodynamics of Small Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bermudez Martinez, A.; Damiani, D.; Guzman Martinez, F.; Rodriguez Hoyos, O.; Rodriguez Manso, A.

    2015-01-01

    Cluster emission at pre-equilibrium stage, in heavy ion fusion reactions of 12 C and 16 O nuclei with 116 Sn, 208 Pb, 238 U are studied. the energy of the projectile nuclei was chosen at 0.25GeV, 0.5GeV and 1GeV. A cluster formation model is developed in order to calculate the cluster size. Thermodynamics of small systems was used in order to examine the cluster behavior inside the nuclear media. This model is based on considering two phases inside the compound nucleus, on one hand the nuclear media phase, and on the other hand the cluster itself. The cluster acts like an instability inside the compound nucleus, provoking an exchange of nucleons with the nuclear media through its surface. The processes were simulated using Monte Carlo methods. We obtained that the cluster emission probability shows great dependence on the cluster size. This project is aimed to implement cluster emission processes, during the pre-equilibrium stage, in the frame of CRISP code (Collaboration Rio-Sao Paulo). (Author)

  4. The Modified Leung-Griffiths Model of Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium: Developments for Binary Mixtures of Dissimilar Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, John James

    1990-01-01

    The modified Leung-Griffiths model is a corresponding states theory applied to mixtures that successfully correlates, evaluates, and predicts vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) boundaries for binary fluid mixtures. The strength of the model lies in its excellent performance at and near the critical locus down to about half of the critical pressures. Conventional phase equilibrium algorithms based on classical equations of state generally fail to converge or are inaccurate near the critical locus. The modified Leung-Griffiths model, however, incorporates nonclassical, scaling-law critical exponents. Because of the universality of critical behavior, the technique is relatively insensitive to phenomena such as polarity or hydrogen bonding which usually cause severe calculation problems. This thesis covers several topics. The first is an investigation into some of the near-critical phenomena of binary fluid mixtures using asymptotic expansions. Dew -bubble curves are expanded through five orders about the critical locus within the formalism of the model. Explicit mathematical representations of the curves are obtained and the coefficients of the expansions are closely evaluated. Another subject, one that has had a significant impact on the progress of the remainder of the work, is the problem of fitting VLE data to non-linear functions. This problem is discussed and examples of systematic non-linear fits are presented. The next topic is the incorporation of "extended scaling," the Wegner correction, into the theory. This extension improves the performance of the model for binary mixtures with wide dew-bubble curves, that is mixtures with two highly dissimilar components. Finally, a study of the predictive capabilities and limitations of the model is presented.

  5. An equilibrium profile model for retreating marsh shorelines in southeast Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Carol A.; Allison, Mead A.

    2008-12-01

    Louisiana's coastal marshes are experiencing the highest wetland loss rates in the U.S., in part due to subsidence-driven relative sea-level rise. These marshes are also vulnerable to the erosive power of wave attack: 1) on the marsh edge adjacent to open-water bodies, and 2) after the marsh platform is submerged. Marsh shorelines in Barataria Bay, Breton Sound, and the active Balize delta of southeastern Louisiana were examined in areas where the subaerial marsh platform had disappeared since 1932. Vibracore transects of marsh and adjacent bay surface sediments (to ˜2 m depth) were analyzed using geotechnical, stratigraphic, and radiochemical (137-Cs and 210-Pb) methods, and the subaerial-to-subaqueous transition of the marsh was mapped for elevation using standard stadia rod transit and fathometer measurements. Results indicate that marsh edge erosion of the platform takes place subaqueously until water depths of ˜1.5 m are reached. This is observed even in interior pond regions, but the shoreface elevation profiles are a function of fetch: exposed open bay sites display greater incision (depth and rate) of the marsh platform than protected interior bay or pond sites. Core stratigraphy reveals that the outer part of the subaqueous platform switches from erosional to depositional as retreat proceeds, covering the incised marsh deposits unconformably with estuarine shelly muds. 137-Cs and excess 210-Pb activity indicates that these muds are deposited within a few decades of subaerial marsh loss. The consistency of the cross-shore profile results suggests that a single profile of equilibrium can approximate the morphology of eroding marsh edges in southeast Louisiana: platform stratigraphy and resistance to erosion have a limited effect on profile shape. This equilibrium profile and remote sensing images of shoreline change are used to estimate the sediment yield to adjacent estuarine areas by this process. On average, 1.5 m 3 of sediment are yielded per m

  6. Out-of-equilibrium dynamical mean-field equations for the perceptron model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoritsas, Elisabeth; Biroli, Giulio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Perceptrons are the building blocks of many theoretical approaches to a wide range of complex systems, ranging from neural networks and deep learning machines, to constraint satisfaction problems, glasses and ecosystems. Despite their applicability and importance, a detailed study of their Langevin dynamics has never been performed yet. Here we derive the mean-field dynamical equations that describe the continuous random perceptron in the thermodynamic limit, in a very general setting with arbitrary noise and friction kernels, not necessarily related by equilibrium relations. We derive the equations in two ways: via a dynamical cavity method, and via a path-integral approach in its supersymmetric formulation. The end point of both approaches is the reduction of the dynamics of the system to an effective stochastic process for a representative dynamical variable. Because the perceptron is formally very close to a system of interacting particles in a high dimensional space, the methods we develop here can be transferred to the study of liquid and glasses in high dimensions. Potentially interesting applications are thus the study of the glass transition in active matter, the study of the dynamics around the jamming transition, and the calculation of rheological properties in driven systems.

  7. Quantum cluster equilibrium model of N-methylformamide–water binary mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domaros, Michael von; Kirchner, Barbara, E-mail: kirchner@thch.uni-bonn.de [Mulliken Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Universität Bonn, Beringstr. 4, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Jähnigen, Sascha [Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, von-Danckelmann-Platz 4, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Friedrich, Joachim [Technische Universität Chemnitz, Straße der Nationen 62, D-09111 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2016-02-14

    The established quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) approach is refined and applied to N-methylformamide (NMF) and its aqueous solution. The QCE method is split into two iterative cycles: one which converges to the liquid phase solution of the QCE equations and another which yields the gas phase. By comparing Gibbs energies, the thermodynamically stable phase at a given temperature and pressure is then chosen. The new methodology avoids metastable solutions and allows a different treatment of the mean-field interactions within the gas and liquid phases. These changes are of crucial importance for the treatment of binary mixtures. For the first time in a QCE study, the cis-trans-isomerism of a species (NMF) is explicitly considered. Cluster geometries and frequencies are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) and complementary coupled cluster single point energies are used to benchmark the DFT results. Independent of the selected quantum-chemical method, a large set of clusters is required for an accurate thermodynamic description of the binary mixture. The liquid phase of neat NMF is found to be dominated by the cyclic trans-NMF pentamer, which can be interpreted as a linear trimer that is stabilized by explicit solvation of two further NMF molecules. This cluster reflects the known hydrogen bond network preferences of neat NMF.

  8. Shielding property for thermal equilibrium states in the quantum Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móller, N. S.; de Paula, A. L.; Drumond, R. C.

    2018-03-01

    We show that Gibbs states of nonhomogeneous transverse Ising chains satisfy a shielding property. Namely, whatever the fields on each spin and exchange couplings between neighboring spins are, if the field in one particular site is null, then the reduced states of the subchains to the right and to the left of this site are exactly the Gibbs states of each subchain alone. Therefore, even if there is a strong exchange coupling between the extremal sites of each subchain, the Gibbs states of the each subchain behave as if there is no interaction between them. In general, if a lattice can be divided into two disconnected regions separated by an interface of sites with zero applied field, then we can guarantee a similar result only if the surface contains a single site. Already for an interface with two sites we show an example where the property does not hold. When it holds, however, we show that if a perturbation of the Hamiltonian parameters is done in one side of the lattice, then the other side is completely unchanged, with regard to both its equilibrium state and dynamics.

  9. Modeling of vapor-liquid-solid equilibrium in gas - aqueous electrolyte systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Rasmussen, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic model for the description of vapor-liquid-solid equilibria is introduced. This model is a combination of the extended UNIQUAC model for electrolytes and the Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation of state. The model has been applied to aqueous systems containing ammonia and/or carbon ...

