WorldWideScience

Sample records for model hydraulic module

  1. Superheater hydraulic model test plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabler, M.; Oliva, R.M.

    1973-10-01

    The plan for conducting a hydraulic test on a full scale model of the AI Steam Generator Module design is presented. The model will incorporate all items necessary to simulate the hydraulic performance characteristics of the superheater but will utilize materials other than the 2-1/4 Cr - 1 Mo in its construction in order to minimize costs and expedite schedule. Testing will be performed in the Rockwell International Rocketdyne High Flow Test Facility which is capable of flowing up to 32,00 gpm of water at ambient temperatures. All necessary support instrumentation is also available at this facility.

  2. Modelling of Hydraulic Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Zhou, Jianjun; Hansen, Lars Henrik

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of identifying the physical model (or the grey box model) of a hydraulic test robot. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the robot. The physical model is formulated in continuous time and is derived by application...

  3. Aquatic Contaminant and Mercury Simulation Modules Developed for Hydrologic and Hydraulic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    with the atmosphere through a volatilization process. The CSM can model multiple contaminants in one simulation. The contaminants themselves are... contaminants in aquatic systems involve four media; atmosphere , water, sediment, and biota. The importance of each of these media depends on the chemical...properties of the contaminant and the form in which the contaminant enters the environment. The atmosphere can be an important source of contaminants to

  4. Hydraulic Arm Modeling via Matlab SimHydraulics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Věchet, Stanislav; Krejsa, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2009), s. 287-296 ISSN 1802-1484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : simulatin modeling * hydraulics * SimHydraulics Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics

  5. Model for polygonal hydraulic jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Watanabe, Shinya; Bohr, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard and co-workers [Nature (London) 392, 767 (1998); Nonlinearity 12, 1 (1999); Physica B 228, 1 (1996)], based on the known flow structure for the type-II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy...

  6. Hydraulic Redistribution: A Modeling Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, E.; Verma, P.; Loheide, S. P., III

    2014-12-01

    Roots play a key role in the soil water balance. They extract and transport water for transpiration, which usually represents the most important soil water loss in vegetated areas, and can redistribute soil water, thereby increasing transpiration rates and enhancing root nutrient uptake. We present here a two-dimensional model capable of describing two key aspects of root water uptake: root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution. Root water compensation is the ability of root systems to respond to the reduction of water uptake from areas of the soil with low soil water potential by increasing the water uptake from the roots in soil parts with higher water potential. Hydraulic redistribution is a passive transfer of water through the root system from areas of the soil with greater water potential to areas with lower water potential. Both mechanisms are driven by gradients of water potential in the soil and the roots. The inclusion of root water compensation and hydraulic redistribution in models can be achieved by describing root water uptake as a function of the difference in water potential between soil and root xylem. We use a model comprising the Richards equation for the water flow in variably saturated soils and the Darcy's equation for the water flow in the xylem. The two equations are coupled via a sink term, which is assumed to be proportional to the difference between soil and xylem water potentials. The model is applied in two case studies to describe vertical and horizontal hydraulic redistribution and the interaction between vegetation with different root depths. In the case of horizontal redistribution, the model is used to reproduce the fluxes of water across the root system of a tree subjected to uneven irrigation. This example can be extended to situations when only part of the root system has access to water, such as vegetation near creeks, trees at the edge of forests, and street trees in urban areas. The second case is inspired by recent

  7. Debris Thermal Hydraulics Modeling of QUENCH Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisselev, Arcadi E.; Kobelev, Gennadii V.; Strizhov, Valerii F.; Vasiliev, Alexander D.

    2006-01-01

    Porous debris formation and behavior in QUENCH experiments (QUENCH-02, QUENCH-03) plays a considerable role and its adequate modeling is important for thermal analysis. This work is aimed to the development of a numerical module which is able to model thermal hydraulics and heat transfer phenomena occurring during the high-temperature stage of severe accident with the formation of debris region and molten pool. The original approach for debris evolution is developed from classical principles using a set of parameters including debris porosity; average particle diameter; temperatures and mass fractions of solid, liquid and gas phases; specific interface areas between different phases; effective thermal conductivity of each phase, including radiative heat conductivity; mass and energy fluxes through the interfaces. The debris model is based on the system of continuity, momentum and energy conservation equations, which consider the dynamics of volume-averaged velocities and temperatures of fluid, solid and gaseous phases of porous debris. The different mechanisms of debris formation are considered, including degradation of fuel rods according to temperature criteria, taking into consideration some correlations between rod layers thicknesses; degradation of rod layer structure due to thermal expansion of melted materials inside intact rod cladding; debris formation due to sharp temperature drop of previously melted material due to reflood; and transition to debris of material from elements lying above. The porous debris model was implemented to best estimate numerical code RATEG/SVECHA/HEFEST developed for modeling thermal hydraulics and severe accident phenomena in a reactor. The model is used for calculation of QUENCH experiments. The results obtained by the model are compared to experimental data concerning different aspects of thermal behavior: thermal hydraulics of porous debris, radiative heat transfer in a porous medium, the generalized melting and refreezing

  8. Kuala Kemaman hydraulic model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Kadir Ishak

    2005-01-01

    There The problems facing the area of Kuala Kemaman are siltation and erosion at shoreline. The objectives of study are to assess the best alignment of the groyne alignment, to ascertain the most stable shoreline regime and to investigate structural measures to overcome the erosion. The scope of study are data collection, wave analysis, hydrodynamic simulation and sediment transport simulation. Numerical models MIKE 21 are used - MIKE 21 NSW, for wind-wave model, which describes the growth, decay and transformation of wind-generated waves and swell in nearshore areas. The study takes into account effects of refraction and shoaling due to varying depth, energy dissipation due to bottom friction and wave breaking, MIKE 21 HD - modelling system for 2D free-surface flow which to stimulate the hydraulics phenomena in estuaries, coastal areas and seas. Predicted tidal elevation and waves (radiation stresses) are considered into study while wind is not considered. MIKE 21 ST - the system that calculates the rates of non-cohesive (sand) sediment transport for both pure content and combined waves and current situation

  9. Data Collecting and Processing System and Hydraulic Control System of Hydraulic Support Model Test

    OpenAIRE

    Hong-Yu LIU; Jun-Qing LIU; Jun-Jie XI

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic support is an important equipment of mechanization caving coal in modernization coal mine. Hydraulic support must pass national strength test before it quantity production and use. Hydraulic support model test based on similarity theory is a new effective hydraulic support design and test method. The test information such as displacement, stress, strain and so on can be generalized to hydraulic support prototype, which can prompt hydraulic support design. In order to satisfy the nee...

  10. ENHANCING HSPF MODEL CHANNEL HYDRAULIC REPRESENTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Hydrological Simulation Program - FORTRAN (HSPF) is a comprehensive watershed model, which employs depth-area-volume-flow relationships known as hydraulic function table (FTABLE) to represent stream channel cross-sections and reservoirs. An accurate FTABLE determination for a...

  11. Modeling and stability of electro-hydraulic servo of hydraulic excavator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wenhua; Yin, Chenbo; Li, Guo; Sun, Menghui

    2017-11-01

    The condition of the hydraulic excavator is complicated and the working environment is bad. The safety and stability of the control system is influenced by the external factors. This paper selects hydraulic excavator electro-hydraulic servo system as the research object. A mathematical model and simulation model using AMESIM of servo system is established. Then the pressure and flow characteristics are analyzed. The design and optimization of electro-hydraulic servo system and its application in engineering machinery is provided.

  12. Hydraulic modelling of the CARA Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasnarof, Daniel O.; Juanico, Luis; Giorgi, M.; Ghiselli, Alberto M.; Zampach, Ruben; Fiori, Jose M.; Yedros, Pablo A.

    2004-01-01

    The CARA fuel element is been developing by the National Atomic Energy Commission for both Argentinean PHWRs. In order to keep the hydraulic restriction in their fuel channels, one of CARA's goals is to keep its similarity with both present fuel elements. In this paper is presented pressure drop test performed at a low-pressure facility (Reynolds numbers between 5x10 4 and 1,5x10 5 ) and rational base models for their spacer grid and rod assembly. Using these models, we could estimate the CARA hydraulic performance in reactor conditions that have shown to be satisfactory. (author) [es

  13. Modeling of a Hydraulic Braking System

    OpenAIRE

    Lundin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to derive an analytical model representing a reduced form of a mine hoist hydraulic braking system. Based primarily on fluid mechanical and mechanical physical modeling, along with a number of simplifying assumptions, the analytical model will be derived and expressed in the form of a system of differential equations including a set of static functions. The obtained model will be suitable for basic simulation and analysis of system dynamics, with the aim to cap...

  14. Implementation of CFD module in the KORSAR thermal-hydraulic system code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yudov, Yury V.; Danilov, Ilia G.; Chepilko, Stepan S. [Alexandrov Research Inst. of Technology (NITI), Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The Russian KORSAR/GP (hereinafter KORSAR) computer code was developed by a joint team from Alexandrov NITI and OKB ''Gidropress'' for VVER safety analysis and certified by the Rostechnadzor of Russia in 2009. The code functionality is based on a 1D two-fluid model for calculation of two-phase flows. A 3D CFD module in the KORSAR computer code is being developed by Alexandrov NITI for representing 3D effects in the downcomer and lower plenum during asymmetrical loop operation. The CFD module uses Cartesian grid method with cut cell approach. The paper presents a numerical algorithm for coupling 1D and 3D thermal- hydraulic modules in the KORSAR code. The combined pressure field is calculated by the multigrid method. The performance efficiency of the algorithm for coupling 1D and 3D modules was demonstrated by solving the benchmark problem of mixing cold and hot flows in a T-junction.

  15. A generalized interface module for the coupling of spatial kinetics and thermal-hydraulics codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, D.A.; Miller, R.M.; Joo, H.G.; Downar, T.J.; Mousseau, V.A.; Ebert, D.D.

    1999-01-01

    A generalized interface module has been developed for the coupling of any thermal-hydraulics code to any spatial kinetics code. The coupling scheme was designed and implemented with emphasis placed on maximizing flexibility while minimizing modifications to the respective codes. In this design, the thermal-hydraulics, general interface, and spatial kinetics codes function independently and utilize the Parallel Virtual Machine software to manage cross-process communication. Using this interface, the USNRC version of the 3D neutron kinetics code, PARCX, has been coupled to the USNRC system analysis codes RELAP5 and TRAC-M. RELAP5/PARCS assessment results are presented for two NEACRP rod ejection benchmark problems and an NEA/OECD main steam line break benchmark problem. The assessment of TRAC-M/PARCS has only recently been initiated, nonetheless, the capabilities of the coupled code are presented for a typical PWR system/core model

  16. Thermal-hydraulic model in MABEL-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowring, R.W.; Cooper, C.A.

    1979-09-01

    The thermal-hydraulic subroutines for MABEL-2 have been written and programmed for testing as a stand-alone code MABSA. The model is that of a fuel rod, surrounded by 8 other rods, with a flow region outside representing the reactor geometry. A subchannel model, similar to that in HAMBO, is used to calculate the feed-back effect of cladding strain on heat transfer due to the progressive blocking of the subchannels around the central fuel rod. A number of assumptions was made in building the coolant model. Their use and validation are discussed. (author)

  17. Multiphase flow models for hydraulic fracturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiptsov, Andrei A.

    2017-10-01

    The technology of hydraulic fracturing of a hydrocarbon-bearing formation is based on pumping a fluid with particles into a well to create fractures in porous medium. After the end of pumping, the fractures filled with closely packed proppant particles create highly conductive channels for hydrocarbon flow from far-field reservoir to the well to surface. The design of the hydraulic fracturing treatment is carried out with a simulator. Those simulators are based on mathematical models, which need to be accurate and close to physical reality. The entire process of fracture placement and flowback/cleanup can be conventionally split into the following four stages: (i) quasi-steady state effectively single-phase suspension flow down the wellbore, (ii) particle transport in an open vertical fracture, (iii) displacement of fracturing fluid by hydrocarbons from the closed fracture filled with a random close pack of proppant particles, and, finally, (iv) highly transient gas-liquid flow in a well during cleanup. The stage (i) is relatively well described by the existing hydralics models, while the models for the other three stages of the process need revisiting and considerable improvement, which was the focus of the author’s research presented in this review paper. For stage (ii), we consider the derivation of a multi-fluid model for suspension flow in a narrow vertical hydraulic fracture at moderate Re on the scale of fracture height and length and also the migration of particles across the flow on the scale of fracture width. At the stage of fracture cleanaup (iii), a novel multi-continua model for suspension filtration is developed. To provide closure relationships for permeability of proppant packings to be used in this model, a 3D direct numerical simulation of single phase flow is carried out using the lattice-Boltzmann method. For wellbore cleanup (iv), we present a combined 1D model for highly-transient gas-liquid flow based on the combination of multi-fluid and

  18. REVIEW ON MODELING AND CONTROLLER DESIGN OF HYDRAULIC ACTUATOR SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Salleh, S.; Rahmat, M. F.; Othman, S. M.; Danapalasingam, K. A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on modeling and previous control strategies of the hydraulic actuator system proposed by most of the researchers around the world. Before comes to the main discussion, some background information related to hydraulic actuator will be presented. This review includes a short summary and conclusion for hydraulic actuator system. The repercussion of this review is for future inventions of a better and robust hydraulic actuator system.

  19. Soil hydraulic properties near saturation, an improved conductivity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, Christen Duus; Jacobsen, Ole Hørbye; Hansen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    of commonly used hydraulic conductivity models and give suggestions for improved models. Water retention and near saturated and saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured for a variety of 81 top and subsoils. The hydraulic conductivity models by van Genuchten [van Genuchten, 1980. A closed-form equation....... Reports and Dissertations 9.] were optimised to describe the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in the range measured. Different optimisation procedures were tested. Using the measured saturated hydraulic conductivity in the vGM model tends to overestimate the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity....... Optimising a matching factor (k0) improved the fit considerably whereas optimising the l-parameter in the vGM model improved the fit only slightly. The vGM was improved with an empirical scaling function to account for the rapid increase in conductivity near saturation. Using the improved models...

  20. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS.

  1. Thermal hydraulic model validation for HOR mixed core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Vries, J.W. de; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1997-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic core management model has been developed for the Hoger Onderwijsreactor (HOR), a 2 MW pool-type university research reactor. The model was adopted for safety analysis purposes in the framework of HEU/LEU core conversion studies. It is applied in the thermal-hydraulic computer code SHORT (Steady-state HOR Thermal-hydraulics) which is presently in use in designing core configurations and for in-core fuel management. An elaborate measurement program was performed for establishing the core hydraulic characteristics for a variety of conditions. The hydraulic data were obtained with a dummy fuel element with special equipment allowing a.o. direct measurement of the true core flow rate. Using these data the thermal-hydraulic model was validated experimentally. The model, experimental tests, and model validation are discussed. (author)

  2. Comparison of empirical models and laboratory saturated hydraulic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerous methods for estimating soil saturated hydraulic conductivity exist, which range from direct measurement in the laboratory to models that use only basic soil properties. A study was conducted to compare laboratory saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) measurement and that estimated from empirical models.

  3. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  4. Model theory and modules

    CERN Document Server

    Prest, M

    1988-01-01

    In recent years the interplay between model theory and other branches of mathematics has led to many deep and intriguing results. In this, the first book on the topic, the theme is the interplay between model theory and the theory of modules. The book is intended to be a self-contained introduction to the subject and introduces the requisite model theory and module theory as it is needed. Dr Prest develops the basic ideas concerning what can be said about modules using the information which may be expressed in a first-order language. Later chapters discuss stability-theoretic aspects of module

  5. HELOKA-HP thermal-hydraulic model validation and calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xue Zhou; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Badea, Aurelian Florin

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The electrical heater in HELOKA-HP has been modeled with RELAP5-3D using experimental data as input. • The model has been validated using novel techniques for assimilating experimental data and the representative model parameters with BEST-EST. • The methodology is successfully used for reducing the model uncertainties and provides a quantitative measure of the consistency between the experimental data and the model. - Abstract: The Helium Loop Karlsruhe High Pressure (HELOKA-HP) is an experimental facility for the testing of various helium-cooled components at high temperature (500 °C) and high pressure (8 MPa) for nuclear fusion applications. For modeling the loop thermal dynamics, a thermal-hydraulic model has been created using the system code RELAP5-3D. Recently, new experimental data covering the behavior of the loop components under relevant operational conditions have been made available giving the possibility of validating and calibrating the existing models in order to reduce the uncertainties of the simulated responses. This paper presents an example where such process has been applied for the HELOKA electrical heater model. Using novel techniques for assimilating experimental data, implemented in the computational module BEST-EST, the representative parameters of the model have been calibrated.

  6. Hydraulic root water uptake models: old concerns and new insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, V.; Carminati, A.; Rothfuss, Y.; Meunier, F.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.

    2014-12-01

    Root water uptake (RWU) affects underground water dynamics, with consequences on plant water availability and groundwater recharge. Even though hydrological and climate models are sensitive to RWU parameters, no consensus exists on the modelling of this process. Back in the 1940ies, Van Den Honert's catenary approach was the first to investigate the use of connected hydraulic resistances to describe water flow in whole plants. However concerns such as the necessary computing when architectures get complex made this approach premature. Now that computing power increased dramatically, hydraulic RWU models are gaining popularity, notably because they naturally produce observed processes like compensatory RWU and hydraulic redistribution. Yet major concerns remain. Some are more fundamental: according to hydraulic principles, plant water potential should equilibrate with soil water potential when the plant does not transpire, which is not a general observation when using current definitions of bulk or average soil water potential. Other concerns regard the validation process: water uptake distribution is not directly measurable, which makes it hard to demonstrate whether or not hydraulic models are more accurate than other models. Eventually parameterization concerns exist: root hydraulic properties are not easily measurable, and would even fluctuate on an hourly basis due to processes like aquaporin gating. While offering opportunities to validate hydraulic RWU models, newly developed observation techniques also make us realize the increasing complexity of processes involved in soil-plant hydrodynamics, such as the change of rhizosphere hydraulic properties with soil drying. Surprisingly, once implemented into hydraulic models, these processes do not necessarily translate into more complex emerging behavior at plant scale, and might justify the use of simplified representations of the soil-plant hydraulic system.

  7. An analytical model for hydraulic fracturing in shallow bedrock formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, José Sérgio; Ballestero, Thomas Paul; Pitombeira, Ernesto da Silva

    2011-01-01

    A theoretical method is proposed to estimate post-fracturing fracture size and transmissivity, and as a test of the methodology, data collected from two wells were used for verification. This method can be employed before hydrofracturing in order to obtain estimates of the potential hydraulic benefits of hydraulic fracturing. Five different pumping test analysis methods were used to evaluate the well hydraulic data. The most effective methods were the Papadopulos-Cooper model (1967), which includes wellbore storage effects, and the Gringarten-Ramey model (1974), known as the single horizontal fracture model. The hydraulic parameters resulting from fitting these models to the field data revealed that as a result of hydraulic fracturing, the transmissivity increased more than 46 times in one well and increased 285 times in the other well. The model developed by dos Santos (2008), which considers horizontal radial fracture propagation from the hydraulically fractured well, was used to estimate potential fracture geometry after hydrofracturing. For the two studied wells, their fractures could have propagated to distances of almost 175 m or more and developed maximum apertures of about 2.20 mm and hydraulic apertures close to 0.30 mm. Fracturing at this site appears to have expanded and propagated existing fractures and not created new fractures. Hydraulic apertures calculated from pumping test analyses closely matched the results obtained from the hydraulic fracturing model. As a result of this model, post-fracturing geometry and resulting post-fracturing well yield can be estimated before the actual hydrofracturing. Copyright © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  8. Thermal-hydraulic feedback model to calculate the neutronic cross-section in PWR reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santiago, Daniela Maiolino Norberto

    2011-01-01

    In neutronic codes,it is important to have a thermal-hydraulic feedback module. This module calculates the thermal-hydraulic feedback of the fuel, that feeds the neutronic cross sections. In the neutronic co de developed at PEN / COPPE / UFRJ, the fuel temperature is obtained through an empirical model. This work presents a physical model to calculate this temperature. We used the finite volume technique of discretized the equation of temperature distribution, while calculation the moderator coefficient of heat transfer, was carried out using the ASME table, and using some of their routines to our program. The model allows one to calculate an average radial temperature per node, since the thermal-hydraulic feedback must follow the conditions imposed by the neutronic code. The results were compared with to the empirical model. Our results show that for the fuel elements near periphery, the empirical model overestimates the temperature in the fuel, as compared to our model, which may indicate that the physical model is more appropriate to calculate the thermal-hydraulic feedback temperatures. The proposed model was validated by the neutronic simulator developed in the PEN / COPPE / UFRJ for analysis of PWR reactors. (author)

  9. Similarity conditions for investigations of hydraulic-thermal tidal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluegge, G.; Schwarze, H.

    1975-01-01

    With the construction of nuclear power plants near German tidal estuaries in mind, investigations of mixing and spreading processes which occur during the discharge of heated cooling water in tidal waters were carried out in hydraulic-thermal tidal models of the Lower Weser and Lower Elbe by the Franzius Institute for hydraulic and coastal engineering of the Technical University Hannover. This contribution discusses in detail the problems met and the experience gained in constructing and operating these models. (orig./TK) [de

  10. Modeling Hydraulic Components for Automated FMEA of a Braking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-23

    causes the diminishing of the wheel brake pressure if the brake pedal is released. When operated under the Anti - lock - braking system (ABS), the valves...Modeling Hydraulic Components for Automated FMEA of a Braking System Peter Struss, Alessandro Fraracci Tech. Univ. of Munich, 85748 Garching...the hydraulic part of a vehicle braking system . We describe the FMEA task and the application problem and outline the foundations for automating the

  11. Influence of Elevation Data Source on 2D Hydraulic Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakuła, Krzysztof; StĘpnik, Mateusz; Kurczyński, Zdzisław

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the influence of the source of various elevation data on hydraulic modelling in open channels. In the research, digital terrain models from different datasets were evaluated and used in two-dimensional hydraulic models. The following aerial and satellite elevation data were used to create the representation of terrain-digital terrain model: airborne laser scanning, image matching, elevation data collected in the LPIS, EuroDEM, and ASTER GDEM. From the results of five 2D hydrodynamic models with different input elevation data, the maximum depth and flow velocity of water were derived and compared with the results of the most accurate ALS data. For such an analysis a statistical evaluation and differences between hydraulic modelling results were prepared. The presented research proved the importance of the quality of elevation data in hydraulic modelling and showed that only ALS and photogrammetric data can be the most reliable elevation data source in accurate 2D hydraulic modelling.

  12. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for water distribution networks: steady state modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osman, Mohammad S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available steady state hydraulic model that will be used within a real-time dynamic hydraulic model (DHM). The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) water distribution network (WDN) is used as a pilot study for this purpose. A hydraulic analysis...

  13. Modelling the Hydraulic Processes on Constructed Stormwater Wetland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isri Ronald Mangangka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Constructed stormwater wetlands are manmade, shallow, and extensively vegetated water bodies which promote runoff volume and peak flow reduction, and also treat stormwater runoff quality. Researchers have noted that treatment processes of runoff in a constructed wetland are influenced by a range of hydraulic factors, which can vary during a rainfall event, and their influence on treatment can also vary as the event progresses. Variation in hydraulic factors during an event can only be generated using a detailed modelling approach, which was adopted in this research by developing a hydraulic conceptual model. The developed model was calibrated using trial and error procedures by comparing the model outflow with the measured field outflow data. The accuracy of the developed model was analyzed using a well-known statistical analysis method developed based on the regression analysis technique. The analysis results show that the developed model is satisfactory.

  14. An XFEM Model for Hydraulic Fracturing in Partially Saturated Rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimzadeh Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is a complex multi-physics phenomenon. Numerous analytical and numerical models of hydraulic fracturing processes have been proposed. Analytical solutions commonly are able to model the growth of a single hydraulic fracture into an initially intact, homogeneous rock mass. Numerical models are able to analyse complex problems such as multiple hydraulic fractures and fracturing in heterogeneous media. However, majority of available models are restricted to single-phase flow through fracture and permeable porous rock. This is not compatible with actual field conditions where the injected fluid does not have similar properties as the host fluid. In this study we present a fully coupled hydro-poroelastic model which incorporates two fluids i.e. fracturing fluid and host fluid. Flow through fracture is defined based on lubrication assumption, while flow through matrix is defined as Darcy flow. The fracture discontinuity in the mechanical model is captured using eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM while the fracture propagation criterion is defined through cohesive fracture model. The discontinuous matrix fluid velocity across fracture is modelled using leak-off loading which couples fracture flow and matrix flow. The proposed model has been discretised using standard Galerkin method, implemented in Matlab and verified against several published solutions. Multiple hydraulic fracturing simulations are performed to show the model robustness and to illustrate how problem parameters such as injection rate and rock permeability affect the hydraulic fracturing variables i.e. injection pressure, fracture aperture and fracture length. The results show the impact of partial saturation on leak-off and the fact that single-phase models may underestimate the leak-off.

  15. Modeling and Design of Cooperative Braking in Electric and Hybrid Vehicles Using Induction Machine and Hydraulic Brake

    OpenAIRE

    Dalimus, Zaini; Hussain, Khallid; Day, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    In mixed-mode braking applications, the electric motor / generator (M/G) and hydraulic pressure valve are controlled to meet the driver’s braking demand. Controlling these braking elements is achieved by modulating the current generated by the M/G and adjusting the fluid pressure to the wheel brake cylinders. This paper aims to model and design combined regenerative and hydraulic braking systems which, comprise an induction electric machine, inverter, NiMH battery, controller, a pressure sour...

  16. the Modeling of Hydraulic Jump Generated Partially on Sloping Apron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Abdulatif Jalil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling aims to characterize system behavior and achieve simulation close as possible of the reality. The rapid energy exchange in supercritical flow to generate quiet or subcritical flow in hydraulic jump phenomenon is important in design of hydraulic structures. Experimental and numerical modeling is done on type B hydraulic jump which starts first on sloping bed and its end on horizontal bed.  Four different apron slopes are used, for each one of these slopes the jump is generated on different locations by controlling the tail water depth.  Modelling validation is based on 120 experimental runs which they show that there is reliability. The air volume fraction which creates in through hydraulic jump varied between 0.18 and 0.28. While the energy exchanges process take place within 6.6, 6.1, 5.8, 5.5 of the average relative jump height for apron slopes of 0.18, 0.14, 0.10, 0.07 respectively. Within the limitations of this study, mathematical prediction model for relative hydraulic jump height is suggested.The model having an acceptable coefficient of determination.

  17. TOUGH-RBSN simulator for hydraulic fracture propagation within fractured media: Model validations against laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kunhwi; Rutqvist, Jonny; Nakagawa, Seiji; Birkholzer, Jens

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents coupled hydro-mechanical modeling of hydraulic fracturing processes in complex fractured media using a discrete fracture network (DFN) approach. The individual physical processes in the fracture propagation are represented by separate program modules: the TOUGH2 code for multiphase flow and mass transport based on the finite volume approach; and the rigid-body-spring network (RBSN) model for mechanical and fracture-damage behavior, which are coupled with each other. Fractures are modeled as discrete features, of which the hydrological properties are evaluated from the fracture deformation and aperture change. The verification of the TOUGH-RBSN code is performed against a 2D analytical model for single hydraulic fracture propagation. Subsequently, modeling capabilities for hydraulic fracturing are demonstrated through simulations of laboratory experiments conducted on rock-analogue (soda-lime glass) samples containing a designed network of pre-existing fractures. Sensitivity analyses are also conducted by changing the modeling parameters, such as viscosity of injected fluid, strength of pre-existing fractures, and confining stress conditions. The hydraulic fracturing characteristics attributed to the modeling parameters are investigated through comparisons of the simulation results.

  18. Modelling and Simulation of Mobile Hydraulic Crane with Telescopic Arm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2005-01-01

    paper a model of a loader crane with a flexible telescopic arm is presented, which may be used for evaluating control strategies. The telescopic arm is operated by four actuators connected hydraulically by a parallel circuit. The operating sequences of the individual actuators is therefore...... not controllable, but depends on the flow from the common control valve, flow resistances between the actuators and friction. The presented model incorporates structural flexibility of the telescopic arm and is capable of describing the dynamic behaviour of both the hydraulic and the mechanical system, including...

  19. Theoretical Modeling of Rock Breakage by Hydraulic and Mechanical Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxiang Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rock breakage by coupled mechanical and hydraulic action has been developed over the past several decades, but theoretical study on rock fragmentation by mechanical tool with water pressure assistance was still lacking. The theoretical model of rock breakage by mechanical tool was developed based on the rock fracture mechanics and the solution of Boussinesq’s problem, and it could explain the process of rock fragmentation as well as predicating the peak reacting force. The theoretical model of rock breakage by coupled mechanical and hydraulic action was developed according to the superposition principle of intensity factors at the crack tip, and the reacting force of mechanical tool assisted by hydraulic action could be reduced obviously if the crack with a critical length could be produced by mechanical or hydraulic impact. The experimental results indicated that the peak reacting force could be reduced about 15% assisted by medium water pressure, and quick reduction of reacting force after peak value decreased the specific energy consumption of rock fragmentation by mechanical tool. The crack formation by mechanical or hydraulic impact was the prerequisite to improvement of the ability of combined breakage.

  20. Empirical flow parameters : a tool for hydraulic model validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, William H.; Burley, Thomas E.; Cleveland, Theodore G.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) To determine and present from existing data in Texas, relations between observed stream flow, topographic slope, mean section velocity, and other hydraulic factors, to produce charts such as Figure 1 and to produce empirical distributions of the various flow parameters to provide a methodology to "check if model results are way off!"; (2) To produce a statistical regional tool to estimate mean velocity or other selected parameters for storm flows or other conditional discharges at ungauged locations (most bridge crossings) in Texas to provide a secondary way to compare such values to a conventional hydraulic modeling approach. (3.) To present ancillary values such as Froude number, stream power, Rosgen channel classification, sinuosity, and other selected characteristics (readily determinable from existing data) to provide additional information to engineers concerned with the hydraulic-soil-foundation component of transportation infrastructure.

  1. Hydraulic Fracturing and Production Optimization in Eagle Ford Shale Using Coupled Geomechanics and Fluid Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppachoknirun, Theerapat; Tutuncu, Azra N.

    2017-12-01

    With increasing production from shale gas and tight oil reservoirs, horizontal drilling and multistage hydraulic fracturing processes have become a routine procedure in unconventional field development efforts. Natural fractures play a critical role in hydraulic fracture growth, subsequently affecting stimulated reservoir volume and the production efficiency. Moreover, the existing fractures can also contribute to the pressure-dependent fluid leak-off during the operations. Hence, a reliable identification of the discrete fracture network covering the zone of interest prior to the hydraulic fracturing design needs to be incorporated into the hydraulic fracturing and reservoir simulations for realistic representation of the in situ reservoir conditions. In this research study, an integrated 3-D fracture and fluid flow model have been developed using a new approach to simulate the fluid flow and deliver reliable production forecasting in naturally fractured and hydraulically stimulated tight reservoirs. The model was created with three key modules. A complex 3-D discrete fracture network model introduces realistic natural fracture geometry with the associated fractured reservoir characteristics. A hydraulic fracturing model is created utilizing the discrete fracture network for simulation of the hydraulic fracture and flow in the complex discrete fracture network. Finally, a reservoir model with the production grid system is used allowing the user to efficiently perform the fluid flow simulation in tight formations with complex fracture networks. The complex discrete natural fracture model, the integrated discrete fracture model for the hydraulic fracturing, the fluid flow model, and the input dataset have been validated against microseismic fracture mapping and commingled production data obtained from a well pad with three horizontal production wells located in the Eagle Ford oil window in south Texas. Two other fracturing geometries were also evaluated to optimize

  2. Determination of hydraulic properties of unsaturated soil via inverse modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodesova, R.

    2004-01-01

    The method for determining the hydraulic properties of unsaturated soil with inverse modeling is presented. A modified cone penetrometer has been designed to inject water into the soil through a screen, and measure the progress of the wetting front with two tensiometer rings positioned above the screen. Cumulative inflow and pressure head readings are analyzed to obtain estimates of the hydraulic parameters describing K(h) and θ(h). Optimization results for tests at one side are used to demonstrate the possibility to evaluate either the wetting branches of the soil hydraulic properties, or the wetting and drying curves simultaneously, via analysis of different parts of the experiment. The optimization results are compared to the results of standard laboratory and field methods. (author)

  3. Thermo-Hydraulic Modelling of Buffer and Backfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintado, X.; Rautioaho, E.

    2013-09-01

    The temporal evolution of saturation, liquid pressure and temperature in the components of the engineered barrier system was studied using numerical methods. A set of laboratory tests was conducted to calibrate the parameters employed in the models. The modelling consisted of thermal, hydraulic and thermo-hydraulic analysis in which the significant thermo-hydraulic processes, parameters and features were identified. CODE B RIGHT was used for the finite element modelling and supplementary calculations were conducted with analytical methods. The main objective in this report is to improve understanding of the thermo-hydraulic processes and material properties that affect buffer behaviour in the Olkiluoto repository and to determine the parametric requirements of models for the accurate prediction of this behaviour. The analyses consisted of evaluating the influence of initial canister temperature and gaps in the buffer, and the role played by fractures and the rock mass located between fractures in supplying water for buffer and backfill saturation. In the thermo-hydraulic analysis, the primary processes examined were the effects of buffer drying near the canister on temperature evolution and the manner in which heat flow affects the buffer saturation process. Uncertainties in parameters and variations in the boundary conditions, modelling geometry and thermo-hydraulic phenomena were assessed with a sensitivity analysis. The material parameters, constitutive models, and assumptions made were carefully selected for all the modelling cases. The reference parameters selected for the simulations were compared and evaluated against laboratory measurements. The modelling results highlight the importance of understanding groundwater flow through the rock mass and from fractures in the rock in order to achieve reliable predictions regarding buffer saturation, since saturation times could range from a few years to tens of thousands of years depending on the hydrogeological

  4. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of reactivity accidents in MTR reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khater Hany

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a dynamic model for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of MTR research reactors during a reactivity insertion accident. The model is formulated for coupling reactor kinetics with feedback reactivity and reactor core thermal-hydraulics. To represent the reactor core, two types of channels are considered, average and hot channels. The developed computer program is compiled and executed on a personal computer, using the FORTRAN language. The model is validated by safety-related benchmark calculations for MTR-TYPE reactors of IAEA 10 MW generic reactor for both slow and fast reactivity insertion transients. A good agreement is shown between the present model and the benchmark calculations. Then, the model is used for simulating the uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod of an ETRR-2 reactor in transient with over power scram trip. The model results for ETRR-2 are analyzed and discussed.

