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Sample records for model iii microcomputer

  1. MICRO-VERS. Micro-computer Software for the Vocational Education Reporting System. Version 3.1. Radio Shack TRS-80 Model III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education.

    This manual is intended to accompany a software system for the TRS-80 Model III computer that is designed to aid local districts in completing vocational education enrollment claims and Vocational Education Data System (VEDS) reports. Part I, Introduction, gives a brief overview of the Microcomputer Vocational Education Reporting System…

  2. The microcomputer scientific software series 2: general linear model--regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold M. Rauscher

    1983-01-01

    The general linear model regression (GLMR) program provides the microcomputer user with a sophisticated regression analysis capability. The output provides a regression ANOVA table, estimators of the regression model coefficients, their confidence intervals, confidence intervals around the predicted Y-values, residuals for plotting, a check for multicollinearity, a...

  3. Doing Physics with Microcomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Per

    1983-01-01

    Describes how microcomputers can perform very demanding/large-scale physics calculations at speeds not much slower than those of modern, full-size computers. Among the examples provided are a Monte Carlo simulation of the three-dimensional Ising model and a program (for the Apple microcomputer) using the time-independent Schrodinger Equation. (JN)

  4. A simple dynamic model and transient simulation of the nuclear power reactor on microcomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yang Gee; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A simple dynamic model is developed for the transient simulation of the nuclear power reactor. The dynamic model includes the normalized neutron kinetics model with reactivity feedback effects and the core thermal-hydraulics model. The main objective of this paper demonstrates the capability of the developed dynamic model to simulate various important variables of interest for a nuclear power reactor transient. Some representative results of transient simulations show the expected trends in all cases, even though no available data for comparison. In this work transient simulations are performed on a microcomputer using the DESIRE/N96T continuous system simulation language which is applicable to nuclear power reactor transient analysis. 3 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  5. Mapping the calcification of bovine pericardium in rat model by enhanced micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhong, Shengping; Lan, Hualin; Meng, Xu; Zhang, Haibo; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Yuxing; Wang, Chunren; Wang, Zhaoxu

    2014-09-01

    The calcification initiation and progression of bioprosthetic heart valve were investigated in a rat model by enhanced micro-computed tomography, together with histologic study and scanning electron microscope analysis. The implantation data at early stage showed apparent dendritic patterns in the radiographic images for the glutaraldehyde-treated bovine pericardium and this dendritic pattern was verified to be associated with the vessel distribution in the tissue. Histologic study and scanning electron microscope analysis both indicated that the calcium deposits in the pericardium vessels regions were more grievous than those scattered in the collagen fibers in the first two weeks after implantation. Subsequently, calcification spreaded and the entire sample was severely calcified in 60 days. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. "Speaking" Microcomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, C.; Annerton, J.

    1986-01-01

    Microcomputer system allows blind person to use portable computer and communicate with remote mainframe computer. System prepares data for transmission to mainframe, translates data transmitted from mainframe for its own use, and converts data ordinarily displayed on its video screen into synthesized speech.

  7. "Speaking" Microcomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandy, C.; Annerton, J.

    1986-01-01

    Microcomputer system allows blind person to use portable computer and communicate with remote mainframe computer. System prepares data for transmission to mainframe, translates data transmitted from mainframe for its own use, and converts data ordinarily displayed on its video screen into synthesized speech.

  8. Modeling survival of juvenile salmon during downriver migration in the Columbia River on a microcomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peloquin, R.A.; McKenzie, D.H.

    1994-10-01

    A compartmental model has been implemented on a microcomputer as an aid in the analysis of alternative solutions to a problem. The model, entitled Smolt Survival Simulator, simulates the survival of juvenile salmon during their downstream migration and passage of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River. The model is designed to function in a workshop environment where resource managers and fisheries biologists can study alternative measures that may potentially increase juvenile anadromous fish survival during downriver migration. The potential application of the model has placed several requirements on the implementing software. It must be available for use in workshop settings. The software must be easily to use with minimal computer knowledge. Scenarios must be created and executed quickly and efficiently. Results must be immediately available. Software design emphasis vas placed on the user interface because of these requirements. The discussion focuses on methods used in the development of the SSS software user interface. These methods should reduce user stress and alloy thorough and easy parameter modification.

  9. RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways Version 3. 0 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niebla, E.

    1989-01-01

    The RAMS Model for Terrestrial Pathways is a computer program for calculation of numeric criteria for land application and distribution and marketing of sludges under the sewage-sludge regulations at 40 CFR Part 503. The risk-assessment models covered assume that municipal sludge with specified characteristics is spread across a defined area of ground at a known rate once each year for a given number of years. Risks associated with direct land application of sludge applied after distribution and marketing are both calculated. The computer program calculates the maximum annual loading of contaminants that can be land applied and still meet the risk criteria specified as input. Software Description: The program is written in the Turbo/Basic programming language for implementation on IBM PC/AT or compatible machines using DOS 3.0 or higher operating system. Minimum core storage is 512K.

  10. Measurement of kidney stone formation in the rat model using micro-computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Holdsworth, David W.

    2012-03-01

    Kidney stones were induced in 5 rats by treating them with 1% ethylene glycol and 1% ammonium chloride through free drinking water for six weeks. The animals were anesthetized and imaged in vivo before the treatment at week 0, to obtain baseline data, then at weeks 2 and 6 to monitor the kidney stone formation. Micro-CT imaging was performed with x-ray tube voltage of 90 kV and a current of 40 mA. At week 2, kidney stone formation was observed. A micro-computed tomography methodology of estimating the volume and hydroxyapatite-equivalent mineral content of the kidney stone is presented. It determines the threshold CT number (390 HU) that separates the kidney stone from the tissue. The mean volume of the stones in the 10 kidneys significantly increased from 3.81+/-0.72 mm3 at week 2 to 23.96+/-9.12 mm3 at week 6 (perror was about 4%. This method allows analysis of the kidney stone formation to be carried out in vivo, with fewer experimental animals compared with other ex vivo methods, in which animals are sacrificed. It is precise, accurate, non-destructive, and could be used in pre-clinical research to study the formation of kidney stones in live small animals.

  11. Evaluation of Angiogenesis Using Micro-Computed Tomography in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Savai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative evaluation of lung tumor angiogenesis using immunohistochemical techniques has been limited by difficulties in generating reproducible data. To analyze intrapulmonary tumor angiogenesis, we used high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT of lung tumors of mice inoculated with mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1 or human adenocarcinoma (A549 cell lines. The lung vasculature was filled with the radiopaque silicone rubber, Microfil, through the jugular vein (in vivo application or pulmonary artery (ex vivo application. In addition, human adenocarcinoma lung tumor-bearing mice treated site-specifically with humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab against vascular endothelial growth factor. Quantitative analysis of lung tumor microvessels imaged with micro-CT showed that more vessels (mainly small, <0.02 mm2 were filled using the in vivo (5.4% compared with the ex vivo (2.1% method. Furthermore, bevacizumab-treated lung tumor-bearing mice showed significantly reduced lung tumor volume and lung tumor angiogenesis compared with untreated mice as assessed by micro-CT. Interestingly, microvascularization of mainly the smaller vessels (<0.02 mm2 was reduced after bevacizumab treatment. This observation with micro-CT was nicely correlated with immunohistochemical measurement of microvessels. Therefore, micro-CT is a novel method for investigating lung tumor angiogenesis, and this might be considered as an additional complementary tool for precise quantification of angiogenesis.

  12. Compression-recovery model of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator guided by X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameswara Rao, P. V.; Rawal, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Rajput, Krishn Gopal

    2017-10-01

    Absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators play a key role in enhancing the cycle life of the valve regulated lead acid (VRLA) batteries by maintaining the elastic characteristics under a defined level of compression force with the plates of the electrodes. Inevitably, there are inherent challenges to maintain the required level of compression characteristics of AGM separators during the charge and discharge of the battery. Herein, we report a three-dimensional (3D) analytical model for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators by formulating a direct relationship with the constituent fiber and structural parameters. The analytical model of compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators has successfully included the fiber slippage criterion and internal friction losses. The presented work uses, for the first time, 3D data of fiber orientation from X-ray micro-computed tomography, for predicting the compression-recovery behavior of AGM separators. A comparison has been made between the theoretical and experimental results of compression-recovery behavior of AGM samples with defined fiber orientation characteristics. In general, the theory agreed reasonably well with the experimental results of AGM samples in both dry and wet states. Through theoretical modeling, fiber volume fraction was established as one of the key structural parameters that modulates the compression hysteresis of an AGM separator.

  13. Problem Solving Using Microcomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demana, Franklin; Waits, Bert

    1987-01-01

    It is argued that microcomputer technology has evolved to the stage that it should be routinely used by mathematics students at all levels. It is shown how the use of microcomputers can change the way problems are solved. Computer-generated graphics are highlighted. (PK)

  14. Sketching with a microcomputer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobi, P.

    This report describes the use of a microcomputer as a tool for the sketch design phase of the building process. A housing development scheme comprising 175 dwellings is chosen for illustrating the procedures. Here the microcomputer is utilized for analysing the landscape, for the three-dimensiona...

  15. The Microcomputer Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinne, Harold C.

    The history of the development of the microcomputer industry since its inception in 1975 is explored in this brief paper, which pays special attention to the advent of the small business computer. The author describes the growth of sales, the development of successful companies, the early resistance to use of microcomputers in business, and the…

  16. A Quantitative Volumetric Micro-Computed Tomography Method to Analyze Lung Tumors in Genetically Engineered Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B. Haines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two genetically engineered, conditional mouse models of lung tumor formation, K-rasLSL-G12D and K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H, are commonly used to model human lung cancer. Developed by Tyler Jacks and colleagues, these models have been invaluable to study in vivo lung cancer initiation and progression in a genetically and physiologically relevant context. However, heterogeneity, multiplicity and complexity of tumor formation in these models make it challenging to monitor tumor growth in vivo and have limited the application of these models in oncology drug discovery. Here, we describe a novel analytical method to quantitatively measure total lung tumor burden in live animals using micro-computed tomography imaging. Applying this methodology, we studied the kinetics of tumor development and response to targeted therapy in vivo in K-ras and K-ras/p53 mice. Consistent with previous reports, lung tumors in both models developed in a time- and dose (Cre recombinase-dependent manner. Furthermore, the compound K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mice developed tumors faster and more robustly than mice harboring a single K-rasLSL-G12D oncogene, as expected. Erlotinib, a small molecule inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, significantly inhibited tumor growth in K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mice. These results demonstrate that this novel imaging technique can be used to monitor both tumor progression and response to treatment and therefore supports a broader application of these genetically engineered mouse models in oncology drug discovery and development.

  17. Airway remodeling in a mouse asthma model assessed by in-vivo respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Montaudon, Michel [Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Respiratoire, Bordeaux (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U885, Bordeaux (France); CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique, Pessac (France); Ozier, Annaig; Begueret, Hugues; Ousova, Olga; Marthan, Roger; Berger, Patrick [Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Respiratoire, Bordeaux (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U885, Bordeaux (France); Laurent, Francois [Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire Respiratoire, Bordeaux (France); Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U885, Bordeaux (France); CHU Bordeaux, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique, Pessac (France); CHU de Bordeaux, Hopital du Haut-Leveque, Hopital Cardiologique, Unite d' Imagerie Thoracique et Cardiovasculaire, Pessac (France)

    2010-01-15

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of non-invasive respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) for assessment of airway remodelling in a mouse asthma model. Six female BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with ovalbumin. A control group of six mice received saline inhalation. All mice underwent plethysmographic study and micro-CT. For each mouse, peribronchial attenuation values of 12 bronchi were measured, from which a peribronchial density index (PBDI) was computed. Mice were then sacrificed and lungs examined histologically. Final analysis involved 10 out of 12 mice. Agreement of measurements across observers and over time was very good (intraclass correlation coefficients: 0.94-0.98). There was a significant difference in PBDI between asthmatic and control mice (-210 vs. -338.9 HU, P=0.008). PBDI values were correlated to bronchial muscle area (r=0.72, P=0.018). This study shows that respiratory-gated micro-CT may allow non-invasive monitoring of bronchial remodelling in asthmatic mice and evaluation of innovative treatment effects. (orig.)

  18. Microcomputer Applications in Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph W.

    The first part of this paper addresses the following topics: (1) the usefulness of microcomputers; (2) applications for microcomputers in analytical chemistry; (3) costs; (4) major microcomputer systems and subsystems; and (5) which microcomputer to buy. Following these brief comments, the major focus of the paper is devoted to a discussion of…

  19. Application of Micro-Computed Tomography with Iodine Staining to Cardiac Imaging, Segmentation and Computational Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanidi, OV; Nikolaidou, T; Zhao, J; Smaill, BH; Gilbert, SH; Holden, AV; Lowe, T; Withers, PJ; Jarvis, JC; Stephenson, RS; Hart, G; Hancox, JC; Boyett, MR; Zhang, H

    2012-01-01

    Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has been widely used to generate high-resolution 3D tissue images from small animals non-destructively, especially for mineralized skeletal tissues. However, its application to the analysis of soft cardiovascular tissues has been limited by poor inter-tissue contrast. Recent ex vivo studies have shown that contrast between muscular and connective tissue in micro-CT images can be enhanced by staining with iodine. In the present study, we apply this novel technique for imaging of cardiovascular structures in canine hearts. We optimize the method to obtain high resolution X-ray micro-CT images of the canine atria and its distinctive regions - including the Bachmann’s bundle, atrioventricular node, pulmonary arteries and veins - with clear inter-tissue contrast. The imaging results are used to reconstruct and segment the detailed 3D geometry of the atria. Structure tensor analysis shows that the arrangement of atrial fibres can also be characterised using the enhanced micro-CT images, as iodine preferentially accumulates within the muscular fibres rather than in connective tissues. This novel technique can be particularly useful in non-destructive imaging of 3D cardiac architectures from large animals and humans, due to the combination of relatively high speed (~1 hour/scan of a large canine heart) and high voxel resolution (36 μm) provided. In summary, contrast micro-CT facilitates fast and non-destructive imaging and segmenting of detailed 3D cardiovascular geometries, as well as measuring fibre orientation, which are crucial in constructing biophysically detailed computational cardiac models. PMID:22829390

  20. An Integrated Library System from Existing Microcomputer Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Lynda S.

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates how three commercial microcomputer software packages--PC-Talk III, Wordstar, and dBase III--were combined to produce an integrated library system at the U.S. Army Concepts Analysis Agency library. The retrospective conversion process is discussed, and the four modules of the system are described: acquisitions/cataloging; online…

  1. Micro-computed tomography (CT) based assessment of dental regenerative therapy in the canine mandible model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khobragade, P.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Andreana, S.; Dziak, R.; Sunkara, S. K.; Sunkara, S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C. N.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution 3D bone-tissue structure measurements may provide information critical to the understanding of the bone regeneration processes and to the bone strength assessment. Tissue engineering studies rely on such nondestructive measurements to monitor bone graft regeneration area. In this study, we measured bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness through micro-CT slices for different grafts and controls. Eight canines underwent surgery to remove a bone volume (defect) in the canine's jaw at a total of 44 different locations. We kept 11 defects empty for control and filled the remaining ones with three regenerative materials; NanoGen (NG), a FDA-approved material (n=11), a novel NanoCalcium Sulfate (NCS) material (n=11) and NCS alginate (NCS+alg) material (n=11). After a minimum of four and eight weeks, the canines were sacrificed and the jaw samples were extracted. We used a custombuilt micro-CT system to acquire the data volume and developed software to measure the bone yield, fractal dimension and trabecular thickness. The software used a segmentation algorithm based on histograms derived from volumes of interest indicated by the operator. Using bone yield and fractal dimension as indices we are able to differentiate between the control and regenerative material (pprocess and quality of bone were dependent upon the position of defect and time period of healing. This study presents one of the first quantitative comparisons using non-destructive Micro-CT analysis for bone regenerative material in a large animal with a critical defect model. Our results indicate that Micro-CT measurement could be used to monitor invivo bone regeneration studies for greater regenerative process understanding.

  2. Teaching with Microcomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction to the special section on microcomputers in special education reviews the trend toward increasing computer use, raises such issues as the need for special educators to provide leadership in the use of computers for individualized instruction, and summarizes remaining articles in the section. (DB)

  3. Microcomputer interfacing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, M A

    1990-01-01

    This is the applications guide to interfacing microcomputers. It offers practical non-mathematical solutions to interfacing problems in many applications including data acquisition and control. Emphasis is given to the definition of the objectives of the interface, then comparing possible solutions and producing the best interface for every situation. Dr Mustafa A Mustafa is a senior designer of control equipment and has written many technical articles and papers on the subject of computers and their application to control engineering.

  4. MODELING NATURAL ATTENUATION OF FUELS WITH BIOPLUME III

    Science.gov (United States)

    A natural attenuation model that simulates the aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation of fuel hydrocarbons was developed. The resulting model, BIOPLUME III, demonstrates the importance of biodegradation in reducing contaminant concentrations in ground water. In hypothetical simulat...

  5. The Microcomputer in the Library: I. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggate, Peter; Dyer, Hilary

    1985-01-01

    This first in a series of six articles introducing microcomputer applications in smaller libraries discusses microcomputer components (hardware, operating systems, applications software); microcomputer history; current hardware; library applications; performance criteria; factors influencing performance; integrated systems; information retrieval;…

  6. A General Introduction to Microcomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiznieks, Viktors

    This basic introduction to microcomputers provides the neophyte with the terminology, definitions, and concepts that explain the microcomputer and computing technology in general. Mathematical operations with binary numbers, computer storage, controlling logic, and the concepts of stack and interrupt are explained. (RAO)

  7. Trends In Microcomputer Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strum, William E.

    1988-05-01

    We have seen, in the last four years, the microcomputer become the platform of choice for many image processing applications. By 1991, Frost and Sullivan forecasts that 75% of all image processing will be carried out on microcomputers. Many factors have contributed to this trend and will be discussed in the following paper.

  8. Microcomputers in Education. Selected Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsulich, Michael

    The more than 300 recent publications on microcomputers in education which are listed include guides, several books, ERIC documents, and journal articles. Entries are categorized by six primary topic areas: microcomputers; computer literacy; computer assisted instruction (drill and practice, tutorial, and simulation applications); computer managed…

  9. Parameter Estimation for the Thurstone Case III Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, David B.; Chaiy, Seoil

    1982-01-01

    The ability of three estimation criteria to recover parameters of the Thurstone Case V and Case III models from comparative judgment data was investigated via Monte Carlo techniques. Significant differences in recovery are shown to exist. (Author/JKS)

  10. Thermal-stress analysis of ceramic laminate veneer restorations with different incisal preparations using micro-computed tomography-based 3D finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, Alper Tunga; Icer, Esra; Eren, Meltem Mert; Baykasoglu, Cengiz; Mugan, Ata; Yildiz, Esra

    2017-11-01

    Main objective of this study is to investigate the thermal behavior of ceramic laminate veneer restorations of the maxillary central incisor with different incisal preparations such as butt joint and palatinal chamfer using finite element method. In addition, it is also aimed to understand the effect of different thermal loads which simulates hot and cold liquid imbibing in the mouth. Three-dimensional solid models of the sound tooth and prepared veneer restorations were obtained using micro-computed tomography images. Each ceramic veneer restoration was made up of ceramic, luting resin cement and adhesive layer which were generated based on the scanned images using computer-aided design software. Our solid model also included the remaining dental tissues such as periodontal ligament and surrounding cortical and spongy bones. Time-dependent linear thermal analyses were carried out to compare temperature changes and stress distributions of the sound and restored tooth models. The liquid is firstly in contact with the crown area where the maximum stresses were obtained. For the restorations, stresses on palatinal surfaces were found larger than buccal surfaces. Through interior tissues, the effect of thermal load diminished and smaller stress distributions were obtained near pulp and root-dentin regions. We found that the palatinal chamfer restoration presents comparatively larger stresses than the butt joint preparation. In addition, cold thermal loading showed larger temperature changes and stress distributions than those of hot thermal loading independent from the restoration technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Recovery boiler model; Soodakattilan kehitystyoe III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, K.; Ylitalo, M.; Sundstroem, K.; Helke, R.; Heinola, M. [Kvaerner Pulping Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The recovery boiler model was further tested and developed. At this moment the model includes submodels for: droplet drying, pyrolysis, char burning, gas burning and for droplet trajectory. During 1996 the formation of CH{sub 4} during pyrolysis and release of sulfur was included to the model. Further the formation of NO from fuel nitrogen and formation of thermal- NO were included to the model using Arrhenius type reaction rate equations. The calculated results are realistic and the model is used as a tool to find out methods to increase the efficiency and availability and decrease the emissions. Analysing the results of the earlier field study of 8 boilers showed that the furnace heat load, fuming rate, find the black liquor composition have influence on the enrichment of the potassium to the fly ash. (orig.)

  12. STUDY OF NEUROSES: III AN EMPIRICAL MODEL*

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatti, Ranbir S.; Channabasavanna, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY The empirical model presented in this paper is based on observations made on 60 neurotics and 60 normals matched at the individual level. Efforts are made to use the systems approach to present this paradigm synthesising both individual and environmental resources. We are of the opinion that this model is not only useful in understanding the genesis of neuroses rather has utility at the intervention level as well.

  13. Using Microcomputers for Institutional Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttle, J. Lloyd

    1984-01-01

    Many institutional researchers will find that the microcomputer leads to greater efficiency in everything that they do, especially in the two most critical elements of their jobs: thinking and communicating. (Author/MLW)

  14. Tevatron extraction microcomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, L.; Finley, D.A.; Harrison, M.; Merz, W.

    1985-06-01

    Extraction in the Fermilab Tevatron is controlled by a multi-processor Multibus microcomputer system called QXR (Quad eXtraction Regulator). QXR monitors several analog beam signals and controls three sets of power supplies: the ''bucker'' and ''pulse'' magnets at a rate of 5760 Hz, and the ''QXR'' magnets at 720 Hz. QXR supports multiple slow spills (up to a total of 35 seconds) with multiple fast pulses intermixed. It linearizes the slow spill and bucks out the high frequency components. Fast extraction is done by outputting a variable pulse waveform. Closed loop learning techniques are used to improve performance from cycle to cycle for both slow and fast extraction. The system is connected to the Tevatron clock system so that it can track the machine cycle. QXR is also connected to the rest of the Fermilab control system, ACNET. Through ACNET, human operators and central computers can monitor and control extraction through communications with QXR. The controls hardware and software both employ some standard and some specialized components. This paper gives an overview of QXR as a control system; another paper summarizes performance.

  15. Microcomputers and School Libraries in the United Kingdom: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain-Lewins, Helen; Watson, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the use of microcomputers in school libraries in the United Kingdom focuses on three models of school library computerization: (1) a library management-centered model, which addresses routine library operations; (2) a pupil-centered information skills model; and (3) a curriculum-centered model, which furthers pupil learning in…

  16. Thermal Modeling Method Improvements for SAGE III on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; McLeod, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Many innovative analysis methods have been used in developing this model; these will be described in the paper. This paper builds on a paper presented at TFAWS 2013, which described some of the initial developments of efficient methods for SAGE III. The current paper describes additional improvements that have been made since that time. To expedite the correlation of the model to thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing, the chambers and GSE for both TVAC chambers at Langley used to test the payload were incorporated within the thermal model. This allowed the runs of TVAC predictions and correlations to be run within the flight model, thus eliminating the need for separate models for TVAC. In one TVAC test, radiant lamps were used which necessitated shooting rays from the lamps, and running in both solar and IR wavebands. A new Dragon model was incorporated which entailed a change in orientation; that change was made using an assembly, so that any potential additional new Dragon orbits could be added in the future without modification of the model. The Earth orbit parameters such as albedo and Earth infrared flux were incorporated as time-varying values that change over the course of the orbit; despite being required in one of the ISS documents, this had not been done before by any previous payload. All parameters such as initial temperature, heater voltage, and location of the payload are defined based on the case definition. For one component, testing was performed in both air and vacuum; incorporating the air convection in a submodel that was

  17. Comparison of Synchrotron Radiation-based Propagation Phase Contrast Imaging and Conventional Micro-computed Tomography for Assessing Intervertebral Discs and Endplates in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianzhong; Ni, Shuangfei; Cao, Yong; Wang, Xiaokai; Liao, Shenghui; Lu, Hongbin

    2017-08-01

    The synchrotron radiation-based micro-computed tomography (SRμCT) and micro-CT (μCT) were applied to comparatively assess the intervertebral disc (IVD) and endplate (EP). To explore a new approach to evaluate the detailed structure of the IVD and EP during maturation and aging in a murine model. Till date, methods to observe the morphological changes in the IVD and EP from rodents have been relatively limited. SRμCT has been recognized as a potential way to visualize the structures containing sclerous and soft tissue. Our study focused on comparing the capacity of SRμCT and μCT in evaluating the detailed structure of the IVD and EP. Both SRμCT and μCT were performed to depict the structure of spinal tissue from 4-month-old mice. Then, the imaging quality was evaluated in the three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed model. Further, the changes in the EP and IVD during the maturation and aging process were assessed morphologically and quantitatively using SRμCT. The 3D reconstructed model of the EP from both μCT and SRμCT provided detailed information on its inner structure. However, the IVD was only depicted using SRμCT. Multi-angle observations of the 3D structure of EP and IVD from mice of different ages (15 days, 2 months, 4 months, and 18 months) were dynamically performed by SRμCT. Quantitative evaluations indicated that the total volume of EP and IVD, the average height of IVD and the canal-total volume ratio of EP increased from 15-day-old mice to 4-month-old mice and decreased in 18-month-old mice. The EP and IVD were clearly visualized using SRμCT. Compared with μCT, SRμCT provided a better ultrahigh resolution image of soft tissue and hard tissue simultaneously, which makes it a promising approach for the noninvasive study of disc degeneration. N /A.

  18. Software design methodologies for microcomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsing, R. D.

    1982-05-01

    It is the development phase of the software lifecycle which has attracted a great deal of interest in the last few years. This paper surveys the stages in software production and the need for a rigorous, formal approach. This type of approach is illustrated by the development of a program for a microcomputer using structured programming techniques.

  19. History Microcomputer Games: Update 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Provides full narrative reviews of B-1 Nuclear Bomber (Avalon, 1982); American History Adventure (Social Science Microcomputer Review Software, 1985); Government Simulations (Prentice-Hall, 1985); and The Great War, FDR and the New Deal, and Hitler's War, all from New Worlds Software, 1985. Lists additional information on five other history and…

  20. Microcomputers and the Department Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, William C.; Donaghy, Carole D.

    Ways in which various uses or applications of a microcomputer can help improve the image of a college or university department are discussed in this paper. The paper discusses applications such as instruction, word processing, management, programing, communications, statistics, and graphics, and audiences for these applications, such as department…

  1. Three phase voltage model AC-AC frequency-variable inverter controlled by single-chip microcomputer%单片机控制的三相电压型交-交变频器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建国

    2001-01-01

    介绍一种单片机控制的三相电压型交-交变频器,论述了交-交变频器的系统组成、控制方案及有关难点问题的解决%This paper introduces a kind of three phase voltage model AC-ACfrequency-variable inverter controlled by single-chip microcomputer control. Construction of the system ,controlling program and solution of some difficult problems are described

  2. An automated microcomputer-based system for determining canine paw pressure quantitatively in the dog synovitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R P; Datko, L J; Welch, T M; Purvis, W F; Shaw, G W; Thompson, J L; Brunner, T R

    1986-04-01

    The automated system for measuring canine paw pressure is a very useful tool for the evaluation of nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs such as indomethacin and ibuprofen in the dog synovitis model. The apparatus has been designed to give the operator control over the dog's posture while measuring hind-paw pressure. The stability of the measuring platform permits reproducible measurement of paw pressures. The software package performs direct data recording and data reduction and eliminates tedious manual calculations. Subsequently, the software produces a printout summarizing the experimental results in tabular and graphic form.

  3. Abel model: Evaluates claims of inability to afford penalties and compliance costs, version 2.6 (for microcomputers). Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    The easy-to-use ABEL software evaluates for-profit company claims of inabiltiy to afford penalties, clean-up costs, or compliance costs. Violators raise the issue of inability to pay in most of EPA`s enforcement actions regardless of whether there is any hard evidence pay in most of EPA`s enforcement actions regardless of whether there is any hard evidence supporting those claims. The program enables Federal, State and local enforcement professionals to quickly determine if there was any validity to those claims. ABEL is a tool that promotes quick settlements by performing screening analyses of defendants and potentially responsible parties (PRP`s) to determine their financial capacity. If ABEL indicates the firm can afford the full penalty, compliance of clean-up cost, then EPA makes no adjustments for inability to pay. If it indicates that the firm cannot afford the full amount, it directs the enforcement personnel to review other financial reports before making any adjustments. After analyzing some basic financial ratios that reflect a company`s solvency, ABEL assesses the firm`s ability to pay by focusing on projected cash flows. The model explicitly calculates the value of projected, internally generated cash flows from historical tax information, and compares these cash flows to the prosposed environmental expenditure(s). The sofware is extremely easy to use. Users are taken through a series of prompts to enter specified data. On screen `help` information is available at any time.

  4. The Training of Microcomputer Users: Insights from Two Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, Walter D.; Wildemuth, Barbara M.

    1992-01-01

    Research in human computer interaction and instructional design can provide insights into effective methods for training microcomputer users. Suggestions include utilizing error recognition and recovery, development of mental models, simplification of documentation, and using cognitive approaches that allow transfer of knowledge to new situations.…

  5. Microcomputers and School Libraries in the United Kingdom: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain-Lewins, Helen; Watson, Linda

    1990-01-01

    Describes study of seven local education authorities in the United Kingdom which was conducted to discover how models of microcomputer use were being adopted by school libraries. Highlights include database information retrieval; computerized catalogs; improving students' information-handling skills; curriculum-centered plans; integrated systems;…

  6. Yunnan-III models for Evolutionary population synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, F; Han, Z; Zhuang, Y; Kang, X

    2012-01-01

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the MESA stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1Myr-15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100Msun). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art MESA code. MESA code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars make the V-K, V-J and V-R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr)>7.6 (the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr)~8.6, ~0.5-0.2mag for colours, ~2 times for K-band flux). The st...

  7. NDT-COMP9 microcomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodd, C.V.; Cowan, R.F.

    1980-09-01

    An 8080-based microcomputer system, the NDT-COMP9, has been designed for instrumentation control and data analysis in eddy-current tests. The NDT-COMP9 represents a significantly more powerful computer system than the NDT-COMP8 microcomputer from which it was developed. The NDT-COMP9 system is contained on a 240- by 120-mm (9.5- by 4.8-in.) circuit board and will fit in a four-wide Nuclear Instrumentation Module (NIM) BIN with 26-pin edge connectors. In addition to the 8080-compatible central processing unit (CPU), an arithmetic processing unit (APU) is available to provide up to 32-bit fixed- or floating-point, basic or transcendental math functions. The 16K of read only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM), one serial input-output (I/O) port (RS-232-C at a maximum speed of 9600 baud), and 72 parallel I/O ports are available. The baud rate is under software control. A system monitor and math package are available for use with the microcomputer.

  8. Microcomputer Checks Butt-Weld Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clisham, W.; Garner, W.; Cohen, C.; Beal, J.; Polen, R.; Lloyd, J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrical gage and microcomputer eliminate time-consuming manual measurements. Alinement and angle of plates on either side of butt weld are measured and recorded automatically by hand-held gage and desk-top microcomputer. Gage/micro-computer quickly determine whether weld is within dimensional tolerances or whether reworking is needed. Microcomputer prints out measurements while operator moves gage from point to point along weld. Out-of-tolerance measurements are marked by an asterisk on printout.

  9. Hydroxo-bridged dicopper(II,III) and -(III,III) complexes: models for putative intermediates in oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvagar, Mohammad Reza; Solntsev, Pavlo V; Lim, Hyeongtaek; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Solomon, Edward I; Cramer, Christopher J; Tolman, William B

    2014-05-21

    A macrocyclic ligand (L(4-)) comprising two pyridine(dicarboxamide) donors was used to target reactive copper species relevant to proposed intermediates in catalytic hydrocarbon oxidations by particulate methane monooxygenase and heterogeneous zeolite systems. Treatment of LH4 with base and Cu(OAc)2·H2O yielded (Me4N)2[L2Cu4(μ4-O)] (1) or (Me4N)[LCu2(μ-OH)] (2), depending on conditions. Complex 2 was found to undergo two reversible 1-electron oxidations via cyclic voltammetry and low-temperature chemical reactions. On the basis of spectroscopy and theory, the oxidation products were identified as novel hydroxo-bridged mixed-valent Cu(II)Cu(III) and symmetric Cu(III)2 species, respectively, that provide the first precedence for such moieties as oxidation catalysis intermediates.

  10. Eu(III) adsorption on rutile:Batch experiments and modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Eu(III) adsorption on rutile was investigated as a function of contact time,pH,ionic strength and Eu(III) concentration by using a batch experimental method.The effects of carbonate,sulfate,and phosphate were also studied.It was found that the kinetics of Eu(III) adsorption on rutile could be described by a pseudo-second-order model.The adsorption of Eu(III) on rutile is strongly pH-dependent,but relatively insensitive to ionic strength.A double layer model (DLM) with two inner-sphere Eu(III) surface complexes was applied to quantitatively interpret the adsorption of Eu(III) on rutile.There were no apparent effects of carbonate and sulfate on Eu(III) adsorption,whereas the presence of phosphate promoted Eu(III) adsorption on rutile.The surface complexes of Eu(III) on rutile were evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  11. Modeling the Evolution of Incised Streams: III. Model Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incision and ensuing widening of alluvial stream channels is widespread in the midsouth and midwestern United States and represents an important form of channel adjustment. Two accompanying papers have presented a robust computational model for simulating the long-term evolution of incised and resto...

  12. Yunnan-III models for evolutionary population synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Li, L.; Han, Z.; Zhuang, Y.; Kang, X.

    2013-02-01

    We build the Yunnan-III evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) models by using the mesa stellar evolution code, BaSeL stellar spectra library and the initial mass functions (IMFs) of Kroupa and Salpeter, and present colours and integrated spectral energy distributions (ISEDs) of solar-metallicity stellar populations (SPs) in the range of 1 Myr to 15 Gyr. The main characteristic of the Yunnan-III EPS models is the usage of a set of self-consistent solar-metallicity stellar evolutionary tracks (the masses of stars are from 0.1 to 100 M⊙). This set of tracks is obtained by using the state-of-the-art mesa code. mesa code can evolve stellar models through thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase for low- and intermediate-mass stars. By comparisons, we confirm that the inclusion of TP-AGB stars makes the V - K, V - J and V - R colours of SPs redder and the infrared flux larger at ages log(t/yr) ≳ 7.6 [the differences reach the maximum at log(t/yr) ˜ 8.6, ˜0.5-0.2 mag for colours, approximately two times for K-band flux]. We also find that the colour-evolution trends of Model with-TPAGB at intermediate and large ages are similar to those from the starburst99 code, which employs the Padova-AGB stellar library, BaSeL spectral library and the Kroupa IMF. At last, we compare the colours with the other EPS models comprising TP-AGB stars (such as CB07, M05, V10 and POPSTAR), and find that the B - V colour agrees with each other but the V-K colour shows a larger discrepancy among these EPS models [˜1 mag when 8 ≲ log(t/yr) ≲ 9]. The stellar evolutionary tracks, isochrones, colours and ISEDs can be obtained on request from the first author or from our website (http://www1.ynao.ac.cn/~zhangfh/). Using the isochrones, you can build your EPS models. Now the format of stellar evolutionary tracks is the same as that in the starburst99 code; you can put them into the starburst99 code and get the SP's results. Moreover, the colours involving other passbands

  13. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  14. The MAPPINGS III Library of Fast Radiative Shock Models

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Mark G; Dopita, Michael A; Sutherland, Ralph S; Kewley, Lisa J

    2008-01-01

    We present a new library of fully-radiative shock models calculated with the MAPPINGS III shock and photoionization code. The library consists of grids of models with shock velocities in the range v=100-1000 km/s and magnetic parameters B/sqrt(n) of 10^-4 - 10 muG cm^(3/2) for five different atomic abundance sets, and for a pre-shock density of 1.0 cm^(-3). Additionally, Solar abundance model grids have been calculated for densities of 0.01, 0.1, 10, 100, and 1000 cm^(-3) with the same range in v and B/sqrt(n). Each model includes components of both the radiative shock and its photoionized precursor, ionized by the EUV and soft X-ray radiation generated in the radiative gas. We present the details of the ionization structure, the column densities, and the luminosities of the shock and its precursor. Emission line ratio predictions are separately given for the shock and its precursor as well as for the composite shock+precursor structure to facilitate comparison with observations in cases where the shock and i...

  15. "Hack" Is Not A Dirty Word--The Tenth Anniversary of Patron Access Microcomputer Centers in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Patrick R.

    1986-01-01

    The history of patron access microcomputers in libraries is described as carrying on a tradition that information and computer power should be shared. Questions that all types of libraries need to ask in planning microcomputer centers are considered and several model centers are described. (EM)

  16. "Hack" Is Not A Dirty Word--The Tenth Anniversary of Patron Access Microcomputer Centers in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Patrick R.

    1986-01-01

    The history of patron access microcomputers in libraries is described as carrying on a tradition that information and computer power should be shared. Questions that all types of libraries need to ask in planning microcomputer centers are considered and several model centers are described. (EM)

  17. Automating Relational Database Design for Microcomputer Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Hao-Che

    1991-01-01

    Discusses issues involved in automating the relational database design process for microcomputer users and presents a prototype of a microcomputer-based system (RA, Relation Assistant) that is based on expert systems technology and helps avoid database maintenance problems. Relational database design is explained and the importance of easy input…

  18. Microcomputer Polling Improvements for AFSATCOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    SBC 80/20 SINGLE BOARD COMPUTER 28 5.2 NATIONAL SEMICONDUCTOR BLC 416 16K PROM BOARD 32 5.3 INTEL 450 16K RAM BOARD 32 5.4 I/O AND DISPLAY CIRCUITS 32...Data Adapter (Sheet 6) 41 5-10 SBC 80/20 Single Board Computer Interfaces (Sheet 7) 42 5-11 Slot Counter/Display (Sheet 8) 43 5-12 RS-232 Serial...report describes a breadb6ard microcomputer system based on an Intel SBC 80/20 Single Board Computer (SBC) which fulfills the project demonstration

  19. Radiative Type III Seesaw Model and its collider phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    von der Pahlen, Federico; Restrepo, Diego; Zapata, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the present bounds of a scotogenic model, the Radiative Type III Seesaw (RSIII), in which an additional scalar doublet and at least two fermion triplets of $SU(2)_L$ are added to the Standard Model (SM). In the RSIII the new physics (NP) sector is odd under an exact global $Z_2$ symmetry. This symmetry guaranties that the lightest NP neutral particle is stable, providing a natural dark matter (DM) candidate, and leads to naturally suppressed neutrino masses generated by a one-loop realization of an effective Weinberg operator. We focus on the region with the highest sensitivity in present and future LHC searches, with light scalar DM and at least one NP fermion triplet at the sub-TeV scale. This region allows for significant production cross-sections of NP fermion pairs at the LHC. We reinterpret a set of searches for supersymmetric particles at the LHC obtained using the package CheckMATE, to set limits on our model as a function of the masses of the NP particles and their Yukawa interactions. The...

  20. Periodic precipitation a microcomputer analysis of transport and reaction processes in diffusion media, with software development

    CERN Document Server

    Henisch, H K

    1991-01-01

    Containing illustrations, worked examples, graphs and tables, this book deals with periodic precipitation (also known as Liesegang Ring formation) in terms of mathematical models and their logical consequences, and is entirely concerned with microcomputer analysis and software development. Three distinctive periodic precipitation mechanisms are included: binary diffusion-reaction; solubility modulation, and competitive particle growth. The book provides didactic illustrations of a valuable investigational procedure, in the form of hypothetical experimentation by microcomputer. The development

  1. Photoionization Models for the Semi-Forbidden C III] 1909 Emission in Star-Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jaskot, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The increasing neutrality of the intergalactic medium at z>6 suppresses Ly-alpha emission, and spectroscopic confirmation of galaxy redshifts requires detecting alternative UV lines. The strong [C III] 1907 + C III] 1909 doublet frequently observed in low-metallicity, actively star-forming galaxies is a promising emission feature. We present CLOUDY photoionization model predictions for C III] equivalent widths (EWs) and line ratios as a function of starburst age, metallicity, and ionization parameter. Our models include a range of C/O abundances, dust content, and gas density. We also examine the effects of varying the nebular geometry and optical depth. Only the stellar models that incorporate binary interaction effects reproduce the highest observed C III] EWs. The spectral energy distributions from the binary stellar population models also generate observable C III] over a longer timescale relative to single-star models. We show that diagnostics using C III] and nebular He II 1640 can separate star-forming...

  2. Pattern-Based Medical Diagnosis on a Microcomputer*

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Paul R.; Kurlander, David J.

    1980-01-01

    A differential diagnosis microcomputer program has been written that utilizes both pattern-recognition and logical analysis in its algorithm. Together with auxilliary routines, the program (called DX) performs medical diagnosis, stores and retrieves patient information, creates new model symptom sets using information from the patient pool, and trains its own data matrices. Designed to be user oriented, DX can communicate the reasoning behind its decisions, thereby complementing the physician...

  3. Reduction of Fe(III) colloids by Shewanella putrefaciens: A kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve; Behrends, Thilo; van Cappellen, Philippe; Hyacinthe, Christelle; Röling, Wilfred F. M.

    2006-12-01

    A kinetic model for the microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids in the presence of excess electron donor is presented. The model assumes a two-step mechanism: (1) attachment of Fe(III) colloids to the cell surface and (2) reduction of Fe(III) centers at the surface of attached colloids. The validity of the model is tested using Shewanella putrefaciens and nanohematite as model dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria and Fe(III) colloidal particles, respectively. Attachment of nanohematite to the bacteria is formally described by a Langmuir isotherm. Initial iron reduction rates are shown to correlate linearly with the relative coverage of the cell surface by nanohematite particles, hence supporting a direct electron transfer from membrane-bound reductases to mineral particles attached to the cells. Using internally consistent parameter values for the maximum attachment capacity of Fe(III) colloids to the cells, Mmax, the attachment constant, KP, and the first-order Fe(III) reduction rate constant, k, the model reproduces the initial reduction rates of a variety of fine-grained Fe(III) oxyhydroxides by S. putrefaciens. The model explains the observed dependency of the apparent Fe(III) half-saturation constant, Km∗, on the solid to cell ratio, and it predicts that initial iron reduction rates exhibit saturation with respect to both the cell density and the abundance of the Fe(III) oxyhydroxide substrate.

  4. Life sciences flight experiments microcomputer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Peter N.

    1987-01-01

    A promising microcomputer configuration for the Spacelab Life Sciences Lab. Equipment inventory consists of multiple processors. One processor's use is reserved, with additional processors dedicated to real time input and output operations. A simple form of such a configuration, with a processor board for analog to digital conversion and another processor board for digital to analog conversion, was studied. The system used digital parallel data lines between the boards, operating independently of the system bus. Good performance of individual components was demonstrated: the analog to digital converter was at over 10,000 samples per second. The combination of the data transfer between boards with the input or output functions on each board slowed performance, with a maximum throughput of 2800 to 2900 analog samples per second. Any of several techniques, such as use of the system bus for data transfer or the addition of direct memory access hardware to the processor boards, should give significantly improved performance.

  5. 275 C Downhole Microcomputer System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Hutchens; Hooi Miin Soo

    2008-08-31

    An HC11 controller IC and along with serial SRAM and ROM support ICs chip set were developed to support a data acquisition and control for extreme temperature/harsh environment conditions greater than 275 C. The 68HC11 microprocessor is widely used in well logging tools for control, data acquisition, and signal processing applications and was the logical choice for a downhole controller. This extreme temperature version of the 68HC11 enables new high temperature designs and additionally allows 68HC11-based well logging tools and MWD tools to be upgraded for high temperature operation in deep gas reservoirs, The microcomputer chip consists of the microprocessor ALU, a small boot ROM, 4 kbyte data RAM, counter/timer unit, serial peripheral interface (SPI), asynchronous serial interface (SCI), and the A, B, C, and D parallel ports. The chip is code compatible with the single chip mode commercial 68HC11 except for the absence of the analog to digital converter system. To avoid mask programmed internal ROM, a boot program is used to load the microcomputer program from an external mask SPI ROM. A SPI RAM IC completes the chip set and allows data RAM to be added in 4 kbyte increments. The HC11 controller IC chip set is implemented in the Peregrine Semiconductor 0.5 micron Silicon-on-Sapphire (SOS) process using a custom high temperature cell library developed at Oklahoma State University. Yield data is presented for all, the HC11, SPI-RAM and ROM. The lessons learned in this project were extended to the successful development of two high temperature versions of the LEON3 and a companion 8 Kbyte SRAM, a 200 C version for the Navy and a 275 C version for the gas industry.

  6. Perbedaan Perubahan Dimensi pada Gipsum Tipe III Komersial Dengan Gipsum Tipe III Daur Ulang Sebagai Bahan Model Kerja Gigitiruan

    OpenAIRE

    Hutasoit, Sri Dewi

    2014-01-01

    Gipsum dalam kedokteran gigi dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi lima tipe sesuai dengan spesifikasi ADA (American Dental Association) No. 25 yaitu tipe I Impression Plaster, tipe II Model Plaster, tipe III Dental Stone, tipe IV Die Stone: High Strength, dan tipe V Die Stone: High Strength, High Expansion.6,7 Pada dasarnya semua jenis gipsum yang digunakan memiliki senyawa dasar yang sama yaitu kalsium sulfat hemihidrat (CaSO4.½ H2O) yang membedakannya adalah metode yang dilakuka...

  7. Microcomputer Instruction for the Learning Disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Gilbert; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of using microcomputers, particularly with learning-disabled (LD) students, are pointed out; and an example of a successful program utilizing computers at the Johns Hopkins University is described. (SW)

  8. Microcomputers: "A New Era at Ramapo Catskill."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Alfred L.

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of the use of microcomputers in a cooperative public library system notes library management applications in areas of clerical work, word processing, book ordering, inventories, special collection catalogs, mailing lists, and a union list of serials. (EJS)

  9. Simulation of Single Chip Microcomputer Efficient Scheduling Model Based on Partition Thinking Classification%基于分区思维分类下的单片机节能调度模型仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宏骞

    2015-01-01

    In order to lower the total energy consumption of single chip microcomputer system scheduling and put forward a partition thinking under the classification fusion energy-saving scheduling method of traveling salesman algorithm and genetic algorithm. Analyzes the single chip microcomputer scheduling three key part of the total energy consumption, process switching transition energy consumption, adjust the energy consumption of energy consumption and stable operation, mold the MCU to complete the transition process scheduling model of energy consumption, smooth process based on single mode for the node, transition mode for branch, build SCM process scheduling total energy consumption of the directed graph model, a single set of process energy consumption optimization process as a classical traveling salesman problem, through improved step by step a multi-objective genetic algorithm (ga) and traveling salesman algorithm path optimization principle, query the best processing parameters under different SCM process scheduling and the best production order of multiple processes, which lower the total energy consumption in the SCM process scheduling. Experimental results indicate that the proposed model can improve the efficiency of single chip microcomputer process scheduling, reduce energy consumption of scheduling.%为了降低单片机系统调度过程的总能耗,提出一种分区思维分类下融合旅行商算法以及遗传算法的节能调度方法。基于分区思维分类方法,将单片机进程调度总能耗,划分成进程切换能耗、进程过渡调整能耗以及进程稳定调度能耗,将单片机进程节能调度问题,转化成单片机多进程调度的能耗优化问题,将单进程调度平稳模态作为节点、进程调度过渡模态作为支路,构建单片机进程调度总能耗的有向图模型,将单片机进程能耗优化过程看成旅行商问题,通过遗传算法的多目标逐层改进以及旅行商算法

  10. National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume III of III: software description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This volume contains a description of the software comprising the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the third of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC-01-79EI-10579. The three volumes are entitled: model overview and description, user's guide, and software guide.

  11. Correleation of the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Models in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Davis, Warren T.; Liles, Kaitlin, A. K.; McLeod, Shawn C.

    2017-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III was launched on February 19, 2017 and mounted to the International Space Station (ISS) to begin its three-year mission. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Correlation of the thermal model is important since the payload will be expected to survive a three-year mission on ISS under varying thermal environments. Three major thermal vacuum (TVAC) tests were completed during the development of the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP); two subsystem-level tests and a payload-level test. Additionally, a characterization TVAC test was performed in order to verify performance of a system of heater plates that was designed to allow the IP to achieve the required temperatures during payload-level testing; model correlation was performed for this test configuration as well as those including the SAGE III flight hardware. This document presents the methods that were used to correlate the SAGE III models to TVAC at the subsystem and IP level, including the approach for modeling the parts of the payload in the thermal chamber, generating pre-test predictions, and making adjustments to the model to align predictions with temperatures observed during testing. Model correlation quality will be presented and discussed, and lessons learned during the correlation process will be shared.

  12. Wind waves modelling on the water body with coupled WRF and WAVEWATCH III models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Baydakov, Georgy; Vdovin, Maxim; Papko, Vladislav; Sergeev, Daniil

    2015-04-01

    Simulation of ocean and sea waves is an accepted instrument for the improvement of the weather forecasts. Wave modelling, coupled models modelling is applied to open seas [1] and is less developed for moderate and small inland water reservoirs and lakes, though being of considerable interest for inland navigation. Our goal is to tune the WAVEWATCH III model to the conditions of the inland reservoir and to carry out the simulations of surface wind waves with coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) and WAVEWATCH III models. Gorky Reservoir, an artificial lake in the central part of the Volga River formed by a hydroelectric dam, was considered as an example of inland reservoir. Comparing to [2] where moderate constant winds (u10 is up to 9 m/s) of different directions blowing steadily all over the surface of the reservoir were considered, here we apply atmospheric model WRF to get wind input to WAVEWATCH III. WRF computations were held on the Yellowstone supercomputer for 4 nested domains with minimum scale of 1 km. WAVEWATCH III model was tuned for the conditions of the Gorky Reservoir. Satellite topographic data on altitudes ranged from 56,6° N to 57,5° N and from 42.9° E to 43.5° E with increments 0,00833 ° in both directions was used. 31 frequencies ranged from 0,2 Hz to 4 Hz and 30 directions were considered. The minimal significant wave height was changed to the lower one. The waves in the model were developing from some initial seeding spectral distribution (Gaussian in frequency and space, cosine in direction). The range of the observed significant wave height in the numerical experiment was from less than 1 cm up to 30 cm. The field experiments were carried out in the south part of the Gorky reservoir from the boat [2, 3]. 1-D spectra of the field experiment were compared with those obtained in the numerical experiments with different parameterizations of flux provided in WAVEWATCH III both with constant wind input and WRF wind input. For all the

  13. Modeling rare earth complexes: Sparkle/AM1 parameters for thulium (III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2005-08-01

    The Sparkle/AM1 model, recently defined for Eu(III), Gd(III) and Tb(III) [R.O. Freire, G.B. Rocha, A.M., Simas, Inorg. Chem. 44 (2005) 3299], is extended to Tm(III). A set of 15 structures of high crystallographic quality from the Cambridge Crystallographic Database, with ligands chosen to be representative of all complexes with nitrogen or oxygen directly bonded to the Tm(III) ion, was used as a training set. For the 15 complexes, the Sparkle/AM1 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the Tm(III) ion and the oxygen or nitrogen ligand atoms of the first sphere of coordination, is 0.07 Å, a level of accuracy useful for luminescent complex design.

  14. Theoretical models of ferromagnetic III-V semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Jungwirth, T.; Sinova, Jairo; Kučera, J.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Recent materials research has advanced the maximum ferromagnetic transition temperature in semiconductors containing magnetic elements toward room temperature. Reaching this goal would make information technology applications of these materials likely. In this article we briefly review the status of work over the past five years which has attempted to achieve a theoretical understanding of these complex magnetic systems. The basic microscopic origins of ferromagnetism in the (III,Mn)V compoun...