  10. Possibilities of application of perfect solution model to calculation of equilibrium composition of complex carbonitrides and their solubility in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dshtejn, M.I.; Popov, V.V.; Cheremnykh, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Using the Fe-Nb-V-C-N and Fe-Ti-V-C-N systems' low carbon steels, the earlier suggested model of perfect solid solutions has been experimentally researched. Also studied has been the feasibility to calculate the composition of carbonitrides in steels by the derived equations, that comprise, as parameters, products of respective compounds' solubility and coefficients of components interaction in iron-based solid solutions. A conclusion is drawn that perfect solutions models may be used adequately for complex carbonitrides like Nbsub(p)Vsub(1-p)Csub(q)Nsub(1-q) and Tisub(p)Vsub(1-p)Csub(q)Nsub(1-q) during the calculations of their equilibrium composition and solubility in steels

  11. Modelling cointegration and Granger causality network to detect long-term equilibrium and diffusion paths in the financial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiangyun; Huang, Shupei; Sun, Xiaoqi; Hao, Xiaoqing; An, Feng

    2018-03-01

    Microscopic factors are the basis of macroscopic phenomena. We proposed a network analysis paradigm to study the macroscopic financial system from a microstructure perspective. We built the cointegration network model and the Granger causality network model based on econometrics and complex network theory and chose stock price time series of the real estate industry and its upstream and downstream industries as empirical sample data. Then, we analysed the cointegration network for understanding the steady long-term equilibrium relationships and analysed the Granger causality network for identifying the diffusion paths of the potential risks in the system. The results showed that the influence from a few key stocks can spread conveniently in the system. The cointegration network and Granger causality network are helpful to detect the diffusion path between the industries. We can also identify and intervene in the transmission medium to curb risk diffusion.

  12. The Optimal Price Ratio of Typical Energy Sources in Beijing Based on the Computable General Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiu He

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In Beijing, China, the rational consumption of energy is affected by the insufficient linkage mechanism of the energy pricing system, the unreasonable price ratio and other issues. This paper combines the characteristics of Beijing’s energy market, putting forward the society-economy equilibrium indicator R maximization taking into consideration the mitigation cost to determine a reasonable price ratio range. Based on the computable general equilibrium (CGE model, and dividing four kinds of energy sources into three groups, the impact of price fluctuations of electricity and natural gas on the Gross Domestic Product (GDP, Consumer Price Index (CPI, energy consumption and CO2 and SO2 emissions can be simulated for various scenarios. On this basis, the integrated effects of electricity and natural gas price shocks on the Beijing economy and environment can be calculated. The results show that relative to the coal prices, the electricity and natural gas prices in Beijing are currently below reasonable levels; the solution to these unreasonable energy price ratios should begin by improving the energy pricing mechanism, through means such as the establishment of a sound dynamic adjustment mechanism between regulated prices and market prices. This provides a new idea for exploring the rationality of energy price ratios in imperfect competitive energy markets.

  13. Optimization of two-phase R600a ejector geometries using a non-equilibrium CFD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Moon Soo; Lee, Hoseong; Hwang, Yunho; Radermacher, Reinhard; Jeong, Hee-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Empirical mass transfer coefficient correlation is built based on Weber number. • Developed model is validated in terms of the e and DP. • A set of Pareto solutions is obtained from MOGA based OAAO method. • DP is improved up to 10,379 Pa with the same e of the baseline. • e is enhanced up to 0.782 with the same DP of the baseline case. - Abstract: A vapor compression cycle, which is typically utilized for the heat pump, air conditioning and refrigeration systems, has inherent thermodynamic losses associated with expansion and compression processes. To minimize these losses and improve the energy efficiency of the vapor compression cycle, an ejector can be applied. However, due to the occurrence of complex physics i.e., non-equilibrium flashing compressible flow in the nozzle with possible shock interactions, it has not been feasible to model or optimize the design of a two-phase ejector. In this study, a homogeneous, non-equilibrium, two-phase flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model in a commercial code is used with an in-house empirical correlation for the mass transfer coefficient and real gas properties to perform a geometric optimization of a two-phase ejector. The model is first validated with experimental data of an ejector with R600a as the working fluid. After that, the design parameters of the ejector are optimized using multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA) based online approximation-assisted optimization (OAAO) approaches to find the maximum performance.

  14. Environmental Fiscal Reform and the Double Dividend: Evidence from a Dynamic General Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Freire-González

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available An environmental fiscal reform (EFR represents a transition of a taxation system toward one based in environmental taxation, rather than on taxation of capital, labor, or consumption. It differs from an environmental tax reform (ETR in that an EFR also includes a reform of subsidies which counteract environmental policy. This research details different ways in which an EFR is not only possible but also a good option that provides economic and environmental benefits. We have developed a detailed dynamic CGE model examining 101 industries and commodities in Spain, with an energy and an environmental extension comprising 31 pollutant emissions, in order to simulate the economic and environmental effects of an EFR. The reform focuses on 39 industries related to the energy, water, transport and waste sectors. We simulate an increase in taxes and a reduction on subsidies for these industries and at the same time we use new revenues to reduce labor, capital and consumption taxes. All revenue recycling options provide both economic and environmental benefits, suggesting that the “double dividend” hypothesis can be achieved. After three to four years after implementing an EFR, GDP is higher than the base case, hydrocarbons consumption declines and all analyzed pollutants show a reduction.

  15. Kinetics, equilibrium data and modeling studies for the sorption of chromium by Prosopis juliflora bark carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the activated carbon was prepared from Prosopis juliflora bark as a novel adsorbent. Removal of chromium (Cr was assessed by varying the parameters like metal concentration, temperature, pH, adsorbent dose and contact time. The feasibility of the sorption was studied using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms including linear and non-linear regression methods. In Langmuir, various forms of linearized equations were evaluated. The isotherm parameter of dimensionless separation factor (RL was also studied. The kinetics of adsorption was studied by using Lagergren’s pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations and the results have shown that the adsorption process follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption process depends on both time and concentration. The mechanistic pathway of the adsorption process was evaluated with intraparticle diffusion model. The effect of heat of adsorption of the adsorbate onto the adsorbent material was determined using the thermodynamic parameters and the reusability of the adsorbent materials was ascertained with desorption studies. The adsorbent material characterization was done by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray Diffraction (XRD method and morphology of the surface of adsorbent was identified with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM.

  16. A Quantal Response Statistical Equilibrium Model of Induced Technical Change in an Interactive Factor Market: Firm-Level Evidence in the EU Economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangho Yang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the pattern of technical change at the firm level by applying and extending the Quantal Response Statistical Equilibrium model (QRSE. The model assumes that a large number of cost minimizing firms decide whether to adopt a new technology based on the potential rate of cost reduction. The firm in the model is assumed to have a limited capacity to process market signals so there is a positive degree of uncertainty in adopting a new technology. The adoption decision by the firm, in turn, makes an impact on the whole market through changes in the factor-price ratio. The equilibrium distribution of the model is a unimodal probability distribution with four parameters, which is qualitatively different from the Walrasian notion of equilibrium in so far as the state of equilibrium is not a single state but a probability distribution of multiple states. This paper applies Bayesian inference to estimate the unknown parameters of the model using the firm-level data of seven advanced OECD countries over eight years and shows that the mentioned equilibrium distribution from the model can satisfactorily recover the observed pattern of technical change.

  17. General Equilibrium Model with a Convex Cone as the Set of Commodity Bundles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model for an exchange economy which is an extension of the classical model as introduced by Arrow and Debreu.In the classical model, there is a nite number of commodi- ties and a nite number of consumers.The commodities are treated separately, and so a commodity bundle is

  18. Experimental Verification of Same Simple Equilibrium Models of Masonry Shear Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosław, Jasiński

    2017-10-01

    This paper contains theoretical fundamentals of strut and tie models, used in unreinforced horizontal shear walls. Depending on support conditions and wall loading, we can distinguish models with discrete bars when point load is applied to the wall (type I model) or with continuous bars (type II model) when load is uniformly distributed at the wall boundary. The main part of this paper compares calculated results with the own tests on horizontal shear walls made of solid brick, silicate elements and autoclaved aerated concrete. The tests were performed in Poland. The model required some modifications due to specific load and static diagram.

  19. Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Condensation Phenomena in Tuneable 3D and 2D Bose Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0009 Equilibrium and non- equilibrium condensation phenomena in tuneable 3D and 2D Bose gases Zoran Hadzibabic THE CHANCELLOR...31-Aug-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Equilibrium and non- equilibrium condensation phenomena in tuneable 3D and 2D Bose gases 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... equilibrium and non- equilibrium many-body phenomena, trapping ultracold atomic gases in different geometries including both 3 and 2 spatial dimensions

  20. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast...

  1. Phase equilibrium modeling of gas hydrate systems for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Peter Jørgensen; Thomsen, Kaj; Abildskov, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Two thermodynamic models capable of describing dissociation pressures of mixed gas clathrate hydrates formed from ternary mixtures of CO2, N2 and liquid water, are presented. Both of the models utilize the Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state (EOS) for the thermodynamic description...... literature data for this system, it was not possible to determine unequivocally, which of the two models perform better....