  5. Hydraulic Model Tests on Modified Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Lynggaard, Jakob

    A floating model of the Wave Dragon (WD) was built in autumn 1998 by the Danish Maritime Institute in scale 1:50, see Sørensen and Friis-Madsen (1999) for reference. This model was subjected to a series of model tests and subsequent modifications at Aalborg University and in the following this mo...

  6. Hydraulic experiments on the failed fuel location module of prototype fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, K.; Kumar, S.; Padmakumar, G.; Prakash, V.; Vijayashree, R.; Rajan Babu, V.; Govinda Rajan, S.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Prabhaker, R.

    2003-01-01

    The design of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is based on sound design concepts with emphasis on intrinsic safety. The uncertainties involved in the design of various components, which are difficult to assess theoretically, are experimentally verified before design is validated. In PFBR core, the coolant (liquid sodium) enters the bottom of the fuel subassembly, passes over the fuel pins picking up the fission heat and issues in to a hot pool. If there is any breach in the fuel pins, the fission products come in direct contact with the coolant. This is undesirable and it is necessary to locate the subassembly with the failed fuel pin and to isolate it. A component called Failed Fuel Location Module (FFLM) is employed for locating the failed SA by monitoring the coolant samples coming out of each Subassembly. The coolant sample from each Subassembly is drawn by FFLM using an EM pump through sampling tube and selector valve and is monitored for the presence of delayed neutrons which is an indication of failure of the Subassembly. The pressure drop across the selector valve determines the rating of the EM Pump. The dilution of the coolant sample across the selector valve determines the effectiveness of monitoring for contamination. It is not possible to predict pressure drop across the selector valve and dilution of the coolant sample theoretically. These two parameters are determined using a hydraulic experiment on the FFLM. The experiment was carried out in conditions that simulate the reactor conditions following appropriate similarity laws. The paper discusses the details of the model, techniques of experiments and the results from the studies

  7. VHTR core modeling: coupling between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limaiem, I.; Damian, F.; Raepsaet, X.; Studer, E.

    2005-01-01

    Following the present interest in the next generation nuclear power plan (NGNP), Cea is deploying special effort to develop new models and qualify its research tools for this next generation reactors core. In this framework, the Very High Temperature Reactor concept (VHTR) has an increasing place in the actual research program. In such type of core, a strong interaction exists between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics. Consequently, the global core modelling requires accounting for the temperature feedback in the neutronic models. The purpose of this paper is to present the new neutronic and thermal-hydraulics coupling model dedicated to the High Temperature Reactors (HTR). The coupling model integrates a new version of the neutronic scheme calculation developed in collaboration between Cea and Framatome-ANP. The neutronic calculations are performed using a specific calculation processes based on the APOLLO2 transport code and CRONOS2 diffusion code which are part of the French reactor physics code system SAPHYR. The thermal-hydraulics model is characterised by an equivalent porous media and 1-D fluid/3-D thermal model implemented in the CAST3M/ARCTURUS code. The porous media approach involves the definition of both homogenous and heterogeneous models to ensure a correct temperature feedback. This study highlights the sensitivity of the coupling system's parameters (radial/axial meshing and data exchange strategy between neutronic and thermal-hydraulics code). The parameters sensitivity study leads to the definition of an optimal coupling system specification for the VHTR. Besides, this work presents the first physical analysis of the VHTR core in steady-state condition. The analysis gives information about the 3-D power peaking and the temperature coefficient. Indeed, it covers different core configurations with different helium distribution in the core bypass. (authors)

  8. Modeling, Optimization & Control of Hydraulic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat

    2014-01-01

    Water supply systems consist of a number of pumping stations, which deliver water to the customers via pipeline networks and elevated reservoirs. A huge amount of drinking water is lost before it reaches to end-users due to the leakage in pipe networks. A cost effective solution to reduce leakage...... systems. To have better understanding of water leakage, to control pressure and leakage effectively and for optimal design of water supply system, suitable modeling is an important prerequisite. Therefore a model with the main objective of pressure control and consequently leakage reduction is presented...

  9. Hydraulic Hybrid Excavator—Mathematical Model Validation and Energy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Casoli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent demands to reduce pollutant emissions and improve energy efficiency have driven the implementation of hybrid solutions in mobile machinery. This paper presents the results of a numerical and experimental analysis conducted on a hydraulic hybrid excavator (HHE. The machinery under study is a middle size excavator, whose standard version was modified with the introduction of an energy recovery system (ERS. The proposed ERS layout was designed to recover the potential energy of the boom, using a hydraulic accumulator as a storage device. The recovered energy is utilized through the pilot pump of the machinery which operates as a motor, thus reducing the torque required from the internal combustion engine (ICE. The analysis reported in this paper validates the HHE model by comparing numerical and experimental data in terms of hydraulic and mechanical variables and fuel consumption. The mathematical model shows its capability to reproduce the realistic operating conditions of the realized prototype, tested on the field. A detailed energy analysis comparison between the standard and the hybrid excavator models was carried out to evaluate the energy flows along the system, showing advantages, weaknesses and possibilities to further improve the machinery efficiency. Finally, the fuel consumption estimated by the model and that measured during the experiments are presented to highlight the fuel saving percentages. The HHE model is an important starting point for the development of other energy saving solutions.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Foam Drilling Hydraulics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Baris

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of foam as a drilling fluid was developed to meet a special set of conditions under which other common drilling fluids had failed. Foam drilling is defined as the process of making boreholes by utilizing foam as the circulating fluid. When compared with conventional drilling, underbalanced or foam drilling has several advantages. These advantages include: avoidance of lost circulation problems, minimizing damage to pay zones, higher penetration rates and bit life. Foams are usually characterized by the quality, the ratio of the volume of gas, and the total foam volume. Obtaining dependable pressure profiles for aerated (gasified fluids and foam is more difficult than for single phase fluids, since in the former ones the drilling mud contains a gas phase that is entrained within the fluid system. The primary goal of this study is to expand the knowledge-base of the hydrodynamic phenomena that occur in a foam drilling operation. In order to gain a better understanding of foam drilling operations, a hydrodynamic model is developed and run at different operating conditions. For this purpose, the flow of foam through the drilling system is modeled by invoking the basic principles of continuum mechanics and thermodynamics. The model was designed to allow gas and liquid flow at desired volumetric flow rates through the drillstring and annulus. Parametric studies are conducted in order to identify the most influential variables in the hydrodynamic modeling of foam flow.

  11. 3D modeling of hydraulic fracturing and stress perturbations during fluid injection

    OpenAIRE

    Roche Vincent; van der Baan Mirko; Preisig Giona

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture growth is simulated in homogeneous granite with a fully coupled hydromechanical discrete element method. Three models are considered namely an intact rock and two models with pre existing fractures connected or disconnected to the incipient hydraulic fracture plane. In all scenarios the hydraulic fracture grows in a plane with a mostly circular front despite anisotropic stresses. In the intact rock and disconnected models a hydraulic fracture propagates normal to the minimu...

  12. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C. H.; Baek, W. P.; Chung, M. K.

    2007-06-01

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of advanced nuclear reactor system for evaluating key thermal-hydraulic phenomena relevant to new safety concepts. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. The Followings are main research topics: - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation-induced Thermal Mixing in a Pool - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Construction of T-H Data Base

  13. Hydraulic modelling of drinking water treatment plant operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Rietveld

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The flow through a unit of a drinking water treatment plant is one of the most important parameters in terms of a unit's effectiveness. In the present paper, a new EPAnet library is presented with the typical hydraulic elements for drinking water treatment processes well abstraction, rapid sand filtration and cascade and tower aeration. Using this treatment step library, a hydraulic model was set up, calibrated and validated for the drinking water treatment plant Harderbroek. With the actual valve position and pump speeds, the flows were calculated through the several treatment steps. A case shows the use of the model to calculate the new setpoints for the current frequency converters of the effluent pumps during a filter backwash.

  14. Project W-320 thermal hydraulic model benchmarking and baselining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, K.

    1998-01-01

    Project W-320 will be retrieving waste from Tank 241-C-106 and transferring the waste to Tank 241-AY-102. Waste in both tanks must be maintained below applicable thermal limits during and following the waste transfer. Thermal hydraulic process control models will be used for process control of the thermal limits. This report documents the process control models and presents a benchmarking of the models with data from Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Revision 1 of this report will provide a baselining of the models in preparation for the initiation of sluicing

  15. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of porous bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araj, K.J.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Optimum design of nuclear reactor core requires an iterative approach between the thermal-hydraulic, neutronic and operational analysis. This paper concentrates on the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a hydrogen cooled, small particle bed reactor (PBR). The PBR core, modeled here, consists of a hexagonal array of fuel elements embedded in a moderator matrix. The fuel elements are annular packed beds of fuel particles held between two porous cylindrical frits. These particles, 500 to 600 μm in diameter, have a uranium carbide core, which is coated by two layers of graphite and an outer coating of zirconium carbide. Coolant flow, radially inward, from the cold frit through the packed bed and hot frit and axially out the channel, formed by the hot frit, to a common plenum. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. Simple Predictive Models for Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Technosands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of technosands (gravel-free, coarse sands with negligible organic matter content) is important for irrigation and drainage management of athletic fields and golf courses. In this study, we developed two simple models for predicting Ks...... of technosands based on either (i) the classic Kozeny-Carman (K-C) model modified by considering the content of finer particles (fines) less than 200 [mu]m to estimate an immobile water fraction or (ii) the Revil-Cathles (R-C) model modified by using the characteristic particle diameter from the Rosin...

  17. Computer models of pipeline systems based on electro hydraulic analogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, S. V.; Kudinov, V. A.; Trubitsyn, K. V.; Tkachev, V. K.; Stefanyuk, E. V.

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the results of the development of mathematical and computer models of complex multi-loop branched pipeline networks for various purposes (water-oil-gas pipelines, heating networks, etc.) based on the electro hydraulic analogy of current spread in conductors and fluids in pipelines described by the same equations. Kirchhoff’s laws used in the calculation of electrical networks are applied in the calculations for pipeline systems. To maximize the approximation of the computer model to the real network concerning its resistance to the process of transferring the medium, the method of automatic identification of the model is applied.

  18. Views on the future of thermal hydraulic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    It is essential for the U.S. NRC to sustain the highest level of the thermal-hydraulics and reactor safety research expertise and continuously improve their accident analysis capability. Such expertise should span over four different areas which are strongly related to each other. These are: (1) Reactor Safety Code Development, (2) Two-phase Flow Modeling, (3) Instrumentation and Fundamental Experimental Research, and (4) Separate Effect and Integral Test. The NRC is already considering a new effort in the area of advanced thermal-hydraulics effort. Its success largely depends on the availability of a significantly improved two-phase flow formulation and constitutive relations supported by detailed experimental data. Therefore, it is recommended that the NRC start significant research efforts in the areas of two-phase flow modeling, instrumentation, basic and separate effect experiments which should be pursued systematically and with clearly defined objectives. It is desirable that some international program is developed in this area. This paper is concentrated on those items in the thermal-hydraulic area which eventually determine the quality of future accident analysis codes.

  19. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 4. Simplified fuel assembly model and parallelization by MPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2001-10-01

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT is being developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal hydraulic phenomena of fast reactors including the effect of the flow between wrapper-tube walls (inter-wrapper flow) under various reactor operation conditions. As appropriate boundary conditions in addition to a detailed modeling of the core are essential for accurate simulations of in-core thermal hydraulics, ACT consists of not only fuel assembly and inter-wrapper flow analysis modules but also a heat transport system analysis module that gives response of the plant dynamics to the core model. This report describes incorporation of a simplified model to the fuel assembly analysis module and program parallelization by a message passing method toward large-scale simulations. ACT has a fuel assembly analysis module which can simulate a whole fuel pin bundle in each fuel assembly of the core and, however, it may take much CPU time for a large-scale core simulation. Therefore, a simplified fuel assembly model that is thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the detailed one has been incorporated in order to save the simulation time and resources. This simplified model is applied to several parts of fuel assemblies in a core where the detailed simulation results are not required. With regard to the program parallelization, the calculation load and the data flow of ACT were analyzed and the optimum parallelization has been done including the improvement of the numerical simulation algorithm of ACT. Message Passing Interface (MPI) is applied to data communication between processes and synchronization in parallel calculations. Parallelized ACT was verified through a comparison simulation with the original one. In addition to the above works, input manuals of the core analysis module and the heat transport system analysis module have been prepared. (author)

  20. Hydraulic fracture propagation modeling and data-based fracture identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing

    Successful shale gas and tight oil production is enabled by the engineering innovation of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulically induced fractures will most likely deviate from the bi-wing planar pattern and generate complex fracture networks due to mechanical interactions and reservoir heterogeneity, both of which render the conventional fracture simulators insufficient to characterize the fractured reservoir. Moreover, in reservoirs with ultra-low permeability, the natural fractures are widely distributed, which will result in hydraulic fractures branching and merging at the interface and consequently lead to the creation of more complex fracture networks. Thus, developing a reliable hydraulic fracturing simulator, including both mechanical interaction and fluid flow, is critical in maximizing hydrocarbon recovery and optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multistage horizontal wells. A novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple nonplanar fractures' propagation in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs with or without pre-existing natural fractures. Initiation, growth, and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. This physics-based modeling approach leads to realistic fracture patterns without using the empirical rock failure and fracture propagation criteria required in conventional continuum methods. Based on this model, a sensitivity study is performed to investigate the effects of perforation spacing, in-situ stress anisotropy, rock properties (Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and compressive strength), fluid properties, and natural fracture properties on hydraulic fracture propagation. In addition, since reservoirs are buried thousands of feet below the surface, the

  1. Hydraulic pitch control system for wind turbines: Advanced modeling and verification of an hydraulic accumulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irizar, Victor; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic pitch systems provide robust and reliable control of power and speed of modern wind turbines. During emergency stops, where the pitch of the blades has to be taken to a full stop position to avoid over speed situations, hydraulic accumulators play a crucial role. Their efficiency...... and capability of providing enough energy to rotate the blades is affected by thermal processes due to the compression and decompression of the gas chamber. This paper presents an in depth study of the thermodynamical processes involved in an hydraulic accumulator during operation, and how they affect the energy...

  2. Hydraulic modeling development and application in water resources engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Francisco J.; Yang, Chih Ted; Wang, Lawrence K.

    2015-01-01

    The use of modeling has become widespread in water resources engineering and science to study rivers, lakes, estuaries, and coastal regions. For example, computer models are commonly used to forecast anthropogenic effects on the environment, and to help provide advanced mitigation measures against catastrophic events such as natural and dam-break floods. Linking hydraulic models to vegetation and habitat models has expanded their use in multidisciplinary applications to the riparian corridor. Implementation of these models in software packages on personal desktop computers has made them accessible to the general engineering community, and their use has been popularized by the need of minimal training due to intuitive graphical user interface front ends. Models are, however, complex and nontrivial, to the extent that even common terminology is sometimes ambiguous and often applied incorrectly. In fact, many efforts are currently under way in order to standardize terminology and offer guidelines for good practice, but none has yet reached unanimous acceptance. This chapter provides a view of the elements involved in modeling surface flows for the application in environmental water resources engineering. It presents the concepts and steps necessary for rational model development and use by starting with the exploration of the ideas involved in defining a model. Tangible form of those ideas is provided by the development of a mathematical and corresponding numerical hydraulic model, which is given with a substantial amount of detail. The issues of model deployment in a practical and productive work environment are also addressed. The chapter ends by presenting a few model applications highlighting the need for good quality control in model validation.

  3. Advanced modelling and numerical strategies in nuclear thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staedtke, H.

    2001-01-01

    The first part of the lecture gives a brief review of the current status of nuclear thermal hydraulics as it forms the basis of established system codes like TRAC, RELAP5, CATHARE or ATHLET. Specific emphasis is given to the capabilities and limitations of the underlying physical modelling and numerical solution strategies with regard to the description of complex transient two-phase flow and heat transfer conditions as expected to occur in PWR reactors during off-normal and accident conditions. The second part of the lecture focuses on new challenges and future needs in nuclear thermal-hydraulics which might arise with regard to re-licensing of old plants using bestestimate methodologies or the design and safety analysis of Advanced Light Water Reactors relying largely on passive safety systems. In order to meet these new requirements various advanced modelling and numerical techniques will be discussed including extended wellposed (hyperbolic) two-fluid models, explicit modelling of interfacial area transport or higher order numerical schemes allowing a high resolution of local multi-dimensional flow processes.(author)

  4. Hydraulic modeling of thermal discharges into shallow, tidal affected streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copp, H.W.; Shashidhara, N.S.

    1981-01-01

    A two-unit nuclear fired power plant is being constructed in western Washington state. Blowdown water from cooling towers will be discharged into the Chehalis River nearby. The location of a diffuser is some 21 miles upriver from Grays Harbor on the Pacific Ocean. Because the Chehalis River is classified as an excellent stream from the standpoint of water quality, State regulatory agencies required demonstration that thermal discharges would maintain water quality standards within fairly strict limits. A hydraulic model investigation used a 1:12 scale, undistorted model of a 1300-foot river reach in the vicinity of the diffuser. The model scale was selected to insure fully turbulent flows both in the stream and from the diffuser (Reynolds similitude). Model operation followed the densimetric Froude similitude. Thermistors were employed to measure temperatures in the model; measurements were taken by computer command and such measurements at some 250 positions were effected in about 2.5 seconds

  5. Developed hydraulic simulation model for water pipeline networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ayad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method that uses linear graph theory is presented for both steady state, and extended period simulation in a pipe network including its hydraulic components (pumps, valves, junctions, etc.. The developed model is based on the Extended Linear Graph Theory (ELGT technique. This technique is modified to include new network components such as flow control valves and tanks. The technique also expanded for extended period simulation (EPS. A newly modified method for the calculation of updated flows improving the convergence rate is being introduced. Both benchmarks, ad Actual networks are analyzed to check the reliability of the proposed method. The results reveal the finer performance of the proposed method.

  6. First wall thermal hydraulic models for fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Subject to normal and off-normal reactor conditions, thermal hydraulic models of first walls, e.g., a thermal mass barrier, a tubular shield, and a radiating liner are reviewed. Under normal operation the plasma behaves as expected in a predicted way for transient and steady-state conditions. The most severe thermal loading on the first wall occurs when the plasma becomes unstable and dumps its energy on the wall in a very short period of time (milliseconds). Depending on the plasma dump time and area over which the energy is deposited may result in melting of the first wall surface, and if the temperature is high enough, vaporization

  7. Hydraulic modeling support for conflict analysis: The Manayunk canal revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, R.A.; Traver, R.G.; Rao, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a study which used a standard, hydraulic computer model to generate detailed design information to support conflict analysis of a water resource use issue. As an extension of previous studies, the conflict analysis in this case included several scenarios for stability analysis - all of which reached the conclusion that compromising, shared access to the water resources available would result in the most benefits to society. This expected equilibrium outcome was found to maximize benefit-cost estimates. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  8. A mangrove creek restoration plan utilizing hydraulic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marois, Darryl E; Mitsch, William J

    2017-11-01

    Despite the valuable ecosystem services provided by mangrove ecosystems they remain threatened around the globe. Urban development has been a primary cause for mangrove destruction and deterioration in south Florida USA for the last several decades. As a result, the restoration of mangrove forests has become an important topic of research. Using field sampling and remote-sensing we assessed the past and present hydrologic conditions of a mangrove creek and its connected mangrove forest and brackish marsh systems located on the coast of Naples Bay in southwest Florida. We concluded that the hydrology of these connected systems had been significantly altered from its natural state due to urban development. We propose here a mangrove creek restoration plan that would extend the existing creek channel 1.1 km inland through the adjacent mangrove forest and up to an adjacent brackish marsh. We then tested the hydrologic implications using a hydraulic model of the mangrove creek calibrated with tidal data from Naples Bay and water levels measured within the creek. The calibrated model was then used to simulate the resulting hydrology of our proposed restoration plan. Simulation results showed that the proposed creek extension would restore a twice-daily flooding regime to a majority of the adjacent mangrove forest and that there would still be minimal tidal influence on the brackish marsh area, keeping its salinity at an acceptable level. This study demonstrates the utility of combining field data and hydraulic modeling to aid in the design of mangrove restoration plans.

  9. The quasi-one-dimensional hyperbolic model of hydraulic fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidar M. Il'yasov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a quasi-one-dimensional hyperbolic model of hydraulic fracture growth assuming for the hydraulic fracturing that stress intensity is much higher than fracture resistance. The mode under analysis, which accounts for convective and unsteady terms in the fluid flow equation, is a generalization of the Perkins–Kern–Nordgren local model. It has been proved that the obtained system of differential equations is a quasi-linear strictly hyperbolic system, for which the characteristics were found as well as their correlations. For the case of the Coriolis correction neglect, the Riemann invariants were found. Neglecting the injected fluid leak-off and viscosity, the Riemann waves, similar to simple plane waves in gas dynamics, were defined and their properties were studied. The evolutionism of fracture boundaries was investigated. The initial boundary value problem was set for fracture growth. It has been shown that the neglect of dissipative terms in the presented model allows constructing a simple wave theory analogous to the theory of one-dimensional gas dynamics for isentropic plane waves.

  10. Modelling the Photovoltaic Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanevakis, Markos

    2011-01-01

    This paper refers into various ways in simulation the Photovoltaic (PV) module behaviour under any combination of solar irradiation and ambient temperature. There are three different approaches presented here briefly and one of them is chosen because of its good accuracy and relatively low...

  11. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  12. Intelligent Hydraulic Actuator and Exp-based Modelling of Losses in Pumps and .

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Muzhi

    A intelligent fuzzy logic self-organising PD+I controller for a gearrotor hydraulic motor was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a experimental-based modelling methods with a new software tool 'Dynamodata' for modelling of losses in hydraulic motors and pumps was developed.......A intelligent fuzzy logic self-organising PD+I controller for a gearrotor hydraulic motor was developed and evaluated. Furthermore, a experimental-based modelling methods with a new software tool 'Dynamodata' for modelling of losses in hydraulic motors and pumps was developed....

  13. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of porous bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araj, K.J.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Optimum design of nuclear reactor cores requires an iterative approach between the thermal-hydraulic, neutronic, and operational analysis. This paper will concentrate on the thermal-hydraulic behavior of a hydrogen-cooled small particle bed reactor (PBR). The PBR core modeled here consists of a hexagonal array of fuel elements embedded in a moderator matrix. The fuel elements are annular packed beds of fuel particles held between two porous cylindrical frits. These particles, 500 to 600 μm in diameter, have a uranium carbide core, which is coated by two layers of graphite and an outer coating of zirconium carbide. Coolant flows, radially inward, from the cold frit through the packed bed and hot frit and axially out the channel, formed by the hot frit to a common plenum. A fast running one-dimensional lumped-parameter steady-state code (FTHP) was developed to evaluate the effects of design changes in fuel assembly and power distribution. Another objective for the code was to investigate various methods of coolant control to minimize hot channel effects and maximize outlet temperatures

  14. Stochastic analysis of the hydraulic conductivity estimated for a heterogeneous aquifer via numerical modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to evaluate the impacts of the average hydraulic conductivity of the heterogeneous aquifer on the estimated hydraulic conductivity using the observations from pumping tests. The results of aquifer tests conducted at a karst aquifer are first introduced. A MODFLOW groundwater flow model was developed to perform numerical pumping tests, and the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity (K field was generated using the Monte Carlo method. The K was estimated by the Theis solution for an unconfined aquifer. The effective hydraulic conductivity (Ke was calculated to represent the hydraulic conductivity of a heterogeneous aquifer. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that Ke increase with the mean of hydraulic conductivity (EK, and decrease with the coefficient of variation of the hydraulic conductivity (Cv. The impact of spatial variability of K on the estimated Ke at two observation wells with smaller EK is less significant compared to the cases with larger EK.

  15. Hydraulic model tests for 100D type primary reactor coolant pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezawa, Kiyomi; Miyamoto, Satoshi; Tagawa, Masashi; Yamada, Isao; Yoshida, Yoshiki; Uehara, Sakuichiro.

    1985-01-01

    We are now energetically promoting the design and development for domestic production of the 100D type (for 50 Hz) as the primary reactor coolant pump for units No. 1, 2 at the Tomari Nuclear Power Station of the Hokkaido Electric Power Co. In this connection, a hydraulic model test was conducted on a 1/2.54 scale model to evaluate the hydraulic characteristics of the pump, which is essential for the basic structure and reliability of the pump, and the fluid exciting force, which is indispensable for evaluating the soundness of the shafting. As a result, these characteristics were determined and the hydraulic characteristics were improved, while a hydraulic design base was established and the validity of the design was confirmed. This paper reports the results of the hydraulic model test, and discusses the optimum hydraulic structure for the designing of actual units to be manufactured henceforth. (author)

  16. submitter Thermal, Hydraulic, and Electromagnetic Modeling of Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2016-01-01

    Modeling techniques and tailored computational tools are becoming increasingly relevant to the design and analysis of large-scale superconducting magnet systems. Efficient and reliable tools are useful to provide an optimal forecast of the envelope of operating conditions and margins, which are difficult to test even when a prototype is available. This knowledge can be used to considerably reduce the design margins of the system, and thus the overall cost, or increase reliability during operation. An integrated analysis of a superconducting magnet system is, however, a complex matter, governed by very diverse physics. This paper reviews the wide spectrum of phenomena and provides an estimate of the time scales of thermal, hydraulic, and electromagnetic mechanisms affecting the performance of superconducting magnet systems. The analysis is useful to provide guidelines on how to divide the complex problem into building blocks that can be integrated in a design and analysis framework for a consistent multiphysic...

  17. Thermal-hydraulic models and correlations for the SPACE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. D.; Lee, S. W.; Bae, S. W.; Moon, S. K.; Kim, S. Y.; Lee, Y. H.

    2009-01-01

    The SPACE code which is based on a multi-dimensional two-fluid, three-field model is under development to be used for licensing future pressurized water reactors. Several research and industrial organizations are participated in the collaboration of the development program, including KAERI, KHNP, KOPEC, KNF, and KEPRI. KAERI has been assigned to develop the thermal-hydraulic models and correlations which are required to solve the field equations as the closure relationships. This task can be categorized into five packages; i) a flow regime selection package, ii) a wall and interfacial friction package, iii) an interfacial heat and mass transfer package iv) a droplet entrainment and de-entrainment package and v) a wall heat transfer package. Since the SPACE code, unlike other major best-estimate nuclear reactor system analysis codes, RELAP5, TRAC-M and CATHARE which consider only liquid and vapor phases, incorporates a dispersed liquid field in addition to vapor and continuous liquid fields, intel facial interaction models between continuous, dispersed liquid phases and vapor phase have to be developed separately. The proper physical models can significantly improve the accuracy of the prediction of a nuclear reactor system behavior under many different transient conditions because those models are composed of the source terms for the governing equations. In this paper, a development program for the physical models and correlations for the SPACE code will be introduced briefly

  18. Development of whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT. 4. Incorporation of three-dimensional upper plenum model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2003-03-01

    The thermal-hydraulic analysis computer program ACT is under development for the evaluation of detailed flow and temperature fields in a core region of fast breeder reactors under various operation conditions. The purpose of this program development is to contribute not only to clarifying thermal hydraulic characteristics that cannot be revealed by experiments due to measurement difficulty but also to performing rational safety design and assessment. This report describes the incorporation of a three-dimensional upper plenum model to ACT and its verification study as part of the program development. To treat the influence of three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in a upper plenum on the in-core temperature field, the multi-dimensional general purpose thermal-hydraulic analysis program AQUA, which was developed and validated at JNC, was applied as the base of the upper plenum analysis module of ACT. AQUA enables to model the upper plenum configuration including immersed heat exchangers of the direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS). In coupling core analysis module that consists of the fuel-assembly and the inter-wrapper gap calculation parts with the upper plenum module, different types of computation mesh systems were jointed using the staggered quarter assembly mesh scheme. A coupling algorithm among core, upper plenum and heat transport system modules, which can keep mass, momentum and energy conservation, was developed and optimized in consideration of parallel computing. ACT was applied to analyzing a sodium experiment (PLANDTL-DHX) performed at JNC, which simulated the natural circulation decay heat removal under DRACS operation conditions for the program verification. From the calculation result, the validity of the improved program was confirmed. (author)

  19. Modeling and design of cooperative braking in electric and hybrid vehicles using induction machine and hydraulic brake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaini Dalimus

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In mixed-mode braking applications, the electric motor / generator (M/G and hydraulic pressure valve are controlled to meet the driver’s braking demand. Controlling these braking elements is achieved by modulating the current generated by the M/G and adjusting the fluid pressure to the wheel brake cylinders. This paper aims to model and design combined regenerative and hydraulic braking systems which, comprise an induction electric machine, inverter, NiMH battery, controller, a pressure source, pressure control unit, and brake calipers. A 15 kW 1500 rpm induction machine equipped with a reduction gear having a gear ratio of 4 is used. A hydraulic brake capable to produce fluid pressure up to 40 bar is used. Direct torque control and pressure control are chosen as the control criteria in the M/G and the hydraulic solenoid valve. The braking demands for the system are derived from the Federal Testing Procedure (FTP drive cycle. Two simulation models have been developed in Matlab®/Simulink® to analyze the performance of the control strategy in each braking system. The developed model is validated through experiment. It is concluded that the control system does introduce torque ripple and pressure oscillation in the braking system, but these effects do not affect vehicle braking performance due to the high frequency nature of pressure fluctuation and the damping effect of the vehicle inertia. Moreover, experiment results prove the effectiveness of the developed model.

  20. Optimizing a gap conductance model applicable to VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahgoshay, M.; Hashemi-Tilehnoee, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Two known conductance models for application in VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic code are examined. ► An optimized gap conductance model is developed which can predict the gap conductance in good agreement with FSAR data. ► The licensed thermal–hydraulic code is coupled with the gap conductance model predictor externally. -- Abstract: The modeling of gap conductance for application in VVER-1000 thermal–hydraulic codes is addressed. Two known models, namely CALZA-BINI and RELAP5 gap conductance models, are examined. By externally linking of gap conductance models and COBRA-EN thermal hydraulic code, the acceptable range of each model is specified. The result of each gap conductance model versus linear heat rate has been compared with FSAR data. A linear heat rate of about 9 kW/m is the boundary for optimization process. Since each gap conductance model has its advantages and limitation, the optimized gap conductance model can predict the gap conductance better than each of the two other models individually.

  1. Designing an Electro-Hydraulic Control Module for an Open-Circuit Variable Displacement Pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben Ole; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2005-01-01

    , in the form of an electric control signal, under varying working conditions, when having access to engine speed and actual pump pressure. The paper presents a model of both the pump and the control module, along with design considerations on which linear controllers are developed for a worst point......This paper deals with the problem of designing an electric control module for a Sauer-Danfoss Series 45 H-frame open circuit axial piston pump. The purpose of the electric control module is to replace the existing hydro-mechanical (LS) regulator, and enable the pump to follow a reference pressure...... consideration. Based on the initial topology experimental results are presented and a simulation comparison is made with the original hydro-mechanical controlled pump. Based on these results, improvements for a second prototype are presented along with a simulation result for this....

  2. A 2D Model of Hydraulic Fracturing, Damage and Microseismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangen, Magnus

    2018-03-01

    We present a model for hydraulic fracturing and damage of low-permeable rock. It computes the intermittent propagation of rock damage, microseismic event locations, microseismic frequency-magnitude distributions, stimulated rock volume and the injection pressure. The model uses a regular 2D grid and is based on ideas from invasion percolation. All damaged and connected cells during a time step constitute a microseismic event, where the size of the event is the number of cells in the cluster. The magnitude of the event is the log _{10} of the event size. The model produces events with a magnitude-frequency distribution having a b value that is approximately 0.8. The model is studied with respect to the physical parameters: permeability of damaged rock and the rock strength. "High" permeabilities of the damaged rock give the same b value ≈ 0.8, but "moderate" permeabilities give higher b values. Another difference is that "high" permeabilities produce a percolation-like fracture network, while "moderate" permeabilities result in damage zones that expand circularly away from the injection point. In the latter case of "moderate" permeabilities, the injection pressure increases substantially beyond the fracturing level. The rock strength and the time step do not change the observed b value of the model for moderate changes.

  3. Non Linear Modelling and Control of Hydraulic Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Šulc

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with non-linear modelling and control of a differential hydraulic actuator. The nonlinear state space equations are derived from basic physical laws. They are more powerful than the transfer function in the case of linear models, and they allow the application of an object oriented approach in simulation programs. The effects of all friction forces (static, Coulomb and viscous have been modelled, and many phenomena that are usually neglected are taken into account, e.g., the static term of friction, the leakage between the two chambers and external space. Proportional Differential (PD and Fuzzy Logic Controllers (FLC have been applied in order to make a comparison by means of simulation. Simulation is performed using Matlab/Simulink, and some of the results are compared graphically. FLC is tuned in a such way that it produces a constant control signal close to its maximum (or minimum, where possible. In the case of PD control the occurrence of peaks cannot be avoided. These peaks produce a very high velocity that oversteps the allowed values.