  15. ABEL model: Evaluates claims of inability to afford penalities and compliance costs (version 2.8) (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    The easy-to-use ABEL software evaluates for-profit company claims of inability to afford penalties, clean-up costs, or compliance costs. Violators raise the issue of inability to pay in most of EPA`s enforcement actions regardless of whether there is any hard evidence supporting those claims. The program enables Federal, State and local enforcement professionals to quickly determine if there was any validity to those claims. ABEL is a tool that promotes quick settlements by performing screening analyses of defendants and potentially responsible parties (PRP`s) to determine their financial capacity. If ABEL indicates the firm can afford the full penalty, compliance or clean-up costs, then EPA makes no adjustments for inability to pay. If it indicates that the firm cannot afford the full amount, it directs the enforcement personnel to review other financial reports before making any adjustments. After analyzing some basic financial ratios that reflect a company`s solvency, ABEL assesses the firm`s ability to pay by focusing on projected cash flows. The model explicitly calculates the value of projected, internally generated cash flows from historical tax information, and compares these cash flows to the proposed environmental expenditure(s). The software is extremely easy to use. Users are taken through a series of prompts to enter specified data. On screen `help` information is available at any time.

  16. [General-purpose microcomputer for medical laboratory instruments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vil'ner, G A; Dudareva, I E; Kurochkin, V E; Opalev, A A; Polek, A M

    1984-01-01

    Presented in the paper is the microcomputer based on the KP580 microprocessor set. Debugging of the hardware and the software by using the unique debugging stand developed on the basis of microcomputer "Electronica-60" is discussed.

  17. Revision of the high energy hadronic interaction models PHOJET/DPMJET-III

    CERN Document Server

    Fedynitch, A

    2015-01-01

    The high-energy hadronic interaction model DPMJET-III is responsible for simulating nuclear interactions in the particle simulation package FLUKA. On the level of individual nucleon interactions it employs PHOJET, which provides sophisticated forward physics and diffraction models. This paper summarizes some of the recent developments, in particular regarding minimum-bias physics at the LHC, which apply to DPMJET-III and PHOJET at the same time.

  18. The Surge of Micro-computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Written By Ichiko; Matsumura, Translated By Tamiko

    Libraries in the United States are now experiencing another phase of rapid change brought by the sudden invasion of micro-computers. Their versatility has made available not only capabilities for word processing and producing spread sheets but also introduced new approaches to large research libraries’ information networks. OCLC’s microenhancers are one example of what is now available. They can be used for retrospective conversion, provide instruction for the use of and function as front end terminals for large online catalogs. Various new ideas for the application of micro-computers will bring interesting developments in library automation.

  19. Finite element modeling and experimental studies on mixed mode-I/III fracture specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bozkurt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, finite element modeling and experimental studies on a mode-I/III specimen similar to the compact tension specimen are presented. By using bolts, the specimen is attached to two loading apparatus that allow different levels of mode-I/III loading by changing the loading holes. Specimens having two different thicknesses are analyzed and tested. Modeling, meshing and the solution of the problem involving the whole assembly, i.e., loading devices, bolts and the specimen, with contact mechanics are performed using ANSYSTM. Then, the mode-I/III specimen is analyzed separately using a submodeling approach, in which threedimensional enriched finite elements are used in FRAC3D solver to calculate the resulting stress intensity factors along the crack front. In all of the analyses, it is clearly shown that although the loading is in the mode-I and III directions, mode-II stress intensity factors coupled with mode-III are also generated due to rotational relative deformations of crack surfaces. The results show that the mode-II stress intensity factors change sign along the crack front and their magnitudes are close to the mode-III stress intensity factors. It is also seen that magnitudes of the mode-III stress intensity factors do not vary much along the crack front. Fracture experiments also performed and, using the stress intensity factors from the analyses and crack paths and surfaces are shown.

  20. Molecular modelling of a chemodosimeter for the selective detection of As(III) ion in water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sairam S Mallajosyula; Usha H; Ayan Datta; Swapan K Pati

    2008-11-01

    We have modelled for the first time a chemodosimeter for As(III) detection in water. The chemodosimeter modelled is a 1,3-dithiole-2-thione derivative with an anthracene unit which has been previously described as a chemodosimeter for Hg(II) detection. Quantum chemical calculations at the DFT level have been used to describe the binding energies and selectivity of the chemodosimeter. We find that the dosimeter action is intrinsically dependent on the thiophillic affinity and the coordination sphere of the metal ion. Binding studies for a series of metal ions: Pb(II), Cd(II), Hg(II), Ni(II) and As(III) followed by an analysis of the complete reaction pathway explains the high selectivity of the dosimeter towards As(III). The dosimeter efficiency is calculated as 66% for As(III)-ion.

  1. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Teacher. Edition III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful educator evaluation and support system will help improve teaching and learning. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Teacher Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all teachers improve. Through the Model, the goal is to help create a…

  2. Micro-Computers in Biology Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Carolyn; Barrett, Kathy

    1981-01-01

    Describes the modification of computer programs (BISON and POLLUT) to accommodate species and areas indigenous to the Pacific Coast area. Suggests that these programs, suitable for PET microcomputers, may foster a long-term, ongoing, inquiry-directed approach in biology. (DS)

  3. Microcomputers in Education: Why Is Earlier Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffaro, Harriet K.

    1984-01-01

    Microcomputers are not necessarily a desirable teaching/learning tool for young children. Learning styles of the preschool child are not often compatible with computer assisted instruction techniques. An examination of the types of available programing activities and software is presented. (DF)

  4. Microcomputer Courseware: Characteristics and Design Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialo, Ellen R.; Erickson, Lisa B.

    A total of 163 microcomputer programs evaluated by the Educational Products Information Exchange (EPIE) Institute through December 1983 were examined in order to identify strengths and weaknesses in instructional and technical design. Programs were evaluated in a variety of areas including the arts, business education, computer languages, computer…

  5. A microcomputer spreadsheet for aminoglycoside kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiacz, B J

    1990-05-01

    Development of an aminoglycoside monitoring program need not entail large capital expenditures for pharmacokinetic software. Microsoft's Excel spreadsheet was used to develop a single compartment, first-order kinetics template for individualized aminoglycoside dosing. The formulas employed may be adapted to virtually any other microcomputer spreadsheet package to provide accurate professional results.

  6. Microcomputer Peripheral Service Technician. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. O., III; Fulkerson, Dan, Ed.

    This manual is the third of a three-text microcomputer service and repair series. This text is designed to assist instructors in teaching service and repair procedures for floppy disk drives, printers, and monitors. The manual contains five units. Each instructional unit includes some or all of these basic components: performance objectives,…

  7. Application of a microcomputer-based system to control and monitor bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, J A; Luli, G W; Dekleva, M L; Strohl, W R

    1984-02-01

    A modular microcomputer-based system was developed to control and monitor various modes of bacterial growth. The control system was composed of an Apple II Plus microcomputer with 64-kilobyte random-access memory; a Cyborg ISAAC model 91A multichannel analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converter; paired MRR-1 pH, pO(2), and foam control units; and in-house-designed relay, servo control, and turbidimetry systems. To demonstrate the flexibility of the system, we grew bacteria under various computer-controlled and monitored modes of growth, including batch, turbidostat, and chemostat systems. The Apple-ISAAC system was programmed in Labsoft BASIC (extended Applesoft) with an average control program using ca. 6 to 8 kilobytes of memory and up to 30 kilobytes for datum arrays. This modular microcomputer-based control system was easily coupled to laboratory scale fermentors for a variety of fermentations.

  8. Tetranuclear {Co(II)2Co(III)2}, Octanuclear {Co(II)4Co(III)4}, and Hexanuclear {Co(III)3Dy(III)3} Pivalate Clusters: Synthesis, Magnetic Characterization, and Theoretical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Ioana; Kravtsov, Victor Ch; Ostrovsky, Serghei M; Reu, Oleg S; Krämer, Karl; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia; Klokishner, Sophia I; Baca, Svetlana G

    2017-03-06

    New tetranuclear and octanuclear mixed-valent cobalt(II/III) pivalate clusters, namely, [NaCo4(O2CCMe3)6(HO2CCMe3)2(teaH)2(N3)]·2H2O (in two polymorphic modifications, 1 and 1a) and [Co8(O2CCMe3)10(teaH)4(N3)](Me3CCO2)·MeCN·H2O (2) have been synthesized by ultrasonic treatment of a dinuclear cobalt(II) pivalate precursor with sodium azide and triethanolamine (teaH3) ligand in acetonitrile. The use of Dy(NO3)3·6H2O in a similar reaction led to the precipitation of a tetranuclear [NaCo4(O2CCMe3)4(teaH)2(N3)(NO3)2(H2O)2]·H2O (3) cluster and a heterometallic hexanuclear [Co3Dy3(OH)4(O2CCMe3)6(teaH)3(H2O)3](NO3)2·H2O (4) cluster. Single-crystal X-ray analysis showed that 1 (1a) and 3 consist of a tetranuclear pivalate/teaH3 mixed-ligand cluster [Co(II)2Co(III)2(O2CCMe3)4(teaH)2(N3)](+) decorated with sodium pivalates [Na(O2CCMe3)2(HO2CCMe3)2](-) (1 or 1a) or sodium nitrates [Na(NO3)2](-) (3) to form a square-pyramidal assembly. In 2, the cationic [Co8(O2CCMe3)10(teaH)4(N3)](+) cluster comprises a mixed-valent {Co(II)4Co(III)4} core encapsulated by an azide, 4 teaH(2-) alcoholamine ligands, and 10 bridging pivalates. Remarkably, in this core, the μ4-N3(-) ligand joins all four Co(II) atoms. The heterometallic hexanuclear compound 4 consists of a cationic [Co(III)3Dy(III)3(OH)4(O2CCMe3)6(teaH)3(H2O)3](2+) cluster, two NO3(-) anions, and a crystallization water molecule. The arrangement of metal atoms in 4 can be approximated as the assembly of a smaller equilateral triangle defined by three Dy sites with a Dy···Dy distance of 3.9 Å and a larger triangle formed by Co sites [Co···Co, 6.1-6.2 Å]. The interpretation of the magnetic properties of clusters 2-4 was performed in the framework of theoretical models, taking into account the structural peculiarities of clusters and their energy spectra. The behavior of clusters 2 and 3 containing Co(II) ions with orbitally nondegenerate ground states is determined by the zero-field splitting of these states and

  9. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Building Administrator. Edition III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful educator evaluation and support system will help improve teaching, learning, and school leadership. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Building Administrator Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all building administrators improve.…

  10. Modeling of III-nitride light-emitting diodes: progress, problems, and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Sergey Yu.

    2011-02-01

    Recent progress in III-nitride LED modeling is reviewed with the focus on physical models that provide a better understanding of such hot issues, as factors limiting the internal quantum efficiency of light emission and high-current efficiency droop, polarization doping in graded-composition III-nitride alloys and its utilization in LEDs, current crowding in LED dice and its impact on the light extraction efficiency, and optimal light conversion in white LED lamps. Specific features of III-nitride materials, their impact on the LED operation, and models accounting for these features are considered. Insufficient understanding of transport mechanisms of non-equilibrium electrons and holes and their localization in InGaN inhomogeneous active regions are discussed along with other still unsolved problems. Influence of technological factors on LED heterostructures and their operation is argued in the context of further model developments.

  11. Differential geometry based solvation model. III. Quantum formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-11-21

    Solvation is of fundamental importance to biomolecular systems. Implicit solvent models, particularly those based on the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for electrostatic analysis, are established approaches for solvation analysis. However, ad hoc solvent-solute interfaces are commonly used in the implicit solvent theory. Recently, we have introduced differential geometry based solvation models which allow the solvent-solute interface to be determined by the variation of a total free energy functional. Atomic fixed partial charges (point charges) are used in our earlier models, which depends on existing molecular mechanical force field software packages for partial charge assignments. As most force field models are parameterized for a certain class of molecules or materials, the use of partial charges limits the accuracy and applicability of our earlier models. Moreover, fixed partial charges do not account for the charge rearrangement during the solvation process. The present work proposes a differential geometry based multiscale solvation model which makes use of the electron density computed directly from the quantum mechanical principle. To this end, we construct a new multiscale total energy functional which consists of not only polar and nonpolar solvation contributions, but also the electronic kinetic and potential energies. By using the Euler-Lagrange variation, we derive a system of three coupled governing equations, i.e., the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrostatic potential, the generalized Laplace-Beltrami equation for the solvent-solute boundary, and the Kohn-Sham equations for the electronic structure. We develop an iterative procedure to solve three coupled equations and to minimize the solvation free energy. The present multiscale model is numerically validated for its stability, consistency and accuracy, and is applied to a few sets of molecules, including a case which is difficult for existing solvation models. Comparison is made

  12. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, M.U.; Hobbs, M.L.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

    1993-08-01

    A generalized one-dimensional, heterogeneous, steady-state, fixed-bed model for coal gasification and combustion is presented. The model, FBED-1, is a design and analysis tool that can be used to simulate a variety of gasification, devolatilization, and combustion processes. The model considers separate gas and solid temperatures, axially variable solid and gas flow rates, variable bed void fraction, coal drying, devolatilization based on chemical functional group composition, depolymerization, vaporization and crosslinking, oxidation, and gasification of char, and partial equilibrium in the gas phase.

  13. Scale invariant cosmology III: dynamical models and comparisons with observations

    CERN Document Server

    Maeder, Andre

    2016-01-01

    We examine the properties of the scale invariant cosmological models, also making the specific hypothesis of the scale invariance of the empty space at large scales. Numerical integrations of the cosmological equations for different values of the curvature parameter k and of the density parameter Omega_m are performed. We compare the dynamical properties of the models to the observations at different epochs. The main numerical data and graphical representations are given for models computed with different curvatures and density parameters. The models with non-zero density start explosively with first a braking phase followed by a continuously accelerating expansion. The comparison of the models with the recent observations from supernovae SN Ia, BAO and CMB data from Planck 2015 shows that the scale invariant model with k=0 and Omega_m=0.30 very well fits the observations in the usual Omega_m vs. Omega_Lambda plane and consistently accounts for the accelerating expansion or dark energy. The expansion history ...

  14. The joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure: development and cross-validation of a six-factor model of cognitive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Price, Larry R

    2003-06-01

    During the standardization of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (3rd ed.; WAIS-III) and the Wechsler Memory Scale (3rd ed.; WMS-III) the participants in the normative study completed both scales. This "co-norming" methodology set the stage for full integration of the 2 tests and the development of an expanded structure of cognitive functioning. Until now, however, the WAIS-III and WMS-III had not been examined together in a factor analytic study. This article presents a series of confirmatory factor analyses to determine the joint WAIS-III and WMS-III factor structure. Using a structural equation modeling approach, a 6-factor model that included verbal, perceptual, processing speed, working memory, auditory memory, and visual memory constructs provided the best model fit to the data. Allowing select subtests to load simultaneously on 2 factors improved model fit and indicated that some subtests are multifaceted. The results were then replicated in a large cross-validation sample (N = 858).

  15. The Instanton-Dyon Liquid Model III: Finite Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    We discuss an extension of the instanton-dyon liquid model that includes light quarks at finite chemical potential in the center symmetric phase. We develop the model in details for the case of SU_c(2)\\times SU_f(2) by mapping the theory on a 3-dimensional quantum effective theory. We analyze the different phases in the mean-field approximation. We extend this analysis to the general case of SU_c(N_c)\\times SU_f(N_f) and note that the chiral and diquark pairings are always comparable.

  16. Perbedaan Kekuatan Kompresi Gips Tipe III Pabrikan dan Daur Ulang untuk Pembuatan Model Kerja

    OpenAIRE

    Wijaya, Cindy Denhara

    2015-01-01

    Gipsum (kalsium sulfat dihidrat) merupakan material yang sering digunakan sebagai model studi maupun model kerja dalam kedokteran gigi. Tipe gips yang sering digunakan sebagai model kerja ialah gips tipe III menurut spesifikasi American Dental Association (ADA). Reaksi pengerasan gipsum merupakan reaksi reversibel sehingga kalsium sulfat dihidrat dapat diubah kembali menjadi kalsium sulfat hemihidrat. Hal ini yang mendasari pemikiran untuk mendaur ulang limbah model kerja ya...

  17. Model validation studies of solar systems, Phase III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, L.J.; Winn, C.B.

    1978-12-01

    Results obtained from a validation study of the TRNSYS, SIMSHAC, and SOLCOST solar system simulation and design are presented. Also included are comparisons between the FCHART and SOLCOST solar system design programs and some changes that were made to the SOLCOST program. Finally, results obtained from the analysis of several solar radiation models are presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for ten papers.

  18. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  19. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  20. Enlist micros: Training science teachers to use microcomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William E.; Ellis, James D.; Kuerbis, Paul J.

    A National Science Foundation grant to the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) at The Colorado College supported the design and production of training materials to encourage literacy of science teachers in the use of microcomputers. ENLIST Micros is based on results of a national needs assessment that identified 22 compentencies needed by K-12 science teachers to use microcomputers for instruction. A writing team developed the 16-hour training program in the summer of 1985, and field-test coordinators tested it with 18 preservice or in-service groups during the 1985-86 academic year at 15 sites within the United States. The training materials consist of video programs, interactive computer disks for the Apple II series microcomputer, a training manual for participants, and a guide for the group leader. The experimental materials address major areas of educational computing: awareness, applications, implementation, evaluation, and resources. Each chapter contains activities developed for this program, such as viewing video segments of science teachers who are using computers effectively and running commercial science and training courseware. Role playing and small-group interaction help the teachers overcome their reluctance to use computers and plan for effective implementation of microcomputers in the school. This study examines the implementation of educational computing among 47 science teachers who completed the ENLIST Micros training at a southern university. We present results of formative evaluation for that site. Results indicate that both elementary and secondary teachers benefit from the training program and demonstrate gains in attitudes toward computer use. Participating teachers said that the program met its stated objectives and helped them obtain needed skills. Only 33 percent of these teachers, however, reported using computers one year after the training. In June 1986, the BSCS initiated a follow up to the ENLIST Micros curriculum to

  1. Neurologic abnormalities in mouse models of the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and mucolipidosis III γ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel A Idol

    Full Text Available UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase is an α2β2γ2 hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of the mannose 6-phosphate targeting signal on lysosomal hydrolases. Mutations in the α/β subunit precursor gene cause the severe lysosomal storage disorder mucolipidosis II (ML II or the more moderate mucolipidosis III alpha/beta (ML III α/β, while mutations in the γ subunit gene cause the mildest disorder, mucolipidosis III gamma (ML III γ. Here we report neurologic consequences of mouse models of ML II and ML III γ. The ML II mice have a total loss of acid hydrolase phosphorylation, which results in depletion of acid hydrolases in mesenchymal-derived cells. The ML III γ mice retain partial phosphorylation. However, in both cases, total brain extracts have normal or near normal activity of many acid hydrolases reflecting mannose 6-phosphate-independent lysosomal targeting pathways. While behavioral deficits occur in both models, the onset of these changes occurs sooner and the severity is greater in the ML II mice. The ML II mice undergo progressive neurodegeneration with neuronal loss, astrocytosis, microgliosis and Purkinje cell depletion which was evident at 4 months whereas ML III γ mice have only mild to moderate astrocytosis and microgliosis at 12 months. Both models accumulate the ganglioside GM2, but only ML II mice accumulate fucosylated glycans. We conclude that in spite of active mannose 6-phosphate-independent targeting pathways in the brain, there are cell types that require at least partial phosphorylation function to avoid lysosomal dysfunction and the associated neurodegeneration and behavioral impairments.

  2. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture -- part III: model verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Based on conventional mass transfer models developed for oxygen, the use of the non-linear ASCE method, 2-point method, and one parameter linear-regression method were evaluated for carbon dioxide stripping data. For values of KLaCO2 < approximately 1.5/h, the 2-point or ASCE method are a good fit to experimental data, but the fit breaks down at higher values of KLaCO2. How to correct KLaCO2 for gas phase enrichment remains to be determined. The one-parameter linear regression model was used to vary the C*CO2 over the test, but it did not result in a better fit to the experimental data when compared to the ASCE or fixed C*CO2 assumptions.

  3. Asymmetric Gepner Models III. B-L Lifting

    CERN Document Server

    Gato-Rivera, B

    2010-01-01

    In the same spirit as heterotic weight lifting, B-L lifting is a way of replacing the superfluous and ubiquitous U(1)_{B-L} with something else with the same modular properties, but different conformal weights and ground state dimensions. This method works in principle for all variants of (2,2) constructions, such as orbifolds, Calabi-Yau manifolds, free bosons and fermions and Gepner models, since it only modifies the universal SO(10) x E_8 part of the CFT. However, it can only yield chiral spectra if the ``internal" sector of the theory provides a simple current of order 5. Here we apply this new method to Gepner models. Including exceptional invariants, 86 of them have the required order 5 simple current, and 69 of these yield chiral spectra. Three family spectra occur abundantly.

  4. Asymmetric Gepner models III. B-L lifting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N., E-mail: t58@nikhef.n [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-06-21

    In the same spirit as heterotic weight lifting, B-L lifting is a way of replacing the superfluous and ubiquitous U(1){sub B-L} with something else with the same modular properties, but different conformal weights and ground state dimensions. This method works in principle for all variants of (2,2) constructions, such as orbifolds, Calabi-Yau manifolds, free bosons and fermions and Gepner models, since it only modifies the universal SO(10)xE{sub 8} part of the CFT. However, it can only yield chiral spectra if the 'internal' sector of the theory provides a simple current of order 5. Here we apply this new method to Gepner models. Including exceptional invariants, 86 of them have the required order 5 simple current, and 69 of these yield chiral spectra. Three family spectra occur abundantly.

  5. Modeling of the adsorptive removal of arsenic(III) using plant biomass: a bioremedial approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Palas; Dey, Uttiya; Chattoraj, Soumya; Mukhopadhyay, Debasis; Mondal, Naba Kumar

    2017-06-01

    In the present work, the possibility of using a non-conventional finely ground (250 μm) Azadirachta indica (neem) bark powder [AiBP] has been tested as a low-cost biosorbent for the removal of arsenic(III) from water. The removal of As(III) was studied by performing a series of biosorption experiments (batch and column). The biosorption behavior of As(III) for batch and column operations were examined in the concentration ranges of 50-500 µg L-1 and 500.0-2000.0 µg L-1, respectively. Under optimized batch conditions, the AiBP could remove up to 89.96 % of As(III) in water system. The artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed from batch experimental data sets which provided reasonable predictive performance ( R 2 = 0.961; 0.954) of As(III) biosorption. In batch operation, the initial As(III) concentration had the most significant impact on the biosorption process. For column operation, central composite design (CCD) was applied to investigate the influence on the breakthrough time for optimization of As(III) biosorption process and evaluation of interacting effects of different operating variables. The optimized result of CCD revealed that the AiBP was an effective and economically feasible biosorbent with maximum breakthrough time of 653.9 min, when the independent variables were retained at 2.0 g AiBP dose, 2000.0 µg L-1 initial As(III) concentrations, and 3.0 mL min-1 flow rate, at maximum desirability value of 0.969.

  6. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhoferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Titaud, O. [Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807 CNRS-UChile, Blanco Encalada 2120 - 7 Piso, Casilla 170 - Correo 3, Santiago (Chile)

    2008-01-15

    We apply the semi-gray model of our previous paper to the particular case of the Earth's atmosphere, in order to illustrate quantitatively the inverse problem associated with the direct problem we dealt with before. From given climatological values of the atmosphere's spherical albedo and transmittance for visible radiation, the single-scattering albedo and the optical thickness in the visible are inferred, while the infrared optical thickness is deduced for given global average surface temperature. Eventually, temperature distributions in terms of the infrared optical depth will be shown for a terrestrial atmosphere assumed to be semi-gray and, locally, in radiative and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  7. Modeling rare earth complexes: Sparkle/PM3 parameters for thulium(III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2006-07-01

    The Sparkle model, recently defined for Tm(III) within AM1 [R.O. Freire, G.B. Rocha, A.M. Simas, Chem. Phys. Lett. 411 (2005) 61], is now extended to PM3. For the same 15 complexes previously used, the Sparkle/PM3 unsigned mean error, for all interatomic distances between the Tm(III) ion and the directly coordinating oxygen or nitrogen atoms, is 0.08 Å, a level of accuracy equivalent to the Sparkle/AM1 figure of 0.07 Å, as well as to results from present day ab initio effective core potential calculations. The results thus indicate that both Sparkle/AM1 and Sparkle/PM3 models may prove useful for luminescent Tm(III) complex design.

  8. Local models of stellar convection III: The Strouhal number

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Ossendrijver, M; Tuominen, I

    2004-01-01

    (Abbreviated) We determine the Strouhal number (St), a nondimensional measure of the correlation time, from numerical models of convection. The Strouhal number arises in the mean-field theories of angular momentum transport and dynamos, where its value determines the validity of certain widely used approximations, such as the first order smoothing (FOSA). More specifically, the relevant transport coefficients can be calculated by means of a cumulative series expansion if St < 1 (e.g. Knobloch 1978). We use two independent methods to estimate St. Firstly, we apply the minimal tau-approximation (MTA) in the equation of the time derivative of the Reynolds stress. In this approach the time derivative is essentially replaced by a term containing a relaxation time which can be interpreted as the correlation time of the turbulence. In this approach, the turnover time is estimated simply from the energy carrying scale of the convection and a typical velocity. In the second approach, we determine the correlation an...

  9. Microcomputer for controlled substance record keeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, R L; Motta, L J; Yee, A D

    1984-01-01

    The use of a microcomputer to maintain controlled substance inventory and record keeping is described. The system maintains perpetual inventories of the central narcotic vault and proof-of-use controlled drug records outstanding at nursing stations. The computerized system has eliminated (1) the delay previously encountered in the posting of transactions from the numeric log to perpetual inventory logs and (2) the potential addition and subtraction errors inherent in a manual system. Computerizing the controlled drug record-keeping system has saved approximately 166 minutes of labor per day, a cost savings of approximately $26. The new system also helps prevent diversion of controlled substances. The computer may also be used for other tasks while not running the controlled substance program. A microcomputer is well suited to the task of controlled-substance record-keeping functions, and the cost of the system (less than $4000) can be quickly recouped in labor savings.

  10. Three-dimensional analysis of the pulp cavity on surface models of molar teeth, using X-ray micro-computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvart, Merete; Bjørndal, Lars; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2012-01-01

    . In summary, three-dimensional surface models were made with a high precision; an increased accumulation of mineral deposits was noted in molars with small pulp chambers and combined with the consistent pattern of intra-radicular connections, the potential endodontic treatment complexity is underlined...

  11. Complexation and molecular modeling studies of europium(III)-gallic acid-amino acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mohamed; Khan, Imran; Coutinho, João A P

    2016-04-01

    With many metal-based drugs extensively used today in the treatment of cancer, attention has focused on the development of new coordination compounds with antitumor activity with europium(III) complexes recently introduced as novel anticancer drugs. The aim of this work is to design new Eu(III) complexes with gallic acid, an antioxida'nt phenolic compound. Gallic acid was chosen because it shows anticancer activity without harming health cells. As antioxidant, it helps to protect human cells against oxidative damage that implicated in DNA damage, cancer, and accelerated cell aging. In this work, the formation of binary and ternary complexes of Eu(III) with gallic acid, primary ligand, and amino acids alanine, leucine, isoleucine, and tryptophan was studied by glass electrode potentiometry in aqueous solution containing 0.1M NaNO3 at (298.2 ± 0.1) K. Their overall stability constants were evaluated and the concentration distributions of the complex species in solution were calculated. The protonation constants of gallic acid and amino acids were also determined at our experimental conditions and compared with those predicted by using conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation (COSMO-RS) model. The geometries of Eu(III)-gallic acid complexes were characterized by the density functional theory (DFT). The spectroscopic UV-visible and photoluminescence measurements are carried out to confirm the formation of Eu(III)-gallic acid complexes in aqueous solutions.

  12. Exchanger network synthesis on a microcomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R.; Mocsny, D.; Cosson, P.; Klei, J.

    1986-07-01

    Recent years have seen two occurrences that have the potential to benefit the process industries; the spread of low-cost microcomputers and the coming age of process synthesis, and the systematic approach to the creation of process flowsheets. In this paper the authors explore the two themes and outline the potential for the advancement of process synthesis with the microcomputer as an instrument of technology transfer. As an illustration, a microcomputer program that aids in the synthesis of heat exchanger networks is described. Heat exchanger network synthesis is the subproblem of process synthesis in which heat integration is performed on a partially completed flowsheet. When reactors, separators, etc., are specified, they have an associated set of streams with heating and cooling requirements. It is desirable to utilize the heating requirements of ''cold'' streams to supply the cooling requirements of the ''hot'' streams to the maximum extent possible. Heat exchanger network synthesis has the twofold aim of determining the limit on this process heat recovery and of specifying the network of exchangers that does it at the minimum investment cost. The technology is demonstrating its worth; there are reports of significant savings resulting from its application to industrial processes. The spread of this valuable technique is retarded somewhat by the shortage of experts to spearhead its implementation. The authors offer a program that can perform heat exchanger network synthesis, not as a replacement for a process designer, but as an aid for learning and a tool for the solution of design problems. The fact that it runs on the most widely accepted microcomputer means that it is accessible to any interested engineer.

  13. Challenge in Numerical Software for Microcomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cody, W J

    1977-09-02

    Microcomputers are now capable of serious numerical computation using programmed floating-point arithmetic and Basic compilers. Unless numerical software designers for these machines exploit experience gained in providing software for larger machines, history will repeat with the initial spread of treacherous software. This paper discusses good software, especially for the elementary functions, in terms of reliability and robustness. The emphasis. is on insight rather than detailed algorithms, to show why certain things are important and how they may be achieved.

  14. Type III Seesaw and Dark Matter in a Supersymmetric Left-Right Model

    CERN Document Server

    Borah, Debasish

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new supersymmetric left right model with Higgs doublets carrying odd B-L charge, higgs bidoublet and heavy Higgs triplets with zero B-L charge and a set of sterile neutrinos which are singlet under the gauge group. We show that spontaneous parity violation can be achieved naturally in this model and the neutrino masses arise from the so called type III seesaw mechanism. We also discuss the possible phenomenology in the context of neutrino masses and dark matter.

  15. Global Analysis of a Delayed Impulsive Lotka-Volterra Model with Holling III Type Functional Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A delayed impulsive Lotka-Volterra model with Holing III type functional response was established. With the help of Mawhin’s Continuation Theorem in coincidence degree theory, a sufficient condition is found for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the system under consideration. By applying the comparison theorem and constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, the permanence and global attractivity of the model are proved. Two numerical simulations are also given to illustrate our main results.

  16. Searching the charged Higgs boson of the type III two Higss doublet model

    CERN Document Server

    Cardenas, H

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the Two Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) type III appears two charged Higgs boson and recently there are experimental reports from D0 and CDF collaborations searching a particular signature of new physics. We present a review of the analisys done in the region $M_{H^+}>m_t$ by D0 collaboration and we use the ratio $R_\\sigma$ for the region $M_{H^+} < m_t$ in different scenarios of space parameter of this model.

  17. Transferable tight binding model for strained group IV and III-V heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yaohua; Povolotskyi, Micheal; Kubis, Tillmann; Boykin, Timothy; Klimeck, Gerhard

    Modern semiconductor devices have reached critical device dimensions in the range of several nanometers. For reliable prediction of device performance, it is critical to have a numerical efficient model that are transferable to material interfaces. In this work, we present an empirical tight binding (ETB) model with transferable parameters for strained IV and III-V group semiconductors. The ETB model is numerically highly efficient as it make use of an orthogonal sp3d5s* basis set with nearest neighbor inter-atomic interactions. The ETB parameters are generated from HSE06 hybrid functional calculations. Band structures of strained group IV and III-V materials by ETB model are in good agreement with corresponding HSE06 calculations. Furthermore, the ETB model is applied to strained superlattices which consist of group IV and III-V elements. The ETB model turns out to be transferable to nano-scale hetero-structure. The ETB band structures agree with the corresponding HSE06 results in the whole Brillouin zone. The ETB band gaps of superlattices with common cations or common anions have discrepancies within 0.05eV.

  18. Modeling of Threading Dislocation Density Reduction in Porous III-Nitride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemiev, Dmitry M.; Orlova, Tatiana S.; Bougrov, Vladislav E.; Odnoblyudov, Maxim A.; Romanov, Alexei E.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we report on the results of the theoretical analysis of threading dislocation (TD) density reduction in porous III-nitride layers grown in polar orientation. The reaction-kinetics model originally developed for describing TD evolution in growing bulk layers has been expanded to the case of the porous layer. The developed model takes into account TD inclinations under the influence of the pores as well as trapping TDs into the pores. It is demonstrated that both these factors increase the probability of dislocation reactions thus reducing the total density of TDs. The mean pore diameter acts as an effective interaction radius for the reactions among TDs. The model includes the main experimentally observed features of TD evolution in porous III-nitride layers.

  19. Assessing Inter-Model Continuity Between the Section II and Section III Conceptualizations of Borderline Personality Disorder in DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Chloe M; Simms, Leonard J

    2017-03-02

    DSM-5 includes 2 competing models of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in Sections II and III. Empirical comparisons between these models are required to understand and improve intermodel continuity. We compared Section III BPD traits to Section II BPD criteria assessed via semistructured interviews in 455 current/recent psychiatric patients using correlation and regression analyses, and also evaluated the incremental predictive power of other Section III traits. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that self-harm would incrementally predict BPD Criterion 5 over the Section III traits. Results supported Section III BPD traits as an adequate representation of traditional BPD symptomatology, although modifications that would increase intermodel continuity were identified. Finally, we found support for the incremental validity of suspiciousness, anhedonia, perceptual dysregulation, and self-harm, suggesting possible gaps in the Section III PD trait definitions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Applications of Local Area Networks of Microcomputers in Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levert, Virginia M.

    1985-01-01

    Important features of local area networks (LAN) are reviewed, and several microcomputer LANs are described (ARCnet, Hinet, ShareNet, Ethernet, Omninet, PLAN 4000). Results of survey of 10 libraries using or planning to use a microcomputer LAN and considerations in choosing a LAN are reported. Forty-one references are cited. (EJS)

  1. Profile of Change in Education: A High School Uses Microcomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossnickle, Donald R.; Laird, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    This report on the introduction of microcomputers into a secondary school in a Chicago suburb briefly describes the setting for change and discusses the history of computers in the school, the emergence of change agents, microcomputer hardware selection, inservice teacher training, and the current status of the project. (MER)

  2. Microcomputers: Software Evaluation. Evaluation Guides. Guide Number 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    This guide discusses three critical steps in selecting microcomputer software and hardware: setting the context, software evaluation, and managing microcomputer use. Specific topics addressed include: (1) conducting an informal task analysis to determine how the potential user's time is spent; (2) identifying tasks amenable to computerization and…

  3. Microcomputers: Communication Software. Evaluation Guides. Guide Number 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    This guide discusses four types of microcomputer-based communication programs that could prove useful to evaluators: (1) the direct communication of information generated by one computer to another computer; (2) using the microcomputer as a terminal to a mainframe computer to input, direct the analysis of, and/or output data using a statistical…

  4. Handbook and Annotated Software Bibliography. Microcomputers in ABE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Mary Patricia; Johnson, Carmen

    This handbook and annotated bibliography presents discussions, ideas, and resources useful to adult basic education (ABE) program teachers and administrators in implementing educational microcomputing, and describes microcomputer software programs that have been used successfully in ABE. The first part of the book, the handbook, is organized in…

  5. Playing the American Revolution: A Historical Microcomputer Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, James E.; Hueston, Stephen P.

    1988-01-01

    Explanation of the purpose of microcomputer simulations in history classes at the college or secondary school level focuses on the development of one simulation, The American Revolution. Highlights include effects on learning processes of using simulations in a microcomputer laboratory; student evaluations of the simulation; and creation of the…

  6. Use of Microcomputers for School Hearing Screening and Evaluation Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Coleen O'Rourke

    A pilot project evaluated the use of a microcomputer database system to maintain hearing screening, evaluation, and followup records in a school for physically, emotionally, or educationally handicapped children (6 months-18 years). Using a universal database management system for a microcomputer, a program was designed which would allow for easy…

  7. Solution chemistry of Mo(III) and Mo(IV): Thermodynamic foundation for modeling localized corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Peiming [OLI Systems Inc., 108 American Road, Morris Plains, NJ 07950 (United States); Wilson, Leslie L.; Wesolowski, David J.; Rosenqvist, Joergen [Chemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 (United States); Anderko, Andrzej [OLI Systems Inc., 108 American Road, Morris Plains, NJ 07950 (United States)], E-mail: aanderko@olisystems.com

    2010-05-15

    To investigate the behavior of molybdenum dissolution products in systems that approximate localized corrosion environments, solubility of Mo(III) in equilibrium with solid MoO{sub 2} has been determined at 80 deg. C as a function of solution acidity, chloride concentration and partial pressure of hydrogen. The measurements indicate a strong increase in solubility with acidity and chloride concentration and a weak effect of hydrogen partial pressure. The obtained results have been combined with literature data for systems containing Mo(III), Mo(IV), and Mo(VI) in solutions to develop a comprehensive thermodynamic model of aqueous molybdenum chemistry. The model is based on a previously developed framework for simulating the properties of electrolyte systems ranging from infinite dilution to solid saturation or fused salt limit. To reproduce the measurements, the model assumes the presence of a chloride complex of Mo(III) (i.e., MoCl{sup 2+}) and hydrolyzed species (MoOH{sup 2+}, Mo(OH){sub 2}{sup +}, and Mo(OH){sub 3}{sup 0}) in addition to the Mo{sup 3+} ion. The model generally reproduces the experimental data within experimental scattering and provides a tool for predicting the phase behavior and speciation in complex, concentrated aqueous solutions. Thus, it provides a foundation for simulating the behavior of molybdenum species in localized corrosion environments.

  8. A mouse model of mitochondrial complex III dysfunction induced by myxothiazol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davoudi, Mina [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Kallijärvi, Jukka; Marjavaara, Sanna [Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00014 (Finland); Kotarsky, Heike; Hansson, Eva [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Levéen, Per [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00014 (Finland); Fellman, Vineta, E-mail: Vineta.Fellman@med.lu.se [Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund 22185 (Sweden); Folkhälsan Research Center, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, 00014 (Finland); Children’s Hospital, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00029 (Finland)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Reversible chemical inhibition of complex III in wild type mouse. • Myxothiazol causes decreased complex III activity in mouse liver. • The model is useful for therapeutic trials to improve mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Myxothiazol is a respiratory chain complex III (CIII) inhibitor that binds to the ubiquinol oxidation site Qo of CIII. It blocks electron transfer from ubiquinol to cytochrome b and thus inhibits CIII activity. It has been utilized as a tool in studies of respiratory chain function in in vitro and cell culture models. We developed a mouse model of biochemically induced and reversible CIII inhibition using myxothiazol. We administered myxothiazol intraperitoneally at a dose of 0.56 mg/kg to C57Bl/J6 mice every 24 h and assessed CIII activity, histology, lipid content, supercomplex formation, and gene expression in the livers of the mice. A reversible CIII activity decrease to 50% of control value occurred at 2 h post-injection. At 74 h only minor histological changes in the liver were found, supercomplex formation was preserved and no significant changes in the expression of genes indicating hepatotoxicity or inflammation were found. Thus, myxothiazol-induced CIII inhibition can be induced in mice for four days in a row without overt hepatotoxicity or lethality. This model could be utilized in further studies of respiratory chain function and pharmacological approaches to mitochondrial hepatopathies.

  9. A Model Study of the Photochemical Fate of As(III in Paddy-Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Carena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The APEX (Aqueous Photochemistry of Environmentally-occurring Xenobiotics software previously developed by one of us was used to model the photochemistry of As(III in paddy-field water, allowing a comparison with biotic processes. The model included key paddy-water variables, such as the shielding effect of the rice canopy on incident sunlight and its monthly variations, water pH, and the photochemical parameters of the chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM occurring in paddy fields. The half-life times (t1/2 of As(III photooxidation to As(V would be ~20–30 days in May. In contrast, the photochemical oxidation of As(III would be much slower in June and July due to rice-canopy shading of radiation because of plant growth, despite higher sunlight irradiance. At pH < 8 the photooxidation of As(III would mainly be accounted for by reaction with transient species produced by irradiated CDOM (here represented by the excited triplet states 3CDOM*, neglecting the possibly more important reactions with poorly known species such as the phenoxy radicals and, to a lesser extent, with the hydroxyl radicals (HO•. However, the carbonate radicals (CO3•− could be key photooxidants at pH > 8.5 provided that the paddy-water 3CDOM* is sufficiently reactive toward the oxidation of CO32−. In particular, if paddy-water 3CDOM* oxidizes the carbonate anion with a second-order reaction rate constant near (or higher than 106 M−1·s−1, the photooxidation of As(III could be quite fast at pH > 8.5. Such pH conditions can be produced by elevated photosynthetic activity that consumes dissolved CO2.

  10. Evolution of microcomputer-based medical instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Willis J

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a historical review of the evolution of the technologies that led to modern microcomputer-based medical instrumentation. I review the history of the microprocessor-based system because of the importance of the microprocessor in the design of modern medical instruments. I then give some examples of medical instruments in which the microprocessor has played a key role and in some cases has even empowered us to develop new instruments that were not possible before. I include a discussion of the role of the microprocessor-based personal computer in development of medical instruments.

  11. A model of axial heterostructure formation in III-V semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-03-01

    A kinetic model of the formation of axial heterostructures in nanocrystalline wires (nanowires, NWs) of III-V semiconductor compounds growing according to the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism is proposed. A general system of nonstationary equations for effective fluxes of two elements of the same group (e.g., group III) is formulated that allows the composition profile of a heterostructure to be calculated as a function of the coordinate and epitaxial growth conditions, including the flux of a group V element. Characteristic times of the composition relaxation, which determine the sharpness of the heteroboundary (heterointerface), are determined in the linear approximation. A temporal interruption (arrest) of fluxes during the switching of elements for a period exceeding these relaxation times must increase sharpness of the heteroboundary. Model calculations of the composition profile in a double GaAs/InAs/GaAs axial heterostructure have been performed for various NW radii.

  12. Physics-based multiscale modeling of III-nitride light emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiangyu

    2016-01-01

    The application of computer simulations to scientific and engineering problems has evolved to an established phase over the last decades. In the field of semiconductor device physics, Technology CAD (TCAD) has been regarded as an indispensable tool for the interpretation and prediction of device behavior. More specifically, TCAD modeling and simulation of nanostructured III-nitride light emitters still have challenging problems and is currently a topic under active research. This thesis devot...

  13. Anisotropic Dark Energy Bianchi Type III Cosmological Models in Brans Dicke Theory of Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Shamir, M Farasat; 10.1139/P2012-007

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to explore the solutions of Bianchi type $III$ cosmological model in Brans Dicke theory of gravity in the background of anisotropic dark energy. We use the assumption of constant deceleration parameter and power law relation between scalar field $\\phi$ and scale factor $a$ to find the solutions. The physical behavior of the solutions has been discussed using some physical quantities.

  14. Perbedaan Kekuatan Kompresi Gipsum Tipe III Pabrikan dan Daur Ulang serta Gipsum Tipe III Daur Ulang dengan Penambahan Larutan Zink Sulfat 4% sebagai Bahan Model Kerja Gigitiruan

    OpenAIRE

    Pitri, Yulindia

    2015-01-01

    Gipsum di bidang kedokteran gigi berasal dari bahan Kalsium Sulfat Dihidrat murni kemudian mengalami kalsinasi menjadi Kalsium Sulfat Hemihidrat. Gipsum mempunyai sifat reversibel sehingga dapat dilakukan proses daur ulang. Gipsum yang sering digunakan adalah gipsum tipe III menurut spesifikasi American Dental Association (ADA) dan digunakan sebagai bahan model kerja gigitiruan. Gipsum sebagai bahan model kerja gigitiruan yang digunakan harus mempunyai kekuatan kompresi yang tinggi agar dihas...

  15. Applicability of WaveWatch-III wave model to fatigue assessment of offshore floating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tao; Kaminski, Miroslaw Lech

    2016-09-01

    In design and operation of floating offshore structures, one has to avoid fatigue failures caused by action of ocean waves. The aim of this paper is to investigate the applicability of WaveWatch-III wave model to fatigue assessment of offshore floating structures. The applicability was investigated for Bluewaters' FPSO (Floating Production, Storage and Offloading) which had been turret moored at Sable field for half a decade. The waves were predicted as sea-state time series consisting of one wind sea and one swell. The predicted waves were compared with wave data obtained from ERA-interim and buoy measurements. Furthermore, the fatigue calculations were also carried out for main deck and side shell locations. It has been concluded that predicted fatigue damages of main deck using WaveWatch-III are in a very good agreement regardless of differences in predicted wind waves and swells caused by differences in wave system partitioning. When compared to buoy measurements, the model underestimates fatigue damages of side shell by approximately 30 %. The reason for that has been found in wider directional spreading of actual waves. The WaveWatch-III wave model has been found suitable for the fatigue assessment. However, more attention should be paid on relative wave directionality, wave system partitioning and uncertainty analysis in further development.

  16. Bianchi VI{sub 0} and III models: self-similar approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinchon, Jose Antonio, E-mail: abelcal@ciccp.e [Departamento de Fisica, ETS Arquitectura, UPM, Av. Juan de Herrera 4, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2009-09-07

    We study several cosmological models with Bianchi VI{sub 0} and III symmetries under the self-similar approach. We find new solutions for the 'classical' perfect fluid model as well as for the vacuum model although they are really restrictive for the equation of state. We also study a perfect fluid model with time-varying constants, G and LAMBDA. As in other studied models we find that the behaviour of G and LAMBDA are related. If G behaves as a growing time function then LAMBDA is a positive decreasing time function but if G is decreasing then LAMBDA{sub 0} is negative. We end by studying a massive cosmic string model, putting special emphasis in calculating the numerical values of the equations of state. We show that there is no SS solution for a string model with time-varying constants.

  17. Information survey for microcomputer systems integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hake, K.A.

    1991-12-01

    One goal of the PM-AIM is to provide US Army Project Managers (PMs) and Project Executive Officers (PEOs) with a fundamental microcomputing resource to help perform acquisition information management and its concomitant reporting requirements. Providing key application software represents one means of accomplishing this goal. This workstation would furnish a broad range of capabilities needed in the PM and PEO office settings as well as software tools for specific project management and acquisition information. Although still in the conceptual phase, the practical result of this exercise in systems integration will likely be a system called the Project Manager`s Information System (PMIS) or the AIM workstation. It would include such software as, Project Manager`s System Software (PMSS), Defense Acquisition Executive Summary (DAES), and Consolidated Acquisition Reporting System (CARS) and would conform to open systems architecture as accepted by the Department of Defense. ORNL has assisted PM-AIM in the development of technology ideas for the PMIS workstation concept. This paper represents the compilation of information gained during this process. This information is presented as a body of knowledge (or knowledge domain) defining the complex technology of microcomputing. The concept of systems integration or tying together all hardware and software components reflects the nature of PM-AIM`s task in attempting to field a PMIS or AIM workstation.

  18. Information survey for microcomputer systems integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hake, K.A.

    1991-12-01

    One goal of the PM-AIM is to provide US Army Project Managers (PMs) and Project Executive Officers (PEOs) with a fundamental microcomputing resource to help perform acquisition information management and its concomitant reporting requirements. Providing key application software represents one means of accomplishing this goal. This workstation would furnish a broad range of capabilities needed in the PM and PEO office settings as well as software tools for specific project management and acquisition information. Although still in the conceptual phase, the practical result of this exercise in systems integration will likely be a system called the Project Manager's Information System (PMIS) or the AIM workstation. It would include such software as, Project Manager's System Software (PMSS), Defense Acquisition Executive Summary (DAES), and Consolidated Acquisition Reporting System (CARS) and would conform to open systems architecture as accepted by the Department of Defense. ORNL has assisted PM-AIM in the development of technology ideas for the PMIS workstation concept. This paper represents the compilation of information gained during this process. This information is presented as a body of knowledge (or knowledge domain) defining the complex technology of microcomputing. The concept of systems integration or tying together all hardware and software components reflects the nature of PM-AIM's task in attempting to field a PMIS or AIM workstation.

  19. An Analysis of the Theoretical Foundations for the Use of Microcomputers in Early Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streibel, Michael J.

    This discussion first analyzes major claims of a cognitive-developmentalist perspective on the use of microcomputers in early childhood education. Five topics are specifically addressed: microcomputers and intellectual structures, microcomputers as cultural events, microcomputers and strategy repetoires, instruction and the self-construction of…

  20. Development of a Microcomputer-Based Adaptive Testing System. Phase I. Specification of Requirements and Preliminary Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-30

    number within the area. Previous banking systems have used content identifiers based on mnemonic codes, Dewey decimal codes, and simple descriptive...ALBING, L FOnTE-LFNNOX NOOO𔃾-2-C-n132 UbiLLASSIFIEO ONR-ASC-82-01 NL -"III2III CC) SX2~ I 1 I I ’%ECuAITY . CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (Wa en Dote...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (aInm Data SEIm 20. microcomputer systems were considered in search of hardware on which to implement the design

  1. A note on tilted Bianchi type VIh models: the type III bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coley, A. A.; Hervik, S.

    2008-10-01

    In this note we complete the analysis of Hervik, van den Hoogen, Lim and Coley (2007 Class. Quantum Grav. 24 3859) of the late-time behaviour of tilted perfect fluid Bianchi type III models. We consider models with dust, and perfect fluids stiffer than dust, and eludicate the late-time behaviour by studying the centre manifold which dominates the behaviour of the model at late times. In the dust case, this centre manifold is three-dimensional and can be considered a double bifurcation as the two parameters (h and γ) of the type VIh model are varied. We therefore complete the analysis of the late-time behaviour of tilted ever-expanding Bianchi models of types I VIII.

  2. Removal of Cr(III ions from salt solution by nanofiltration: experimental and modelling analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik-Klimczak Anna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was experimental and modelling analysis of the nanofiltration process used for the removal of chromium(III ions from salt solution characterized by low pH. The experimental results were interpreted with Donnan and Steric Partitioning Pore (DSP model based on the extended Nernst-Planck equation. In this model, one of the main parameters, describing retention of ions by the membrane, is pore dielectric constant. In this work, it was identified for various process pressures and feed compositions. The obtained results showed the satisfactory agreement between the experimental and modelling data. It means that the DSP model may be helpful for the monitoring of nanofiltration process applied for treatment of chromium tannery wastewater.

  3. A Modified Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Dummy Head Model for Lateral Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Rafukka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid III six-year-old (6YO child dummy head model was developed and validated for frontal impact assessment according to the specifications contained in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Part 572.122, Subpart N by Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC. This work is aimed at improving biofidelity of the head for frontal impact and also extending its application to lateral impact assessment by modifying the head skin viscoelastic properties and validating the head response using the scaled nine-year-old (9YO child cadaver head response recently published in the literature. The modified head model was validated for two drop heights for frontal, right, and left parietal impact locations. Peak resultant acceleration of the modified head model appeared to have good correlation with scaled 9YO child cadaver head response for frontal impact on dropping from 302 mm height and fair correlation with 12.3% difference for 151 mm drop height. Right parietal peak resultant acceleration values correlate well with scaled 9YO head experimental data for 153 mm drop height, while fair correlation with 16.4% difference was noticed for 302 mm drop height. Left parietal, however, shows low biofidelity for the two drop heights as the difference in head acceleration response was within 30%. The modified head model could therefore be used to estimate injuries in vehicle crash for head parietal impact locations which cannot be measured by the current hybrid III dummy head model.

  4. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro); Spektroskopische Untersuchungen zur Komplexbildung von Cm(III) und Eu(III) mit organischen Modellliganden sowie ihrer chemischen Bindungsform in menschlichem Urin (in vitro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-10-26

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  5. Use of single chip microcomputer in hydraulic digital adaptive control system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Presents a one-grade adaptive controller with one reference model which is built according to δ MRACS adaptive control theorv and used to control an actual high-order hydraulic system, and the whole hard ware system used, which includes a AT89C51 single chip microcomputer, 74Ls373 flip-latch, 6116 store, eight-bit ADC0809, and so on, and the satisfactory results obtained in study on hydraulic control system.