  2. A Market Equilibrium Supply Chain Model for Supporting Self-Manufacturing or Outsourcing Decisions in Prefabricated Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhu Han

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Prefabricated construction is a sustainable alternative to traditional on-site construction methods. However, many challenges still exist in the prefabricated construction process. For example, self-manufacturing or outsourcing decisions are vital to the industrial structure and organization of the prefabricated construction industry, and the company’s production and operation decision-making. This paper considers a prefabricated construction supply chain, which is composed of one upstream component manufacturing company and two downstream contractors. The large contractor can get the precast component through self-manufacturing or outsourcing, while the small and medium-sized enterprise (SME contractor can only buy components from the component manufacturer. A comprehensive game model (Cournot-Stackelberg model under different decisions, that is, component self-manufacturing or outsourcing, was established. By solving the profit functions of different companies in the prefabricated construction supply chain, the equilibrium solutions of output, price and profit can be achieved. These solutions of equilibrium indicate the optimal decision on the production and operation, and the profit’s boundary conditions. After assuming relevant parameters, the profit levels of the companies in the supply chain are analyzed via a dynamic simulation in the changing process of prefabricated construction market size under different behavioral decisions. The conclusions are as follows: (1 the profit levels of all supply chain enterprises and the whole supply chain are increasing with an increase of market size; (2 the downstream contractors and the whole supply chain have a higher profit level under the component self-manufacturing decision, however, on the contrary, the upstream component suppliers get a higher profit level under the component outsourcing decision; (3 the equilibrium output of the SME contractor is reduced under the outsourcing decision of

  3. A 2-D basin-scale methane hydrate model: equilibrium and transient sensitivity to ocean temperature. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, D. E.; McGuire, P. C.; Buffett, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic variations through the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum event suggest that biogenic methane was not the source of the perturbing carbon, but this does not guarantee that the hydrates on Earth today will not eventually respond to the unique provocation of the global warming climate event. The SpongeBOB ocean methane hydrate model is used to simulate the accumulation of sediment along a passive continental margin over geologic time scales. Fluid motions within the sediment column are driven by compaction and variations in sediment permeability, and they impact the efficiency of methane trapping within hydrate deposits. The equilibrium and transient sensitivity of the methane inventory in the sediments to the temperature of the ocean will be assessed.

  4. Bio-economic modeling of water quality improvements using a dynamic applied general equilibrium approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dellink, R.; Brouwer, R.; Linderhof, V.G.M.; Stone, K.

    2011-01-01

    An integrated bio-economic model is developed to assess the impacts of pollution reduction policies on water quality and the economy. Emission levels of economic activities to water are determined based on existing environmental accounts. These emission levels are built into a dynamic economic model

  5. Out of equilibrium phase transitions and a toy model for disoriented chiral condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedaque, P.F.; Das, A.

    1993-07-01

    We study the dynamics of a second order phase transition in a situation that mimics a sudden quench to a temperature below the critical temperature in a model with dynamical symmetry breaking. In particular we show that the domains of correlated values of the condensate grow as √t and that this result seems to be largely model independent. (author). 9 refs

  6. UNIQUAC activity coefficient model and modified Redlich- Kwong EOS for the vapor liquid equilibrium systems of carbon dioxide-water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurak Grisdanurak

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The UNIQUAC activity coefficient model and fugacity coefficient model of modified Redlich-Kwong predicted vapor-liquid equilibrium between carbon dioxide and water efficiently. The activity coefficient model needed the energy interaction parameters between molecules of carbon dioxide and water. Those parameters can be obtained by non-linear regression method of the experimental data of the vapor-liquid equilibria of carbon dioxide and water (Lide, 1992. The fugacity coefficient model of modified Redlich- Kwong needed only some physical properties of carbon dioxide and water without any interaction parameters. The experimental data had ranges of temperature and partial pressure of carbon dioxide between 10 to 100ºC and 5 to 1,200 kPa, respectively. The parameters for the activity coefficient model are temperature dependent but are not concentration dependent. The regression results gave good agreements with the experimental data in which the mean absolute error (MAE between experiment and calculated partial pressure of carbon dioxide was 2.72% and the mean absolute standard deviation (MAD of that error was 1.35%. Comparing the effects of activity coefficients and fugacity coefficients, we found that the non-ideality in vapor phase was more influential than the non-ideality in liquid phase.

  7. A synthesis of the Uzawa-Lucas model with the Walrasian-General-Equilibrium and Neoclassical-Growth theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a dynamic economic model of wealth accumulation and human capital accumulation with endogenous education. It is an extension of the Uzawa-Lucas model of a heterogeneous household economy with multiple ways of human capital accumulation. In addition to learning by education in the Uzawa-Lucas model (Uzawa, 1965; Lucas, 1988, we also consider Arrow’s ‘learning by producing’ (Arrow, 1962 and Zhang’s ‘learning by consuming’ (creative learning, Zhang, 2007 in the human capital accumulation equation. The economic system consists of one production sector and one education sector. Households differ in propensity to save, to obtain education, to consume, and in learning abilities. The model describes a dynamic interdependence between wealth accumulation, human capital accumulation, and division of labour with endogenous wealth and income distribution in perfect competition. We simulate the model to demonstrate the existence of equilibrium points and the motion of the dynamic system. We also demonstrate how changes in the propensity to obtain education, the population, the propensity to save, and the education sector’s total productivity affect economic development.

  8. Stochastic user equilibrium with equilibrated choice sets: Part I - Model formulations under alternative distributions and restrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watling, David Paul; Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    the advantages of the two principles, namely the definition of unused routes in DUE and of mis-perception in SUE, such that the resulting choice sets of used routes are equilibrated. Two model families are formulated to address this issue: the first is a general version of SUE permitting bounded and discrete...... error distributions; the second is a Restricted SUE model with an additional constraint that must be satisfied for unused paths. The overall advantage of these model families consists in their ability to combine the unused routes with the use of random utility models for used routes, without the need...... to pre-specify the choice set. We present model specifications within these families, show illustrative examples, evaluate their relative merits, and identify key directions for further research....

  9. General equilibrium without utility functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2010-01-01

    How far can we go in weakening the assumptions of the general equilibrium model? Existence of equilibrium, structural stability and finiteness of equilibria of regular economies, genericity of regular economies and an index formula for the equilibria of regular economies have been known...... and the diffeomorphism of the equilibrium manifold with a Euclidean space; (2) the diffeomorphism of the set of no-trade equilibria with a Euclidean space; (3) the openness and genericity of the set of regular equilibria as a subset of the equilibrium manifold; (4) for small trade vectors, the uniqueness, regularity...

  10. An economy energy environment computable general equilibrium model for the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meral, P.; Schembri, P.; Zyla, E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this paper is mainly a methodological discussion about integrating top-down and bottom-up models which can be used to assess carbon dioxide abatement policies impacts on economic activity. In part one, we stress that integration is relatively difficult to define and to apply; some questions remain unsolved, concerning the appropriate level of disaggregation, the time-span simulation, and the numeraire. On the basis of a system dynamics model, we define a principle of structural integration. This principle is illustrated in part two through the modelling of the electricity sub-sector. 4 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs

  11. Experimental study and phase equilibrium modeling of systems containing acid gas and glycol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Waheed; Breil, Martin P.; Tsivintzelis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we study phase equilibria of systems containing acid gases and glycols. The acid gases include carbonyl sulfide (COS), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and carbon dioxide (CO2) while glycols include monoethylene glycol (MEG), diethylene glycol (DEG), and triethylene glycol (TEG). A brief lit...

  12. Kinetics and Equilibrium Sorption Models: Fitting Plutonium, Strontium, Uranium and Neptunium Loading on Monosodium Titanate (MST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondeur, F

    2006-03-08

    The Dubinin-Astashov (DA) isotherm parameters for U, Pu, Sr and Np have been updated to include additional data obtained since the original derivation. The DA isotherms were modified to include a kinetic function derived by Rahn to describe sorbate loading from the beginning of sorption up to steady state. The final functions describe both kinetic and thermodynamic sorption.

  13. Abnormal grain growth: a non-equilibrium thermodynamic model for multi-grain binary systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří; Fischer, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2014), Art. No. 015013 ISSN 0965-0393 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : grain boundary segregation * abnormal grain growth * theory * modelling * solute drag Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.167, year: 2014

  14. Heavy metal concentrations in plants and different harvestable parts: A soil-plant equilibrium model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guala, Sebastian D. [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Gutierrez 1150, Los Polvorines, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Vega, Flora A. [Departamento de Bioloxia Vexetal e Ciencia do Solo, Facultade de Bioloxia, Universidade de Vigo, Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain); Covelo, Emma F., E-mail: emmaf@uvigo.e [Departamento de Bioloxia Vexetal e Ciencia do Solo, Facultade de Bioloxia, Universidade de Vigo, Lagoas, Marcosende, 36310 Vigo, Pontevedra (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    A mathematical interaction model, validated by experimental results, was developed to modeling the metal uptake by plants and induced growth decrease, by knowing metal in soils. The model relates the dynamics of the uptake of metals from soil to plants. Also, two types of relationships are tested: total and available metal content. The model successfully fitted the experimental data and made it possible to predict the threshold values of total mortality with a satisfactory approach. Data are taken from soils treated with Cd and Ni for ryegrass (Lolium perenne, L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.), respectively. Concentrations are measured in the aboveground biomass of plants. In the latter case, the concentration of metals in different parts of the plants (tillering, shooting and earing) is also modeled. At low concentrations, the effects of metals are moderate, and the dynamics appear to be linear. However, increasing concentrations show nonlinear behaviors. - The model proposed in this study makes possible to characterize the nonlinear behavior of the soil-plant interaction with metal pollution.