  4. Bayesian Model Averaging of Artificial Intelligence Models for Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiri, A.; Chitsazan, N.; Tsai, F. T.; Asghari Moghaddam, A.

    2012-12-01

    This research presents a Bayesian artificial intelligence model averaging (BAIMA) method that incorporates multiple artificial intelligence (AI) models to estimate hydraulic conductivity and evaluate estimation uncertainties. Uncertainty in the AI model outputs stems from error in model input as well as non-uniqueness in selecting different AI methods. Using one single AI model tends to bias the estimation and underestimate uncertainty. BAIMA employs Bayesian model averaging (BMA) technique to address the issue of using one single AI model for estimation. BAIMA estimates hydraulic conductivity by averaging the outputs of AI models according to their model weights. In this study, the model weights were determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC) that follows the parsimony principle. BAIMA calculates the within-model variances to account for uncertainty propagation from input data to AI model output. Between-model variances are evaluated to account for uncertainty due to model non-uniqueness. We employed Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy logic (TS-FL), artificial neural network (ANN) and neurofuzzy (NF) to estimate hydraulic conductivity for the Tasuj plain aquifer, Iran. BAIMA combined three AI models and produced better fitting than individual models. While NF was expected to be the best AI model owing to its utilization of both TS-FL and ANN models, the NF model is nearly discarded by the parsimony principle. The TS-FL model and the ANN model showed equal importance although their hydraulic conductivity estimates were quite different. This resulted in significant between-model variances that are normally ignored by using one AI model.

  5. Model-based remote handling with the MAESTRO hydraulic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravez, Philippe; Leroux, C.; Irving, M.; Galbiati, L.; Raneda, A.; Siuko, M.; Maisonnier, D.; Palmer, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    A powerful hydraulic manipulator may be a useful tool to deal efficiently with the remote handling, dexterous operations required during the Divertor maintenance. Its main advantages are a good weight capacity, the large range of tasks that can be addressed and its capability to recover from unforeseen situations. On the other hand, it implies intensive video monitoring and the use of hydraulics technology that is not currently suited to nuclear environments. This paper describes the developments and experiments performed in conjunction with CEA/LIST, IHA and ENEA in the frame of task T329-5 to enhance the benefits of computer-assisted hydraulic remote operation, while minimising its shortcomings

  6. Implicit level set algorithms for modelling hydraulic fracture propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, A

    2016-10-13

    Hydraulic fractures are tensile cracks that propagate in pre-stressed solid media due to the injection of a viscous fluid. Developing numerical schemes to model the propagation of these fractures is particularly challenging due to the degenerate, hypersingular nature of the coupled integro-partial differential equations. These equations typically involve a singular free boundary whose velocity can only be determined by evaluating a distinguished limit. This review paper describes a class of numerical schemes that have been developed to use the multiscale asymptotic behaviour typically encountered near the fracture boundary as multiple physical processes compete to determine the evolution of the fracture. The fundamental concepts of locating the free boundary using the tip asymptotics and imposing the tip asymptotic behaviour in a weak form are illustrated in two quite different formulations of the governing equations. These formulations are the displacement discontinuity boundary integral method and the extended finite-element method. Practical issues are also discussed, including new models for proppant transport able to capture 'tip screen-out'; efficient numerical schemes to solve the coupled nonlinear equations; and fast methods to solve resulting linear systems. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the performance of the numerical schemes. We conclude the paper with open questions for further research. This article is part of the themed issue 'Energy and the subsurface'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  7. Soil Systems for Upscaling Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity (Ksat) for Hydrological Modeling in the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful hydrological model predictions depend on appropriate framing of scale and the spatial-temporal accuracy of input parameters describing soil hydraulic properties. Saturated soil hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is one of the most important properties influencing water movement through soil un...

  8. Leakage detection algorithm integrating water distribution networks hydraulic model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adedeji, K

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available and estimation is vital for effective water service. For effective detection of background leakages, a hydraulic analysis of flow characteristics in water piping networks is indispensable for appraising such type of leakage. A leakage detection algorithm...

  9. A comparison study of one-and two-dimensional hydraulic models for river environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Computer models are used every day to analyze river systems for a wide variety of reasons vital to : the public interest. For decades most hydraulic engineers have been limited to models that simplify the fluid : mechanics to the unidirectional case....

  10. Numerical model of massive hydraulic fracture. Final report. [SYMFRAC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, I.D.; Craig, H.R.; Luiskutty, C.T.

    1985-03-01

    This project has involved development of a hydraulic fracture simulator which calculates fracture height as a function of distance from the wellbore in a situation in which a payzone is bounded by two zones in which the minimum in-situ stress is higher (the fracture is vertical). The fracture must be highly elongated (length/height ratio approximately greater than 4) and variations in elastic modulus across zones are ignored. First, we describe the leakoff and spurt loss calculations employed in the modeling. Second, we discuss a revised version of the vertically symmetric simulator (bounding zone stresses equal). The addition of non-Newtonian flow and leakoff (including spurt loss) is described in detail. An illustrative result is given. Third, we describe in detail the vertically asymmetric simulator (bounding zone stresses not equal). To illustrate the last results, we present design calculations for a 30,000 gallon fracture, which was the first stimulation in the Multi-Well Experiment. The 80 ft fracture interval in the Paludal zone has at its upper edge a 520 psi stress contrast, and at its lower edge a 1195 psi contrast. Computed fracture height growth above and below the perforated interval, bottomhole pressure, and width profiles in vertical sections are displayed. Comparison is made with diagnostic measurements of fracture length, height, and bottomhole pressure. The appropriate computer codes are included in this report. 21 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.

  11. Pen Branch Delta and Savannah River Swamp Hydraulic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, K.F.

    1999-01-01

    The proposed Savannah River Site (SRS) Wetlands Restoration Project area is located in Barnwell County, South Carolina on the southwestern boundary of the SRS Reservation. The swamp covers about 40.5 km2 and is bounded to the west and south by the Savannah River and to the north and east by low bluffs at the edge of the Savannah River floodplain. Water levels within the swamp are determined by stage along the Savannah River, local drainage, groundwater seepage, and inflows from four tributaries, Beaver Dam Creek, Fourmile Branch, Pen Branch, and Steel Creek. Historic discharges of heated process water into these tributaries scoured the streambed, created deltas in the adjacent wetland, and killed native vegetation in the vicinity of the delta deposits. Future releases from these tributaries will be substantially smaller and closer to ambient temperatures. One component of the proposed restoration project will be to reestablish indigenous wetland vegetation on the Pen Branch delta that covers about 1.0 km2. Long-term predictions of water levels within the swamp are required to determine the characteristics of suitable plants. The objective of the study was to predict water levels at various locations within the proposed SRS Wetlands Restoration Project area for a range of Savannah River flows and regulated releases from Pen Branch. TABS-MD, a United States Army Corps of Engineer developed two-dimensional finite element open channel hydraulic computer code, was used to model the SRS swamp area for various flow conditions

  12. Stochastic Modelling of the Hydraulic Anisotropy of Ash Impoundment Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slávik, Ivan

    2017-12-01

    In the case reported here the impoundments of a 400 MW coal heated power plant with an annual production of about 1.5 million tons of fuel ash are of the cross-valley type, operated by the simple and cheap „upstream method”. The aim of the research was to determine overall and local values of the permeability in horizontal as well as in vertical direction and the anisotropy of the thin-layered sedimented ash. The coal ashes are hydraulically transported through pipelines in form of a slurry and periodically floated on the beach of the impoundment. The ashes are deposited in the form of a thin-layered sediment, with random alternation of layers with a coarser or finer granularity. The ash impoundment sediment is anthropogenic sediment with horizontally laminated texture. Therefore, the sediment is anisotropic from the viewpoint of water seepage. The knowledge of the permeability and the seepage anisotropy of the sediment is a basic requirement for the design of an appropriate dewatering system. The seepage anisotropy of the ash sediment has been checked by means of stochastic modelling, based on the correlation between the effective grain diameter and the coefficient of permeability of the ash: the effective grain diameter and the thickness of individual layers have been proposed to be random events.

  13. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved.

  14. Evaluation of Fish Passage at Whitewater Parks Using 2D and 3D Hydraulic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, T.; Nelson, P. A.; Kondratieff, M.; Bledsoe, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    In-stream whitewater parks (WWPs) are increasingly popular recreational amenities that typically create waves by constricting flow through a chute to increase velocities and form a hydraulic jump. However, the hydraulic conditions these structures create can limit longitudinal habitat connectivity and potentially inhibit upstream fish migration, especially of native fishes. An improved understanding of the fundamental hydraulic processes and potential environmental effects of whitewater parks is needed to inform management decisions about Recreational In-Channel Diversions (RICDs). Here, we use hydraulic models to compute a continuous and spatially explicit description of velocity and depth along potential fish swimming paths in the flow field, and the ensemble of potential paths are compared to fish swimming performance data to predict fish passage via logistic regression analysis. While 3d models have been shown to accurately predict trout movement through WWP structures, 2d methods can provide a more cost-effective and manager-friendly approach to assessing the effects of similar hydraulic structures on fish passage when 3d analysis in not feasible. Here, we use 2d models to examine the hydraulics in several WWP structures on the North Fork of the St. Vrain River at Lyons, Colorado, and we compare these model results to fish passage predictions from a 3d model. Our analysis establishes a foundation for a practical, transferable and physically-rigorous 2d modeling approach for mechanistically evaluating the effects of hydraulic structures on fish passage.

  15. Using SCADA Data, Field Studies, and Real-Time Modeling to Calibrate Flint's Hydraulic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has been providing technical assistance to the City of Flint and the State of Michigan in response to the drinking water lead contamination incident. Responders quickly recognized the need for a water distribution system hydraulic model to provide insight on flow patterns an...

  16. Hydraulic fracturing model based on the discrete fracture model and the generalized J integral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Liu, Z. F.; Wang, X. H.; Zeng, B.

    2016-08-01

    The hydraulic fracturing technique is an effective stimulation for low permeability reservoirs. In fracturing models, one key point is to accurately calculate the flux across the fracture surface and the stress intensity factor. To achieve high precision, the discrete fracture model is recommended to calculate the flux. Using the generalized J integral, the present work obtains an accurate simulation of the stress intensity factor. Based on the above factors, an alternative hydraulic fracturing model is presented. Examples are included to demonstrate the reliability of the proposed model and its ability to model the fracture propagation. Subsequently, the model is used to describe the relationship between the geometry of the fracture and the fracturing equipment parameters. The numerical results indicate that the working pressure and the pump power will significantly influence the fracturing process.

  17. Transient thermal hydraulic modeling and analysis of ITER divertor plate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Morshedy, Salah El-Din; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed/updated to simulate the steady state and transient thermal-hydraulics of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor module. The model predicts the thermal response of the armour coating, divertor plate structural materials and coolant channels. The selected heat transfer correlations cover all operating conditions of ITER under both normal and off-normal situations. The model also accounts for the melting, vaporization, and solidification of the armour material. The developed model is to provide a quick benchmark of the HEIGHTS multidimensional comprehensive simulation package. The present model divides the coolant channels into a specified axial regions and the divertor plate into a specified radial zones, then a two-dimensional heat conduction calculation is created to predict the temperature distribution for both steady and transient states. The model is benchmarked against experimental data performed at Sandia National Laboratory for both bare and swirl tape coolant channel mockups. The results show very good agreements with the data for steady and transient states. The model is then used to predict the thermal behavior of the ITER plasma facing and structural materials due to plasma instability event where 60 MJ/m 2 plasma energy is deposited over 500 ms. The results for ITER divertor response is analyzed and compared with HEIGHTS results.

  18. Transient thermal hydraulic modeling and analysis of ITER divertor plate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Morshedy, Salah El-Din [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: selmorshedy@etrr2-aea.org.eg; Hassanein, Ahmed [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)], E-mail: hassanein@purdue.edu

    2009-12-15

    A mathematical model has been developed/updated to simulate the steady state and transient thermal-hydraulics of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor module. The model predicts the thermal response of the armour coating, divertor plate structural materials and coolant channels. The selected heat transfer correlations cover all operating conditions of ITER under both normal and off-normal situations. The model also accounts for the melting, vaporization, and solidification of the armour material. The developed model is to provide a quick benchmark of the HEIGHTS multidimensional comprehensive simulation package. The present model divides the coolant channels into a specified axial regions and the divertor plate into a specified radial zones, then a two-dimensional heat conduction calculation is created to predict the temperature distribution for both steady and transient states. The model is benchmarked against experimental data performed at Sandia National Laboratory for both bare and swirl tape coolant channel mockups. The results show very good agreements with the data for steady and transient states. The model is then used to predict the thermal behavior of the ITER plasma facing and structural materials due to plasma instability event where 60 MJ/m{sup 2} plasma energy is deposited over 500 ms. The results for ITER divertor response is analyzed and compared with HEIGHTS results.

  19. Recent Developments in Multiscale and Multiphase Modelling of the Hydraulic Fracturing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently hydraulic fracturing of rocks has received much attention not only for its economic importance but also for its potential environmental impact. The hydraulically fracturing technique has been widely used in the oil (EOR and gas (EGR industries, especially in the USA, to extract more oil/gas through the deep rock formations. Also there have been increasing interests in utilising the hydraulic fracturing technique in geological storage of CO2 in recent years. In all cases, the design and implementation of the hydraulic fracturing process play a central role, highlighting the significance of research and development of this technique. However, the uncertainty behind the fracking mechanism has triggered public debates regarding the possible effect of this technique on human health and the environment. This has presented new challenges in the study of the hydraulic fracturing process. This paper describes the hydraulic fracturing mechanism and provides an overview of past and recent developments of the research performed towards better understandings of the hydraulic fracturing and its potential impacts, with particular emphasis on the development of modelling techniques and their implementation on the hydraulic fracturing.

  20. Hydraulic modeling test of intake pump in Ulchin nuclear power plant 5 and 6 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lee, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    In the intake structure of a nuclear power plant, undesirable pump operating characteristics such as vortices and non-uniform pump-approach flow around the pump bells take place frequently due to poorly-arranged intake geometry. Therefore, prior to the construction of intake structure or internal auxiliary facilities, hydraulic modeling test should be performed to predict the undesirable hydraulic phenomenon. In this study, a 1:10-scale, geometrically undistorted physical model was employed to investigate the hydraulic behavior and flow control devices were proposed to assure stable suction condition of pumps in the intake structure of Ulchin nuclear power plant 5,6 Units

  1. Thermal hydraulics-II. 2. Benchmarking of the TRIO Two-Phase-Flow Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, Donald; Kumbaro, Anela; Hassan, Yassin

    2001-01-01

    The Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) is currently developing a two-phase-flow module for the Trio-U CFD computer program. Work in the area of advanced numerical technique application to two-phase flow is being carried out by the SYSCO division at the CEA Saclay center. Recently, this division implemented several advanced numerical solvers, including approximate Riemann solvers and flux vector splitting schemes. As a test of these new advances, several benchmark tests were executed. This paper describes the pertinent results of this study. The first benchmark problem was the Ransom faucet problem. This problem consists of a vertical column of water acting under the gravity force. The appeal of this problem is that it tests the program's handling of the body force term and it has an analytical solution. The Trio results [based on a two-fluid, two-dimensional (2-D) simulation] for this problem were very encouraging. The two-phase-flow module was able to reproduce the analytical velocity and void fraction profiles. A reasonable amount of numerical diffusion was observed, and the numerical solution converged to the analytical solution as the grid size was refined, as shown in Fig. 1. A second series of benchmark problems is concerned with the employment of a drag force term. In a first approach, we test the capability of the code to take account of this source term, using a flux scheme solution technique. For this test, a rectangular duct was utilized. As shown in Fig. 2, mesh refinement results in an approach to the analytical solution. Next, a convergent/divergent nozzle problem is proposed. The nozzle is characterized by a brief contraction section and a long expansion section. A two-phase, 2-D, non-condensing model is used in conjunction with the Rieman solver. Figure 3 shows a comparison of the pressure profile for the experimental case and for the values calculated by the TRIO U two-phase-flow module. Trio was able to handle the drag force term and

  2. A methodology for the parametric modelling of the flow coefficients and flow rate in hydraulic valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdés, José R.; Rodríguez, José M.; Saumell, Javier; Pütz, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a methodology for the parametric modelling of flow in hydraulic valves. • We characterize the flow coefficients with a generic function with two parameters. • The parameters are derived from CFD simulations of the generic geometry. • We apply the methodology to two cases from the automotive brake industry. • We validate by comparing with CFD results varying the original dimensions. - Abstract: The main objective of this work is to develop a methodology for the parametric modelling of the flow rate in hydraulic valve systems. This methodology is based on the derivation, from CFD simulations, of the flow coefficient of the critical restrictions as a function of the Reynolds number, using a generalized square root function with two parameters. The methodology is then demonstrated by applying it to two completely different hydraulic systems: a brake master cylinder and an ABS valve. This type of parametric valve models facilitates their implementation in dynamic simulation models of complex hydraulic systems

  3. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned toward conditions usually encountered in the Marce...

  4. HYDRAULIC POWER TRANSFER SYSTEMS. AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY--SERVICE OCCUPATIONS, MODULE NUMBER 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ONE OF A SERIES DESIGNED TO HELP TEACHERS PREPARE POSTSECONDARY-LEVEL STUDENTS FOR THE AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY SERVICE OCCUPATIONS AS PARTS MEN, MECHANICS, MECHANIC'S HELPERS, AND SERVICE SUPERVISORS, THIS GUIDE AIMS TO DEVELOP STUDENT COMPETENCY IN UNDERSTANDING BASIC HYDRAULICS AND ITS APPLICATION TO AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY A…

  5. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of the Nyl River floodplain Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-01-01

    Jan 1, 2007 ... and savannah vegetation. Average monthly evaporation rates were used in the hydraulic study. These were obtained using actual evaporation measurements by Blight. (2002b) on the floodplain and application of the energy balance method. Measurements were taken over seven isolated days between ...

  6. Hydraulic modelling of drinking water treatment plant operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, G.I.M.; Mesman, G.A.M.; Van Schagen, K.M.; Borger, K.J.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2009-01-01

    The flow through a unit of a drinking water treatment plant is one of the most important parameters in terms of a unit's effectiveness. In the present paper, a new EPAnet library is presented with the typical hydraulic elements for drinking water treatment processes well abstraction, rapid sand

  7. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of the Nyl River floodplain Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nyl River floodplain is a seasonal wetland of great conservation importance in Limpopo Province, South Africa. Water resource developments in the upstream catchments are changing the quantity and timing of water delivery to the floodplain, and this is expected to have an ecological impact. Hydrological and hydraulic ...

  8. Application of the Ecohydraulic Model on Hydraulic and Water Resources Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Ecohydraulics includes the role of physical processes such as hydraulics, sediment transport, and geomorphology in ecological systems. In recent decades, a number of numerical models were developed for simulating hydraulic, hydromorphological, and ecological processes. There are very few model systems existing which could simulta-neously simulate hydromorphodynamic processes, habitat quality distributions, and population status. Therefore, this research work aims to develop an ecohydraulic mo...

  9. Coupled 3D neutronics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the SAFARI-1 MTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Adam; Avramova, Maria; Ivanov, Kostadin; Prinsloo, Rian; Botes, Danniëll; Elsakhawy, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of 3D coupled neutronics/thermal–hydraulic model of SAFARI-1. • Verification of 3D steady-state NEM based neutronics model for SAFARI-1. • Verification of 3D COBRA-TF based thermal–hydraulic model of SAFARI-1. • Quantification of the effect of correct modeling of thermal–hydraulic feedback. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to develop a coupled accurate multi-physics model of the SAFARI-1 Material Testing Reactor (MTR), a facility that is used for both research and the production of medical isotopes. The model was developed as part of the SAFARI-1 benchmarking project as a cooperative effort between the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa). It was created using a multi-physics coupling of state of the art nuclear reactor simulation tools, consisting of a neutronics code and a thermal hydraulics code. The neutronics tool used was the PSU code NEM, and the results from this component were verified using the Necsa neutronics code OSCAR-4, which is utilized for SAFARI-1 core design and fuel management. On average, the multiplication factors of the neutronics models agreed to within 5 pcm and the radial assembly-averaged powers agreed to within 0.2%. The thermal hydraulics tool used was the PSU version of COBRA-TF (CTF) sub-channel code, and the results of this component were verified against another thermal hydraulics code, the RELAP5-3D system code, used at Necsa for thermal–hydraulics analysis of SAFARI-1. Although only assembly-averaged results from RELAP5-3D were available, they fell within the range of values for the corresponding assemblies in the comprehensive CTF solution. This comparison allows for the first time to perform a quantification of steady-state errors for a low-powered MTR with an advanced thermal–hydraulic code such as CTF on a per-channel basis as compared to simpler and coarser-mesh RELAP5-3D modeling. Additionally, a new cross section

  10. EFFECTIVE APPLICATIO N OF LIDAR DATA IN T WO - DIMENSIONAL HYDRAULIC MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakuła Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents aspects of ALS data usage in two - dimensional hydraulic modelling including generation of high - precision digital terrain models, t heir effective processing which is a compromise between the resolution and the accuracy of the processed data, as well as information about the roughness of the land cover providing information that could compete with information from topographic databases and orthophotomaps. Still evolving ALS technology makes it possible to collect the data with constantly increasing spatial resolution that guarantees correct representation of the terrain shape and height. It also provides a reliable description of the la nd cover. However, the size of generated files may cause roblems in their effective usage in the 2D hydraulic modeling where Saint - Venant’s equations are implemented. High - resolution elevation models make it impossible or prolong the duration of the calcu lations for large areas in complex algorithms defining a model of the water movement, which is directly related to the cost of the hydraulic analysis. As far as an effective usage of voluminous datasets is concerned, the data reduction is recommended. Suc h a process should reduce the size of the data files, maintain their accuracy and keep the appropriate structure to allow their further application in the hydraulic modelling. An application of only a few percent of unprocessed datasets, selected with the use of specified filtering algorithms and spatial analysis tools, can give the same result of the hydraulic modeling obtained in a significantly shorter time than the result of the comparable operation on unprocessed datasets. Such an approach, however, is not commonly used, which means the most reliable hydraulic models are applied only in small areas in the largest cities. Another application of ALS data is its potential usage in digital roughness model creation for 2D hydraulic models. There are many po ssibilities of roughness

  11. Insight into the hydraulics and resilience of Ponderosa pine seedlings using a mechanistic ecohydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneta, M. P.; Simeone, C.; Dobrowski, S.; Holden, Z.; Sapes, G.; Sala, A.; Begueria, S.

    2017-12-01

    In semiarid regions, drought-induced seedling mortality is considered to be caused by failure in the tree hydraulic column. Understanding the mechanisms that cause hydraulic failure and death in seedlings is important, among other things, to diagnose where some tree species may fail to regenerate, triggering demographic imbalances in the forest that could result in climate-driven shifts of tree species. Ponderosa pine is a common lower tree line species in the western US. Seedlings of ponderosa pine are often subject to low soil water potentials, which require lower water potentials in the xylem and leaves to maintain the negative pressure gradient that drives water upward. The resilience of the hydraulic column to hydraulic tension is species dependent, but from greenhouse experiments, we have identified general tension thresholds beyond which loss of xylem conductivity becomes critical, and mortality in Ponderosa pine seedlings start to occur. We describe this hydraulic behavior of plants using a mechanistic soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model. Before we use this models to understand water-stress induced seedling mortality at the landscape scale, we perform a modeling analysis of the dynamics of soil moisture, transpiration, leaf water potential and loss of plant water conductivity using detailed data from our green house experiments. The analysis is done using a spatially distributed model that simulates water fluxes, energy exchanges and water potentials in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. Plant hydraulic and physiological parameters of this model were calibrated using Monte Carlo methods against information on soil moisture, soil hydraulic potential, transpiration, leaf water potential and percent loss of conductivity in the xylem. This analysis permits us to construct a full portrait of the parameter space for Ponderosa pine seedling and generate posterior predictive distributions of tree response to understand the sensitivity of transpiration

  12. Numerical simulation of the two-phase flows in a hydraulic coupling by solving VOF model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; Zuo, Z G; Liu, S H; Fan, H G; Zhuge, W L

    2013-01-01

    The flow in a partially filled hydraulic coupling is essentially a gas-liquid two-phase flow, in which the distribution of two phases has significant influence on its characteristics. The interfaces between the air and the liquid, and the circulating flows inside the hydraulic coupling can be simulated by solving the VOF two-phase model. In this paper, PISO algorithm and RNG k–ε turbulence model were employed to simulate the phase distribution and the flow field in a hydraulic coupling with 80% liquid fill. The results indicate that the flow forms a circulating movement on the torus section with decreasing speed ratio. In the pump impeller, the air phase mostly accumulates on the suction side of the blades, while liquid on the pressure side; in turbine runner, air locates in the middle of the flow passage. Flow separations appear near the blades and the enclosing boundaries of the hydraulic coupling

  13. Control method and system for hydraulic machines employing a dynamic joint motion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, George [Reno, NV

    2011-11-22

    A control method and system for controlling a hydraulically actuated mechanical arm to perform a task, the mechanical arm optionally being a hydraulically actuated excavator arm. The method can include determining a dynamic model of the motion of the hydraulic arm for each hydraulic arm link by relating the input signal vector for each respective link to the output signal vector for the same link. Also the method can include determining an error signal for each link as the weighted sum of the differences between a measured position and a reference position and between the time derivatives of the measured position and the time derivatives of the reference position for each respective link. The weights used in the determination of the error signal can be determined from the constant coefficients of the dynamic model. The error signal can be applied in a closed negative feedback control loop to diminish or eliminate the error signal for each respective link.

  14. Pressure Transient Model of Water-Hydraulic Pipelines with Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Jiang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient pressure investigation of water-hydraulic pipelines is a challenge in the fluid transmission field, since the flow continuity equation and momentum equation are partial differential, and the vaporous cavitation has high dynamics; the frictional force caused by fluid viscosity is especially uncertain. In this study, due to the different transient pressure dynamics in upstream and downstream pipelines, the finite difference method (FDM is adopted to handle pressure transients with and without cavitation, as well as steady friction and frequency-dependent unsteady friction. Different from the traditional method of characteristics (MOC, the FDM is advantageous in terms of the simple and convenient computation. Furthermore, the mechanism of cavitation growth and collapse are captured both upstream and downstream of the water-hydraulic pipeline, i.e., the cavitation start time, the end time, the duration, the maximum volume, and the corresponding time points. By referring to the experimental results of two previous works, the comparative simulation results of two computation methods are verified in experimental water-hydraulic pipelines, which indicates that the finite difference method shows better data consistency than the MOC.

  15. Analytical modeling of core hydraulics and flow management in breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Willis, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model representing the hydraulic behavior of the primary system of fast breeder nuclear reactors is discussed. A computer code capable of detailing the core flow distribution and characterizing the flow and pressure drop in each reactor component is presented. Application of this method to the reactor core thermal-hydraulic design has allowed optimization of the flow management with consequent upgrading in performance, reduction of unnecessary conservatism and very substantial cost savings. Typical quantitative examples are presented

  16. Modeling and control of a hybrid wind-tidal turbine with hydraulic accumulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, YaJun; Mu, AnLe; Ma, Tao

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling and control of a hybrid wind-tidal turbine with hydraulic accumulator. The hybrid turbine captures the offshore wind energy and tidal current energy simultaneously and stores the excess energy in hydraulic accumulator prior to electricity generation. Two hydraulic pumps installed respectively in wind and tidal turbine nacelles are used to transform the captured mechanical energy into hydraulic energy. To extract the maximal power from wind and tidal current, standard torque controls are achieved by regulating the displacements of the hydraulic pumps. To meet the output power demand, a Proportion Integration Differentiation (PID) controller is designed to distribute the hydraulic energy between the accumulator and the Pelton turbine. A simulation case study based on combining a 5 MW offshore wind turbine and a 1 MW tidal current turbine is undertaken. Case study demonstrates that the hybrid generation system not only captures all the available wind and tidal energy and also delivers the desired generator power precisely through the accumulator damping out all the power fluctuations from the wind and tidal speed disturbances. Energy and exergy analyses show that the energy efficiency can exceed 100% as the small input speeds are considered, and the exergy efficiency has the consistent change trends with demand power. Further more parametric sensitivity study on hydraulic accumulator shows that there is an inversely proportional relationship between accumulator and hydraulic equipments including the pump and nozzle in terms of dimensions. - Highlights: • A hybrid wind-tidal turbine is presented. • Hydraulic accumulator stores/releases the surplus energy. • Standard torque controls extract the maximal power from wind and tidal. • Generator outputs meet the electricity demand precisely. • Parametric sensitivity study on accumulator is implemented.

  17. Model-based nonlinear control of hydraulic servo systems: Challenges, developments and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianyong

    2017-11-01

    Hydraulic servo system plays a significant role in industries, and usually acts as a core point in control and power transmission. Although linear theory-based control methods have been well established, advanced controller design methods for hydraulic servo system to achieve high performance is still an unending pursuit along with the development of modern industry. Essential nonlinearity is a unique feature and makes model-based nonlinear control more attractive, due to benefit from prior knowledge of the servo valve controlled hydraulic system. In this paper, a discussion for challenges in model-based nonlinear control, latest developments and brief perspectives of hydraulic servo systems are presented: Modelling uncertainty in hydraulic system is a major challenge, which includes parametric uncertainty and time-varying disturbance; some specific requirements also arise ad hoc difficulties such as nonlinear friction during low velocity tracking, severe disturbance, periodic disturbance, etc.; to handle various challenges, nonlinear solutions including parameter adaptation, nonlinear robust control, state and disturbance observation, backstepping design and so on, are proposed and integrated, theoretical analysis and lots of applications reveal their powerful capability to solve pertinent problems; and at the end, some perspectives and associated research topics (measurement noise, constraints, inner valve dynamics, input nonlinearity, etc.) in nonlinear hydraulic servo control are briefly explored and discussed.

  18. Capacity of textile filters for wastewater Treatment at changeable wastewater level – a hydraulic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Spychała

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to describe in a mathematical manner the hydraulic capacity of textile filters for wastewater treatment at changeable wastewater levels during a period between consecutive doses, taking into consideration the decisive factors for flow-conditions of filtering media. Highly changeable and slightly changeable flow-conditions tests were performed on reactors equipped with non-woven geo-textile filters. Hydraulic conductivity of filter material coupons was determined. The dry mass covering the surface and contained in internal space of filtering material was then indicated and a mathematical model was elaborated. Flow characteristics during the highly changeable flow-condition test were sensitivity to differentiated values of hydraulic conductivity in horizontal zones of filtering layer. During the slightly changeable flow-conditions experiment the differences in permeability and hydraulic conductivity of different filter (horizontal zones height regions were much smaller. The proposed modelling approach in spite of its simplicity provides a satisfactory agreement with empirical data and therefore enables to simulate the hydraulic capacity of vertically oriented textile filters. The mathematical model reflects the significant impact of the filter characteristics (textile permeability at different filter height and operational conditions (dosing frequency on the textile filters hydraulic capacity.

  19. Modeling, Optimization, and Detailed Design of a Hydraulic Flywheel-Accumulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmaier, Kyle Glenn

    Improving mobile energy storage technology is an important means of addressing concerns over fossil fuel scarcity and energy independence. Traditional hydraulic accumulator energy storage, though favorable in power density, durability, cost, and environmental impact, suffers from relatively low energy density and a pressure-dependent state of charge. The hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept utilizes both the hydro-pneumatic and rotating kinetic energy domains by employing a rotating pressure vessel. This thesis provides an in-depth analysis of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator concept and an assessment of the advantages it offers over traditional static accumulator energy storage. After specifying a practical architecture for the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator, this thesis addresses the complex fluid phenomena and control implications associated with multi-domain energy storage. To facilitate rapid selection of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator dimensions, computationally inexpensive material stress models are developed for each component. A drive cycle simulation strategy is also developed to assess the dynamic performance of the device. The stress models and performance simulation are combined to form a toolset that facilitates computationally-efficient model-based design. The aforementioned toolset has been embedded into a multi-objective optimization algorithm that aims to minimize the mass of the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator system and to minimize the losses it incurs over the course of a drive cycle. Two optimizations have been performed - one with constraints that reflect a vehicle-scale application, and one with constraints that reflect a laboratory application. At both scales, the optimization results suggest that the hydraulic flywheel-accumulator offers at least an order of magnitude improvement over traditional static accumulator energy storage, while operating at efficiencies between 75% and 93%. A particular hydraulic flywheel-accumulator design

  20. Evaluation of Regression and Neuro_Fuzzy Models in Estimating Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Behmanesh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Study of soil hydraulic properties such as saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is required in the environmental investigations. Despite numerous research, measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity using by direct methods are still costly, time consuming and professional. Therefore estimating saturated hydraulic conductivity using rapid and low cost methods such as pedo-transfer functions with acceptable accuracy was developed. The purpose of this research was to compare and evaluate 11 pedo-transfer functions and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS to estimate saturated hydraulic conductivity of soil. In this direct, saturated hydraulic conductivity and physical properties in 40 points of Urmia were calculated. The soil excavated was used in the lab to determine its easily accessible parameters. The results showed that among existing models, Aimrun et al model had the best estimation for soil saturated hydraulic conductivity. For mentioned model, the Root Mean Square Error and Mean Absolute Error parameters were 0.174 and 0.028 m/day respectively. The results of the present research, emphasises the importance of effective porosity application as an important accessible parameter in accuracy of pedo-transfer functions. sand and silt percent, bulk density and soil particle density were selected to apply in 561 ANFIS models. In training phase of best ANFIS model, the R2 and RMSE were calculated 1 and 1.2×10-7 respectively. These amounts in the test phase were 0.98 and 0.0006 respectively. Comparison of regression and ANFIS models showed that the ANFIS model had better results than regression functions. Also Nuro-Fuzzy Inference System had capability to estimatae with high accuracy in various soil textures.