  6. Dipole model analysis of the new HERA I+II data

    CERN Document Server

    Luszczak, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    We use the dipole model to analyze the inclusive DIS cross section data, obtained from the HERA I+II measurements \\cite{Abramowicz:2015mha}. We show that these combined data are very well described within the dipole model framework, which is complemented with a valence quark structure functions. Our motivation is to investigate the gluon density with the BGK dipole model \\cite{BGK} as an alternative to the PDF approach. BGK dipole model uses for evolution the DGLAP mechanism in the $kt$ factorization scheme (in contrast to the collinear factorization for PDFs). We confirm our results from the previous paper \\cite{Luszczak:2013rxa} with old HERA data \\cite{HERA2010}. In addition we also performed a first, preliminary investigation of saturation. The analysis was done in the xFitter framework \\cite{xFitter,xFitter2,xFitter3,xFitter4,xFitter5}.}

  7. Microcomputer array processor system. [design for electronic warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, K. D.

    1980-01-01

    The microcomputer array system is discussed with specific attention given to its electronic warware applications. Several aspects of the system architecture are described as well as some of its distinctive characteristics.

  8. Microcomputer-controlled high-altitude data aquisition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    A new microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system was developed. The system provides a new technique for data acquisition from China's astronomical, meteorological and other high altitude experiments and opens up new territory in microcomputer applications. This microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system is made up of a Z80 single board computer, 10 K memory expansion board, and keyboard and display board which can collect 16 analog signals simultaneously, and through analog/digital conversion can convert external analog signals into digital signals then encode them in a certain form through program modulation and store them on audio cassette. The data is immediately retrieved from the tape and sent to the surface microcomputer system for data processing and analysis.

  9. The catalytic ozonization of model lignin compounds in the presence of Fe(III) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben'ko, E. M.; Mukovnya, A. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2007-05-01

    The ozonization of several model lignin compounds (guaiacol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, phenol, and vanillin) was studied in acid media in the presence of iron(III) ions. It was found that Fe3+ did not influence the initial rate of the reactions between model phenols and ozone but accelerated the oxidation of intermediate ozonolysis products. The metal concentration dependences of the total ozone consumption and effective rate constants of catalytic reaction stages were determined. Data on reactions in the presence of oxalic acid as a competing chelate ligand showed that complex formation with Fe3+ was the principal factor that accelerated the ozonolysis of model phenols at the stage of the oxidation of carboxylic dibasic acids and C2 aldehydes formed as intermediate products.

  10. Iron(III) complexes of certain tetradentate phenolate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mallayan Palaniandavar; Marappan Velusamy; Ramasamy Mayilmurugan

    2006-11-01

    Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (CTD) and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (PCD) are bacterial non-heme iron enzymes, which catalyse the oxidative cleavage of catechols to cis, cis-muconic acids with the incorporation of molecular oxygen via a mechanism involving a high-spin ferric centre. The iron(III) complexes of tripodal phenolate ligands containing N3O and N2O2 donor sets represent the metal binding region of the iron proteins. In our laboratory iron(III) complexes of mono- and bisphenolate ligands have been studied successfully as structural and functional models for the intradiol-cleaving catechol dioxygenase enzymes. The single crystal X-ray crystal structures of four of the complexes have been determined. One of the bis-phenolato complexes contains a FeN2O2Cl chromophore with a novel trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry. The Fe-O-C bond angle of 136.1° observed for one of the iron(III) complex of a monophenolate ligand is very similar to that in the enzymes. The importance of the nearby sterically demanding coordinated -NMe2 group has been established and implies similar stereochemical constraints from the other ligated amino acid moieties in the 3,4-PCD enzymes, the enzyme activity of which is traced to the difference in the equatorial and axial Fe-O(tyrosinate) bonds (Fe-O-C, 133, 148°). The nature of heterocyclic rings of the ligands and the methyl substituents on them regulate the electronic spectral features, FeIII/FeII redox potentials and catechol cleavage activity of the complexes. Upon interacting with catecholate anions, two catecholate to iron(III) charge transfer bands appear and the low energy band is similar to that of catechol dioxygenase-substrate complex. Four of the complexes catalyze the oxidative cleavage of H2DBC by molecular oxygen to yield intradiol cleavage products. Remarkably, the more basic N-methylimidazole ring in one of the complexes facilitates the rate-determining productreleasing phase of the catalytic reaction. The present

  11. Development and Implementation of Efficiency-Improving Analysis Methods for the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Model Originating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; Scola, Salvatore; Tobin, Steven; McLeod, Shawn; Mannu, Sergio; Guglielmo, Corrado; Moeller, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle in 2015. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Several novel methods have been implemented to facilitate efficient payload-level thermal analysis, including the use of a design of experiments (DOE) methodology to determine the worst-case orbits for SAGE III while on ISS, use of TD assemblies to move payloads from the Dragon trunk to the Enhanced Operational Transfer Platform (EOTP) to its final home on the Expedite the Processing of Experiments to Space Station (ExPRESS) Logistics Carrier (ELC)-4, incorporation of older models in varying unit sets, ability to change units easily (including hardcoded logic blocks), case-based logic to facilitate activating heaters and active elements for varying scenarios within a single model, incorporation of several coordinate frames to easily map to structural models with differing geometries and locations, and streamlined results processing using an Excel-based text file plotter developed in-house at LaRC. This document presents an overview of the SAGE III thermal model and describes the development and implementation of these efficiency-improving analysis methods.

  12. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  13. Modelling of the L-band brightness temperatures measured with ELBARA III radiometer on Bubnow wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba, Lukasz; Sagan, Joanna; Lukowski, Mateusz; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Microwave radiometry has become the main tool for investigating soil moisture (SM) with remote sensing methods. ESA - SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite operating at L-band provides global distribution of soil moisture. An integral part of SMOS mission are calibration and validation activities involving measurements with ELBARA III which is an L-band microwave passive radiometer. It is done in order to improve soil moisture retrievals - make them more time-effective and accurate. The instrument is located at Bubnow test-site, on the border of cultivated field, fallow, meadow and natural wetland being a part of Polesie National Park (Poland). We obtain both temporal and spatial dependences of brightness temperatures for varied types of land covers with the ELBARA III directed at different azimuths. Soil moisture is retrieved from brightness temperature using L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) model, the same as currently used radiative transfer model for SMOS. Parametrization of L-MEB, as well as input values are still under debate. We discuss the results of SM retrievals basing on data obtained during first year of the radiometer's operation. We analyze temporal dependences of retrieved SM for one-parameter (SM), two-parameter (SM, τ - optical depth) and three-parameter (SM, τ, Hr - roughness parameter) retrievals, as well as spatial dependences for specific dates. Special case of Simplified Roughness Parametrization, combining the roughness parameter and optical depth, is considered. L-MEB processing is supported by the continuous measurements of soil moisture and temperature obtained from nearby agrometeorological station, as well as studies on the soil granulometric composition of the Bubnow test-site area. Furthermore, for better estimation of optical depth, the satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was employed, supported by measured in situ vegetation parameters (such as Leaf Area Index and Vegetation

  14. Numerical modeling of space-time wave extremes using WAVEWATCH III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbariol, Francesco; Alves, Jose-Henrique G. M.; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bergamasco, Filippo; Bertotti, Luciana; Carniel, Sandro; Cavaleri, Luigi; Chao, Yung Y.; Chawla, Arun; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro; Tolman, Hendrik

    2017-01-01

    A novel implementation of parameters estimating the space-time wave extremes within the spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III (WW3) is presented. The new output parameters, available in WW3 version 5.16, rely on the theoretical model of Fedele (J Phys Oceanogr 42(9):1601-1615, 2012) extended by Benetazzo et al. (J Phys Oceanogr 45(9):2261-2275, 2015) to estimate the maximum second-order nonlinear crest height over a given space-time region. In order to assess the wave height associated to the maximum crest height and the maximum wave height (generally different in a broad-band stormy sea state), the linear quasi-determinism theory of Boccotti (2000) is considered. The new WW3 implementation is tested by simulating sea states and space-time extremes over the Mediterranean Sea (forced by the wind fields produced by the COSMO-ME atmospheric model). Model simulations are compared to space-time wave maxima observed on March 10th, 2014, in the northern Adriatic Sea (Italy), by a stereo camera system installed on-board the "Acqua Alta" oceanographic tower. Results show that modeled space-time extremes are in general agreement with observations. Differences are mostly ascribed to the accuracy of the wind forcing and, to a lesser extent, to the approximations introduced in the space-time extremes parameterizations. Model estimates are expected to be even more accurate over areas larger than the mean wavelength (for instance, the model grid size).

  15. Modeling of the electrical carrier transport in III-V on silicon tandem solar cell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, T. K.; Cheong, Dan; Yang, Jingfeng; Kleiman, R. N.

    2011-08-01

    The electrical carrier transport of a tandem cell structure was evaluated by investigating the band alignment of and carrier transport through a tunnel junction. The modeling structure of a tandem cell consists of a III-V (or II-VI) top cell layer, a Si bottom cell layer and tunnel junction layers in-between which connect the top and the bottom cells. The values of energy bandgap and electron affinity of each layer were varied to investigate their effect on the energy barrier height at the interface between Si and compound semiconductors of interest. The contour plots of barrier heights for majority and minority carriers at the hetero-interface are used as a starting point to define the successful regions for electrical carrier transport through the tunnel junctions.

  16. Energy Optimization Modeling of Geothermal Power Plant (Case Study: Darajat Geothermal Field Unit III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, R. H. M.; Darmanto, P. S.

    2016-09-01

    Darajat unit III geothermal power plant is developed by PT. Chevron Geothermal Indonesia (CGI). The plant capacity is 121 MW and load 110%. The greatest utilization power is consumed by Hot Well Pump (HWP) and Cooling Tower Fan (CTF). Reducing the utility power can be attempted by utilizing the wet bulb temperature fluctuation. In this study, a modelling process is developed by using Engineering Equation Solver (EES) software version 9.430.The possibility of energy saving is indicated by Specific Steam Consumption (SSC) net in relation to wet bulb temperature fluctuation from 9°C up to 20.5°C. Result shows that the existing daily operation reaches its optimum condition. The installation of Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) could be applied to optimize both utility power of HWP and CTF. The highest gain is obtained by VFD HWP installation as much as 0.80% when wet bulb temperature 18.5 °C.

  17. Microcomputer-Assisted Biomass Determination of Plankton Bacteria on Scanning Electron Micrographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krambeck, Christiane; Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen; Overbeck, Jürgen

    1981-01-01

    Although biovolume is a better measure of biomass than is cell number, biovolumes have rarely been measured because their evaluation is extremely time-consuming. We developed a microcomputer system that assists cell size measurements on images of filtered plankton: scanning electron micrograph negatives were projected on a digitizer field, bacterial length and width were marked by a cursor, and coordinates were directly transferred to an MOS 6502 microcomputer (KIM 1). The dialogue program BABI organized and controlled the digitizer measurements in cooperation with the user, enabled corrections, and printed out results with 95% confidence limits and sample description. The time for scanning electron micrograph preparation was reduced to 15 min (quick transfer to Freon 113 during filtration and air drying). Altogether, this biovolume determination took about 2.5 h for confidence limits of ±15%. Examples are given for applications of the method: (i) comparison of 10 lakes (with specific activities for glucose uptake and for heterotrophic CO2 fixation); (ii) ranges of biomass parameters in one lake; (iii) diurnal cycles (with synchronizing effects, uptake of algal exudates, and calculation of daily growth). This method is discussed in relation to other biomass methods (epifluorescent microscopy, lipopolysaccharide technique, frequency of dividing cells) and the problem of biovolume-to-carbon conversions. Images PMID:16345807

  18. Development of a hydrogen diffusion gothic model of MARK III-containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Zhen-Yu [National Tsing Hua Univ., Dept. of Engineering and System Science, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yu-Kai; Pei, Bau-Shei [National Tsing Hua Univ., Inst. of Nuclear Engineering Science, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Wen-Sheng [National Tsing Hua Univ., Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Shu [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Nuclear Engineering Div., Taiyuan County, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-15

    The accident that occurred at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is a reminder of the danger of hydrogen explosion within a reactor building. Sufficiently high hydrogen concentration may cause an explosion that could damage the structure, resulting in the release of radioisotopes into the environment. In the first part of this study, a gas diffusion experiment was performed, in which helium was used as the working fluid. An analytical model was also developed using the GOTHIC code and the model predictions of the helium distribution were found to be in good agreement with the experimentally measured data. In the second part of the study, a model of the Mark III containment of the Kuosheng Plant in Taiwan was developed, and was applied to a long-term station blackout (SBO) accident similar to that of the Fukushima plant. The hydrogen generation was calculated using the Modular Accident Analysis Program and was used as the boundary condition for the GOTHIC containment model. The simulation results revealed that the hydrogen concentration at the first floor of the wetwell in the containment reached 4 % 9.7 h after the accident. This indicated the possibility of dangerous conditions inside the containment. Although active hydrogen ignitors are already installed in the Kuosheng plant, the findings of this study indicate that it may be necessary to add passive recombiners to prolong an SBO event.

  19. A new statistical model for Population III supernova rates: discriminating between ΛCDM and WDM cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magg, Mattis; Hartwig, Tilman; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2016-11-01

    With new observational facilities becoming available soon, discovering and characterizing supernovae from the first stars will open up alternative observational windows to the end of the cosmic dark ages. Based on a semi-analytical merger tree model of early star formation, we constrain Population III supernova rates. We find that our method reproduces the Population III supernova rates of large-scale cosmological simulations very well. Our computationally efficient model allows us to survey a large parameter space and to explore a wide range of different scenarios for Population III star formation. Our calculations show that observations of the first supernovae can be used to differentiate between cold and warm dark matter models and to constrain the corresponding particle mass of the latter. Our predictions can also be used to optimize survey strategies with the goal to maximize supernova detection rates.

  20. A New Statistical Model for Population III Supernova Rates: Discriminating Between $\\Lambda$CDM and WDM Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Magg, Mattis; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S; Whalen, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    With new observational facilities becoming available soon, discovering and characterising supernovae from the first stars will open up alternative observational windows to the end of the cosmic dark ages. Based on a semi-analytical merger tree model of early star formation we constrain Population III supernova rates. We find that our method reproduces the Population III supernova rates of large-scale cosmological simulations very well. Our computationally efficient model allows us to survey a large parameter space and to explore a wide range of different scenarios for Population III star formation. Our calculations show that observations of the first supernovae can be used to differentiate between cold and warm dark matter models and to constrain the corresponding particle mass of the latter. Our predictions can also be used to optimize survey strategies with the goal to maximize supernova detection rates.

  1. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III ions by Blue Green-alga Spirulina sp. Part II. Mathematical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Chojnacka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper bioaccumulation of Cr(III ions by blue-green algae Spirulina sp. is discussed. We found that the process consisted of two stages: passive in which Cr(III ions are bound to the surface of cells, identical with biosorption and active, metabolism-dependent, in which Cr(III ions are transported into the cellular interior. The passive stage occurs in both living and non-living cells and the active only in living biomass. Two distinctive mathematical models of the process were proposed. The first was physical model basing on the identified mechanism of the process. In the second model, artificial neural networks were proposed.

  2. Impact of Type III Secretion Effectors and of Phenoxyacetamide Inhibitors of Type III Secretion on Abscess Formation in a Mouse Model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, Bryan J; Murphy, Katherine; Torhan, Matthew C; Bowlin, Nicholas O; Williams, John D; Bowlin, Terry L; Moir, Donald T; Hauser, Alan R

    2017-08-14

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of intra-abdominal infections, wound infections, and community-acquired folliculitis, each of which may involve macro- or micro-abscess formation. The rising incidence of multi-drug resistance among P. aeruginosa isolates has increased both the economic burden and the morbidity and mortality associated with P. aeruginosa disease and necessitates a search for novel therapeutics. Previous work from our group detailed novel phenoxyacetamide inhibitors that block type III secretion and injection into host cells in vitro In this study, we used a murine abscess model of P. aeruginosa infection to test in vivo efficacy of these compounds against the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS). Bacteria used the T3SS to intoxicate infiltrating neutrophils to establish abscesses. Despite this antagonism, sufficient numbers of functioning neutrophils remained for proper containment of abscesses, as neutrophil depletion resulted in increased abscess size, formation of dermonecrotic lesions on the skin, and dissemination of P. aeruginosa to internal organs. Consistent with the specificity of the T3SS/neutrophil interaction, P. aeruginosa lacking a functional T3SS was fully capable of causing abscesses in a neutropenic host. Phenoxyacetamide inhibitors attenuated abscess formation and aided in immune clearance of bacteria. Finally, a P. aeruginosa strain resistant to the phenoxyacetamide compound was fully capable of causing abscess formation even in the presence of the T3SS inhibitors. Together our results further define the role of type III secretion in murine abscess formation and demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of phenoxyacetamide inhibitors in P. aeruginosa infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. A modeling study of notch noise responses of type III units in the gerbil dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaohan; Voigt, Herbert F

    2006-12-01

    A computational model of the neural circuitry of the gerbil dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), based on the MacGregor's neuromime model, was used to simulate type III unit (P-cell) responses to notch noise stimuli. The DCN patch model is based on a previous computational model of the cat DCN [Hancock, K. E., and H. F. Voigt. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 27:73-87, 1999]. According to the experimental study of Parsons et al. [Ann. Biomed. Eng. 29:887-896, 2001], the responses of gerbil DCN type III units to notch noise stimuli are similar to those of cat DCN type IV units, which are thought to be spectral notch detectors. This suggests that type III units in the gerbil DCN may serve as spectral notch detectors. In this modeling study, a simplified notch noise response plot--spike discharge rate vs. notch cutoff frequency plot--was used to compare model responses to the experimental results. Parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis of three connection parameters within the DCN patch have been studied and shows the model is robust, providing reasonable fits to the experimental data from 14 of 15 type III units examined.

  4. Feynman Rules in the Type III Natural Flavour-Conserving Two-Higgs Doublet Model

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, C; Yang, Y W; Lin, Chilong; Lee, Chien-er; Yang, Yeou-Wei

    1994-01-01

    We consider a two Higgs-doublet model with $S_3$ symmetry, which implies a $\\pi \\over 2$ rather than 0 relative phase between the vacuum expectation values $$ and $$. The corresponding Feynman rules are derived accordingly and the transformation of the Higgs fields from the weak to the mass eigenstates includes not only an angle rotation but also a phase transformation. In this model, both doublets couple to the same type of fermions and the flavour-changing neutral currents are naturally suppressed. We also demonstrate that the Type III natural flavour-conserving model is valid at tree-level even when an explicit $S_3$ symmetry breaking perturbation is introduced to get a reasonable CKM matrix. In the special case $\\beta = \\alpha$, as the ratio $\\tan\\beta = {v_2 \\over v_1}$ runs from 0 to $\\infty$, the dominant Yukawa coupling will change from the first two generations to the third generation. In the Feynman rules, we also find that the charged Higgs currents are explicitly left-right asymmetric. The ratios ...

  5. A DYNAMO application of microcomputer-based simulation in health sciences teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez Navarro, J D; Toval Alvarez, J A; Palacios Ortega, F; Sanchez Casado, M P; Perez Polo, M

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents a concrete application of microcomputer-based simulation in health sciences education. It shows a pharmacological system dynamics model representing graphics and numerical behaviour and relations between variables, which in addition allows interaction with students for experimentation. The work also illustrates a strategy for introducing this kind of model in the classroom, as well as the suitability of their implementation, in educational environments, using professional tools such as DYNAMO and DYNEX. Subsequent evaluation of the results and comments given by the students revealed more positive attitudes towards the discipline.

  6. Mathematical Modeling of Allelopathy. III. A Model for Curve-Fitting Allelochemical Dose Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li; An, Min; Johnson, Ian R.; Lovett, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Bioassay techniques are often used to study the effects of allelochemicals on plant processes, and it is generally observed that the processes are stimulated at low allelochemical concentrations and inhibited as the concentrations increase. A simple empirical model is presented to analyze this type of response. The stimulation-inhibition properties of allelochemical-dose responses can be described by the parameters in the model. The indices, p% reductions, are calculated to assess the alleloc...

  7. Modelling of wind waves on the lake-like basin of Gorky Reservoir with WAVEWATCH III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Zenkovich, Dmitry; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Baidakov, Georgy; Vdovin, Maxim; Sergeev, Daniil

    2014-05-01

    Simulation of ocean waves and sea waves is nowadays a generally adopted technique of operational meteorology. Such well-known models as WAVEWATCH, WAM, SWAM are aimed primarily at describing ocean waves including coastal (nearshore) zones. Meanwhile, wave modelling is less developed for moderate and small inland water reservoirs and lakes, though being of considerable interest for inland navigation. In this paper test numerical experiments on simulating waves on the lake-like basin of the Gorky Reservoir using WAVEWATCH III are reported. We aimed to evaluate the applicability of the model to the waves on a mid-sized inland reservoir. Gorky Reservoir is an artificial lake in the central part of the Volga River formed by a hydroelectric dam of Gorky Hydroelectric Station between the towns of Gorodets and Zavolzhye. It spans for 427 km from the dam of Rybinsk to the dam of Gorodets through several regions of Central Russia. While it is relatively narrow and follows the natural riverbed of Volga in the upper part, it becomes up to 15 km wide downstream the town of Yuryevets. Its maximum depth is 22 m, the surface area is 1590 km2, the accumulated water volume amounts to 8.71 km3. In the series of calculations we considered moderate winds of different directions blowing steadily all over the surface of the reservoir and the waves developing from calm conditions or from some initial seeding spectral distribution that is Gaussian in frequency and space, cosine in direction. The results of wave simulation are compared then with the data collected by the field in-situ observations and measurements. The field experiments were carried out in the south part of the Gorky reservoir from the boat. In the course of the experiment we simultaneously measured profiles of wind speed and surface wave spectra using instruments placed on the Froude buoy, which measures the following parameters: i) the module and the direction of the wind speed using ultrasonic wind sensor WindSonic Gill

  8. GCR Environmental Models III: GCR Model Validation and Propagated Uncertainties in Effective Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Xu, Xiaojing; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the last of three papers focused on quantifying the uncertainty associated with galactic cosmic rays (GCR) models used for space radiation shielding applications. In the first paper, it was found that GCR ions with Z>2 and boundary energy below 500 MeV/nucleon induce less than 5% of the total effective dose behind shielding. This is an important finding since GCR model development and validation have been heavily biased toward Advanced Composition Explorer/Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer measurements below 500 MeV/nucleon. Weights were also developed that quantify the relative contribution of defined GCR energy and charge groups to effective dose behind shielding. In the second paper, it was shown that these weights could be used to efficiently propagate GCR model uncertainties into effective dose behind shielding. In this work, uncertainties are quantified for a few commonly used GCR models. A validation metric is developed that accounts for measurements uncertainty, and the metric is coupled to the fast uncertainty propagation method. For this work, the Badhwar-O'Neill (BON) 2010 and 2011 and the Matthia GCR models are compared to an extensive measurement database. It is shown that BON2011 systematically overestimates heavy ion fluxes in the range 0.5-4 GeV/nucleon. The BON2010 and BON2011 also show moderate and large errors in reproducing past solar activity near the 2000 solar maximum and 2010 solar minimum. It is found that all three models induce relative errors in effective dose in the interval [-20%, 20%] at a 68% confidence level. The BON2010 and Matthia models are found to have similar overall uncertainty estimates and are preferred for space radiation shielding applications.

  9. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of low back pain (LBPhas evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  10. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  11. Tidal Downsizing Model. III. Planets from sub-Earths to Brown Dwarfs: structure and metallicity preferences

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We present improved population synthesis calculations in the context of the Tidal Downsizing (TD) hypothesis for planet formation. Our models provide natural explanations and/or quantitative match to exoplanet observations in the following categories: (i) most abundant planets being super-Earths; (ii) cores more massive than $\\sim 5-15 M_\\oplus$ are enveloped by massive metal-rich atmospheres; (iii) the frequency of occurrence of close-in gas giant planets correlates strongly with metallicity of the host star; (iv) no such correlation is found for sub-Neptune planets; (v) presence of massive cores in giant planets; (vi) the composition of gas giant planets is over-abundant in metals compared to their host stars; (vii) this over-abundance decreases with planet's mass, as observed; (viii) a deep valley in the planet mass function between masses of $\\sim 10-20 M_\\oplus$ and $\\sim 100 M_\\oplus$. We provide a number of observational predictions distinguishing the model from Core Accretion: (a) composition of the m...

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Allelopathy. III. A Model for Curve-Fitting Allelochemical Dose Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, De Li; An, Min; Johnson, Ian R.; Lovett, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Bioassay techniques are often used to study the effects of allelochemicals on plant processes, and it is generally observed that the processes are stimulated at low allelochemical concentrations and inhibited as the concentrations increase. A simple empirical model is presented to analyze this type of response. The stimulation-inhibition properties of allelochemical-dose responses can be described by the parameters in the model. The indices, p% reductions, are calculated to assess the allelochemical effects. The model is compared with experimental data for the response of lettuce seedling growth to Centaurepensin, the olfactory response of weevil larvae to α-terpineol, and the responses of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra L., cv. Ensylva), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., cv. Kenblue), perennial ryegrass (L. perenne L., cv. Manhattan), and Rebel tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb) seedling growth to leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue. The results show that the model gives a good description to observations and can be used to fit a wide range of dose responses. Assessments of the effects of leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue clearly differentiate the properties of the allelopathic sources and the relative sensitivities of indicators such as the length of root and leaf. PMID:19330111

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Allelopathy. III. A Model for Curve-Fitting Allelochemical Dose Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, De Li; An, Min; Johnson, Ian R; Lovett, John V

    2003-01-01

    Bioassay techniques are often used to study the effects of allelochemicals on plant processes, and it is generally observed that the processes are stimulated at low allelochemical concentrations and inhibited as the concentrations increase. A simple empirical model is presented to analyze this type of response. The stimulation-inhibition properties of allelochemical-dose responses can be described by the parameters in the model. The indices, p% reductions, are calculated to assess the allelochemical effects. The model is compared with experimental data for the response of lettuce seedling growth to Centaurepensin, the olfactory response of weevil larvae to alpha-terpineol, and the responses of annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.), creeping red fescue (Festuca rubra L., cv. Ensylva), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., cv. Kenblue), perennial ryegrass (L. perenne L., cv. Manhattan), and Rebel tall fescue (F. arundinacea Schreb) seedling growth to leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue. The results show that the model gives a good description to observations and can be used to fit a wide range of dose responses. Assessments of the effects of leachates of Rebel and Kentucky 31 tall fescue clearly differentiate the properties of the allelopathic sources and the relative sensitivities of indicators such as the length of root and leaf.

  14. Comparison of the Mortality Probability Admission Model III, National Quality Forum, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IV hospital mortality models: implications for national benchmarking*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Andrew A; Higgins, Thomas L; Zimmerman, Jack E

    2014-03-01

    To examine the accuracy of the original Mortality Probability Admission Model III, ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum modification of Mortality Probability Admission Model III, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa models for comparing observed and risk-adjusted hospital mortality predictions. Retrospective paired analyses of day 1 hospital mortality predictions using three prognostic models. Fifty-five ICUs at 38 U.S. hospitals from January 2008 to December 2012. Among 174,001 intensive care admissions, 109,926 met model inclusion criteria and 55,304 had data for mortality prediction using all three models. None. We compared patient exclusions and the discrimination, calibration, and accuracy for each model. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa excluded 10.7% of all patients, ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum 20.1%, and Mortality Probability Admission Model III 24.1%. Discrimination of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa was superior with area under receiver operating curve (0.88) compared with Mortality Probability Admission Model III (0.81) and ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum (0.80). Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa was better calibrated (lowest Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic). The accuracy of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa was superior (adjusted Brier score = 31.0%) to that for Mortality Probability Admission Model III (16.1%) and ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum (17.8%). Compared with observed mortality, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation IVa overpredicted mortality by 1.5% and Mortality Probability Admission Model III by 3.1%; ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum underpredicted mortality by 1.2%. Calibration curves showed that Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation performed well over the entire risk range, unlike the Mortality Probability Admission Model and ICU Outcomes Model/National Quality Forum models. Acute

  15. Modeling and Simulation. III. Simulation of a Model for Development of Visual Cortical Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-15

    of parameter values. Experiment, model, and simulation 5’ The simulations we consider mimic, in form, classic deprivation experiments. Kittens are...second paper of the series (ref. 8) reviews the results of numerous experiments on the neuronal development of kitten visual cortex. We have...restricted to a very limited range of oriented contours (see citations in ref. 8). Kittens were raised, for example, viewing only horizontal or only vertical

  16. Tristability in the iodate-As(III) chemical system arising from a model of stirring and mixing effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathisubramanian, N.

    1991-08-01

    The iodate-As(III) system which exhibits bistability in an ideal continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR), exhibits tristability when subjected to the mixing model of Kumpinsky and Epstein [J. Chem. Phys. 82, 53 (1985)]. The cross flow between the major and minor reactors influences the system's lower hysteresis limit more than its upper hysteresis limit.

  17. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Report of phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L.; Rutqvist, J.; Stephansson, O. [eds.] [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Tsang, C.F. [ed.] [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.; Kautsky, F. [ed.] [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the methodologies and results of the field/laboratory experiments and mathematical modeling defined for the phase III of the project. Results from test cases 2-6 are given in separate chapters of the report (which have been indexed separately), and the last chapter discusses the lessons learned from the three phases of the DECOVALEX project.

  18. Talents and Type Iiis: The Effects of the Talents Unlimited Model on Creative Productivity in Gifted Youngsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Jane L.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined a set of lessons that integrate the Talents Unlimited Model (TU; C. L. Schlichter, 1986) with the 10 steps of completing a Type III activity (J. S. Renzulli & S. M. Reis, 1985) to determine the effects of these lessons on the quality of students' creative products and on the number of students who completed their products.…

  19. Establishment of a biomarker model for predicting bone metastasis in resected stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to establish a biomarker risk model for predicting bone metastasis in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods The model consists of 105 cases of stage III NSCLC, who were treated and followed up. The patients were divided into bone metastasis group (n = 45 and non-bone metastasis group (other visceral metastasis and those without recurrence (n = 60. Tissue microarrays were constructed for immunohistochemical study of 10 molecular markers associated with bone metastasis, based on which a model was established via logistic regression analysis for predicting the risk of bone metastases. The model was prospectively validated in another 40 patients with stage III NSCLC. Results The molecular model for predicting bone metastasis was logit (P = − 2.538 + 2.808 CXCR4 +1.629 BSP +0.846 OPN-2.939 BMP4. ROC test showed that when P ≥ 0.408, the sensitivity was up to 71% and specificity of 70%. Model validation in the 40 cases in clinical trial (NCT 01124253 demonstrated that the prediction sensitivity of the model was 85.7%, specificity 66.7%, Kappa: 0.618, with a high degree of consistency. Conclusion The molecular model combining CXCR4, BSP, OPN and BMP4 could help predict the risk of bone metastasis in stage IIIa and IIIb resected NSCLC.

  20. Performance evaluation of WAVEWATCH III model in the Persian Gulf using different wind resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazeminezhad, Mohammad Hossein; Siadatmousavi, Seyed Mostafa

    2017-07-01

    The third-generation wave model, WAVEWATCH III, was employed to simulate bulk wave parameters in the Persian Gulf using three different wind sources: ERA-Interim, CCMP, and GFS-Analysis. Different formulations for whitecapping term and the energy transfer from wind to wave were used, namely the Tolman and Chalikov (J Phys Oceanogr 26:497-518, 1996), WAM cycle 4 (BJA and WAM4), and Ardhuin et al. (J Phys Oceanogr 40(9):1917-1941, 2010) (TEST405 and TEST451 parameterizations) source term packages. The obtained results from numerical simulations were compared to altimeter-derived significant wave heights and measured wave parameters at two stations in the northern part of the Persian Gulf through statistical indicators and the Taylor diagram. Comparison of the bulk wave parameters with measured values showed underestimation of wave height using all wind sources. However, the performance of the model was best when GFS-Analysis wind data were used. In general, when wind veering from southeast to northwest occurred, and wind speed was high during the rotation, the model underestimation of wave height was severe. Except for the Tolman and Chalikov (J Phys Oceanogr 26:497-518, 1996) source term package, which severely underestimated the bulk wave parameters during stormy condition, the performances of other formulations were practically similar. However, in terms of statistics, the Ardhuin et al. (J Phys Oceanogr 40(9):1917-1941, 2010) source terms with TEST405 parameterization were the most successful formulation in the Persian Gulf when compared to in situ and altimeter-derived observations.

  1. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Modelling of FEBEX In-Situ Test. Task1 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E.E.; Alcoverro, J. [Univ. Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)] (comps.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 1 of DECOVALEX III was conceived as a benchmark exercise supported by all field and laboratory data generated during the performance of the FEBEX experiment designed to study thermo-hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-geochemical processes of the buffer and rock in the near field. The task was defined as a series of three successive blind prediction exercises (Parts A, B and C), which cover the behaviour of both the rock and bentonite barrier. Research teams participating in the FEBEX task were given, for each of the three parts, a set of field and laboratory data theoretically sufficient to generate a proper model and were asked to submit predictions, at given locations and time, for some of the measured variables. The merits and limitations of different modeling approaches were therefore established. The teams could perform additional calculations, once the actual 'solution' was disclosed. Final calculations represented the best approximation that a given team could provide, always within the general time constraints imposed by the General DECOVALEX III Organization. This report presents the works performed for Task 1. It contains the case definitions and evaluations of modelling results for Part A, B and C, and the overall evaluation of the works performed. The report is completed by a CD-ROM containing a set of final reports provided by the modeling teams participating in each of the three parts defined. These reports provide the necessary details to better understand the nature of the blind or final predictions included in this report. The report closes with a set of conclusions, which provides a summary of the main findings and highlights the lessons learned, some of which were summarized below. The best predictions of the water inflow into the excavated tunnel are found when the hydro geological model is properly calibrated on the basis of other known flow measurements in the same area. The particular idealization of the rock mass (equivalent

  2. Phosphate removal from wastewater by model-La(III) zeolite adsorbents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Ping; BART Hans-J(o)rg; LI Bing; LU Xiwu; ZHANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorus is one of the primary nutrients which leads to eutrophication and accelerates aging process in enclosed water bodies.Because of the poor phosphorus selectivity of other adsorbents,the novel La (III)-modified zedim adsorbent (LZA) was prepared by modifying 90 nm zeolite with lanthanide to selectively remove phosphate in the presence of various omnipresent anions,such as sulfates,bicarbonates,and chlorides.Through batch and fixed bed operation,the following optimum conditions were obtalned:concentration of lanthanum chloride solution 0.05 mol/L:solid/liquor ratio 1/25;pH 10;calcination temperature 550℃;time 1 h.The value of the Freundlich model constants Kf and 1/n were found to he 16.76 mg/L and 0.2209,respectively.In addition,when calculated at pH 6.0,distilhution coefficient KD could be as high as 36.6.Furthermore,in the alkaline pH range,solution of 0.8 mol/L NaCl Was used to regenerate the saturated LZA, which could reach the high regeneration efficiency as high as 100%.Because of the good selectivity and regenerability of LZA,it might serve as a potenti way for advanced phosphate removal from the sewage containing other anions.

  3. Commentary on the Liquid Metallic Hydrogen Model of the Sun III. Insight into Solar Lithium Abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The apparent depletion of lithium represents one of the grea test challenges to modern gaseous solar models. As a result, lithium has been hypothes ized to undergo nuclear burning deep within the Sun. Conversely, extremely low lith ium abundances can be easily accounted for within the liquid metallic hydrogen mo del, as lithium has been hypothesized to greatly stabilize the formation of metalli c hydrogen (E. Zurek et al. A little bit of lithium does a lot for hydrogen. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA , 2009, v. 106, no. 42, 17640–17643. Hence, the abundances of lithium on th e solar surface can be explained, not by requiring the nuclear burning of this elem ent, but rather, by suggesting that the Sun is retaining lithium within the solar body in ord er to help stabilize its liquid metallic hydrogen lattice. Unlike lithium, many of t he other elements synthesized within the Sun should experience powerful lattice exclusio nary forces as they are driven out of the intercalate regions between the layered liquid me tallic hydrogen hexagonal planes (Robitaille J.C. and Robitaille P.M. Liquid Metalli c Hydrogen III. Intercalation and Lattice Exclusion Versus Gravitational Settling and Th eir Consequences Relative to Internal Structure, Surface Activity, and Solar Winds in the Sun. Progr. Phys ., 2013, v. 2, in press. As for lithium, its stabilizing role within t he solar interior helps to account for the lack of this element on the surface of the Sun.

  4. Numerical modeling and validation of wave heights and directionality in the ice using WAVEWATCH III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhuin, Fabrice; Dumont, Dany; Accensi, Mickael; Sevigny, Caroline; Boutin, Guillaume; Rogers, Erick

    2016-04-01

    The poorly understood attenuation of waves, the key dynamic effect that defines the width of the Marginal Ice Zone, has been attributed to the combined effect of wave scattering and wave dissipation. Because scattering and dissipation have very different effects on the directional distribution of wave energy, it is possible to better understand the balance between scattering and dissipation by an analysis of the width of the directional wave spectrum. We have thus introduced dissipation and scattering terms in the spectral wave model WAVEWATCH III, and an estimation of the maximum ice floe size. Academic and realistic simulations show that the energy level and directional spreading far into the Arctic pack ice (Wadhams and Doble 2009) can be well explained by dissipative processes without the need for scattering. The same is true of observed swells in the Southern Ocean (Ardhuin et al. 2015). However, the dissipation level required to explain the observed wave height goes from 2 in the southern ocean to 12 times the viscous dissipation under a smooth ice plate. This and other data suggest that broken ice causes less dissipation than a continuous ice cover, possibly due to the dissipation by creep inside the ice when it is not broken and bends. Work is under way to parameterize that effect using the estimated maximum ice floe size.

  5. Maintenance of EGFR and EGFRvIII expressions in an in vivo and in vitro model of human glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése; Broholm, Helle; Villingshøj, Mette;

    2011-01-01

    with mutation of EGFR, and the constitutive activated deletion variant EGFRvIII is the most common EGFR mutation found in GBM. Activated EGFR signaling, through overexpression and/or mutation, is involved in increased tumorigenic potential. As such, EGFR is an attractive target for GBM therapy. However...... the expressions of EGFR and EGFRvIII are maintained both in xenograft tumors growing subcutaneously on mice and in cell cultures established in stem cell conditions. With this model it will be possible to further study the role of EGFR and EGFRvIII, and response to targeted therapy, in GBM.......Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common, and most aggressive primary brain tumor among adults. A vast majority of the tumors express high levels of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as a consequence of gene amplification. Furthermore, gene amplification is often associated...

  6. Spectroscopic, structural characterizations and antioxidant capacity of the chromium (III) niacinamide compound as a diabetes mellitus drug model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S; El-Megharbel, Samy M; Hussien, M A; Hamza, Reham Z; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Naglah, Ahmed M; Afifi, Walid M; Kobeasy, Mohamed I

    2017-02-15

    New binuclear chromium (III) niacinamide compound with chemical formula [Cr2(Nic)(Cl)6(H2O)4]·H2O was obtained upon the reaction of chromium (III) chloride with niacinamide (Nic) in methanol solvent at 60°C. The proposed structure was discussed with the help of microanalytical analyses, conductivity, spectroscopic (FT-IR and UV-vis.), magnetic calculations, thermogravimetric analyses (TG/TGA), and morphological studies (X-ray of solid powder and scan electron microscopy. The infrared spectrum of free niacinamide in comparison with its chromium (III) compound indicated that the chelation mode occurs via both nitrogen atoms of pyridine ring and primary -NH2 group. The efficiency of chromium (III) niacinamide compound in decreasing of glucose level of blood and HbA1c in case of diabetic rats was checked. The ameliorating gluconeogenic enzymes, lipid profile and antioxidant defense capacities are considered as an indicator of the efficiency of new chromium (III) compound as antidiabetic drug model.

  7. Spectroscopic, structural characterizations and antioxidant capacity of the chromium (III) niacinamide compound as a diabetes mellitus drug model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refat, Moamen S.; El-Megharbel, Samy M.; Hussien, M. A.; Hamza, Reham Z.; Al-Omar, Mohamed A.; Naglah, Ahmed M.; Afifi, Walid M.; Kobeasy, Mohamed I.

    2017-02-01

    New binuclear chromium (III) niacinamide compound with chemical formula [Cr2(Nic)(Cl)6(H2O)4]·H2O was obtained upon the reaction of chromium (III) chloride with niacinamide (Nic) in methanol solvent at 60 °C. The proposed structure was discussed with the help of microanalytical analyses, conductivity, spectroscopic (FT-IR and UV-vis.), magnetic calculations, thermogravimetric analyses (TG/TGA), and morphological studies (X-ray of solid powder and scan electron microscopy. The infrared spectrum of free niacinamide in comparison with its chromium (III) compound indicated that the chelation mode occurs via both nitrogen atoms of pyridine ring and primary -NH2 group. The efficiency of chromium (III) niacinamide compound in decreasing of glucose level of blood and HbA1c in case of diabetic rats was checked. The ameliorating gluconeogenic enzymes, lipid profile and antioxidant defense capacities are considered as an indicator of the efficiency of new chromium (III) compound as antidiabetic drug model.

  8. Model predictions of realgar precipitation by reaction of As(III) with synthetic mackinawite under anoxic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, T.J.; Han, Y.-S.; Hayes, K.F.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the removal of As(III) from solution using mackinawite, a nanoparticulate reduced iron sulfide. Mackinawite suspensions (0.1-40 g/L) effectively lower initial concentrations of 1.3 ?? 10 -5 M As(III) from pH 5-10, with maximum removal occurring under acidic conditions. Based on Eh measurements, it was found that the redox state of the system depended on the mackinawite solids concentration and pH. Higher initial mackinawite concentrations and alkaline pH resulted in a more reducing redox condition. Given this, the pH edge data were modeled thermodynamically using pe (-log[e-]) as a fitting parameter and linear pe-pH relationships within the range of measured Eh values as a function of pH and mackinawite concentration. The model predicts removal of As(III) from solution by precipitation of realgar with the formation of secondary oxidation products, greigite or a mixed-valence iron oxide phase, depending on pH. This study demonstrates that mackinawite is an effective sequestration agent for As(III) and highlights the importance of incorporating redox into models describing the As-Fe-S-H2O system. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  9. Online Searching with a Microcomputer--Getting Started.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casbon, Susan

    1983-01-01

    Based on online searching experiences on microcomputer at a small liberal arts college, this article outlines for the novice advantages and disadvantages of micro-searching, legal implications, future trends, and factors to consider in selecting hardware and software. A 16-item bibliography arranged in order of usefulness and 10 references are…

  10. Microcomputer Learning Project. Willow Creek School Division No. 28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Garnet; MacLeod, Alan

    Comparative research was conducted using gifted and average upper elementary and junior high school students to determine the effectiveness of utilizing microcomputers for the development of computer literacy and the implementation of curriculum courseware. Eighty students were selected as the treatment group and received instruction in the…

  11. The Surface Features of Four Microcomputer Reading Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Virginia N.

    1984-01-01

    Uses the Bradley Inventory of Reading Comprehension Software to evaluate surface characteristics (including documentation and instructional design) of microcomputer reading comprehension programs produced by Scott Foresman, Random House, Control Data Corporation, and Basic Learning Systems. All four programs received high scores, but the Scott…

  12. Use of Microcomputers for Spelling Assessment: Reasons to Be Cautious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnhagen, Stanley; Gerber, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    Two versions, via microcomputer, of the Test of Written Spelling were administered to underachieving students from a regular third-grade class and from an upper-grade, self-contained class for learning handicapped (LH) students. Results indicated that students took less time and spelled more words correctly on the standard written version.…

  13. Utilization of the Microcomputer in the Mathematics Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Poppy L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reports a study investigating the instructional use of microcomputers by secondary mathematics teachers, and discusses results from a sample of 128 completed questionnaires showing that computer utilization is hampered by inadequate access to equipment, lack of software appropriate to the mathematics curricula, and a lack of guidance for…

  14. An Observational Study of Social Behavior in Microcomputer Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Shirley C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study examined the effects of five variables--student grouping at the computer, keyboarding status, academic discipline, student gender, and gender of partner--on student social behavior, both verbal and affective, in microcomputer classrooms in a public business high school. The effect of these variables on teacher behavior was also…

  15. Microcomputers: Statistical Analysis Software. Evaluation Guide Number 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    This guide discusses six sets of features to examine when purchasing a microcomputer-based statistics program: hardware requirements; data management; data processing; statistical procedures; printing; and documentation. While the current statistical packages have several negative features, they are cost saving and convenient for small to moderate…

  16. Microcomputers: Word Processing. Evaluation Guides. Guide Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    Designed to provide guidance in selecting the appropriate microcomputer-based word processing program, this document discusses the key characteristics of word processing software, including formatting, editing, merging, and printing. Possible capabilities of word processing features are identified, i.e., indent, tab, center, creation of footnotes,…

  17. Microcomputers and Evaluation. Evaluation Guides: Guide Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    The potential uses of microcomputers in evaluation research are discussed in this pamphlet. At the beginning, a matrix is provided showing the relationship between the steps in the evaluation research process and common types of computer software. Thereafter, the guide is organized sequentially around the evaluation research activities that are…

  18. Integrating Microcomputers and Microelectronics into the Physics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Douglas S.

    1980-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary microcomputer and microelectronics program offered jointly by the Physics and Computer Science Departments of East Texas State University. The program operates on both the graduate and undergraduate level. Content as well as structure of the program are discussed. (Author/DS)

  19. Microcomputed tomography-based assessment of retrieved dental implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narra, N.; Antalainen, A.K.; Zipprich, H.; Sándor, G.K.; Wolff, J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the potential of microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) technology in the assessment of retrieved dental implants. Cases are presented to illustrate the value of micro-CT imaging techniques in determining possible mechanical causes for dental implant

  20. Multi-microcomputer system for Monte-Carlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, B; Krasemann, H

    1981-01-01

    The authors propose a microcomputer system that allows parallel processing for Monte Carlo calculations in lattice gauge theories, simulations of high energy physics experiments and many other fields of current interest. The master-n-slave multiprocessor system is based on the Motorola MC 6800 microprocessor. One attraction of this processor is that it allows up to 16 M Byte random access memory.

  1. Matrix algebra routines for the Acorn Archimedes microcomputer: example applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, A

    1988-08-01

    A set of matrix algebra routines have been written, as BASICV procedures, for the Acorn Archimedes microcomputer. It is shown that these procedures are executed so quickly that programs, which require matrix algebra computations, can be written in interpreted BASIC. Two example applications, reciprocal averaging and principal components analysis, are demonstrated.

  2. Planning the Use of Microcomputers in Higher Education Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovacek, Simeon P.; Dolence, Michael G.

    The process of planning the role of the microcomputer in higher education administration is investigated through a survey of a sample of universities and colleges in California engaged in such efforts, and through a review of literature in education as well as computing. A major objective of the study was to systematically investigate the…

  3. Use of Microcomputers for Spelling Assessment: Reasons to Be Cautious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnhagen, Stanley; Gerber, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    Two versions, via microcomputer, of the Test of Written Spelling were administered to underachieving students from a regular third-grade class and from an upper-grade, self-contained class for learning handicapped (LH) students. Results indicated that students took less time and spelled more words correctly on the standard written version.…

  4. A Micro-Computer Based Tutor for Teaching Arithmetic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attisha, M.; Yazdani, M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a knowledge-based tutoring system which provides pupil interaction with the microcomputer to diagnose pupils' errors in subtraction operations. Current subtraction methods; nature and origin of subtraction errors; and the structure, achievements, and future developments of the computer system are included. Thirteen references and a…

  5. Microcomputer-Based Digital Signal Processing Laboratory Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinari, Jr., Rocco; Rao, S. Sathyanarayan

    1985-01-01

    Describes a system (Apple II microcomputer interfaced to flexible, custom-designed digital hardware) which can provide: (1) Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) computation on real-time data with a video display of spectrum; (2) frequency synthesis experiments using the inverse FFT; and (3) real-time digital filtering experiments. (JN)

  6. Instructional Microcomputer Applications by Business Teachers in Minnesota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Judith J.

    Data were collected from Minnesota secondary and postsecondary business teachers regarding their instructional microcomputer applications and their attitudes about several instructional computing issues. Usable surveys were returned by 342 teachers in 236 schools. The predominant brand of computer at the secondary level was the Apple II; most…

  7. Using a Microcomputer to Communicate: Part 2: Specialized Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Carol Hansen; Murphy, John J.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses microcomputer software designed specifically to be used in the online bibliographic database search process. The specialized communications software discussed includes programs that aid in database selection, logging on, uploading, searching, downloading, post-processing, and recordkeeping. A directory of specialized communications…

  8. Validated Competing Event Model for the Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer Population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Ruben; Gulaya, Sachin; Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Rose, Brent S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wu, John; Noticewala, Sonal [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); McHale, Michael T. [Department of Reproductive Medicine, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Yashar, Catheryn M. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Vaida, Florin [Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of California San Diego Medical Center, San Diego, California (United States); Mell, Loren K., E-mail: lmell@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose/Objectives(s): Early-stage endometrial cancer patients are at higher risk of noncancer mortality than of cancer mortality. Competing event models incorporating comorbidity could help identify women most likely to benefit from treatment intensification. Methods and Materials: 67,397 women with stage I-II endometrioid adenocarcinoma after total hysterectomy diagnosed from 1988 to 2009 were identified in Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) and linked SEER-Medicare databases. Using demographic and clinical information, including comorbidity, we sought to develop and validate a risk score to predict the incidence of competing mortality. Results: In the validation cohort, increasing competing mortality risk score was associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality (subdistribution hazard ratio [SDHR], 1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.60-2.30) and decreased risk of endometrial cancer mortality (SDHR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.55-0.78). Controlling for other variables, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) = 1 (SDHR, 1.62; 95% CI, 1.45-1.82) and CCI >1 (SDHR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.74-4.01) were associated with increased risk of noncancer mortality. The 10-year cumulative incidences of competing mortality within low-, medium-, and high-risk strata were 27.3% (95% CI, 25.2%-29.4%), 34.6% (95% CI, 32.5%-36.7%), and 50.3% (95% CI, 48.2%-52.6%), respectively. With increasing competing mortality risk score, we observed a significant decline in omega (ω), indicating a diminishing likelihood of benefit from treatment intensification. Conclusion: Comorbidity and other factors influence the risk of competing mortality among patients with early-stage endometrial cancer. Competing event models could improve our ability to identify patients likely to benefit from treatment intensification.

  9. Modeling and experimental assessment of a buried Leu–Ile mutation in dengue envelope domain III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Manjiri R. [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Nakamachi, Koganei-shi, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan); Numoto, Nobutaka; Ito, Nobutoshi [Department of Structural Biology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45, Yushima Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8510 (Japan); Kuroda, Yutaka, E-mail: ykuroda@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Nakamachi, Koganei-shi, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-26

    Envelope protein domain III (ED3) of the dengue virus is important for both antibody binding and host cell interaction. Here, we focused on how a L387I mutation in the protein core could take place in DEN4 ED3, but cannot be accommodated in DEN3 ED3 without destabilizing its structure. To this end, we modeled a DEN4-L387I structure using the Penultimate Rotamer Library and taking the DEN4 ED3 main-chain as a fixed template. We found that three out of seven Ile{sup 387} conformers fit in DEN4 ED3 without introducing the severe atomic clashes that are observed when DEN3 serotype’s ED3 is used as a template. A more extensive search using 273 side-chain rotamers of the residues surrounding Ile{sup 387} confirmed this prediction. In order to assess the prediction, we determined the crystal structure of DEN4-L387I at 2 Å resolution. Ile{sup 387} indeed adopted one of the three predicted rotamers. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the effects of single mutations are to a large extent successfully predicted by systematically modeling the side-chain structures of the mutated as well as those of its surrounding residues using fixed main-chain structures and assessing inter-atomic steric clashes. More accurate and reliable predictions require considering sub-angstrom main-chain deformation, which remains a challenging task. - Highlights: • We mutated L387I of DEN4 ED3 and examined its effects on structure and stability. • We modeled the side-chain of Ile{sup 387} using DEN4 ED3's structure as a template. • We determined the crystal structure of DEN4-L387I and confirmed the modeling. • Side-chain repacking occurring around Ile{sup 387} involved >3 inter-connected residues. • These results explained why L387I mutation in DEN4 ED3 conserves thermostability.