  15. A Model of Equilibrium Conditions of Roof Rock Mass Giving Consideration to the Yielding Capacity of Powered Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczuk, Marek; Pawlikowski, Arkadiusz

    2017-12-01

    The work presents the model of interactions between the powered roof support units and the rock mass, while giving consideration to the yielding capacity of the supports - a value used for the analysis of equilibrium conditions of roof rock mass strata in geological and mining conditions of a given longwall. In the model, the roof rock mass is kept in equilibrium by: support units, the seam, goafs, and caving rocks (Fig. 1). In the assumed model of external load on the powered roof support units it is a new development - in relation to the model applied in selection of supports based on the allowable deflection of roof theory - that the load bearing capacity is dependent on the increment of the inclination of the roof rock mass and on the properties of the working medium, while giving consideration to the air pockets in the hydraulic systems, the load of the caving rocks on the caving shield, introducing the RA support value of the roof rock mass by the coal seam as a closed-form expression and while giving consideration to the additional support provided by the rocks of the goaf as a horizontal component R01H of the goaf reaction. To determine the roof maintenance conditions it is necessary to know the characteristics linking the yielding capacity of the support units with the heading convergence, which may be measured as the inclination angle of the roof rock mass. In worldwide mining, Ground Reaction Curves are used, which allow to determine the required yielding capacity of support units based on the relation between the load exerted on the unit and the convergence of the heading ensuring the equilibrium of the roof rock mass. (Figs. 4 and 8). The equilibrium of the roof rock mass in given conditions is determined at the displacement of the rock mass by the α angle, which impacts the following values: yielding capacity of units FN, vertical component of goaf reaction R01V and the horizontal component of goaf reaction R01H. In the model of load on the support

  16. RCM: a new model accounting for the non-linear chloride binding isotherm and the non-equilibrium conditions between the free- and bound-chloride concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiesz, Przemek; Ballari, M.M.; Brouwers, Jos

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a new theoretical model for the Rapid Chloride Migration test is presented. This model accounts for the non-linear chloride binding isotherm and the non-equilibrium conditions between the free- and bound-chloride concentrations in concrete. The new system of equations is solved

  17. Multi-component vapor-liquid equilibrium model for LES of high-pressure fuel injection and application to ECN Spray A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matheis, Jan; Hickel, S.

    2018-01-01

    We present and evaluate a two-phase model for Eulerian large-eddy simulations (LES) of liquid-fuel injection and mixing at high pressure. The model is based on cubic equations of state and vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations and can represent the coexistence of supercritical states and

  18. Random Hamiltonian in thermal equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Brody, Dorje C.; Ellis, David C. P.; Holm, Darryl D.

    2009-01-01

    A framework for the investigation of disordered quantum systems in thermal equilibrium is proposed. The approach is based on a dynamical model--which consists of a combination of a double-bracket gradient flow and a uniform Brownian fluctuation--that `equilibrates' the Hamiltonian into a canonical distribution. The resulting equilibrium state is used to calculate quenched and annealed averages of quantum observables.

  19. Leading bureaucracies to the tipping point: An alternative model of multiple stable equilibrium levels of corruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P.; Feichtinger, Gustav; Grass, Dieter; Hartl, Richard F.; Kort, Peter M.; Novak, Andreas J.; Seidl, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel model of corruption dynamics in the form of a nonlinear optimal dynamic control problem. It has a tipping point, but one whose origins and character are distinct from that in the classic Schelling (1978) model. The decision maker choosing a level of corruption is the chief or some other kind of authority figure who presides over a bureaucracy whose state of corruption is influenced by the authority figure’s actions, and whose state in turn influences the pay-off for the authority figure. The policy interpretation is somewhat more optimistic than in other tipping models, and there are some surprising implications, notably that reforming the bureaucracy may be of limited value if the bureaucracy takes its cues from a corrupt leader. PMID:23565027

  20. Equilibrium models and kinetic for the adsorption of methylene blue on Co-hectorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jun; Jia Yongzhong; Jing Yan; Sun Jinhe; Yao Ying; Wang Xiaohua

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) onto the surface of cobalt doping hectorite (Co-hectorite) was systematically studied. The physical properties of Co-hectorites were investigated, where characterizations were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron Diffraction Spectrum (EDS) techniques, and morphology was examined by nitrogen adsorption. The sample with a Co content 5% (m/m) had a higher specific surface area than other Co-hectorites. The pore diameters were distributed between 2.5 and 5.0 nm. The adsorption results revealed that Co-hectorite surfaces possessed effective interactions with MB and bases, and greatest adsorption capacity achieved with Co content 5%, where the best-fit isotherm model was the Langmuir adsorption model. Kinetic studies were fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The intraparticle diffusion was not the rate-limiting step for the whole reaction.

  1. Leading bureaucracies to the tipping point: An alternative model of multiple stable equilibrium levels of corruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, Jonathan P; Feichtinger, Gustav; Grass, Dieter; Hartl, Richard F; Kort, Peter M; Novak, Andreas J; Seidl, Andrea

    2013-03-16

    We present a novel model of corruption dynamics in the form of a nonlinear optimal dynamic control problem. It has a tipping point, but one whose origins and character are distinct from that in the classic Schelling (1978) model. The decision maker choosing a level of corruption is the chief or some other kind of authority figure who presides over a bureaucracy whose state of corruption is influenced by the authority figure's actions, and whose state in turn influences the pay-off for the authority figure. The policy interpretation is somewhat more optimistic than in other tipping models, and there are some surprising implications, notably that reforming the bureaucracy may be of limited value if the bureaucracy takes its cues from a corrupt leader.

  2. The inherent dangers of using computable general equilibrium models as a single integrated modelling framework for sustainability impact assessment. A critical note on Boehringer and Loeschel (2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrieciu, S. Serban

    2007-01-01

    The search for methods of assessment that best evaluate and integrate the trade-offs and interactions between the economic, environmental and social components of development has been receiving a new impetus due to the requirement that sustainability concerns be incorporated into the policy formulation process. A paper forthcoming in Ecological Economics (Boehringer, C., Loeschel, A., in press. Computable general equilibrium models for sustainability impact assessment: status quo and prospects, Ecological Economics.) claims that Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) models may potentially represent the much needed 'back-bone' tool to carry out reliable integrated quantitative Sustainability Impact Assessments (SIAs). While acknowledging the usefulness of CGE models for some dimensions of SIA, this commentary questions the legitimacy of employing this particular economic modelling tool as a single integrating modelling framework for a comprehensive evaluation of the multi-dimensional, dynamic and complex interactions between policy and sustainability. It discusses several inherent dangers associated with the advocated prospects for the CGE modelling approach to contribute to comprehensive and reliable sustainability impact assessments. The paper warns that this reductionist viewpoint may seriously infringe upon the basic values underpinning the SIA process, namely a transparent, heterogeneous, balanced, inter-disciplinary, consultative and participatory take to policy evaluation and building of the evidence-base. (author)

  3. A development of multi-Species mass transport model considering thermodynamic phase equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosokawa, Yoshifumi; Yamada, Kazuo; Johannesson, Björn

    2008-01-01

    ) variation in solid-phase composition when using different types of cement, (ii) physicochemical evaluation of steel corrosion initiation behaviour by calculating the molar ratio of chloride ion to hydroxide ion [Cl]/[OH] in pore solution, (iii) complicated changes of solid-phase composition caused......In this paper, a multi-species mass transport model, which can predict time dependent variation of pore solution and solid-phase composition due to the mass transport into the hardened cement paste, has been developed. Since most of the multi-species models established previously, based...

  4. A dynamic analysis of Schelling’s binary corruption model : A competitive equilibrium approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caulkins, J.P.; Feichtinger, G.; Grass, D.; Hartl, R.F.; Kort, P.M.; Novak, A.J.; Seidl, A.; Wirl, F.

    Schelling (in Micromotives and Macrobehavior, Norton, New York, 1978) suggested a simple binary choice model to explain the variation of corruption levels across societies. His basic idea was that the expected profitability of engaging in corruption depends on its prevalence. The key result of the

  5. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Methane with Water and Methanol. Measurements and Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Michael Grynnerup; Karakatsani, Eirini; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    + water for several temperatures in the range 284 K to 324 K and in the pressure range (5 to 20) MPa. The Cubic-Plus-Association (CPA) equation of state is used to model the phase equilibria data measured. A good agreement between predictions and experimental data is observed, supporting the reliability...

  6. Phase equilibrium modelling for mixtures with acetic acid using an association equation of state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muro Sunè, Nuria; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; von Solms, Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    over extended temperature and pressure ranges. From the scientific point of view, modeling of such equilibria is challenging because of the complex association and solvation phenomena present. In this work, a previously developed association equation of state (cubic-plus-association, CPA) is applied...

  7. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  8. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, Jaime; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Pena, Franklin; ININ-IVIC Team; Cinvestav-UAM-A Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. Cinvestav-Abacus.