  1. Simulation of Hydraulic and Natural Fracture Interaction Using a Coupled DFN-DEM Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J.; Huang, H.; Deo, M.

    2016-03-01

    The presence of natural fractures will usually result in a complex fracture network due to the interactions between hydraulic and natural fracture. The reactivation of natural fractures can generally provide additional flow paths from formation to wellbore which play a crucial role in improving the hydrocarbon recovery in these ultra-low permeability reservoir. Thus, accurate description of the geometry of discrete fractures and bedding is highly desired for accurate flow and production predictions. Compared to conventional continuum models that implicitly represent the discrete feature, Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models could realistically model the connectivity of discontinuities at both reservoir scale and well scale. In this work, a new hybrid numerical model that couples Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) and Dual-Lattice Discrete Element Method (DL-DEM) is proposed to investigate the interaction between hydraulic fracture and natural fractures. Based on the proposed model, the effects of natural fracture orientation, density and injection properties on hydraulic-natural fractures interaction are investigated.

  2. Modelling of Moving Coil Actuators in Fast Switching Valves Suitable for Digital Hydraulic Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Christian; Roemer, Daniel Beck; Bech, Michael Møller

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of digital hydraulic machines is strongly dependent on the valve switching time. Recently, fast switching have been achieved by using a direct electromagnetic moving coil actuator as the force producing element in fast switching hydraulic valves suitable for digital hydraulic...... machines. Mathematical models of the valve switching, targeted for design optimisation of the moving coil actuator, are developed. A detailed analytical model is derived and presented and its accuracy is evaluated against transient electromagnetic finite element simulations. The model includes...... an estimation of the eddy currents generated in the actuator yoke upon current rise, as they may have significant influence on the coil current response. The analytical model facilitates fast simulation of the transient actuator response opposed to the transient electro-magnetic finite element model which...

  3. Pulse-modulated control of switching valves for an electro-hydraulic servo actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tersteegen, Johannes

    1992-02-01

    The consequent step in using digital technology in servohydraulics leads to the use of fast switching electrohydraulic control valves. By changing the pulse duty ratio between opening and closing (pulse width modulation) a quasi-continuous control of the fluid flow can be achieved. The essential design criteria of a valve controlled actuator including the pulse modulated closed loop position control are described. Those computer programs which are dealt with in detail include the digital control circuit with its pulse modulated control as well as fault detection and fault elimination.

  4. Application of Fuzzy Clustering in Modeling of a Water Hydraulics System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Jianjun; Kroszynski, Uri

    2000-01-01

    This article presents a case study of applying fuzzy modeling techniques for a water hydraulics system. The obtained model is intended to provide a basis for model-based control of the system. Fuzzy clustering is used for classifying measured input-output data points into partitions. The fuzzy...

  5. Use of operational data for the validation of thermal hydraulic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoukas, L.; Martin, G.; Ho, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic models used to predict Primary Heat Transport (PHT) System behaviour have traditionally been applied with design conditions to predict transient responses of accident scenarios in safety analyses. Recently, the use of reactor operational data has been integral in the development of thermal hydraulic codes to improve the quality of the predictions. The basis of accurate thermal hydraulic predictions is the use of appropriate models with accurate input data. An operating reactor provides a wealth of information, therefore, the models can be validated against operating conditions specific to the field of application. Thus, agreement between prediction and plant data continue to improve due to constant update of the thermal hydraulic models and/or the input data. The ability to accurately predict thermal hydraulic responses with the code provides the analyst with a powerful tool in reactor performance monitoring. The primary objective of this paper is to describe the validation process of the Mini-SOPHT (Simulation Of Primary Heat Transport) Header to Header Model with the use of reactor operational data. The secondary objective is to illustrate the effectiveness of the code as a performance monitoring tool by discussing the discoveries that were made during the validation process. (author)

  6. Inverse modeling of hydraulic tests in fractured crystalline rock based on a transition probability geostatistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blessent, Daniela; Therrien, René; Lemieux, Jean-Michel

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents numerical simulations of a series of hydraulic interference tests conducted in crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto (Finland), a potential site for the disposal of the Finnish high-level nuclear waste. The tests are in a block of crystalline bedrock of about 0.03 km3 that contains low-transmissivity fractures. Fracture density, orientation, and fracture transmissivity are estimated from Posiva Flow Log (PFL) measurements in boreholes drilled in the rock block. On the basis of those data, a geostatistical approach relying on a transitional probability and Markov chain models is used to define a conceptual model based on stochastic fractured rock facies. Four facies are defined, from sparsely fractured bedrock to highly fractured bedrock. Using this conceptual model, three-dimensional groundwater flow is then simulated to reproduce interference pumping tests in either open or packed-off boreholes. Hydraulic conductivities of the fracture facies are estimated through automatic calibration using either hydraulic heads or both hydraulic heads and PFL flow rates as targets for calibration. The latter option produces a narrower confidence interval for the calibrated hydraulic conductivities, therefore reducing the associated uncertainty and demonstrating the usefulness of the measured PFL flow rates. Furthermore, the stochastic facies conceptual model is a suitable alternative to discrete fracture network models to simulate fluid flow in fractured geological media.

  7. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken

  8. Thermal-hydraulic modeling needs for passive reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J.M. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received an application for design certification from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for an Advanced Light Water Reactor design known as the AP600. As part of the design certification process, the USNRC uses its thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes to independently audit the vendor calculations. The focus of this effort has been the small break LOCA transients that rely upon the passive safety features of the design to depressurize the primary system sufficiently so that gravity driven injection can provide a stable source for long term cooling. Of course, large break LOCAs have also been considered, but as the involved phenomena do not appear to be appreciably different from those of current plants, they were not discussed in this paper. Although the SBLOCA scenario does not appear to threaten core coolability - indeed, heatup is not even expected to occur - there have been concerns as to the performance of the passive safety systems. For example, the passive systems drive flows with small heads, consequently requiring more precision in the analysis compared to active systems methods for passive plants as compared to current plants with active systems. For the analysis of SBLOCAs and operating transients, the USNRC uses the RELAP5 thermal-hydraulic system analysis code. To assure the applicability of RELAP5 to the analysis of these transients for the AP600 design, a four year long program of code development and assessment has been undertaken.

  9. Modeling the Risk of Commercial Failure for Hydraulic Fracturing Projects Due to Reservoir Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Parvizi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing technologies play a major role in the global energy supply and affect oil pricing. The current oil price fluctuations within 40 to 55 USD per barrel have caused diminished economical margins for hydraulic fracturing projects. Hence, successful decision making the for execution of hydraulic fracturing projects requires a higher level of integration of technical, commercial, and uncertainty analyses. However, the complexity of hydraulic fracturing modeling, and the sensitivity and the effects of uncertainty of reservoir heterogeneity on well performance renders the integration of such studies rather impractical. The impact of reservoir heterogeneity on hydraulic fracturing performance has been quantified by the introduction of Heterogeneity Impact Factor (HIF and formulas have been developed to forecast well performance using HIF. These advances provide a platform for introducing a practical approach for introducing the Risk of Commercial Failure (RCF due to reservoir heterogeneity in hydraulic fracturing projects. This paper defines such a parameter and the methodology to calculate it in a time-efficient manner. The proposed approach has been exercised on a real project in which a RCF of 20% is computed. The analysis also covers the sensitivity on Capital Expenditure (CAPEX, Operational Expenditure (OPEX, gas price, HIF and discount rate.

  10. Micromachined hydraulic astable multivibrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Tas, Niels Roelof; Berenschot, Johan W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a hydraulic astable multivibrator system. The system consists of hydraulic resistors, hydraulic capacitors and hydraulic pressure controlled valves. The system is designed, realised and tested. The measured system behaviour agrees well with the model simulations. The free running

  11. Variable hydraulic resistances and their impact on plant drought response modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baert, Annelies; De Schepper, Veerle; Steppe, Kathy

    2015-04-01

    Plant drought responses are still not fully understood. Improved knowledge on drought responses is, however, crucial to better predict their impact on individual plant and ecosystem functioning. Mechanistic models in combination with plant measurements are promising for obtaining information on plant water status and can assist us in understanding the effect of limiting soil water availability and drought stress. While existing models are reliable under sufficient soil water availability, they generally fail under dry conditions as not all appropriate mechanisms seem yet to have been implemented. We therefore aimed at identifying mechanisms underlying plant drought responses, and in particular investigated the behaviour of hydraulic resistances encountered in the soil and xylem for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.). A variable hydraulic soil-to-stem resistance was necessary to describe plant drought responses. In addition, implementation of a variable soil-to-stem hydraulic resistance enabled us to generate an in situ soil-to-stem vulnerability curve, which might be an alternative to the conventionally used vulnerability curves. Furthermore, a daily recalibration of the model revealed a drought-induced increase in radial hydraulic resistance between xylem and elastic living tissues. Accurate information on plant hydraulic resistances and simulation of plant drought responses can foster important discussions regarding the functioning of plants and ecosystems during droughts. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Validation of ISAAC Thermal Hydraulic Model against the RD-14M Experiment B9401

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, Hyung Tae; Park, Soo Yong; Kim, Sang Baik

    2009-09-01

    The thermal hydraulic behavior prior to core damage was compared with the experimental data to validate the ISAAC thermal hydraulic models. B9401 test at RD-14M facility was selected as a benchmark data set, which was open for the international standard problem (ISP). As ISAAC had hard-wired systems and models inside the code, new input parameters were prepared with the minimum model changes. Among 37 parameters measured from the experiment, pressures, flow rates, void fractions, and the fuel temperatures were compared. The simulation showed that the thermal hydraulic behavior estimated from ISAAC was similar to the experimental data or to the detailed code, even though ISAAC was developed mainly for the severe accident analysis. Based on these comparison analyses, it can be concluded that the thermal hydraulic conditions estimated from ISAAC can be used as the boundary conditions for further analysis causing severe core damage. In order to extend the data base for the thermal hydraulic behavior of ISAAC, more RD-14M tests as well as DBA sequences need to be simulated

  13. Hydraulic Performances of a Mixed-Flow Pump: Unsteady Inviscid Computations and Loss Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, B.P.M.; van Esch, B.P.M.; Kruyt, Nicolaas P.

    2001-01-01

    The hydraulic performance of an industrial mixed-flow pump is analyzed using a three-dimensional potential flow model to compute the unsteady flow through the entire pump configuration. Subsequently, several additional models that use the potential flow results are employed to assess the losses.

  14. Modeling hydraulic conductivity of a complex confining layer at various spatial scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bierkens, M.F.P.

    1996-01-01

    The spatial variation of the hydraulic conductivity of a complex confining layer in the Netherlands was modelled on four scales: sediment cores, numerical model blocks, and local and regional scales. Two stochastic methods were combined: conditional simulation of texture classes to obtain

  15. Survey of thermal-hydraulic models of commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determan, J.C.; Hendrix, C.E.

    1992-12-01

    A survey of the thermal-hydraulic models of nuclear power plants has been performed to identify the NRC's current analytical capabilities for critical event response. The survey also supports ongoing research for accident management. The results of the survey are presented here. The PC database which records detailed data on each model is described

  16. A coupled carbon and plant hydraulic model to predict ecosystem carbon and water flux responses to disturbance and environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Roberts, D. E.; McDowell, N. G.; Pendall, E.; Frank, J. M.; Reed, D. E.; Massman, W. J.; Mitra, B.

    2011-12-01

    Changing climate drivers including temperature, humidity, precipitation, and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations directly control land surface exchanges of CO2 and water. In a profound way these responses are modulated by disturbances that are driven by or exacerbated by climate change. Predicting these changes is challenging given that the feedbacks between environmental controls, disturbances, and fluxes are complex. Flux data in areas of bark beetle outbreaks in the western U.S.A. show differential declines in carbon and water flux in response to the occlusion of xylem by associated fungi. For example, bark beetle infestation at the GLEES AmeriFlux site manifested in a decline in summer water use efficiency to 60% in the year after peak infestation compared to previous years, and no recovery of carbon uptake following a period of high vapor pressure deficit. This points to complex feedbacks between disturbance and differential ecosystem reaction and relaxation responses. Theory based on plant hydraulics and extending to include links to carbon storage and exhaustion has potential for explaining these dynamics with simple, yet rigorous models. In this spirit we developed a coupled model that combines an existing model of canopy water and carbon flow, TREES [e.g., Loranty et al., 2010], with the Sperry et al., [1998] plant hydraulic model. The new model simultaneously solves carbon uptake and losses along with plant hydraulics, and allows for testing specific hypotheses on feedbacks between xylem dysfunction, stomatal and non-stomatal controls on photosynthesis and carbon allocation, and autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration. These are constrained through gas exchange, root vulnerability to cavitation, sap flux, and eddy covariance data in a novel model complexity-testing framework. Our analysis focuses on an ecosystem gradient spanning sagebrush to subalpine forests. Our modeling results support hypotheses on feedbacks between hydraulic dysfunction and 1) non

  17. Model and simulation of the hydraulic turbine speed regulator of the Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copparoni, G.; Etchepareborda, A.; Urrutia, G.

    1992-01-01

    The hydraulics turbines of Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant takes advantage of condenser cooling water level difference between the plant and the river to recover about 2,5 MW e. It also supplies emergency power until diesel generators start up. Speed regulation is needed due to the transients that during this process occur. The purpose is to minimize the diesels start up time, and to avoid overshoots on the internal grid frequency. The hydraulic turbine, its speed regulator and the electric system associated with this transient have been modeled. The models and some simulation results are presented in this work. (author)

  18. Thermal - hydraulic analysis of pressurizer water reactors using the model of open lateral boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, R.C.

    1980-10-01

    A computational method is developed for thermal-hydraulic analysis, where the channel may be analysed by more than one independent steps of calculation. This is made possible by the incorporation of the model of open lateral boundary in the code COBRA-IIIP, which permits the determination of the subchannel of an open lattice PWR core in a multi-step calculation. The thermal-hydraulic code COBRA-IIIP, developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is used as the basic model for this study. (Author) [pt

  19. A Stochastic model for two-station hydraulics exhibiting transient impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Judith L.; Madsen, Henrik; Harremoës, Poul

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to interpret data on water level variation in a river affected by overflow from a sewer system during rain. The simplest possible, hydraulic description is combined with stochastic methods for data analysis and model parameter estimation. This combination of determin......The objective of the paper is to interpret data on water level variation in a river affected by overflow from a sewer system during rain. The simplest possible, hydraulic description is combined with stochastic methods for data analysis and model parameter estimation. This combination...

  20. Hydraulic correction method (HCM) to enhance the efficiency of SRTM DEM in flood modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huili; Liang, Qiuhua; Liu, Yong; Xie, Shuguang

    2018-04-01

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) is one of the most important controlling factors determining the simulation accuracy of hydraulic models. However, the currently available global topographic data is confronted with limitations for application in 2-D hydraulic modeling, mainly due to the existence of vegetation bias, random errors and insufficient spatial resolution. A hydraulic correction method (HCM) for the SRTM DEM is proposed in this study to improve modeling accuracy. Firstly, we employ the global vegetation corrected DEM (i.e. Bare-Earth DEM), developed from the SRTM DEM to include both vegetation height and SRTM vegetation signal. Then, a newly released DEM, removing both vegetation bias and random errors (i.e. Multi-Error Removed DEM), is employed to overcome the limitation of height errors. Last, an approach to correct the Multi-Error Removed DEM is presented to account for the insufficiency of spatial resolution, ensuring flow connectivity of the river networks. The approach involves: (a) extracting river networks from the Multi-Error Removed DEM using an automated algorithm in ArcGIS; (b) correcting the location and layout of extracted streams with the aid of Google Earth platform and Remote Sensing imagery; and (c) removing the positive biases of the raised segment in the river networks based on bed slope to generate the hydraulically corrected DEM. The proposed HCM utilizes easily available data and tools to improve the flow connectivity of river networks without manual adjustment. To demonstrate the advantages of HCM, an extreme flood event in Huifa River Basin (China) is simulated on the original DEM, Bare-Earth DEM, Multi-Error removed DEM, and hydraulically corrected DEM using an integrated hydrologic-hydraulic model. A comparative analysis is subsequently performed to assess the simulation accuracy and performance of four different DEMs and favorable results have been obtained on the corrected DEM.

  1. A complete soil hydraulic model accounting for capillary and adsorptive water retention, capillary and film conductivity, and hysteresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakai, Masaru; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31481518X; Alazba, A. A.; Setiawan, Budi Indra; Minasny, Budiman

    2015-01-01

    A soil hydraulic model that considers capillary hysteretic and adsorptive water retention as well as capillary and film conductivity covering the complete soil moisture range is presented. The model was obtained by incorporating the capillary hysteresis model of Parker and Lenhard into the hydraulic

  2. Seismicity Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing in Shales: A Bedding Plane Slip Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staněk, František; Eisner, Leo

    2017-10-01

    Passive seismic monitoring of microseismic events induced in oil or gas reservoirs is known as microseismic monitoring. Microseismic monitoring is used to understand the process of hydraulic fracturing, which is a reservoir stimulation technique. We use a new geomechanical model with bedding plane slippage induced by hydraulic fractures within shale reservoirs to explain seismicity observed in a typical case study of hydraulic fracturing of a shale gas play in North America. Microseismic events propagating from the injection point are located at similar depths (within the uncertainty of their locations), and their source mechanisms are dominated by shear failure with both dip-slip and strike-slip senses of motion. The prevailing dip-slip mechanisms have one nearly vertical nodal plane perpendicular to the minimum horizontal stress axis, while the other nodal plane is nearly horizontal. Such dip-slip mechanisms can be explained by slippage along bedding planes activated by the aseismic opening of vertical hydraulic fractures. The model explains the observed prevailing orientation of the shear planes of the microseismic events, as well as the large difference between seismic and hydraulic energy.

  3. High Resolution Modelling of the Congo River's Multi-Threaded Main Stem Hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, A. B.; Trigg, M.; Tshimanga, R.; Neal, J. C.; Borman, D.; Smith, M. W.; Bola, G.; Kabuya, P.; Mushie, C. A.; Tschumbu, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    We present the results of a summer 2017 field campaign by members of the Congo River users Hydraulics and Morphology (CRuHM) project, and a subsequent reach-scale hydraulic modelling study on the Congo's main stem. Sonar bathymetry, ADCP transects, and water surface elevation data have been collected along the Congo's heavily multi-threaded middle reach, which exhibits complex in-channel hydraulic processes that are not well understood. To model the entire basin's hydrodynamics, these in-channel hydraulic processes must be parameterised since it is not computationally feasible to represent them explicitly. Furthermore, recent research suggests that relative to other large global rivers, in-channel flows on the Congo represent a relatively large proportion of total flow through the river-floodplain system. We therefore regard sufficient representation of in-channel hydraulic processes as a Congo River hydrodynamic research priority. To enable explicit representation of in-channel hydraulics, we develop a reach-scale (70 km), high resolution hydraulic model. Simulation of flow through individual channel threads provides new information on flow depths and velocities, and will be used to inform the parameterisation of a broader basin-scale hydrodynamic model. The basin-scale model will ultimately be used to investigate floodplain fluxes, flood wave attenuation, and the impact of future hydrological change scenarios on basin hydrodynamics. This presentation will focus on the methodology we use to develop a reach-scale bathymetric DEM. The bathymetry of only a small proportion of channel threads can realistically be captured, necessitating some estimation of the bathymetry of channels not surveyed. We explore different approaches to this bathymetry estimation, and the extent to which it influences hydraulic model predictions. The CRuHM project is a consortium comprising the Universities of Kinshasa, Rhodes, Dar es Salaam, Bristol, and Leeds, and is funded by Royal

  4. Variation of phytoplankton functional groups modulated by hydraulic controls in Hongze Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Hao, Daping; Doblin, Martina A; Ren, Ying; Wei, Jielin; Feng, Yawei

    2015-11-01

    Hongze Lake is a large, shallow, polymictic, eutrophic lake in the eastern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in this lake were investigated from March 2011 to February 2013, and a comparison was made between the eastern, western, and northern regions. The lake shows strong fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and regular hydraulic controls. By application of the phytoplankton functional group approach, this study aims to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics and analyze their influencing factors. Altogether, 18 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, encompassing 187 species. In order to seek the best variable describing the phytoplankton functional group distribution, 14 of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Due to the turbid condition of the lake, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of low light. The predominant functional groups in the annual succession were D (Cyclotella spp. and Synedra acus), T (Planctonema lauterbornii), P (Fragilaria crotonensis), X1 (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa), C (Cyclotella meneghiniana and Cyclotella ocellata), and Y (Cryptomonas erosa). An opposite relationship between water level and the biomass of predominant groups was observed in the present study. Water level fluctuations, caused by monsoonal climate and artificial drawdown, were significant factors influencing phytoplankton succession in Hongze Lake, since they alter the hydrological conditions and influence light and nutrient availability. The clearly demonstrated factors, which significantly influence phytoplankton dynamics in Hongze Lake, will help government manage the large shallow lakes with frequent water level fluctuations.

  5. A mathematical model of the hydraulic system of the universal hosed concrete pump

    OpenAIRE

    Chayka, Denys; Emeljanova, Inga; Andrenko, Pavlo

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a scheme of a new-design universal pistonless concrete pump with a hydraulic drive and provides a basic diagram of its hydraulic system. To maximize energy efficiency, the designed hydraulic circuit is implemented through the following hydraulic devices: high-torque hydraulic motors, a gear pump, a hydraulic cylinder, hydraulic spreaders, a filter, a safety valve, anticavitation and check valves, a flow controller, and pipelines. The key element in the hydraulic circuit of ...

  6. Effect of unrepresented model errors on estimated soil hydraulic material properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jaumann

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Unrepresented model errors influence the estimation of effective soil hydraulic material properties. As the required model complexity for a consistent description of the measurement data is application dependent and unknown a priori, we implemented a structural error analysis based on the inversion of increasingly complex models. We show that the method can indicate unrepresented model errors and quantify their effects on the resulting material properties. To this end, a complicated 2-D subsurface architecture (ASSESS was forced with a fluctuating groundwater table while time domain reflectometry (TDR and hydraulic potential measurement devices monitored the hydraulic state. In this work, we analyze the quantitative effect of unrepresented (i sensor position uncertainty, (ii small scale-heterogeneity, and (iii 2-D flow phenomena on estimated soil hydraulic material properties with a 1-D and a 2-D study. The results of these studies demonstrate three main points: (i the fewer sensors are available per material, the larger is the effect of unrepresented model errors on the resulting material properties. (ii The 1-D study yields biased parameters due to unrepresented lateral flow. (iii Representing and estimating sensor positions as well as small-scale heterogeneity decreased the mean absolute error of the volumetric water content data by more than a factor of 2 to 0. 004.

  7. Effect of unrepresented model errors on estimated soil hydraulic material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumann, Stefan; Roth, Kurt

    2017-09-01

    Unrepresented model errors influence the estimation of effective soil hydraulic material properties. As the required model complexity for a consistent description of the measurement data is application dependent and unknown a priori, we implemented a structural error analysis based on the inversion of increasingly complex models. We show that the method can indicate unrepresented model errors and quantify their effects on the resulting material properties. To this end, a complicated 2-D subsurface architecture (ASSESS) was forced with a fluctuating groundwater table while time domain reflectometry (TDR) and hydraulic potential measurement devices monitored the hydraulic state. In this work, we analyze the quantitative effect of unrepresented (i) sensor position uncertainty, (ii) small scale-heterogeneity, and (iii) 2-D flow phenomena on estimated soil hydraulic material properties with a 1-D and a 2-D study. The results of these studies demonstrate three main points: (i) the fewer sensors are available per material, the larger is the effect of unrepresented model errors on the resulting material properties. (ii) The 1-D study yields biased parameters due to unrepresented lateral flow. (iii) Representing and estimating sensor positions as well as small-scale heterogeneity decreased the mean absolute error of the volumetric water content data by more than a factor of 2 to 0. 004.

  8. The Benefits and Limitations of Hydraulic Modeling for Ordinary High Water Mark Delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    simulates the water surface elevation and width for a given discharge. This modeling can be helpful in OHWM delineations but can be misleading if the model...OHWM delineation. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising , publication, or promotional purposes. Ci- tation of...Despite its benefits, hydraulic modeling can be misleading if performed or applied improperly; and agencies reviewing the models as part of a juris

  9. A siphon well model for hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Hui; Ji, Ping; Xia, Qingfu; Guo, Xinlei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A new method was proposed to improve the hydraulic performance and bubble elimination. • The diversion pier and diversion grid were used to stabilize the flow pattern. • Double multi-hole orifices were arranged after the weir. • The new method has a simpler construction and greater bubble elimination. - Abstract: In coastal nuclear power plants, bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump in the siphon well causes foam pollution and salt fog erosion near the outfall of the siphon well. Thus, bubble elimination in siphon wells has been a topic of considerable interest. This study presents a new hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination method based on model experiments. Compared to previous methods, the new method has a simple structure, is effective in eliminating bubbles and is well adapted to different tide levels. The method mainly uses a diversion pier, diversion grid and multi-hole orifices to improve the hydraulic performance, thus reducing bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump and shortening the bubble movement length in the siphon well. This study provides a valuable reference for the future siphon well design of coastal power plants.

  10. A siphon well model for hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Hui, E-mail: fuhui_iwhr@126.com; Ji, Ping; Xia, Qingfu; Guo, Xinlei

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A new method was proposed to improve the hydraulic performance and bubble elimination. • The diversion pier and diversion grid were used to stabilize the flow pattern. • Double multi-hole orifices were arranged after the weir. • The new method has a simpler construction and greater bubble elimination. - Abstract: In coastal nuclear power plants, bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump in the siphon well causes foam pollution and salt fog erosion near the outfall of the siphon well. Thus, bubble elimination in siphon wells has been a topic of considerable interest. This study presents a new hydraulic performance optimization and bubble elimination method based on model experiments. Compared to previous methods, the new method has a simple structure, is effective in eliminating bubbles and is well adapted to different tide levels. The method mainly uses a diversion pier, diversion grid and multi-hole orifices to improve the hydraulic performance, thus reducing bubble entrainment at the hydraulic jump and shortening the bubble movement length in the siphon well. This study provides a valuable reference for the future siphon well design of coastal power plants.

  11. Development of a Nuclear Steam Supply System Thermal-Hydraulic Module for the Nuclear Power Plant Simulator Using a Best-Estimate Code, RETRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jae Seung

    2004-08-01

    The NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) thermal-hydraulic programs adopted in the domestic full-scope power plant simulators were provided in early 1980s by foreign vendors. Because of limited computational capability at that time, they usually used very simplified physical models for the real-time simulation of Ness thermal-hydraulic transients, which entails inaccurate results and, thus, the possibility of so-called 'negative training', especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, a realistic NSSS thermal-hydraulic program ARTS has been developed, it was based on the RETRAN code for the improvement of the Nuclear Power Plant full-scope simulator. Since ARTS is a generalized code to solve a simultaneous equation system, the smaller time-step size should be used if converged solution could not obtain even in a single volume. Therefore, dedicated models which do not force to reduce the time-step size are sometimes more suitable in terms of a real-time calculation and robustness. The PRT(Pressurizer Relief Tank) is a good example, which requires a dedicated model. The PRT consists of subcooled water in bottom and non-condensable gas in top. The sparger merged under subcooled water enhances condensation. The complicated thermal-hydraulic phenomena such as condensation, phase separation with existence of non-condensable gas makes difficult to simulate. Therefore, the PRT volume may limit the time-step size if it is modeled with a general control volume. To mitigate the time-step size reduction due to convergence failure at this component using RETRAN, the PRT model was developed as a dedicated model. The dedicated model was expected to provide reasonable results without convergence problem in the analysis of the system transients. The ARTS code guarantees the real-time calculations of almost all transients and ensures the robustness of simulations. However, there are some possibilities of calculation failure in the

  12. Comparison for the interfacial and wall friction models in thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Moon Kyu; Park, Jee Won; Chung, Bub Dong; Kim, Soo Hyung; Kim, See Dal

    2007-07-01

    The average equations employed in the current thermal hydraulic analysis codes need to be closed with the appropriate models and correlations to specify the interphase phenomena along with fluid/structure interactions. This includes both thermal and mechanical interactions. Among the closure laws, an interfacial and wall frictions, which are included in the momentum equations, not only affect pressure drops along the fluid flow, but also have great effects for the numerical stability of the codes. In this study, the interfacial and wall frictions are reviewed for the commonly applied thermal-hydraulic system analysis codes, i.e. RELAP5-3D, MARS-3D, TRAC-M, and CATHARE

  13. Characterisation of karst hydrogeology in Western Ireland using geophysical and hydraulic modelling techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. McCormack

    2017-04-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: Results suggest two primary pathways of northwards groundwater flow in the catchment, a fault which discharges offshore, and a ∼2 m diameter karst conduit running underneath the catchment lowlands against the prevailing geological dip. This conduit, whose existence was suspected but never confirmed, links a large ephemeral lake to the coast where it discharges intertidally. Hydraulic modelling indicates that the conduit network is a complex mixture of constrictions with multiple inlets and outlets. Two ephemeral lakes are shown to be hydraulically discontinuous, either drained separately or linked by a low pressure channel.

  14. Modeling and control of a hydraulically actuated flexible-prismatic link robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, L.; Kress, R.; Jansen, J.

    1996-12-01

    Most of the research related to flexible link manipulators to date has focused on single link, fixed length, single plane of vibration test beds. In addition, actuation has been predominantly based upon electromagnetic motors. Ironically, these elements are rarely found in the existing industrial long reach systems. This manuscript describes a new hydraulically actuated, long reach manipulator with a flexible prismatic link at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Focus is directed towards both modeling and control of hydraulic actuators as well as flexible links that have variable natural frequencies

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors During Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Jensen, Mette; Ingildsen, Pernille; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Aeration Tank Settling is a control method alowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration Tank Settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plant's using present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have...... shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. The paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet...

  16. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of LTS cables for the DEMO TF coil using simplified models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowska Monika

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The conceptual design activities for the DEMOnstration reactor (DEMO – the prototype fusion power plant – are conducted in Europe by the EUROfusion Consortium. In 2015, three design concepts of the DEMO toroidal field (TF coil were proposed by Swiss Plasma Center (EPFL-SPC, PSI Villigen, Italian National Agency for New Technologies (ENEA Frascati, and Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA Cadarache. The proposed conductor designs were subjected to complete mechanical, electromagnetic, and thermal-hydraulic analyses. The present study is focused on the thermal-hydraulic analysis of the candidate conductor designs using simplified models. It includes (a hydraulic analysis, (b heat removal analysis, and (c assessment of the maximum temperature and the maximum pressure in each conductor during quench. The performed analysis, aimed at verification whether the proposed design concepts fulfil the established acceptance criteria, provides the information for further improvements of the coil and conductors design.

  17. On a model simulating lack of hydraulic connection between a man ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The idea that a direct hydraulic connection between a man-made reservoir and the foci of postimpoundment earthquakes may not exist at all sites is eminently credible on geological grounds. Our aim is to provide a simple earth model and related theory for use during investigations of earthquakes near new man-made ...

  18. Hydrodynamic and hydrostatic modelling of hydraulic journal bearings considering small displacement condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Yin; Chuang, Jen-Chen; Tu, Jia-Ying

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes modified coefficients for the dynamic model of hydraulic journal bearing system that integrates the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties. In recent years, design of hydraulic bearing for machine tool attracts worldwide attention, because hydraulic bearings are able to provide higher capacity and accuracy with lower friction, compared to conventional bearing systems. In order to achieve active control of the flow pressure and enhance the operation accuracy, the dynamic model of hydraulic bearings need to be developed. Modified coefficients of hydrostatic stiffness, hydrodynamic stiffness, and squeeze damping of the dynamic model are presented in this work, which are derived referring to small displacement analysis from literature. The proposed modified coefficients and model, which consider the pressure variations, relevant geometry size, and fluid properties of the journal bearings, are able to characterise the hydrodynamic and hydrostatic properties with better precision, thus offering the following pragmatic contribution: (1) on-line prediction of the eccentricity and the position of the shaft in the face of external force that results in vibration; (2) development of active control system to regulate the supply flow pressure and to minimize the eccentricity of the shaft. Theoretical derivation and simulation results with different vibration cases are discussed to verify the proposed techniques.

  19. Comparison of Methods for Modeling a Hydraulic Loader Crane With Flexible Translational Links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen; Andersen, Torben O.; Nielsen, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    not hold for translational links. Hence, special care has to be taken when including flexible translational links. In the current paper, different methods for modeling a hydraulic loader crane with a telescopic arm are investigated and compared using both the finite segment (FS) and AMs method...

  20. Hydrologic and hydraulic modelling of the Nyl River floodplain Part 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-01-01

    Jan 1, 2007 ... The ecological functioning of the Nyl River floodplain in the Limpopo Province of South Africa depends on water supplied by catchments which are experiencing continuing water resource development. Hydrological and hydraulic models have been produced to assist in future planning by simulating the ...

  1. Real-time dynamic hydraulic model for potable water loss reduction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abu-Mahfouz, Adnan M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available -overlay required for the WDN can itself be a cause of technical problems that also need to be solved before water utilities will implement these techniques. This paper propose a real-time dynamic hydraulic model (DHM) based control system connected to near realtime...

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors during Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.D.; Ingildsen, P.; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    haveshown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluiddynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses theresults at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet...