  10. Model Rockets and Microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1986-01-01

    Points out the instructional applications and program possibilities of a unit on model rocketry. Describes the ways that microcomputers can assist in model rocket design and in problem calculations. Provides a descriptive listing of model rocket software for the Apple II microcomputer. (ML)

  11. Fibronectin unfolding revisited: modeling cell traction-mediated unfolding of the tenth type-III repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine P S Gee

    Full Text Available Fibronectin polymerization is essential for the development and repair of the extracellular matrix. Consequently, deciphering the mechanism of fibronectin fibril formation is of immense interest. Fibronectin fibrillogenesis is driven by cell-traction forces that mechanically unfold particular modules within fibronectin. Previously, mechanical unfolding of fibronectin has been modeled by applying tensile forces at the N- and C-termini of fibronectin domains; however, physiological loading is likely focused on the solvent-exposed RGD loop in the 10(th type-III repeat of fibronectin (10FNIII, which mediates binding to cell-surface integrin receptors. In this work we used steered molecular dynamics to study the mechanical unfolding of 10FNIII under tensile force applied at this RGD site. We demonstrate that mechanically unfolding 10FNIII by pulling at the RGD site requires less work than unfolding by pulling at the N- and C- termini. Moreover, pulling at the N- and C-termini leads to 10FNIII unfolding along several pathways while pulling on the RGD site leads to a single exclusive unfolding pathway that includes a partially unfolded intermediate with exposed hydrophobic N-terminal beta-strands - residues that may facilitate fibronectin self-association. Additional mechanical unfolding triggers an essential arginine residue, which is required for high affinity binding to integrins, to move to a position far from the integrin binding site. This cell traction-induced conformational change may promote cell detachment after important partially unfolded kinetic intermediates are formed. These data suggest a novel mechanism that explains how cell-mediated forces promote fibronectin fibrillogenesis and how cell surface integrins detach from newly forming fibrils. This process enables cells to bind and unfold additional fibronectin modules - a method that propagates matrix assembly.

  12. Sorption behavior of Eu(III) from an aqueous solution onto modified hydroxyapatite: kinetics, modeling and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, H M H; Youssef, M A

    2017-08-16

    Nano-pore hydroxyapatite (HAP) was prepared using physical activation of raw and chemically modified [using Acid; HNO3 (HAPA) or Base; NaOH (HAPB)] bone char (BC) by heating at 900°C for 1 hr to obtain HAP9, HAPA9 and HAPB9, respectively. Investigation the effects of thermal and chemical treatment of prepared nano-hydroxyapatite on elemental analysis, FTIR, scanning electron microscopy, surface area and consequently, the sorption behavior of Eu (III) ions onto the prepared nano-pore hydroxyapatite. Batch adsorption technique was used and the obtained results revealed that the optimum pH = 5.0. The % removal of europium (III) using HAPA9 and HAPB9 reach to 100% within 15 min, while HAP9 after 180 min and the pseudo-second-order was found to be fit to the experimental data. According to Langmuir model, the maximum sorption capacities (qm) were 123.8, 384.9 and 74.2 mg g(-1) for HAP9, HAPA9 and HAPB9, respectively. The reaction is spontaneous according to ΔG° value. HCl (0.5 M) was the most efficient desorbing agent for recovery of Eu(III) and regeneration of adsorbents. Finally, nano-pore hydroxyapatite (HAP) was low cost and very effective adsorbent for sorption or recovery of Eu(III) from aqueous solutions and remediation of environmental pollution.

  13. Quantum mechanical treatment of As(3+)-thiol model compounds: implication for the core structure of As(III)-metallothionein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garla, Roobee; Kaur, Narinder; Bansal, Mohinder Pal; Garg, Mohan Lal; Mohanty, Biraja Prasad

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic (As) is one of the major health concerns in several regions around the world. Binding of As(III) with thiols is central to the mechanisms related to its toxicity, detoxification, and therapeutic effects. Due to its high thiol content, metallothionein (MT) is presumed to play an important role in case of arsenic toxicity. Consequences of these As-thiol interactions are not yet clear due to various difficulties in the characterization of arsenic bound proteins by spectroscopic techniques. Computational modeling can be a reliable approach in predicting the molecular structures of such complexes. This paper presents the results of a systematic study on different As(III)-thiol model compounds conducted by both ab initio and DFT methods with different Gaussian type basis sets. Proficiency of these theoretical methods has been evaluated in terms of bond lengths, bond angles, free energy, partial atomic charges, computational cost, and comparison with the experimental data. It has been demonstrated that the DFT-B3LYP/6-311+G(3df) functional offers better accuracy in predicting the structure and the UV absorption spectra of As(III)-thiol complexes. The results of the present study also helps in defining the boundaries for the core of arsenic bound MT so that quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods can be employed to predict the structural and functional aspects of the protein. Graphical Abstract Optimized structural parameters of As(3+)-thiol model compounds.

  14. Expression of metallothionein-I, -II, and -III in Alzheimer disease and animal models of neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Juan; Penkowa, Milena; Espejo, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    In recent years it has become increasingly clear that the metallothionein (MT) family of proteins is important in neurobiology. MT-I and MT-II are normally dramatically up-regulated by neuroinflammation. Results for MT-III are less clear. MTs could also be relevant in human neuropathology. In Alz...

  15. Enhanced FAA-hybrid III numerical dummy model in Madymo for aircraft occupant safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boucher, H.; Waagmeester, C.D.

    2003-01-01

    To improve survivability and to minimize the risk of injury to occupants in helicopter crash events, a complete Cabin Safety System concept including safety features and an enhanced FAA-Hybrid III dummy were developed within the HeliSafe project. A numerical tool was also created and validated to al

  16. Modeling, Growth and Characterization of III-V and Dilute Nitride Antimonide Materials and Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maros, Aymeric

    III-V multijunction solar cells have demonstrated record efficiencies with the best device currently at 46 % under concentration. Dilute nitride materials such as GaInNAsSb have been identified as a prime choice for the development of high efficiency, monolithic and lattice-matched multijunction solar cells as they can be lattice-matched to both GaAs and Ge substrates. These types of cells have demonstrated efficiencies of 44% for terrestrial concentrators, and with their upright configuration, they are a direct drop-in product for today's space and concentrator solar panels. The work presented in this dissertation has focused on the development of relatively novel dilute nitride antimonide (GaNAsSb) materials and solar cells using plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, along with the modeling and characterization of single- and multijunction solar cells. Nitrogen-free ternary compounds such as GaInAs and GaAsSb were investigated first in order to understand their structural and optical properties prior to introducing nitrogen. The formation of extended defects and the resulting strain relaxation in these lattice-mismatched materials is investigated through extensive structural characterization. Temperature- and power-dependent photoluminescence revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of Sb in GaAsSb films, leading to carrier localization effects at low temperatures. Tuning of the growth parameters was shown to suppress these Sb-induced localized states. The introduction of nitrogen was then considered and the growth process was optimized to obtain high quality GaNAsSb films lattice-matched to GaAs. Near 1-eV single-junction GaNAsSb solar cells were produced. The best devices used a p-n heterojunction configuration and demonstrated a current density of 20.8 mA/cm2, a fill factor of 64 % and an open-circuit voltage of 0.39 V, corresponding to a bandgap-voltage offset of 0.57 V, comparable with the state-of-the-art for this type of solar cells. Post-growth annealing

  17. A microcomputer based system for current-meter data acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, R.T.; Gartner, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting current measurements as part of an interdisciplinary study of the San Francisco Bay estuarine system. The current meters used in the study record current speed, direction, temperature, and conductivity in digital codes on magnetic tape cartridges. Upon recovery of the current meters, the data tapes are translated by a tape reader into computer codes for further analyses. Quite often the importance of the data processing phase of a current-measurement program is underestimated and downplayed. In this paper a data-processing system which performs the complete data processing and analyses is described. The system, which is configured around an LSI-11 microcomputer, has been assembled to provide the capabilities of data translation, reduction, and tabulation and graphical display immediately following recovery of current meters. The flexibility inherent in a microcomputer has made it available to perform many other research functions which would normally be done on an institutional computer.

  18. Simulation of Heat Transfer and Electromagnetic Fields of Protected Microcomputers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Lakatos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of collaboration between Department of mechatronics and electronics at University of Žilina and VÚVT Engineering a.s. Žilina in area of heat transfer simulations and disturbing electromagnetic radiation simulations in computer construction. The simulations results were used in development of protected microcomputer prototypes in frame of applied research at both of workplaces.

  19. Use of Data Base Microcomputer Software in Descriptive Nursing Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, Judy Jean

    1985-01-01

    Data base microcomputer software was used to design a file for data storage and retrieval in a qualitative nursing research project. The needs of 50 breast feeding mothers from birth to four months were studied. One thousand records with descriptive nursing data were entered into the file. The search and retrieval capability of data base software facilitated this qualitative research. The findings will be discussed in three areas: (1) infant concerns, (2) postpartum concerns, and (3) breast c...

  20. A Method for Evaluation of Microcomputers for Tactical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    to microcomputer systems. f. Ada Programming Language Ada , which is named after the world’s first com- puter programmer, Lady Ada Lovelace , is a very...HOL) Ada used as a program development tool for real-time processing including microprocessor applications. (2) Hosted on small development systems. 4...mainstream. The Defense Department’s Ada HOL is being developed to serve programming needs for real-time processing including 14 microprocessor

  1. Microcomputer Simulation of a Fourier Approach to Optical Wave Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    efficient method to model such ultrasonic propagation has been developed by Guyomar and Powers [Refs. 2,3]. Relying upon linear systems theory and...the application of linear systems theory , and the mathematical derivation of the field solution utilizing the Fourier approach. Chapter III commences...the spatial impulse response. Guyomar and Powers’ view differs from Stepanishen’s work in that linear systems theory is used to point out the

  2. The microcomputer: A tool for personal language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Wyatt

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Computer-assisted methods of teaching and learning languages have been surrounded by controversy and debate for over a decade. In 1979, however, microcomputers began to appear in a form suitable for educational applications, offering for the first time an alternative to both the cost and the approach of large computer systems. The impact of the microcomputer has been limited by a number of factors, and microcomputerassisted learning is still in a relative state of infancy. The main implications for language teaching and learning are only now beginning to be understood, just as the limiting factors are starting to disappear. This paper will assess the present situation and outline some likely future developments in the use of microcomputers in language learning. Rekenaargesteunde metodes by die onderrig en aanleer van tale is reeds meer as 'n dekade lank omgewe deur meningsverskil. In 1979 egter het mikrorekenaars hulle verskyning begin maak in 'n toepaslike vorm vir opvoedkundige doeleindes. Vir die eerste keer was daar 'n alternatief vir die koste verbonde aan en die benaderingswyse van groot rekenaarstelsels. Die trefkrag van die mikrorekenaar is deur 'n aantal faktore gekortwiek en rekenaargesteunde onderrig is steeds in sy kinderskoene. Die belangrikste implikasies vir die aanleer en onderrig van tale begin nou eers deurdring soos die beperkende faktore begin verdwyn. Hierdie artikel takseer die huidige situasie en omlyn moontlike toekomstige ontwikkelings vir die gebruik van mikrorekenaars by taalaanleer.

  3. A Rutherford Scattering Simulation with Microcomputer Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Wright, Lavonia F.

    1989-01-01

    Lists a program for a simulation of Rutherford's gold foil experiment in BASIC for both Apple II and IBM compatible computers. Compares Rutherford's model of the atom with Thompson's plum pudding model of the atom. (MVL)

  4. Two-Higgs-doublet type-II and -III models and t → ch at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arhrib, A. [Universite Abdelmalek Essaadi, Departement de Mathematiques, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, B. 416, Tangier (Morocco); National Center for Theoretical Sciences, Physics Division, Hsinchu (China); Benbrik, R. [Cadi Ayyad University, LPHEA, Semlalia, Marrakech (Morocco); Faculte Polydisciplinaire de Safi, MSISM Team, Sidi Bouzid, B.P 4162, Safi (Morocco); Chen, Chuan-Hung [National Cheng-Kung University, Department of Physics, Tainan (China); Gomez-Bock, Melina [Universidad de las Americas Puebla, DAFM, Cholula, PUE (Mexico); Semlali, Souad [Cadi Ayyad University, LPHEA, Semlalia, Marrakech (Morocco)

    2016-06-15

    We study the constraints of the generic two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) type-III and the impacts of the new Yukawa couplings. For comparisons, we revisit the analysis in the 2HDM type-II. To understand the influence of all involving free parameters and to realize their correlations, we employ a χ-square fitting approach by including theoretical and experimental constraints, such as the S, T, and U oblique parameters, the production of standard model Higgs and its decay to γγ, WW*/ZZ*, τ{sup +}τ{sup -}, etc. The errors of the analysis are taken at 68, 95.5, and 99.7% confidence levels. Due to the new Yukawa couplings being associated with cos(β - α) and sin(β - α), we find that the allowed regions for sin α and tan β in the type-III model can be broader when the dictated parameter χ{sub F} is positive; however, for negative χ{sub F}, the limits are stricter than those in the type-II model. By using the constrained parameters, we find that the deviation from the SM in h → Zγ can be of O(10 %). Additionally, we also study the top-quark flavor-changing processes induced at the tree level in the type-III model and find that when all current experimental data are considered, we get Br(t → c(h, H)) < 10{sup -3} for m{sub h} = 125.36 and m{sub h} = 150 GeV, and Br(t → cA) slightly exceeds 10{sup -3} for m{sub A} = 130 GeV. (orig.)

  5. Optimal III-nitride HEMTs: from materials and device design to compact model of the 2DEG charge density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kexin; Rakheja, Shaloo

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a physically motivated compact model of the charge-voltage (Q-V) characteristics in various III-nitride high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) operating under highly non-equilibrium transport conditions, i.e. high drain-source current. By solving the coupled Schrödinger-Poisson equation and incorporating the two-dimensional electrostatics in the channel, we obtain the charge at the top-of-the-barrier for various applied terminal voltages. The Q-V model accounts for cutting off of the negative momenta states from the drain terminal under high drain-source bias and when the transmission in the channel is quasi-ballistic. We specifically focus on AlGaN and AlInN as barrier materials and InGaN and GaN as the channel material in the heterostructure. The Q-V model is verified and calibrated against numerical results using the commercial TCAD simulator Sentaurus from Synopsys for a 20-nm channel length III-nitride HEMT. With 10 fitting parameters, most of which have a physical origin and can easily be obtained from numerical or experimental calibration, the compact Q-V model allows us to study the limits and opportunities of III-nitride technology. We also identify optimal material and geometrical parameters of the device that maximize the carrier concentration in the HEMT channel in order to achieve superior RF performance. Additionally, the compact charge model can be easily integrated in a hierarchical circuit simulator, such as Keysight ADS and CADENCE, to facilitate circuit design and optimization of various technology parameters.

  6. Developmental defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans model for type III galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokate-Llanos, Ana M; Monje, José M; Murdoch, Piedad Del Socorro; Muñoz, Manuel J

    2014-12-01

    Type III galactosemia is a metabolic disorder caused by reduced activity of UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, which participates in galactose metabolism and the generation of various UDP-sugar species. We characterized gale-1 in Caenorhabditis elegans and found that a complete loss-of-function mutation is lethal, as has been hypothesized for humans, whereas a nonlethal partial loss-of-function allele causes a variety of developmental abnormalities, likely resulting from the impairment of the glycosylation process. We also observed that gale-1 mutants are hypersensitive to galactose as well as to infections. Interestingly, we found interactions between gale-1 and the unfolded protein response.

  7. Application of microcomputers for electric arc heating processes. Session 2. 2b N. 2. 2. 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitarts, D.A.; Izakson-Demidov, Y.A.; Kalistratov, V.A.; Edemsky, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    Control systems employed with furnaces for steel production and for smelting of ores together with installations of electroslag and vacuum-arc remelting equipments are described. Details of mathematical models and control algorithms is given in addition to the schematic electrical circuits and lists of component parts of the control systems. The particular feature of the mathematical model is the application of the general state parameters and the static methods for their identification and adaptation. The variety of control system types employed in electroheat and having the possibility of using microcomputers, allows for expediency by using a single system approach for designing algorithm, a programme and the hardware to be used. Provision of the hardware to be employed for the real-time system, is based on a developed system of interruptions and use of a single library of hard and software modules, the latter having a general design of its layout for the different systems.

  8. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-29

    This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

  9. Structural safety evaluation of Karun III Dam and calibration of its finite element model using instrumentation and site observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mirzabozorg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, a comprehensive finite element model of Karun III double curvature arch dam is calibrated based on the micro geodesies measurements and instrumentation. Thermal properties of concrete are obtained by transient thermal analysis and the results are compared with those obtained from thermometers. Thermal analysis features include air temperature, water layers temperatures, and the solar radiation on the exposed faces. Structural calibration features include thermal distribution within the dam body, dam self-weight, hydrostatic pressure, and silt load applied on the model of dam–reservoir–foundation system. Finite element model calibration provides updated information related to the current dam status and can be used for further safety evaluations.

  10. Ultraviolet C II and Si III Transit Spectroscopy and Modeling of the Evaporating Atmosphere of GJ436b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke Loyd, R. O.; Koskinen, T. T.; France, Kevin; Schneider, Christian; Redfield, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen gas evaporating from the atmosphere of the hot-Neptune GJ436b absorbs over 50% of the stellar Lyα emission during transit. Given the planet’s atmospheric composition and energy-limited escape rate, this hydrogen outflow is expected to entrain heavier atoms such as C and O. We searched for C and Si in the escaping atmosphere of GJ436b using far-ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope COS G130M observations made during the planet’s extended H i transit. These observations show no transit absorption in the C ii 1334,1335 Å and Si iii 1206 Å lines integrated over [‑100, 100] km s‑1, imposing 95% (2σ) upper limits of 14% (C ii) and 60% (Si iii) depth on the transit of an opaque disk and 22% (C ii) and 49% (Si iii) depth on an extended highly asymmetric transit similar to that of H i Lyα. C+ is likely present in the outflow according to a simulation we carried out using a spherically symmetric photochemical-hydrodynamical model. This simulation predicts an ∼2% transit over the integrated bandpass, consistent with the data. At line center, we predict the C ii transit depth to be as high as 19%. Our model predicts a neutral hydrogen escape rate of 1.6× {10}9 g s‑1 (3.1× {10}9 g s‑1 for all species) for an upper atmosphere composed of hydrogen and helium.

  11. Effects of Microcomputer versus Electric Element Typewriter Instruction on Straight Copy and Production Keyboarding Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Leslie J.

    1990-01-01

    One group of secondary keyboarding students was taught on typewriters and switched to microcomputers after six weeks, the other used microcomputers first, then typewriters. Using computers, students showed faster completion times and fewer typographical errors. Transfer from computers to typewriters slowed times and increased errors. Overall,…

  12. Usage Patterns at Western Kentucky University Microcomputer Lab (U.S.A.): Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Jung Sun

    This paper describes the results of a study of the microcomputer use patterns reflected by more than 13,000 users' records from the microcomputer laboratory at Western Kentucky University for 1983 to 1986. The data analyzed focused on: (1) numbers of users; (2) frequent user groups; (3) sex differences; (4) prime time usage; (5) the use of…

  13. Microcomputers and Evaluation Research: Potential Benefits and Problems. Paper and Report Series, No. 98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    This paper deals with two questions: (1) what are the the applications that might be made of microcomputers in evaluation? and (2) what are the kinds of problems (personnel, organizational, and technical) that must be overcome if microcomputers are to be used effectively? The applications include proposals and planning, management, data…

  14. A Design Method for a State Feedback Microcomputer Controller of a Wide Bandwidth Analog Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    METHOD . . . .... 16 1. State Feedback Control System . . . . . . 16 2. Microcomputer Controller Design with Time Delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18...90 C. DESIGN OF STATE FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEM WITH MICROCOMPUTER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 1. Control Algorithm...FIGURES 2.1 Signal Flow Diagram of State Feedback System . . 17 2.2 Feedback Control System with PD Control . . . . 18 2.3 Bode Diagram of Eqn. 2.7

  15. The Development and Application of Advanced Video and Microcomputer- Based Command and Control (C2) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    video recorders; microcomputers; spatial data management; shared data microcomputer software design; 6502 Microprocessor; APPLE II M AUSTRAC -T (CaeUE...maintain a key role in supporting the continued development of the technology. In 1979, work began at the Computer Corporation of Amer- ica to

  16. A DMA interface between a Biomation 8100 and an Intel MDS-800 microcomputer development system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynk, E T

    1979-09-01

    An interface is described which permits high-speed data transfer between a Biomation 8100 transient recorder and an Intel MDS-800 microcomputer system equipped with an MDS-501 DMA (direct memory access) channel controller. The interface is especially useful for data acquisition situations in which many successive traces must be recorded. For example, signal averaging can be performed within the microcomputer system.

  17. Using the Analogue Input Port on the BBC Microcomputer: Some General Principles and a Specific Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, R. H.; Underwood, C. I.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses an easy way of interfacing physics experiments to a microcomputer, providing information on the "analog input port" of a BBC microcomputer. Also describes a capacitor discharge experiment with suggestions for several student activities such as investigating decay curve shapes. Program listing is available from author. (DH)

  18. MicroComputers: New Directions and Methods for the Preparation of Special Education Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Scott K.; Kelemen, Eve J.

    1984-01-01

    The article discusses the dual role of the microcomputer as a focus and a medium for training special educators. Current issues, applications, and outcomes surrounding the impact of microcomputer technology on the preparation of special education personnel are explored. Implications for inservice and preservice training of special educators are…

  19. Mathematics for seismic data processing with basic microcomputer programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camina, A.R.; Janacek, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The new, refined techniques for exploration of oil and gas and the growth of computer uses have led to a far wider application of mathematics, and the interpretation of seismic data in particular. The authors explain in detail the mathematical principles required for signal processing and clarify for the reader what are sometimes very complex concepts. The book starts at precalculus level and progresses through to advanced theories and principles. A collection of BASIC microcomputer programs is included to give the reader a practical feel for the mathematics and their applications to these techniques.

  20. Sand and gravel mine operations and reclamation planning using microcomputers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariffin, J.B.

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to focus on the application of microcomputers, also known as personal computers, in planning for sand and gravel mine operations and reclamation at a site in Story County, Iowa. This site, called the Arrasmith Pit, is operated by Martin Marietta Aggregates, Inc. The Arrasmith site, which encompasses an area of about 25 acres, is a relatively small site for aggregate mining. However, planning for the concurrent mine operation and reclamation program at this site is just as critical as with larger sites and the planning process is the same.

  1. Constraining the Absolute Orientation of Eta Carinae's Binary Orbit: A 3-D Dynamical Model for the Broad [Fe III] Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Madura, Thomas I; Owocki, Stanley P; Groh, Jose H; Okazaki, Atsuo T; Russell, Christopher M P

    2011-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamical model for the broad [Fe III] emission observed in Eta Carinae using the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). This model is based on full 3-D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's binary colliding winds. Radiative transfer codes are used to generate synthetic spectro-images of [Fe III] emission line structures at various observed orbital phases and STIS slit position angles (PAs). Through a parameter study that varies the orbital inclination i, the PA {\\theta} that the orbital plane projection of the line-of-sight makes with the apastron side of the semi-major axis, and the PA on the sky of the orbital axis, we are able, for the first time, to tightly constrain the absolute 3-D orientation of the binary orbit. To simultaneously reproduce the blue-shifted emission arcs observed at orbital phase 0.976, STIS slit PA = +38 degrees, and the temporal variations in emission seen at negative slit PAs, the binary ...

  2. Two-Higgs-Doublet type-II and -III models and $t\\to c h$ at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Arhrib, A; Chen, Chuan-Hung; Gomez-Bock, M; Semlali, S

    2015-01-01

    Based on the updated $8$ TeV LHC data for the Higgs searches, we study the constraints of generic two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM) type-III and the impacts of the new Yukawa couplings. For comparisons, we revisit the analysis in 2HDM type-II. For understanding the influence of all involving free parameters and realizing their correlations, we employ $\\chi$-square fitting approach by including theoretical and experimental constraints, such as $B\\to X_s \\gamma$, $B_q-\\bar B_q$ mixing, S, T and U oblique parameters, the production of standard model Higgs and its decay to $\\gamma\\gamma$, $WW^*/ZZ^*$, $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$, etc. The errors of analysis are taken at $68\\%$, $95.5\\%$ and $99.7\\%$ confidence level. Due to the new Yukawa couplings being associated with $\\cos(\\alpha-\\beta)$ and $\\sin(\\alpha-\\beta)$, we find that the allowed regions for $\\sin\\alpha$ and $\\tan\\beta$ in type-III could be broader when the dictated parameter $\\chi_F$ is positive; however, for negative $\\chi_F$, the limits are more strict than those ...

  3. Microcomputers in Art Education: An Introductory Vocabulary for Art Teachers Who Need To Make Sense of New Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouch, Ginny

    This booklet provides introductory information and terminology for art teachers concerning the use of microcomputers in elementary and secondary school art classes. Part 1 describes the sizes and uses of microcomputers and distinguishes between maxi, mini, micro, lap, and handheld computers. Part 2 discusses: (1) basic microcomputer hardware and…

  4. Evaluation of Simulated Marine Aerosol Production Using the WaveWatchIII Prognostic Wave Model Coupled to the Community Atmosphere Model within the Community Earth System Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, M. S. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Sciences; Keene, William C. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Zhang, J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Reichl, B. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Shi, Y. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences; Hara, T. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Reid, J. S. [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Monterey, CA (United States); Fox-Kemper, B. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences; Craig, A. P. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Erickson, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Division; Ginis, I. [Univ. of Rhode Island, Narragansett, RI (United States). Graduate School of Oceanography; Webb, A. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Ocean Technology, Policy, and Environment

    2016-11-08

    Primary marine aerosol (PMA) is emitted into the atmosphere via breaking wind waves on the ocean surface. Most parameterizations of PMA emissions use 10-meter wind speed as a proxy for wave action. This investigation coupled the 3rd generation prognostic WAVEWATCH-III wind-wave model within a coupled Earth system model (ESM) to drive PMA production using wave energy dissipation rate – analogous to whitecapping – in place of 10-meter wind speed. The wind speed parameterization did not capture basin-scale variability in relations between wind and wave fields. Overall, the wave parameterization did not improve comparison between simulated versus measured AOD or Na+, thus highlighting large remaining uncertainties in model physics. Results confirm the efficacy of prognostic wind-wave models for air-sea exchange studies coupled with laboratory- and field-based characterizations of the primary physical drivers of PMA production. No discernible correlations were evident between simulated PMA fields and observed chlorophyll or sea surface temperature.

  5. Micro-Computed Tomography and Finite Element Method Study of Open-Cell Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wejrzanowski Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the characterization of structure and properties of open-cell porous materials by high-resolution x-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT and finite element method (FEM is addressed. The unique properties of open porosity foams make them interesting in a range of applications in science and engineering such as energy absorbers, lightweight construction materials or heat insulators. Consequently, a detailed knowledge of structure as well as mechanical properties (i.e. Young’s Modulus, Poisson’s Ratio of such foams is essential. The resulting pixel size of the μCT was 40 μm, which enabled satisfactory visualization of the complex foam structure and quantitative characterization. Foam morphology was studied on post-processed computed tomography images, while mechanical properties were analyzed with use of the finite element method on numerical model obtained from μCT results.

  6. Econometrics and data of the 9 sector Dynamic General Equilibrium Model. Volume III. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, E.R.; Fraumeni, B.M.; Hudson, E.A.; Jorgenson, D.W.; Stoker, T.M.

    1981-03-01

    This report presents the econometrics and data of the 9 sector Dynamic General Equilibrium Model. There are two key components of 9DGEM - the model of household behavior and the model of produconcrneer behavior. The household model is concerned with decisions on consumption, saving, labor supply and the composition of consumption. The producer model is concerned with output price formation and determination of input patterns and purchases for each of the nine producing sectors. These components form the behavioral basis of DGEM. The remaining components are concerned with constraints, balance conditions, accounting, and government revenues and expenditures (these elements are developed in the report on the model specification).

  7. Surface area and volume measurements of volcanic ash particles using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT): A comparison with scanning electron microscope (SEM) stereoscopic imaging and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Orkun; Şen, Erdal; Aydar, Erkan; Tatar, Ä.°Lkan; Ćelik, H. Hamdi

    2010-05-01

    Volcanic ash particles are important components of explosive eruptions and their surface texture is the subject of intense research. Characterization of ash surfaces is crucial for understanding the physics of the volcanic plumes, remote sensing measurements of ash and aerosols, interfacial processes, modelling transportation and deposition of tephra and characterizing eruptive styles. A number of different methods have been used over the years to arrive at surface area estimates. The more common methods include estimates based on the geometric considerations (geometric surface area) and the physisorption of gas molecules on the surface of interest (physical surface area). In this study, micro computed tomography (micro-CT), a non-destructive method providing three-dimensional data enabled the measurement of surface areas and volumes of individual ash particles. Specific surface area estimates for ash particles were also obtained using nitrogen as gas adsorbent and the BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) model. Results were compared with the values obtained from SEM stereoscopic imaging and geometric considerations. Surface area estimates of micro-CT and SEM stereoscopic imaging overlaps with mean specific surface area results of 0.0167 and 0.0214 m2/g, respectively. However, ash particle surface textures present quite a deviation from that of their geometric forms and approximation to sphere and ellipsoid both seemed to be inadequate for representation of real ash surfaces. The higher surface area estimate (> 0.4 m2/g) obtained from the technique based on physical sorption of gases (BET model here) was attributed to its capability for surface areas associated even with angstrom-sized pores. SEM stereoscopic and/or micro-CT imaging were suggested for characterization of textures on macro-pore regions of ash particles.

  8. A case of polyostotic osteosarcoma with kidney metastases in a dog: histopathology and microcomputed tomographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, E; Goyenvalle, E; Guintard, C

    2014-12-01

    A 7-year- old sexually intact female Leonberg dog was evaluated for chronic lameness of the right forelimb. The bitch showed mild hyperthermia (39.3°C), a decrease in its activity, a capricious appetite, a high weight loss (4 kg in 15 days) and a right foreleg lameness. A careful clinical examination revealed a deformation of the right proximal humerus and right tibia. Radiographic examination of the right tibia, right humerus showed osteolysis of both cortical and trabecular bone with a periosteal bone proliferation in the vicinal soft tissues. The owner having refused a bone biopsy, a treatment with NSAIDs and antibiotics was prescribed. After a marked improvement during the first two weeks, an increase in lameness and activity was observed. At that time, the owner accepted the bone biopsy. Histopathologic examination evidenced an osteosarcoma but the amount of available tissue was limited. Due to the poor prognosis, he declined treatment and decided to euthanize the dog. An osteosarcoma with a large chondroid component was observed at autopsy together with ossifying kidney metastases. Histological findings revealed a grade III osteosarcoma. Conventional and undecalcified histology and X-ray microcomputed tomography findings evidenced a large and partially mineralized osteoid part with a sunburst extension in the soft tissues. This is the first time that microCT and undecalcified analyses of an osteosarcoma are presented. The osteolytic and metaplastic bone foci were easily demonstrated by this method.

  9. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Mathematical Models of Coupled Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes for Nuclear Waste Repositories. Executive Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Tsang, C.F. [Lawrence Berkely National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Science Div.; Mayor, J.C. [ENRESA, Madrid (Spain); Kautzky, F. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)] (eds.)

    2005-02-15

    DECOVALEX is an international consortium of governmental agencies associated with the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a number of countries. The consortium's mission is the DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiments. Hence the acronym/name DECOVALEX. Currently, agencies from Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden, United Kingdom, and the United States are in DECOVALEX. Emplacement of nuclear waste in a repository in geologic media causes a number of physical processes to be intensified in the surrounding rock mass due to the decay heat from the waste. The four main processes of concern are thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical. Interactions or coupling between these heat-driven processes must be taken into account in modeling the performance of the repository for such modeling to be meaningful and reliable. DECOVALEX III is organized around four tasks. The FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barriers EXperiment) in situ experiment being conducted at the Grimsel site in Switzerland is to be simulated and analyzed in Task 1. Task 2, centered around the Drift Scale Test (DST) at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, USA, has several sub-tasks (Task 2A, Task 2B, Task 2C and Task 2D) to investigate a number of the coupled processes in the DST. Task 3 studies three benchmark problems: a) the effects of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) coupling on the performance of the near-field of a nuclear waste repository (BMT1); b) the effect of upscaling THM processes on the results of performance assessment (BMT2); and c) the effect of glaciation on rock mass behavior (BMT3). Task 4 is on the direct application of THM coupled process modeling in the performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories in geologic media. This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, approaches, and the highlights of the main achievements and outstanding issues of the tasks studied in the DECOVALEX III project

  10. Factor analysis and predictive validity of microcomputer-based tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R. S.; Baltzley, D. R.; Turnage, J. J.; Jones, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    11 tests were selected from two microcomputer-based performance test batteries because previously these tests exhibited rapid stability (less than 10 min, of practice) and high retest reliability efficiencies (r greater than 0.707 for each 3 min. of testing). The battery was administered three times to each of 108 college students (48 men and 60 women) and a factor analysis was performed. Two of the three identified factors appear to be related to information processing ("encoding" and "throughput/decoding"), and the third named an "output/speed" factor. The spatial, memory, and verbal tests loaded on the "encoding" factor and included Grammatical Reasoning, Pattern Comparison, Continuous Recall, and Matrix Rotation. The "throughput/decoding" tests included perceptual/numerical tests like Math Processing, Code Substitution, and Pattern Comparison. The output speed factor was identified by Tapping and Reaction Time tests. The Wonderlic Personnel Test was group administered before the first and after the last administration of the performance tests. The multiple Rs in the total sample between combined Wonderlic as a criterion and less than 5 min. of microcomputer testing on Grammatical Reasoning and Math Processing as predictors ranged between 0.41 and 0.52 on the three test administrations. Based on these results, the authors recommend a core battery which, if time permits, would consist of two tests from each factor. Such a battery is now known to permit stable, reliable, and efficient assessment.

  11. Analysis of fault using microcomputer protection by symmetrical component method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Ashish Choubey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To enhance power supply reliability for the userterminals in the case of the distribution system toavoid interference by the fault again, rapidlycomplete the automatic identification, positioning,automatic fault isolation, network reconfigurationuntil the resumption of supply of non-fault section,a microprocessor-based relay protection device hasdeveloped. As the fault component theory is widelyused in microcomputer protection, and faultcomponent exists in the network of faultcomponent, it is necessary to build up the faultcomponent network when short circuit faultemerging and to draw the current and voltagecomponent phasor diagram at fault point. In orderto understand microcomputer protection based onthe symmetrical component principle, we obtainedthe sequence current and sequence voltageaccording to the concept of symmetrical component.Distribution line directly to user-oriented powersupply, the reliability of its operation determines thequality and level of electricity supply. In recentdecades, because of the general power of the tirelessefforts of scientists and technicians, relay protectiontechnology and equipment application level hasbeen greatly improved, but the current domesticproduction of computer hardware, protectiondevices are still outdated systems. Softwaredevelopment has maintenance difficulties and shortsurvival time. With the factory automation systeminterface functions weak points, the networkcommunication cannot meet the actualrequirements. Protection principle configurationand device manufacturing process to be improvedand so on.

  12. Analysis of fault using microcomputer protection by symmetrical component method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Choubey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available To enhance power supply reliability for the user terminals in the case of the distribution system to avoid interference by the fault again, rapidly complete the automatic identification, positioning, automatic fault isolation, network reconfiguration until the resumption of supply of non-fault section, a microprocessor-based relay protection device has developed. As the fault component theory is widely used in microcomputer protection, and fault component exists in the network of fault component, it is necessary to build up the fault component network when short circuit fault emerging and to draw the current and voltage component phasor diagram at fault point. In order to understand microcomputer protection based on the symmetrical component principle, we obtained the sequence current and sequence voltage according to the concept of symmetrical component. Distribution line directly to user-oriented power supply, the reliability of its operation determines the quality and level of electricity supply. In recent decades, because of the general power of the tireless efforts of scientists and technicians, relay protection technology and equipment application level has been greatly improved, but the current domestic production of computer hardware, protection devices are still outdated systems. Software development has maintenance difficulties and short survival time. With the factory automation system interface functions weak points, the network communication cannot meet the actual requirements. Protection principle configuration and device manufacturing process to be improved and so on.

  13. DFT modeling and spectroscopic study of metal ligand bonding in La(III) complex of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylov, Tz.; Trendafilova, N.; Kostova, I.; Georgieva, I.; Bauer, G.

    2006-09-01

    The binding mode of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III) is elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexation ability of the deprotonated ligand (CCA -) to La(III) is studied using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. The experimental data suggest the complex formula La(CCA) 2(NO 3)(H 2O) 2. B3LYP, BHLYP, B3P86, B3PW91, PW91P86 and MPW1PW91 functionals are tested for geometry and frequency calculations of the neutral ligand and all of them show bond length deviations bellow 1%. B3LYP/6-31G(d) level combined with large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanum is selected to describe the molecular, electronic and vibrational structures as well as the conformational behavior of HCCA, CCA - and La-CCA complex. The metal-ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different La-CCA structures. The calculated atomic charges and the bonding orbital polarizations point to strong ionic metal-ligand bonding in La-CCA complex and insignificant donor acceptor interaction. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA - and La(CCA) 2(NO 3)(H 2O) 2 systems based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal-ligand binding mode.

  14. The use of artificial neural network for modelling of phycoremediation of toxic elements As(III) and As(V) from wastewater using Botryococcus braunii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, M. S.; Majumder, C. B.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, a thorough investigation has been done on the removal efficiency of both As(III) and As (V) from synthetic wastewater by phycoremediation of Botryococcus braunii algal biomass. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are practised for predicting % phycoremediation efficiency of both As(III) and As(V) ions. The influence of several parameters for example initial pH, inoculum size, contact time and initial arsenic concentration (either As(III) or As(V)) was examined systematically. The maximum phycoremediation of As(III) and As(V) was found to be 85.22% and 88.15% at pH 9.0, equilibrium time of 144 h by using algal inoculum size of 10% (v/v) and initial arsenic concentration of 50 mg/L. The data acquired from laboratory scale experimental set up was utilized for training a three-layer feed-forward back propagation (BP) with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) training algorithm having 4:5:1 architecture. A comparison between the experimental data and model outputs provided a high correlation coefficient (R2all_ANN equal to 0.9998) and exhibited that the model was capable for predicting the phycoremediation of both As(III) and As(V) from wastewater. The network topology was optimized by changing number of neurons in hidden layers. ANNs are efficient to model and simulate highly non-liner multivariable relationships. Absolute error and Standard deviation (SD) with respect to experimental output were calculated for ANN model outputs. The comparison of phycoremediation efficiencies of both As(III) and As(V) between experimental results and ANN model outputs exhibited that ANN model can determine the behaviour of As(III) and As(V) elimination process under various circumstances.

  15. The use of artificial neural network for modelling of phycoremediation of toxic elements As(III) and As(V) from wastewater using Botryococcus braunii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-02-15

    In the present study, a thorough investigation has been done on the removal efficiency of both As(III) and As (V) from synthetic wastewater by phycoremediation of Botryococcus braunii algal biomass. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are practised for predicting % phycoremediation efficiency of both As(III) and As(V) ions. The influence of several parameters for example initial pH, inoculum size, contact time and initial arsenic concentration (either As(III) or As(V)) was examined systematically. The maximum phycoremediation of As(III) and As(V) was found to be 85.22% and 88.15% at pH9.0, equilibrium time of 144h by using algal inoculum size of 10% (v/v) and initial arsenic concentration of 50mg/L. The data acquired from laboratory scale experimental set up was utilized for training a three-layer feed-forward back propagation (BP) with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) training algorithm having 4:5:1 architecture. A comparison between the experimental data and model outputs provided a high correlation coefficient (R(2)all_ANN equal to 0.9998) and exhibited that the model was capable for predicting the phycoremediation of both As(III) and As(V) from wastewater. The network topology was optimized by changing number of neurons in hidden layers. ANNs are efficient to model and simulate highly non-liner multivariable relationships. Absolute error and Standard deviation (SD) with respect to experimental output were calculated for ANN model outputs. The comparison of phycoremediation efficiencies of both As(III) and As(V) between experimental results and ANN model outputs exhibited that ANN model can determine the behaviour of As(III) and As(V) elimination process under various circumstances.

  16. Development of a plate-type fuel model for the neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled code - SIMMER-III - and its application to the analyses of SPERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Ping, E-mail: ping.liu@areva.co [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gabrielli, Fabrizio; Rineiski, Andrei; Maschek, Werner [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (IKET), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bruna, Giovanni B. [Reactor Safety Division, French Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), B.P. 17, 92262 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

    2010-10-15

    SIMMER-III, a neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled code, was originally developed for core disruptive accident analyses of liquid metal cooled fast reactors. Due to its versatility in investigating scenarios of core disruption, the code has also been extended to the simulation of transients in thermal neutron systems such as the criticality accident at the JCO fuel fabrication plant, and, in recent years, applied to water-moderated thermal research reactor transient studies, too. Originally, SIMMER considered only cylindrical fuel pin geometry. Therefore, implementation of a plate-type fuel model to the SIMMER-III code is of importance for the analysis of research reactors adopting this kind of fuel. Furthermore, validation of the SIMMER-III modeling of light water-cooled thermal reactor reactivity initiated transients is of necessity. This paper presents the work carried out on the SIMMER-III code in the framework of a KIT and IRSN joint activity aimed at providing the code with experimental reactor transient study capabilities. The first step of the job was the implementation of a new fuel model in SIMMER-III. Verification on this new model indicates that it can well simulate the steady-state temperature profile in the fuel. Secondly, three cases with the shortest reactor periods of 5.0 ms, 4.6 ms and 3.2 ms among the Special Power Excursion Reactor Tests (SPERT) performed in the SPERT I D-12/25 facility have been simulated. Comparison of the results between the SIMMER-III simulation and the reported SPERT results indicates that although there is space for further improvement on the modeling of negative feedback mechanisms, with this plate-type fuel model SIMMER-III can well represent the transient phenomena of reactivity driven power excursion.

  17. Metallothionein-I and -III expression in animal models of Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Adlard, P; Cotman, C

    2006-01-01

    diseases, the use of animal models is a valuable tool. Several transgenic mouse models of AD amyloid deposits are currently available. These models express human beta-amyloid precursor protein (AbetaPP) carrying different mutations that subsequently result in a varied pattern of beta-amyloid (Abeta...... suggesting that the various MT isoforms may have different roles in these experimental systems, and perhaps also in human AD....

  18. The Translation Invariant Massive Nelson Model: III. Asymptotic Completeness Below the Two-Boson Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybalski, Wojciech; Møller, Jacob Schach

    2015-11-01

    We show asymptotic completeness of two-body scattering for a class of translation invariant models describing a single quantum particle (the electron) linearly coupled to a massive scalar field (bosons). Our proof is based on a recently established Mourre estimate for these models. In contrast to previous approaches, it requires no number cutoff, no restriction on the particle-field coupling strength, and no restriction on the magnitude of total momentum. Energy, however, is restricted by the two-boson threshold, admitting only scattering of a dressed electron and a single asymptotic boson. The class of models we consider include the UV-cutoff Nelson and polaron models.

  19. Constraining the Absolute Orientation of eta Carinae's Binary Orbit: A 3-D Dynamical Model for the Broad [Fe III] Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) dynamical model for the broad [Fe III] emission observed in Eta Carinae using the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). This model is based on full 3-D Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's binary colliding winds. Radiative transfer codes are used to generate synthetic spectro-images of [Fe III] emission line structures at various observed orbital phases and STIS slit position angles (PAs). Through a parameter study that varies the orbital inclination i, the PA(theta) that the orbital plane projection of the line-of-sight makes with the apastron side of the semi-major axis, and the PA on the sky of the orbital axis, we are able, for the first time, to tightly constrain the absolute 3-D orientation of the binary orbit. To simultaneously reproduce the blue-shifted emission arcs observed at orbital phase 0.976, STIS slit PA = +38deg, and the temporal variations in emission seen at negative slit PAs, the binary needs to have an i approx. = 130deg to 145deg, Theta approx. = -15deg to +30deg, and an orbital axis projected on the sky at a P A approx. = 302deg to 327deg east of north. This represents a system with an orbital axis that is closely aligned with the inferred polar axis of the Homunculus nebula, in 3-D. The companion star, Eta(sub B), thus orbits clockwise on the sky and is on the observer's side of the system at apastron. This orientation has important implications for theories for the formation of the Homunculus and helps lay the groundwork for orbital modeling to determine the stellar masses.

  20. Long-Term Study of Children With ROME III Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders Managed Symptomatically in a Biopsychosocial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, Shailender; Parikh, Suchi; Madani, Rohit S; Krasaelap, Amornluck

    2017-04-01

    Our study evaluated progression of and identified potential factors contributing to outcomes of ROME III defined-functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in children treated symptomatically in a biopsychosocial model of care with a long-term follow-up. We performed a retrospective review of pediatric patients who were diagnosed with ROME III defined-FGIDs including functional abdominal pain, functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome and abdominal migraine. Patients were managed symptomatically in a biopsychosocial model of care from the time of initial diagnosis. Demographics, management, progression and response to treatment assessed as complete, partial, and no improvement were reviewed. Two hundred fifty-eight patients were included with mean age of 10.6 years, female 55.4%, mean number of encounters 3.3 visits, and mean follow-up was 18.7 months (range 2 - 59, SD 15.8). Diagnoses were functional abdominal pain 45%, irritable bowel syndrome 20.9%, multiple 13.2%, functional dyspepsia 12.8%, and abdominal migraine 8.1%. Investigations were performed in most patients: laboratory studies in 93.4% (non-contributory abnormal 23.6%), imaging studies in 45.3% (non-contributory abnormal 5%) and endoscopies in 43.0% (non-contributory abnormal 1.2%). Treatment included medication in 93.7%, and surgery in 1.9% (normal pathology). There were new functional gastrointestinal diagnosis in 11.6%, evolution of FGIDs, from one to another in 12.0%, and recurrence found in 35.7% of patients. There were 60.1% patients in the complete improvement group (CIG) and 39.1% in the partial/no improvement group (PIG/NIG). No statistical difference was found between CIG and PIG/NIG regarding demographics or evaluation. PIG/NIG had more encounters (mean 3.63 vs. 3.11; P = 0.03), had non-contributory lab abnormalities (34.4% vs. 20.0%; P = 0.01), needed more endoscopies (52.4% vs. 36.8%; P = 0.02), required more treatment changes (mean 1.41 vs. 0.81; P ROME III defined-FGIDs who

  1. Ethanol mediated As(III) adsorption onto Zn-loaded pinecone biochar: Experimental investigation, modeling, and optimization using hybrid artificial neural network-genetic algorithm approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Mohd; Van Vinh, N; Behera, Shishir Kumar; Park, Hung-Suck

    2017-04-01

    Organic matters (OMs) and their oxidization products often influence the fate and transport of heavy metals in the subsurface aqueous systems through interaction with the mineral surfaces. This study investigates the ethanol (EtOH)-mediated As(III) adsorption onto Zn-loaded pinecone (PC) biochar through batch experiments conducted under Box-Behnken design. The effect of EtOH on As(III) adsorption mechanism was quantitatively elucidated by fitting the experimental data using artificial neural network and quadratic modeling approaches. The quadratic model could describe the limiting nature of EtOH and pH on As(III) adsorption, whereas neural network revealed the stronger influence of EtOH (64.5%) followed by pH (20.75%) and As(III) concentration (14.75%) on the adsorption phenomena. Besides, the interaction among process variables indicated that EtOH enhances As(III) adsorption over a pH range of 2 to 7, possibly due to facilitation of ligand-metal(Zn) binding complexation mechanism. Eventually, hybrid response surface model-genetic algorithm (RSM-GA) approach predicted a better optimal solution than RSM, i.e., the adsorptive removal of As(III) (10.47μg/g) is facilitated at 30.22mg C/L of EtOH with initial As(III) concentration of 196.77μg/L at pH5.8. The implication of this investigation might help in understanding the application of biochar for removal of various As(III) species in the presence of OM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Evaluating the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals using a level III model based on poly-parameter linear free energy relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowska, Barbara; Breivik, Knut; Wania, Frank

    2006-04-15

    We recently proposed how to expand the applicability of multimedia models towards polar organic chemicals by expressing environmental phase partitioning with the help of poly-parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). Here we elaborate on this approach by applying it to three pharmaceutical substances. A PP-LFER-based version of a Level III fugacity model calculates overall persistence, concentrations and intermedia fluxes of polar and non-polar organic chemicals between air, water, soil and sediments at steady-state. Illustrative modeling results for the pharmaceuticals within a defined coastal region are presented and discussed. The model results are highly sensitive to the degradation rate in water and the equilibrium partitioning between organic carbon and water, suggesting that an accurate description of this particular partitioning equilibrium is essential in order to obtain reliable predictions of environmental fate. The PP-LFER based modeling approach furthermore illustrates that the greatest mobility in aqueous phases may be experienced by pharmaceuticals that combines a small molecular size with strong H-acceptor properties.

  3. Evaluating the environmental fate of pharmaceuticals using a level III model based on poly-parameter linear free energy relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zukowska, Barbara [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdansk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Breivik, Knut [NILU- Norwegian Institute for Air Research, P.O. Box 100, NO-2027 Kjeller (Norway)]. E-mail: knut.breivik@nilu.no; Wania, Frank [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough, 1265 Military Trail, Scarborough, Ontario, M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2006-04-15

    We recently proposed how to expand the applicability of multimedia models towards polar organic chemicals by expressing environmental phase partitioning with the help of poly-parameter linear free energy relationships (PP-LFERs). Here we elaborate on this approach by applying it to three pharmaceutical substances. A PP-LFER-based version of a Level III fugacity model calculates overall persistence, concentrations and intermedia fluxes of polar and non-polar organic chemicals between air, water, soil and sediments at steady-state. Illustrative modeling results for the pharmaceuticals within a defined coastal region are presented and discussed. The model results are highly sensitive to the degradation rate in water and the equilibrium partitioning between organic carbon and water, suggesting that an accurate description of this particular partitioning equilibrium is essential in order to obtain reliable predictions of environmental fate. The PP-LFER based modeling approach furthermore illustrates that the greatest mobility in aqueous phases may be experienced by pharmaceuticals that combines a small molecular size with strong H-acceptor properties.

  4. River water quality model no. 1 (RWQM1): III. Biochemical submodel selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanrolleghem, P.; Borchardt, D.; Henze, Mogens

    2001-01-01

    The new River Water Quality Model no.1 introduced in the two accompanying papers by Shanahan et al. and Reichert et al. is comprehensive. Shanahan et al. introduced a six-step decision procedure to select the necessary model features for a certain application. This paper specifically addresses on...

  5. Everyone Wants to Be a Model Teacher: Part III: Extensions to Atomic Structures and Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, C. L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes activities in which students: (1) propose creative atomic models that account for observed properties and predict additional experimental data; (2) calculate empirical formulas for 27 binary compounds; (3) propose a model to explain why certain elements have certain valences; and (4) arrange hypothetical elements into a periodic chart.…

  6. River water quality model no. 1 (RWQM1): III. Biochemical submodel selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanrolleghem, P.; Borchardt, D.; Henze, Mogens;

    2001-01-01

    The new River Water Quality Model no.1 introduced in the two accompanying papers by Shanahan et al. and Reichert et al. is comprehensive. Shanahan et al. introduced a six-step decision procedure to select the necessary model features for a certain application. This paper specifically addresses one...

  7. Almost-Commutative Geometries Beyond the Standard Model III: Vector Doublets

    CERN Document Server

    Squellari, Romain

    2007-01-01

    We will present a new extension of the standard model of particle physics in its almostcommutative formulation. This extension has as its basis the algebra of the standard model with four summands [11], and enlarges only the particle content by an arbitrary number of generations of left-right symmetric doublets which couple vectorially to the U(1)_YxSU(2)_w subgroup of the standard model. As in the model presented in [8], which introduced particles with a new colour, grand unification is no longer required by the spectral action. The new model may also possess a candidate for dark matter in the hundred TeV mass range with neutrino-like cross section.