  9. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    e-mail: SSNSIRASANI@yahoo.com. MS received 2 March 2001; revised 17 August 2001. Abstract. ... In ligand substitution reactions of vitamin B12, its derivatives 1–3 and B12 model compounds, cobaloximes4 are of interest from the point of view ... vitamin B12 coenzyme. Marques et al11 and Randaccio et al12 studied the ...

  10. Trend to equilibrium for a reaction-diffusion system modelling reversible enzyme reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Jan

    2016-01-01

    20 pages; A spatio-temporal evolution of chemicals appearing in a reversible enzyme reaction and modelled by a four component reaction-diffusion system with the reaction terms obtained by the law of mass action is considered. The large time behaviour of the system is studied by means of entropy methods.

  11. Trend to Equilibrium for a Reaction-Diffusion System Modelling Reversible Enzyme Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliaš, Ján

    2018-01-01

    A spatio-temporal evolution of chemicals appearing in a reversible enzyme reaction and modelled by a four-component reaction-diffusion system with the reaction terms obtained by the law of mass action is considered. The large time behaviour of the system is studied by means of entropy methods.

  12. Trade Barrier Elimination, Economics of Scale and Market Competition: Computable General Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyastutik Widyastutik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ASEAN and its dialogue partner countries agreed to reduce trade barriers in the services sector, one of which is sea transport services. The purpose of this study is to estimate the equivalent tax of non-tariff barriers in the sea transport services. Besides that, this study is going to analyze the economic impacts of the regulatory barriers elimination in the sea transport services of ASEAN and its dialogue partner countries. Using the gravity model, it can be identified that trade barriers of sea transport services sector of ASEAN and dialogue partner countries are still relatively high. Additionally, by adopting IC-IRTS model in Global CGE Model (GTAP, the simulation results show consistent results with the theory of pro-competitive effects. The greater gain from trade is obtained in the CGE model assuming IC-IRTS compared to PC-CRTS. China gains a greater benefit that is indicated by the highest increase in welfare and GDP followed by Japan and AustraliaDOI: 10.15408/sjie.v6i2.5279

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of phases equilibrium in aqueous systems to recover potassium chloride from natural brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruberlan Gomes da Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical fertilizers, such as potassium chloride, ammonium nitrate and other chemical products like sodium hydroxide and soda ash are produced from electrolyte solutions or brines with a high content of soluble salts. Some of these products are manufactured by fractional crystallization, when several salts are separated as solid phases with high purity (>90%. Due to the large global demand for potassium fertilizers, a good knowledge about the compositions of salts and brines is helpful to design an effective process. A thermodynamic model based on Pitzer and Harvie's model was used to predict the composition of crystallized salts after water removal by forced evaporation and cooling from multicomponent solutions or brines. Initially, the salts’ solubilities in binary systems (NaCl–H2O, KCl–H2O and MgCl2–H2O and ternary system (KCl–MgCl2–H2O were calculated at 20 °C and compared with literature data. Next, the model was compared to our experimental data on the quinary system NaCl–KCl–MgCl2–CaCl2–H2O system at 20 °C. The Pitzer and Harvie's model represented well both the binary and ternary systems. Besides, for the quinary system the fit was good for brine densities up to 1350 kg/m3. The models were used to estimate the chemical composition of the solutions and salts produced by fractional crystallization and in association with material balance to respond to issues related to the production rates in a solar pond containing several salts dissolved, for instance, NaCl, KCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2.

  14. A multi-scale distribution model for non-equilibrium populations suggests resource limitation in an endangered rodent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William T Bean

    Full Text Available Species distributions are known to be limited by biotic and abiotic factors at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Species distribution models, however, frequently assume a population at equilibrium in both time and space. Studies of habitat selection have repeatedly shown the difficulty of estimating resource selection if the scale or extent of analysis is incorrect. Here, we present a multi-step approach to estimate the realized and potential distribution of the endangered giant kangaroo rat. First, we estimate the potential distribution by modeling suitability at a range-wide scale using static bioclimatic variables. We then examine annual changes in extent at a population-level. We define "available" habitat based on the total suitable potential distribution at the range-wide scale. Then, within the available habitat, model changes in population extent driven by multiple measures of resource availability. By modeling distributions for a population with robust estimates of population extent through time, and ecologically relevant predictor variables, we improved the predictive ability of SDMs, as well as revealed an unanticipated relationship between population extent and precipitation at multiple scales. At a range-wide scale, the best model indicated the giant kangaroo rat was limited to areas that received little to no precipitation in the summer months. In contrast, the best model for shorter time scales showed a positive relation with resource abundance, driven by precipitation, in the current and previous year. These results suggest that the distribution of the giant kangaroo rat was limited to the wettest parts of the drier areas within the study region. This multi-step approach reinforces the differing relationship species may have with environmental variables at different scales, provides a novel method for defining "available" habitat in habitat selection studies, and suggests a way to create distribution models at spatial and

  15. The Lag Model, a Turbulence Model for Wall Bounded Flows Including Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Coakley, Thomas J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new class of turbulence model is described for wall bounded, high Reynolds number flows. A specific turbulence model is demonstrated, with results for favorable and adverse pressure gradient flowfields. Separation predictions are as good or better than either Spalart Almaras or SST models, do not require specification of wall distance, and have similar or reduced computational effort compared with these models.

  16. Risk premia in general equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf

    solutions of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, including a novel solution with endogenous labor supply, to obtain closed-form expressions for the risk premium in production economies. We find that the curvature of the policy functions affects the risk premium through controlling the individual......This paper shows that non-linearities can generate time-varying and asymmetric risk premia over the business cycle. These (empirical) key features become relevant and asset market implications improve substantially when we allow for non-normalities in the form of rare disasters. We employ explicit......'s effective risk aversion....

  17. Estimating fate and transport of multiple contaminants in the vadose zone using a multi-layered soil column and three-phase equilibrium partitioning model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, Gregory G.

    2007-01-01

    Soils at waste sites must be evaluated for the potential of residual soil contamination to leach and migrate to the groundwater beneath the disposal area. If migration to the aquifer occurs, contaminants can travel vast distances and pollute drinking water wells, thus exposing human receptors to harmful levels of toxins and carcinogens. To prevent groundwater contamination, a contaminant fate and transport analysis is necessary to assess the migration potential of residual soil contaminants. This type of migration analysis is usually performed using a vadose zone model to account for complex geotechnical and chemical variables including: decay processes, infiltration rate, soil properties, vadose zone thickness, and chemical behavior. The distinct advantage of using a complex model is that less restrictive, but still protective, soil threshold levels may be determined avoiding the unnecessary and costly remediation of marginally contaminated soils. However, the disadvantage of such modeling is the additional cost for data collection and labor required to apply these models. In order to allay these higher costs and to achieve a less restrictive but still protective clean-up level, a multiple contaminant and multi layered soil column equilibrium partitioning model was developed which is faster, simpler and less expensive to use. (authors)

  18. Petrogenesis of incipient charnockite in the Ikalamavony sub-domain, south-central Madagascar: New insights from phase equilibrium modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Takahiro; Tsunogae, Toshiaki; Santosh, M.; Shaji, E.; Rambeloson, Roger A.

    2017-06-01

    Incipient charnockites representing granulite formation on a mesoscopic scale occur in the Ambodin Ifandana area of Ikalamavony sub-domain in south-central Madagascar. Here we report new petrological data from these rocks, and discuss the process of granulite formation on the basis of petrography, mineral equilibrium modeling, and fluid inclusion studies. The incipient charnockites occur as brownish patches, lenses, and layers characterized by an assemblage of biotite + orthopyroxene + K-feldspar + plagioclase + quartz + magnetite + ilmenite within host orthopyroxene-free biotite gneiss with an assemblage of biotite + K-feldspar + plagioclase + quartz + magnetite + ilmenite. Lenses and layers of calc-silicate rock (clinopyroxene + garnet + plagioclase + quartz + titanite + calcite) are typically associated with the charnockite. Coarse-grained charnockite occurs along the contact between the layered charnockite and calc-silicate rock. The application of mineral equilibrium modeling on the mineral assemblages in charnockite and biotite gneiss employing the NCKFMASHTO system as well as fluid inclusion study on coarse-grained charnockite defines a P-T range of 8.5-10.5 kbar and 880-900 °C, which is nearly consistent with the inferred P-T condition of the Ikalamavony sub-domain (8.0-10.5 kbar and 820-880 °C). The result of T versus H2O activity (a(H2O)) modeling demonstrates that orthopyroxene-bearing assemblage in charnockite is stable under relatively low a(H2O) condition of 0.42-0.43, which is consistent with the popular models of incipient-charnockite formation related to the lowering of water activity and stabilization of orthopyroxene through dehydration of biotite. The occurrence of calc-silicate rocks adjacent to the charnockite suggests that the CO2-bearing fluid that caused dehydration and incipient-charnockite formation might have been derived through decarbonation of calc-silicate rocks during the initial stage of decompression slightly after the peak