  3. Determination of hydraulic properties of a tropical soil of Hawaii using column experiments and inverse modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Sobotkova

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A method for determining soil hydraulic properties of a weathered tropical soil (Oxisol using a medium-sized column with undisturbed soil is presented. The method was used to determine fitting parameters of the water retention curve and hydraulic conductivity functions of a soil column in support of a pesticide leaching study. The soil column was extracted from a continuously-used research plot in Central Oahu (Hawaii, USA and its internal structure was examined by computed tomography. The experiment was based on tension infiltration into the soil column with free outflow at the lower end. Water flow through the soil core was mathematically modeled using a computer code that numerically solves the one-dimensional Richards equation. Measured soil hydraulic parameters were used for direct simulation, and the retention and soil hydraulic parameters were estimated by inverse modeling. The inverse modeling produced very good agreement between model outputs and measured flux and pressure head data for the relatively homogeneous column. The moisture content at a given pressure from the retention curve measured directly in small soil samples was lower than that obtained through parameter optimization based on experiments using a medium-sized undisturbed soil column.

  4. Adaptive PID and Model Reference Adaptive Control Switch Controller for Nonlinear Hydraulic Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear systems are modeled as piecewise linear systems at multiple operating points, where the operating points are modeled as switches between constituent linearized systems. In this paper, adaptive piecewise linear switch controller is proposed for improving the response time and tracking performance of the hydraulic actuator control system, which is essentially piecewise linear. The controller composed of PID and Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC adaptively chooses the proportion of these two components and makes the designed system have faster response time at the transient phase and better tracking performance, simultaneously. Then, their stability and tracking performance are analyzed and evaluated by the hydraulic actuator control system, the hydraulic actuator is controlled by the electrohydraulic system, and its model is built, which has piecewise linear characteristic. Then the controller results are compared between PID and MRAC and the switch controller designed in this paper is applied to the hydraulic actuator; it is obvious that adaptive switch controller has better effects both on response time and on tracking performance.

  5. Hydraulic modeling analysis of the Middle Rio Grande - Escondida Reach, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda K. Larsen

    2007-01-01

    Human influence on the Middle Rio Grande has resulted in major changes throughout the Middle Rio Grande region in central New Mexico, including problems with erosion and sedimentation. Hydraulic modeling analyses have been performed on the Middle Rio Grande to determine changes in channel morphology and other important parameters. Important changes occurring in the...

  6. Hydrologic and hydraulic modelling of the Nyl River floodplain Part 3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ecological functioning of the Nyl River floodplain in the Limpopo Province of South Africa depends on water supplied by catchments which are experiencing continuing water resource development. Hydrological and hydraulic models have been produced to assist in future planning by simulating the effects of ...

  7. On a model simulating lack of hydraulic connection between a man ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reservoir weight and hydraulic pressure at its bottom both influence stress and pore pressure inside a FHCEM (e.g., Roeloffs 1988), while only the weight of the reservoir exerts influence within the NHCEM. Beginning with Haskell (1953), numerous multi- layered models have been used to explain observa- tions in different ...

  8. On a model simulating lack of hydraulic connection between a man ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 8. On a model simulating lack of hydraulic connection between a man-made reservoir and the volume of poroelastic rock hosting the focus of a post-impoundment earthquake. Ramesh Chander S K Tomar. Volume 125 Issue 8 December 2016 pp 1543- ...

  9. Bonneville Second Powerhouse Columbia River, Oregon and Washington. Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    scroll case, stay vanes , wicket gates , discharge ring, and complete draft tube) were modeled. The Kaplan blades and hubs were omitted from the model...the model was supplied by a recircu- lating system and measured with a calibrated orifice. Flow was con- trolled with wicket gates to reproduce...at controlled gate openings. Hydraulic roughness was created with roughened concrete surfaces, rock chips, crushed rock, and small boulders. Tailwater

  10. Global river flood hazard maps: hydraulic modelling methods and appropriate uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townend, Samuel; Smith, Helen; Molloy, James

    2014-05-01

    Flood hazard is not well understood or documented in many parts of the world. Consequently, the (re-)insurance sector now needs to better understand where the potential for considerable river flooding aligns with significant exposure. For example, international manufacturing companies are often attracted to countries with emerging economies, meaning that events such as the 2011 Thailand floods have resulted in many multinational businesses with assets in these regions incurring large, unexpected losses. This contribution addresses and critically evaluates the hydraulic methods employed to develop a consistent global scale set of river flood hazard maps, used to fill the knowledge gap outlined above. The basis of the modelling approach is an innovative, bespoke 1D/2D hydraulic model (RFlow) which has been used to model a global river network of over 5.3 million kilometres. Estimated flood peaks at each of these model nodes are determined using an empirically based rainfall-runoff approach linking design rainfall to design river flood magnitudes. The hydraulic model is used to determine extents and depths of floodplain inundation following river bank overflow. From this, deterministic flood hazard maps are calculated for several design return periods between 20-years and 1,500-years. Firstly, we will discuss the rationale behind the appropriate hydraulic modelling methods and inputs chosen to produce a consistent global scaled river flood hazard map. This will highlight how a model designed to work with global datasets can be more favourable for hydraulic modelling at the global scale and why using innovative techniques customised for broad scale use are preferable to modifying existing hydraulic models. Similarly, the advantages and disadvantages of both 1D and 2D modelling will be explored and balanced against the time, computer and human resources available, particularly when using a Digital Surface Model at 30m resolution. Finally, we will suggest some

  11. A Grey Box Model for the Hydraulics in a Creek

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsdottir, Harpa; Jacobsen, Judith L.; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The Saint-Venant equation of mass balance is used to derive a stochastics lumped model, describing the dynamics of a cross-sectional area in a river. The unknown parameters of the model are estimated by combining the physical equation with a set of data, a method known as grey box modelling. The ...

  12. Hydrological and hydraulic models for determination of flood-prone and flood inundation areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aksoy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Geographic Information Systems (GIS are widely used in most studies on water resources. Especially, when the topography and geomorphology of study area are considered, GIS can ease the work load. Detailed data should be used in this kind of studies. Because of, either the complication of the models or the requirement of highly detailed data, model outputs can be obtained fast only with a good optimization. The aim in this study, firstly, is to determine flood-prone areas in a watershed by using a hydrological model considering two wetness indexes; the topographical wetness index, and the SAGA (System for Automated Geoscientific Analyses wetness index. The wetness indexes were obtained in the Quantum GIS (QGIS software by using the Digital Elevation Model of the study area. Flood-prone areas are determined by considering the wetness index maps of the watershed. As the second stage of this study, a hydraulic model, HEC-RAS, was executed to determine flood inundation areas under different return period-flood events. River network cross-sections required for this study were derived from highly detailed digital elevation models by QGIS. Also river hydraulic parameters were used in the hydraulic model. Modelling technology used in this study is made of freely available open source softwares. Based on case studies performed on watersheds in Turkey, it is concluded that results of such studies can be used for taking precaution measures against life and monetary losses due to floods in urban areas particularly.

  13. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a)), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The

  14. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The

  15. TRSM-a thermal-hydraulic real-time simulation model for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weichang

    1997-01-01

    TRSM (a Thermal-hydraulic Real-time Simulation Model) has been developed for PWR real-time simulation and best-estimate prediction of normal operating and abnormal accident conditions. It is a non-equilibrium two phase flow thermal-hydraulic model based on five basic conservation equations. A drift flux model is used to account for the unequal velocities of liquid and gaseous mixture, with or without the presence of the noncondensibles. Critical flow models are applied for break flow and valve flow calculations. A 5-regime two phase heat convection model is applied for clad-to-coolant as well as fluid-to-tubing heat transfer. A rigorous reactor coolant pump model is used to calculate the pressure drop and rise for the suction and discharge ends with complete pump characteristics curves included. The TRSM model has been adapted in the full-scale training simulator of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant 300 MW unit to simulate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the NSSS. The simulation results of a cold leg LOCA and a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident are presented

  16. A seventh-order model for dynamic response of an electro-hydraulic servo valve

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Changhai; Jiang Hongzhou

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, taking two degrees of freedom on the armature–flapper assembly into account, a seventh-order model is deduced and proposed for the dynamic response of a two-stage electro-hydraulic servo valve from nonlinear equations. These deductions are based on fundamental laws of electromagnetism, fluid, and general mechanics. The coefficients of the proposed seventh-order model are derived in terms of servo valve physical parameters and fluid properties explicitly. For validating the resu...

  17. Prototype Data Models and Data Dictionaries for Hanford Sediment Physical and Hydraulic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Last, George V.; Middleton, Lisa A.

    2010-09-30

    The Remediation Decision Support (RDS) project, managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC), has been compiling physical and hydraulic property data and parameters to support risk analyses and waste management decisions at Hanford. In FY09 the RDS project developed a strategic plan for a physical and hydraulic property database. This report documents prototype data models and dictionaries for these properties and associated parameters. Physical properties and hydraulic parameters and their distributions are required for any type of quantitative assessment of risk and uncertainty associated with predictions of contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface. The central plateau of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State contains most of the contamination at the Site and has up to {approx}100 m of unsaturated and unconsolidated or semi-consolidated sediments overlying the unconfined aquifer. These sediments contain a wide variety of contaminants ranging from organic compounds, such as carbon tetrachloride, to numerous radionuclides including technetium, plutonium, and uranium. Knowledge of the physical and hydraulic properties of the sediments and their distributions is critical for quantitative assessment of the transport of these contaminants in the subsurface, for evaluation of long-term risks and uncertainty associated with model predictions of contaminant transport and fate, and for evaluating, designing, and operating remediation alternatives. One of the goals of PNNL's RDS project is to work with the Hanford Environmental Data Manager (currently with CHPRC) to develop a protocol and schedule for incorporation of physical property and hydraulic parameter datasets currently maintained by PNNL into HEIS. This requires that the data first be reviewed to ensure quality and consistency. New data models must then be developed for HEIS that are

  18. Combining multi-objective optimization and bayesian model averaging to calibrate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohling, Thomas [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    Most studies in vadose zone hydrology use a single conceptual model for predictive inference and analysis. Focusing on the outcome of a single model is prone to statistical bias and underestimation of uncertainty. In this study, we combine multi-objective optimization and Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models. To illustrate our method, we use observed tensiometric pressure head data at three different depths in a layered vadose zone of volcanic origin in New Zealand. A set of seven different soil hydraulic models is calibrated using a multi-objective formulation with three different objective functions that each measure the mismatch between observed and predicted soil water pressure head at one specific depth. The Pareto solution space corresponding to these three objectives is estimated with AMALGAM, and used to generate four different model ensembles. These ensembles are post-processed with BMA and used for predictive analysis and uncertainty estimation. Our most important conclusions for the vadose zone under consideration are: (1) the mean BMA forecast exhibits similar predictive capabilities as the best individual performing soil hydraulic model, (2) the size of the BMA uncertainty ranges increase with increasing depth and dryness in the soil profile, (3) the best performing ensemble corresponds to the compromise (or balanced) solution of the three-objective Pareto surface, and (4) the combined multi-objective optimization and BMA framework proposed in this paper is very useful to generate forecast ensembles of soil hydraulic models.

  19. Deformation Behavior between Hydraulic and Natural Fractures Using Fully Coupled Hydromechanical Model with XFEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a growing consensus that preexisting natural fractures play an important role during stimulation. A novel fully coupled hydromechanical model using extended finite element method is proposed. This directly coupled scheme avoids the cumbersome process during calculating the fluid pressure in complicated fracture networks and translating into an equivalent nodal force. Numerical examples are presented to simulate the hydraulic fracture propagation paths for simultaneous multifracture treatments with properly using the stress shadow effects for horizontal wells and to reveal the deformation response and interaction mechanism between hydraulic induced fracture and nonintersected natural fractures at orthotropic and nonorthotropic angles. With the stress shadow effects, the induced hydraulic flexural fracture deflecting to wellbore rather than transverse fracture would be formed during the progress of simultaneous fracturing for a horizontal well. The coupled hydromechanical simulation reveals that the adjacent section to the intersection is opened and the others are closed for orthogonal natural fracture, while the nonorthogonal natural fracture is activated near the intersection firstly and along the whole section with increasing perturbed stresses. The results imply that the induced hydraulic fracture tends to cross orthotropic natural fracture, while it is prior to being arrested by the nonorthotropic natural fracture.

  20. Saturated hydraulic conductivity as parameter for modeling applications - comparison of determination methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Thomas; Kreiselmeier, Janis; Chandrasekhar, Parvarthy; Julich, Stefan; Feger, Karl-Heinz; Schwärzel, Kai; Schwen, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    Saturated hydraulic conductivity is broadly used to parametrize physical characteristics of soil. Many methods for its determination have been developed, but still no standard has been established. For the interpretation of results it has to be considered that different methods yield varying results. In this study, values for saturated hydraulic conductivity were measured directly by the falling head lab-method as well as derived indirectly by model fitting to data from hood-infiltrometer experiments in the field and evaporation experiments in the lab. Successive sampling of the exactly same soil body for all three methods ensured the highest possible comparability. Additional physical soil parameters were measured and tested for their suitability as predictors in pedotransfer functions. The experiments were conducted all through the vegetation period 2016 at 4 sites in Lower Austria and Saxony, Germany. Sampled soils had a sandy loam or loamy silt texture and were cultivated with regionally common annual field crops. Subsequently, the results were evaluated with regard to their further use as key parameter in the expression of hydraulic soil properties. Significant differences were found between the evaporation method and the two other methods, where the former underestimated the saturated conductivity considerably. Consequently, an appropriate procedure for the determination of saturated hydraulic conductivity was formulated which combines results of hood infiltrometry and falling head method.

  1. Simulation of the hydraulic performance of highway filter drains through laboratory models and stormwater management tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Jato-Espino, Daniel; Lashford, Craig; Coupe, Stephen J

    2017-05-23

    Road drainage is one of the most relevant assets in transport infrastructure due to its inherent influence on traffic management and road safety. Highway filter drains (HFDs), also known as "French Drains", are the main drainage system currently in use in the UK, throughout 7000 km of its strategic road network. Despite being a widespread technique across the whole country, little research has been completed on their design considerations and their subsequent impact on their hydraulic performance, representing a gap in the field. Laboratory experiments have been proven to be a reliable indicator for the simulation of the hydraulic performance of stormwater best management practices (BMPs). In addition to this, stormwater management tools (SMT) have been preferentially chosen as a design tool for BMPs by practitioners from all over the world. In this context, this research aims to investigate the hydraulic performance of HFDs by comparing the results from laboratory simulation and two widely used SMT such as the US EPA's stormwater management model (SWMM) and MicroDrainage®. Statistical analyses were applied to a series of rainfall scenarios simulated, showing a high level of accuracy between the results obtained in laboratory and using SMT as indicated by the high and low values of the Nash-Sutcliffe and R 2 coefficients and root-mean-square error (RMSE) reached, which validated the usefulness of SMT to determine the hydraulic performance of HFDs.

  2. Heat Conductor Model and Assessment Results of the Nuclear Reactor Component Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code CUPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Park, Ik Kyu; Kim, Jong Tae; Yoon, Han Young; Jeong, Jae Jun

    2008-09-15

    A thermal-hydraulic analysis module, CUPID has been developed for a design and safety analysis of a nuclear reactor component. In the CUPID code, a two-fluid three-field model is adopted and the governing equations are solved on an unstructured grid to make CUPID advantageous for a flow analysis in complicated geometries. As for the numerical solution scheme, the semi-implicit method was adopted, which has proved to be stable and accurate for most applications of a nuclear reactor transient. A thermal analysis of a heat structure in a nuclear reactor component is very important for the safety analysis of a nuclear reactor as well as that of a fluid. Moreover, a conjugate heat transfer analysis between a fluid and a heat structure is indispensable in many transient situations of a nuclear reactor. For this reason, a heat conductor model was implemented into the CUPID module in this study. This report presents the governing equation, numerical method and verification results of the heat conductor model.

  3. Development of model pump for establishing hydraulic design of primary sodium pumps in PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, R.J.; Sahasrabudhe, H.G.; Rao, A.S.L.K.; Balchander, K.; Kale, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam indicated requirement of indigenous development of primary sodium pump, handling liquid sodium as coolant in Fast Breeder Reactor. The primary sodium pump concept selected in its preliminary design is a vertical, single stage, with single suction impeller, suction facing downwards. The pump is having diffuser, discharge casing and discharge collector. The 1/3 rd size model pump is developed to establish the hydraulic performance of the prototype primary sodium pump. The main objectives were to verify the hydraulic design to operate on low net positive suction head available (NPSHA), no evidence of visible cavitation at available NPSHA, the pump should be designed with a diffuser etc. The model pump PSP 250/40 was designed and successfully developed by Research and Development Division of M/s Kirloskar Brothers Ltd., Kirloskarvadi. The performance testing using model pump was successfully carried out on a closed circuit test rig. The performance of a model pump at three different speeds 1900 rpm, 1456 rpm and 975 rpm was established. The values of hydraulic axial thrust with and without balancing holes on impeller at 1900 rpm was measured. Visual cavitation study at 1900 rpm was carried out to establish the NPSH at bubble free operation of the pump. The tested performance of the model pump is converted to the full scale prototype pump. The predicted performance of prototype pump at 700 rpm was found to be meeting fully with the expected duties. (author). 6 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Development of a Simple Hydraulic Performance Model for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... model prediction is proposed. The procedure for conducting the field flow test in the determination of the Hazen William's friction factor is described by utilizing the set up and data of the field flow test carried out on 11th August 1988 on completion of the swabbing exercise. Journal of Civil Engineering, JKUAT (2001) Vol 6, ...

  5. Hydrological and hydraulic modelling of the Nyl River floodplain Part ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catchment land-use and water resource developments may threaten the ecological integrity of the Nyl River floodplain, a world-renowned conservation area. The effect of developments on the water supply regime to the floodplain can be predicted by hydrological modelling, but assessing their ecological consequences ...

  6. A Thermal Hydraulic Model of Melt Lubrication in Railgun Armatures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kothmann, R

    2003-01-01

    ... wear of 7075 aluminum sliding against ETP copper for face pressures ranging from 6 to 22 ksi. Discrepancies between calculated and experimental results are attributed to uncertainties in modeling the complex phase change behavior of aluminum alloy 7075 and uncertain conditions at the rail interface.

  7. Hydrogeological model of the territory of Kowsar hydraulic project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Vyacheslav Valentinovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical hydrogeology model of the territory of Kowsar Project was created with account for the results of the engineering surveys and hydro geological monitoring, which was conducted in the process of Kowsar Project construction. In order to create the model in the present work a universal computer system Ansys was used, which implements the finite element method and solid modeling technology, allowing to solve the filtration problem with the use of thermal analogy. The three-dimensional geometric model was built with use of the principle “hard body” modeling, which displays the main line of the territory relief, including the created water reservoir, geological structure (anticline Duk and the main lithological complexes developed within the territory. In the limestone mass As here is a zone characterized by water permeability on territory of Kowsar Project, and a layer characterized by seepage feeding, which occurs outside the considered territory. The water reservoir is a source of the change of hydro geological situation. The results of field observations witness, that the levels of underground waters within the area of the main structures reacts almost instantly on the water level change in the water reservoir; the delay period of levels change is not more than 1,5…2,0 weeks at maximum distance from the water reservoir. These particularities of the hydro geological regime allow using the steady-state scheme of the decision of forecast problems. The mass of limestone As, containing the structures of the Kowsar Project, is not homogeneous and anisotropy in its seepage characteristics. The heterogeneity is conditioned by exogenous influence on the mass up to the depth of 100…150 m. The seepage anisotropy of the mass is expressed by the difference of water permeability of the mass along and across the layers for almost one order. The structures of Kowsar Project is presented by a dam, grouting curtain on axis of the dam and

  8. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  9. Habitat hydraulic models - a tool for Danish stream quality assessment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin

    In relation to the European Water Framework Directive (WFD), Danish water management has to change to a holistic management approach considering both groundwaters and surface waters at the same time. Furthermore the WFD introduces the concept "Good ecological status" where the quality of the biol......In relation to the European Water Framework Directive (WFD), Danish water management has to change to a holistic management approach considering both groundwaters and surface waters at the same time. Furthermore the WFD introduces the concept "Good ecological status" where the quality...... in Danish stream management and stream quality assessment. The stream Ledreborg catchment is modelled using a precipitation-run-off-model (NAM) and as an addition to the normal calibration procedure (Kronvang et al., 2000) the model is calibrated using DAISY adjusted evaporation data. The impact from...... groundwater abstraction upon stream discharge is assessed and in relation to this the relative importance of variations in precipitation, evaporation/temperature and groundwater abstraction are discussed. Physical habitat preferences for trout in the stream Ledreborg are assessed through a series of field...

  10. Thermal-hydraulic Experiments for Advanced Physical Model Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chulhwa

    2012-04-01

    The improvement of prediction models is needed to enhance the safety analysis capability through experimental database of local phenomena. To improve the two-phase interfacial area transport model, the various experiments were carried out with local two-phase interfacial structure test facilities. 2 Χ 2 and 6 Χ 6 rod bundle test facilities were used for the experiment on the droplet behavior. The experiments on the droplet behavior inside a heated rod bundle geometry. The experiments used GIRLS and JICO and CFD analysis were carried out to comprehend the local condensation of steam jet, turbulent jet induced by condensation and the thermal mixing in a pool. In order to develop a model for key phenomena of newly adapted safety system, experiments for boiling inside a pool and condensation in horizontal channel have been performed. An experimental database of the CHF (Critical Heat Flux) and PDO (Post-dryout) was constructed. The mechanism of the heat transfer enhancement by surface modifications in nano-fluid was investigated in boiling mode and rapid quenching mode. The special measurement techniques were developed. They are Double-sensor optical void probe, Optic Rod, PIV technique and UBIM system

  11. Habitat hydraulic modeling for assessing changes of mesohabitat types in a Greek mountainous river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Christina; Mentzafou, Aggeliki; Ntoanidis, Lazaros; Zogaris, Stamatis; Evelpidou, Niki; Argyropoulos, Demetris; Dimitriou, Elias

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and assess changes in physical attributes of mesohabitat types in response to different flows in a Greek mountainous river. Hydraulic simulations were applied using two one-dimensional hydraulic models, MIKE 11 and HEC-RAS. The differences between the two models were analyzed by comparing their outputs against in situ measurements. A 200 m reach in Acheloos river was chosen as study site (Mesochora upstream) mainly because it is located in relatively undisturbed conditions (near reference conditions according to the Water Framework Directive) but also because there is intense interest for the construction of small hydroelectric plants in this area and in other mountainous rivers. Transects were typically placed in areas representative of the various habitat types, proportionally determined by a habitat mapping process at a larger stream segment. Each transect was permanently marked with metal rods to allow repeated measurements in time. The channel and floodplain were surveyed to create a digital elevation model (DEM) of the river. A detailed topographic survey with a GPS/GNSS Geomax - Zenith 20 was made using reference stations at geodetic control points for highest accuracy. Also, a gauging station was installed downstream of the reach in order to provide water level data in an hourly step. Hydraulic models were applied over a range of flows and river stages, based on past measurements. For selecting the control transects a thorough analysis of various parameters, such as habitat representativity, streambed slope and substrate types, was applied. In this way the habitat changes were described based on various flow scenarios over time. In a later step the results from the hydraulic models will be combined with fish habitat simulation curves (HSCs) focusing on the integration of mesohabitat and microhabitat types in the environmental flow assessment scheme.

  12. A mathematical model of the inline CMOS matrix sensor for investigation of particles in hydraulic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilin, DV; Kudryavtsev, IA

    2016-10-01

    One of the most effective ways to diagnose the state of hydraulic system is an investigation of the particles in their liquids. The sizes of such particles range from 2 to 200 gm and their concentration and shape reveal important information about the current state of equipment and the necessity of maintenance. In-line automatic particle counters (APC), which are built into hydraulic system, are widely used for determination of particle size and concentration. These counters are based on a single photodiode and a light emitting diode (LED); however, samples of liquid are needed for analysis using microscope or industrial video camera in order to get information about particle shapes. The act of obtaining the sample leads to contamination by other particles from the air or from the sample tube, meaning that the results are usually corrupted. Using the CMOS or CCD matrix sensor without any lens for inline APC is the solution proposed by authors. In this case the matrix sensors are put into the liquid channel of the hydraulic system and illuminated by LED. This system could be stable in arduous conditions like high pressure and the vibration of the hydraulic system; however, the image or signal from that matrix sensor needs to be processed differently in comparison with the signal from microscope or industrial video camera because of relatively short distance between LED and sensor. This paper introduces mathematical model of a sensor with CMOS and LED, which can be built into hydraulic system. It is also provided a computational algorithm and results, which can be useful for calculation of particle sizes and shapes using the signal from the CMOS matrix sensor.

  13. A Fully Three Dimensional Semianalytical Model for Shale Gas Reservoirs with Hydraulic Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Two challenges exist for modeling gas transport in shale. One is the existence of complex gas transport mechanisms, and the other is the impact of hydraulic fracture networks. In this study, a truly three dimensional semianalytical model was developed for shale gas reservoirs with hydraulic fractures of various shapes. Using the instantaneous point source solution, the pressure are solved for a bounded reservoir with fully 3D, partially penetrated hydraulic fractures of different strike angles and dip angles. The fractures could have various shapes such as rectangles, disks and ellipses. The shale gas diffusion equations considers complex transport mechanism such as gas slippage and gas diffusion. This semianalytical model is verified with a commercial software and an analytical method for single fully penetrated rectangle fracture, and the production results of shale gas are consistent. The impacts of fracture height and strike angles are investigated by five systematically constructed models. The comparison shows that the production increases proportionally with the fracture height, and decreases with the increase of strike angles. The method proposed in this study could also be applied in well testing to analyze the reservoir properties and used to forecast the production for tight oil and conventional resources.

  14. Multiscale parameterization of LIDAR elevations for reducing complexity in hydraulic models of coastal urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sweungwon; Slatton, K. Clint; Cho, Hyun-Chong; Dean, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology now makes it possible to sample the Earth's surface with point spacings well below 1 m. It is, however, time consuming, costly, and technically challenging to directly use very high resolution LIDAR data for hydraulic modeling because of the computational requirements associated with solving fluid dynamics equations over complex boundary conditions in large data sets. For high relief terrain and urban areas, using coarse digital elevation models (DEMs) can cause significant degradation in hydraulic modeling, particularly when artificial obstructions, such as buildings, mask spatial correlations between terrain points. In this paper we present a strategy to reduce the computational complexity in the estimation of surface water discharge through a decomposition of the DEM data, wherein features have different characteristic spatial frequencies. Though the optimal DEM scale for a particular application will ultimately be decided by the user's tolerance for error, we present guidelines to choose a proper scale by balancing computer memory usage and accuracy. We also suggest a method to parameterize man-made structures, such as buildings in hydraulic modeling, to efficiently and accurately account for their effects on surface water discharge.

  15. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF WORKING PROCESS IN HYDRAULIC DRIVE OF SPECIFICALLY HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK STEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Zabolotsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an analysis that shows application of pump-controlled steering hydraulic drives. Dynamic model of steering hydraulic drive of open-cast BelAZ-75131 dump truck developed at BNTU and also mathematical models for circuit consisting of a metering pump and a turning cylinder and a flow amplifier and a turning cylinder with due account of compressibility and resistance of service drain line. It is noted that on the basis of the given methodology a multi-variant dynamic calculation has been carried out, drive dynamics has been analyzed at various design and component parameters of a metering pump and a flow amplifier, rational values of these parameters has been selected for design development. The paper also gives an algorithm scheme for the solution of the derived equation systems.

  16. FLOOD HAZARD MAP IN THE CITY OF BATNA (ALGERIA BY HYDRAULIC MODELING APPROCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guellouh SAMI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the light of the global climatic changes that appear to influence the frequency and the intensity of floods, and whose damages are still growing; understanding the hydrological processes, their spatiotemporal setting and their extreme shape, became a paramount concern to local communities in forecasting terms. The aim of this study is to map the floods hazard using a hydraulic modeling method. In fact, using the operating Geographic Information System (GIS, would allow us to perform a more detailed spatial analysis about the extent of the flooding risk, through the approval of the hydraulic modeling programs in different frequencies. Based on the results of this analysis, decision makers can implement a strategy of risk management related to rivers overflowing through the city of Batna.

  17. Thermal-hydraulic Experiments for Advanced Physical Model Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Baek, W. P.; Yoon, B. J.

    2010-04-01

    The improvement of prediction models is needed to enhance the safety analysis capability through the fine measurements of local phenomena. To improve the two-phase interfacial area transport model, the various experiments were carried out used SUBO and DOBO. 2x2 and 6x6 rod bundle test facilities were used for the experiment on the droplet behavior. The experiments on the droplet behavior inside a heated rod bundle were focused on the break-up of droplets induced by a spacer grid in a rod bundle geometry. The experiments used GIRLS and JICO and CFD analysis were carried out to comprehend the local condensation of steam jet, turbulent jet induced by condensation and the thermal mixing in a pool. An experimental database of the CHF (Critical Heat Flux) and PDO (Post-dryout) had been constructed. The mechanism of the heat transfer enhancement by surface modifications in nano-fluid was investigated in boiling mode and rapid quenching mode. The special measurement techniques were developed. They are Double -sensor optical void probe, Optic Rod, PIV technique and UBIM system

  18. A conceptual model of the hydraulics of check dam for gully control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, C.; Pérez, R.; Gómez, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Check dams have been long recognized as useful structures to minimize concentrated flow erosion by reducing the original gradient of the gully channel and, consequently, the erosive power of run-off (FAO, 1986). Careful attention must be paid to the design of the structures in order to avoid negative effects such as bypassing or scouring that might lead to the parcial or total collapse of the structure (Nyssen,2004). This study attempts to offer a conceptual model to explain the fundamental hydraulics of the flow regime modifications produced by these structures on rectagular-shaped gullies, before and after the filling by sediment of the small volume created by the check dam. The factors affecting the characteristics (location and amount of dissipated energy) of the hydraulic jump and the role played by the steepness of the gully on the hydraulic influence are discussed through a geometric and energetic approach. The shear stress reduction efficiency of the structure is evaluated against flow conditions (subcritical and supercritical), steepness factor, effective height and check dam spacing. HEC RAS 4.0 model (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2008) has been used for validation purposes. In addition, apron protection measures (riprap stone and gabions) have been discussed in order to determine the limits of the discharge and drop height to prevent scouring. The model presented a good performance on the prediction of hydraulic variables, and especially estimating shear stress reduction by the check dam structure. Steepness factor is the key parameter defining the hydraulic influence and ultimate slope and, therefore, the efficiency of the structure. The effective control of the flow erosivity requires the selection of a steepness factor value close to or higher than 1, showing similarities with natural stabilised channels as step-pools morphologies (Abrahams, 1995). The requirements for an efficient reduction of the shear stress and for assuring the stability of the

  19. A General Model for Thermal, Hydraulic and Electric Analysis of Superconducting Cables

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L; Rosso, C

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe a generic, multi-component and multi-channel model for the analysis of superconducting cables. The aim of the model is to treat in a general and consistent manner simultaneous thermal, electric and hydraulic transients in cables. The model is devised for most general situations, but reduces in limiting cases to most common approximations without loss of efficiency. We discuss here the governing equations, and we write them in a matrix form that is well adapted to numerical treatment. We finally demonstrate the model capability by comparison with published experimental data on current distribution in a two-strand cable.

  20. Mathematical Model Defining Volumetric Losses of Hydraulic Oil Compression in a Variable Capacity Displacement Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paszota Zygmunt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work is to develop the capability of evaluating the volumetric losses of hydraulic oil compression in the working chambers of high pressure variable capacity displacement pump. Volumetric losses of oil compression must be determined as functions of the same parameters, which the volumetric losses due to leakage, resulting from the quality of design solution of the pump, are evaluated as dependent on and also as function of the oil aeration coefficient Ɛ. A mathematical model has been developed describing the hydraulic oil compressibility coefficient klc|Δppi;Ɛ;v as a relation to the ratio ΔpPi/pn of indicated increase ΔpPi of pressure in the working chambers and the nominal pressure pn, to the pump capacity coefficient bP, to the oil aeration coefficient  and to the ratio v/vnof oil viscosity v and reference viscosity vn. A mathematical model is presented of volumetric losses qpvc|ΔpPi;bp;;vof hydraulic oil compression in the pump working chambers in the form allowing to use it in the model of power of losses and energy efficiency

  1. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  2. Downstream fish passage guide walls: A hydraulic scale model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2018-01-01

    Partial-depth guide walls are used to improve passage efficiency and reduce the delay of out-migrating anadromous fish species by guiding fish to a bypass route (i.e. weir, pipe, sluice gate) that circumvents the turbine intakes, where survival is usually lower. Evaluation and monitoring studies, however, indicate a high propensity for some fish to pass underneath, rather than along, the guide walls, compromising their effectiveness. In the present study we evaluated a range of guide wall structures to identify where/if the flow field shifts from sweeping (i.e. flow direction primarily along the wall and towards the bypass) to downward-dominant. Many migratory fish species, particularly juveniles, are known to drift with the flow and/or exhibit rheotactic behaviour during their migration. When these behaviours are present, fish follow the path of the flow field. Hence, maintaining a strong sweeping velocity in relation to the downward velocity along a guide wall is essential to successful fish guidance. Nine experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional velocity components upstream of a scale model guide wall set at a wide range of depths and angles to flow. Results demonstrated how each guide wall configuration affected the three-dimensional velocity components, and hence the downward and sweeping velocity, along the full length of the guide wall. In general, the velocities produced in the scale model were sweeping dominant near the water surface and either downward dominant or close to the transitional depth near the bottom of the guide wall. The primary exception to this shift from sweeping do downward flow was for the minimum guide wall angle tested in this study (15°). At 15° the flow pattern was fully sweeping dominant for every cross-section, indicating that a guide wall with a relatively small angle may be more likely to produce conditions favorable to efficient guidance. A critical next step is to evaluate the behaviour of migratory fish as

  3. Two and Three-Phases Fractal Models Application in Soil Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELNAZ Rezaei abajelu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil Hydraulic conductivity is considered as one of the most important hydraulic properties in water and solutionmovement in porous media. In recent years, variousmodels as pedo-transfer functions, fractal models and scaling technique are used to estimate the soil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks. Fractal models with two subset of two (solid and pore and three phases (solid, pore and soil fractal (PSF are used to estimate the fractal dimension of soil particles. The PSF represents a generalization of the solid and pore mass fractal models. The PSF characterizes both the solid and pore phases of the porous material. It also exhibits self-similarity to some degree, in the sense that where local structure seems to be similar to the whole structure.PSF models can estimate interface fractal dimension using soil pore size distribution data (PSD and soil moisture retention curve (SWRC. The main objective of this study was to evaluate different fractal models to estimate the Ksparameter. Materials and Methods: The Schaapetal data was used in this study. The complex consists of sixty soil samples. Soil texture, soil bulk density, soil saturated hydraulic conductivity and soil particle size distribution curve were measured by hydrometer method, undistributed soil sample, constant head method and wet sieve method, respectively for all soil samples.Soil water retention curve were determined by using pressure plates apparatus.The Ks parameter could be estimated by Ralws model as a function of fractal dimension by seven fractal models. Fractal models included Fuentes at al. (1996, Hunt and Gee (2002, Bird et al. (2000, Huang and Zhang (2005, Tyler and Wheatcraft (1990, Kutlu et al. (2008, Sepaskhah and Tafteh (2013.Therefore The Ks parameter can be estimated as a function of the DS (fractal dimension by seven fractal models (Table 2.Sensitivity analysis of Rawls model was assessed by making changes±10%, ±20% and±30%(in input parameters

  4. Can hydraulic-modelled rating curves reduce uncertainty in high flow data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Ida; Lam, Norris; Lyon, Steve W.