  8. Crack tip fields in elastic-plastic and mixed mode I+II+III conditions, finite elements simulations and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fremy,

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the analysis of the load path effect on I+II+III mixed mode fatigue crack propagation in a 316L stainless steel. Experiments were conducted in mode I+II and in mode I+II+III. The same maximum, minimum and mean values of the stress intensity factors were used for each loading path in the experiments. The main result of this set of experiments is that very different crack growth rates and crack paths are observed for load paths that are however considered as equivalent in most fatigue criteria. The experiments conducted in mode I+II and in mode I+II+III, also allowed to show that the addition of mode III loading steps to a mode I+II loading sequence is increasing the fatigue crack growth rate, even when the crack path is not significantly modified.

  9. ENTHALPY-BASED THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LOOPS. III. COMPARISON OF ZERO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cargill, P. J. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston TX 77005 (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, J. A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    Zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic models provide a simple and quick way to study the thermal evolution of coronal loops subjected to time-dependent heating. This paper presents a comparison of a number of 0D models that have been published in the past and is intended to provide a guide for those interested in either using the old models or developing new ones. The principal difference between the models is the way the exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region, and chromosphere is treated, as plasma cycles into and out of a loop during a heating-cooling cycle. It is shown that models based on the principles of mass and energy conservation can give satisfactory results at some or, in the case of the Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops model, all stages of the loop evolution. Empirical models can have significant difficulties in obtaining accurate behavior due to invocation of assumptions incompatible with the correct exchange of mass and energy between corona, transition region, and chromosphere.

  10. Charge state evolution in the solar wind. III. Model comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landi, E.; Oran, R.; Lepri, S. T.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Fisk, L. A.; Van der Holst, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We test three theoretical models of the fast solar wind with a set of remote sensing observations and in-situ measurements taken during the minimum of solar cycle 23. First, the model electron density and temperature are compared to SOHO/SUMER spectroscopic measurements. Second, the model electron density, temperature, and wind speed are used to predict the charge state evolution of the wind plasma from the source regions to the freeze-in point. Frozen-in charge states are compared with Ulysses/SWICS measurements at 1 AU, while charge states close to the Sun are combined with the CHIANTI spectral code to calculate the intensities of selected spectral lines, to be compared with SOHO/SUMER observations in the north polar coronal hole. We find that none of the theoretical models are able to completely reproduce all observations; namely, all of them underestimate the charge state distribution of the solar wind everywhere, although the levels of disagreement vary from model to model. We discuss possible causes of the disagreement, namely, uncertainties in the calculation of the charge state evolution and of line intensities, in the atomic data, and in the assumptions on the wind plasma conditions. Last, we discuss the scenario where the wind is accelerated from a region located in the solar corona rather than in the chromosphere as assumed in the three theoretical models, and find that a wind originating from the corona is in much closer agreement with observations.

  11. Multi-group covariance and mean structure modeling of the relationship between the WAIS-III common factors and sex and educational attainment in Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolan, C.V.; Colom, R.; Abad, F.J.; Wicherts, J.M.; Hessen, D.J.; van de Sluis, S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated sex effects and the effects of educational attainment (EA) on the covariance structure of the WAIS-III in a subsample of the Spanish standardization data. We fitted both first order common factor models and second order common factor models. The latter include general intelligence (g

  12. Wavelength-Dependent Second Harmonic Generation Circular Dichroism for Differentiation of Col I and Col III Isoforms in Stromal Models of Ovarian Cancer Based on Intrinsic Chirality Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kirby R; Campagnola, Paul J

    2017-03-02

    Extensive remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in many epithelial cancers. For example, in ovarian cancer, upregulation of collagen isoform type III has been linked to invasive forms of the disease, and this change may be a potential biomarker. To examine this possibility, we implemented wavelength-dependent second harmonic generation circular dichroism (SHG-CD) imaging microscopy to quantitatively determine changes in chirality in ECM models comprised of different Col I/Col III composition. In these models, Col III was varied between 0 and 40%, and we found increasing Col III results in reduced net chirality, consistent with structural biology studies of Col I and III in tissues where the isoforms comingle in the same fibrils. We further examined the wavelength dependence of the SHG-CD to both optimize the response and gain insight into the underlying mechanism. We found using shorter SHG excitation wavelengths resulted in increased SHG-CD sensitivity, where this is consistent with the electric-dipole-coupled oscillator model suggested previously for the nonlinear chirality response from thin films. Moreover, the sensitivity is further consistent with the wavelength dependency of SHG intensity fit to a two-state model of the two-photon absorption in collagen. We also provide experimental calibration protocols to implement the SHG-CD modality on a laser scanning microscope. We last suggest that the technique has broad applicability in probing a wide range of diseased states with changes in collagen molecular structure.

  13. The Establishment of Parallel Systems on Microcomputer and the Development of Parallel Programs%微机环境下并行系统的建立与并行程序的开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王顺绪; 李志英

    2001-01-01

    The significance of establishing parallel systems on microcomputer and making parallel simulation is illustrated with methods given to install PVM on microcomputer. Besides, the file (.cshrc) which makes PVM run correctly and the examples of program application in the model of master/slave are also presented.%阐述了在微机环境下建立并行环境,进行并行模拟的意义,给出了微机上PVM的安装方法和使PVM正确运行的.cshrc文件,以及master/slave编程模式的PVM应用程序示例.

  14. Oscillations of low-current electrical discharges between parallel-plane electrodes. III. Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, A. V.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Jelenković, B. M.

    1993-04-01

    Simple models are developed to describe the results of measurements of the oscillatory and negative differential resistance properties of low- to moderate-current discharges in parallel-plane geometry. The time-dependent model assumes that the ion transit time is fixed and is short compared to the times of interest, that electrons are produced at the cathode only by ions, and that space-charge distortion of the electric field is small but not negligible. Illustrative numerical solutions are given for large voltage and current changes and analytic solutions for the time dependence of current and voltage are obtained in the small-signal limit. The small-signal results include the frequency and damping constants for decaying oscillations following a voltage change or following the injection of photoelectrons. The conditions for underdamped, overdamped, and self-sustained or growing oscillations are obtained. A previously developed steady-state, nonequilibrium model for low-pressure hydrogen discharges that includes the effects of space-charge distortion of the electric field on the yield of electrons at the cathode is used to obtain the negative differential resistance. Analytic expressions for the differential resistance and capacitance are developed using the steady-state, local-equilibrium model for electron and ion motion and a first-order perturbation treatment of space-charge electric fields. These models generally show good agreement with data from dc and pulsed discharge experiments presented in the accompanying papers.

  15. Development og groundwater flow modeling techniques for the low-level radwaste disposal (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Dae-Seok; Kim, Chun-Soo; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Park, Byung-Yoon; Koh, Yong-Kweon; Park, Hyun-Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    The project amis to establish the methodology of hydrogeologic assessment by the field application of the evaluation techniques gained and accumulated from the previous hydrogeological research works in Korea. The results of the project and their possible areas for application are (1) acquisition of detailed hydrogeologic information by using a borehole televiewer and a multipacker system, (2) establishing an integrated hydrogeological assessment method for fractured rocks, (3) acquisition of the fracture parameters for fracture modeling, (4) an inversion analysis of hydraulic parameters from fracture network modeling, (5) geostatistical methods for the spatial assignment of hydraulic parameters for fractured rocks, and (6) establishing the groundwater flow modeling procedure for a repository. 75 refs., 72 figs., 34 tabs. (Author)

  16. Simulating the All-Order Strong Coupling Expansion III: O(N) sigma/loop models

    CERN Document Server

    Wolff, Ulli

    2009-01-01

    We reformulate the O(N) sigma model as a loop model whose configurations are the all-order strong coupling graphs of the original model. The loop configurations are represented by a pointer list in the computer and a Monte Carlo update scheme is proposed. Sample simulations are reported and the method turns out to be similarly efficient as the reflection cluster method, but it has greater potential for systematic generalization to other lattice field theories. A variant action suggested by the method is also simulated and leads to a rather extreme demonstration of the concept of universality of the scaling or continuum limit. {\\it I would like to dedicate this paper to Martin L\\"uscher on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday. I thank him for his superb contributions to quantum field theory and for the privilege to collaborate with him.}

  17. Mathematical modeling of the heat treatment and combustion of a coal particle. III. Volatile escape stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhjargal, Kh.; Salomatov, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The present paper is a continuation of previous publications of the authors in this journal in which two phases of the multistage process of combustion of a coal particle were considered in detail with the help of mathematical modeling: its radiation-convection heating and drying. In the present work, the escape dynamics of volatiles is investigated. The physico-mathematical model of the thermodestruction of an individual coal particle with a dominant influence of endothermal effects has been formulated. Approximate-analytical solutions of this model that are of paramount importance for detailed analysis of the influence of the physical and regime parameters on the escape dynamics of volatiles have been found. The results obtained form the basis for engineering calculations of the volatile escape stage and can be used successfully in the search for effective regimes of burning of various solid fuels, in particular, Shivé-Ovoos coal of Mongolia.

  18. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F; Gaskell, C M

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that part of, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. Hence. in this paper, we run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We use the latest version of the Monte Carlo code STOKES presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal, obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. We find that, in comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectr...

  19. Microcomputer controlled X-ray diffractometer for investigations in transmission technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, E.C.; Kroeber, R.; Wessel, R.; Mueller, J.J.; Gernat, C.; Pleissner, K.P.; Damaschun, G.; Lucius, H. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Molekularbiologie)

    1984-01-01

    The coupling of the microcomputer system MPS 4944 with an X-ray wide-angle diffractometer is presented. The configuration of the system, algorithms and programs are described. The microcomputer system effects control and surveillance of the goniometer, accumulation and normalization of the scattered intensities. The coupling of a microcomputer to the diffractometer afforded an increase of the precision of measurement, shortening of the time needed for the scattering experiment and improved the handling comfort of the diffractometer. New experimental variants are rendered possible, for instance, structural investigations with program-controlled temperature regulation of the samples.

  20. Clinical inferences and decisions--III. Utility assessment and the Bayesian decision model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinall, P A; Hill, A R

    1984-01-01

    It is accepted that errors of misclassifications, however small, can occur in clinical decisions but it cannot be assumed that the importance associated with false positive errors is the same as that for false negatives. The relative importance of these two types of error is frequently implied by a decision maker in the different weighting factors or utilities he assigns to the alternative consequences of his decisions. Formal procedures are available by which it is possible to make explicit in numerical form the value or worth of the outcome of a decision process. The two principal methods are described for generating utilities as associated with clinical decisions. The concept and application of utility is then expanded from a unidimensional to a multidimensional problem where, for example, one variable may be state of health and another monetary assets. When combined with the principles of subjective probability and test criterion selection outlined in Parts I and II of this series, the consequent use of utilities completes the framework upon which the general Bayesian model of clinical decision making is based. The five main stages in this general decision making model are described and applications of the model are illustrated with clinical examples from the field of ophthalmology. These include examples for unidimensional and multidimensional problems which are worked through in detail to illustrate both the principles and methodology involved in a rationalized normative model of clinical decision making behaviour.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar models until He burning - III. (Claret+, 1997)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, A.

    1997-04-01

    In this Paper I present grids for the stellar models with a slightly higher metallic content than in the previous works (Claret, 1995A&AS..109..441C; Claret & Gimenez, 1995A&AS..114..549C), say, Z=0.03. The initial helium abundances in mass are Yi=0.42, 0.32 and 0.22; this last value was used only to facilitate interpolations since it is a little bit smaller than the primordial helium abundance. The present computations are based on the radiative opacities with spin-orbi t coupling provided by the Lawrence Livermore group (Iglesias et al., 1992ApJ...397..771I). For the lower temperatures I have used the results by Alexander (1992, priv. comm.). Core overshooting was taken into account as well as mass loss. The models presented here cover the mass range between 1 and 40M⊙. I also compute for all models the internal structure constants kj and the radius of gyration β. For the first time the calculation of the tidal constants E2 and λ2, which are used to evaluate circularization and synchronization times in binary stars, are presented for stellar models as a function of the initial mass and time. The former is related with the dynamical tidal contribution to the total perturbed potential in a binary star while the latter is connected with the external structure of the outer layers. (1 data file).

  2. Hydrodynamic models of a Cepheid atmosphere. III - Line spectrum and radius determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Line profiles are computed on the basis of the moving atmospheres from the hydrodynamic models investigated by Karp (1975). It is found that the velocity gradients in the atmosphere can be used to explain the apparent, slightly supersonic microturbulence. The total observed microturbulence is seen to be consistent with the linear sum of the classical microturbulence and that caused by the velocity gradients.

  3. PIO I-II tendencies case study. Part 1. Mathematical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian TOADER

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a study is performed from the perspective of giving a method to reduce the conservatism of the well known PIO (Pilot-Induced Oscillation criteria in predicting the susceptibility of an aircraft to this very harmful phenomenon. There are three interacting components of a PIO – the pilot, the vehicle, and the trigger (in fact, the hazard. The study, conceived in two parts, aims to underline the importance of human pilot model involved in analysis. In this first part, it is shown, following classical sources, how the LQG theory of control and estimation is used to obtain a complex model of human pilot. The approach is based on the argument, experimentally proved, that the human behaves “optimally” in some sense, subject to his inherent psychophysical limitations. The validation of such model is accomplished based on the experimental model of a VTOL-type aircraft. Then, the procedure of inserting typical saturation nonlinearities in the open loop transfer function is presented. A second part of the paper will illustrate PIO tendencies evaluation by means of a grapho-analytic method.

  4. Photometry and models of selected main belt asteroids. III. 283 Emma, 665 Sabine, and 690 Wratislavia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michałowski, T.; Kaasalainen, M.; Polińska, M.; Marciniak, A.; Kwiatkowski, T.; Kryszczyńska, A.; Velichko, F. P.

    2006-11-01

    Photometric observations of 283 Emma (1998, 2000, 2001, 2004), 665 Sabine (1998, 1999, 2001, 2004, 2005), and 690 Wratislavia (1998, 2000, 2004, 2005-2006) carried out on 44 nights at two observatories are presented. Using all available lightcurves, the spin vectors, senses of rotation, and shape models for these three asteroids have been determined.

  5. Modelling of intermediate-age stellar populations III Effects of dust-shells around AGB stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mouhcine, M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,we present single stellar population models of intermediate age stellar populations where dust-enshrouded AGB stars are introduced. The formation of carbon stars is also accounted for, and is taken to be a function of both initial mass and metallicity. The effect of the dusty envelopes around AGB stars on the optical/near-infrared spectral energy distribution were introduced using semi-emipirical models where the mass-loss and the photospheric chemistry determine the spectral properties of a star along the AGB sequence. The spectral dichotomy between O-rich stars and C-rich stars is taken into account in the modelling. We have investigated the AGB sequence morphology in he near-infrared CMD as a function of time and metallicity. We show that this diaggram is characterized by three morphological features, occupied by optically bright O-rich stars, optically bright C-rich stars, and dust-enshrouded O-rich and C-rich stars respectively. Our models are able to reproduce the distribution of the three...

  6. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. A growing body of evidence suggests that some, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. The inner AGN components cannot be spatially resolved with current instruments and must be studied by numerical simulations of observed spectroscopy and polarization data. Aims: We run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We obtain geometry-sensitive polarization spectra and images to improve our previous AGN models and their comparison with the observations. Methods: We use the latest public version 1.2 of the Monte Carlo code stokes presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate the importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. Results: In comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectra and show a decrease in the net polarization percentage at all lines of sight. The resulting polarization position angle depends on the morphology of the clumpy structure, with extended tori favoring parallel polarization while compact tori produce orthogonal polarization position angles. In the case of polar scattering regions, fragmentation increases the net polarization unless the cloud filling factor is small. A complete AGN model constructed from the individual, fragmented regions can produce low polarization percentages (<2%), with a parallel polarization angle for observer inclinations up to 70° for a torus half opening angle of 60°. For

  7. Goethite surface reactivity: III. Unifying arsenate adsorption behavior through a variable crystal face - Site density model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Camacho, Carlos; Villalobos, Mario

    2010-04-01

    We developed a model that describes quantitatively the arsenate adsorption behavior for any goethite preparation as a function of pH and ionic strength, by using one basic surface arsenate stoichiometry, with two affinity constants. The model combines a face distribution-crystallographic site density model for goethite with tenets of the Triple Layer and CD-MUSIC surface complexation models, and is self-consistent with its adsorption behavior towards protons, electrolytes, and other ions investigated previously. Five different systems of published arsenate adsorption data were used to calibrate the model spanning a wide range of chemical conditions, which included adsorption isotherms at different pH values, and adsorption pH-edges at different As(V) loadings, both at different ionic strengths and background electrolytes. Four additional goethite-arsenate systems reported with limited characterization and adsorption data were accurately described by the model developed. The adsorption reaction proposed is: lbond2 FeOH +lbond2 SOH +AsO43-+H→lbond2 FeOAsO3[2-]…SOH+HO where lbond2 SOH is an adjacent surface site to lbond2 FeOH; with log K = 21.6 ± 0.7 when lbond2 SOH is another lbond2 FeOH, and log K = 18.75 ± 0.9, when lbond2 SOH is lbond2 Fe 2OH. An additional small contribution of a protonated complex was required to describe data at low pH and very high arsenate loadings. The model considered goethites above 80 m 2/g as ideally composed of 70% face (1 0 1) and 30% face (0 0 1), resulting in a site density for lbond2 FeOH and for lbond2 Fe 3OH of 3.125/nm 2 each. Below 80 m 2/g surface capacity increases progressively with decreasing area, which was modeled by considering a progressively increasing proportion of faces (0 1 0)/(1 0 1), because face (0 1 0) shows a much higher site density of lbond2 FeOH groups. Computation of the specific proportion of faces, and thus of the site densities for the three types of crystallographic surface groups present in

  8. Micro-computed tomography assisted distal femur metaphyseal blunt punch compression for determining trabecular bone strength in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Uma; Pritchard, Zachary J; Voor, Michael J

    2016-05-03

    Shorter generation time and the power of genetic manipulation make mice an ideal model system to study bone biology as well as bone diseases. However their small size presents a challenge to perform strength measurements, particularly of the weight-bearing cancellous bone in the murine long bones. We recently developed an improved method to measure the axial compressive strength of the cancellous bone in the distal femur metaphysis in mice. Transverse micro-computed tomography image slices that are 7µm thick were used to locate the position where the epiphysis-metaphysis transition occurs. This enabled the removal of the distal femur epiphysis at the exact transition point exposing the full extent of metaphyseal trabecular bone, allowing more accurate and consistent measurement of its strength. When applied to a murine model system consisting of five month old male wild-type (WT) and Ca(2+)/calmodulin dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CaMKK2) knockout (KO) Camkk2(-/-) mice that possess recorded differences in trabecular bone volume, data collected using this method showed good correlation between bone volume fraction and strength of trabecular bone. In combination with micro-computed tomography and histology, this method will provide a comprehensive and consistent assessment of the microarchitecture and tissue strength of the cancellous bone in murine mouse models.

  9. A new microcomputer-based ECG analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, M C; Klingeman, J D; Conrad, J D; Freis, E D; Pipberger, H V

    1983-09-01

    A new automated ECG system using advances in microprocessor technology and computerized electrocardiography is described. This microcomputer-based system is self-contained and mobile. It acquires both the 12-lead and orthogonal lead (Frank) electrocardiograms and analyzes the latter within minutes. Software includes the program developed in the Veterans Administration which uses advanced statistical classification techniques and a large well-documented patient data base. Diagnostic probabilities are computed using a Bayesian approach. Diagnostic performance has been tested using independent clinical criteria and found to be quite accurate. This system enables the clinician to immediately review the computer's identifications, measurements, and diagnostic classifications and quickly use these results in clinical decision making. Serial comparisons are readily made since all previous recordings are stored on floppy diskettes. The use of microprocessors in this system makes it economically feasible for practicing physicians.

  10. Micro-computed tomography for small animal imaging: Technological details

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Li; Hui Zhang; Zhiwei Tang; Guangshu Hu

    2008-01-01

    The high-resolution micro-computed tomography(micro-CT)system has now become an important tool for biological research.The micro-CT system enables a non-invasive inspection to screen anatomical changes in small animals.The promising advantages include high-spatial resolution,high sensitivity to bone and lung,short scan time and cost-effectiveness.The dose received by the small animal might be a critical concern in the research.In this article,the choice of the components,fundamental physical problems,the image reconstruction algorithm and the representative applications of micro-CT are summarized.Some results from our research group are also presented to show high-resolution images obtained by the micro-CT system.

  11. Microcomputer based instrument for measuring a novel pulmonary function test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, Brian L.; Craine, Eric R.

    1996-08-01

    The design of a prototype instrument for measuring the end-tidal concentration of carbon monoxide during human respiration is presented. The instrument automatically samples the final sixty cubic centimeters of exhaled breath, from successive breathing cycles, by coordinating a pump and the breathing cycle with a set of vacuum and pressure sensors. The concentration of carbon monoxide is measured using a nondispersive infrared spectrophotometer. The amount of carbon monoxide present is measured relative to the source air concentration eliminating the need for calibrating the instrument. The testing protocol and measurements can be controlled by a microcomputer connected to the instrument through a standard RS-232 serial interface. When at equilibrium, the end-tidal concentration of CO can be measured in a simple and reproducible fashion. This simplified technology allows for the construction of a small, portable, easy to use instrument that will allow the application of this new pulmonary function test at the point of contact with patients.

  12. Development of a microcomputer-based magnetic heading sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, H. D.

    1987-01-01

    This paper explores the development of a flux-gate magnetic heading reference using a single-chip microcomputer to process heading information and to present it to the pilot in appropriate form. This instrument is intended to replace the conventional combination of mechanical compass and directional gyroscope currently in use in general aviation aircraft, at appreciable savings in cost and reduction in maintenance. Design of the sensing element, the signal processing electronics, and the computer algorithms which calculate the magnetic heading of the aircraft from the magnetometer data have been integrated in such a way as to minimize hardware requirements and simplify calibration procedures. Damping and deviation errors are avoided by the inherent design of the device, and a technique for compensating for northerly-turning-error is described.

  13. An advanced microcomputer design for processing of semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjoern, L.; Lindkvist, L.; Zaar, J.

    1988-01-01

    In the Get Away Special 330 payload two germanium samples doped with gallium will be processed. The aim of the experiments is to create a planar solid/liquid interface, and to study the breakdown of this interface as the crystal growth rate increases. For the experiments a gradient furnace was designed which is heated by resistive heaters. Cooling is provided by circulating gas from the atmosphere in the cannister through cooling channels in the furnace. The temperature along the sample are measured by platinum/rhodium thermocouples. The furnace is controlled by a microcomputer system, based upon the processor 80C88. A data acquisition system is integrated into the system. In order to synchronize the different actions in time, a multitask manager is used.

  14. Deep in situ dry-etch monitoring of III-V multilayer structures using laser reflectometry and reflectivity modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moussa, H; Meriadec, C; Manin, L; Sagnes, I; Raj, R

    2002-01-01

    Deep reactive ion etching of III-V multilayer structures is an important issue for long wavelength vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSELs) where full laser structures are usually very thick. Test etchings were performed on GaAs/Al sub x Ga sub 1 sub - sub x As Bragg mirror structures and monitored using laser reflectometry at 651.4 nm. In order to perform very deep etching, up to 9 mu m, we designed and fabricated a special two-level mask made up of a thick nitride layer and a thin nickel layer. The etching rate is a complex function of many parameters and may change from run to run for similar structures. Therefore, it is important to have a method to control accurately the process in situ by continuously matching, experimental curves with the results of the reflectivity modeling. Here, we present a model, based on the Abeles matrix method, of the normal incidence reflectivity of a multilayer stack as a function of etch depth. Comparison between the model and the observed reflectivity variation durin...

  15. Winds in collision. III - Modeling the interaction nebulae of eruptive symbiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, T.; Willson, L. A.

    1987-09-01

    Observations of HM Sge and V1016 Cyg have been interpreted (Wallerstein et al., 1984; Wilson et al., 1984) in terms of two colliding stellar winds in an interacting binary. Here, a simplified model for the structure of the nebula which forms at the interface of the colliding winds is developed, based on momentum conservation. From this model, the geometry, mass distribution, and velocity distribution of the nebula can be found as a function of the parameters of the colliding stellar winds which sustain it. Under the assumption of negligible orbital motion, the nebular shell reaches a steady-state configuration. Its shape is roughly conical, with the cone apex angle determined by a single parameter. The time development of a cross-section of the nebula which forms in a system with nonnegligible orbital motion is also calculated, under the assumption that the nebular shell is thin relative to its overall dimensions.

  16. Perbedaan kekuatan kompresi gips Tipe iii pabrikan dan daur ulang Untuk pembuatan model kerja

    OpenAIRE

    Wijaya, Cindy Denhara

    2014-01-01

    Gipsum merupakan mineral yang ditambang dari berbagai belahan dunia dan sudah digunakan di bidang kedokteran gigi sejak tahun 1756. Gipsum yang digunakan dalam kedokteran gigi berasal dari kalsium sulfat dihidrat murni (CaSO4 .2H2O) yang dipanaskan sehingga terbentuk kalsium sulfat hemihidrat (CaSO4 .½H2O). Dalam kedokteran gigi, produk gipsum biasa disebut gips dan banyak digunakan untuk membuat model duplikat dari rongga mulut serta struktur jaringan sekitarnya dan s...

  17. Synthesis, characterisation and modelling of a ferromagnetically coupled chromium(III) Dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Weihe, Høgni; Bendix, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    tetraphenylphosphonium salt, (Ph4P)4[(SCN)4Cr(OH)2Cr(NCS)4]·2CH3CN (1). From magnetometry the coupling constant, J, was determined to be -5.17 cm-1 (in an H = JSA·SB scheme). The X-band EPR spectra were measured in the temperature range 2-305 K and the data were modelled. The spectra, which are very rich, are the first...

  18. Modeling interacting dynamic networks: III. Extraordinary properties in a population of extreme introverts and extroverts

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wenjia; Bassler, Kevin E; Schmittmann, Beate; Zia, Royce K P

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we introduced dynamic networks with preferred degrees, showing that interesting properties are present in a single, homogeneous system as well as one with two interacting networks. While simulations are readily performed, analytic studies are challenging, due mainly to the lack of detailed balance in the dynamics. Here, we consider the two-community case in a special limit: a system of extreme introverts and extroverts - the XIE model. Surprising phenomena appear, even in this minimal model, where the only control parameters are the numbers of each subgroup: $N_{I,E}$. Specifically, an extraordinary transition emerges when $N_I$ crosses $N_E$. For example, the fraction of total number of I-E links jumps from $\\thicksim 0$ to $\\thicksim 1$. In a $N_I=N_E$ system, this fraction performs a pure random walk so that its distribution displays a flat plateau across most of $[0,1]$, with the edges vanishing as $(N_{I,E})^{-0.38}$ for large systems. Thus, we believe the XIE model exhibits an extreme Thouless...

  19. A new model to predict weak-lensing peak counts III. Filtering technique comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Chieh-An; Pires, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    This is the third in a series of papers that develop a new and flexible model to predict weak-lensing (WL) peak counts, which have been shown to be a very valuable non-Gaussian probe of cosmology. In this paper, we compare the cosmological information extracted from WL peak counts using different filtering techniques of the galaxy shear data, including linear filtering with a Gaussian and two compensated filters (the starlet wavelet and the aperture mass), and the nonlinear filtering method MRLens. We present improvements to our model that account for realistic survey conditions, which are masks, shear-to-convergence transformations, and non-constant noise. We create simulated peak counts from our stochastic model, from which we obtain constraints on the matter density $\\Omega_\\mathrm{m}$, the power spectrum normalization $\\sigma_8$, and the dark-energy parameter $w_0^\\mathrm{de}$. We use two methods for parameter inference, a copula likelihood, and approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). We measure the conto...

  20. Dual luminophor pressure-sensitive paint: III. Application to automotive model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouterman, Martin; Callis, James; Dalton, Larry; Khalil, Gamal; Mébarki, Youssef; Cooper, Kevin R.; Grenier, Michel

    2004-10-01

    Porphyrins play key roles in natural energy conversion systems, including photosynthesis and oxygen transport. Because of their chemical stability, unique optical properties and synthetic versatility, porphyrins are well suited as chemical sensors. One successful application is the use of platinum porphyrin (PtP) in pressure-sensitive paint (PSP). Oxygen in the film quenches luminescence, and oxygen pressure was initially monitored by measuring the ratio of I(wind-off)/I(wind-on). But this ratio is compromised if there is model motion and if the paint layer is inhomogeneous. Furthermore it requires careful monitoring and placement of light sources. Moreover, this method is seriously affected by temperature. The errors caused by model motion and temperature sensitivity are eliminated or greatly reduced using dual luminophor paint. This paper illustrates a successful application of a dual luminophor PSP in auto model testing. The PSP is made from an oxygen sensitive luminophor, Pt tetra(pentafluorophenyl)-porpholactone, which provides Isen, and Mg tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine, which provides temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) as the pressure-independent reference. The ratio PSP/TSP in the FIB polymer produced ideal PSP measurements with a very low-temperature dependence of -0.1% °C-1.

  1. DFT modeling and spectroscopic study of metal-ligand bonding in La(III) complex of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihaylov, Tz. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Trendafilova, N. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria)], E-mail: ntrend@svr.igic.bas.bg; Kostova, I. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Medical University, Sofia 1000 (Bulgaria); Georgieva, I. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Bauer, G. [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Technical University of Vienna, Vienna A-1060 (Austria)

    2006-09-11

    The binding mode of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III) is elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexation ability of the deprotonated ligand (CCA{sup -}) to La(III) is studied using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. The experimental data suggest the complex formula La(CCA){sub 2}(NO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}. B3LYP, BHLYP, B3P86, B3PW91, PW91P86 and MPW1PW91 functionals are tested for geometry and frequency calculations of the neutral ligand and all of them show bond length deviations bellow 1%. B3LYP/6-31G(d) level combined with large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanum is selected to describe the molecular, electronic and vibrational structures as well as the conformational behavior of HCCA, CCA{sup -} and La-CCA complex. The metal-ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different La-CCA structures. The calculated atomic charges and the bonding orbital polarizations point to strong ionic metal-ligand bonding in La-CCA complex and insignificant donor acceptor interaction. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA{sup -} and La(CCA){sub 2}(NO{sub 3})(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} systems based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal-ligand binding mode.

  2. Modeling Contamination Migration on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tice, Neil W.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Grant, Catherine E.; Marshall, Herman L.; Vikhlinin, Alexy A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Dahmer, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    During its first 16 years of operation, the cold (about -60 C) optical blocking filter of the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory, has accumulated a growing layer of molecular contamination that attenuates low-energy x rays. Over the past few years, the accumulation rate, spatial distribution, and composition have changed. This evolution has motivated further analysis of contamination migration within and near the ACIS cavity, in part to evaluate potential bake-out scenarios intended to reduce the level of contamination. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, CCDs, contamination, modeling and simulation, spacecraft operations

  3. Lightest Higgs boson production at photon colliders in the two Higgs doublet model type III

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, R; Rodríguez, José Alberto; 10.1103/PhysRevD.72.035017

    2005-01-01

    The branching ratios of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson h/sup 0/ are calculated in the framework of the general two higgs doublet model. Different scenarios are presented taking into account constraints on the flavor changing neutral currents factors obtained in previous works. Plausible scenarios where appear flavor changing processes at tree level like bs and tc are analyzed for relevant parameters. The loop-induced Higgs couplings to photon pairs can be tested with a photon collider. The number of events of h/sup 0/ as a resonance in photon colliders are calculated taking into account its corresponding background signal at TESLA, CLIC, and NLC.

  4. Modeling Three-Terminal III-V/Si Tandem Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Emily L.; Deceglie, Michael G.; Stradins, Paul; Tamboli, Adele C.

    2017-06-27

    Three-terminal (3T) tandem cells fabricated by combining an interdigitated back contact (IBC) Si device with a wider bandgap top cell have the potential to provide a robust operating mechanism to efficiently capture the solar spectrum without the need to current match sub-cells or fabricate complicated metal interconnects between cells. Here we develop a two dimensional device physics model to study the behavior of IBC Si solar cells operated in a 3T configuration. We investigate how different cell designs impact device performance and discuss the analysis protocol used to understand and optimize power produced from a single junction, 3T device.

  5. Passivity of Metals in the Point Defect Model: Effect of Chloride [Part-III

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel, Bosco

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of addition of chloride on the stability of the compact oxide layer pre-existing on a metal surface at a given impressed potential and . The variant of the point defect model (PDM)advanced by us recently is used to construct a theory for the chloride-induced build-up of metal vacancies at the metal-film interface and the chloride-induced dissolution of the compact oxide layer. Under the quasi-steady-state approximation the relevant moving boundary value probl...

  6. Modeling the near-UV band of GK stars, Paper III: Dependence on abundance pattern

    CERN Document Server

    Short, C Ian

    2013-01-01

    We extend the grid of NLTE models presented in Paper II to explore variations in abundance pattern in two ways: 1) The adoption of the Asplund et al. (2009) (GASS10) abundances, 2) For stars of metallicity, [M/H], of -0.5, the adoption of a non-solar enhancement of alpha-elements by +0.3 dex. Moreover, our grid of synthetic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) is interpolated to a finer numerical resolution in both T_eff (Delta T_eff = 25 K) and log g (Delta log g = 0.25). We compare the values of T_eff and log g inferred from fitting LTE and Non-LTE SEDs to observed SEDs throughout the entire visible band, and in an ad hoc "blue" band. We compare our spectrophotometrically derived T_eff values to a variety of T_eff calibrations, including more empirical ones, drawn from the literature. For stars of solar metallicity, we find that the adoption of the GASS10 abundances lowers the inferred T_eff value by 25 - 50 K for late-type giants, and NLTE models computed with the GASS10 abundances give T_eff results that ...

  7. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals III. Modelling the heat conductivity of porous chondrite material

    CERN Document Server

    Henke, Stephan; Trieloff, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The construction of models for the internal constitution and the temporal evolution of large planetesimals, the parent bodies of chondrites, requires information on the heat conductivity of the complex mixture of minerals and iron metal found in chondrites. It is attempted to evaluate the heat conductivity of a multi-component mineral mixture and granular medium from the heat conductivities of its mixture components. Random mixtures of solids with chondritic composition and packings of spheres are numerically generated. The heat conduction equation is solved in high spatial resolution for a test cube filled with such matter. From the heat flux through the cube the heat conductivity of the mixture is derived. The model results for porous material are consistent with data for compacted sandstone, but are at odds with measurements for H and L chondrites. The discrepancy is traced back to shock modification of the currently available meteoritic material by impacts on the parent body over the last 4.5 Ga. This cau...

  8. Testing intermediate-age stellar evolution models with VLT photometry of LMC clusters. III. Padova results

    CERN Document Server

    Bertelli, G; Girardi, L; Chiosi, C; Zoccali, M; Gallart, C

    2002-01-01

    The color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of three intermediate-age LMC clusters, NGC 2173, SL556 and NGC2155 are analyzed to determine their age and metallicity basing on Padova stellar models. Synthetic CMDs are compared with cluster data. The best match is obtained using two fitting functions based on star counts in the different bins of the cluster CMD. Two different criteria are used. One of them takes into account the uncertainties in the color of the red clump stars. Given the uncertainties on the experimental values of the clusters metallicity, we provide a set of acceptable solutions. They define the correspondent values of metallicity, age, reddening and distance modulus (for the assumed IMF). The comparison with Padova models suggests for NGC 2173 a prolonged star formation (spanning a period of about 0.3 Gyr), beginning 1.7 Gyr and ending 1.4 Gyr ago. The metallicity Z is in the range 0.0016 $-$ 0.003. Contrary to what suggested for NGC 2173 a period of extended star formation was not required to fit th...

  9. Richard III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Palle Schantz

    2017-01-01

    Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"......Kort analyse af Shakespeares Richard III med fokus på, hvordan denne skurk fremstilles, så tilskuere (og læsere) langt henad vejen kan føle sympati med ham. Med paralleller til Netflix-serien "House of Cards"...

  10. Continuing Education in Micro-Computers for Academic and Practicing Psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, James V.; Ware, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    A workshop designed to teach participants how to use microcomputers for practice management, psychological testing, word processing, peripheral interface, and data analysis was found to meet the interests and needs of both academic and practicing psychologists. (RM)

  11. Microcomputer design and analysis of the cable catenary large space antenna system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akle, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of microcomputers in the design of a cable catenary large space antenna system is discussed. The development of a system design capability, data base utilization, systems integration, program structure and logic, and integrated graphics output are discussed.

  12. Assessing Inexpensive Microcomputers for Classroom Use: A Product-Oriented Course to Promote Instructional Computing Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Dick; Seay, Jean A.

    1979-01-01

    A teacher inservice class that focused on evaluating inexpensive microcomputer systems is described. Evaluative criteria used by the class are included, and the findings and preferences of the class are summarized. (Author/IRT)

  13. Digital TV-echelle spectrograph for simultaneous multielemental analysis using microcomputer control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J.B.; Case, A.L.

    1980-12-01

    A digital TV-echelle spectrograph with microcomputer control was developed for simultaneous multielemental analysis. The optical system is a commercially available unit originally equipped for film and photomultiplier (single element) readout. The film port was adapted for the intensifier camera. The camera output is digitized and stored in a microcomputer-controlled, 512 x 512 x 12 bit memory and image processor. Multiple spectra over the range of 200 to 800 nm are recorded in a single exposure. Spectra lasting from nanoseconds to seconds are digitized and stored in 0.033 s and displayed on a TV monitor. An inexpensive microcomputer controls the exposure, reads and displays the intensity of predetermined spectral lines, and calculates wavelengths of unknown lines. The digital addresses of unknown lines are determined by superimposing a cursor on the TV display. The microcomputer also writes into memory wavelength fiducial marks for alignment of the TV camera.

  14. Microcomputer Decisions for the 1990s [and] Apple's Macintosh: A Viable Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Audrey N.

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of the factors that should be considered when purchasing or upgrading a microcomputer focuses on the MS-DOS and OS/2 operating systems. Macintosh purchasing decisions are discussed in a sidebar. A glossary is provided. (CLB)

  15. X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of the Buzzard Coulee Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, D.; Samson, C.; Herd, R. K.; Fry, C.; McCausland, P. J. A.; Umoh, J.; Holdsworth, D. W.

    2012-03-01

    This abstract outlines research and some results of X-ray micro-computed tomography imaging of the Buzzard Coulee H4 chondrite. A comparison of bulk density results and an analysis of radio-density profile curves are discussed.

  16. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Actis, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Passarino, G. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy)

    2006-12-15

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  17. Nonclassical Riemann solvers and kinetic relations III: A nonconvex hyperbolic model for Van der Waals fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe G. LeFloch

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the so-called p-system describing the dynamics of isothermal and compressible fluids. The constitutive equation is assumed to have the typical convexity/concavity properties of the van der Waals equation. We search for discontinuous solutions constrained by the associated mathematical entropy inequality. First, following a strategy proposed by Abeyaratne and Knowles and by Hayes and LeFloch, we describe here the whole family of nonclassical Riemann solutions for this model. Second, we supplement the set of equations with a kinetic relation for the propagation of nonclassical undercompressive shocks, and we arrive at a uniquely defined solution of the Riemann problem. We also prove that the solutions depend $L^1$-continuously upon their data. The main novelty of the present paper is the presence of two inflection points in the constitutive equation. The Riemann solver constructed here is relevant for fluids in which viscosity and capillarity effects are kept in balance.

  18. Models for Quarks and Elementary Particles --- Part III: What is the Nature of the Gravitational Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich K. W. Neumann

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The first two parts of this article series dealt with the questions: What is a quark? and What is mass? While the present models lead to a physical idea of the mass, the geometrical theory of the general relativity only shows the effect of mass. From the physical idea of mass, from the idea of the resultant vector (EV as electric flux and from the ideas relating to the magnetic monopole (MMP it follows that the gravitational field is an electrical field. The share of the electrical gravitational flux on the entire electrical flux of a quark is determined from Newton's empirical gravitational constant. The superposition of the fluxes of two quark collectives produces the gravitational force effect between two quark collectives. Gravitational fields reach infinitely far according to our current ideas. Connected with the quark oscillations hinted in the Parts I and II this results in the idea of the flux spreading with infinite speed, having enormous consequences.

  19. Chemical association in simple models of molecular and ionic fluids. III. The cavity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaoqi; Stell, George

    1992-01-01

    Exact equations which relate the cavity function to excess solvation free energies and equilibrium association constants are rederived by using a thermodynamic cycle. A zeroth-order approximation, derived previously by us as a simple interpolation scheme, is found to be very accurate if the associative bonding occurs on or near the surface of the repulsive core of the interaction potential. If the bonding radius is substantially less than the core radius, the approximation overestimates the association degree and the association constant. For binary association, the zeroth-order approximation is equivalent to the first-order thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) of Wertheim. For n-particle association, the combination of the zeroth-order approximation with a ``linear'' approximation (for n-particle distribution functions in terms of the two-particle function) yields the first-order TPT result. Using our exact equations to go beyond TPT, near-exact analytic results for binary hard-sphere association are obtained. Solvent effects on binary hard-sphere association and ionic association are also investigated. A new rule which generalizes Le Chatelier's principle is used to describe the three distinct forms of behaviors involving solvent effects that we find. The replacement of the dielectric-continuum solvent model by a dipolar hard-sphere model leads to improved agreement with an experimental observation. Finally, equation of state for an n-particle flexible linear-chain fluid is derived on the basis of a one-parameter approximation that interpolates between the generalized Kirkwood superposition approximation and the linear approximation. A value of the parameter that appears to be near optimal in the context of this application is obtained from comparison with computer-simulation data.

  20. Measurement and thermal modeling of sapphire substrate temperature at III-Nitride MOVPE conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, J. Randall; Coltrin, Michael E.; Figiel, Jeffrey J.

    2017-04-01

    Growth rates and alloy composition of AlGaN grown by MOVPE is often very temperature dependent due to the presence of gas-phase parasitic chemical processes. These processes make wafer temperature measurement highly important, but in fact such measurements are very difficult because of substrate transparency in the near-IR ( 900 nm) where conventional pyrometers detect radiation. The transparency problem can be solved by using a mid-IR pyrometer operating at a wavelength ( 7500 nm) where sapphire is opaque. We employ a mid-IR pyrometer to measure the sapphire wafer temperature and simultaneously a near-IR pyrometer to measure wafer pocket temperature, while varying reactor pressure in both a N2 and H2 ambient. Near 1300 °C, as the reactor pressure is lowered from 300 Torr to 10 Torr the wafer temperature drops dramatically, and the ∆T between the pocket and wafer increases from 20 °C to 250 °C. Without the mid-IR pyrometer the large wafer temperature change with pressure would not have been noted. In order to explain this behavior we have developed a quasi-2D thermal model that includes a proper accounting of the pressure-dependent thermal contact resistance, and also accounts for sapphire optical transmission. The model and experimental results demonstrate that at most growth conditions the majority of the heat is transported from the wafer pocket to the wafer via gas conduction, in the free molecular flow limit. In this limit gas conductivity is independent of gap size but first order in pressure, and can quantitatively explain results from 20 to 300 Torr. Further analysis yields a measure of the thermal accommodation coefficients; α(H2) =0.23, α(N2) =0.50, which are in the range typically measured.

  1. Phyllotaxis or the properties of spiral lattices. III. An algebraic model of morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, M.; Rothen, F.

    1992-11-01

    A phyllotactical pattern such as the arrangement of the scales of a fir-cone originates along a thin ring surrounding a local center of growth. We study a simple model of the morphogenesis of such a botanical structure by considering algebraic relations between permutations of the n first natural numbers, each number corresponding to the birth order of a given scale or leaf. This model allows to define a divergence angle in a natural way. The possible values of the divergence can be classified according to a hierarchical structure which places the noble numbers in a prominent position. This construction is similar to the Farey-tree obtained in the study of lattices of tangent circles aligned along equiangular spirals. Une structure phyllotactique comme celles que constituent les écailles d'une pomme de pin prend naissance sur un étroit anneau apical qui entoure un centre local de croissance. On étudie un modèle simple de la morphogenèse d'une telle formation en établissant des relations algébriques entre permutations des n premiers nombres naturels, chaque nombre correspondant à l'ordre d'apparition d'une écaille ou d'une feuille. Ce modèle conduit à la définition naturelle d'une divergence. Les valeurs que peut prendre cette divergence s'ordonnent en une structure hiérarchique qui met en évidence le rôle des nombres nobles. Il y a parenté évidente avec l'arbre de Farey que l'on obtient en classant les réseaux de cercles tangents alignés le long de spirales équiangulaires.

  2. Modeling the Effects of Ecosystem Fragmentation and Restoration: Management Models for Mobile Animals. Volume 1. Appendices I-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    mesquite in mesquite (no edge effect ) How to Run the Model Open an existing or new ArcView GIS project. Open a View, and if not already present, add...values, which in the same example would be 0.7 and 25, respectively. To model no edge effect (the null model) for any one edge type, enter a value of...units for dmax are the same as the map units of the habitat spatial data. For edge types in which no edge effect will be modeled, enter a “basal

  3. Direct microcomputer controlled determination of zinc in human serum by flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Nielsen, Bent; Jensen, Arne

    1986-01-01

    A procedure is described for the direct determination of zinc in human serum by fully automated, microcomputer controlled flow injection atomic absorption spectrometry (Fl-AAS). The Fl system is pumpless, using the negative pressure created by the nebuliser. It only consists of a three-way valve......, programmable from the microcomputer, to control the sample volume. No pre-treatment of the samples is necessary. The limit of detection is 0.14 mg l–1, and only small amounts of serum (

  4. The structure of radiative shock waves. III. The model grid for partially ionized hydrogen gas

    CERN Document Server

    Fadeyev, Y A; Fadeyev, Yu. A.

    2001-01-01

    The grid of the models of radiative shock waves propagating through partially ionized hydrogen gas with temperature 3000K <= T_1 <= 8000K and density 10^{-12} gm/cm^3 <= \\rho_1 <= 10^{-9}gm/cm^3 is computed for shock velocities 20 km/s <= U_1 <= 90 km/s. The fraction of the total energy of the shock wave irreversibly lost due to radiation flux ranges from 0.3 to 0.8 for 20 km/s <= U_1 <= 70 km/s. The postshock gas is compressed mostly due to radiative cooling in the hydrogen recombination zone and final compression ratios are within 1 <\\rho_N/\\rho_1 \\lesssim 10^2, depending mostly on the shock velocity U_1. The preshock gas temperature affects the shock wave structure due to the equilibrium ionization of the unperturbed hydrogen gas, since the rates of postshock relaxation processes are very sensitive to the number density of hydrogen ions ahead the discontinuous jump. Both the increase of the preshock gas temperature and the decrease of the preshock gas density lead to lower postsh...

  5. Circuit modeling of the electrical impedance: part III. Disuse following bone fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, C A

    2013-05-01

    Multifrequency measurements of the electrical impedance of muscle have been extended to the study of disuse following bone fracture, and analyzed using the five-element circuit model used earlier in the study of the effects of disease. Eighteen subjects recovering from simple fractures on upper or lower limbs were examined (ten males, eight females, aged 18-66). Muscles on uninjured contralateral limbs were used as comparison standards, and results are presented in terms of the ratios p(injured)/p(uninjured), where p stands for the circuit parameter r1, r2, r3, 1/c1 or 1/c2. These are strikingly similar to the diseased-to-healthy ratios for patients with neuromuscular disease, reported in part I of this series. In particular, r1 is virtually unaffected and the ratios for r2, r3, 1/c1 and 1/c2 can be as large as in serious disease. Furthermore, the same pattern of relationships between the parameters is found, suggesting that there is a common underlying mechanism for the impedance changes. Atrophy and fibrosis are examined as candidates for that mechanism, but it is argued that their effects are too small to explain the observed changes. Fundamental considerations aside, the sensitivity, reproducibility and technical simplicity of the technique recommend its use for in-flight assessments of muscles during orbital or interplanetary missions.

  6. Models for Quarks and Elementary Particles. Part III: What is the Nature of the Gravitational Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann U. K. W.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The first two parts of this article series dealt with the questions: What is a quark? and What is mass? While the present models lead to a physical idea of the mass, the geometrical theory of the general relativity only shows the effect of mass. From the physical idea of mass, from the idea of the resultant vector (EV as electric flux and from the ideas relating to the magnetic monopole (MMP it follows that the gravitational field is an electrical field. The share of the electrical gravitational flux on the entire electrical flux of a quark is determined from Newton’s empirical gravitational constant G . The superposition of the < fluxes of two quark collectives produces the gravitational force effect between two quark collectives. Gravitational fields reach infinitely far according to our current ideas. Connected with the quark oscillations hinted in the Parts I and II this results in the idea of the < - < flux spreading with infinite speed, having enormous consequences.

  7. Dynamics of the solar tachocline III: Numerical solutions of the Gough and McIntyre model

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo-Arreguin, Luis A; Wood, Toby S

    2013-01-01

    We present the first numerical simulations of the solar interior to exhibit a tachocline consistent with the Gough and McIntyre (1998) model. We find nonlinear, axisymmetric, steady-state numerical solutions in which: (1) a large-scale primordial field is confined within the radiation zone by downwelling meridional flows that are gyroscopically pumped in the convection zone (2) the radiation zone is in almost-uniform rotation, with a rotation rate consistent with observations (3) the bulk of the tachocline is magnetic free, in thermal-wind balance and in thermal equilibrium and (4) the interaction between the field and the flows takes place within a very thin magnetic boundary layer, the tachopause, located at the bottom of the tachocline. We show that the thickness of the tachocline scales with the amplitude of the meridional flows exactly as predicted by Gough and McIntyre. We also determine the parameter conditions under which such solutions can be obtained, and provide a simple explanation for the failure...

  8. Determination of Uncertainties for +III and +IV Actinide Solubilities in the WIPP Geochemistry Model for the 2009 Compliance Recertification Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, A. E.; Xiong, Y.; Nowak, E. J.; Brush, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) repository in southeast New Mexico for defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste. Every five years, the DOE is required to submit an application to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) demonstrating the WIPP’s continuing compliance with the applicable EPA regulations governing the repository. Part of this recertification effort involves a performance assessment—a probabilistic evaluation of the repository performance with respect to regulatory limits on the amount of releases from the repository to the accessible environment. One of the models used as part of the performance assessment process is a geochemistry model, which predicts solubilities of the radionuclides in the brines that may enter the repository in the different scenarios considered by the performance assessment. The dissolved actinide source term comprises actinide solubilities, which are input parameters for modeling the transport of radionuclides as a result of brine flow through and from the repository. During a performance assessment, the solubilities are modeled as the product of a “base” solubility determined from calculations based on the chemical conditions expected in the repository, and an uncertainty factor that describes the potential deviations of the model from expected behavior. We will focus here on a discussion of the uncertainties. To compute a cumulative distribution function (CDF) for the uncertainties, we compare published, experimentally measured solubility data to predictions made using the established WIPP geochemistry model. The differences between the solubilities observed for a given experiment and the calculated solubilities from the model are used to form the overall CDF, which is then sampled as part of the performance assessment. We will discuss the methodology used to update the CDF’s for the +III actinides, obtained from data for Nd, Am, and Cm, and the +IV actinides, obtained

  9. Photochemistry of iron(III)-carboxylato complexes in aqueous atmospheric particles - Laboratory experiments and modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, C.; Tilgner, A.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    , glutarate and gluconate complexes lie in the range of 0.02 < Φ < 0.10, whereas succinate, tartronate, pyruvate and glyoxalate systems have values between 0.16 < Φ < 1.26. All quantum yields include contributions from secondary thermal reactions. Furthermore, an attempt was made to differentiate between contributions of individual iron-oxalato complexes to the overall measured quantum yield. The formation and photolysis of the iron-carboxylate complexes and the subsequent reactions of the resulting compounds have been implemented in CAPRAM 3.0 (Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism). Modeling studies were performed to investigate the effects of the expanded iron photochemistry on oxidant budgets, the iron redox-cycling and the processing of secondary organic acids in cloud droplets and deliquescent particles under different environmental conditions. The model studies have shown that, i.e. for pyruvic acid under urban conditions, the photolysis of the iron-pyruvate complex can contribute with about 40 % significantly to the overall degradation flux and represents thus an important loss pathway beside the radical oxidation pathways.