  19. A spatial price equilibrium model in the oligopolistic market for oil derivatives: an application to the brazilian scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Mezadre Pompermayer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a spatial price equilibrium model in an oligopoly market for refined oil products. Till 1997 the Brazilian oil market was characterized by the state monopoly of Petrobras, which up to 2001 remained the only firm authorized to import oil derivatives. With several agents operating in the primary oil supply market, the government stopped fixing the prices for Petrobras, which started to determine the prices based on competition with other players. In this new scenario some questions arise regarding the price levels at which refined products will be supplied in different regions across Brazil as well as the capacity of national refineries to compete with imported products. To answer those and other questions, a new oligopoly spatial equilibrium model is herein proposed, taking into account the special characteristics of production of refined oil products. An iterative Gauss-Seidel-like algorithm with sequential adjustments was developed and applied to Brazilian market data. The model, the algorithm and its application are described in this work. Such a model may be used both by regulatory authorities and by companies in the sector.Este artigo apresenta um modelo de equilíbrio espacial de preços em um mercado oligopolizado de derivados de petróleo. Até o ano de 1997, o mercado brasileiro era caracterizado pelo monopólio estatal da Petrobrás, a qual permaneceu, até 2001, como a única empresa autorizada a importar derivados de petróleo. Com vários agentes operando no mercado, o governo deixou de fixar os preços para a Petrobrás, que passou a determinar os preços baseada na competição com outros agentes. Neste cenário, surgem algumas questões relativas aos níveis de preços a serem oferecidos no mercado e relativas à capacidade das refinarias nacionais de competir com produtos importados. Para responder a estas e outras questões, um novo modelo de equilíbrio espacial de preços para um mercado oligopolizado foi

  20. Comparison of bootstrap current and plasma conductivity models applied in a self-consistent equilibrium calculation for Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Maria Celia Ramos; Ludwig, Gerson Otto [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma]. E-mail: mcr@plasma.inpe.br

    2004-07-01

    Different bootstrap current formulations are implemented in a self-consistent equilibrium calculation obtained from a direct variational technique in fixed boundary tokamak plasmas. The total plasma current profile is supposed to have contributions of the diamagnetic, Pfirsch-Schlueter, and the neoclassical Ohmic and bootstrap currents. The Ohmic component is calculated in terms of the neoclassical conductivity, compared here among different expressions, and the loop voltage determined consistently in order to give the prescribed value of the total plasma current. A comparison among several bootstrap current models for different viscosity coefficient calculations and distinct forms for the Coulomb collision operator is performed for a variety of plasma parameters of the small aspect ratio tokamak ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) at the Associated Plasma Laboratory of INPE, in Brazil. We have performed this comparison for the ETE tokamak so that the differences among all the models reported here, mainly regarding plasma collisionality, can be better illustrated. The dependence of the bootstrap current ratio upon some plasma parameters in the frame of the self-consistent calculation is also analysed. We emphasize in this paper what we call the Hirshman-Sigmar/Shaing model, valid for all collisionality regimes and aspect ratios, and a fitted formulation proposed by Sauter, which has the same range of validity but is faster to compute than the previous one. The advantages or possible limitations of all these different formulations for the bootstrap current estimate are analysed throughout this work. (author)

  1. Nonlinear relative-proportion-based route adjustment process for day-to-day traffic dynamics: modeling, equilibrium and stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenlong; Ma, Shoufeng; Tian, Junfang; Li, Geng

    2016-11-01

    Travelers' route adjustment behaviors in a congested road traffic network are acknowledged as a dynamic game process between them. Existing Proportional-Switch Adjustment Process (PSAP) models have been extensively investigated to characterize travelers' route choice behaviors; PSAP has concise structure and intuitive behavior rule. Unfortunately most of which have some limitations, i.e., the flow over adjustment problem for the discrete PSAP model, the absolute cost differences route adjustment problem, etc. This paper proposes a relative-Proportion-based Route Adjustment Process (rePRAP) maintains the advantages of PSAP and overcomes these limitations. The rePRAP describes the situation that travelers on higher cost route switch to those with lower cost at the rate that is unilaterally depended on the relative cost differences between higher cost route and its alternatives. It is verified to be consistent with the principle of the rational behavior adjustment process. The equivalence among user equilibrium, stationary path flow pattern and stationary link flow pattern is established, which can be applied to judge whether a given network traffic flow has reached UE or not by detecting the stationary or non-stationary state of link flow pattern. The stability theorem is proved by the Lyapunov function approach. A simple example is tested to demonstrate the effectiveness of the rePRAP model.

  2. Exploring the boundary-layer cloud-climate feedback through Single-Column Model in Radiative-Advective Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Gesso, Sara; Neggers, Roel

    2017-04-01

    Boundary-layer clouds remain the major contributor to the inter-model spread in future climate predictions. Although light has been shed on the low-level cloud feedback, much remains to be understood about the physical mechanisms at the basis of the response of these clouds to climate warming. In the present study, EC-EARTH Single Column Model (SCM) is used to explore the boundary-layer cloud-climate feedback by imposing a Radiative-Advective Equilibrium, namely a balance between the radiative cooling and the advection of warm air. 30-year simulations are performed with the SCM forced by high-frequency cfSites outputs of the CMIP5 simulations of the host General Circulation Model (GCM) for both the AMIP and AMIP4K experiments. As this study exclusively focuses on marine low-level cloud regimes, the simulations are performed at the Barbados Cloud Observatory in the so-called "dry period", when the large-scale forcing are representative of subtropical marine trade-wind conditions. A first step is to assess how representative long-term SCM simulations are of their host GCM. Subsequently, the SCM is forced by different GCMs within the same framework. In this way, the contribution of the physical parameterization to the boundary-layer cloud feedback is isolated from the dynamics, and systematically evaluated. Finally, a procedure to integrate Large-Eddy Simulations and observations into this framework is discussed.

  3. Modelling of saturated soil slopes equilibrium with an account of the liquid phase bearing capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maltseva Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an original method of solving the problem of uniformly distributed load action on a two-phase elastic half-plane with the use of a kinematic model. The kinematic model (Maltsev L.E. of two-phase medium is based on two new hypotheses according to which the stress and strain state of the two-phase body is described by a system of linear elliptic equations. These equations differ from the Lame equations of elasticity theory with two terms in each equation. The terms describe the bearing capacity of the liquid phase or a decrease in stress in the solid phase. The finite element method has been chosen as a solution method.

  4. Fully-implicit simulation of vertical-equilibrium models with hysteresis and capillary fringe

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, Halvor Møll; Lie, Knut-Andreas; Andersen, Odd

    2015-01-01

    - Geological carbon storage represents a new and substantial challenge for the subsurface geosciences. To increase understanding and make good engineering decisions, containment processes and large-scale storage operations must be simulated in a thousand year perspective. A hierarchy of models of increasing computational complexity for analysis and simulation of large-scale \\co storage has been implemented as a separate module of the open-source Matlab Reservoir Simulation Toolbox (MRS...

  5. OPEC, Saudi Arabia, and the Shale Revolution: Insights from Equilibrium Modelling and Oil Politics

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Dawud

    2017-01-01

    Why did OPEC not cut oil production in the wake of 2014’s price fall? This study aims at aiding the mostly qualitative discussion with quantitative evidence from computing quarterly partial market equilibria Q4 2011 – Q4 2015 under present short-term profit maximisation and different competition setups. Although the model performs reasonably well in explaining pre-2014 prices, all setups fail to capture low prices, which fall even beyond perfect competition outcomes. This result is robust wit...

  6. A COMPUTABLE GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM APPROACH TO TRADE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MODELLING IN THE MALAYSIAN ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Amin, Abul Quasem; Jaafar, Abdul Hamid; Siwar, Chamhuri

    2008-01-01

    Environmental pollution is now a serious problem in many developing countries. One approach to mitigate the problem is to implement various pollution control policies. However, due to a lack of adequate quantitative models, the economic impacts and effectiveness of many pollution control policies are still unknown. Therefore, there is a greater need to know whether economic liberalization, trade, environment and social welfare can be joined in one direction under environmental taxation and po...

  7. Characterization and modeling of major constituent equilibrium chemistry of a blended cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeussen J.C.L.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cementitious materials containing ground granulated iron blast furnace slag and coal combustion fly ash as admixtures are being used extensively for nuclear waste containment applications. Whereas the solid phases of ordinary Portland cement (OPC have been studied in great detail, the chemistry of cement, fly ash and slag blends has received relatively less study. Given that OPC is generally more reactive than slag and fly ash, the mineralogy of OPC provides a logical starting point for describing the major constituent chemistry of blended cement mortars. To this end, a blended cement mortar containing Portland cement, granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash and quartz sand was modeled using a set of solid phases known to form in hydrated OPC with the geochemical speciation solver LeachXS/ORCHESTRA. Comparison of modeling results to the experimentally determined pH-dependent batch leaching concentrations (USEPA Method 1313 indicates that major constituent concentrations are described reasonably well with the Portland cement mineral set; however, modeled and measured aluminum concentrations differ greatly. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the mortar reveals the presence of Al-rich phyllosilicate minerals heretofore unreported in similar cementitious blends: kaolinite and potassic phyllosilicates similar in composition to illite and muscovite. Whereas the potassic phyllosilicates are present in the quartz sand aggregate, the formation of kaolinite appears to be authigenic. The inclusion of kaolinite in speciation modeling provides a substantially improved description of the release of Al and therefore, suggests that the behavior of phyllosilicate phases may be important for predicting long-term physico-chemical behavior of such systems.