    2017-04-01

    Flood risk assessments rely on accurate discharge data records. Establishing a reliable rating curve for calculating discharge from stage at a gauging station normally takes years of data collection efforts. Estimation of high flows is particularly difficult as high flows occur rarely and are often practically difficult to gauge. Hydraulically-modelled rating curves can be derived based on as few as two concurrent stage-discharge and water-surface slope measurements at different flow conditions. This means that a reliable rating curve can, potentially, be derived much faster than a traditional rating curve based on numerous stage-discharge gaugings. In this study we compared the uncertainty in discharge data that resulted from these two rating curve modelling approaches. We applied both methods to a Swedish catchment, accounting for uncertainties in the stage-discharge gauging and water-surface slope data for the hydraulic model and in the stage-discharge gauging data and rating-curve parameters for the traditional method. We focused our analyses on high-flow uncertainty and the factors that could reduce this uncertainty. In particular, we investigated which data uncertainties were most important, and at what flow conditions the gaugings should preferably be taken. First results show that the hydraulically-modelled rating curves were more sensitive to uncertainties in the calibration measurements of discharge than water surface slope. The uncertainty of the hydraulically-modelled rating curves were lowest within the range of the three calibration stage-discharge gaugings (i.e. between median and two-times median flow) whereas uncertainties were higher outside of this range. For instance, at the highest observed stage of the 24-year stage record, the 90% uncertainty band was -15% to +40% of the official rating curve. Additional gaugings at high flows (i.e. four to five times median flow) would likely substantially reduce those uncertainties. These first results show

  5. Temporal evolution modeling of hydraulic and water quality performance of permeable pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; He, Jianxun; Valeo, Caterina; Chu, Angus

    2016-02-01

    A mathematical model for predicting hydraulic and water quality performance in both the short- and long-term is proposed based on field measurements for three types of permeable pavements: porous asphalt (PA), porous concrete (PC), and permeable inter-locking concrete pavers (PICP). The model was applied to three field-scale test sites in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. The model performance was assessed in terms of hydraulic parameters including time to peak, peak flow and water balance and a water quality variable (the removal rate of total suspended solids). A total of 20 simulated storm events were used for model calibration and verification processes. The proposed model can simulate the outflow hydrographs with a coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.762 to 0.907, and normalized root-mean-square deviation (NRMSD) ranging from 13.78% to 17.83%. Comparison of the time to peak flow, peak flow, runoff volume and TSS removal rates between the measured and modeled values in model verification phase had a maximum difference of 11%. The results demonstrate that the proposed model is capable of capturing the temporal dynamics of the pavement performance. Therefore, the model has great potential as a practical modeling tool for permeable pavement design and performance assessment.

  6. Assessing the impact of different sources of topographic data on 1-D hydraulic modelling of floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A. Md; Solomatine, D. P.; Di Baldassarre, G.

    2015-01-01

    Topographic data, such as digital elevation models (DEMs), are essential input in flood inundation modelling. DEMs can be derived from several sources either through remote sensing techniques (spaceborne or airborne imagery) or from traditional methods (ground survey). The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), the light detection and ranging (lidar), and topographic contour maps are some of the most commonly used sources of data for DEMs. These DEMs are characterized by different precision and accuracy. On the one hand, the spatial resolution of low-cost DEMs from satellite imagery, such as ASTER and SRTM, is rather coarse (around 30 to 90 m). On the other hand, the lidar technique is able to produce high-resolution DEMs (at around 1 m), but at a much higher cost. Lastly, contour mapping based on ground survey is time consuming, particularly for higher scales, and may not be possible for some remote areas. The use of these different sources of DEM obviously affects the results of flood inundation models. This paper shows and compares a number of 1-D hydraulic models developed using HEC-RAS as model code and the aforementioned sources of DEM as geometric input. To test model selection, the outcomes of the 1-D models were also compared, in terms of flood water levels, to the results of 2-D models (LISFLOOD-FP). The study was carried out on a reach of the Johor River, in Malaysia. The effect of the different sources of DEMs (and different resolutions) was investigated by considering the performance of the hydraulic models in simulating flood water levels as well as inundation maps. The outcomes of our study show that the use of different DEMs has serious implications to the results of hydraulic models. The outcomes also indicate that the loss of model accuracy due to re-sampling the highest resolution DEM (i.e. lidar 1 m) to lower resolution is much less than the loss of model accuracy due

  7. Development of mathematical models for forecasting hydraulic loads of water and wastewater networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studzinki, Jan [Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland). Systems Research Institute; Bartkiewicz, Lidia [Technical Univ. Kielce (Poland); Stachura, Marcin [Warsaw University of Technology (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    In municipal waterworks the operation of water and wastewater networks decides about the functioning of the sewage treatment plant that is the last element of the whole water and sewage system. The both networks are connected each other and the work of the water net affects the operation of the wastewater one. The parameters which are important for right leading of all waterworks objects are their hydraulic loads that have to be not exceeded. Too large loads can cause accidents in the wastewater net or the treatment plant and an early knowledge of them is of importance for undertaking some counteractions. In the paper different algorithms to model hydraulic loads of municipal water and wastewater nets are described and compared regarding their computation velocity and accuracy. Some exemplary computations have been done with some real data received from a Polish water company. (orig.)

  8. Back Analysis of Rock Hydraulic Fracturing by Coupling Numerical Model and Computational Intelligent Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojun Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing is widely used to determine in situ stress of rock engineering. In this paper we propose a new method for simultaneously determining the in situ stress and elastic parameters of rock. The method utilizing the hydraulic fracturing numerical model and a computational intelligent method is proposed and verified. The hydraulic fracturing numerical model provides the samples which include borehole pressure, in situ stress, and elastic parameters. A computational intelligent method is applied in back analysis. A multioutput support vector machine is used to map the complex, nonlinear relationship between the in situ stress, elastic parameters, and borehole pressure. The artificial bee colony algorithm is applied in back analysis to find the optimal in situ stress and elastic parameters. The in situ stress is determined using the proposed method and the results are compared with those of the classic breakdown formula. The proposed method provides a good estimate of the relationship between the in situ stress and borehole pressure and predicts the maximum horizontal in situ stress with high precision while considering the influence of pore pressure without the need to estimate Biot’s coefficient and other parameters.

  9. Development of a New Bio-Kinetic Model for Assessing the Environmental Property of Military Hydraulic Fluids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhee, In-Sik

    2006-01-01

    ... (POL) products utilized in the current and future combat systems. As part of these efforts, a bio-kinetic model was developed to predict the biodegradability of lubricants including hydraulic fluids...

  10. Comparative study of boron transport models in NRC Thermal-Hydraulic Code Trace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo-Juan, Nicolás; Barrachina, Teresa; Miró, Rafael; Verdú, Gumersindo; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: nioljua@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety (ISIRYM). Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the interest in the study of various types of transients involving changes in the boron concentration inside the reactor, has led to an increase in the interest of developing and studying new models and tools that allow a correct study of boron transport. Therefore, a significant variety of different boron transport models and spatial difference schemes are available in the thermal-hydraulic codes, as TRACE. According to this interest, in this work it will be compared the results obtained using the different boron transport models implemented in the NRC thermal-hydraulic code TRACE. To do this, a set of models have been created using the different options and configurations that could have influence in boron transport. These models allow to reproduce a simple event of filling or emptying the boron concentration in a long pipe. Moreover, with the aim to compare the differences obtained when one-dimensional or three-dimensional components are chosen, it has modeled many different cases using only pipe components or a mix of pipe and vessel components. In addition, the influence of the void fraction in the boron transport has been studied and compared under close conditions to BWR commercial model. A final collection of the different cases and boron transport models are compared between them and those corresponding to the analytical solution provided by the Burgers equation. From this comparison, important conclusions are drawn that will be the basis of modeling the boron transport in TRACE adequately. (author)

  11. Review of turbulence modelling for numerical simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, J.P.; Haapalehto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The report deals with the modelling of turbulent flows in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulic applications. The goal is to give tools and knowledge about turbulent flows and their modelling in practical applications for engineers, and especially nuclear engineers. The emphasize is on the theory of turbulence, the existing different turbulence models, the state-of-art of turbulence in research centres, the available models in the commercial code CFD-FLOW3D, and the latest applications of turbulence modelling in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics. It turns out that it is difficult to elaborate an universal turbulence model and each model has its advantages and drawbacks in each application. However, the increasing power of computers can permit the emergence of new methods of turbulence modelling such as Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) which open new horizons in this field. These latter methods are beginning to be available in commercial codes and are used in different nuclear applications such as 3-D modelling of the nuclear reactor cores and the steam generators. (orig.) (22 refs.)

  12. Time-Varying Hydraulic Gradient Model of Paste-Like Tailings in Long-Distance Pipeline Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Paste-like tailings slurry (PTLS is always simplified as a Bingham plastic fluid, leading to excessive computational errors in the calculation of the hydraulic gradient. In the case of paste-like tailings in long-distance pipeline transportation, to explore a high-precision and reliable hydraulic gradient formula, the rheological behavior of paste-like tailings slurry was analyzed, a time-varying hydraulic gradient model was constructed, and a series of laboratory shear tests were conducted. The results indicate that the PTLS shows noticeable shear-thinning characteristics in constant shear tests; the calculated hydraulic gradient declined by about 56%, from 4.44 MPa·km−1 to 1.95 MPa·km−1 within 253 s, and remained constant for the next four hours during the pipeline transportation. Comparing with the balance hydraulic gradient obtained in a semi-industrial loop test, the computational errors of those calculated by using the time-varying hydraulic gradient model, Jinchuan formula, and Shanxi formula are 15%, 78%, and 130%, respectively. Therefore, our model is a feasible and high-precision solution for the calculation of the hydraulic gradient of paste-like tailings in long-distance pipeline transportation.

  13. COMMIX analysis of four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in a thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarlagadda, B.S.

    1989-04-01

    The three-dimensional thermal hydraulics computer code COMMIX-1AR was used to analyze four constant flow thermal upramp experiments performed in the thermal hydraulic model of an advanced LMR. An objective of these analyses was the validation of COMMIX-1AR for buoyancy affected flows. The COMMIX calculated temperature histories of some thermocouples in the model were compared with the corresponding measured data. The conclusions of this work are presented. 3 refs., 5 figs

  14. A simple macroscopic root water uptake model based on the hydraulic architecture approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, V.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.

    2012-12-01

    Many hydrological models including root water uptake (RWU) do not consider the dimension of root system hydraulic architecture (HA) because explicitly solving water flow in such a complex system is too time consuming. However, they might lack process understanding when basing RWU and plant water stress predictions on functions of variables such as the root length density distribution. On the basis of analytical solutions of water flow in a simple HA, we developed a model implicitly accounting for the root system HA, allowing the simulation of both RWU distribution and plant water stress, in three-dimensional soil water flow models. The new model has three macroscopic parameters defined at the soil element scale, or at the plant scale, rather than for each segment of the root system architecture: the standard sink fraction distribution SSF, the root system equivalent conductance Krs and the compensatory RWU conductance Kcomp. It clearly decouples the process of water stress from compensatory RWU, and its structure is appropriate for hydraulic lift simulation. As compared to a model explicitly solving water flow in a complex root system HA, the new model showed to be accurate and fast, in dissimilar water dynamics scenarios, while keeping the same parameter set. With the proposed model, new concepts are brought which open avenues towards simple and mechanistic RWU models and water stress functions operational for field scale water dynamics simulation. A further study focuses on its applicability for simulating one-dimensional water dynamics in wheat cropped fields.

  15. Optimization of soil hydraulic model parameters using Synthetic Aperture Radar data: an integrated multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, F.; Pauwels, V. R.; Balenzano, A.; Satalino, G.; Skriver, H.; Verhoest, N. E.

    2008-12-01

    It is widely recognized that Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data are a very valuable source of information for the modeling of the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. During the last couple of decades, most of the research on the use of SAR data in hydrologic applications has been focused on the retrieval of land and bio-geophysical parameters (e.g. soil moisture contents). One relatively unexplored issue consists of the optimization of soil hydraulic model parameters, such as for example hydraulic conductivity values, through remote sensing. This is due to the fact that no direct relationships between the remote sensing observations, more specifically radar backscatter values, and the parameter values can be derived. However, land surface models can provide these relationships. The objective of this study is to retrieve a number of soil physical model parameters through a combination of remote sensing and land surface modeling. Spatially distributed and multitemporal SAR-based soil moisture maps are the basis of the study. The surface soil moisture values are used in a parameter estimation procedure based on the Extended Kalman Filter equations. In fact, the land surface model is thus used to determine the relationship between the soil physical parameters and the remote sensing data. An analysis is then performed, relating the retrieved soil parameters to the soil texture data available over the study area. The results of the study show that there is a potential to retrieve soil physical model parameters through a combination of land surface modeling and remote sensing.

  16. Reduced-order model based active disturbance rejection control of hydraulic servo system with singular value perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengwen; Quan, Long; Zhang, Shijie; Meng, Hongjun; Lan, Yuan

    2017-03-01

    Hydraulic servomechanism is the typical mechanical/hydraulic double-dynamics coupling system with the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems, which hinder direct applications of many advanced control approaches in the hydraulic servo fields. In this paper, by introducing the singular value perturbation theory, the original double-dynamics coupling model of the hydraulic servomechanism was reduced to a integral chain system. So that, the popular ADRC (active disturbance rejection control) technology could be directly applied to the reduced system. In addition, the high stiffness control and mismatched uncertainties input problems are avoided. The validity of the simplified model is analyzed and proven theoretically. The standard linear ADRC algorithm is then developed based on the obtained reduced-order model. Extensive comparative co-simulations and experiments are carried out to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling and experiments on the drive characteristics of high-strength water hydraulic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zengmeng; Hou, Jiaoyi; Ning, Dayong; Gong, Xiaofeng; Gong, Yongjun

    2017-05-01

    Fluidic artificial muscles are popular in robotics and function as biomimetic actuators. Their pneumatic version has been widely investigated. A novel water hydraulic artificial muscle (WHAM) with high strength is developed in this study. WHAMs can be applied to underwater manipulators widely used in ocean development because of their environment-friendly characteristics, high force-to-weight ratio, and good bio-imitability. Therefore, the strength of WHAMs has been improved to fit the requirements of underwater environments and the work pressure of water hydraulic components. However, understanding the mechanical behaviors of WHAMs is necessary because WHAMs use work media and pressure control that are different from those used by pneumatic artificial muscles. This paper presents the static and dynamic characteristics of the WHAM system, including the water hydraulic pressure control circuit. A test system is designed and built to analyze the drive characteristics of the developed WHAM. The theoretical relationships among the amount of contraction, pressure, and output drawing force of the WHAM are tested and verified. A linearized transfer function is proposed, and the dynamic characteristics of the WHAM are investigated through simulation and inertia load experiments. Simulation results agree with the experimental results and show that the proposed model can be applied to the control of WHAM actuators.

  18. Numerical modeling of solute transport in a sand tank physical model under varying hydraulic gradient and hydrological stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlabachew, Abunu; Shu, Longcang; Wu, Peipeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Xu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    This laboratory study improves the understanding of the impacts of horizontal hydraulic gradient, artificial recharge, and groundwater pumping on solute transport through aquifers. Nine experiments and numerical simulations were carried out using a sand tank. The variable-density groundwater flow and sodium chloride transport were simulated using the three-dimensional numerical model SEAWAT. Numerical modelling results successfully reproduced heads and concentrations observed in the sand tank. A higher horizontal hydraulic gradient enhanced the migration of sodium chloride, particularly in the groundwater flow direction. The application of constant artificial recharge increased the spread of the sodium chloride plume in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. In addition, groundwater pumping accelerated spreading of the sodium chloride plume towards the pumping well. Both higher hydraulic gradient and pumping rate generated oval-shaped plumes in the horizontal plane. However, the artificial recharge process produced stretched plumes. These effects of artificial recharge and groundwater pumping were greater under higher hydraulic gradient. The concentration breakthrough curves indicated that emerging solutions never attained the concentration of the originally injected solution. This is probably because of sorption of sodium chloride onto the silica sand and/or the exchange of sodium chloride between the mobile and immobile liquid domains. The fingering and protruding plume shapes in the numerical models constitute instability zones produced by buoyancy-driven flow. Overall, the results have substantiated the influences of hydraulic gradient, boundary condition, artificial recharge, pumping rate and density differences on solute transport through a homogeneous unconfined aquifer. The implications of these findings are important for managing liquid wastes.

  19. Hydraulic model and steam flow numerical simulation of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Mexico, pipeline network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Gutiérrez, A.; Hernández, A.F.; Martínez, J.I.; Ceceñas, M.; Ovando, R.; Canchola, I.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a hydraulic model and numerical simulation results of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field (CPGF) steam pipeline network are presented. Cerro Prieto is the largest water-dominant geothermal field in the world and its transportation network has 162 producing wells, connected through a network of pipelines that feeds 13 power-generating plants with an installed capacity of 720 MWe. The network is about 125 km long and has parallel high- and low-pressure networks. Prior to this study, it was suspected that steam flow stagnated or reversed from its planned direction in some segments of the network. Yet, the network complexity and extension complicated the analysis of steam transport for adequate delivery to the power plants. Thus, a hydraulic model of the steam transportation system was developed and implemented numerically using an existing simulator, which allowed the overall analysis of the network in order to quantify the pressure and energy losses as well as the steam flow direction in every part of the network. Numerical results of the high-pressure network were obtained which show that the mean relative differences between measured and simulated pressures and flowrates are less than 10%, which is considered satisfactory. Analysis of results led to the detection of areas of opportunity and to the recommendation of changes for improving steam transport. A main contribution of the present work is having simulated satisfactorily the longest (to our knowledge), and probably the most complex, steam pipeline network in the world. - Highlights: • Extensive literature review of flow models of geothermal steam gathering networks. • Hydraulic model of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field steam network. • Selection and validation of the employed pressure-drop model. • Numerical flow simulation of the world's largest geothermal steam gathering network. • Detailed network pressure drop analysis and mapping of steam flow distribution

  20. Modeling Studies to Constrain Fluid and Gas Migration Associated with Hydraulic Fracturing Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, H.; Birdsell, D.; Lackey, G.; Karra, S.; Viswanathan, H. S.; Dempsey, D.

    2015-12-01

    The dramatic increase in the extraction of unconventional oil and gas resources using horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing (fracking) technologies has raised concerns about potential environmental impacts. Large volumes of hydraulic fracturing fluids are injected during fracking. Incidents of stray gas occurrence in shallow aquifers overlying shale gas reservoirs have been reported; whether these are in any way related to fracking continues to be debated. Computational models serve as useful tools for evaluating potential environmental impacts. We present modeling studies of hydraulic fracturing fluid and gas migration during the various stages of well operation, production, and subsequent plugging. The fluid migration models account for overpressure in the gas reservoir, density contrast between injected fluids and brine, imbibition into partially saturated shale, and well operations. Our results highlight the importance of representing the different stages of well operation consistently. Most importantly, well suction and imbibition both play a significant role in limiting upward migration of injected fluids, even in the presence of permeable connecting pathways. In an overall assessment, our fluid migration simulations suggest very low risk to groundwater aquifers when the vertical separation from a shale gas reservoir is of the order of 1000' or more. Multi-phase models of gas migration were developed to couple flow and transport in compromised wellbores and subsurface formations. These models are useful for evaluating both short-term and long-term scenarios of stray methane release. We present simulation results to evaluate mechanisms controlling stray gas migration, and explore relationships between bradenhead pressures and the likelihood of methane release and transport.

  1. Harmonic amplitude dependent dynamic stiffness of hydraulic bushings: Alternate nonlinear models and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredette, Luke; Dreyer, Jason T.; Rook, Todd E.; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic stiffness properties of automotive hydraulic bushings exhibit significant amplitude sensitivity which cannot be captured by linear time-invariant models. Quasi-linear and nonlinear models are therefore proposed with focus on the amplitude sensitivity in magnitude and loss angle spectra (up to 50 Hz). Since production bushing model parameters are unknown, dynamic stiffness tests and laboratory experiments are utilized to extract model parameters. Nonlinear compliance and resistance elements are incorporated, including their interactions in order to improve amplitude sensitive predictions. New solution approximations for the new nonlinear system equations refine the multi-term harmonic balance term method. Quasi-linear models yield excellent accuracy but cannot predict trends in amplitude sensitivity since they rely on available dynamic stiffness measurements. Nonlinear models containing both nonlinear resistance and compliance elements yield superior predictions to those of prior models (with a single nonlinearity) while also providing more physical insight. Suggestion for further work is briefly mentioned.

  2. On the choice of the demand and hydraulic modeling approach to WDN real-time simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaco, Enrico; Pezzinga, Giuseppe; Savic, Dragan

    2017-07-01

    This paper aims to analyze two demand modeling approaches, i.e., top-down deterministic (TDA) and bottom-up stochastic (BUA), with particular reference to their impact on the hydraulic modeling of water distribution networks (WDNs). In the applications, the hydraulic modeling is carried out through the extended period simulation (EPS) and unsteady flow modeling (UFM). Taking as benchmark the modeling conditions that are closest to the WDN's real operation (UFM + BUA), the analysis showed that the traditional use of EPS + TDA produces large pressure head and water discharge errors, which can be attenuated only when large temporal steps (up to 1 h in the case study) are used inside EPS. The use of EPS + BUA always yields better results. Indeed, EPS + BUA already gives a good approximation of the WDN's real operation when intermediate temporal steps (larger than 2 min in the case study) are used for the simulation. The trade-off between consistency of results and computational burden makes EPS + BUA the most suitable tool for real-time WDN simulation, while benefitting from data acquired through smart meters for the parameterization of demand generation models.

  3. Coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics modelling in reactor dynamics codes TRAB-3D and HEXTRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Raety, H.

    1999-01-01

    The reactor dynamics codes for transient and accident analyses inherently include the coupling of neutronics and thermal hydraulics modelling. In Finland a number of codes with 1D and 3D neutronic models have been developed, which include models also for the cooling circuits. They have been used mainly for the needs of Finnish power plants, but some of the codes have also been utilized elsewhere. The continuous validation, simultaneous development, and experiences obtained in commercial applications have considerably improved the performance and range of application of the codes. The fast operation of the codes has enabled realistic analysis of 3D core combined to a full model of the cooling circuit even in such long reactivity scenarios as ATWS. The reactor dynamics methods are developed further and new more detailed models are created for tasks related to increased safety requirements. For thermal hydraulics calculations, an accurate general flow model based on a new solution method has been developed. Although mainly intended for analysis purposes, the reactor dynamics codes also provide reference solutions for simulator applications. As computer capability increases, these more sophisticated methods can be taken into use also in simulator environments. (author)

  4. Modeling of fault reactivation and induced seismicity during hydraulic fracturing of shale-gas reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rinaldi, Antonio P.; Cappa, Frédéric; Moridis, George J.

    2013-07-01

    We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicated fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively

  5. Generalized Thermohydraulics Module GENFLO for Combining With the PWR Core Melting Model, BWR Recriticality Neutronics Model and Fuel Performance Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miettinen, Jaakko; Hamalainen, Anitta; Pekkarinen, Esko

    2002-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic simulation capability for accident conditions is needed at present in VTT in several programs. Traditional thermal hydraulic models are too heavy for simulation in the analysis tasks, where the main emphasis is the rapid neutron dynamics or the core melting. The GENFLO thermal hydraulic model has been developed at VTT for special applications in the combined codes. The basic field equations in GENFLO are for the phase mass, the mixture momentum and phase energy conservation equations. The phase separation is solved with the drift flux model. The basic variables to be solved are the pressure, void fraction, mixture velocity, gas enthalpy, liquid enthalpy, and concentration of non-condensable gas fractions. The validation of the thermohydraulic solution alone includes large break LOCA reflooding experiments and in specific for the severe accident conditions QUENCH tests. In the recriticality analysis the core neutronics is simulated with a two-dimensional transient neutronics code TWODIM. The recriticality with one rapid prompt peak is expected during a severe accident scenario, where the control rods have been melted and ECCS reflooding is started after the depressurization. The GENFLO module simulates the BWR thermohydraulics in this application. The core melting module has been developed for the real time operator training by using the APROS engineering simulators. The core heatup, oxidation, metal and fuel pellet relocation and corium pool formation into the lower plenum are calculated. In this application the GENFLO model simulates the PWR vessel thermohydraulics. In the fuel performance analysis the fuel rod transient behavior is simulated with the FRAPTRAN code. GENFLO simulates the subchannel around a single fuel rod and delivers the heat transfer on the cladding surface for the FRAPTRAN. The transient boundary conditions for the subchannel are transmitted from the system code for operational transient, loss of coolant accidents and

  6. Calibration of hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics for TOC removal modeling in biofilm reactors under different hydraulic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Roche, Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, total organic carbon (TOC) biodegradation was simulated by GPS-X software in biofilm reactors with carriers of plastic rings and glass beads under different hydraulic conditions. Hydrodynamic model by retention time distribution and biokinetic measurement by in-situ batch test served as two significant parts of model calibration. Experimental results showed that TOC removal efficiency was stable in both media due to the enough height of column, although the actual hydraulic volume changed during the variation of hydraulic condition. Simulated TOC removal efficiencies were close to experimental ones with low theil inequality coefficient values (below 0.15). Compared with glass beads, more TOC was removed in the filter with plastic rings due to the larger actual hydraulic volume and lower half saturation coefficient in spite of its lower maximum specific growth rate of biofilm, which highlighted the importance of calibrating hydrodynamic behavior and biokinetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Growth model for large branched three-dimensional hydraulic crack system in gas or oil shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Viet T.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis of gas outflow histories at wellheads shows that the hydraulic crack spacing must be of the order of 0.1 m (rather than 1 m or 10 m). Consequently, the existing models, limited to one or several cracks, are unrealistic. The reality is 105–106 almost vertical hydraulic cracks per fracking stage. Here, we study the growth of two intersecting near-orthogonal systems of parallel hydraulic cracks spaced at 0.1 m, preferably following pre-existing rock joints. One key idea is that, to model lateral cracks branching from a primary crack wall, crack pressurization, by viscous Poiseuille-type flow, of compressible (proppant-laden) frac water must be complemented with the pressurization of a sufficient volume of micropores and microcracks by Darcy-type water diffusion into the shale, to generate tension along existing crack walls, overcoming the strength limit of the cohesive-crack or crack-band model. A second key idea is that enforcing the equilibrium of stresses in cracks, pores and water, with the generation of tension in the solid phase, requires a new three-phase medium concept, which is transitional between Biot’s two-phase medium and Terzaghi’s effective stress and introduces the loading of the solid by pressure gradients of diffusing pore water. A computer program, combining finite elements for deformation and fracture with volume elements for water flow, is developed to validate the new model. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Energy and the subsurface’. PMID:27597791

  8. Hydraulic modelling of fish habitat in urban rivers during high flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, D. J.

    2003-02-01

    In urban rivers, flow regime and channel morphology are the drivers of physical habitat quality for aquatic species. Peak discharges are increased at high flows as a result of impermeable catchments and channel engineering for flood protection schemes. Hazardous conditions and flashy hydrographs mean that measurement of velocities at high flows is a difficult task. This research uses a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3D-CFD) model to simulate hydraulic patterns in two urban river channels. A 3D-CFD code, called SSIIM, was used to simulate hydraulic conditions in two engineered river reaches of the River Tame, Birmingham, UK. These two sites represent channels with different levels of engineering. Models were calibrated and tested using field measurements. Results show that modelled water surface levels and velocity profiles are well simulated. Calibrated roughness heights are compared with those derived from field measurement of sediment size. Numerical experiments are used to assess the relationship between grid resolution in the vertical dimension and the form of the modelled velocity profiles. Biologists have used laboratory experiments to determine maximum sustainable swimming speeds (MSSS) of fish, often in order to assess what level of a particular pollutant may be tolerable. In this work, simulations of high-flow hydraulic patterns are used to compare velocity patterns with fish MSSS. Results show that when the water levels rise to fill the first channel of the two-stage channels at the sites, which occurred 16 times in 2000, MSSS are surpassed in the majority of available habitat, suggesting that excessive velocities at high flows are one factor that limits fish habitat. A comparison between the two reaches shows that there is less available habitat in the more modified reach. Conclusions suggest that an approach that integrates water quality issues and physical channel characteristics must be taken in river rehabilitation schemes, as

  9. Development of the Real-time Core and Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Kori-1 Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jin Hyuk; Lee, Myeong Soo; Hwang, Do Hyun; Byon, Soo Jin

    2010-01-01

    The operation of the Kori-Unit 1 (1723.5MWt) is expanded to additional 10 years with upgrades of the Main Control Room (MCR). Therefore, the revision of the procedures, performance tests and works related with the exchange of the Main Control Board (MCB) are currently carried out. And as a part of it, the fullscope simulator for the Kori-1 is being developed for the purpose of the pre-operation and emergence response capability for the operators. The purpose of this paper is to report on the performance of the developed neutronics and thermal-hydraulic (TH) models of Kori Unit 1 simulator. The neutronics model is based on the NESTLE code and TH model based on the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulics analysis code which was funded as FY-93 LDRD Project 7201 and is running on the commercial simulator environment tool (the 3KeyMaster TM of the WSC). As some examples for the verification of the developed neutronics and TH models, some figures are provided. The outputs of the developed neutronics and TH models are in accord with the Nuclear Design Report (NDR) and Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) of the reference plant

  10. Modelling the Hydraulic Behaviour of Growing Media with the Explicit Finite Volume Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Carbone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing imperviousness of urban areas reduces the infiltration and evapotranspiration capacity of urban catchments and results in increased runoff. In the last few decades, several solutions and techniques have been proposed to prevent such impacts by restoring the hydrological cycle. A limiting factor in spreading the use of such systems is the lack of proper modelling tools for design, especially for the infiltration processes in a growing medium. In this research, a physically-based model, employing the explicit Finite Volume Method (FVM, is proposed for modelling infiltration into growing media. The model solves a modified version of the Richards equation using a formulation which takes into account the main characteristics of green infrastructure substrates. The proposed model was verified against the HYDRUS-1D software and the comparison of results confirmed the suitability of the proposed model for correctly describing the hydraulic behaviour of soil substrates.

  11. Flower, a Model for the Analysis of Hydraulic Networks and Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2003-01-01

    We have developed in the past years a model that describes hydraulic networks that are typical of the cryogenic interconnection of superconducting magnets. The original model, called Flower, was used mostly to provide consistent boundary conditions for the operation of a magnet. The main limitations were associated with the number and nature of modelling elements available, and to the maximum size of the model that could be solved. Here we present an improvement of the model largely relaxing the above limitations by the addition of new modelling elements, such as parallel flow heat exchangers, and by a significant improvement in the numerics of the solver, using sparse matrix storage and solution techniques. We finally show a typical application to the case of a magnet quench in the LHC string.