  10. DECOVALEX - Mathematical models of coupled T-H-M processes for nuclear waste repositories. Executive summary for Phases I,II and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L.; Stephansson, O. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Tsang, C.F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kautsky, F. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-06-01

    This executive summary presents the motivation, structure, objectives, methodologies and results of the first stage of the international DECOVALEX project - DECOVALEX I (1992-1995). The acronym stands for Development of Coupled Models and their Validation against Experiment in Nuclear Waste Isolation, and the project is an international effort to develop mathematical models, numerical methods and computer codes for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rocks and buffer materials for geological isolation of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive wastes, and validate them against laboratory and field experiments. 24 refs.

  11. Off-diagonal terms in Yukawa textures of the Type-III 2-Higgs doublet model and light charged Higgs boson phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández-Sánchez, J; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Rosado, A

    2013-01-01

    We discuss flavor-violating constraints and consequently possible charged Higgs boson phenomenology emerging from a four-zero Yukawa texture embedded within the Type-III 2-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM-III). Firstly, we show in detail how we can obtain several kinds of 2HDMs when some parameters in the Yukawa texture are absent. Secondly, we present a comprehensive study of the main $B$-physics constraints on such parameters induced by flavor-changing processes, in particular on the off-diagonal terms of such a texture: i.e., from $\\mu -e$ universality in $\\tau$ decays, several leptonic B-decays ($B \\to \\tau \

  12. Noninvasive technique for monitoring drug transport through the murine cochlea using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghpanahi, Masoumeh; Gladstone, Miriam B; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D; Borkholder, David A

    2013-10-01

    Local delivery of drugs to the inner ear has the potential to treat inner ear disorders including permanent hearing loss or deafness. Current mathematical models describing the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery to the inner ear have been based on large rodent studies with invasive measurements of concentration at few locations within the cochlea. Hence, estimates of clearance and diffusion parameters are based on fitting measured data with limited spatial resolution to a model. To overcome these limitations, we developed a noninvasive imaging technique to monitor and characterize drug delivery inside the mouse cochlea using micro-computed tomography (μCT). To increase the measurement accuracy, we performed a subject-atlas image registration to exploit the information readily available in the atlas image of the mouse cochlea and pass segmentation or labeling information from the atlas to our μCT scans. The approach presented here has the potential to quantify concentrations at any point along fluid-filled scalae of the inner ear. This may permit determination of spatially dependent diffusion and clearance parameters for enhanced models.

  13. 4-Nitrocatecholato iron(III) complexes of 2-aminomethyl pyridine-based bis(phenol) amine as structural models for catechol-bound 3,4-PCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Elham; Heidari, Sima; Wojtczak, Andrzej; Cotič, Patricia; Kozakiewicz, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Two nitrocatecholato(HNC) iron(III) complexes, [FeLAMPX(H-NC)]. NEt3, of the tetradendate ligand (2-aminomethylpyridine)bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (H2LAMPX) were synthesized and structurally characterized. These structural models for catechol-bound 3,4-PCD were characterized by IR, UV-vis, elemental analysis and magnetic measurements. X-ray crystallography studies revealed that in both complexes the iron(III) centers are distorted octahedral and coordinated by two phenolate oxygen's, two amine nitrogen's of the ligand and mono anionic nitrocatecholate group (HNC). The variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility studies revealed paramagnetic properties of the reported complexes. The effective magnetic moments for the complexes lie between 5.3 and 5.4 BM correspond to the reported values for high spin Fe(III) center. The ligand-centered oxidation and metal-centered reduction of complexes was studies using cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique.

  14. Differentiation of Col I and Col III isoforms in stromal models of ovarian cancer by analysis of second harmonic generation polarization and emission directionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbury, Karissa; Lien, Chi-Hsiang; Chen, Shean-Jen; Campagnola, Paul J

    2014-01-21

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix occurs in many epithelial cancers. In ovarian cancer, the minor collagen isoform of Col III becomes upregulated in invasive disease. Here we use second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging microscopy to probe structural differences in fibrillar models of the ovarian stroma comprised of mixtures of Col I and III. The SHG intensity and forward-backward ratios decrease with increasing Col III content, consistent with decreased phasematching due to more randomized structures. We further probe the net collagen α-helix pitch angle within the gel mixtures using what is believed to be a new pixel-based polarization-resolved approach that combines and extends previous analyses. The extracted pitch angles are consistent with those of peptide models and the method has sufficient sensitivity to differentiate Col I from the Col I/Col III mixtures. We further developed the pixel-based approach to extract the SHG signal polarization anisotropy from the same polarization-resolved image matrix. Using this approach, we found that increased Col III results in decreased alignment of the dipole moments within the focal volume. Collectively, the SHG measurements and analysis all indicate that incorporation of Col III results in decreased organization across several levels of collagen organization. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the collagen isoforms comingle within the same fibrils, in good agreement with ultrastructural data. The pixel-based polarization analyses (both excitation and emission) afford determination of structural properties without the previous requirement of having well-aligned fibers, and the approaches should be generally applicable in tissue.

  15. Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part III: Sensitivity to Modeling Assumptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Laura D.; Randall, David A.

    1996-03-01

    The inclusion of cloud microphysical processes in general circulation models makes it possible to study the multiple interactions among clouds, the hydrological cycle, and radiation. The gaps between the temporal and spatial scales at which such cloud microphysical processes work and those at which general circulation models presently function force climate modelers to crudely parameterize and simplify the various interactions among the different water species (namely, water vapor, cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow) and to use adjustable parameters to which large-scale models can be highly sensitive. Accordingly, the authors have investigated the sensitivity of the climate, simulated with the Colorado State University general circulation model, to various aspects of the parameterization of cloud microphysical processes and its interactions with the cumulus convection and radiative transfer parameterizations.The results of 120-day sensitivity experiments corresponding to perpetual January conditions have been compared with those of a control simulation in order to 1 ) determine the importance of advecting cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow at the temporal and spatial scale resolutions presently used in the model; 2) study the importance of the formation of extended stratiform anvils at the tops of cumulus towers, 3) analyze the role of mixed-phase clouds in determining the partitioning among cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow and, hence, their impacts on the simulated cloud optical properties; 4) evaluate the sensitivity of the atmospheric moisture budget and precipitation rates to a change in the fall velocities of rain and snow; 5) determine the model's sensitivity to the prescribed thresholds of autoconversion of cloud water to rain and cloud ice to snow; and 6) study the impact of the collection of supercooled cloud water by snow, as well as accounting for the cloud optical properties of snow.Results are presented in terms of 30-day mean differences

  16. A stochastic model for the synthesis and degradation of natural organic matter. Part III: Modeling Cu(II) complexation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabaniss, Stephen E. [Department of Chemistry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: cabaniss@unm.edu; Maurice, Patricia A. [Department of Geology and Civil Engineering, University of Notre Dame (United States); Madey, Greg [Department of Computer Science, University of Notre Dame (United States)

    2007-08-15

    An agent-based biogeochemical model has been developed which begins with biochemical precursor molecules and simulates the transformation and degradation of natural organic matter (NOM). This manuscript presents an empirical quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) which uses the numbers of ligand groups, charge density and heteroatom density of a molecule to estimate Cu-binding affinity (K{sub Cu}{sup '}) at pH 7.0 and ionic strength 0.10 for the molecules in this model. Calibration of this QSAR on a set of 41 model compounds gives a root mean square error of 0.88 log units and r{sup 2} 0.93. Two simulated NOM assemblages, one beginning with small molecules (tannins, terpenoids, flavonoids) and one with biopolymers (protein, lignin), give markedly different distributions of logK{sub Cu}{sup '}. However, calculations based on these logK{sub Cu}{sup '} distributions agree qualitatively with published experimental Cu(II) titration data from river and lake NOM samples.

  17. BREEDER: a microcomputer program for financial analysis of a large-scale prototype breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giese, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    This report describes a microcomputer-based, single-project financial analysis program: BREEDER. BREEDER is a user-friendly model designed to facilitate frequent and rapid analyses of the financial implications associated with alternative design and financing strategies for electric generating plants and large-scale prototype breeder (LSPB) reactors in particular. The model has proved to be a useful tool in establishing cost goals for LSPB reactors. The program is available on floppy disks for use on an IBM personal computer (or IBM look-a-like) running under PC-DOS or a Kaypro II transportable computer running under CP/M (and many other CP/M machines). The report documents version 1.5 of BREEDER and contains a user's guide. The report also includes a general overview of BREEDER, a summary of hardware requirements, a definition of all required program inputs, a description of all algorithms used in performing the construction-period and operation-period analyses, and a summary of all available reports. The appendixes contain a complete source-code listing, a cross-reference table, a sample interactive session, several sample runs, and additional documentation of the net-equity program option.

  18. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.oberije@maastro.nl [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, KU Leuven (Belgium); Houben, Ruud [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deasy, Joseph O. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  19. The FORTRAN NALAP code adapted to a microcomputer compiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Paulo David de Castro; Borges, Eduardo Madeira; Braz Filho, Francisco Antonio; Guimaraes, Lamartine Nogueira Frutuoso, E-mail: plobo.a@uol.com.b, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The Nuclear Energy Division of the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv) is conducting the TERRA project (TEcnologia de Reatores Rapidos Avancados), Technology for Advanced Fast Reactors project, aimed at a space reactor application. In this work, to attend the TERRA project, the NALAP code adapted to a microcomputer compiler called Compaq Visual Fortran (Version 6.6) is presented. This code, adapted from the light water reactor transient code RELAP 3B, simulates thermal-hydraulic responses for sodium cooled fast reactors. The strategy to run the code in a PC was divided in some steps mainly to remove unnecessary routines, to eliminate old statements, to introduce new ones and also to include extension precision mode. The source program was able to solve three sample cases under conditions of protected transients suggested in literature: the normal reactor shutdown, with a delay of 200 ms to start the control rod movement and a delay of 500 ms to stop the pumps; reactor scram after transient of loss of flow; and transients protected from overpower. Comparisons were made with results from the time when the NALAP code was acquired by the IEAv, back in the 80's. All the responses for these three simulations reproduced the calculations performed with the CDC compiler in 1985. Further modifications will include the usage of gas as coolant for the nuclear reactor to allow a Closed Brayton Cycle Loop - CBCL - to be used as a heat/electric converter. (author)

  20. Long term stability of rat sleep quantified by microcomputer analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivaldi, E A; Pastel, R H; Fernstrom, J D; Hobson, J A

    1984-09-01

    An inexpensive microcomputer system is described for the direct recording of electrographic data from animals. Using this system, electrographic data can be recorded continuously on a polygraph and simultaneously quantitated by the computer, for days or weeks. Our system quantifies the amounts of delta waves, spindle bursts, hippocampal RSA activity and movement spikes for 15 sec epochs. These electrographic data are stored by the computer and subsequently can be used to score sleep stages. We find that the computer reliably counts waves; using these data, it can then score sleep stages off-line with about 90% accuracy. With this system, we find that the minutes/hour of both SWS and REM are remarkably stable from day to day. The absolute number of delta waves, spindle bursts, trains of RSA and movement counts/hour also remain stable from day to day. This type of system should find significant application in situations where quantitation of longterm effects of drugs, diets and other environmental inputs on sleep states or EEG wave bands are of interest.

  1. Compensatory axon sprouting for very slow axonal die-back in a transgenic model of spinal muscular atrophy type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, Esther; Putman, Charles T; Harris, Luke R; Tyreman, Neil; Cook, Victoria E; Gordon, Tessa

    2017-03-01

    Smn(+/-) transgenic mouse is a model of the mildest form of spinal muscular atrophy. Although there is a loss of spinal motoneurons in 11-month-old animals, muscular force is maintained. This maintained muscular force is mediated by reinnervation of the denervated fibres by surviving motoneurons. The spinal motoneurons in these animals do not show an increased susceptibility to death after nerve injury and they retain their regenerative capacity. We conclude that the hypothesized immaturity of the neuromuscular system in this model cannot explain the loss of motoneurons by systematic die-back. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder in humans and is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. Patients lack the SMN1 gene with the severity of the disease depending on the number of copies of the highly homologous SMN2 gene. Although motoneuron death in the Smn(+/-) transgenic mouse model of the mildest form of SMA, SMA type III, has been reported, we have used retrograde tracing of sciatic and femoral motoneurons in the hindlimb with recording of muscle and motor unit isometric forces to count the number of motoneurons with intact neuromuscular connections. Thereby, we investigated whether incomplete maturation of the neuromuscular system induced by survival motoneuron protein (SMN) defects is responsible for die-back of axons relative to survival of motoneurons. First, a reduction of ∼30% of backlabelled motoneurons began relatively late, at 11 months of age, with a significant loss of 19% at 7 months. Motor axon die-back was affirmed by motor unit number estimation. Loss of functional motor units was fully compensated by axonal sprouting to retain normal contractile force in four hindlimb muscles (three fast-twitch and one slow-twitch) innervated by branches of the sciatic nerve. Second, our evaluation of whether axotomy of motoneurons in the adult Smn(+/-) transgenic mouse increases their susceptibility to cell death

  2. Efficient isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion translocators and assembly of heteromeric transmembrane pores in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Fabian B; Rossi, Kyle C; Savva, Christos G; Holzenburg, Andreas; Clerico, Eugenia M; Heuck, Alejandro P

    2011-08-23

    Translocation of bacterial toxins or effectors into host cells using the type III secretion (T3S) system is a conserved mechanism shared by many Gram-negative pathogens. Pseudomonas aeruginosa injects different proteins across the plasma membrane of target cells, altering the normal metabolism of the host. Protein translocation presumably occurs through a proteinaceous transmembrane pore formed by two T3S secreted protein translocators, PopB and PopD. Unfolded translocators are secreted through the T3S needle prior to insertion into the target membrane. Purified PopB and PopD form pores in model membranes. However, their tendency to form heterogeneous aggregates in solution had hampered the analysis of how these proteins undergo the transition from a denatured state to a membrane-inserted state. Translocators were purified as stable complexes with the cognate chaperone PcrH and isolated from the chaperone using 6 M urea. We report here the assembly of stable transmembrane pores by dilution of urea-denatured translocators in the presence of membranes. PopB and PopD spontaneously bound liposomes containing anionic phospholipids and cholesterol in a pH-dependent manner as observed by two independent assays, time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer and sucrose-step gradient ultracentrifugation. Using Bodipy-labeled proteins, we found that PopB interacts with PopD on the membrane surface as determined by excitation energy migration and fluorescence quenching. Stable transmembrane pores are more efficiently assembled at pH <5.0, suggesting that acidic residues might be involved in the initial membrane binding and/or insertion. Altogether, the experimental setup described here represents an efficient method for the reconstitution and analysis of membrane-inserted translocators.

  3. Comparison of fast-acting of Java on microcomputer Raspberry Pi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Didukh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The speed of a specific set of instructions is important working with highlevel programming language for microcomputers. The method of comparing execution times of two functionally different programs on different versions of Virtual Machine Java is used to determine the performance of Java on Raspberry Pi microcomputer. Application of modern fast search algorithm primes up to a given integer N (Atkin sieve and a program to perform basic operations on floating point numbers are implemented. Results. Two algorithms microcomputer operating frequencies: 700 MHz, 900 MHz, 1000 MHz are tested. Two versions of Java for Raspberry Pi: Oracle Java and OpenJDK are used. Conclusions. In microcomputer Raspberry Pi elementary operations on floating-point run are faster than with complex search algorithm primes. It is established that Java from Oracle is 13-14 times is faster than OpenJDK. Oracle Java on Raspberry Pi gives good performance and it is recommended for installation and use on microcomputer.

  4. Quantification of arthritic bone degradation by analysis of 3D micro-computed tomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Carl-Magnus; Hoffmann, Bianca; Irmler, Ingo M.; Straßburger, Maria; Figge, Marc Thilo; Saluz, Hans Peter

    2017-01-01

    The use of animal models of arthritis is a key component in the evaluation of therapeutic strategies against the human disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here we present quantitative measurements of bone degradation characterised by the cortical bone profile using glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI) induced arthritis. We applied micro-computed tomography (μCT) during three arthritis experiments and one control experiment to image the metatarsals of the hind paws and to investigate the effect of experimental arthritis on their cortical bone profile. For measurements of the cortical profile we automatically identified slices that are orthogonal to individual metatarsals, thereby making the measurements independent of animal placement in the scanner. We measured the average cortical thickness index (CTI) of the metatarsals, as well as the thickness changes along the metatarsal. In this study we introduced the cortical thickness gradient (CTG) as a new measure and we investigated how arthritis affects this measure. We found that in general both CTI and CTG are able to quantify arthritic progression, whilst CTG was found to be the more sensitive measure. PMID:28290525

  5. Revisiting dosing regimen using PK/PD modeling: the MODEL1 phase I/II trial of docetaxel plus epirubicin in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénin, Emilie; Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; You, Benoit; Guitton, Jérôme; Iliadis, Athanassios; Freyer, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    The MODEL1 trial is the first model-driven phase I/II dose-escalation study of densified docetaxel plus epirubicin administration in metastatic breast cancer patients, a regimen previously known to induce unacceptable life-threatening toxicities. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of this densified regimen. Study of the efficacy was a secondary objective. Her2-negative, hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer patients were treated with escalating doses of docetaxel plus epirubicin every 2 weeks for six cycles with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support. A total of 16 patients were treated with total doses ranging from 85 to 110 mg of docetaxel plus epirubicin per cycle. Dose escalation was controlled by a non-hematological toxicity model. Dose densification was guided by a model of neutrophil kinetics, able to optimize docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing with respect to pre-defined acceptable levels of hematological toxicity while ensuring maximal efficacy. The densified treatment was safe since hematological toxicity was much lower compared to previous findings, and other adverse events were consistent with those observed with this regimen. The maximal tolerated dose was 100 mg given every 2 weeks. The response rate was 45 %; median progression-free survival was 10.4 months, whereas 54.6 months of median overall survival was achieved. The optimized docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing regimen led to fewer toxicities associated with higher efficacy as compared with standard or empirical densified dosing. This study suggests that model-driven dosage adjustment can lead to improved efficacy-toxicity balance in patients with cancer when several anticancer drugs are combined.

  6. Microcomputers and minipopulations: the 1981 Cook Islands census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G R

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents some of the background behind the installation and use of a microcomputer for census processing and briefly reviews the results of the 1981 census in the light of the Cook Islands' special demographic situation. Since independence from New Zealand in 1965, the Cook Islands has gradually developed a capacity for statistics gathering in general and census taking in particular. The 1981 quinquennial census represents a watershed in the development of local personnel without the aid of external advisors; it was the 1st census to be processed within the Cook Islands by means of a computer. Both the installation of the microcomputer and the processing of the 1981 census are counted as successes. This is due to a number of factors, namely: a long period of careful planning procedures which preceded the choice of system and installation; the enthusiasm of the local staff closely involved in the planning; the emphasis on training; tests of the equipment before installation by computer practitioners with knowledge of local needs and capacities; reasonable goal setting; and the supply, with the system, of adequate spare parts tools and maintenance and training manuals. Like many island populations, that of the Cook Islands is characterized by considerable instability as illustrated by the 1981 census results. As the rate and direction of population change varies from island to island, generalizations across the nation as a whole are difficult. For example, while some of the northern atolls experienced population decline during the latest intercensal period, most had their popultion increase in 1981. All the southern islands declined during the 1976-81 period at annual rates varying from 0.6% to 3.2%. The explanation for these patterns of change lies primarily in the different rates and direction of external migration on each island, as Cook Islanders are exempt from immigration regulations to New Zealand and Australia. In recent years, women have formed a

  7. Visualization of Three-Dimensional Nephron Structure With Microcomputed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentley,M.; Jorgensen, S.; Lerman, L.; Ritman, E.; Romero, J.

    2007-01-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of nephrons in situ and their interrelationship with other nephrons are difficult to visualize by microscopic methods. The present study uses microcomputed X-ray tomography (micro-CT) to visualize intact nephrons in situ. Rat kidneys were perfusion-fixed with buffered formalin and their vasculature was subsequently perfused with radiopaque silicone. Cortical tissue was stained en bloc with osmium tetroxide, embedded in plastic, scanned, and reconstructed at voxel resolutions of 6, 2, and 1 {mu}m. At 6 {mu}m resolution, large blood vessels and glomeruli could be visualized but nephrons and their lumens were small and difficult to visualize. Optimal images were obtained using a synchrotron radiation source at 2 {mu}m resolution where nephron components could be identified, correlated with histological sections, and traced. Proximal tubules had large diameters and opaque walls, whereas distal tubules, connecting tubules, and collecting ducts had smaller diameters and less opaque walls. Blood vessels could be distinguished from nephrons by the luminal presence of radiopaque silicone. Proximal tubules were three times longer than distal tubules. Proximal and distal tubules were tightly coiled in the outer cortex but were loosely coiled in the middle and inner cortex. The connecting tubules had the narrowest diameters of the tubules and converged to form arcades that paralleled the radial vessels as they extended to the outer cortex. These results illustrate a potential use of micro-CT to obtain three-dimensional information about nephron architecture and nephron interrelationships, which could be useful in evaluating experimental tubular hypertrophy, atrophy, and necrosis.

  8. Visualization of three-dimensional nephron structure with microcomputed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Michael D; Jorgensen, Steven M; Lerman, Lilach O; Ritman, Erik L; Romero, J Carlos

    2007-03-01

    The three-dimensional architecture of nephrons in situ and their interrelationship with other nephrons are difficult to visualize by microscopic methods. The present study uses microcomputed X-ray tomography (micro-CT) to visualize intact nephrons in situ. Rat kidneys were perfusion-fixed with buffered formalin and their vasculature was subsequently perfused with radiopaque silicone. Cortical tissue was stained en bloc with osmium tetroxide, embedded in plastic, scanned, and reconstructed at voxel resolutions of 6, 2, and 1 microm. At 6 microm resolution, large blood vessels and glomeruli could be visualized but nephrons and their lumens were small and difficult to visualize. Optimal images were obtained using a synchrotron radiation source at 2 microm resolution where nephron components could be identified, correlated with histological sections, and traced. Proximal tubules had large diameters and opaque walls, whereas distal tubules, connecting tubules, and collecting ducts had smaller diameters and less opaque walls. Blood vessels could be distinguished from nephrons by the luminal presence of radiopaque silicone. Proximal tubules were three times longer than distal tubules. Proximal and distal tubules were tightly coiled in the outer cortex but were loosely coiled in the middle and inner cortex. The connecting tubules had the narrowest diameters of the tubules and converged to form arcades that paralleled the radial vessels as they extended to the outer cortex. These results illustrate a potential use of micro-CT to obtain three-dimensional information about nephron architecture and nephron interrelationships, which could be useful in evaluating experimental tubular hypertrophy, atrophy, and necrosis.

  9. A microcomputer-controlled gas phase microreactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R.M.

    1983-08-01

    Although automated reactors are effective tools for studying a single type of reaction or optimizing catalyst performance, they may not be well suited for exploratory research. These reactors generally have several shortcomings. First, they may have limited versatility since they are usually designed with a single application in mind. Second, computer systems used for process control and data acquisition are often expensive and complex, so that once they are set up for a given application, it is quite difficult to adapt them for another. Because of these restrictions, experimental reactors are often operated manually, requiring a full-time operator to monitor operations and acquire data. This is a greater problem in laboratories where projects are often short-term, and the costs of setting up an automated reactor may outweigh the benefits of automation. For an automated reactor to be cost-effective in such an environment, both reactor hardware and control software must be versatile enough that they can be easily modified and adapted for different experiments. An automated gas-flow microreactor has been designed and constructed which is both inexpensive and flexible. The reactor is capable of performing three different types of experiments, 1) continuous reagent feed with analysis of the product stream, 2) pulsed-flow experiments, and 3) temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reaction (TPR). Conversion of the reactor from one configuration to another requires less than one hour. Process control and data acquisition are performed using an Apple II Plus microcomputer (Apple Computer Corp., Cupertino, Calif.) and an ISAAC interface device (Cyborg Corp., Newton, Mass.).

  10. Microcomputed tomography and shock microdeformation studies on shatter cones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaag, Patrice Tristan; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Hipsley, Christy Anna

    2016-08-01

    One of the aspects of impact cratering that are still not fully understood is the formation of shatter cones and related fracturing phenomena. Yet, shatter cones have been applied as an impact-diagnostic criterion for decades without the role of shock waves and target rock defects in their formation having been elucidated ever. We have tested the application of the nondestructive microcomputed tomography (μCT) method to visualize the interior of shatter cones in order to possibly resolve links between fracture patterns and shatter cone surface features (striations and intervening "valleys"). Shatter-coned samples from different impact sites and in different lithologies were investigated for their μCT suitability, with a shatter cone in sandstone from the Serra da Cangalha impact structure (Brazil) remaining as the most promising candidate because of the fracture resolution achieved. To validate the obtained CT data, the scanned specimen was cut into three orthogonal sets of thin sections. Scans with 13 μm resolution were obtained. μCT scans and microscopic analysis unraveled an orientation of subplanar fractures and related fluid inclusion trails, and planar fracture (PF) orientations in the interior of shatter cones. Planar deformation features (PDF) were observed predominantly near the shatter cone surface. Previously undescribed varieties of feather features (FF), in the form of lamellae emanating from curviplanar and curved fractures, as well as an "arrowhead"-like FF development with microlamellae originating from both sides of a PF, were observed. The timing of shatter cone formation was investigated by establishing temporal relations to the generation of various shock microscopic effects. Shatter cones are, thus, generated post- or syn-formation of PF, FF, subplanar fractures, and PDF. The earliest possible time for shatter cone formation is during the late stage of the compressional phase, that is, shock wave passage, of an impact event.

  11. Chromium (III) recovery from waste acid solution by ion exchange processing using Amberlite IR-120 resin: batch and continuous ion exchange modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Alguacil,Francisco José; Alonso Gámez, Manuel; Lozano, Kuis Javier

    2004-01-01

    The use of ion exchange technology was studied to remove chromium (III) from acidic waste solution by Amberlite IR-120 resin. Batch and column experimental tests were conducted to provide data for theoretical models and verify the system performance of the adsorption process. Results of batch equilibrium tests indicated that Langmuir isotherm describes well the adsorption process, whereas experimental data also provide evidence that, under the present experimental conditions, chro...

  12. Tomo III

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Memorias, histórico, físicas, crítico, apologéticas de la América Meridional con unas breves advertencias y noticias útiles, a los que de orden de Su Majestad, hubiesen de viajar y describir aquellas vastas regiones. Reino Animal. Tomo III. Por un anónimo americano en Cádiz por los años de 1757. Primera Parte Prólogo Artículo 1°De los cuadrúpedos útiles al hombre a varios usos y a su sustento. Vaca Caballos Carneros de la tierra, especie de camellos Vicuña Guanacos Puercos monteses Artículo 2...

  13. 48 CFR 1552.239-103 - Acquisition of Energy Star Compliant Microcomputers, Including Personal Computers, Monitors and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Compliant Microcomputers, Including Personal Computers, Monitors and Printers. 1552.239-103 Section 1552.239... Star Compliant Microcomputers, Including Personal Computers, Monitors and Printers. As prescribed in... Personal Computers, Monitors, and Printers (APR 1996) (a) The Contractor shall provide computer products...

  14. 2-Mercaptobenzoxazole pentacyanoferrate(II/III complexes: UV-Visible, Mössbauer, electron paramagnetic resonance, electrochemistry and molecular modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Juciane B

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-Mercaptobenzoxazole pentacyanoferrate(II/III complexes, [FeII/III(CN5(bzoxs]3-/2- , were prepared in MeOH/H2O 75:25% solutions and characterized by spectroscopic UV-Vis, Mössbauer, electron paramagnetic resonance (epr and electrochemical-cyclic voltammetry- techniques. UV-Vis and epr spectra along with the electrochemical behavior suggested the coordination of the multi-functional N,S,O- donor ligand, bzoxs, to iron(III through the sulfur atom. The crystal field parameters, DqL and Dt, calculated for the iron(II complex, in addition to the reversible redox process FeIII-bzoxs + e- -> FeII-bzoxs also pointed to coordination via the sulfur atom. The results were compared with the chemical properties of pentacyanoferrate complexes containing other monodentate N-, S- and O-donor ligands. Ab initio calculations revealed the composition of the frontier orbitals of bzoxs and are in agreement with the mode of coordination proposed from the experimental data.

  15. Effects of industrial microcomputer use in control systems for machines and conveyors in surface mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borczyk, Z.; Rosseger, A. (Poltegor-Instytut, Wroclaw (Poland))

    1991-01-01

    Evaluates use of the ComPan Pzaz microcomputers manufactured in Poland for control of bucket wheel excavators without thrust action and for belt conveyors used in brown coal surface mines in Poland. The microcomputer consists of 14 standard microprocessor controller modules and 4 specialized modules. Structure of the control system, types of operations controlled by the system and effects of computerized control on safety and efficiency of operation of bucket wheel excavators are analyzed. Use of the ComPan Pzaz microcomputers for control of steep-angle conveyor systems (with a drive power from 1,000 kW to 4,000 kW) is evaluated. The system controls conveyor start-up and conveyor braking. Selected aspects of ComPan Pzaz reliability and service are also discussed. 2 refs.

  16. Site-specific functionalization for chemical speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Priyanka; Varshney, Shilpa; Srivastava, Shalini

    2017-07-01

    Site-specific functionalizations are the emergent attention for the enhancement of sorption latent of heavy metals. Limited chemistry has been applied for the fabrication of diafunctionalized materials having potential to tether both environmentally stable oxidation states of chromium (Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite (PANI-NCC) has been fabricated using click chemistry and explored for the removal of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from hydrological environment. The structure, stability, morphology, particle size, surface area, hydrophilicity, and porosity of fabricated PANI-NCC were characterized comprehensively using analytical techniques and mathematical tools. The maximum sorption performance of PANI-NCC was procured for (Cr(III): 47.06 mg g-1; 94.12 %) and (Cr(VI): 48.92 mg g-1; 97.84 %) by equilibrating 0.5 g sorbent dose with 1000 mL of 25 mg L-1 chromium conc. at pH 6.5 and 2.5 for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively. The sorption data showed a best fit to the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative value of ∆ G° (-8.59 and -11.16 kJ mol-1) and ∆ H° (66.46 × 10-1 and 17.84 × 10-1 kJ mol-1), and positive value of ∆ S° (26.66 and 31.46 J mol-1K-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, reflect the spontaneous, feasibility, and exothermic nature of the sorption process. The application of fabricated PANI-NCC for removing both the forms of chromium in the presence of other heavy metals was also tested at laboratory and industrial waste water regime. These findings open up new avenues in the row of high performance, scalable, and economic nanobiomaterial for the remediation of both forms of chromium from water streams.

  17. Comparison of optical coherence tomography, microcomputed tomography, and histology at a three-dimensionally imaged trabecular bone sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasseck, Christoph; Kratz, Marita; Torcasio, Antonia; Gerhardt, Nils C.; van Lenthe, G. Harry; Gambichler, Thilo; Hoffmann, Klaus; Jones, David B.; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a method for imaging bone. The OCT images are compared directly to those of the standard methods of bone histology and microcomputed tomography (μCT) on a single, fixed human femoral trabecular bone sample. An advantage of OCT over bone histology is its noninvasive nature. OCT also images the lamellar structure of trabeculae at slightly higher contrast than normal bone histology. While μCT visualizes the trabecular framework of the whole sample, OCT can image additionally cells with a penetration depth limited approximately to 1 mm. The most significant advantage of OCT, however, is the absence of toxic effects (no ionizing radiation), i.e., continuous images may be made and individual cell tracking may be performed. The penetration depth of OCT, however, limits its use to small animal models and small bone organ cultures.

  18. A micro-computed tomography study of the negotiation and anatomical feature in apical root canal of mandibular molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yi; Ma, Jing-Zhi; Shen, Ya; Cheung, Gary Shun-Pan; Gao, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical negotiation of various apical anatomic features of the mandibular first molars in a Chinese population using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). A total of 152 mandibular first molars were scanned with micro-CT at 30 µm resolution. The apical 5 mm of root canal (ARC) was reconstructed three dimensionally and classified. Subsequently, the access cavity was prepared with the ARC anatomy blinded to the operator. The ARC was negotiated with a size 10 K file with or without precurve. Information on the ability to obtain a reproducible glide path was recorded. The anatomical classification of ARC was Type I with 68.45% in mandibular first molars. The negotiation result of ARC with Category i was 387 canals (74.00%). With a bent negotiating file, 96 canals were negotiated, including 88 reproducible glide paths (Category ii) and 8 irregular glide paths (Category iii). About 7.65% canals could not be negotiated with patency successfully (Category iv). The statistical analyze shown the anatomic feature of ARC had effect on the negotiation of ARC (p negotiation. The category of negotiation in ARC would be helpful in the using of NiTi rotary instruments. Negotiation of ARC to the working length with patency should be careful and skillful because of the complexities of ARC. SCANNING 38:819-824, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Development and validation of a model TRIGA Mark III reactor with code MCNP5; Desarrollo y validacion de un modelo del reactor Triga Mark III con el codigo MCNP5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galicia A, J.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Aguilar H, F., E-mail: blink19871@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The main purpose of this paper is to obtain a model of the reactor core TRIGA Mark III that accurately represents the real operating conditions to 1 M Wth, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. To provide a more detailed analysis, different models of the reactor core were realized by simulating the control rods extracted and inserted in conditions in cold (293 K) also including an analysis for shutdown margin, so that satisfied the Operation Technical Specifications. The position they must have the control rods to reach a power equal to 1 M Wth, were obtained from practice entitled Operation in Manual Mode performed at Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). Later, the behavior of the K{sub eff} was analyzed considering different temperatures in the fuel elements, achieving calculate subsequently the values that best represent the actual reactor operation. Finally, the calculations in the developed model for to obtain the distribution of average flow of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons in the six new experimental facilities are presented. (Author)

  20. Structural, EPR, and Mössbauer characterization of (μ-alkoxo)(μ-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) model complexes for the active sites of mixed-valent diiron enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feifei; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Dong, Yanhong; Kauffmann, Karl; Bominaar, Emile L; Münck, Eckard; Que, Lawrence

    2012-03-05

    To obtain structural and spectroscopic models for the diiron(II,III) centers in the active sites of diiron enzymes, the (μ-alkoxo)(μ-carboxylato)diiron(II,III) complexes [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(NCCH(3))(2)](ClO(4))(3) (1) and [Fe(II)Fe(III)(N-Et-HPTB)(O(2)CPh)(Cl)(HOCH(3))](ClO(4))(2) (2) (N-Et-HPTB = N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-(1-ethyl-benzimidazolylmethyl))-2-hydroxy-1,3-diaminopropane) have been prepared and characterized by X-ray crystallography, UV-visible absorption, EPR, and Mössbauer spectroscopies. Fe1-Fe2 separations are 3.60 and 3.63 Å, and Fe1-O1-Fe2 bond angles are 128.0° and 129.4° for 1 and 2, respectively. Mössbauer and EPR studies of 1 show that the Fe(III) (S(A) = 5/2) and Fe(II) (S(B) = 2) sites are antiferromagnetically coupled to yield a ground state with S = 1/2 (g= 1.75, 1.88, 1.96); Mössbauer analysis of solid 1 yields J = 22.5 ± 2 cm(-1) for the exchange coupling constant (H = JS(A)·S(B) convention). In addition to the S = 1/2 ground-state spectrum of 1, the EPR signal for the S = 3/2 excited state of the spin ladder can also be observed, the first time such a signal has been detected for an antiferromagnetically coupled diiron(II,III) complex. The anisotropy of the (57)Fe magnetic hyperfine interactions at the Fe(III) site is larger than normally observed in mononuclear complexes and arises from admixing S > 1/2 excited states into the S = 1/2 ground state by zero-field splittings at the two Fe sites. Analysis of the "D/J" mixing has allowed us to extract the zero-field splitting parameters, local g values, and magnetic hyperfine structural parameters for the individual Fe sites. The methodology developed and followed in this analysis is presented in detail. The spin Hamiltonian parameters of 1 are related to the molecular structure with the help of DFT calculations. Contrary to what was assumed in previous studies, our analysis demonstrates that the deviations of the g values from the free electron value (g = 2) for the

  1. Adjusting of Wind Input Source Term in WAVEWATCH III Model for the Middle-Sized Water Body on the Basis of the Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjusting of wind input source term in numerical model WAVEWATCH III for the middle-sized water body is reported. For this purpose, the field experiment on Gorky Reservoir is carried out. Surface waves are measured along with the parameters of the airflow. The measurement of wind speed in close proximity to the water surface is performed. On the basis of the experimental results, the parameterization of the drag coefficient depending on the 10 m wind speed is proposed. This parameterization is used in WAVEWATCH III for the adjusting of the wind input source term within WAM 3 and Tolman and Chalikov parameterizations. The simulation of the surface wind waves within tuned to the conditions of the middle-sized water body WAVEWATCH III is performed using three built-in parameterizations (WAM 3, Tolman and Chalikov, and WAM 4 and adjusted wind input source term parameterizations. Verification of the applicability of the model to the middle-sized reservoir is performed by comparing the simulated data with the results of the field experiment. It is shown that the use of the proposed parameterization CD(U10 improves the agreement in the significant wave height HS from the field experiment and from the numerical simulation.

  2. Students’ Perspective On The Impact Of The Title III Program On Doctoral And Professional Programs At Minority Serving Institutions: An Analysis Using A Multilevel Rasch Rating Scale Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloyce R. Kaliba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the impact of Part B, section 326 of the Title III program using data from three historically Black Universities. The Title III program aims at strengthening the resource capacity of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs with eligible doctoral and professional programs. The lack of documented quantitative impact contributes to skepticism regarding program efficacy. A web-based survey instrument was used to collect data from students across five domains: research and instruction; technology development; facilities improvement; student financial assistance; and student services. A multilevel Rasch Rating Scale Model (ARSM was utilized for data analysis. The students indicated that the program has intermediate to high impact on research and instruction and low impact on tutorial and counseling services and outreach programs.

  3. Electrical properties of III-Nitride LEDs: Recombination-based injection model and theoretical limits to electrical efficiency and electroluminescent cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Aurelien; Hurni, Christophe A.; Young, Nathan G.; Craven, Michael D.

    2016-08-01

    The current-voltage characteristic and ideality factor of III-Nitride quantum well light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on bulk GaN substrates are investigated. At operating temperature, these electrical properties exhibit a simple behavior. A model in which only active-region recombinations have a contribution to the LED current is found to account for experimental results. The limit of LED electrical efficiency is discussed based on the model and on thermodynamic arguments, and implications for electroluminescent cooling are examined.

  4. An open microcomputer-based laboratory system for perceptional experimentality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Ari

    A computer, equipped with hardware for acquiring data about the properties of a physical system and programs for processing that data, is a powerful tool for physics research and instruction. There is strong evidence that utilizing microcomputer-based laboratories (MBLs) in instruction can lead to significantly improved learning. The perceptional approach is a method for physics instruction, developed at the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki. Its main arguments are that the meanings of the concepts must be learnt before their formal definitions and adoption, and that learning and research are fundamentally similar concept formation processes. Applying the perceptional approach requires the ability to perform quantitative experiments, either as students' laboratory exercises or as lecture demonstrations, and to process their results. MBL tools are essential for this. In student's laboratory exercises, they reduce the routine work and leave more time for the actual learning. In lecture demonstrations, they make it possible to perform the experiments in the tight time limits. At a previous stage of the research, a set of requirements was found that the perceptional approach places on MBL systems. The primary goal of this thesis is to build a prototype of a MBL system that would fulfil these requirements. A secondary goal is to describe technical aspects of a computerized measurement system from the standpoint of educational use. The prototype was built using mostly commercial sensors and data acquisition units. The software was written with a visual programming language, designed for instrumentation applications. The prototype system was developed and tested with a set of demonstrations of various topics in the Finnish high school physics curriculum, which were implemented according to the perceptional approach. Limited usability tests were also performed. The prototype was improved, until it could perform the test demonstrations. It was found to meet the

  5. A 2-year intercomparison of the WAM-Cycle4 and the WAVEWATCH-III wave models implemented within the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. KORRES

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present the implementation of a wave forecast/hindcast system for the Mediterranean Sea at a 1/10º horizontal resolution and we show a first assessment of its performance by inter-comparing model results to observational data time series at selected points for the period 2000-2001. The system which is part of the POSEIDON-II operational system includes the WAM – Cycle4 and the WAVEWATCH-III wave forecast models (implemented within the same region one way coupled with the non-hydrostatic version of the ETA atmospheric model which provides at 3-hour intervals the necessary wind velocity fields to the wave models. The same system but based on the WAM-Cycle4 wave model, has been used in the past for the production of the Aegean Sea wind and wave Atlas. Overall, the inter-comparison shows that both wave models are rather skilful in predicting the integral wave parameters with significant wave height skill scores in the range 0.85-0.90 and mean period scores in the range 0.77-0.83. It is also evident that WAM model has a tendency to overestimate mean wave periods while the opposite is true for WAVEWATCH-III model. Differences between the two models simulated spectra exist along the main passage of cyclonic systems over the Mediterranean Sea while in the wind seas dominated areas of the basin (the Aegean Sea for example the two models show almost the same behavior.

  6. Visualizing polymeric bioresorbable scaffolds with three-dimensional image reconstruction using contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Sheng; Hu, Fudong; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Liyan; Zhang, Linlin; Zheng, Hong; Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Lianglong

    2017-05-01

    There are no previous studies showing how to visualize polymeric bioresorbable scaffolds (BRSs) by micro-computed tomography (mCT). There are no previous studies showing how to visualize polymeric bioresorbable scaffolds (BRSs) by micro-computed tomography (mCT). This study aimed to explore the feasibility of detecting polymeric BRS with 3-dimensional reconstruction of BRS images by contrast-enhanced mCT and to determine the optimal imaging settings. BRSs, made of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), were implanted in coronary bifurcation models. Five treatments were conducted to examine an optimal condition for imaging BRSs: Baseline treatment, samples were filled with normal saline and scanned with mCT immediately; Treatment-1, -2, -3 and -4, samples were filled with contrast medium and scanned with mCT immediately and 1, 2 and 3 h thereafter, corresponding to soaking time of contrast medium of 0, 1, 2 and 3 h. Compared to Baseline, mCT scanning completely discriminate the scaffold struts from the vascular lumen immediately after filling the samples with contrast agent but not from the vascular wall until the contrast agent soaking time was more than 2 h (Treatment-3 and -4). By setting 10-15 HU as a cut-point of CT values, the scaffold strut detectable rate at Baseline and Teatment-1, -2, -3 and -4 were 1.23 ± 0.31%, 1.65 ± 0.26%, 58.14 ± 12.84%, 97.97 ± 1.43% and 98.90 ± 0.38%, respectively (Treatment-3 vs. Treatment-2, p scaffold struts from the surrounding structures in the phantom samples.

  7. Experimental determination of water activity for binary aqueous cerium(III) ionic solutions: application to an assessment of the predictive capability of the binding mean spherical approximation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruas, Alexandre; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Moisy, Philippe

    2005-12-08

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of actinide salt solutions at high concentration. The predictive capability of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory to describe the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes is assessed in the case of aqueous solutions of lanthanide(III) nitrate and chloride salts. Osmotic coefficients of cerium(III) nitrate and chloride were calculated from other lanthanide(III) salts properties. In parallel, concentrated binary solutions of cerium nitrate were prepared in order to measure experimentally its water activity and density as a function of concentration, at 25 degrees C. Water activities of several binary solutions of cerium chloride were also measured to check existing data on this salt. Then, the properties of cerium chloride and cerium nitrate solutions were compared within the BIMSA model. Osmotic coefficient values for promethium nitrate and promethium chloride given by this theory are proposed. Finally, water activity measurements were made to examine the fact that the ternary system Ce(NO3)3/HNO3/H2O and the quaternary system Ce(NO3)3/HNO3/N2H5NO3/H2O may be regarded as "simple solutions" (in the sense of Zdanovskii and Mikulin).

  8. Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Timothy, Ginn R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    2013-08-14

    citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

  9. Microcomputers in the School Office. ERIC Clearinghouse on Educational Management: ERIC Digest, Number Eight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Thomas I.

    Microcomputers can vastly improve the efficiency of data management, data analysis, and communications in the school office, but implementation should be carefully planned, with attention to relative cost for benefits obtained, appropriateness of software and hardware, and potential security risks. (TE)

  10. Development of the output monitor with single-chip microcomputer in a time-keeping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiguang; Gong, Yuanfang

    An output monitor has been designed with Intel 8031 single-chip microcomputer for a time working station. The functions of the instrument include the comparable measurement of the clocks, the buffer output of time and frequency signals, the monitoring and alarming of working state etc. The principle and application of the instrument are described.

  11. Microcomputer Based School Information Management Systems (SIMS) in Alberta Junior and Senior High Schools. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, P.; Valbonesi, P.

    This report comprises a detailed evaluation of three IBM microcomputer-based school information management systems: Student Information and Records System (SIRS) by Management Information Group, The School System (TSS) by Columbia Computing Services, and Computer Educational Management Accounting System (CEMAS) by Computerlib. These three systems…

  12. The Microcomputer as a Classroom Audio Visual Device: The Concept and Prospects for Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hativa, Nira

    1986-01-01

    Discusses attributes of the microcomputer that give it advantages over other types of media equipment for large-group classroom instruction and factors contributing to teacher adoption of technology. The discussion is based on the research literature and on statistical analysis of a questionnaire answered by teachers. (Author/MBR)

  13. Microcomputers in Education: An Annotated Bibliography of Educational Resources Center Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Rebecca S.

    This annotated bibliography is a listing of both book and non-book materials in the collection at the Educational Resources Center at Western Kentucky University that relate to using microcomputers in education. These materials are primarily concerned with locating, selecting, and evaluating appropriate software; implementation of a microcomputer…

  14. The Microcomputer in the School Library Project. Phase 1 (September 1983-August 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, James E.; And Others

    The first of two phases in this research project aimed at linking information technology (IT) with library information skills used the microcomputer as an information retrieval tool, and investigated ways of using curriculum-based keywords to help secondary school students define and maintain a clear sense of purpose when selecting, evaluating,…

  15. COED Transactions, Vol. IX, No. 6, June 1977. An Introductory Course in Microprocessors and Microcomputers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcovitz, Alan B., Ed.

    This paper describes an introductory course in microprocessors and microcomputers implemented at Grossmont College. The current state-of-the-art in the microprocessor field is discussed, with special emphasis on the 8-bit MOS single-chip processors which are the most commonly used devices. Objectives and guidelines for the course are presented,…

  16. The Effects of Cooperative Training and Ability Grouping on Microcomputer Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Lois J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study of fifth and sixth graders that investigated the effects of cooperative training and ability grouping on microcomputer learning. Results on four measures of achievement did not support the use of cooperative learning or ability grouping to enhance achievement in computer-assisted instruction. (Author/LRW)

  17. Using Microcomputers Simulations in the Classroom: Examples from Undergraduate and Faculty Computer Literacy Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Jeffrey A.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of how computer simulations are used in two undergraduate social science courses and a faculty computer literacy course on simulations and artificial intelligence. Includes a list of 60 simulations for use on mainframes and microcomputers. Entries include type of hardware required, publisher's address, and cost. Sample…

  18. Testing and Measurement Potentials of Microcomputers for Cognitive Style Research and Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroway, Robert L.

    Microcomputer versions of three commonly used cognitive style measurement instruments are described and demonstrated: the Leveling-Sharpening House Test (LSHT) (Santostefano, 1964); Lowenfeld's Successive Impressions Test I (SIT-I) (1945); and the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (Witkin, Oltman, Ruskin, and Karp, 1971). At present, many…

  19. Creating, Storing, and Dumping Low and High Resolution Graphics on the Apple IIe Microcomputer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Richard K., Jr.

    This description of procedures for dumping high and low resolution graphics using the Apple IIe microcomputer system focuses on two special hardware configurations that are commonly used in schools--the Apple Dot Matrix Printer with the Apple Parallel Interface Card, and the Imagewriter Printer with the Apple Super Serial Interface Card. Special…

  20. Dumping Low and High Resolution Graphics on the Apple IIe Microcomputer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Richard K., Jr.; Ruckman, Frank, Jr.

    This paper discusses and outlines procedures for obtaining a hard copy of the graphic output of a microcomputer or "dumping a graphic" using the Apple Dot Matrix Printer with the Apple Parallel Interface Card, and the Imagewriter Printer with the Apple Super Serial Interface Card. Hardware configurations and instructions for high…

  1. A Comparison of Using a Microcomputer, Precision Teaching, and Worksheets to Master Basic Multiplication Facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nancy Nesbitt

    1992-01-01

    Discusses methods for teaching mathematics skills and describes a study of third graders that compared student performances on worksheets, a microcomputer drill and practice program, and daily one-minute timing procedures of precision teaching for independent practice of multiplication facts. Results indicate that precision teaching was the most…

  2. LEAF: A Microcomputer Program for Constructing the Tukey Stem and Leaf Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascale, Pietro J.; Smith, Joseph

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a BASIC microcomputer program that constructs the Tukey (1977) stem and leaf graph. Options within the LEAF program include a modified stem and leaf where the stem is split and a parallel stem and leaf graph where two separate sets of data are displayed from a common stem. (Author)

  3. Microcomputers in the Schools--Implementation in Special Education. Case Study Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRA Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA.

    The report presents case studies of microcomputer use in 12 school districts' special education programs. The case study approach was designed to focus on organizational issues, specifically the following four: nature of collaboration between regular and special education, centralization or decentralization of decisionmaking in implementation…

  4. Testing and Measurement Potentials of Microcomputers for Cognitive Style Research and Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroway, Robert L.

    Microcomputer versions of three commonly used cognitive style measurement instruments are described and demonstrated: the Leveling-Sharpening House Test (LSHT) (Santostefano, 1964); Lowenfeld's Successive Impressions Test I (SIT-I) (1945); and the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) (Witkin, Oltman, Ruskin, and Karp, 1971). At present, many…

  5. From Teaching Machines to Microcomputers: Some Milestones in the History of Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Richard P.; Walberg, Herbert J.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the history of computer-based education within the context of psychological theorists of instruction, including Pressey, Thorndike, Skinner, and Crowder. Topics discussed include computer-managed instruction; computer-assisted instruction; the Computer Curriculum Corporation; PLATO; TICCIT; microcomputers; effects on students; and cost…

  6. Developing Telecommunication Linkages for Microcomputer-Aided Instruction. TDC Research Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinn, Charles R.; And Others

    A project undertaken at the University of Minnesota evaluated two microcomputer teletraining systems (audiographic conferencing) to determine the effectiveness of this technology for point-to-point and multipoint distance education. System design requirements included broadcast keystrokes, error checking, master-slave linkages, simultaneous voice…

  7. Microcomputer-Controlled Reader Systems for Archaeological and Geological TL Dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Mejdahl, V.

    1984-01-01

    Two fully automated TL reader systems for TL dating and a manually operated reader for research purpose were put into operation during 1982-3. All systems are controlled by HP-85 or HP-86 microcomputers; thus flexibility in selection of measurement parameters, calculation of TL signals and display...

  8. Neonatal Information System Using an Interactive Microcomputer Data Base Management Program

    OpenAIRE

    Engelke, Stephen C.; Paulette, Ed W.; Kopelman, Arthur E.

    1981-01-01

    A low cost, interactive microcomputer data base management system is presented which is being used in a neonatal follow-up program at the East Carolina University School of Medicine. The features and flexibility of the system could be applied to a variety of medical care settings.

  9. The Effectiveness of Microcomputer Exercises in Teaching Marketing Planning and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calantone, Roger J.; di Benedetto, C. Anthony

    1989-01-01

    Student teams in a senior capstone course in marketing completed microcomputer simulation in which they developed six-month marketing plan for a new product. A procedure similar to Kelly's Role Repertory Test was applied to define the role that various information sources played in their decision-making process, a means of determining the amount…

  10. Library Media Specialists and Instructional Development: A Probe of the Literature via Microcomputer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, David L.