  8. Removal of three nitrophenols from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto char ash: equilibrium and kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdy, Yehia M.; Altaher, Hossam; ElQada, E.

    2018-03-01

    In this research, the removal of 2,4 dinitrophenol, 2 nitrophenol and 4 nitrophenol from aqueous solution using char ash from animal bones was investigated using batch technique. Three 2-parameter isotherms (Freundlich, Langmuir, and Temkin) were applied to analyze the experimental data. Both linear and nonlinear regression analyses were performed for these models to estimate the isotherm parameters. Three 3-parameter isotherms (Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Toth) were also tested. Moreover, the kinetic data were tested using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, Intraparticle diffusion and Boyd methods. Langmuir adsorption isotherm provided the best fit for the experimental data indicating monolayer adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacity was 8.624, 7.55, 7.384 mg/g for 2 nitrophenol, 2,4 dinitrophenol, and 4 nitrophenol, respectively. The experimental data fitted well to pseudo-second order model suggested a chemical nature of the adsorption process. The R 2 values for this model were 0.973 up to 0.999. This result with supported by the Temkin model indicating heat of adsorption to be greater than 10 kJ/mol. The rate controlling step was intraparticle diffusion for 2 nitrophenol, and a combination of intraparticle diffusion and film diffusion for the other two phenols. The pH and temperature of solution were found to have a considerable effect, and the temperature indicated the exothermic nature of the adsorption process. The highest adsorption capacity was obtained at pH 9 and 25 °C.

  9. BioModels: expanding horizons to include more modelling approaches and formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glont, Mihai; Nguyen, Tung V N; Graesslin, Martin; Hälke, Robert; Ali, Raza; Schramm, Jochen; Wimalaratne, Sarala M; Kothamachu, Varun B; Rodriguez, Nicolas; Swat, Maciej J; Eils, Jurgen; Eils, Roland; Laibe, Camille; Malik-Sheriff, Rahuman S; Chelliah, Vijayalakshmi; Le Novère, Nicolas; Hermjakob, Henning

    2018-01-04

    BioModels serves as a central repository of mathematical models representing biological processes. It offers a platform to make mathematical models easily shareable across the systems modelling community, thereby supporting model reuse. To facilitate hosting a broader range of model formats derived from diverse modelling approaches and tools, a new infrastructure for BioModels has been developed that is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels. This new system allows submitting and sharing of a wide range of models with improved support for formats other than SBML. It also offers a version-control backed environment in which authors and curators can work collaboratively to curate models. This article summarises the features available in the current system and discusses the potential benefit they offer to the users over the previous system. In summary, the new portal broadens the scope of models accepted in BioModels and supports collaborative model curation which is crucial for model reproducibility and sharing. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Biosorption of diazinon by a pre-treated alimentary industrial waste: equilibrium and kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeddou Mezenner, N.; Lagha, H.; Kais, H.; Trari, M.

    2017-11-01

    This study explores the feasibility of pre-treated coffee waste (PCW) as biosorbent for the removal of diazinon. The effect of the pesticide concentration (6-20 mg L-1), contact time, adsorbent dose (0.2-1.2 g L-1), solution pH (3-11.5), temperature (15-40 °C) and co-existing inorganic ions (H2PO4 -, NO3 -) on the diazinon biosorption over PCW is investigated. The experimental results indicate an optimal pH of 7.3 for the diazinon elimination on PCW (1 g L-1). The Langmuir model describes well the isotherm data with a high regression coefficient ( R 2 > 0.990) and a maximum monolayer biosorption capacity of 18.52 mg g-1 at 15 °C. It is also observed that the intra-particle diffusion is not the rate-controlling step. A comparison is evaluated between the pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models; the experimental data are well fitted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The biosorption capacity decreases with increasing temperature for a diazinon concentration of 10 mg L-1. The negative enthalpy Δ H° (-63.57 kJ/mol) indicates that the diazinon biosorption onto PCW is exothermic. Under optimal conditions, the biosorption reaches 95% after 90 min. The removal efficiency decreases from 95 to 65.67 and 48.9% for the diazinon alone and in the presence of NO3 - and H2PO4 - (100 mg L-1), respectively.

  11. Modeling the Non-Equilibrium Process of the Chemical Adsorption of Ammonia on GaN(0001) Reconstructed Surfaces Based on Steepest-Entropy-Ascent Quantum Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusaba, Akira; Li, Guanchen; von Spakovsky, Michael R; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2017-08-15

    Clearly understanding elementary growth processes that depend on surface reconstruction is essential to controlling vapor-phase epitaxy more precisely. In this study, ammonia chemical adsorption on GaN(0001) reconstructed surfaces under metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) conditions (3Ga-H and N ad -H + Ga-H on a 2 × 2 unit cell) is investigated using steepest-entropy-ascent quantum thermodynamics (SEAQT). SEAQT is a thermodynamic-ensemble based, first-principles framework that can predict the behavior of non-equilibrium processes, even those far from equilibrium where the state evolution is a combination of reversible and irreversible dynamics. SEAQT is an ideal choice to handle this problem on a first-principles basis since the chemical adsorption process starts from a highly non-equilibrium state. A result of the analysis shows that the probability of adsorption on 3Ga-H is significantly higher than that on N ad -H + Ga-H. Additionally, the growth temperature dependence of these adsorption probabilities and the temperature increase due to the heat of reaction is determined. The non-equilibrium thermodynamic modeling applied can lead to better control of the MOVPE process through the selection of preferable reconstructed surfaces. The modeling also demonstrates the efficacy of DFT-SEAQT coupling for determining detailed non-equilibrium process characteristics with a much smaller computational burden than would be entailed with mechanics-based, microscopic-mesoscopic approaches.

  12. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis by Integrated AHP and TOPSIS Method Using an Equilibrium Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, S. R. [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, S. Y. [UNIST, Ulju (Korea, Republic of); Koc, W. I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Determining whether to break away from domestic conflict surrounding nuclear power and step forward for public consensus can be identified by transparent policy making considering public acceptability. In this context, deriving the best suitable nuclear fuel cycle for Korea is the key task in current situation. Assessing nuclear fuel cycle is a multicriteria decision making problem dealing with multiple interconnected issues on efficiently using natural uranium resources, securing an environment friendliness to deal with waste, obtaining the public acceptance, ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy, maintaining economic competitiveness compared to other electricity sources, and assessing technical feasibility of advanced nuclear energy systems. This paper performed the integrated AHP and TOPSIS analysis on three nuclear fuel cycle options against 5 different criteria including U utilization, waste management, material attractiveness, economics, and technical feasibility. The fuel cycle options analyzed in this paper are three different fuel cycle options as follows: PWR-Once through cycle(PWR-OT), PWR-MOX cycle, Pyro- SFR cycle. These fuel cycles are most likely to be adopted in the foreseeable future. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and TOPSIS (Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The analyzed nuclear fuel cycle options include the once-through cycle, the PWR-MOX recycle, and the Pyro-SFR recycle.

  13. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Analysis by Integrated AHP and TOPSIS Method Using an Equilibrium Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, S. R.; Choi, S. Y.; Koc, W. I.