  12. A model selection support system for numerical simulations of nuclear thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, Akio; Shimizu, Kenji; Sugano, Keiji; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Wakabayashi, Jiro

    1990-01-01

    In order to execute efficiently a dynamic simulation of a large-scaled engineering system such as a nuclear power plant, it is necessary to develop intelligent simulation support system for all phases of the simulation. This study is concerned with the intelligent support for the program development phase and is engaged in the adequate model selection support method by applying AI (Artificial Intelligence) techniques to execute a simulation consistent with its purpose and conditions. A proto-type expert system to support the model selection for numerical simulations of nuclear thermal-hydraulics in the case of cold leg small break loss-of-coolant accident of PWR plant is now under development on a personal computer. The steps to support the selection of both fluid model and constitutive equations for the drift flux model have been developed. Several cases of model selection were carried out and reasonable model selection results were obtained. (author)

  13. Linking hydraulic traits to tropical forest function in a size-structured and trait-driven model (TFS v.1-Hydro)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Bradley O.; Gloor, Manuel; Fauset, Sophie; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Galbraith, David R.; Baker, Timothy R.; Kruijt, Bart; Rowland, Lucy; Fisher, Rosie A.; Binks, Oliver J.; Sevanto, Sanna; Xu, Chonggang; Jansen, Steven; Choat, Brendan; Mencuccini, Maurizio; McDowell, Nate G.; Meir, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Forest ecosystem models based on heuristic water stress functions poorly predict tropical forest response to drought partly because they do not capture the diversity of hydraulic traits (including variation in tree size) observed in tropical forests. We developed a continuous porous media approach to modeling plant hydraulics in which all parameters of the constitutive equations are biologically interpretable and measurable plant hydraulic traits (e.g., turgor loss point πtlp, bulk elastic modulus ɛ, hydraulic capacitance Cft, xylem hydraulic conductivity ks,max, water potential at 50 % loss of conductivity for both xylem (P50,x) and stomata (P50,gs), and the leaf : sapwood area ratio Al : As). We embedded this plant hydraulics model within a trait forest simulator (TFS) that models light environments of individual trees and their upper boundary conditions (transpiration), as well as providing a means for parameterizing variation in hydraulic traits among individuals. We synthesized literature and existing databases to parameterize all hydraulic traits as a function of stem and leaf traits, including wood density (WD), leaf mass per area (LMA), and photosynthetic capacity (Amax), and evaluated the coupled model (called TFS v.1-Hydro) predictions, against observed diurnal and seasonal variability in stem and leaf water potential as well as stand-scaled sap flux. Our hydraulic trait synthesis revealed coordination among leaf and xylem hydraulic traits and statistically significant relationships of most hydraulic traits with more easily measured plant traits. Using the most informative empirical trait-trait relationships derived from this synthesis, TFS v.1-Hydro successfully captured individual variation in leaf and stem water potential due to increasing tree size and light environment, with model representation of hydraulic architecture and plant traits exerting primary and secondary controls, respectively, on the fidelity of model predictions. The plant

  14. Linking hydraulic traits to tropical forest function in a size-structured and trait-driven model (TFS v.1-Hydro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. O. Christoffersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Forest ecosystem models based on heuristic water stress functions poorly predict tropical forest response to drought partly because they do not capture the diversity of hydraulic traits (including variation in tree size observed in tropical forests. We developed a continuous porous media approach to modeling plant hydraulics in which all parameters of the constitutive equations are biologically interpretable and measurable plant hydraulic traits (e.g., turgor loss point πtlp, bulk elastic modulus ε, hydraulic capacitance Cft, xylem hydraulic conductivity ks,max, water potential at 50 % loss of conductivity for both xylem (P50,x and stomata (P50,gs, and the leaf : sapwood area ratio Al : As. We embedded this plant hydraulics model within a trait forest simulator (TFS that models light environments of individual trees and their upper boundary conditions (transpiration, as well as providing a means for parameterizing variation in hydraulic traits among individuals. We synthesized literature and existing databases to parameterize all hydraulic traits as a function of stem and leaf traits, including wood density (WD, leaf mass per area (LMA, and photosynthetic capacity (Amax, and evaluated the coupled model (called TFS v.1-Hydro predictions, against observed diurnal and seasonal variability in stem and leaf water potential as well as stand-scaled sap flux. Our hydraulic trait synthesis revealed coordination among leaf and xylem hydraulic traits and statistically significant relationships of most hydraulic traits with more easily measured plant traits. Using the most informative empirical trait–trait relationships derived from this synthesis, TFS v.1-Hydro successfully captured individual variation in leaf and stem water potential due to increasing tree size and light environment, with model representation of hydraulic architecture and plant traits exerting primary and secondary controls, respectively, on the fidelity of model

  15. Modeling and analysis of a meso-hydraulic climbing robot with artificial muscle actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Edward M; Jenkins, Tyler E; Bryant, Matthew

    2017-07-10

    This paper presents a fully coupled electro-hydraulic model of a bio-inspired climbing robot actuated by fluidic artificial muscles (FAMs). This analysis expands upon previous FAM literature by considering not only the force and contraction characteristics of the actuator, but the complete hydraulic and electromechanical circuits as well as the dynamics of the climbing robot. This analysis allows modeling of the time-varying applied pressure, electrical current, and actuator contraction for accurate prediction of the robot motion, energy consumption, and mechanical work output. The developed model is first validated against mechanical and electrical data collected from a proof-of-concept prototype robot. The model is then employed to study the system-level sensitivities of the robot locomotion efficiency and average climbing speed to several design and operating parameters. The results of this analysis demonstrate that considering only the transduction efficiency of the FAM actuators is insufficient to maximize the efficiency of the complete robot, and that a holistic approach can lead to significant improvements in performance. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  16. A new empirical model for estimating the hydraulic conductivity of low permeability media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, S.; Wen, Z.; Lu, C.; Shu, L.; Shao, J.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Huang, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (K) is one of the significant soil characteristics in terms of flow movement and solute transport. It has been recognized that K is statistically related to the grain-size distribution. Numerous models have been developed to reveal the relationship between K and the grain-size distribution of soil, but most of these are inappropriate for fine-grained media. Therefore, a new empirical model for estimating K of low permeability media was proposed in this study. In total, the values of K of 30 soil samples collected in the Jiangning District of Nanjing were measured using the single-ring infiltrometer method. The new model was developed using the percentages of sand, silt and clay-sized particles, and the first and the second rank moment of the grain-size through the moment method as predictor variables. Multivariate nonlinear regression analysis yielded a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.75, indicating that this empirical model seems to provide a new approach for the indirect determination of hydraulic conductivity of low permeability media.

  17. A whole-plant hydraulic capacitance approach to modeling distributed root water uptake and actual transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Tomas; Votrubova, Jana; Dohnal, Michal; Dusek, Jaromir

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, we propose a simple transpiration stream model, based on the concept of whole-plant hydraulic capacitance. The suggested algorithm is implemented in a one-dimensional soil water flow model involving vertically distributed macroscopic root water uptake. The proposed transient plant water storage approach is compared with the more conventionally used quasi- steady-state approach. Both approaches are used to simulate soil water flow and diurnal variations of transpiration at a forest site covered with Norway spruce. The key parameter of the transient storage approach - plant hydraulic capacitance - is estimated by comparing the variations of potential transpiration rate, derived from micrometeorological measurements, with observed sap flow intensities. The application of the proposed model leads to improved predictions of root water uptake and actual transpiration rates. The algorithm can be easily implemented into existing soil water flow models and used to simulate transpiration stream responses to varying atmospheric and soil moisture conditions including isohydric and anisohydric plant responses to drought stress.

  18. Improving Predictions of Tree Drought Mortality in the Community Land Model Using Hydraulic Physiology Theory and its Effects on Carbon Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNellis, B.; Hudiburg, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    Tree mortality due to drought is predicted to have increasing impacts on ecosystem structure and function during the 21st century. Models can attempt to predict which forests are most at risk from drought, but novel environments may preclude analysis that relies on past observations. The inclusion of more mechanistic detail may reduce uncertainty in predictions, but can also compound model complexity, especially in global models. The Community Land Model version 5 (CLM5), itself a component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), has recently integrated cohort-based demography into its dynamic vegetation component and is in the process of coupling this demography to a model of plant hydraulic physiology (FATES-Hydro). Previous treatment of drought stress and plant mortality within CLM has been relatively broad, but a detailed hydraulics module represents a key step towards accurate mortality prognosis. Here, we examine the structure of FATES-Hydro with respect to two key physiological attributes: tissue osmotic potentials and embolism refilling. Specifically, we ask how FATES-Hydro captures mechanistic realism within each attribute and how much support there is within the physiological literature for its further elaboration within the model structure. Additionally, connections to broader aspects of carbon metabolism within FATES are explored to better resolve emergent consequences of drought stress on ecosystem function and tree demographics. An on-going field experiment in managed stands of Pinus ponderosa and mixed conifers is assessed for model parameterization and performance across PNW forests, with important implications for future forest management strategy.

  19. Predictive modeling of liquid-sodium thermal–hydraulics experiments and computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, Erkan; Cacuci, Dan G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied the predictive modeling method of Cacuci and Ionescu-Bujor (2010). • We assimilated data from sodium flow experiments. • We used computational fluid dynamics simulations of sodium experiments. • The predictive modeling method greatly reduced uncertainties in predicted results. - Abstract: This work applies the predictive modeling procedure formulated by Cacuci and Ionescu-Bujor (2010) to assimilate data from liquid-sodium thermal–hydraulics experiments in order to reduce systematically the uncertainties in the predictions of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. The predicted CFD-results for the best-estimate model parameters and results describing sodium-flow velocities and temperature distributions are shown to be significantly more precise than the original computations and experiments, in that the predicted uncertainties for the best-estimate results and model parameters are significantly smaller than both the originally computed and the experimental uncertainties

  20. Validation of ANUGA hydraulic model using exact solutions to shallow water wave problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungkasi, S; Roberts, S G

    2013-01-01

    ANUGA is an open source and free software developed by the Australian National University (ANU) and Geoscience Australia (GA). This software is a hydraulic numerical model used to solve the two-dimensional shallow water equations. The numerical method underlying it is a finite volume method. This paper presents some validation results of ANUGA with respect to exact solutions to shallow water flow problems. We identify the strengths of ANUGA and comment on future work that may be taken into account for ANUGA development.

  1. Experimental Validation of Modelled Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Hydraulic On/Off Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Christian; Bech, Michael Møller; Roemer, Daniel Beck

    2015-01-01

    A prototype of a fast switching valve for a digital hydraulic machine has been designed and manufactured. The valve is composed of an annular seat plunger connected with a moving coil actuator as the force producing element. The valve prototype is designed for flow rates of 600 l/min with less than...... validate a transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the fluid forces that oppose the valve plunger when moving rapidly through the surrounding oil during switching. Due to the fast switching of the valve, the fluid forces which oppose plunger movement increases drastically as the plunger...

  2. Training Module on the Evaluation of Best Modeling Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building upon the fundamental concepts outlined in previous modules, the objectives of this module are to explore the topic of model evaluation and identify the 'best modeling practices' and strategies for the Evaluation Stage of the model life-cycle.

  3. Incorporating hydraulic/hydromorphologic properties and their stage dependency into hydrologic compartmental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, A.; Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    According to recent studies, the volumetric error of the predicted size of the spring flood in Sweden can be as large as 20%. A significant part of this error originates from simplifications in the spatial and hydrodynamic description of watercourse networks, as well as statistical problems to give proper weight to extreme flows. Possible ways to improve current hydrological modelling practises is by making models more adapted to varying flow conditions as well as by increasing the coupling between model parameters and physical catchment characteristics. This study formulates a methodology based in hydrodynamical/hydraulic theory to investigate how river network characteristics vary with flow stage and how to transfer this information to compartmental hydrologic models such as the HBV/HYPE models. This is particularly important during extreme flows when a significant portion of the water flows outside the normal stream channels. The aim is to combine knowledge about the hydrodynamics and hydro-morphology of watercourse networks to improve the predictions of peak flows. HYPE is a semi-distributed conceptual compartmental hydrological model which is currently being developed at the SMHI as a successor to the HBV model. The model (HYPE) is thought to be better adapted to varying flow conditions by using the dynamical response functions derived by the methodology described here. The distribution of residence times within the watercourse network - and how these depend on flow stage is analysed. This information is then incorporated into the response functions of the HYPE model, i.e. the compartmental model receives a dynamic transformation function relating river discharge to storativity within the sub-catchment. This response function hence reflects the topologic and hydromorphologic characteristics of the watercourse network as well as flow stage. Seven subcatchments in Rönne River basin (1900 km2) are studied to show how this approach can improve the prediction of

  4. Suitability of parametric models to describe the hydraulic properties of an unsaturated coarse sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Andy; Rudolph, David L.; Kachanoski , R. Gary

    1998-01-01

    The performance of parametric models used to describe soil water retention (SWR) properties and predict unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (K) as a function of volumetric water content (θ) is examined using SWR and K(θ) data for coarse sand and gravel sediments. Six 70 cm long, 10 cm diameter cores of glacial outwash were instrumented at eight depths with porous cup ten-siometers and time domain reflectometry probes to measure soil water pressure head (h) and θ, respectively, for seven unsaturated and one saturated steady-state flow conditions. Forty-two θ(h) and K(θ) relationships were measured from the infiltration tests on the cores. Of the four SWR models compared in the analysis, the van Genuchten (1980) equation with parameters m and n restricted according to the Mualem (m = 1 - 1/n) criterion is best suited to describe the θ(h) relationships. The accuracy of two models that predict K(θ) using parameter values derived from the SWR models was also evaluated. The model developed by van Genuchten (1980) based on the theoretical expression of Mualem (1976) predicted K(θ) more accurately than the van Genuchten (1980) model based on the theory of Burdine (1953). A sensitivity analysis shows that more accurate predictions of K(θ) are achieved using SWR model parameters derived with residual water content (θr) specified according to independent measurements of θ at values of h where θ/h ∼ 0 rather than model-fit θr values. The accuracy of the model K(θ) function improves markedly when at least one value of unsaturated K is used to scale the K(θ) function predicted using the saturated K. The results of this investigation indicate that the hydraulic properties of coarse-grained sediments can be accurately described using the parametric models. In addition, data collection efforts should focus on measuring at least one value of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity and as complete a set of SWR data as possible, particularly in the dry range.

  5. Testing sensitivity of the LISFLOOD subgrid hydraulic model to SAR image derived information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Melissa; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeff; Hostache, Renaud; Matgen, Patrick; Chini, Marco; Giustarini, Laura

    2013-04-01

    There has been much interest in the use of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images to indirectly estimate flood extent and flood elevation to aid the understanding of fluvial flood inundation processes. SAR remote sensing satellites are capable of all-weather day/night observations that can discriminate between land and smooth open water surfaces over large scales. By combining SAR derived information with 2D hydraulic models and terrain data, the mechanisms of flooding can be better simulated therefore enabling more accurate and reliable flood forecasting. The objective of this study is to test the sensitivity of a LISFLOOD subgrid 2D model to its main parameters (i.e. roughness coefficient, river bathymetry) using SAR derived flood extent maps. Because of SAR imaging techniques and processing steps used to derive the flood information, any SAR-derived flood extent image will contain inherent uncertainty. We therefore use the uncertainty of the SAR information to obtain a range of plausible parameters to test sensitivity of the hydraulic model. LISFLOOD is a distributed 2D model developed at the University of Bristol and designed for use with larger ungauged river catchments. The version used employs a subgrid procedure which allows any size of river channel below that of the grid resolution to be represented. This procedure has been shown to improve hydraulic connectivity within the modelled flooded area and thus improve flood prediction for data sparse areas. A hydrodynamic LISFLOOD subgrid model of the River Severn at Tewkesbury covering a domain area of 50x70km and including the confluence with a major tributary (the River Avon) will be utilised. A complete storm hydrograph will be used as inflow to the model to simulate the full flood event. Surveyed cross section and gauged daily flows are also available for the River Severn. Therefore, the model results using variable parameters can be compared against results obtained from ground observations to further

  6. Elucidating hydraulic fracturing impacts on groundwater quality using a regional geospatial statistical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Taylour G; Rifai, Hanadi S; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Fontenot, Brian E; Schug, Kevin A

    2016-03-01

    Hydraulic fracturing operations have been viewed as the cause of certain environmental issues including groundwater contamination. The potential for hydraulic fracturing to induce contaminant pathways in groundwater is not well understood since gas wells are completed while isolating the water table and the gas-bearing reservoirs lay thousands of feet below the water table. Recent studies have attributed ground water contamination to poor well construction and leaks in the wellbore annulus due to ruptured wellbore casings. In this paper, a geospatial model of the Barnett Shale region was created using ArcGIS. The model was used for spatial analysis of groundwater quality data in order to determine if regional variations in groundwater quality, as indicated by various groundwater constituent concentrations, may be associated with the presence of hydraulically fractured gas wells in the region. The Barnett Shale reservoir pressure, completions data, and fracture treatment data were evaluated as predictors of groundwater quality change. Results indicated that elevated concentrations of certain groundwater constituents are likely related to natural gas production in the study area and that beryllium, in this formation, could be used as an indicator variable for evaluating fracturing impacts on regional groundwater quality. Results also indicated that gas well density and formation pressures correlate to change in regional water quality whereas proximity to gas wells, by itself, does not. The results also provided indirect evidence supporting the possibility that micro annular fissures serve as a pathway transporting fluids and chemicals from the fractured wellbore to the overlying groundwater aquifers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. FEQinput—An editor for the full equations (FEQ) hydraulic modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancalle, David S.; Ancalle, Pablo J.; Domanski, Marian M.

    2017-10-30

    IntroductionThe Full Equations Model (FEQ) is a computer program that solves the full, dynamic equations of motion for one-dimensional unsteady hydraulic flow in open channels and through control structures. As a result, hydrologists have used FEQ to design and operate flood-control structures, delineate inundation maps, and analyze peak-flow impacts. To aid in fighting floods, hydrologists are using the software to develop a system that uses flood-plain models to simulate real-time streamflow.Input files for FEQ are composed of text files that contain large amounts of parameters, data, and instructions that are written in a format exclusive to FEQ. Although documentation exists that can aid in the creation and editing of these input files, new users face a steep learning curve in order to understand the specific format and language of the files.FEQinput provides a set of tools to help a new user overcome the steep learning curve associated with creating and modifying input files for the FEQ hydraulic model and the related utility tool, Full Equations Utilities (FEQUTL).

  8. The application of Biological-Hydraulic coupled model for Tubificidae-microorganism interaction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao; Sun, Peide; Song, Yingqi; Wang, Ruyi; Fang, Zhiguo

    2010-11-01

    Based on the fully coupled activated sludge model (FCASM), the novel model Tubificidae -Fully Coupled Activated Sludge Model-hydraulic (T-FCASM-Hydro), has been developed in our previous work. T-FCASM-Hydro not only describe the interactive system between Tubificidae and functional microorganisms for the sludge reduction and nutrient removal simultaneously, but also considere the interaction between biological and hydraulic field, After calibration and validation of T-FCASM-Hydro at Zhuji Feida-hongyu Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Zhejiang province, T-FCASM-Hydro was applied for determining optimal operating condition in the WWTP. Simulation results showed that nitrogen and phosphorus could be removed efficiently, and the efficiency of NH4+-N removal enhanced with increase of DO concentration. At a certain low level of DO concentration in the aerobic stage, shortcut nitrification-denitrification dominated in the process of denitrification in the novel system. However, overhigh agitation (>6 mgṡL-1) could result in the unfavorable feeding behavior of Tubificidae because of the strong flow disturbance, which might lead to low rate of sludge reduction. High sludge reduction rate and high removal rate of nitrogen and phosphorus could be obtained in the new-style oxidation ditch when DO concentration at the aerobic stage with Tubificidae was maintained at 3.6 gṡm-3.

  9. Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical-Chemical Modeling of Water Leak-Off Process during Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale Gas Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The water leak-off during hydraulic fracturing in shale gas reservoirs is a complicated transport behavior involving thermal (T, hydrodynamic (H, mechanical (M and chemical (C processes. Although many leak-off models have been published, none of the models fully coupled the transient fluid flow modeling with heat transfer, chemical-potential equilibrium and natural-fracture dilation phenomena. In this paper, a coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC model based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, thermo-poroelastic rock mechanics, and non-isothermal chemical-potential equations is presented to simulate the water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The THMC model takes into account a triple-porosity medium, which includes hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and shale matrix. The leak-off simulation with the THMC model involves all the important processes in this triple-porosity medium, including: (1 water transport driven by hydraulic, capillary, chemical and thermal osmotic convections; (2 gas transport induced by both hydraulic pressure driven convection and adsorption; (3 heat transport driven by thermal convection and conduction; and (4 natural-fracture dilation considered as a thermo-poroelastic rock deformation. The fluid and heat transport, coupled with rock deformation, are described by a set of partial differential equations resulting from the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The semi-implicit finite-difference algorithm is proposed to solve these equations. The evolution of pressure, temperature, saturation and salinity profiles of hydraulic fractures, natural fractures and matrix is calculated, revealing the multi-field coupled water leak-off process in shale gas reservoirs. The influences of hydraulic pressure, natural-fracture dilation, chemical osmosis and thermal osmosis on water leak-off are investigated. Results from this study are expected to provide a better understanding of the

  10. BRISENT: An Entropy-Based Model for Bridge-Pier Scour Estimation under Complex Hydraulic Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Pizarro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to introduce the first clear-water scour model based on both the informational entropy concept and the principle of maximum entropy, showing that a variational approach is ideal for describing erosional processes under complex situations. The proposed bridge–pier scour entropic (BRISENT model is capable of reproducing the main dynamics of scour depth evolution under steady hydraulic conditions, step-wise hydrographs, and flood waves. For the calibration process, 266 clear-water scour experiments from 20 precedent studies were considered, where the dimensionless parameters varied widely. Simple formulations are proposed to estimate BRISENT’s fitting coefficients, in which the ratio between pier-diameter and sediment-size was the most critical physical characteristic controlling scour model parametrization. A validation process considering highly unsteady and multi-peaked hydrographs was carried out, showing that the proposed BRISENT model reproduces scour evolution with high accuracy.

  11. IMPROVEMENT OF THE LOCA PSA MODEL USING A BEST-ESTIMATE THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG HYUN LEE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA has been widely used to estimate the overall safety of nuclear power plants (NPP and it provides base information for risk informed application (RIA and risk informed regulation (RIR. For the effective and correct use of PSA in RIA/RIR related decision making, the risk estimated by a PSA model should be as realistic as possible. In this work, a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs for the Hanul Nuclear Units 3&4 is first carried out in a systematic way. That is, the behaviors of peak cladding temperature (PCT were analyzed with various combinations of break sizes, the operating conditions of safety systems, and the operator's action time for aggressive secondary cooling. Thereafter, the results of the thermal-hydraulic analysis have been reflected in the improvement of the PSA model by changing both accident sequences and success criteria of the event trees for the LOCA scenarios.

  12. A Computer Model for the Hydraulic Analysis of Open Channel Cross Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Shayya

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Irrigation and hydraulic engineers are often faced with the difficulty of tedious trial solutions of the Manning equation to determine the various geometric elements of open channels. This paper addresses the development of a computer model for the design of the most commonly used channel-sections. The developed model is intended as an educational tool. It may be applied to the hydraulic design of trapezoidal , rectangular, triangular, parabolic, round-concered rectangular, and circular cross sections. Two procedures were utilized for the solution of the encountered implicit equations; the Newton-Raphson and the Regula-Falsi methods.  In order to initiate the solution process , these methods require one and two initial guesses, respectively. Tge result revealed that the Regula-Flasi method required more iterations to coverage to the solution compared to the Newton-Raphson method, irrespective of the nearness of the initial guess to the actual solution. The average number of iterations for the Regula-Falsi method was approximately three times that of the Newton-Raphson method.

  13. A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiajing; Yang, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    A novel thermo-hydraulic coupling model was proposed in this study to investigate the crater formation in electrical discharge machining (EDM). The temperature distribution of workpiece materials was included, and the crater formation process was explained from the perspective of hydrodynamic characteristics of the molten region. To better track the morphology of the crater and the movement of debris, the level-set method was introduced in this study. Simulation results showed that the crater appears shortly after the ignition of the discharge, and the molten material is removed by vaporizing in the initial stage, then by splashing at the following time. The driving force for the detachment of debris in the splashing removal stage comes from the extremely large pressure difference in the upper part of the molten region, and the morphology of the crater is also influenced by the shearing flow of molten material. It was found that the removal ratio of molten material is only about 7.63% under the studied conditions, leaving most to form the re-solidification layer on the surface of the crater. The size of the crater reaches the maximum at the end of discharge duration then experiences a slight reduction because of the reflux of molten material after the discharge. The results of single pulse discharge experiments showed that the morphologies and sizes between the simulation crater and actual crater are good at agreement, verifying the feasibility of the proposed thermo-hydraulic coupling model in explaining the mechanisms of crater formation in EDM.

  14. A high resolution coupled hydrologic-hydraulic model (HiResFlood-UCI) for flash flood modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phu; Thorstensen, Andrea; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuolin; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sanders, Brett; Koren, Victor; Cui, Zhengtao; Smith, Michael

    2016-10-01

    HiResFlood-UCI was developed by coupling the NWS's hydrologic model (HL-RDHM) with the hydraulic model (BreZo) for flash flood modeling at decameter resolutions. The coupled model uses HL-RDHM as a rainfall-runoff generator and replaces the routing scheme of HL-RDHM with the 2D hydraulic model (BreZo) in order to predict localized flood depths and velocities. A semi-automated technique of unstructured mesh generation was developed to cluster an adequate density of computational cells along river channels such that numerical errors are negligible compared with other sources of error, while ensuring that computational costs of the hydraulic model are kept to a bare minimum. HiResFlood-UCI was implemented for a watershed (ELDO2) in the DMIP2 experiment domain in Oklahoma. Using synthetic precipitation input, the model was tested for various components including HL-RDHM parameters (a priori versus calibrated), channel and floodplain Manning n values, DEM resolution (10 m versus 30 m) and computation mesh resolution (10 m+ versus 30 m+). Simulations with calibrated versus a priori parameters of HL-RDHM show that HiResFlood-UCI produces reasonable results with the a priori parameters from NWS. Sensitivities to hydraulic model resistance parameters, mesh resolution and DEM resolution are also identified, pointing to the importance of model calibration and validation for accurate prediction of localized flood intensities. HiResFlood-UCI performance was examined using 6 measured precipitation events as model input for model calibration and validation of the streamflow at the outlet. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) obtained ranges from 0.588 to 0.905. The model was also validated for the flooded map using USGS observed water level at an interior point. The predicted flood stage error is 0.82 m or less, based on a comparison to measured stage. Validation of stage and discharge predictions builds confidence in model predictions of flood extent and localized velocities

  15. Recent advances in modeling and validation of nuclear thermal-hydraulics applications with NEPTUNE CFD - 15471

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guingo, M.; Baudry, C.; Hassanaly, M.; Lavieville, J.; Mechitouna, N.; Merigoux, N.; Mimouni, S.; Bestion, D.; Coste, P.; Morel, C.

    2015-01-01

    NEPTUNE CFD is a Computational Multi-(Fluid) Dynamics code dedicated to the simulation of multiphase flows, primarily targeting nuclear thermo-hydraulics applications, such as the departure from nuclear boiling (DNB) or the two-phase Pressurized Thermal Shock (PTS). It is co-developed within the joint research/development project NEPTUNE (AREVA, CEA, EDF, IRSN) since 2001. Over the years, to address the aforementioned applications, dedicated physical models and numerical methods have been developed and implemented in the code, including specific sets of models for turbulent boiling flows and two-phase non-adiabatic stratified flows. This paper aims at summarizing the current main modeling capabilities of the code, and gives an overview of the associated validation database. A brief summary of emerging applications of the code, such as containment simulation during a potential severe accident or in-vessel retention, is also provided. (authors)

  16. SPATIAL-TEMPORAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATERBORNE INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK USING THE HYDRAULIC MODEL AND OUTPATIENT DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ayako; Sakuma, Taisuke; Kazama, So

    This study evaluated waterborne infectious diseases risk and incidence rate around Phonm Penh in Cambodia. We use the hydraulic flood simulation, coliform bacterium diffusion model, dose-response model and outpatient data for quantitative analysis. The results obtained are as follows; 1. The incidence (incidence rate) of diarrhea as water borne diseases risk is 0.14 million people (9%) in the inundation area. 2. The residents in the inundation area are exposed up to 4 times as high risk as daily mean calculated by the integrated model combined in the regional scale. 3.The infectious disease risk due to floods and inundation indicated is effective as an element to explain the risk. The scenario explains 34% number of patient estimated by the outpatient data.

  17. Inverse Modeling of Soil Hydraulic Parameters Based on a Hybrid of Vector-Evaluated Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Bo Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The accurate estimation of soil hydraulic parameters (θs, α, n, and Ks of the van Genuchten–Mualem model has attracted considerable attention. In this study, we proposed a new two-step inversion method, which first estimated the hydraulic parameter θs using objective function by the final water content, and subsequently estimated the soil hydraulic parameters α, n, and Ks, using a vector-evaluated genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization (VEGA-PSO method based on objective functions by cumulative infiltration and infiltration rate. The parameters were inversely estimated for four types of soils (sand, loam, silt, and clay under an in silico experiment simulating the tension disc infiltration at three initial water content levels. The results indicated that the method is excellent and robust. Because the objective function had multilocal minima in a tiny range near the true values, inverse estimation of the hydraulic parameters was difficult; however, the estimated soil water retention curves and hydraulic conductivity curves were nearly identical to the true curves. In addition, the proposed method was able to estimate the hydraulic parameters accurately despite substantial measurement errors in initial water content, final water content, and cumulative infiltration, proving that the method was feasible and practical for field application.

  18. Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin dam-hydraulic system, travel time and temperature modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devkota, Bishnu; Imberger, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    SummaryTiete River System in the State of Sao Paolo, Brazil is characterized by complex hydraulics and operational problems due to series of dams and point and diffuse inflows along the river. A one dimension Lagrangian river model was developed and applied to the 313 km reach of the Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin from the Penha Dam to the head water of Bara Bonita Reservoir, a stretch of river that includes six small to medium size dams (3.4-22 m high) including the Pirapora Reservoir and 26 inflows into the river (11 tributaries, 9 diffuse source areas, and discharges of 4 cities stormwater and 2 wastewater treatment plants. The conservative tracer transport and temperature model that accounts for the short and long wave radiation and heat transfers at the free surface was included and solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The time variable catchment input to the model was the simulated output of the external hydrological model called Runoff Load Model which results were provided by CETESB. The numerical treatment of series of dams and spillway (that included uncontrolled overflow spillway, gate-controlled ogee spillway; and underflow gates and tunnels) and parameterisation of hydraulic jumps are described. Special attention was focused on the high spatial and temporal variation of flows in Tiete River Basin, a result of the large variation in catchment inflows and channel geometry due to dams and reservoirs along the river. Predicted and measured spatial and seasonal variation of flow and temperature profiles along the river show good agreement. The simulated travel time of conservative tracer is compared against the CETESB's 1982 and 1984 field study data in a 254 km reach of the Middle Tiete River that again shows good agreement. Being Lagrangian in construction, this new model is computationally efficient making it an ideal tool for long term simulation for water resource planning, management and operation decision making in a large and complex river

  19. Post-excavation analysis of a revised hydraulic model of the Room 209 fracture, URL, Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winberg, A.; Tin Chan; Griffiths, P.; Nakka, B.

    1989-10-01

    An excavation response test was conducted in the Room 209 on the 240 m level of the AECL Underground Research Laboratory. Model predictions prior to excavation were made of the geomechanical response of the rock mass and the hydraulic response of an intercepted fracture. The model results were compared with excavation response data collected in a comprehensive instrument array. The work performed has addressed discrepancies between calculated and in-situ measured hydraulic response as part of a post-test analysis. Already existing hydraulic conceptual models of the fracture were revised and any available information was included in the new model. The model reproduced the pre-excavation hydraulic head distribution and hydraulic test results in terms of normalized flow rate within 5% and 75%, respectively. It was also found that the model reproduced the results of cross-hole hydraulic interference tests at least from a qualitative standpoint. The next stage of the modelling addressed the response of the model to a simulation of the excavated pilot tunnel. The preliminary results suggested the presence of a skin of different permeability in a thin zone around the periphery of the tunnel. By altering the permeability in the floor and along the walls and roof of the periphery, a better correspondence between calculated and measured drawdown was obtained. The same also applied for measured groundwater inflow in quantity, though not for the actual distribution on inflow. As probable causes for the interpreted positive skin in the crown and wall, temporary partial unsaturation and propulsion of debris into the fracture were suggested. The negative skin in the floor was interpreted as an effect of the dense and high energy charges used in the excavation process. (authors)

  20. Model predictive control-based dynamic coordinate strategy for hydraulic hub-motor auxiliary system of a heavy commercial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaohua; Li, Guanghan; Yin, Guodong; Song, Dafeng; Li, Sheng; Yang, Nannan

    2018-02-01

    Equipping a hydraulic hub-motor auxiliary system (HHMAS), which mainly consists of a hydraulic variable pump, a hydraulic hub-motor, a hydraulic valve block and hydraulic accumulators, with part-time all-wheel-drive functions improves the power performance and fuel economy of heavy commercial vehicles. The coordinated control problem that occurs when HHMAS operates in the auxiliary drive mode is addressed in this paper; the solution to this problem is the key to the maximization of HHMAS. To achieve a reasonable distribution of the engine power between mechanical and hydraulic paths, a nonlinear control scheme based on model predictive control (MPC) is investigated. First, a nonlinear model of HHMAS with vehicle dynamics and tire slip characteristics is built, and a controller-design-oriented model is simplified. Then, a steady-state feedforward + dynamic MPC feedback controller (FMPC) is designed to calculate the control input sequence of engine torque and hydraulic variable pump displacement. Finally, the controller is tested in the MATLAB/Simulink and AMESim co-simulation platform and the hardware-in-the-loop experiment platform, and its performance is compared with that of the existing proportional-integral-derivative controller and the feedforward controller under the same conditions. Simulation results show that the designed FMPC has the best performance, and control performance can be guaranteed in a real-time environment. Compared with the tracking control error of the feedforward controller, that of the designed FMPC is decreased by 85% and the traction efficiency performance is improved by 23% under a low-friction-surface condition. Moreover, under common road conditions for heavy commercial vehicles, the traction force can increase up to 13.4-15.6%.

  1. Surface Deformation and Direct Field Observation to Constrain Conceptual Models of Hydraulic Fracture Growth and Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, W.; Murdoch, L.