    1982-01-01

    This simulated interaction between a human and a microcomputer is presented as an example of one way in which a computer could be used to report data and results from research studies on particular topics in school librarianship. A brief discussion of the example is included. (JL)

  11. Microcomputer interface for computer-controlled enzyme kinetic studies with the monolayer technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, G. de; Donné-Op den Kelder, G.M.; Wildt, H. van der

    1984-01-01

    Abstract A microcomputer interface for computer-assisted monolayer experiments was developed, tested, and used for analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysis by pancreatic phospholipases A2 (EC 3.1.1.4) of 1,2-didodecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-sulfate monitored under constant surface pressure. The interface descr

  12. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Hernández Anzaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H2O2 oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto, (meso, (deuteroporphyrinato (picdien]Fe(III complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III quantum mixed spin (qms ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1–3 + guaiacol + H2O2 → oxidation guaiacol products. The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III and H2O2, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0–4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III family with the ligand picdien [N,N’-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, 1H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  13. Biogenic uraninite precipitation and its reoxidation by iron(III) (hydr)oxides: A reaction modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spycher, Nicolas F.; Issarangkun, Montarat; Stewart, Brandy D.; Sevinç Şengör, S.; Belding, Eileen; Ginn, Tim R.; Peyton, Brent M.; Sani, Rajesh K.

    2011-08-01

    One option for immobilizing uranium present in subsurface contaminated groundwater is in situ bioremediation, whereby dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and/or sulfate-reducing bacteria are stimulated to catalyze the reduction of soluble U(VI) and precipitate it as uraninite (UO 2). This is typically accomplished by amending groundwater with an organic electron donor. It has been shown, however, that once the electron donor is entirely consumed, Fe(III) (hydr)oxides can reoxidize biogenically produced UO 2, thus potentially impeding cleanup efforts. On the basis of published experiments showing that such reoxidation takes place even under highly reducing conditions (e.g., sulfate-reducing conditions), thermodynamic and kinetic constraints affecting this reoxidation are examined using multicomponent biogeochemical simulations, with particular focus on the role of sulfide and Fe(II) in solution. The solubility of UO 2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxides are presented, and the effect of nanoscale particle size on stability is discussed. Thermodynamically, sulfide is preferentially oxidized by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, compared to biogenic UO 2, and for this reason the relative rates of sulfide and UO 2 oxidation play a key role on whether or not UO 2 reoxidizes. The amount of Fe(II) in solution is another important factor, with the precipitation of Fe(II) minerals lowering the Fe +2 activity in solution and increasing the potential for both sulfide and UO 2 reoxidation. The greater (and unintuitive) UO 2 reoxidation by hematite compared to ferrihydrite previously reported in some experiments can be explained by the exhaustion of this mineral from reaction with sulfide. Simulations also confirm previous studies suggesting that carbonate produced by the degradation of organic electron donors used for bioreduction may significantly increase the potential for UO 2 reoxidation through formation of uranyl carbonate aqueous complexes.

  14. Novel Low Spin Mixed Ligand Thiohydrazide Complexes of Iron(III: Synthesis, Spectral Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and Antibacterial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolan Sengupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixed ligand complexes of Fe(III with aromatic thiohydrazides of general composition [Fe(acac(L2] have been synthesized and characterized (acac-acetylacetonate, L = bidentate uninegative aromatic thiohydrazide ligand, for example, thiobenzhydrazide, 2-hydroxythiobenzhydrazide, furan-2-thiohydrazide, and thiophen-2-thiohydrazide. The magnetic susceptibility data and the EPR spectra of these complexes suggested the formation of rhombically distorted low spin iron center (d5 in octahedral environment, which was also supported by the UV-vis spectral data of the complexes. Biological studies of these complexes also indicated that the iron-thiohydrazido complexes have superior antibacterial properties compared to the corresponding ligands.

  15. Modeling the chelation of As(III) in lewisite by dithiols using density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lenora K; Bayse, Craig A

    2015-12-01

    Dithiols such as British anti-lewisite (BAL, rac-2,3-dimercaptopropanol) are an important class of antidotes for the blister agent lewisite (trans-2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine) and, more generally, are chelating agents for arsenic and other toxic metals. The reaction of the vicinal thiols of BAL with lewisite through the chelation of the As(III) center has been modeled using density functional theory (DFT) and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE), a microsolvation method that uses a network of water molecules to mimic the role of bulk solvent in models of aqueous phase chemical reactions. The small activation barriers for the stepwise SN2-type nucleophilic attack of BAL on lewisite (0.7-4.9kcal/mol) are consistent with the favorable leaving group properties of the chloride and the affinity of As(III) for soft sulfur nucleophiles. Small, but insignificant, differences in activation barriers were found for the initial attack of the primary versus secondary thiol of BAL and the R vs S enantiomer. An examination of the relative stability of various dithiol-lewisite complexes shows that ethanedithiols like BAL form the most favorable chelation complexes because the angles formed in five-membered ring are most consistent with the hybridization of As(III). More obtuse S-As-S angles are required for larger chelate rings, but internal As⋯N or As⋯O interactions can enhance the stability of moderate-sized rings. The low barriers for lewisite detoxification by BAL and the greater stability of the chelation complexes of small dithiols are consistent with the rapid reversal of toxicity demonstrated in previously reported animal models.

  16. Oxidation of dibenzothiophene as a model substrate for the removal of organic sulphur from fossil fuels by iron(III ions generated from pyrite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR P. BESKOSKI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Within this paper a new idea for the removal of organically bonded sulphur from fossil fuels is discussed. Dibenzothiophene (DBT was used as a model compound of organicmolecules containing sulphur. This form of (biodesulphurization was performed by an indirect mechanism in which iron(III ions generated from pyrite by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans performed the abiotic oxidation. The obtained reaction products, dibenzothiopene sulfoxide and dibenzothiophene sulfone, are more soluble in water than the basic substrate and the obtained results confirmed the basic hypothesis and give the posibility of continuing the experiments related to application of this (biodesulphurization process.

  17. Mathematical model of uptake and metabolism of arsenic(III in human hepatocytes - Incorporation of cellular antioxidant response and threshold-dependent behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isukapalli Sastry S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is an environmental pollutant, potent human toxicant, and oxidative stress agent with a multiplicity of health effects associated with both acute and chronic exposures. A semi-mechanistic cellular-level toxicokinetic (TK model was developed in order to describe the uptake, biotransformation and clearance of arsenical species in human hepatocytes. Notable features of this model are the incorporation of arsenic-glutathione complex formation and a "switch-like" formulation to describe the antioxidant response of hepatocytes to arsenic exposure. Results The cellular-level TK model applies mass action kinetics in order to predict the concentrations of trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals in hepatocytes. The model simulates uptake of arsenite (iAsIII via aquaporin isozymes 9 (AQP9s, glutathione (GSH conjugation, methylation by arsenic methyltransferase (AS3MT, efflux through multidrug resistant proteins (MRPs and the induced antioxidant response via thioredoxin reductase (TR activity. The model was parameterized by optimization of model estimates for arsenite (iAsIII, monomethylated (MMA and dimethylated (DMA arsenicals concentrations with time-course experimental data in human hepatocytes for a time span of 48 hours, and dose-response data at 24 hours for a range of arsenite concentrations from 0.1 to 10 μM. Global sensitivity analysis of the model showed that at low doses the transport parameters had a dominant role, whereas at higher doses the biotransformation parameters were the most significant. A parametric comparison of the TK model with an analogous model developed for rat hepatocytes from the literature demonstrated that the biotransformation of arsenite (e.g. GSH conjugation has a large role in explaining the variation in methylation between rats and humans. Conclusions The cellular-level TK model captures the temporal modes of arsenical accumulation in human hepatocytes. It highlighted the key biological

  18. DNA translocation by type III restriction enzymes: a comparison of current models of their operation derived from ensemble and single-molecule measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, David T F; Edwardson, J M; Henderson, Robert M

    2011-06-01

    Much insight into the interactions of DNA and enzymes has been obtained using a number of single-molecule techniques. However, recent results generated using two of these techniques-atomic force microscopy (AFM) and magnetic tweezers (MT)-have produced apparently contradictory results when applied to the action of the ATP-dependent type III restriction endonucleases on DNA. The AFM images show extensive looping of the DNA brought about by the existence of multiple DNA binding sites on each enzyme and enzyme dimerisation. The MT experiments show no evidence for looping being a requirement for DNA cleavage, but instead support a diffusive sliding of the enzyme on the DNA until an enzyme-enzyme collision occurs, leading to cleavage. Not only do these two methods appear to disagree, but also the models derived from them have difficulty explaining some ensemble biochemical results on DNA cleavage. In this 'Survey and Summary', we describe several different models put forward for the action of type III restriction enzymes and their inadequacies. We also attempt to reconcile the different models and indicate areas for further experimentation to elucidate the mechanism of these enzymes.

  19. Measuring the efficacy of flunixin meglumine and meloxicam for lame sows using a GAITFour pressure mat and an embedded microcomputer-based force plate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairis-Garcia, M D; Johnson, A K; Abell, C A; Coetzee, J F; Karriker, L A; Millman, S T; Stalder, K J

    2015-05-01

    Pain associated with lameness on farm is a negative affective state and has a detrimental impact on individual farm animal welfare. Animal pain can be managed utilizing husbandry tools and through pharmacological approaches. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including meloxicam and flunixin meglumine are compounds used in many species for pain management because they are easy to administer, long lasting, and cost-effective. Assessing an animal's biomechanical parameters using such tools as the embedded microcomputer-based force plate system and GAITFour pressure mat gait analysis walkway system provides an objective, sensitive, and precise means to detect animals in lame states. The objectives of this study were to determine the efficacy of meloxicam and flunixin meglumine for pain mitigation in lame sows using the embedded microcomputer-based force plate system and GAITFour pressure mat gait analysis walkway system. Lameness was induced in 24 mature mixed-parity sows using a chemical synovitis model and compared 3 treatments: meloxicam (1.0 mg/kg per os), flunixin meglumine (2.2 mg/kg intramuscular) and sterile saline (intramuscular). Weight distribution (kg) for each foot was collected twice per second for a total of 5 min for each time point using the embedded microcomputer-based force plate system. Stride time, stride length, maximum pressure, activated sensors, and stance time were collected using 3 quality walks (readings) for each time point using the GAITFour pressure mat gait analysis walkway system. Sows administered flunixin meglumine or meloxicam tolerated more weight on their lame leg compared with saline sows (P meloxicam had smaller differences in stance time, maximum pressure, and activated sensors between the sound and lame legs compared with saline-treated sows between 37 and 60 h after lameness induction (P meloxicam administration mitigated pain sensitivity in sows after lameness induction when pain sensitivity was evaluated with the embedded

  20. The use of a microcomputer system as an aid to classical and digital control system design and analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey, John Douglas

    1983-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis takes five FORTRAN IV programs from "Computer Programs for Computational Assistance in the Study of Linear Control Theory" by Melsa and Jones and translates them into a microcomputer BASIC language to run on an inexpensive microcomputer system. Three of the five programs are state variable programs. They are BASMAT for basic matrix manipulation, RTRESP for rational time response, and GTRESP for graphica...

  1. Development of Microcomputer Methods for Analysis and Simulation of Clinical Pharmacokinetic Data Relevant to New Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-02

    applications of new microcomputer graphics techonology to the analysis and interpretation of clinical pharmacological data. This involves continuing...COF AD DEVELOPMENT OF MICROCOMPUTER METHODS FOR ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETIC DATA RELEVANT TO NEW DRUG DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL/FINAL...Simulation of Clinical Pharmacokinetic Data ERING ORG. TU Relevant to New Drug Development 6. PERFORMiNG ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) 5. CONTRACT OR

  2. Evaluation of Root Canal Preparation Using Rotary System and Hand Instruments Assessed by Micro-Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Stavileci, Miranda; Hoxha, Veton; Görduysus, Ömer; Tatar, Ilkan; Laperre, Kjell; Hostens, Jeroen; Küçükkaya, Selen; Muhaxheri, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete mechanical preparation of the root canal system is rarely achieved. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the root canal shaping efficacy of ProTaper rotary files and standard stainless steel K-files using micro-computed tomography. Material/Methods Sixty extracted upper second premolars were selected and divided into 2 groups of 30 teeth each. Before preparation, all samples were scanned by micro-computed tomography. Thirty teeth were prepared w...

  3. A Family Study of the DSM-5 Section III Personality Pathology Model Using the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Andrea C; Hee, Danelle; Hooker, Christine I; Shankman, Stewart A

    2017-10-03

    In Section III of the DSM-5, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) proposes a pathological personality trait model of personality disorders. The recommended assessment instrument is the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 (PID-5), an empirically derived scale that assesses personality pathology along five domains and 25 facets. Although the PID-5 demonstrates strong convergent validity with other personality measures, no study has examined whether it identifies traits that run in families, another important step toward validating the DSM-5's dimensional model. Using a family study method, we investigated familial associations of PID-5 domain and facet scores in 195 families, examining associations between parents and offspring and across siblings. The Psychoticism, Antagonism, and Detachment domains showed significant familial aggregation, as did facets of Negative Affect and Disinhibition. Results are discussed in the context of personality pathology and family study methodology. The results also help validate the PID-5, given the familial nature of personality traits.

  4. Development of fracture facets from a crack loaded in mode I+III: Solution and application of a model 2D problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Jean-Baptiste; Frelat, Joël

    2014-03-01

    It is experimentally well-known that a crack loaded in mode I+III propagates through formation of discrete fracture facets inclined at a certain tilt angle on the original crack plane, depending on the ratio of the mode III to mode I initial stress intensity factors. Pollard et al. (1982) have proposed to calculate this angle by considering the tractions on all possible future infinitesimal facets and assuming shear tractions to be zero on that which will actually develop. In this paper we consider the opposite case of well-developed facets; the stress field near the lateral fronts of such facets becomes independent of the initial crack and essentially 2D in a plane perpendicular to the main direction of crack propagation. To determine this stress field, we solve the model 2D problem of an infinite plate containing an infinite periodic array of cracks inclined at some angle on a straight line, and loaded through uniform stresses at infinity. This is done first analytically, for small values of this angle, by combining Muskhelishvili's (1953) formalism and a first-order perturbation procedure. The formulae found for the 2D stress intensity factors are then extended in an approximate way to larger angles by using another reference solution, and finally assessed through comparison with some finite element results. To finally illustrate the possible future application of these formulae to the prediction of the stationary tilt angle, we introduce the tentative assumption that the 2D mode II stress intensity factor is zero on the lateral fronts of the facets. An approximate formula providing the tilt angle as a function of the ratio of the mode III to mode I stress intensity factors of the initial crack is deduced from there. This formula, which slightly depends on the type of loading imposed, predicts somewhat smaller angles than that of Pollard et al. (1982).

  5. Electronic structure description of a [Co(III)3Co(IV)O4] cluster: a model for the paramagnetic intermediate in cobalt-catalyzed water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpin, J Gregory; Stich, Troy A; Ohlin, C André; Surendranath, Yogesh; Nocera, Daniel G; Casey, William H; Britt, R David

    2011-10-01

    Multifrequency electron paramagnetic resonace (EPR) spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations were performed on [Co(4)O(4)(C(5)H(5)N)(4)(CH(3)CO(2))(4)](+) (1(+)), a cobalt tetramer with total electron spin S = 1/2 and formal cobalt oxidation states III, III, III, and IV. The cuboidal arrangement of its cobalt and oxygen atoms is similar to that of proposed structures for the molecular cobaltate clusters of the cobalt-phosphate (Co-Pi) water-oxidizing catalyst. The Davies electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectrum is well-modeled using a single class of hyperfine-coupled (59)Co nuclei with a modestly strong interaction (principal elements of the hyperfine tensor are equal to [-20(±2), 77(±1), -5(±15)] MHz). Mims (1)H ENDOR spectra of 1(+) with selectively deuterated pyridine ligands confirm that the amount of unpaired spin on the cobalt-bonding partner is significantly reduced from unity. Multifrequency (14)N ESEEM spectra (acquired at 9.5 and 34.0 GHz) indicate that four nearly equivalent nitrogen nuclei are coupled to the electron spin. Cumulatively, our EPR spectroscopic findings indicate that the unpaired spin is delocalized almost equally across the eight core atoms, a finding corroborated by results from DFT calculations. Each octahedrally coordinated cobalt ion is forced into a low-spin electron configuration by the anionic oxo and carboxylato ligands, and a fractional electron hole is localized on each metal center in a Co 3d(xz,yz)-based molecular orbital for this essentially [Co(+3.125)(4)O(4)] system. Comparing the EPR spectrum of 1(+) with that of the catalyst film allows us to draw conclusions about the electronic structure of this water-oxidation catalyst.

  6. Education as Experimentation: A Planned Variation Model. Volume IIIA: Findings: Cohort II; Interim Findings: Cohort III. Volume IIIB: Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Linda B.; And Others

    This segment of the national evaluation study of the Follow Through Planned Variation Model reviews the background of the study, describes 13 of the Follow Through models involved, and presents an analysis of the effects of these models on students. The analysis is based on data from 4 years of Follow Through participation by Cohort II children…

  7. Narrow-line seyfert 1 galaxies: the [O III] λ5007/Hβ ratio and photoionization models for the nlr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ardila Rodríguez

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudiamos los per les opticos y las condiciones f sicas de la regi on de l neas estrechas (NLR de galaxias Seyfert 1 con l neas estrechas (NLS1s. Los resultados muestran que el ujo asociado a la componente estrecha de H puede ser un factor de hasta 10 veces mayor que el valor usualmente adoptado en la literatura. Como consecuencia, la raz on [O III] 5007/H oscila entre 1 hasta 5, en lugar del valor de 10 comunmente adoptado. Probamos modelos de fotoionizaci on que consideran una NLR compuesta de una combinaci on de nubes limitadas por materia y limitadas por radiaci on y mostramos que este escenario reproduce de forma satisfactoria las razones de l neas de emisi on observadas. Proponemos que las propiedades peculiares de la NLR en las NLS1s pueden ser explicadas por un continuo inclinado de tipo ley de potencia en la region EUV{Rayos-X blandos, con un ndice espectral

  8. Microcomputer-based pneumatic controller for neutron activation analysis. [For analyzing uranium ore samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, J.S.; Sand, R.J.

    1976-10-01

    A microcomputer-based pneumatic controller for neutron activation analysis was designed and built at the Savannah River Laboratory for analysis of large numbers of geologic samples for locating potential supplies of uranium ore for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. In this system, commercially available microcomputer logic modules are used to transport sample capsules through a network of pressurized air lines. The logic modules are interfaced to pneumatic valves, solenoids, and photo-optical detectors. The system operates from programs stored in firmware (permanent software). It also commands a minicomputer and a hard-wired pulse height analyzer for data collection and bookkeeping tasks. The advantage of the system is that major system changes can be implemented in the firmware with no hardware changes. This report describes the hardware, firmware, and software for the electronics system.

  9. Effects of group size, gender, and ability grouping on learning science process skills using microcomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Zane L.

    What are the effects of group size (individuals, pairs, and quads of students), gender, and ability grouping of 245 seventh- and eighth-grade students on achievement within an environment that uses microcomputers as tools in learning science process skills? A split-plot, multivariate factorial design was used to analyze the above factors and interactions among the factors. Analyses indicated that the only statistically significant result was a main effect on ability for the two response variables measured in the study. Major conclusions included: (1) teams of two and four members working together solved problems as effectively as individuals, (2) the lessons and procedures implemented in the manner described generated a gender-neutral achievement outcome in science, and (3) microcomputer, using a file-management program and structured activities, can be used as a tool to promote student learning of science process skills.

  10. THE ROLE OF THE MICROCOMPUTER IN THE DEMISE OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, David

    1979-02-01

    Every revolutionary: new technology has been accompanied by a host of Cassandras prophesying the end of the world as we know it. Unlike Cassandra, heretofore they have all been wrong. The microcomputer has come into its own as a revolutioary new technology, and the new generation of Cassandras is beginning to appear. They, too, for the most part are wrong, but their error is not in their conclusion--for the microcomputer will bring about the end of Western Civilization--but in their conentration on technological consequences. It is rather a social consequence, the willful dis-integiation of society, which will be the motivating force. But Cassandra's tragedy was that no-one listened to her.

  11. Examination of the coordination sphere of Al(III) in trifluoromethyl-heteroarylalkenolato complex ions by gas-phase IRMPD spectroscopy and computational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückmann, Lisa; Tyrra, Wieland; Mathur, Sanjay; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Meijer, Anthony J H M; Schäfer, Mathias

    2012-06-01

    A series of aluminium complex ions with trifluoromethyl-heteroarylalkenolato (TMHA) ligands are studied by gas-phase infrared multiphoton-dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy and computational modelling. The selected series of aluminium TMHA complex ions are promising species for the initial study of intrinsic binding characteristics of Al(III) cations in the gas phase as corresponding molecular ions. They are readily available for examination by (+) and (-) electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) by spraying of [Al(3+)⋅(L(-))(3)] solutions. The complex ions under investigation contain trivalent Al(3+) cations with two chelating anionic enolate ligands, [Al(3+)⋅(L(-))(2)](+), providing insights in the nature of the heteroatom-Al bonds. Additionally, the structure of a deprotonated benzimidazole ligand, L(-,) and an anionic complex ion of Al(III) with two doubly deprotonated benzimidazole ligands, [Al(3+)⋅(L(2-))(2)](-), are examined by (-)ESI-IRMPD spectroscopy. Experimental and computational results are highly consistent and allow a reliable identification of the ion structures. In all complex ions examined the planar TMHA ligands are oriented perpendicular to each other around the metal ion, leading to a tetrahedral coordination sphere in which aluminium interacts with the enolate oxygen and heteroaryl nitrogen atoms available in each of the bidentate ligands.

  12. A microcomputer-based sleep system: data acquisition and system calibration programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivaldi, E A; Pastel, R H; Bakalian, M J; Fernstrom, J D

    1988-01-01

    A data acquisition program is described for the Apple II series of microcomputers that allows for continuous, direct monitoring of electrographic elements from cortical, hippocampal and muscle leads from rats. The program detects cortical delta waves and sigma activity, hippocampal theta activity and electromyographic activity. The detected elements are counted and stored in memory at 15 second intervals (bins). Every three hours, the data are transferred to disks for permanent storage and off-line analysis.

  13. A Comparison of Three LISP Interpreters for MS-DOS-Based Microcomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Stephen N.; Johannes, Richard S.

    1985-01-01

    We report a comparison of three commercially available LISP interpreters running on MS-DOS-based microcomputers. Marked differences were found between the different products' memory addressing abilities, error handling and debugging facilities. Editing tools, tutoring environments, windowing, graphic capabilities, operating system and port call facilities are also contrasted. Speed was tested via a group of LISP functions (benchmarks) that attempt to isolate list manipulation, iteration, function calling, recursion and mathematical calculation performance.

  14. Microcomputer-based digital image processing - A tutorial package for exploration geologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, J. A., Jr.; Cartin, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    An Apple II microcomputer-based software package for analysis of digital data developed at the University of Oklahoma, the Digital Image Analysis System (DIAS), provides a relatively low-cost, portable alternative to large, dedicated minicomputers for digital image processing education. Digital processing techniques for analysis of Landsat MSS data and a series of tutorial exercises for exploration geologists are described and evaluated. DIAS allows in-house training that does not interfere with computer-based prospect analysis objectives.

  15. Understanding the sequential activation of Type III and Type VI Secretion Systems in Salmonella typhimurium using Boolean modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Three pathogenicity islands, viz. SPI-1 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 1), SPI-2 (Salmonella pathogenicity island 2) and T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), present in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium have been implicated in the virulence of the pathogen. While the regulation of SPI-1 and SPI-2 (both encoding components of the Type III Secretion System - T3SS) are well understood, T6SS regulation is comparatively less studied. Interestingly, inter-connections among the regulatory elements of these three virulence determinants have also been suggested to be essential for successful infection. However, till date, an integrated view of gene regulation involving the regulators of these three secretion systems and their cross-talk is not available. Results In the current study, relevant regulatory information available from literature have been integrated into a single Boolean network, which portrays the dynamics of T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS mediated virulence. Some additional regulatory interactions involving a two-component system response regulator YfhA have also been predicted and included in the Boolean network. These predictions are aimed at deciphering the effects of osmolarity on T6SS regulation, an aspect that has been suggested in earlier studies, but the mechanism of which was hitherto unknown. Simulation of the regulatory network was able to recreate in silico the experimentally observed sequential activation of SPI-1, SPI-2 and T6SS. Conclusions The present study integrates relevant gene regulatory data (from literature and our prediction) into a single network, representing the cross-communication between T3SS (SPI-1 and SPI-2) and T6SS. This holistic view of regulatory interactions is expected to improve the current understanding of pathogenesis of S. typhimurium. PMID:24079299

  16. Density Functional Theory Modeling of Low-Loss Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy in Wurtzite III-Nitride Ternary Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljarrat, Alberto; Sastre, Xavier; Peiró, Francesca; Estradé, Sónia

    2016-06-01

    In the present work, the dielectric response of III-nitride semiconductors is studied using density functional theory (DFT) band structure calculations. The aim of this study is to improve our understanding of the features in the low-loss electron energy-loss spectra of ternary alloys, but the results are also relevant to optical and UV spectroscopy results. In addition, the dependence of the most remarkable features with composition is tested, i.e. applying Vegard's law to band gap and plasmon energy. For this purpose, three wurtzite ternary alloys, from the combination of binaries AlN, GaN, and InN, were simulated through a wide compositional range (i.e., Al x Ga1-x N, In x Al1-x N, and In x Ga1-x N, with x=[0,1]). For this DFT calculations, the standard tools found in Wien2k software were used. In order to improve the band structure description of these semiconductor compounds, the modified Becke-Johnson exchange-correlation potential was also used. Results from these calculations are presented, including band structure, density of states, and complex dielectric function for the whole compositional range. Larger, closer to experimental values, band gap energies are predicted using the novel potential, when compared with standard generalized gradient approximation. Moreover, a detailed analysis of the collective excitation features in the dielectric response reveals their compositional dependence, which sometimes departs from a linear behavior (bowing). Finally, an advantageous method for measuring the plasmon energy dependence from these calculations is explained.

  17. Psychometric Testing of the FACES III with Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Bette; Dingmann, Colleen; Cuevas, Elizabeth; Meehan, Maurita

    2010-01-01

    This study tests the validity and reliability of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Scale III (FACES III) in two samples of rural adolescents. The underlying theory is the linear 3-D circumplex model. The FACES III was administered to 1,632 adolescents in Grades 7 through 12 in two counties in a rural western state. The FACES III Scale and the…

  18. Graphics of (X,Y) spectrum for microcomputer; Graficado de espectro (X,Y) para microcomputadora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias B, L.R

    1991-08-15

    When carrying out diffraction works is frequently required to visualize the spectra of the data obtained in order to analyzing them. The design for the obtaining of data in the neutron diffractometer by means of the microcomputer allows to store them in a file by means of the one which transferring to the CYBER system so that by means of its utilities the mentioned spectrum is observed in a graph. In diffraction works, it is sought to study crystalline materials by means of the execution of the Bragg law by that the mounted sample on the diffractometer is subjected to a scanning of the sample with a radiation of a well-known wavelength and this way varying the angles, the corresponding interplanar distances are determined. The main objective of this work, is starting of a data set generated by the diffractometer, to generate the graph of the corresponding (X,Y) spectra in visual form in the screen of a microcomputer and if it is required, to obtain the graph in printed form by means of the same computer program for microcomputer. (Author)

  19. Graphics of (X,Y) spectrum for microcomputer; Graficado de espectro (X,Y) para microcomputadora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macias B, L.R

    1991-08-15

    When carrying out diffraction works is frequently required to visualize the spectra of the data obtained in order to analyzing them. The design for the obtaining of data in the neutron diffractometer by means of the microcomputer allows to store them in a file by means of the one which transferring to the CYBER system so that by means of its utilities the mentioned spectrum is observed in a graph. In diffraction works, it is sought to study crystalline materials by means of the execution of the Bragg law by that the mounted sample on the diffractometer is subjected to a scanning of the sample with a radiation of a well-known wavelength and this way varying the angles, the corresponding interplanar distances are determined. The main objective of this work, is starting of a data set generated by the diffractometer, to generate the graph of the corresponding (X,Y) spectra in visual form in the screen of a microcomputer and if it is required, to obtain the graph in printed form by means of the same computer program for microcomputer. (Author)

  20. Graphics Gems III IBM version

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, David

    1994-01-01

    This sequel to Graphics Gems (Academic Press, 1990), and Graphics Gems II (Academic Press, 1991) is a practical collection of computer graphics programming tools and techniques. Graphics Gems III contains a larger percentage of gems related to modeling and rendering, particularly lighting and shading. This new edition also covers image processing, numerical and programming techniques, modeling and transformations, 2D and 3D geometry and algorithms,ray tracing and radiosity, rendering, and more clever new tools and tricks for graphics programming. Volume III also includes a

  1. X-Ray Reflected Spectra from Accretion Disk Models. III. A Complete Grid of Ionized Reflection Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, J.; Dauser, T.; Reynolds, C. S.; Kallman, T. R.; McClintock, J. E.; Wilms, J.; Eikmann, W.

    2013-05-01

    We present a new and complete library of synthetic spectra for modeling the component of emission that is reflected from an illuminated accretion disk. The spectra were computed using an updated version of our code XILLVER that incorporates new routines and a richer atomic database. We offer in the form of a table model an extensive grid of reflection models that cover a wide range of parameters. Each individual model is characterized by the photon index Γ of the illuminating radiation, the ionization parameter ξ at the surface of the disk (i.e., the ratio of the X-ray flux to the gas density), and the iron abundance A Fe relative to the solar value. The ranges of the parameters covered are 1.2 law flux. The models are expected to provide an accurate description of the Fe K emission line, which is the crucial spectral feature used to measure black hole spin. A total of 720 reflection spectra are provided in a single FITS file (http://hea-www.cfa.harvard.edu/~javier/xillver/) suitable for the analysis of X-ray observations via the atable model in XSPEC. Detailed comparisons with previous reflection models illustrate the improvements incorporated in this version of XILLVER.

  2. Type-III two Higgs doublet model plus a pseudoscalar confronted with h→μτ, muon g−2 and dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewen Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce an extra singlet pseudoscalar into the Type-III two Higgs doublet model (2HDM which is supposed to solve a series of problems in the modern particle-cosmology. With existence of a light pseudoscalar, the h→μτ excess measured at CMS and as well as the (g−2μ anomaly could be simultaneously explained within certain parameter spaces that can also tolerate the data on the flavor-violating processes τ→μγ and Higgs decay gained at LHC. Within the same parameter spaces, the DM relic abundance is well accounted. Moreover, the recently observed Galactic Center gamma ray excess (GCE is proposed to realize through dark matter (DM pair annihilations, and in this work, the scenario of the annihilation being mediated by the pseudoscalar is also addressed.

  3. Type-III two Higgs doublet model plus a pseudoscalar confronted with h → μτ, muon g - 2 and dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuewen; Bian, Ligong; Li, Xue-Qian; Shu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we introduce an extra singlet pseudoscalar into the Type-III two Higgs doublet model (2HDM) which is supposed to solve a series of problems in the modern particle-cosmology. With existence of a light pseudoscalar, the h → μτ excess measured at CMS and as well as the (g - 2) μ anomaly could be simultaneously explained within certain parameter spaces that can also tolerate the data on the flavor-violating processes τ → μγ and Higgs decay gained at LHC. Within the same parameter spaces, the DM relic abundance is well accounted. Moreover, the recently observed Galactic Center gamma ray excess (GCE) is proposed to realize through dark matter (DM) pair annihilations, and in this work, the scenario of the annihilation being mediated by the pseudoscalar is also addressed.

  4. Missed opportunities in the DSM-5 Section III personality disorder model: commentary on "personality disorders are the vanguard of the post-DSM-5.0 era".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joshua D; Lynam, Donald R

    2013-10-01

    Comments on an article by Krueger (see record 2013-45025-008). The current authors appreciate the opportunity to comment on Krueger's article. They remark that as a member of the DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association, 2013) Personality and Personality Disorders Work Group (PPDWG), he is in a unique position to describe the process surrounding the deliberations of the PPDWG and why their model was placed in Section III. Whereas Krueger offers that too much openness and contentiousness in the personality and personality disorder (PD) field were responsible for the difficulties faced by the DSM-5 PPDWG proposal, the current authors suggest another condition that may have been at play: myopia. The current authors discuss several shortsighted decisions made by the PPDWG that may have contributed to the disappointing outcome. Specifically, they describe ways in which the PPDWG ignored large bodies of extant research that could have guided and supported the proposal, inoculating it against many of the most damning critiques.

  5. Modelling galaxy spectra in presence of interstellar dust-III. From nearby galaxies to the distant Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Cassarà, Letizia P; Chiosi, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Improving upon the standard evolutionary population synthesis (EPS) technique, we present spectrophotometric models of galaxies whose morphology goes from spherical structures to discs, properly accounting for the effect of dust in the interstellar medium (ISM). These models enclose three main physical components: the diffuse ISM composed by gas and dust, the complexes of molecular clouds (MCs) where active star formation occurs and the stars of any age and chemical composition. These models are based on robust evolutionary chemical models that provide the total amount of gas and stars present at any age and that are adjusted in order to match the gross properties of galaxies of different morphological type. We have employed the results for the properties of the ISM presented in Piovan, Tantalo & Chiosi (2006a) and the single stellar populations calculated by Cassar\\`a et al. (2013) to derive the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies going from pure bulge to discs passing through a number of co...

  6. Scaling and long-range dependence in option pricing III: A fractional version of the Merton model with transaction costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Tian; Yan, Hai-Gang; Tang, Ming-Ming; Zhu, En-Hui

    2010-02-01

    A model for option pricing of fractional version of the Merton model with ‘Hurst exponent’ H being in [1/2,1) is established with transaction costs. In particular, for H∈(1/2,1) the minimal price Cmin(t,St) of an option under transaction costs is obtained, which displays that the timestep δt and the ‘Hurst exponent’ H play an important role in option pricing with transaction costs.

  7. Impact of a four-zero Yukawa texture on $h\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $\\gamma Z$ in the framework of the 2-Higgs Doublet Model Type III

    CERN Document Server

    Cordero-Cid, A; Honorato, C G; Moretti, S; Perez, M A; Rosado, A

    2013-01-01

    We study the substantial enhancement, with respect to the corresponding Standard Model rates, that can be obtained for the branching ratios of the decay channels $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ and $h\\to \\gamma Z$ within the framework of the 2-Higgs-Doublet Model Type III, assuming a four-zero Yukawa texture and a general Higgs potential. We show that these processes are very sensitive to the flavour pattern entering the Yukawa texture and to the triple coupling structure of the Higgs potential, both of which impact onto the aforementioned decays. We can accommodate the parameters of the model in such a way to obtain the $h \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ rates reported by the Large Hadron Collider and at the same time get a $h\\to \\gamma Z$ fraction much larger than in the Standard Model, indeed within experimental reach. We present some scenarios where this phenomenology is realised for spectrum configurations that are consistent with current constraints. We also discuss the possibility of obtaining a light charged Higgs boson com...

  8. The overlooked potential of generalized linear models in astronomy - III. Bayesian negative binomial regression and globular cluster populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, R. S.; Hilbe, J. M.; Buelens, B.; Riggs, J. D.; Cameron, E.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Chies-Santos, A. L.; Killedar, M.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the third in a series illustrating the power of generalized linear models (GLMs) for the astronomical community, we elucidate the potential of the class of GLMs which handles count data. The size of a galaxy's globular cluster (GC) population (NGC) is a prolonged puzzle in the astronomical literature. It falls in the category of count data analysis, yet it is usually modelled as if it were a continuous response variable. We have developed a Bayesian negative binomial regression model to study the connection between NGC and the following galaxy properties: central black hole mass, dynamical bulge mass, bulge velocity dispersion and absolute visual magnitude. The methodology introduced herein naturally accounts for heteroscedasticity, intrinsic scatter, errors in measurements in both axes (either discrete or continuous) and allows modelling the population of GCs on their natural scale as a non-negative integer variable. Prediction intervals of 99 per cent around the trend for expected NGC comfortably envelope the data, notably including the Milky Way, which has hitherto been considered a problematic outlier. Finally, we demonstrate how random intercept models can incorporate information of each particular galaxy morphological type. Bayesian variable selection methodology allows for automatically identifying galaxy types with different productions of GCs, suggesting that on average S0 galaxies have a GC population 35 per cent smaller than other types with similar brightness.

  9. Photometric Redshifts and Model Spectral Energy Distributions of Galaxies From the SDSS-III BOSS DR10 Data

    CERN Document Server

    Greisel, N; Drory, N; Bender, R; Saglia, R P; Snigula, J

    2015-01-01

    We construct a set of model spectra specifically designed to match the colours of the BOSS CMASS galaxies and to be used with photometric redshift template fitting techniques. As a basis we use a set of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of single and composite stellar population models. These models cannot describe well the whole colour range populated by the CMASS galaxies at all redshifts, wherefore we modify them by multiplying the SEDs with $\\lambda^{-\\beta}$ for $\\lambda>\\lambda_i$ for different values of $\\lambda_i$ and $\\beta$. When fitting these SEDs to the colours of the CMASS sample, with a burst and dust components in superposition, we can recreate the location in colour spaces inhabited by the CMASS galaxies. From the best fitting models we select a small subset in a two-dimensional plane, whereto the galaxies were mapped by a self-organizing map. These models are used for the estimation of photometric redshifts with a Bayesian template fitting code. The photometric redshifts with the novel tem...

  10. Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

    1998-08-01

    This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

  11. Development Study of Turbulent Kappa-Epsilon Model for Recirculation flow III : Two Dimension Recirculation Flow in a Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Syahril B. Kusuma

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of recirculation flow in Jatiluhur reservoir is conducted based on two dimensions turbulent K-e model. The numerical model was developed using finite difference method where hydrodynamic equation was solved by the combination of Mc Cormack and splitting methods. The K-e equation is solved using quickest scheme in convection term, central scheme in diffusion term and Euler scheme in reaction term. The simulations were done for maximum incoming flow during the rainy season and the dry season. Model results for the rainy season case have shown good agreement with those found by field measurement. The rainy season case generated a much recirculted flow and higher concentration of DO in the reservoir than that of the dry season case. Denser grid and high courant number is needed to avoid it from becoming oscillating and unstable and for achieving a more accurate results for the case with less average velocity.

  12. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydrological Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2A concerns coupled TH modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, mechanical, hydrologic, and mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and requiring predictions for distributions and evolutions of the temperature and saturation fields. Three teams of ENRESA (Spain), DOE (USA), and NRC (USA) teams participated the task with different approaches, using FEM code Bright with a double porosity structure (ENRESA), a FDM code MULTIFLO with a dual continuum approach and an active fracture model (NRC) and a FDM code TOUGH 2 with a dual permeability approach (DOE), respectively. Based on the results of the temperature and moisture distributions and temperature histories, it can be concluded that in general, the three models capture the TH response of the DST fairly well, although there are some differences between the teams' results. Conduction is the dominant heat-transfer mechanism in the fractured unsaturated rock in the DST, especially in the sub-boiling regime. However, the pore water plays an important role near the boiling point as it goes through cycles of vaporization and condensation causing the so called heat-pipe effect. A characteristic signature of heatpipes - a short lull in the rise of temperature - was captured by all three teams. The 2D modeling of the DST carried out by the ENRESA team initially was characterized by very little diffusion of vapor because the tortuosity factor was set at a low value of 0.05 and is referred to as the ND (No Diffusion) case. The recent 3D model with a tortuosity factor set at 1 and a vapor diffusion enhancement coefficient allows maximum vapor diffusion and is referred to as the MD (maximum diffusion) case. Comparative analyses of the modeling results for ND and MD

  13. Energy balance in the solar transition region. III - Helium emission in hydrostatic, constant-abundance models with diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Avrett, E. H.; Loeser, R.

    1993-01-01

    In our previous papers we described the mathematical formalism and the computed results for energy-balance hydrostatic models of the solar transition region. In this paper we discuss in some detail the limitations of the hydrostatic and one-dimensional assumptions used. Then we analyze the determination of helium emission when diffusion is included. We use transport coefficients estimated from kinetic theory to determine the helium departures from local ionization balance. We calculate the helium spectra for each of our models and evaluate the role of helium in the energy transport. Also, we investigate the effects of coronal illumination on the structure of the transition region and upper chromosphere, and show how coronal illumination affects various EUV lines and the He I 10830 A line. Comparing with both absolute intensities and detailed line profiles, we show that our models are consistent not only with the observed hydrogen spectra but also with the available helium spectra.

  14. Atmospheric Test Models and Numerical Experiments for the Simulation of the Global Distributions of Weather Data Transponders III. Horizontal Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molenkamp, C.R.; Grossman, A.

    1999-12-20

    A network of small balloon-borne transponders which gather very high resolution wind and temperature data for use by modern numerical weather predication models has been proposed to improve the reliability of long-range weather forecasts. The global distribution of an array of such transponders is simulated using LLNL's atmospheric parcel transport model (GRANTOUR) with winds supplied by two different general circulation models. An initial study used winds from CCM3 with a horizontal resolution of about 3 degrees in latitude and longitude, and a second study used winds from NOGAPS with a 0.75 degree horizontal resolution. Results from both simulations show that reasonable global coverage can be attained by releasing balloons from an appropriate set of launch sites.

  15. A model for steady state stage III creep regime at low-high stress/temperature range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bonora

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Although diffusional flow creep is often considered out of practical engineering applications, the need for a model capable to account for the resulting action of both diffusional and dislocation type creep is justified by the increasing demands of reliable creep design for very long lives (exceeding 100.000h, high stress-low temperatures and high temperature-low stress regimes. In this paper, a creep model formulation, in which the change of the creep mechanism has been accounted for through an explicit dependence of the creep exponent n on stress and temperature, has been proposed. An application example of the proposed approach to high purity aluminum is given.

  16. Contributions to the dimensional assessment of personality disorders using Millon's model and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI9-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, Stephen; Millon, Theodore

    2007-08-01

    For over 35 years, Mllion's (1996) model of personality and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (Millon, 1977, 1987, 2006) have been useful resources for clinicians to understand and assess personality disorders (PDs) and clinical syndromes in psychiatric patients. In this article, we highlight significant features of the model and test that have proved valuable to personologists in their quest for a more satisfactory taxonomy of PDs based on continuously distributed traits. We also describe Millon's (1996)prototypal domain approach to personality that combines dimensional and categorical elements for the description of PDs and their normal counterparts.

  17. Mathematical modeling of regulation of type III secretion system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium by SirA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Aparna B; Rajasingh, Hannah; Mande, Sharmila S

    2009-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invades the intestinal epithelial cells using type three secretion system (TTSS) encoded on Salmonella pathogenicity island-1 (SPI-1). The key regulator of this secretion system is HilA, which is in turn regulated by HilD, HilC and RtsA. It is also known that SirA/BarA system, a two-component regulatory system plays a crucial role in regulating HilA. There are two different mechanisms that have been proposed earlier for regulation of HilD-HilC-RtsA-HilA network by SirA. One considers SirA to be acting through HilA and HilC, whereas the other considers SirA to be acting through HilD. In this paper, we have built mathematical models corresponding to both these scenarios and carried out simulations under different gene knock-out conditions. Additionally, since the two proposed mechanisms based on the experimental data are equally likely, we also considered a mechanism which is a combination of the two proposed mechanisms. The simulations were carried out to check the levels of HilA, the factor regulating the virulence, as well as the levels of the intermediate components in the network, namely HilC and RtsA. The simulation results were used to check the consistency of various models and also to suggest the most probable mechanism of hilA regulation. The results of our study show that while most of the mathematical models are able to predict the virulence data, the models considering SirA to regulate through HilA and HilC fail to predict the levels of intermediate components, HilC and RtsA. Nevertheless, one of the models considering regulation of virulence by SirA via HilD was able to predict results comparable to the experimental data. In addition, combination of this model (regulation by SirA via HilD) with the model considering regulation by SirA through HilA and HilC, also predicted results consistent with experimental observations. Our conclusions were further validated by testing the stability of the results against

  18. Mechanisms of Sb(III) Photooxidation by the Excitation of Organic Fe(III) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghao; He, Mengchang

    2016-07-05

    Organic Fe(III) complexes are widely distributed in the aqueous environment, which can efficiently generate free radicals under light illumination, playing a significant role in heavy metal speciation. However, the potential importance of the photooxidation of Sb(III) by organic Fe(III) complexes remains unclear. Therefore, the photooxidation mechanisms of Sb(III) were comprehensively investigated in Fe(III)-oxalate, Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-fulvic acid (FA) solutions by kinetic measurements and modeling. Rapid photooxidation of Sb(III) was observed in an Fe(III)-oxalate solution over the pH range of 3 to 7. The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) as an ·OH scavenger quenched the Sb(III) oxidation, suggesting that ·OH is an important oxidant for Sb(III). However, the incomplete quenching of Sb(III) oxidation indicated the existence of other oxidants, presumably an Fe(IV) species in irradiated Fe(III)-oxalate solution. In acidic solutions, ·OH may be formed by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4) with H2O2, but a hypothetical Fe(IV) species may be generated by the reaction of Fe(II)(C2O4)2(2-) with H2O2 at higher pH. Kinetic modeling provides a quantitative explanation of the results. Evidence for the existence of ·OH and hypothetical Fe(IV) was also observed in an irradiated Fe(III)-citrate and Fe(III)-FA system. This study demonstrated an important pathway of Sb(III) oxidation in surface waters.

  19. The accretion history of dark matter halos III: A physical model for the concentration-mass relation

    CERN Document Server

    Correa, Camila A; Schaye, Joop; Duffy, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    We present a semi-analytic, physically motivated model for dark matter halo concentration as a function of halo mass and redshift. The semi-analytic model is intimately based on hierarchical structure formation. It uses an analytic model for the halo mass accretion history, based on extended Press Schechter (EPS) theory, and an empirical relation between concentration and an appropriate definition of formation time obtained through fits to the results of numerical simulations. The resulting concentration-mass relations are tested against the simulations and do not exhibit an upturn at high masses or high redshifts as claimed by recent works. Because our semi-analytic model is based on EPS theory, it can be applied to wide ranges in mass, redshift and cosmology. We predict a change of slope in the z=0 concentration-mass relation at a mass scale of $10^{11}\\rm{M}_{\\odot}$, that is caused by the varying power in the density perturbations. We provide best-fitting expressions of the $c-M$ relations as well as nume...

  20. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation III: Modelling galaxy formation and the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B; Angel, Paul W; Duffy, Alan R; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    We introduce Meraxes, a new, purpose-built semi-analytic galaxy formation model designed for studying galaxy growth during reionization. Meraxes is the first model of its type to include a temporally- and spatially-coupled treatment of reionization and is built upon a custom (100 Mpc)$^3$ N-body simulation with high temporal and mass resolution, allowing us to resolve the galaxy and star formation physics relevant to early galaxy formation. Our fiducial model with supernova feedback reproduces the observed optical depth to electron scattering and evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function between $z$=5-7, predicting that a broad range of halo masses contribute to reionization. Using a constant escape fraction and global recombination rate, our model is unable to simultaneously match the observed ionizing emissivity at $z{\\lesssim}6$. However, the use of an evolving escape fraction of 0.05-0.1 at $z{\\sim}6$, increasing towards higher redshift, is able to satisfy these three constraints. We also demonstrate ...

  1. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models - III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    CERN Document Server

    Magic, Zazralt; Asplund, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, s_bot, and the entropy jump, {\\Delta}s, determined from the 3D RHD models, are matched with the mixing length parameter, {\\alpha}_MLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derive the mass mixing length, {\\alpha}_m, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[v_z,v_z], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is {\\alpha}_MLT (s_bot) = 1.98. For different stellar parameters, {\\alpha}_MLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, {\\alpha}_MLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity...

  2. Comparative adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) on TPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Q H; Zhao, X L; Ma, X X; Yang, Y B; Wu, W S; Zheng, G D; Wang, D L

    2015-09-01

    Comparative adsorption behaviors of Eu(III) and Am(III) on thorium phosphate diphosphate (TPD), i.e., Th4(PO4)4P2O7, have been studied using a batch approach and surface complexation model (SCM) in this study. The results showed that Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption increased to a large extent with the increase in TPD dose. Strong pH-dependence was observed in both Eu(III) and Am(III) adsorption processes, suggesting that inner-sphere complexes (ISCs) were possibly responsible for the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III). Meanwhile, the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) decreased to a different extent with the increase in ion strength, which was possibly related to outer-sphere complexes and/or ion exchange. In the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the adsorption of Eu(III) and Am(III) showed high enhancement mainly due to the ternary surface complexes of TPD-FA-Eu(3+) and TPD-FA-Am(3+). The SCM showed that one ion exchange (≡S3Am/Eu) and two ISCs (≡(XO)2Am/EuNO3 and ≡(YO)2Am/EuNO3) seemed more reasonable to quantitatively describe the adsorption edges of both Eu(III) and Am(III). Our findings obviously showed that Eu(III) could be a good analogue to study actinide behaviors in practical terms. However, it should be kept in mind that there are still obvious differences between the characteristics of Eu(III) and Am(III) in some special cases, for instance, the complex ability with organic matter and adsorption affinity to a solid surface.

  3. CyberStorm III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.; et al

    2010-01-01

    Projectteam Cyber Storm III - De Verenigde Staten organiseerden de afgelopen jaren een reeks grootschalige ICT-crisisoefeningen met de naam Cyber Storm. Cyber Storm III is de derde oefening in de reeks. Het scenario van Cyber Storm III staat in het teken van grootschalige ICT-verstoringen, waarbij n

  4. Dark-ages reionization and galaxy formation simulation - III. Modelling galaxy formation and the epoch of reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Simon J.; Geil, Paul M.; Poole, Gregory B.; Angel, Paul W.; Duffy, Alan R.; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce MERAXES, a new, purpose-built semi-analytic galaxy formation model designed for studying galaxy growth during reionization. MERAXES is the first model of its type to include a temporally and spatially coupled treatment of reionization and is built upon a custom (100 Mpc)3 N-body simulation with high temporal and mass resolution, allowing us to resolve the galaxy and star formation physics relevant to early galaxy formation. Our fiducial model with supernova feedback reproduces the observed optical depth to electron scattering and evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function between z = 5 and 7, predicting that a broad range of halo masses contribute to reionization. Using a constant escape fraction and global recombination rate, our model is unable to simultaneously match the observed ionizing emissivity at z ≲ 6. However, the use of an evolving escape fraction of 0.05-0.1 at z ˜ 6, increasing towards higher redshift, is able to satisfy these three constraints. We also demonstrate that photoionization suppression of low-mass galaxy formation during reionization has only a small effect on the ionization history of the intergalactic medium. This lack of `self-regulation' arises due to the already efficient quenching of star formation by supernova feedback. It is only in models with gas supply-limited star formation that reionization feedback is effective at regulating galaxy growth. We similarly find that reionization has only a small effect on the stellar mass function, with no observationally detectable imprint at M* > 107.5 M⊙. However, patchy reionization has significant effects on individual galaxy masses, with variations of factors of 2-3 at z = 5 that correlate with environment.

  5. The accretion history of dark matter haloes - III. A physical model for the concentration-mass relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Camila A.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.; Schaye, Joop; Duffy, Alan R.

    2015-09-01

    We present a semi-analytic, physically motivated model for dark matter halo concentration as a function of halo mass and redshift. The semi-analytic model combines an analytic model for the halo mass accretion history (MAH), based on extended Press-Schechter (EPS) theory, with an empirical relation between concentration and formation time obtained through fits to the results of numerical simulations. Because the semi-analytic model is based on EPS theory, it can be applied to wide ranges in mass, redshift and cosmology. The resulting concentration-mass (c-M) relations are found to agree with the simulations, and because the model applies only to relaxed haloes, they do not exhibit the upturn at high masses or high redshifts found by some recent works. We predict a change of slope in the z ˜ 0 c-M relation at a mass-scale of 1011 M⊙. We find that this is due to the change in the functional form of the halo MAH, which goes from being dominated by an exponential (for high-mass haloes) to a power law (for low-mass haloes). During the latter phase, the core radius remains approximately constant, and the concentration grows due to the drop of the background density. We also analyse how the c-M relation predicted by this work affects the power produced by dark matter annihilation, finding that at z = 0 the power is two orders of magnitude lower than that obtained from extrapolating best-fitting c-M relations. We provide fits to the c-M relations as well as numerical routines to compute concentrations and MAHs.†

  6. A Thermodynamic Model for Acetate, Lactate, and Oxalate Complexation with Am(III), Th(IV), Np(V), and U(VI) Valid to High Ionic Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bynaum, R.V.; Free, S.J.; Moore, R.C.