    2015-01-01

    Determining whether to break away from domestic conflict surrounding nuclear power and step forward for public consensus can be identified by transparent policy making considering public acceptability. In this context, deriving the best suitable nuclear fuel cycle for Korea is the key task in current situation. Assessing nuclear fuel cycle is a multicriteria decision making problem dealing with multiple interconnected issues on efficiently using natural uranium resources, securing an environment friendliness to deal with waste, obtaining the public acceptance, ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy, maintaining economic competitiveness compared to other electricity sources, and assessing technical feasibility of advanced nuclear energy systems. This paper performed the integrated AHP and TOPSIS analysis on three nuclear fuel cycle options against 5 different criteria including U utilization, waste management, material attractiveness, economics, and technical feasibility. The fuel cycle options analyzed in this paper are three different fuel cycle options as follows: PWR-Once through cycle(PWR-OT), PWR-MOX cycle, Pyro- SFR cycle. These fuel cycles are most likely to be adopted in the foreseeable future. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and TOPSIS (Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution). The analyzed nuclear fuel cycle options include the once-through cycle, the PWR-MOX recycle, and the Pyro-SFR recycle

  14. Spectral-Lagrangian methods for collisional models of non-equilibrium statistical states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Tharkabhushanam, Sri Harsha

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new spectral Lagrangian based deterministic solver for the non-linear Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) in d-dimensions for variable hard sphere (VHS) collision kernels with conservative or non-conservative binary interactions. The method is based on symmetries of the Fourier transform of the collision integral, where the complexity in its computation is reduced to a separate integral over the unit sphere S d-1 . The conservation of moments is enforced by Lagrangian constraints. The resulting scheme, implemented in free space, is very versatile and adjusts in a very simple manner to several cases that involve energy dissipation due to local micro-reversibility (inelastic interactions) or elastic models of slowing down process. Our simulations are benchmarked with available exact self-similar solutions, exact moment equations and analytical estimates for the homogeneous Boltzmann equation, both for elastic and inelastic VHS interactions. Benchmarking of the simulations involves the selection of a time self-similar rescaling of the numerical distribution function which is performed using the continuous spectrum of the equation for Maxwell molecules as studied first in Bobylev et al. [A.V. Bobylev, C. Cercignani, G. Toscani, Proof of an asymptotic property of self-similar solutions of the Boltzmann equation for granular materials, Journal of Statistical Physics 111 (2003) 403-417] and generalized to a wide range of related models in Bobylev et al. [A.V. Bobylev, C. Cercignani, I.M. Gamba, On the self-similar asymptotics for generalized non-linear kinetic Maxwell models, Communication in Mathematical Physics, in press. URL: ( )]. The method also produces accurate results in the case of inelastic diffusive Boltzmann equations for hard spheres (inelastic collisions under thermal bath), where overpopulated non-Gaussian exponential tails have been conjectured in computations by stochastic methods [T.V. Noije, M. Ernst, Velocity distributions in homogeneously

  15. MERGE-ETL: An Optimisation Equilibrium Model with Two Different Endogeneous Technological Learning Formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahn, O.; Kypreos, S.

    2002-07-01

    In MERGE-ETL, endogenous technological progress is applied to eight energy technologies: six power plants (integrated coal gasification with combined cycle, gas turbine with combined cycle, gas fuel cell, new nuclear designs, wind turbine and solar photovoltaic) and two plants producing hydrogen (from biomass and solar photovoltaic). Furthermore, compared to the original MERGE model, we have introduced two new power plants (using coal and gas) with CO{sub 2} capture and disposal into depleted oil and gas reservoirs. The difficulty with incorporating endogenous technological progress in MERGE comes from the resulting formulation of the MERGE-ETL model. Indeed, technological learning is related to increasing returns to adoption, and the mathematical formulation of MERGE-ETL corresponds then to a (non-linear and) non-convex optimisation problem. To solve MERGE-ETL, we have devised a three-step heuristic approach, where we search for the global optimum in an iterative way. We use in particular for this a linearisation, following mixed integer programming techniques, of the bottom-up part of MERGE-ETL. To study the impacts of modelling endogenous technological change in MERGE, we have considered several scenarios related to technological learning and carbon control. The latter corresponds to a 'soft landing' of world energy related CO{sub 2} emissions to a level of 10 Gt C by 2050, and takes into account the recent (2001) Marrakech Agreements for CO{sub 2} emission limits by 2010. Notice that our baseline scenario (without emission control and endogenous technological change) is consistent, in particular in terms of population and CO{sub 2} emissions, with the IPCC B2 scenario. Our numerical application with MERGE-ETL shows that technological learning yields an increase of primary energy use and of electricity generation. Indeed, energy production, and in particular electricity generation, become less expensive over-time. Energy (electricity, but also non

  16. Comprehensive optimisation of China’s energy prices, taxes and subsidy policies based on the dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Y.X.; Liu, Y.Y.; Du, M.; Zhang, J.X.; Pang, Y.X.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy policy is defined as a complication of energy price, tax and subsidy policies. • The maximisation of total social benefit is the optimised objective. • A more rational carbon tax ranges from 10 to 20 Yuan/ton under the current situation. • The optimal coefficient pricing is more conducive to maximise total social benefit. - Abstract: Under the condition of increasingly serious environmental pollution, rational energy policy plays an important role in the practical significance of energy conservation and emission reduction. This paper defines energy policies as the compilation of energy prices, taxes and subsidy policies. Moreover, it establishes the optimisation model of China’s energy policy based on the dynamic computable general equilibrium model, which maximises the total social benefit, in order to explore the comprehensive influences of a carbon tax, the sales pricing mechanism and the renewable energy fund policy. The results show that when the change rates of gross domestic product and consumer price index are ±2%, ±5% and the renewable energy supply structure ratio is 7%, the more reasonable carbon tax ranges from 10 to 20 Yuan/ton, and the optimal coefficient pricing mechanism is more conducive to the objective of maximising the total social benefit. From the perspective of optimising the overall energy policies, if the upper limit of change rate in consumer price index is 2.2%, the existing renewable energy fund should be improved

  17. Modeling of solvent extraction equilibrium of Cu(II from sulphuric Acid solution with MOC-55TD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of Cu(II from acidic sulphate aqueous solutions using the commercial MOC-55TD extractant is studied. A predictive model, which consists in a set of non-linear mass action and mass balance equations is proposed. The model was solved using a tailor-made equation-solving program. The extraction of copper can be described by the formation of CuR2 species (log Kext= 0.717 ± 0.03 in the organic phase. The copper equilibrium isotherm was also obtained at 20°C.

    Se estudia la extracción de Cu(II de disoluciones acuosas acidas, en medio sulfato, mediante la oxima comercial MOC-55TD. Se propone un modelo para predecir la extracción del metal; este modelo consiste en una serie de ecuaciones no lineales de acción de masas y balance de masas. El modelo se resolvió empleando un programa de ordenador específicamente definido para este tipo de equilibrios. La extracción de cobre se describe por la formación de la especie CuR2 (log Kext= 0,717 ± 0,03 en la fase orgánica. Se ha obtenido la isoterma de extracción de cobre a 20 °C.

  18. Comparison of adsorption equilibrium models and error functions for the study of sulfate removal by calcium hydroxyapatite microfibrillated cellulose composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokkanen, Sanna; Bhatnagar, Amit; Koistinen, Ari; Kangas, Teija; Lassi, Ulla; Sillanpää, Mika

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, the adsorption of sulfates of sodium sulfate (Na 2 SO 4 ) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) by calcium hydroxyapatite-modified microfibrillated cellulose was studied in the aqueous solution. The adsorbent was characterized using elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared, scanning electron microscope and elemental analysis in order to gain the information on its structure and physico-chemical properties. The adsorption studies were conducted in batch mode. The effects of solution pH, contact time, the initial concentration of sulfate and the effect of competing anions were studied on the performance of synthesized adsorbent for sulfate removal. Adsorption kinetics indicated very fast adsorption rate for sulfate of both sources (Na 2 SO 4 and SLS) and the adsorption process was well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Experimental maximum adsorption capacities were found to be 34.53 mg g -1 for sulfates of SLS and 7.35 mg g -1 for sulfates of Na 2 SO 4. The equilibrium data were described by the Langmuir, Sips, Freundlich, Toth and Redlich-Peterson isotherm models using five different error functions.

  19. The substitution of mineral fertilizers by compost from household waste in Cameroon: economic analysis with a partial equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaza Folefack, Achille Jean

    2009-05-01

    This paper analyses the possibility of substitution between compost and mineral fertilizer in order to assess the impact on the foreign exchange savings in Cameroon of increasing the use of compost. In this regard, a partial equilibrium model was built up and used as a tool for policy simulations. The review of existing literature already suggests that, the compost commercial value i.e. value of substitution (33,740 FCFA tonne(-1)) is higher compared to the compost real price (30,000 FCFA tonne(-1)), proving that it could be profitable to substitute the mineral fertilizer by compost. Further results from the scenarios used in the modelling exercise show that, increasing the compost availability is the most favourable policy for the substitution of mineral fertilizer by compost. This policy helps to save about 18.55% of the annual imported mineral fertilizer quantity and thus to avoid approximately 8.47% of the yearly total import expenditure in Cameroon. The policy of decreasing the transport rate of compost in regions that are far from the city is also favourable to the substitution. Therefore, in order to encourage the substitution of mineral fertilizer by compost, programmes of popularization of compost should be highlighted and be among the top priorities in the agricultural policy of the Cameroon government.

  20. MEASUREMENT AND MODELLING OF SORPTION EQUILIBRIUM CURVE OF WATER ON PA6, PP, HDPE AND PVC BY USING FLORY-HUGGINS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suherman Suherman

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of water on granular polyamide-6 (PA6, granular polypropylene (PP, and powdery high density polyethylene (HDPE and powdery polyvinyl chloride (PVC were measured using a gravimetric method in a magnetic suspension balance (MSB. The Flory-Huggins model was successfully applied on the sorption equilibrium curve of all investigated polymers. The influence of temperature is low. The value of Flory-Huggins parameters(c of PA6, PVC, PP and HDPE were 1.8, 5.8, 6.3, and 8.1, respectively. The water in PA6 is mainly bound moisture, while in PP, HDPE and PVC it is mainly surface moisture.