    1999-01-15

    The organic ligands acetate, lactate, oxalate and EDTA have been identified as components of wastes targeted for disposal in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located in Southeastern New Mexico. The presence of these ligands is of concern because complexation of the actinides with the ligands may increase dissolved actinide concentrations and impact chemical retardation during transport. The current work considers the complexation of Am(III), Th (IV), Np(V), and U(W) with two of the organic ligands, acetate and lactate, in NaCl media from dilute through high concentration. A thermodynamic model for actinide complexation with the organic ligands has been developed based on the Pitzer activity coefficient formalism and the Harvie-Moller-Weare, Felmy-Weare database for describing brine evaporite systems. The model was parameterized using first apparent stability constant data from the literature. Because of complexation of other metal ions (Fe, Mg, Ni, Pb, etc.) present in the WIPP disposal room with the organic ligands, preliminary results from model calculations indicate the organic ligands do not significantly increase dissolved actinide concentrations.

  7. The simulated features of heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation with a time-dependent drift model. III - General energy dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, M. S.; Le Roux, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The time-dependent cosmic-ray transport equation is solved numerically in an axially symmetric heliosphere. Gradient and curvature drifts are incorporated, together with an emulated wavy neutral sheet. This model is used to simulate heliospheric cosmic-ray modulation for the period 1985-1989 during which drifts are considered to be important. The general energy dependence of the modulation of Galactic protons is studied as predicted by the model for the energy range 1 MeV to 10 GeV. The corresponding instantaneous radial and latitudinal gradients are calculated, and it is found that, whereas the latitudinal gradients follow the trends in the waviness of the neutral sheet to a large extent for all energies, the radial gradients below about 200 MeV deviate from this general pattern. In particular, these gradients increase when the waviness decreases for the simulated period 1985-1987.3, after which they again follow the neutral sheet by increasing rapidly.

  8. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part III. Biocatalysis, metabolic engineering and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology has been defined as the use and application of biotechnology for the sustainable processing and production of chemicals, materials and fuels. It makes use of biocatalysts such as microbial communities, whole-cell microorganisms or purified enzymes. In the review these processes are described. Drug design is an iterative process which begins when a chemist identifies a compound that displays an interesting biological profile and ends when both the activity profile and the chemical synthesis of the new chemical entity are optimized. Traditional approaches to drug discovery rely on a stepwise synthesis and screening program for large numbers of compounds to optimize activity profiles. Over the past ten to twenty years, scientists have used computer models of new chemical entities to help define activity profiles, geometries and relativities. This article introduces inter alia the concepts of molecular modelling and contains references for further reading.

  9. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Chemical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2D Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    Task 2D concerns numerical simulation of the coupled THC modeling of the DST test at Yucca mountain, with given results for geologic, thermal, hydrologic, mineralogic and petrologic characterization, as-built configuration of the test block of DST, including locations of various sensors and measuring instruments and the plans for heating and cooling, including expected heater powers at various times, and compared with geochemical measurements performed on gas, water, and mineral samples collected from the DST. Two teams of DOE/LBNL (USA) and JNC (Japan) participated the task with different approaches. The LBNL model represented the fractures and rock matrix by a dual-continuum concept, with the mineral-water-gas reactions treated by primarily kinetic and a few equilibrium reactions. The JNC model represented the fractures and matrix as a single effective continuum, with equilibrium mineral-water reactions controlling the chemical evolution (as well as considering aqueous species transport). The JNC team performed the coupled THC simulation of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test by the coupled THM code 'THAMES', mass transport code 'Dtransu' and geochemical code 'PHREEQE' under coupling system code 'COUPLYS'. The LBNL team simulated the THC processes include coupling between heat, water, and vapor flow; aqueous and gaseous species transport; kinetic and equilibrium mineral-water reactions; and feedback of mineral precipitation/dissolution on porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure, with the FDM code TOUGHREACT V3.0. In general, both models capture the temperature evolution in the rock fairly well, although the JNC model yielded a closer match to the initial temperature rise in the rock, probably due to the better site-specific thermal data. Both models showed the contrasting solubility effects of increasing temperature on calcite and silica solubility; yet the dual continuum approach better represented the effects of

  10. a Detailed Account of Alain CONNES’ Version of the Standard Model in Non-Commutative Differential Geometry III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastler, Daniel

    We describe in detail Alain Connes’ last presentation of the (classical level of the) standard model in noncommutative differential geometry, now free of the cumbersome adynamical fields which parasited the initial treatment. Accessorily, the theory is presented in a more transparent way by systematic use of the skew tensor-product structure, and of 2×2 matrices with 2×2 matrix-entries instead of the previous 4×4 matrices.

  11. A quantitative mechanistic description of Ni, Zn and Ca sorption on Na-Montmorillonite. Part III: Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, B.; Bradbury, M.H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1995-07-01

    Titration and sorption measurements, carried out under a wide variety of conditions on Na-montmorillonite, were examined in terms of cation exchange and surface complexation mechanisms. A computer code called MINSORB was developed and used throughout this work. This code allowed the uptake of radionuclides by both mechanisms to be calculated simultaneously; also taking into account competitive reactions from other cations present. A stepwise iterative fitting/modelling procedure is described. For the case of Na-montmorillonite it is demonstrated that an electrostatic term in the surface complexation model is not required. A basic data set comprising of site capacities and protonation/deprotonation constants was defined, which was valid for all surface complexation sorption reactions. The main study was carried out with Ni, but impurity cations present in the system, particularly Zn, had to be examined in addition due to their competitive effects on Ni sorption. The surface complexation behaviour of Ni and Zn was investigated in detail to give intrinsic surface complexation constants on two of the {identical_to}SOH type sites included in the model. The sorption of Mg, Ca and Mn is also considered, though in less detail, and estimated surface complexation constants for these nuclides are presented. Cation exchange was included in all of the calculations. Measured selectivity coefficients for Ni-Na, Zn-Na and Ca-Na exchange reactions are given. The model, with the derived parameters, allowed all the data from titration measurements through sorption edges to sorption isotherms to be calculated. (author) 31 figs., 9 tabs., refs.

  12. Holling's "hungry mantid" model for the invertebrate functional response considered as a Markov process. III. Stable satiation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijmans, H J

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, we study an analytical model describing predatory behaviour. It is assumed that the parameter describing the predator's behaviour is its satiation. Using semigroup methods and compactness arguments we prove that a stable satiation distribution is reached if t----infinity. Furthermore, using a Trotter-Kato theorem we justify the transition to the much simpler problem that is obtained if the prey biomass tends to zero.

  13. Numerical modelling of the lobes of radio galaxies in cluster environments - III. Powerful relativistic and non-relativistic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, W.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Krause, M. G. H.

    2016-09-01

    We present results from two suites of simulations of powerful radio galaxies in poor cluster environments, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the radio lobes. One suite of models uses relativistic hydrodynamics and the other relativistic magnetohydrodynamics; both are set up to cover a range of jet powers and velocities. The dynamics of the lobes are shown to be in good agreement with analytical models and with previous numerical models, confirming in the relativistic regime that the observed widths of radio lobes may be explained if they are driven by very light jets. The ratio of energy stored in the radio lobes to that put into the intracluster gas is seen to be the same regardless of jet power, jet velocity or simulation type, suggesting that we have a robust understanding of the work done on the ambient gas by this type of radio source. For the most powerful jets, we at times find magnetic field amplification by up to a factor of 2 in energy, but mostly the magnetic energy in the lobes is consistent with the magnetic energy injected. We confirm our earlier result that for jets with a toroidally injected magnetic field, the field in the lobes is predominantly aligned with the jet axis once the lobes are well developed, and that this leads to radio flux anisotropies of up to a factor of about two for mature sources. We reproduce the relationship between 151 MHz luminosity and jet power determined analytically in the literature.

  14. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera. III. Immunology and immunopathology in rapidly induced models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1983-03-01

    Although chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) frequently develops in the long-term rat radiation chimera, we present three additional models in which a histologically similar disease is rapidly induced. These include adoptive transfer of spleen and bone marrow from rats with spontaneous chronic GVHD into lethally irradiated rats of the primary host strain; sublethal irradiation of stable chimeras followed by a booster transplant; and transfer of spleen cells of chimeras recovering from acute GVHD into second-party (primary recipient strain) or third-party hosts. Some immunopathologic and immune abnormalities associated with spontaneous chronic GVHD were not observed in one or more of the induced models. Thus, IgM deposition in the skin, antinuclear antibodies, and vasculitis appear to be paraphenomena. On the other hand, lymphoid hypocellularity of the thymic medulla, immaturity of splenic follicles, and nonspecific suppressor cells were consistently present in the long term chimeras, and in all models. These abnormalities therefore may be pathogenetically important, or closely related to the development of chronic GVHD.

  15. Numerical modelling of the lobes of radio galaxies in cluster environments - III. Powerful relativistic and nonrelativistic jets

    CERN Document Server

    English, William; Krause, Martin G H

    2016-01-01

    We present results from two suites of simulations of powerful radio galaxies in poor cluster environments, with a focus on the formation and evolution of the radio lobes. One suite of models uses relativistic hydrodynamics and the other relativistic magnetohydrodynamics; both are set up to cover a range of jet powers and velocities. The dynamics of the lobes are shown to be in good agreement with analytical models and with previous numerical models, confirming in the relativistic regime that the observed widths of radio lobes may be explained if they are driven by very light jets. The ratio of energy stored in the radio lobes to that put into the intracluster gas is seen to be the same regardless of jet power, jet velocity or simulation type, suggesting that we have a robust understanding of the work done on the ambient gas by this type of radio source. For the most powerful jets we at times find magnetic field amplification by up to a factor of two in energy, but mostly the magnetic energy in the lobes is co...

  16. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack Watt, Kristin E; Achilleos, Annita; Neben, Cynthia L; Merrill, Amy E; Trainor, Paul A

    2016-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) by RNA polymerases (Pol) I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention.

  17. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin E Noack Watt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs by RNA polymerases (Pol I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention.

  18. Global Positioning System III (GPS III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Military Operations in Urban Terrain; Defense-Wide Mission Support; Air Mobility; and Space Launch Orbital Support. For military users, the GPS III...program provides Precise Positioning Service (PPS) to military operations and force enhancement. It also provides increased anti-jam power to the earth ...to be modified . On January 31, 2016, USD(AT&L) signed the GPS III revised APB. This Change 1 to the APB was due to both cost and schedule breaches

  19. The Stagger-grid: A grid of 3D stellar atmosphere models. III. The relation to mixing length convection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magic, Z.; Weiss, A.; Asplund, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigate the relation between 1D atmosphere models that rely on the mixing length theory and models based on full 3D radiative hydrodynamic (RHD) calculations to describe convection in the envelopes of late-type stars. Methods: The adiabatic entropy value of the deep convection zone, sbot, and the entropy jump, Δs, determined from the 3D RHD models, were matched with the mixing length parameter, αMLT, from 1D hydrostatic atmosphere models with identical microphysics (opacities and equation-of-state). We also derived the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and the vertical correlation length of the vertical velocity, C[vz,vz], directly from the 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar subsurface convection. Results: The calibrated mixing length parameter for the Sun is α๏MLT (Sbot) = 1.98. . For different stellar parameters, αMLT varies systematically in the range of 1.7 - 2.4. In particular, αMLT decreases towards higher effective temperature, lower surface gravity and higher metallicity. We find equivalent results for α๏MLT (ΔS). In addition, we find a tight correlation between the mixing length parameter and the inverse entropy jump. We derive an analytical expression from the hydrodynamic mean-field equations that motivates the relation to the mass mixing length parameter, αm, and find that it qualitatively shows a similar variation with stellar parameter (between 1.6 and 2.4) with the solar value of α๏m = 1.83.. The vertical correlation length scaled with the pressure scale height yields 1.71 for the Sun, but only displays a small systematic variation with stellar parameters, the correlation length slightly increases with Teff. Conclusions: We derive mixing length parameters for various stellar parameters that can be used to replace a constant value. Within any convective envelope, αm and related quantities vary strongly. Our results will help to replace a constant αMLT. Appendices are available in electronic form at http

  20. Calibrated multi-subband Monte Carlo modeling of tunnel-FETs in silicon and III-V channel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelant, A.; Palestri, P.; Osgnach, P.; Selmi, L.

    2013-10-01

    We present a semiclassical model for Tunnel-FET (TFET) devices capable to describe band-to-band tunneling (BtBT) as well as far from equilibrium transport of the generated carriers. BtBT generation is implemented as an add-on into an existing multi-subband Monte Carlo (MSMC) transport simulator that accounts as well for the effects typical to alternative channel materials and high-κ dielectrics. A simple but accurate correction for the calculation of the BtBT generation rate to account for carrier confinement in the subbands is proposed and verified by comparison with full 2D quantum calculation.

  1. Analysis of maize ( Zea mays ) kernel density and volume using microcomputed tomography and single-kernel near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, Jeffery L; Jackson, Sean; Williams, Chekeria; Patel, Anokhee; Armstrong, Paul; Peter, Gary F; Settles, A Mark

    2013-11-20

    Maize kernel density affects milling quality of the grain. Kernel density of bulk samples can be predicted by near-infrared reflectance (NIR) spectroscopy, but no accurate method to measure individual kernel density has been reported. This study demonstrates that individual kernel density and volume are accurately measured using X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT). Kernel density was significantly correlated with kernel volume, air space within the kernel, and protein content. Embryo density and volume did not influence overall kernel density. Partial least-squares (PLS) regression of μCT traits with single-kernel NIR spectra gave stable predictive models for kernel density (R(2) = 0.78, SEP = 0.034 g/cm(3)) and volume (R(2) = 0.86, SEP = 2.88 cm(3)). Density and volume predictions were accurate for data collected over 10 months based on kernel weights calculated from predicted density and volume (R(2) = 0.83, SEP = 24.78 mg). Kernel density was significantly correlated with bulk test weight (r = 0.80), suggesting that selection of dense kernels can translate to improved agronomic performance.

  2. Microcomputer-aided reconstruction: a system designed for the study of 3-D microstructure in histology and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaegashi, H; Takahashi, T; Kawasaki, M

    1987-04-01

    We have designed a microcomputer system to reproduce 3-D tissue structures graphically from serial microscopic sections. The system, based on a Hewlett-Packard model 310 desktop computer, comprises a floppy disc drive, a hard-disc that extends the available user memory by adding 40 Mbytes, a colour memory-mapped graphics display, a graphics tablet and a graphics printer. A set of serial 2-D images, manually extracted from serial sections using a microprojector, are digitized on the tablet by tracing the contours of the structure of interest; up to ten different structures can be inputted and reproduced using a 'hidden line' effect. The software, written mainly in HP-BASIC 4.0, produces 3-D pictures of a tissue structure either as a 'stack of slices' with or without being 'tiled' with triangular patches, or in 'wire framing'. Any angle of rotation around the x, y and z axes is assigned for the image to be reconstructed, allowing the operator to obtain the best perspective. The system also discloses the internal connectivity of an object by reducing the structure to a network diagram; this is especially useful in analysing the topological properties of tissue structure. It is shown how, in some examples, the system contributes to a better understanding of tissue microstructures and their morbid changes and how, as an effective tool in morphology, it will aid future studies of histology and histopathology.

  3. A novel in vivo vascular imaging approach for hierarchical quantification of vasculature using contrast enhanced micro-computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Nebuloni

    Full Text Available The vasculature of body tissues is continuously subject to remodeling processes originating at the micro-vascular level. The formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis is essential for a number of physiological and pathophysiological processes such as tissue regeneration, tumor development and the integration of artificial tissues. There are currently no time-lapsed in vivo imaging techniques providing information on the vascular network at the capillary level in a non-destructive, three-dimensional and high-resolution fashion. This paper presents a novel imaging framework based on contrast enhanced micro-computed tomography (micro-CT for hierarchical in vivo quantification of blood vessels in mice, ranging from largest to smallest structures. The framework combines for the first time a standard morphometric approach with densitometric analysis. Validation tests showed that the method is precise and robust. Furthermore, the framework is sensitive in detecting different perfusion levels after the implementation of a murine ischemia-reperfusion model. Correlation with both histological data and micro-CT analysis of vascular corrosion casts confirmed accuracy of the method. The newly developed time-lapsed imaging approach shows high potential for in vivo monitoring of a number of different physiological and pathological conditions in angiogenesis and vascular development.

  4. The dark matter halo shape of edge-on disk galaxies - III. Modelling the HI observations: results

    CERN Document Server

    O'Brien, J C; van der Kruit, P C

    2010-01-01

    This is the third paper in a series in which we attempt to put constraints on the flattening of dark halos in disk galaxies. For this purpose we need to analyse the observed XV diagrams in edge-on galaxies to accurately measure the radial HI surface density, the rotation curve and the HI velocity dispersion. We present the results of the modelling of HI observations of 8 HI-rich, late-type, edge-on galaxies. In all of these we find differential rotation. Most systems display HI velocity dispersions of 6.5 to 7.5 km s$^{-1}$ and all except one show radial structure. There is an increase in the mean HI velocity dispersion with maximum rotation velocity, at least up to 120 km s$^{-1}$. Next we analyse the observations to derive the radial variation of the thickness (flaring) of the HI layer. We find that with the exception of the asymmetric IC5052, all of the galaxies in our sample are good candidates for 3D mass modelling to measure the dark halo shape. The flaring profiles are symmetric and have a common shape...

  5. Nonlinear model-based control of the Czochralski process III: Proper choice of manipulated variables and controller parameter scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubert, M.; Winkler, J.

    2012-12-01

    This contribution continues an article series [1,2] about the nonlinear model-based control of the Czochralski crystal growth process. The key idea of the presented approach is to use a sophisticated combination of nonlinear model-based and conventional (linear) PI controllers for tracking of both, crystal radius and growth rate. Using heater power and pulling speed as manipulated variables several controller structures are possible. The present part tries to systematize the properties of the materials to be grown in order to get unambiguous decision criteria for a most profitable choice of the controller structure. For this purpose a material specific constant M called interface mobility and a more process specific constant S called system response number are introduced. While the first one summarizes important material properties like thermal conductivity and latent heat the latter one characterizes the process by evaluating the average axial thermal gradients at the phase boundary and the actual growth rate at which the crystal is grown. Furthermore these characteristic numbers are useful for establishing a scheduling strategy for the PI controller parameters in order to improve the controller performance. Finally, both numbers give a better understanding of the general thermal system dynamics of the Czochralski technique.

  6. Spectroscopic, biological, and molecular modeling studies on the interactions of [Fe(III)-meloxicam] with G-quadruplex DNA and investigation of its release from bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Malihe; Khayamian, Taghi; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Sayed Tabatabaei, Badraldin Ebrahim; Jannesari, Zahra; Khaksar, Ghazale

    2015-01-01

    The guanine-rich sequence, specifically in DNA, telomeric DNA, is a potential target of anticancer drugs. In this work, a mononuclear Fe(III) complex containing two meloxicam ligands was synthesized as a G-quadruplex stabilizer. The interaction between the Fe(III) complex and G-quadruplex with sequence of 5'-G3(T2AG3)3-3' (HTG21) was investigated using spectroscopic methods, molecular modeling, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The spectroscopic methods of UV-vis, fluorescence, and circular dichroism showed that the metal complex can effectively induce and stabilize G-quadruplex structure in the G-rich 21-mer sequence. Also, the binding constant between the Fe(III) complex and G-quadruplex was measured by these methods and it was found to be 4.53(±0.30) × 10(5) M(-1)). The PCR stop assay indicated that the Fe(III) complex inhibits DNA amplification. The cell viability assay showed that the complex has significant antitumor activities against Hela cells. According to the UV-vis results, the interaction of the Fe(III) complex with duplex DNA is an order of magnitude lower than G-quadruplex. Furthermore, the release of the complex incorporated in bovine serum albumin nanoparticles was also investigated in physiological conditions. The release of the complex followed a bi-phasic release pattern with high and low releasing rates at the first and second phases, respectively. Also, in order to obtain the binding mode of the Fe(III) complex with G-quadruplex, molecular modeling was performed. The molecular docking results showed that the Fe(III) complex was docked to the end-stacked of the G-quadruplex with a π-π interaction, created between the meloxicam ligand and the guanine bases of the G-quadruplex.

  7. A Model of Numerical Calculation of Conductivity for III-V MBE Epilayers Using a Hall Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Wolkenberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrical conduction versus temperature model using a Hall device was developed. In the case of InAs, InGaAs, and GaAs MBE epilayers, the prediction agrees well with the experimental results. Herein, we explain here how these calculated fractions of total conductivity describe the measured values. The method allows for the calculation of the carrier concentration and mobility of each component of a multicarrier system. The extracted concentrations are used to characterise the different components of charge transport in the active layer. The conductance values G [S] of these components of charge transport were obtained. Also the scattering events for the investigated samples are presented. The analysis of the experimental results for three semiconductor compositions and different concentrations demonstrates the utility of our method in comparing the conductance of each component of the multilayered system as a function of temperature.

  8. Verification Test of the SURF and SURFplus Models in xRage: Part III Affect of Mesh Alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The previous studies used an underdriven detonation wave in 1-dimension (steady ZND reaction zone profile followed by a scale-invariant rarefaction wave) for PBX 9502 as a verification test of the implementation of the SURF and SURFplus models in the xRage code. Since the SURF rate is a function of the lead shock pressure, the question arises as to the effect on accuracy of variations in the detected shock pressure due to the alignment of the shock front with the mesh. To study the effect of mesh alignment we simulate a cylindrically diverging detonation wave using a planar 2-D mesh. The leading issue is the magnitude of azimuthal asymmetries in the numerical solution. The 2-D test case does not have an exact analytic solution. To quantify the accuracy, the 2-D solution along rays through the origin are compared to a highly resolved 1-D simulation in cylindrical geometry.

  9. Integrated Sensing & Controls for Coal Gasification - Development of Model-Based Controls for GE's Gasifier & Syngas Cooler. Topical Rerport for Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Aditya

    2011-02-17

    This Topical Report for the final Phase III of the program summarizes the results from the Task 3 of the program. In this task, the separately designed extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and model predictive controls (MPC) with ideal sensing, developed in Phase II, were integrated to achieve the overall sensing and control system for the gasification section of an IGCC plant. The EKF and MPC algorithms were updated and re-tuned to achieve closed-loop system stability as well as good steady-state and transient control response. In particular, the performance of the integrated EKF and MPC solution was tested extensively through multiple simulation studies to achieve improved steady-state as well as transient performance, with coal as well as coal-petcoke blended fuel, in the presence of unknown modeling errors as well as sensor errors (noise and bias). The simulation studies demonstrated significant improvements in steady state and transient operation performance, similar to that achieved by MPC with ideal sensors in Phase II of the program.

  10. THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT AND DIFFUSION MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. WILLIAMS [and others

    1999-08-01

    The LANL atmospheric transport and diffusion models are composed of two state-of-the-art computer codes. The first is an atmospheric wind model called HOThlAC, Higher Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric circulations. HOTMAC generates wind and turbulence fields by solving a set of atmospheric dynamic equations. The second is an atmospheric diffusion model called RAPTAD, Random Particle Transport And Diffusion. RAPTAD uses the wind and turbulence output from HOTMAC to compute particle trajectories and concentration at any location downwind from a source. Both of these models, originally developed as research codes on supercomputers, have been modified to run on microcomputers. Because the capability of microcomputers is advancing so rapidly, the expectation is that they will eventually become as good as today's supercomputers. Now both models are run on desktop or deskside computers, such as an IBM PC/AT with an Opus Pm 350-32 bit coprocessor board and a SUN workstation. Codes have also been modified so that high level graphics, NCAR Graphics, of the output from both models are displayed on the desktop computer monitors and plotted on a laser printer. Two programs, HOTPLT and RAPLOT, produce wind vector plots of the output from HOTMAC and particle trajectory plots of the output from RAPTAD, respectively. A third CONPLT provides concentration contour plots. Section II describes step-by-step operational procedures, specifically for a SUN-4 desk side computer, on how to run main programs HOTMAC and RAPTAD, and graphics programs to display the results. Governing equations, boundary conditions and initial values of HOTMAC and RAPTAD are discussed in Section III. Finite-difference representations of the governing equations, numerical solution procedures, and a grid system are given in Section IV.

  11. Presentation of the EURODELTA III intercomparison exercise - evaluation of the chemistry transport models' performance on criteria pollutants and joint analysis with meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessagnet, Bertrand; Pirovano, Guido; Mircea, Mihaela; Cuvelier, Cornelius; Aulinger, Armin; Calori, Giuseppe; Ciarelli, Giancarlo; Manders, Astrid; Stern, Rainer; Tsyro, Svetlana; García Vivanco, Marta; Thunis, Philippe; Pay, Maria-Teresa; Colette, Augustin; Couvidat, Florian; Meleux, Frédérik; Rouïl, Laurence; Ung, Anthony; Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; María Baldasano, José; Bieser, Johannes; Briganti, Gino; Cappelletti, Andrea; D'Isidoro, Massimo; Finardi, Sandro; Kranenburg, Richard; Silibello, Camillo; Carnevale, Claudio; Aas, Wenche; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Fagerli, Hilde; Gonzalez, Lucia; Menut, Laurent; Prévôt, André S. H.; Roberts, Pete; White, Les

    2016-10-01

    The EURODELTA III exercise has facilitated a comprehensive intercomparison and evaluation of chemistry transport model performances. Participating models performed calculations for four 1-month periods in different seasons in the years 2006 to 2009, allowing the influence of different meteorological conditions on model performances to be evaluated. The exercise was performed with strict requirements for the input data, with few exceptions. As a consequence, most of differences in the outputs will be attributed to the differences in model formulations of chemical and physical processes. The models were evaluated mainly for background rural stations in Europe. The performance was assessed in terms of bias, root mean square error and correlation with respect to the concentrations of air pollutants (NO2, O3, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5), as well as key meteorological variables. Though most of meteorological parameters were prescribed, some variables like the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and the vertical diffusion coefficient were derived in the model preprocessors and can partly explain the spread in model results. In general, the daytime PBL height is underestimated by all models. The largest variability of predicted PBL is observed over the ocean and seas. For ozone, this study shows the importance of proper boundary conditions for accurate model calculations and then on the regime of the gas and particle chemistry. The models show similar and quite good performance for nitrogen dioxide, whereas they struggle to accurately reproduce measured sulfur dioxide concentrations (for which the agreement with observations is the poorest). In general, the models provide a close-to-observations map of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) concentrations over Europe rather with correlations in the range 0.4-0.7 and a systematic underestimation reaching -10 µg m-3 for PM10. The highest concentrations are much more underestimated, particularly in wintertime. Further evaluation of

  12. Stellar masses of SDSS-III BOSS galaxies at z~0.5 and constraints to galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Maraston, Claudia; Henriques, Bruno M; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David; Brownstein, Joel R; Capozzi, Diego; Bundy, Kevin; Skibba, Ramin A; Beifiori, Alessandra; Nichol, Robert C; Edmondson, Edd; Schneider, Don P; Chen, Yanmei; Masters, Karen L; Steele, Oliver; Bolton, Adam S; York, Donald G; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Snedden, Stephanie; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    We calculate stellar masses for ~400,000 massive luminous galaxies at redshift ~0.2-0.7 using the first two years of data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Stellar masses are obtained by fitting model spectral energy distributions to u,g,r,i,z magnitudes. Accurate BOSS spectroscopic redshifts are used to constrain the fits. We find that the distribution of stellar masses in BOSS is narrow (Delta log M ~0.5 dex) and peaks at about log M/M_sun ~ 11.3 (for a Kroupa initial stellar mass function), and that the mass sampling is uniform over the redshift range 0.2 to 0.6, in agreement with the intended BOSS target selection. The galaxy masses probed by BOSS extend over ~ 10^{12} M_{sun}, providing unprecedented measurements of the high-mass end of the galaxy mass function. We find that the galaxy number density above ~ 2.5 10^{11} M_{sun} agrees with previous determinations within 2sigma, but there is a slight offset towards lower number densities in BOSS. This alleviates a tension between th...

  13. An interferometric study of the Fomalhaut inner debris disk. III. Detailed models of the exozodiacal disk and its origin

    CERN Document Server

    Lebreton, J; Augereau, J -C; Absil, O; Mennesson, B; Kama, M; Dominik, C; Bonsor, A; Vandeportal, J; Beust, H; Defrère, D; Ertel, S; Faramaz, V; Hinz, P; Kral, Q; Lagrange, A -M; Liu, W; Thébault, P

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] Debris disks are extrasolar analogs to the solar system planetesimal belts. The star Fomalhaut harbors a cold debris belt at 140 AU as well as evidence of a warm dust component, which is suspected of being a bright analog to the solar system's zodiacal dust. Interferometric observations obtained with the VLTI and the KIN have identified near- and mid-infrared excesses attributed to hot and warm exozodiacal dust in the inner few AU of the star. We performed parametric modeling of the exozodiacal disk using the GRaTeR radiative transfer code to reproduce the interferometric data, complemented by mid- to far-infrared measurements. A detailed treatment of sublimation temperatures was introduced to explore the hot population at the sublimation rim. We then used an analytical approach to successively testing several source mechanisms. A good fit to the data is found by two distinct dust populations: (1) very small, hence unbound, hot dust grains confined in a narrow region at the sublimation rim of carbo...

  14. XMM-Newton observations of OY Car III: OM light curve modelling, X-ray timing and spectral studies

    CERN Document Server

    Hakala, P; Hakala, Pasi; Ramsay, Gavin

    2003-01-01

    We revisit the XMM-Newton observations of the dwarf nova OY Car taken in July 2000 which occured shortly after an outburst. Ramsay et al (2001a) found a prominent energy dependent modulation at a period of 2240 sec: this modulation was only seen for app. 1/3 of the observation duration. In our new analysis, we examine this time interval in greater detail. In addition to the 2240 sec period we find evidence for other periods, the most prominent being near 3500 sec. Both these modulations are most likely due to changes in photoelectric absorption over this period: this is supported by phase-resolved spectroscopy. This may indicate the presence of matter above the accretion disc or a presence of a magnetic accretion curtain. In this case the 2240 sec period could represent a spin period of the white dwarf and the 3500 sec period a beat period between the spin and orbital periods. We also model the B band and UV eclipse profiles and light curves using a new technique to map the spatial extent of the accretion dis...

  15. Measurements and Modeling of III-V Solar Cells at High Temperatures up to 400 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Lee, Minjoo Larry; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study the performance of 2.0 eV Al0.12Ga0.39In0.49P and 1.4 eV GaAs solar cells over a temperature range of 25-400 degrees C. The temperature-dependent J01 and J02 dark currents are extracted by fitting current-voltage measurements to a two-diode model. We find that the intrinsic carrier concentration ni dominates the temperature dependence of the dark currents, open-circuit voltage, and cell efficiency. To study the impact of temperature on the photocurrent and bandgap of the solar cells, we measure the quantum efficiency and illuminated current-voltage characteristics of the devices up to 400 degrees C. As the temperature is increased, we observe no degradation to the internal quantum efficiency and a decrease in the bandgap. These two factors drive an increase in the short-circuit current density at high temperatures. Finally, we measure the devices at concentrations ranging from ~30 to 1500 suns and observe n = 1 recombination characteristics across the entire temperature range. These findings should be a valuable guide to the design of any system that requires high-temperature solar cell operation.

  16. Radiation thermo-chemical models of protoplanetary discs. III. Impact of inner rims on Spectral Energy Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Thi, Wing-Fai; Kamp, Inga

    2010-01-01

    We study the hydrostatic density structure of the inner disc rim around HerbigAe stars using the thermo-chemical hydrostatic code ProDiMo. We compare the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) and images from our hydrostatic disc models to that from prescribed density structure discs. The 2D continuum radiative transfer in ProDiMo includes isotropic scattering. The dust temperature is set by the condition of radiative equilibrium. In the thermal-decoupled case the gas temperature is governed by the balance between various heating and cooling processes. The gas and dust interact thermally via photoelectrons, radiatively, and via gas accommodation on grain surfaces. As a result, the gas is much hotter than in the thermo-coupled case, where the gas and dust temperatures are equal, reaching a few thousands K in the upper disc layers and making the inner rim higher. A physically motivated density drop at the inner radius ("soft-edge") results in rounded inner rims, which appear ring-like in near-infrared images. The...

  17. Quick Development Microcomputer System: Training Automatic Components for Electronic Troubleshooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    memory demands. The lack of interaction is counter to the buffer models of short-term memory (e.g., Baddeley 1988, Atkinson & Shiffrin 1968). Fourth, the...working memory capacity, and how practice under high workload enhances skilled performance. We have developed a training system for combinatoric...operations become fast (about looms) and can be executed with little attention or working memory load. Third, problems In the initial acquisition were NOT

  18. MICRO-VERS. Micro-computer Software for the Vocational Education Reporting System. User's Guide and Reference Manual. Version 3.1. Apple II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield. Dept. of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education.

    This manual is intended to accompany a software system for the Apple II microcomputer that is designed to aid local districts in completing vocational education enrollment claims and Vocational Education Data System (VEDS) reports. Part I, Introduction, gives a brief overview of the Microcomputer Vocational Education Reporting System (MICRO-VERS),…

  19. An Evaluator's Guide to Using DB MASTER: A Microcomputer Based File Management Program. Research on Evaluation Program, Paper and Report Series No. 91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Peter J.

    Ways a microcomputer can be used to establish and maintain an evaluation database and types of data management features possible on a microcomputer are described in this report, which contains step-by-step procedures and numerous examples for establishing a database, manipulating data, and designing and printing reports. Following a brief…

  20. Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM): industrial energy use in the United States, 1974-2000. Volume 1. Primary model documentation. Book 1: Chapters I, II, and III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, R.E.; Herod, J.S.

    1978-06-19

    The model is designed to predict the commercial-market penetration of various energy technologies in the industrial sector out to the year 2000. The model represents the refinement and further development of the Industrial Sector Model developed for the Market Oriented Program Planning Study task force in 1977. The model assesses the comparative economic competitiveness of each technology and then uses these assessments to project each technology's anticipated market penetration. The introductory chapter provides logic and special terminology information of the model. The next sections deal with the input requirements and a discussion of the solution of the model.

  1. Microcomputer-Based Approaches for Preventing Drug and Alcohol Abuse Among Adolescents from Ethnic-Racial Minority Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncher, Michael S; Parms, Clifford A; Orlandi, Mario A; Schinke, Steven P; Miller, Samuel O; Palleja, Josephine; Schinke, Mary B

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to empirically assess the potential of microcomputer-based intervention with black adolescents from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. Subjects were 26, 11 through 14-year-old black females and males recruited from three boroughs in New York City. A sample task was administered via microcomputer system followed by a postintervention measurement battery. Observational measures were also employed to assess interactional variables. Subjects' attitudes toward educational content in general, and toward drug and alcohol information delivery in particular, appeared to be a significant intervening variable that could alter the overall efficacy of computer-delivered interventions. Both observational and postintervention measures indicated an overall positive subject response to computer-administered instruction. In contrast, however, respondents indicated a negative response to microcomputer delivery of drug and alcohol related materials. Results of the experiment are discussed along with rationales and future research directions.

  2. Inside marginal adaptation of crowns by X-ray micro-computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dos Santos, T. M.; Lima, I.; Lopes, R. T. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Program, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, RJ, (Brazil); Author, S. B. Jr. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO 80523, (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this work was to access dental arcade by using X-ray micro-computed tomography. For this purpose high resolution system was used and three groups were studied: Zirkonzahn CAD-CAM system, IPS e.max Press, and metal ceramic. The three systems assessed in this study showed results of marginal and discrepancy gaps clinically accepted. The great result of 2D and 3D evaluations showed that the used technique is a powerful method to investigate quantitative characteristics of dental arcade. (authors)

  3. The Distributed Logical Reasoning Language D—Tuili and Its Implementation on Microcomputer Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高全泉; 陆汝钤; 等

    1992-01-01

    D-Tuili,having been implemented on microcompute network,is a distributed logical reasoning programming language.D-Tuili supports parallel programming on the language level,and couples loosely with the distributed database management system,so data in distributed databases can be used in the distributed logic programs.In this paper,we mainly introduce the components of D-Tuili used to design distributed logic programs.Furthermore,the main principles to implement D-Tuili and the main technologies adopted in the implemented system of D-Tuili are described.

  4. Microcomputer-Controlled Reader Systems for Archaeological and Geological TL Dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, Lars; Mejdahl, V.

    1984-01-01

    Two fully automated TL reader systems for TL dating and a manually operated reader for research purpose were put into operation during 1982-3. All systems are controlled by HP-85 or HP-86 microcomputers; thus flexibility in selection of measurement parameters, calculation of TL signals and display...... and printout of glow curves is achieved. The basic design of the automated reader system incorporates a 24-position microprocessor-controlled sample changer and a beta irradiator. The system automatically provides the data for constructing the primary and secondary response curves required for determining...

  5. THE METHOD OF DATA PROCESSING OF THE ELECTRICAL SURVEYING AND THE PROGRAM SYSTEM USED ON MICROCOMPUTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志聃; 高绋麟

    1990-01-01

    The ESS software package is prepared for electrical data processing in the fields of coal prospecting, hydrogeological engineering, and can be used in the other fields of electrical data processing. It can be operated on any kind of microcomputer which has an internal memories of moro than 512kB. The ESS software package would be leading the office operation to an automatic data processing period and the field work free from the tedious, repeated data treating and mapping, so that the engineers would have more time to analyse and interpret field data. Undoubtedly, it is of benefit to improving the relibility of the geological evaluation.

  6. The Effect of Experimental Variables on Industrial X-Ray Micro-Computed Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Don J.; Rauser, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    A study was performed on the effect of experimental variables on radiographic sensitivity (image quality) in x-ray micro-computed tomography images for a high density thin wall metallic cylinder containing micro-EDM holes. Image quality was evaluated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, flaw detectability, and feature sharpness. The variables included: day-to-day reproducibility, current, integration time, voltage, filtering, number of frame averages, number of projection views, beam width, effective object radius, binning, orientation of sample, acquisition angle range (180deg to 360deg), and directional versus transmission tube.

  7. Designation and Implementation of Microcomputer Principle and Interface Technology Virtual Experimental Platform Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, JinYue; Tang, Yin

    This paper explicitly discusses the designation and implementation thought and method of Microcomputer Principle and Interface Technology virtual experimental platform website construction. The instructional design of this platform mainly follows with the students-oriented constructivism learning theory, and the overall structure is subject to the features of teaching aims, teaching contents and interactive methods. Virtual experiment platform production and development should fully take the characteristics of network operation into consideration and adopt relevant technologies to improve the effect and speed of network software application in internet.

  8. Using microcomputers for lighting appliance control using a DALI bus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sysala Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Article concerns the DALI bus theoretical and practical aspects. The DALI bus is a modern technology developed especially for illumination systems control. Authors are outlining communication basic principles related to the physical layer and going up to more complex data transactions among particular devices. The article main topic is aimed at two device models development based on microcontroller and exploiting that technology. The first of those two devices is a DALI slave unit enabling the light source or multi switch with light indication components control via DALI bus. The second device measures the ambient illumination intensity and it also detects errors in the load.

  9. Metallothionein (MT)-III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco, J; Giralt, M; Molinero, A

    1999-01-01

    Metallothionein-III is a low molecular weight, heavy-metal binding protein expressed mainly in the central nervous system. First identified as a growth inhibitory factor (GIF) of rat cortical neurons in vitro, it has subsequently been shown to be a member of the metallothionein (MT) gene family...... and renamed as MT-III. In this study we have raised polyclonal antibodies in rabbits against recombinant rat MT-III (rMT-III). The sera obtained reacted specifically against recombinant zinc-and cadmium-saturated rMT-III, and did not cross-react with native rat MT-I and MT-II purified from the liver of zinc...... injected rats. The specificity of the antibody was also demonstrated in immunocytochemical studies by the elimination of the immunostaining by preincubation of the antibody with brain (but not liver) extracts, and by the results obtained in MT-III null mice. The antibody was used to characterize...

  10. CARI III Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Model through Induction of G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88% was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients.

  11. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Mechanical Modeling of the Yucca Mountain Project Drift Scale Test. Task 2B/2C Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Robin N. [Bechtel SAlC Company, Las Vegas (US)] (comp.)

    2005-02-15

    , ENRESA and NRC teams. All teams discretized the DST test area into two-dimensional vertical cross sections through the center of the heated drift and derived material properties suitable for their respective modeling approaches using the site testing data from Yucca Mountain project reports. The generally good agreement between simulated and measured temperature, displacements, and changes in air permeability shows that the numerical models and underlying conceptual models are adequate for simulating coupled THM processes at the DST. From the analyses and discussions presented, the following specific conclusions were drawn: i) A continuum model approach is adequate for simulating relevant coupled THM processes at the DST; ii) TM-induced rock deformations are generally well simulated using an elastic model, although some individual displacements appear to be captured using an elasto-plastic model; iii) The highest potential for inelastic deformation in the form of fracture shear slip occurs near the drift wall and in a zone of thermal stress decrease located more than 15 m above the heated drift and iv) Despite potential shear slip along fractures, fracture closure/opening caused by change in normal stress across fractures is the dominant mechanism for TM-induced changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, whereas fracture shear dilation appears to be less significant at the DST. This conclusion indicates that TM-induced changes in permeability at the DST, which are within one order of magnitude, tend to be reversible.

  12. Sirtuin and pan-class I/II deacetylase (DAC) inhibition is synergistic in preclinical models and clinical studies of lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amengual, Jennifer E; Clark-Garvey, Sean; Kalac, Matko; Scotto, Luigi; Marchi, Enrica; Neylon, Ellen; Johannet, Paul; Wei, Ying; Zain, Jasmine; O'Connor, Owen A

    2013-09-19

    Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of lymphoma has led to paradigm-changing treatment opportunities. One example involves tailoring specific agents based on the cell of origin in aggressive lymphomas. Germinal center (GC)-derived diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is known to be driven by an addiction to Bcl6, whereas the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype is driven by nuclear factor κB. In the GC subtype, there is a critical inverse relationship between Bcl6 and p53, the functional status of which is linked to each transcription factor's degree of acetylation. Deacetylation of Bcl6 is required for its transcriptional repressor effects allowing for the oncogene to drive lymphomagenesis. Conversely, acetylation of p53 is activating when class III deacetylases (DACs), or sirtuins, are inhibited by niacinamide. Treatment of DLBCL cell lines with pan-DAC inhibitors in combination with niacinamide produces synergistic cytotoxicity in GC over ABC subtypes. This correlated with acetylation of both Bcl6 and p53. This combination also produced remissions in a spontaneous aggressive B-cell lymphoma mouse model expressing Bcl6. In a phase 1 proof-of-principle clinical trial, 24% of patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma attained a response to vorinostat and niacinamide, and 57% experienced disease stabilization. We report herein on the preclinical and clinical activity of this targeted strategy in aggressive lymphomas. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00691210.

  13. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: modeling of the luminosity and colour dependence in the Data Release 10

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hong; Zehavi, Idit; Xu, Haojie; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Weinberg, David H; Bahcall, Neta A; Berlind, Andreas A; Comparat, Johan; McBride, Cameron K; Ross, Ashley J; Schneider, Donald P; Skibba, Ramin A; Swanson, Molly E C; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and colour dependence of clustering of CMASS galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Tenth Data Release. The halo occupation distribution framework is adopted to model the projected two-point correlation function measurements on small and intermediate scales (from $0.02$ to $60\\,h^{-1}{\\rm {Mpc}}$) and to interpret the observed trends and infer the connection of galaxies to dark matter halos. We find that luminous red galaxies reside in massive halos of mass $M{\\sim}10^{13}$--$10^{14}\\,h^{-1}{\\rm M_\\odot}$ and more luminous galaxies are more clustered and hosted by more massive halos. The strong small-scale clustering requires a fraction of these galaxies to be satellites in massive halos, with the fraction at the level of 5--8 per cent and decreasing with luminosity. The characteristic mass of a halo hosting on average one satellite galaxy above a luminosity threshold is about a factor $8.7$ larger than that of a halo hosting a centra...

  14. Microcomputer applications of, and modifications to, the modular fault trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, T.L.; Graves, N.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.; Whitehead, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The LaSalle Probabilistic Risk Assessment was the first major application of the modular logic fault trees after the IREP program. In the process of performing the analysis, many errors were discovered in the fault tree modules that led to difficulties in combining the modules to form the final system fault trees. These errors are corrected in the revised modules listed in this report. In addition, the application of the modules in terms of editing them and forming them into the system fault trees was inefficient. Originally, the editing had to be done line by line and no error checking was performed by the computer. This led to many typos and other logic errors in the construction of the modular fault tree files. Two programs were written to help alleviate this problem: (1) MODEDIT - This program allows an operator to retrieve a file for editing, edit the file for the plant specific application, perform some general error checking while the file is being modified, and store the file for later use, and (2) INDEX - This program checks that the modules that are supposed to form one fault tree all link up appropriately before the files are,loaded onto the mainframe computer. Lastly, the modules were not designed for relay type logic common in BWR designs but for solid state type logic. Some additional modules were defined for modeling relay logic, and an explanation and example of their use are included in this report.

  15. Automation of an X-ray diffractometer by means of a microcomputer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gernat, C.; Kroeber, R.; Damaschun, G.; Mueller, E.C. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Molekularbiologie)

    1983-12-20

    For the fully automated registration of the scattering curves in the small angle X-ray region and the wide angle X-ray region a modified X-ray diffractometer HZG 3 was coupled with the microcomputer MPS 4944. Using this diffractometer system the scanning of scattering curves of polycrystalline and amorphous materials and of solutions in transmission is possible in a scattering angle region from s = 0.3 nm/sup -1/ to s = 40.7 nm/sup -1/ (s = 4 ..pi.. lambda/sup -1/ sin THETA, lambda = 0.154 nm). The effectiveness of the diffractometer system was proved by the example of the measured scattering curves of human serum albumin, human serum albumin-sodium dodecyl sulfate-complex, immunoglobulin G and of a maltodextrin gel. The coupling of a microcomputer to the X-ray diffractometer afforded an increase of precision of measurement, shortening of the time needed for the scattering experiment and the adjustment, and improved the handling comfort of the diffractometer.

  16. On-line acquisition, analysis and presentation of neurophysiological data based on a personal microcomputer system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromquist, B R; Pavlides, C; Zelano, J A

    1990-12-01

    A microcomputer based system is described for the acquisition, averaging, displaying, analysis and storage of electrophysiological (EPSP and post-stimulus histogram) data. The system consists of commercially available hardware (IBM-PC AT compatible, 80286 or 80386 based microcomputer, Burr-Brown analog-to-digital (A/D) converter), a custom built interface module, and a combination of commercially available and custom built software packages. The software operates within a Microsoft Windows environment and is comprised of custom built data acquisition and review modules which are linked to Microsoft's Excel program. The system is capable of four channel A/D conversion of EPSP's at a sampling frequency of up to 10 KHz (50 KHz single channel), the averaging of data including the addition and subtraction of various channels, the graphical display of data, the extraction of various data parameters, and the transfer of data to an Excel spreadsheet. The spreadsheet allows for the development of mathematical formulas for statistical analysis of data and presentation of the results in graphical form. Finally, data can easily be output to a laser printer or plotter. A sample experiment, illustrating system operation, is presented.

  17. Virtual casting of stab wounds in cartilage using micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, Derrick J; Sim, Louise J

    2011-06-01

    In homicidal stabbings using a serrated knife, stab wounds involving costal cartilage leave striations on the cut surface of the cartilage from the serration points on the blade edge. Class characteristics of the serrated blade can be determined from the striation marks, and individualizing characteristics may be seen also. The traditional method for recording the striation marks involves the pernickety technique of casting with dental impression material. We assessed the potential utility of micro-computed tomography scanning of the stab track as a technique for nondestructive recording of striation patterns and virtual casting of them. Stab tracks in porcine cartilage, produced with a coarsely serrated blade, were scanned with a bench-top micro-computed tomography scanner. The typical irregularly regular striation pattern could be demonstrated, and the images manipulated, using proprietary software to produce a virtual cast. Whether the technology will have sufficient resolution to image not only class characteristic tool marks but also the much finer individualizing tool marks remains to be evaluated, but the technology shows considerable promise.

  18. Assessment of Root Canal Filling Removal Effectiveness Using Micro-computed Tomography: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero; Ahmed, Hany Mohamed Aly

    2017-04-01

    The removal of obturation materials from the root canal system is a primary objective in root canal retreatment procedures. This systematic review aims to discuss the effectiveness of different instrumentation procedures in removing root-canal filling materials assessed by micro-computed tomography. An electronic search in PubMed and major endodontic journals was conducted using appropriate key words to identify investigations that examined the effectiveness of obturation material removal assessed by micro-computed tomography. Among 345 studies, 22 satisfied the inclusion criteria. Seven studies compared hand instrumentation with Nickel-Titanium rotary or reciprocating systems. Three studies investigated rotary systems, and another three studies explored reciprocation. Eight studies compared rotary systems and reciprocation in removing filling materials from the root canal system. Other factors, such as the role of solvents and irrigant agitation, were discussed. The application of different instrumentation protocols can effectively, but not completely, remove the filling materials from the root canal system. Only hand instrumentation was not associated with iatrogenic errors. Reciprocating and rotary systems exhibited similar abilities in removing root filling material. Retreatment files performed similarly to conventional ones. Solvents enhanced penetration of files but hindered cleaning of the root canal. The role of irrigant agitation was determined as controversial. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The root canal morphology in mandibular first premolars: a comparative evaluation of cone-beam computed tomography and micro-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Chen, Junhong; Lan, Guihua; Li, Min; An, Jianping; Wen, Xiujie; Liu, Luchuan; Deng, Manjing

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting the root canal morphology of mandibular first premolars using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) as a reference standard. In total, 143 extracted human mandibular first premolars were selected and scanned using micro-CT and CBCT. The acquired images were used to evaluate the root canal morphology in each tooth, and evaluations were repeated after 2 weeks. The root canal configurations observed on the three-dimensional images were recorded, and the findings from both modalities were compared using chi-square tests. The actual agreement between the two modalities was assessed using kappa statistics. In total, the root morphologies in 136 mandibular first premolars were consistently identified by both CBCT and micro-CT: type I in 104, type III in five, type V in 20, and type IX in seven. Of the remaining seven teeth, the morphology in two, one, and four teeth was identified as type I, type VII, and type IX (type 1-3 in two and type 1-2-3 in two), respectively, by micro-CT and misdiagnosed as type III, type V, and type V, respectively, by CBCT. There were no significant differences between the two modalities with regard to the accurate detection of root canal configurations, with a kappa value of 0.886 for the actual agreement. Although CBCT may be accurate in detecting the root canal configuration in mandibular first premolars, it produces poorer image details compared with micro-CT. CBCT is a reliable radiological technique, but its accuracy in detecting details of the root canal morphology in mandibular first premolars, especially in some complex root canal configurations, needs to be improved.

  20. Effect of micro-computed tomography voxel size and segmentation method on trabecular bone microstructure measures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Blaine A

    2016-12-01

    Micro-computed tomography (μCT) is currently the gold standard for determining trabecular bone microstructure in small animal models. Numerous parameters associated with scanning and evaluation of μCT scans can strongly affect morphologic results obtained from bone samples. However, the effect of these parameters on specific trabecular bone outcomes is not well understood. This study investigated the effect of μCT scanning with nominal voxel sizes between 6-30 μm on trabecular bone outcomes quantified in mouse vertebral body trabecular bone. Additionally, two methods for determining a global segmentation threshold were compared: based on qualitative assessment of 2D images, or based on quantitative assessment of image histograms. It was found that nominal voxel size had a strong effect on several commonly reported trabecular bone parameters, in particular connectivity density, trabecular thickness, and bone tissue mineral density. Additionally, the two segmentation methods provided similar trabecular bone outcomes for scans with small nominal voxel sizes, but considerably different outcomes for scans with larger voxel sizes. The Qualitatively Selected segmentation method more consistently estimated trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness across different voxel sizes, but the Histogram segmentation method more consistently estimated trabecular number, trabecular separation, and structure model index. Altogether, these results suggest that high-resolution scans be used whenever possible to provide the most accurate estimation of trabecular bone microstructure, and that the limitations of accurately determining trabecular bone outcomes should be considered when selecting scan parameters and making conclusions about inter-group variance or between-group differences in studies of trabecular bone microstructure in small animals.