    2016-12-01

    Hydraulic fractures can be created in shallow soil or bedrock to promote processes that destroy or remove chemical contaminants. The form of the fracture plays an important role in how it is used in such applications. We created more than 4500 environmental hydraulic fractures at approximately 300 sites since 1990, and we measured surface deformation at many. Several of these sites subsequently were excavated to evaluate fracture form in detail. In one recent example, six hydraulic fractures were created at 1.5m depth while we measured upward displacement and tilt at 15 overlying locations. We excavated in the vicinities of two of the fractures and mapped the exposed fractures. Tilt vectors were initially symmetric about the borehole but radiated from a point that moved southwest with time. Upward displacement of as much as 2.5 cm covered a region 5m to 6m across. The maximum displacement was roughly at the center of the deformed region but was 2m southwest of the borehole, consistent with the tilt data. Excavation revealed an oblong, proppant-filled fracture over 4.2 m in length with a maximum thickness of 1 cm, so the proppant covers a region that is smaller than the uplifted area and the proppant thickness is roughly half of the uplift. The fracture was shaped like a shallow saucer with maximum dips of approximately 15o at the southwestern end. The pattern of tilt and uplift generally reflect the aperture of the underlying pressurized fracture, but the deformation extends beyond the extent of the sand proppant so a quantitative interpretation requires inversion. Inversion of the tilt data using a simple double dislocation model under-estimates the extent but correctly predicts the depth, orientation, and off-centered location. Inversion of uplift using a model that assumes the overburden deforms like a plate over-estimates the extent. Neither can characterize the curved shape. A forward model using FEM analysis capable of representing 3D shapes is capable of

  2. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT III, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS--HYDRAULICS (PART I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO INTRODUCE BASIC HYDRAULIC PRINCIPLES AND PROVIDE AN UNDERSTANDING OF HYDRAULIC TRANSMISSIONS USED IN DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE WHY USE HYDRAULICS, REVIEWING BASIC PHYSICS LAWS IN RELATION TO HYDRAULICS, UNDERSTANDING THE HYDRAULIC SYSTEM, AND DEVELOPING A BASIC HYDRAULIC SYSTEM. THE MODULE…

  3. Analytical modeling of parametrically modulated transmon qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Nicolas; Sete, Eyob A.; da Silva, Marcus P.; Rigetti, Chad

    2018-02-01

    Building a scalable quantum computer requires developing appropriate models to understand and verify its complex quantum dynamics. We focus on superconducting quantum processors based on transmons for which full numerical simulations are already challenging at the level of qubytes. It is thus highly desirable to develop accurate methods of modeling qubit networks that do not rely solely on numerical computations. Using systematic perturbation theory to large orders in the transmon regime, we derive precise analytic expressions of the transmon parameters. We apply our results to the case of parametrically modulated transmons to study recently implemented, parametrically activated entangling gates.

  4. Effect of Initial Hydraulic Conditions on Capillary Rise in a Porous Medium: Pore-Network Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, V.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of capillary rise in a porous medium have been mostly studied in initially dry systems. As initial saturation and initial hydraulic conditions in many natural and industrial porous media can be variable, it is important to investigate the influence of initial conditions on the dynamics of the process. In this study, using dynamic pore-network modeling, we simulated capillary rise in a porous medium for different initial saturations (and consequently initial capillary pressures). Furthermore, the effect of hydraulic connectivity of the wetting phase in corners on the height and velocity of the wetting front was studied. Our simulation results show that there is a trade-off between capillary forces and trapping due to snap-off, which leads to a nonlinear dependence of wetting front velocity on initial saturation at the pore scale. This analysis may provide a possible answer to the experimental observations in the literature showing a non-monotonic dependency between initial saturation and the macroscopic front velocity. © Soil Science Society of America.

  5. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Malla

    2008-01-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  6. Parametric analyses of DEMO Divertor using two dimensional transient thermal hydraulic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domalapally, Phani; Di Caro, Marco

    2017-11-01

    Among the options considered for cooling of the Plasma facing components of the DEMO reactor, water cooling is a conservative option because of its high heat removal capability. In this work a two-dimensional transient thermal hydraulic code is developed to support the design of the divertor for the projected DEMO reactor with water as a coolant. The mathematical model accounts for transient 2D heat conduction in the divertor section. Temperature-dependent properties are used for more accurate analysis. Correlations for single phase flow forced convection, partially developed subcooled nucleate boiling, fully developed subcooled nucleate boiling and film boiling are used to calculate the heat transfer coefficients on the channel side considering the swirl flow, wherein different correlations found in the literature are compared against each other. Correlation for the Critical Heat Flux is used to estimate its limit for a given flow conditions. This paper then investigates the results of the parametric analysis performed, whereby flow velocity, diameter of the coolant channel, thickness of the coolant pipe, thickness of the armor material, inlet temperature and operating pressure affect the behavior of the divertor under steady or transient heat fluxes. This code will help in understanding the basic parameterś effect on the behavior of the divertor, to achieve a better design from a thermal hydraulic point of view.

  7. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Malla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  8. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of flow inversion in a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazeminejad, H.

    2008-01-01

    The course of loss of flow accident and flow inversion in a pool type research reactor, with scram enabled under natural circulation condition is numerically investigated. The analyses were performed by a lumped parameters approach for the coupled kinetic-thermal-hydraulics, with continuous feedback due to coolant and fuel temperature effects. A modified Runge-Kutta method was adopted for a better solution to the set of stiff differential equations. Transient thermal-hydraulics during the process of flow inversion and establishment of natural circulation were considered for a 10-MW IAEA research reactor. Some important parameters such as the peak temperatures for the hot channel were obtained for both high-enriched and low enriched fuel. The model prediction is also verified through comparison with other computer code results reported in the literature for detailed simulations of loss of flow accidents (LOFA) and the agreement between the results for the peak clad temperatures and key parameters has been satisfactory. It was found that the flow inversion and subsequent establishment of natural circulation keep the peak cladding surface temperature below the saturation temperature to avoid the escalation of clad temperature to the level of onset of nucleate boiling and sub-cooled void formation to ensure the safe operation of the reactor

  9. Testability analysis on a hydraulic system in a certain equipment based on simulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Cong, Hua; Liu, Yuanhong; Feng, Fuzhou

    2018-03-01

    Aiming at the problem that the complicated structure and the shortage of fault statistics information in hydraulic systems, a multi value testability analysis method based on simulation model is proposed. Based on the simulation model of AMESim, this method injects the simulated faults and records variation of test parameters ,such as pressure, flow rate, at each test point compared with those under normal conditions .Thus a multi-value fault-test dependency matrix is established. Then the fault detection rate (FDR) and fault isolation rate (FIR) are calculated based on the dependency matrix. Finally the system of testability and fault diagnosis capability are analyzed and evaluated, which can only reach a lower 54%(FDR) and 23%(FIR). In order to improve testability performance of the system,. number and position of the test points are optimized on the system. Results show the proposed test placement scheme can be used to solve the problems that difficulty, inefficiency and high cost in the system maintenance.

  10. Hydraulic model of a gas-lift bioreactor with flocculating yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roca, E. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ghommidh, C. [G.B.S.A. Microbiologie et Biochimie Industrielle. Univ. Montpellier 2, 34 Montpellier (France); Navarro, J.M. [G.B.S.A. Microbiologie et Biochimie Industrielle. Univ. Montpellier 2, 34 Montpellier (France); Lema, J.M. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Univ. of Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    1995-04-01

    The hydraulic model of a gas lift bioreactor, during a continuous alcoholic fermentation by using a strongly flocculating yeast, is analysed. Sucrose at two different concentrations (50 and 100 g/l) was used as substrate and the dilution rate for all the experiments was 1 h{sup -1}. The biomass concentrations were between 85 and 110 g dry weight/l. A stimulus response technique was used to obtain the Residence Time Distribution curves, a pulse of a lactose solution being used as the tracer. Mixing time was determined by means of the response to a pulse of an acid tracer. These experiments were carried out by using an on-line data-acquisition system. The bioreactor behaviour is completely homogeneous, except for high substrate and biomass concentrations. A two parameters combined model is necessary, in this case, to fit the experimental data. Mixing times are very low, in the order of 10 seconds. (orig.)

  11. The Benefit of Multi-Mission Altimetry Series for the Calibration of Hydraulic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeneghetti, Alessio; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Tourian, Mohammad J.; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; Castellarin, Attilio; Sneeuw, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The growing availability of satellite altimetric time series during last decades has fostered their use in many hydrological and hydraulic applications. However, the use of remotely sensed water level series still remains hampered by the limited temporal resolution that characterizes each sensor (i.e. revisit time varying from 10 to 35 days), as well as by the accuracy of different instrumentation adopted for monitoring inland water. As a consequence, each sensor is characterized by distinctive potentials and limitations that constrain its use for hydrological applications. In this study we refer to a stretch of about 140 km of the Po River (the longest Italian river) in order to investigate the performance of different altimetry series for the calibration of a quasi-2d model built with detailed topographic information. The usefulness of remotely sensed water surface elevation is tested using data collected by different altimetry missions (i.e., ERS-2, ENVISAT, TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-2 and SARAL/Altika) by investigating the effect of (i) record length (i.e. number of satellite measurements provided by a given sensor at a specific satellite track) and (ii) data uncertainty (i.e. altimetry measurements errors). Since the relatively poor time resolution of satellites constrains the operational use of altimetric time series, in this study we also investigate the use of multi-mission altimetry series obtained by merging datasets sensed by different sensors over the study area. Benefits of the highest temporal frequency of multi-mission series are tested by calibrating the quasi-2d model referring in turn to original satellite series and multi-mission datasets. Jason-2 and ENVISAT outperform other sensors, ensuring the reliability on the calibration process for shorter time series. The multi-mission dataset appears particularly reliable and suitable for the calibration of hydraulic model. If short time periods are considered, the performance of the multi-mission dataset

  12. Modeling coupled nitrogen and water use strategies of plant productivity through hydraulic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. S.; Savoy, P.; Pleban, J. R.; Tai, X.; Ewers, B. E.; Sperry, J.; Weinig, C.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in heat, nutrient, and drought stresses create novel environments that threaten the health of forests and viability of crop production. Here a trait-based conceptual model finds tradeoffs in maximum hydraulic conductance (Kmax), root to leaf area ratio (RLA) and vulnerability to cavitation (VC) based on the energy costs of acquiring water and nitrogen (N) to support gross primary production (GPP). The atmosphere supplies carbon to and demands water from plants via their stomata. The demand for water increases at higher temperatures due to increased vapor pressure deficits. The lost water is replenished by a passive wicking process that pulls water and N from the soil into roots and up water-filled xylem tubes. When water is in short supply the cost of getting it is high as measured by a decline in K and stomatal closure. Soil N dynamics also influence plant water use. When N is abundant, plants grow low VC fine roots with lower specific root length (m g-1), low Kmax, and maintain a relatively low RLA. In low N environments, N is costly and fine roots gain efficiency by building less robust (or higher VC) xylem with higher Kmax and higher RLA. What happens when the cost of acquiring water changes from high to low under low and high N costs? We incorporated the conceptual model into TREES, which couples whole plant hydraulics to carbon allocation, root-rhizosphere expansion/contraction and, also new for this study, a rhizosphere-root centric microbe-plant N dynamics. We used two experimental studies (drought, N) and two drought-prone fluxnet sites to test the conceptual model at individual plant and regional scales, respectively, and with frequent short versus infrequent long dry periods. When water was not limiting the hydraulic tradeoffs suppressed differences in GPP between the N use strategies. When water was in short supply, however, low RLA&VC plants dropped GPP early during drought because of low Kmax. Since these plants had low VC roots they also

  13. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  14. Model Development of Degradation of PV Modules Backsheet with Locating Place of Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempe, Michael D [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Yu [Case Western Reserve University; Fairbrother, Andrew [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Merzlic, Sebastien [Arkema; Julien, Scott [Northeastern University; Fridman, Lucas S. [Case Western Reserve University; Loyer, Camille [Arkema; Lefebvre, Amy L. [Arkema; O' Brien, Gregory [Arkema; Gu, Xiaohong [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Ji, Liang [Underwriters Laboratories; Boyce, Kenneth P. [Underwriters Laboratories; Wan, Kai-tak [Northeastern University; French, Roger H. [Case Western Reserve University; Bruckman, Laura S. [Case Western Reserve University

    2017-08-23

    Performance of a photovoltaic (PV) module is related to the micro-environment around the module. The position of photovoltaic modules in an array row have a large effect on the yellowing and gloss of PV module backsheet exposed in Dfa climatic zone (Gaithersburg, MD) with a polyethylene naphthalate (PEN) outer layer. Stress/Response models of yellowing and gloss-losing as function of location parameters of module, including the shed, row, measurement position in a same module and the distance of module location to the row center, are under development. The module installation height had the greatest influence on degradation of PEN PV backsheet in the Dfa climatic zone. The module backsheets at the end of an array have higher degradation rate (edge effect). The edge effect decreases with increasing of module installation heights.

  15. A seventh-order model for dynamic response of an electro-hydraulic servo valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Changhai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, taking two degrees of freedom on the armature–flapper assembly into account, a seventh-order model is deduced and proposed for the dynamic response of a two-stage electro-hydraulic servo valve from nonlinear equations. These deductions are based on fundamental laws of electromagnetism, fluid, and general mechanics. The coefficients of the proposed seventh-order model are derived in terms of servo valve physical parameters and fluid properties explicitly. For validating the results of the proposed model, an AMESim simulation model based on physical laws and the existing low-order models validated by other researchers through experiments are used to compare with the seventh-order model. The results show that the seventh-order model can reflect the physical behavior of the servo valve more explicitly than the existing low-order models and it could provide guidance more easily for a linear control design approach and sensitivity analysis than the AMESim simulation model.

  16. Modeling and Experimental Tests on the Hydraulically Driven Control Rod option for IRIS Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cammi, Antonio; Ricotti, Marco E.; Vitulo, Alessia

    2004-01-01

    The adoption of Internal Control Rod Drive Mechanisms (ICRDMs) represents a valuable alternative to classical, external CRDMs based on electro-magnetic devices, as adopted in current PWRs. The advantages on the safety features of the reactor are apparent: inherent elimination of the Rod Ejection accidents and of possible concerns about the vessel head penetrations. A further positive feedback on the design is the reduction of the primary system overall dimensions. Within the frame of the ICRDM concepts, the Hydraulically Driven Control Rod solution is investigated as a possible option for the IRIS integral reactor. After a brief comparison of the solutions currently proposed for integral reactors, the configuration of the Hydraulic Control Rod device for IRIS, made up by an external movable piston and an internal fixed cylinder, is described. A description of the whole control system is reported as well. Particular attention is devoted to the Control Rod profile characterization, performed by means of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The investigation of the system behavior has been carried out, including the dynamic equilibrium and its stability properties, the withdrawal and insertion step movement and the sensitivity study on command time periods. A suitable dynamic model has been set up for the mentioned purposes: the models corresponding to the various Control Rod system devices have been written in an Object-Oriented language (Modelica), thus allowing an easy implementation of such a system into the simulator for the whole reactor. Finally, a preliminary low pressure, low temperature, reduced length experimental facility has been built. Tests on HDCR stability and operational transients have been performed. The results are compared with the dynamic system model and CFD simulation model, showing good agreement between simulations and experimental data. During these preliminary tests, the control system performed correctly, allowing stable dynamic

  17. Quantitative Hydraulic Models Of Early Land Plants Provide Insight Into Middle Paleozoic Terrestrial Paleoenvironmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. P.; Fischer, W. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fossil plants provide useful proxies of Earth’s climate because plants are closely connected, through physiology and morphology, to the environments in which they lived. Recent advances in quantitative hydraulic models of plant water transport provide new insight into the history of climate by allowing fossils to speak directly to environmental conditions based on preserved internal anatomy. We report results of a quantitative hydraulic model applied to one of the earliest terrestrial plants preserved in three dimensions, the ~396 million-year-old vascular plant Asteroxylon mackei. This model combines equations describing the rate of fluid flow through plant tissues with detailed observations of plant anatomy; this allows quantitative estimates of two critical aspects of plant function. First and foremost, results from these models quantify the supply of water to evaporative surfaces; second, results describe the ability of plant vascular systems to resist tensile damage from extreme environmental events, such as drought or frost. This approach permits quantitative comparisons of functional aspects of Asteroxylon with other extinct and extant plants, informs the quality of plant-based environmental proxies, and provides concrete data that can be input into climate models. Results indicate that despite their small size, water transport cells in Asteroxylon could supply a large volume of water to the plant's leaves--even greater than cells from some later-evolved seed plants. The smallest Asteroxylon tracheids have conductivities exceeding 0.015 m^2 / MPa * s, whereas Paleozoic conifer tracheids do not reach this threshold until they are three times wider. However, this increase in conductivity came at the cost of little to no adaptations for transport safety, placing the plant’s vegetative organs in jeopardy during drought events. Analysis of the thickness-to-span ratio of Asteroxylon’s tracheids suggests that environmental conditions of reduced relative

  18. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, Adam R [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  19. Multiple Module Simulation of Water Cooled Breeding Blankets in K-DEMO Using Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Code MARS-KS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Geon-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Hun; Park, Goon-Cherl; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Kihak [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A preliminary concept for the Korean fusion demonstration reactor (K-DEMO) has been studied by the National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) based on the National Fusion Roadmap of Korea. The feasibility studies have been performed in order to establish the conceptual design guidelines of the breeding blanket. As a part of the NFRI research, Seoul National University (SNU) is conducting thermal design, evaluation and validation of the water-cooled breeding blanket for the K-DEMO reactor. The purpose of this study is to extend the capability of MARS-KS to the overall blanket system analysis which includes 736 blanket modules in total. The strategy for the multi-module blanket system analysis using MARS-KS is introduced and the analysis result of the 46 blanket modules of single sector was summarized. A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for a nuclear reactor safety, MARS-KS, was applied for thermal analysis of the conceptual design of the K-DEMO breeding blanket. Then, a methodology to simulate multiple blanket modules was proposed, which uses a supervisor program to handle each blanket module individually at first and then distribute the flow rate considering the pressure drop that occurs in each module. For a feasibility test of the proposed methodology, 46 blankets in a sector, which are connected with each other through the common headers for the sector inlet and outlet, were simulated. The calculation results of flow rates, pressure drops, and temperatures showed the validity of the calculation. Because of parallelization using the MPI system, the computational time could be reduced significantly. In future, this methodology will be extended to an efficient simulation of multiple sectors, and further validation for transient simulation will be carried out for more practical applications.

  20. Evaluation of Hydraulic Loads on the Runner Blades of a Kaplan Turbine using CFD Simulation and Model Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan-Iosif Korka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamic is today a standard procedure for analyzing and simulating the flow through several hydraulic machines. In this process, the fluid flow domain is divided into small volumes where the governing equations are converted into algebraic ones, which are numerically solved. Computational results strongly depend on the applied mathematical model and on the numerical methods used for converting the governing equations into the algebraic ones. The goal of the paper is to evaluate, by numerical simulation, the hydraulic loads (forces and torques on the runner blades of an existent Kaplan turbine and to compare them with the experimental results obtained from model test.

  1. High resolution global flood hazard map from physically-based hydrologic and hydraulic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begnudelli, L.; Kaheil, Y.; McCollum, J.

    2017-12-01

    The global flood map published online at http://www.fmglobal.com/research-and-resources/global-flood-map at 90m resolution is being used worldwide to understand flood risk exposure, exercise certain measures of mitigation, and/or transfer the residual risk financially through flood insurance programs. The modeling system is based on a physically-based hydrologic model to simulate river discharges, and 2D shallow-water hydrodynamic model to simulate inundation. The model can be applied to large-scale flood hazard mapping thanks to several solutions that maximize its efficiency and the use of parallel computing. The hydrologic component of the modeling system is the Hillslope River Routing (HRR) hydrologic model. HRR simulates hydrological processes using a Green-Ampt parameterization, and is calibrated against observed discharge data from several publicly-available datasets. For inundation mapping, we use a 2D Finite-Volume Shallow-Water model with wetting/drying. We introduce here a grid Up-Scaling Technique (UST) for hydraulic modeling to perform simulations at higher resolution at global scale with relatively short computational times. A 30m SRTM is now available worldwide along with higher accuracy and/or resolution local Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) in many countries and regions. UST consists of aggregating computational cells, thus forming a coarser grid, while retaining the topographic information from the original full-resolution mesh. The full-resolution topography is used for building relationships between volume and free surface elevation inside cells and computing inter-cell fluxes. This approach almost achieves computational speed typical of the coarse grids while preserving, to a significant extent, the accuracy offered by the much higher resolution available DEM. The simulations are carried out along each river of the network by forcing the hydraulic model with the streamflow hydrographs generated by HRR. Hydrographs are scaled so that the peak

  2. Thermal-hydraulic investigation of the creep-fatigue specimens in the IFMIF medium flux test module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Schleisiek, K. [Ingenieurbuero Dr.-Ing. W. Hering, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    IFMIF (international fusion materials irradiation facility) is a facility under development to irradiate fusion relevant materials. The irradiation volume is divided into three sections, the high-, medium, and low flux test module. The medium flux test module (MFTM) consists of three submodules arranged in series in the direction of the beam. The first submodule at the beam entrance side is housing several creep-fatigue specimens. Direct electrical heating is envisaged to adjust and control the desired irradiation temperature of the specimens. The main problem in designing this submodule is to reach the level of the irradiation temperature with reasonably low temperature differences in the specimens. Preliminary estimates confirmed the suitability of the envisaged design for reaching the desired irradiation temperature but did not deliver the temperature distribution in the specimens. To obtain information on this subject a series of numerical analyses was carried out using the CFD code STAR-CD. To keep the effort in the present early design phase reasonably low, the computer model of the test installation including the initial and boundary conditions were kept as simple as possible. Nevertheless, the results are a useful additional contribution to the further design and layout of the concept. The most important conclusions and recommendation on the concept variants are summarized at the end of the report. (orig.) [German] IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) ist eine in der Planung befindliche Einrichtung zur Bestrahlung von Fusionsreaktor-relevanten Materialien. Das Bestrahlungsvo-lumen gliedert sich in drei Bereiche, den Hoch-, Mittel- und Niederflusstestmodul. Das Mittelflusstestmodul (MFTM) besteht aus drei Submodulen, die in Strahlrichtung hinter-einander angeordnet sind. Im ersten Submodul auf der Strahleintrittsseite sind drei Ermue-dungsproben untergebracht. Zur Einstellung und Konstanthaltung der gewuenschten Bestrah

  3. Airborne laser scanning terrain and land cover models as basis for hydrological and hydraulic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vetter, M.

    2013-01-01

    point cloud. Because of the interaction of the laser signal at a specific wavelength and the water surface, the capability to identify areas containing water is very high. These water surface areas are used for land cover classification or generating proper geometry data for hydrodynamic-numerical models. The extent of the water surface is used to replace the water surface with river bed geometry or for hydraulic friction parameter allocation. Based on the water surface extent a river bed modeling method is presented in the next chapter. By combining the existing water surface with terrestrially measured cross section data, a river bed model is created, which is finally integrated into the existing DTM. The main aim of this chapter is to create a DTM of the watercourse, including the river bed model, which can be used as basis for hydrodynamic-numerical modeling and for change detection between two major flood events. The advantage of the DTM with an integrated river bed is that the relevant elevation data of the flood plains are used from the dense and accurate original DTM and the river bed is an interpolated DTM from cross sections. If the distance between the cross sections is large, the river bed model is of poor quality, because of the linear interpolation of the cross sections. In the final methodological part a point cloud based method for estimating hydraulic roughness coefficients is presented. Based on the geometry of the 3D point cloud, vertical structures of the vegetation are analyzed and classified into different land cover classes, which are transformed to Manning's n values. The advantages of the presented method are that the data analysis is fully automatic, reproducible and fast. Finally, the geometry used as elevation input for a 2D hydrodynamic-numerical model and the roughness parameters are measured at one single point in time and calculated from the same data source. Therefore, it is possible to create a hydrodynamic-numerical model exactly

  4. Modeling Innovative Power Take-Off Based on Double-Acting Hydraulic Cylinders Array for Wave Energy Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Antolín-Urbaneja

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the key systems of a Wave Energy Converter for extraction of wave energy is the Power Take-Off (PTO device. This device transforms the mechanical energy of a moving body into electrical energy. This paper describes the model of an innovative PTO based on independently activated double-acting hydraulic cylinders array. The model has been developed using a simulation tool, based on a port-based approach to model hydraulics systems. The components and subsystems used in the model have been parameterized as real components and their values experimentally obtained from an existing prototype. In fact, the model takes into account most of the hydraulic losses of each component. The simulations show the flexibility to apply different restraining torques to the input movement depending on the geometrical configuration and the hydraulic cylinders on duty, easily modified by a control law. The combination of these two actions allows suitable flexibility to adapt the device to different sea states whilst optimizing the energy extraction. The model has been validated using a real test bench showing good correlations between simulation and experimental tests.

  5. Hydraulic sediment remotion in physical models; Aplicacion en modelos fisicos de la remocion hidraulica de sedimentos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marengo Mogollon, Humberto [Comision Federal de Electricidad (Mexico)

    2001-03-01

    Sediment remotion in reservoirs has received an increased attention worldwide because of the difficulty to build new dams. This paper shows the application of some flushing techniques in two hydraulic experimental models that were used in order to estimate the efficiency in sediment remotion, as well as feasible solutions to be applied in our country. [Spanish] La remocion de sedimentos que se acumulan en los embalses ha recibido recientemente una gran atencion en diversas partes del mundo debido fundamentalmente a la dificultad de construir nuevas presas. Este articulo muestra el uso de la remocion hidraulica de sedimentos en embalses aplicados a dos modelos hidraulicos experimentales que se emplearon para estimar la eficiencia de dicha remocion, ademas de posibles soluciones que se consideran factibles de utilizarse en nuestro pais.

  6. Modeling Flow Rate to Estimate Hydraulic Conductivity in a Parabolic Ceramic Water Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Wald

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this project we model volumetric flow rate through a parabolic ceramic water filter (CWF to determine how quickly it can process water while still improving its quality. The volumetric flow rate is dependent upon the pore size of the filter, the surface area, and the height of water in the filter (hydraulic head. We derive differential equations governing this flow from the conservation of mass principle and Darcy's Law and find the flow rate with respect to time. We then use methods of calculus to find optimal specifications for the filter. This work is related to the research conducted in Dr. James R. Mihelcic's Civil and Environmental Engineering Lab at USF.

  7. Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing on the Basis of the Particle Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhnoi, D. V.; Gabsalikova, N. F.; Izotov, V. G.; Miheev, V. V.

    2018-01-01

    A technique of calculating the deformation of the soil environment when it interacts with a liquid on the basis of the particle method a is realized. To describe the behavior of the solid and liquid phases of the soil, a classical two-parameter Lennard-Jones interaction potential and its modified version proposed by the authors were chosen. The model problem of deformation and partial destruction of a soil massif under strong pressure from the liquid pumped into it is solved. Analysis of the results shows that the use of the modified Lennard-Jones potential for describing the solid phase of the soil environment makes it possible to describe the process of formation of cracks in the soil during hydraulic fracturing of the formation.

  8. Hydraulic modeling of flow impact on bridge structures: a case study on Citarum bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, R. I.

    2018-02-01

    Flood waves because of the rapid catchment response to high intense rainfall, breaches of flood defenses may induce huge impact forces on structures, causing structural damage or even failures. Overflowing stream that passes over the bridge, it means to discharge flood water level is smaller than the capacity of the river flow. In this study, the researches present the methodological approach of flood modeling on bridge structures. The amount of force that obtained because of the hydrostatic pressure received by the bridge at the time of the flood caused the bridge structure disrupted. This paper presents simulation of flow impact on bridge structures with some event flood conditions. Estimating the hydrostatic pressure developed new model components, to quantify the flow impact on structures. Flow parameters applied the model for analyzing, such as discharge, velocity, and water level or head that effect of bridge structures. The simulation will illustrate the capability of bridge structures with some event flood river and observe the behavior of the flow that occurred during the flood. Hydraulic flood modeling use HEC-RAS for simulation. This modeling will describe the impact on bridge structures. Based on the above modelling resulted, in 2008 has flood effect more than other years on the Citarum Bridge, because its flow overflow on the bridge.

  9. Validating a Wave-to-Wire Model for a Wave Energy Converter—Part I: The Hydraulic Transmission System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markel Penalba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Considering the full dynamics of the different conversion stages from ocean waves to the electricity grid is essential to evaluate the realistic power flow in the drive train and design accurate model-based control formulations. The power take-off system for wave energy converters (WECs is one of the essential parts of wave-to-wire (W2W models, for which hydraulic transmissions are a robust solution and offer the flexibility to design specific drive-trains for specific energy absorption requirements of different WECs. The potential hydraulic drive train topologies can be classified into two main configuration groups (constant-pressure and variable-pressure configurations, each of which uses specific components and has a particular impact on the preceding and following stages of the drive train. The present paper describes the models for both configurations, including the main nonlinear dynamics, losses and constraints. Results from the mathematical model simulations are compared against experimental results obtained from two independent test rigs, which represent the two main configurations, and high-fidelity software. Special attention is paid to the impact of friction in the hydraulic cylinder and flow and torque losses in the hydraulic motor. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of the models in reproducing experimental results, capturing friction effects and showing similar losses.

  10. Simulation-optimization model for water management in hydraulic fracturing operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, E. A.; Uddameri, V.

    2015-09-01

    A combined simulation-optimization model was developed to minimize the freshwater footprint at multi-well hydraulic fracturing sites. The model seeks to reduce freshwater use by blending it with brackish groundwater and recovered water. Time-varying water quality and quantity mass balance expressions and drawdown calculations using the Theis solution along with the superposition principle were embedded into the optimization model and solved using genetic algorithms. The model was parameterized for representative conditions in the Permian Basin oil and gas play region with the Dockum Formation serving as the brackish water source (Texas, USA). The results indicate that freshwater use can be reduced by 25-30 % by blending. Recovered water accounted for 2-3 % of the total blend or 10-15 % of total water recovered on-site. The concentration requirements of sulfate and magnesium limited blending. The evaporation in the frac pit constrained the amount blended during summer, while well yield of the brackish (Dockum) aquifer constrained the blending during winter. The Edwards-Trinity aquifer provided the best quality water compared to the Ogallala and Pecos Valley aquifers. However, the aquifer has low diffusivity causing the drawdown impacts to be felt over large areas. Speciation calculations carried out using PHREEQC indicated that precipitation of barium and strontium minerals is unlikely in the blended water. Conversely, the potential for precipitation of iron minerals is high. The developed simulation-optimization modeling framework is flexible and easily adapted for water management at other fracturing sites.

  11. Statistical inference and comparison of stochastic models for the hydraulic conductivity at the Finnsjoen-site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, S.

    1992-04-01

    The origin of this study was to find a good, or even the best, stochastic model for the hydraulic conductivity field at the Finnsjoe site. The conductivity field in question are regularized, that is upscaled. The reason for performing regularization of measurement data is primarily the need for long correlation scales. This is needed in order to model reasonably large domains that can be used when describing regional groundwater flow accurately. A theory of regularization is discussed in this report. In order to find the best model, jacknifing is employed to compare different stochastic models. The theory for this method is described. In the act of doing so we also take a look at linear predictor theory, so called kriging, and include a general discussion of stochastic functions and intrinsic random functions. The statistical inference methods for finding the models are also described, in particular regression, iterative generalized regression (IGLSE) and non-parametric variogram estimators. A large amount of results is presented for a regularization scale of 36 metre. (30 refs.) (au)

  12. Effect of rainfall infiltration on the hydraulic response and failure mechanisms of sandy slope models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David Montoya-Domínguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results obtained from silty sand slope models subjected to an artificial rainfall. Four models were constructed to evaluate the effect of initial water content and rainfall intensity on the hydraulic behavior and failure mechanisms of the slopes. The models were instrumented with volumetric water content sensors to monitor the advance of the water front, and inclinometers to measure lateral movements of the slope. The models were subjected to rainfall intensities ranging from 25 to 50 mm/h, and durations from 19 to 152 minutes. The influence of low intensity rainfall events before a high intensity rainfall is discussed herein. The results showed that the time the slope models required to reach failure was influenced by the soil initial water content, being shorter at high initial water contents. These results are useful to understand the behavior of unsaturated natural slopes and embankments exposed to rainfall infiltration, and to complement the existing laboratory database existing in this subject.

  13. Hydraulic Conductivity Modeling of Fractured Rock at Grasberg Surface Mine, Papua-Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tedy Agung Cahyadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Packer tests and slug tests were conducted at 49 points at the Grasberg surface mine, Indonesia to obtain hydraulic conductivity data. The HC-system approach, which relies on rock quality designation, lithology permeability index, depth index, and gouge content designation, was applied. Geotechnical drill holes in 441 locations, consisting of 4,850 points of information, were used to determine the K values using the equation K = 2x10-6x HC0.5571. The K values, which were within the range of 10-8 and 10-5 m/s, were distributed into five alternative 3D distributions using Ordinary Kriging (OK and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. The result of the ANN modeling showed that some of the K values, with log K varying from -10.51 m/s to -3.09 m/s, were outside the range of the observed K values. The OK modeling results of K values, with log K varying from -8.12 m/s to -5.75 m/s, were within the range of the observed K values. The ANN modeled K values were slightly more varied than the OK modeled values. The result of an alternative OK modeling was chosen to represent the existing data population of flow media because it fits well to the geological conditions.

  14. Trends in Modelling, Simulation and Design of Water Hydraulic Systems – Motion Control and Open-Ended Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2006-01-01

    is that the components operate with pure water from the tap without additives of any kind. Hence water hydraulics takes the benefit of pure water as fluid being environmentally friendly, easy to clean sanitary design, non-toxic, non-flammable, inexpensive, readily available and easily disposable. The low-pressure tap......, dedicated pumps and accessories running with sea-water as fluid are available. A unique solution is to use reverse osmosis to generate drinking water from sea-water, and furthermore for several off-shore applications. Furthermore, tap water hydraulic components of the Nessie® family and examples of measured......The paper presents and discusses a R&D-view on trends in development and best practise in modelling, simulation and design of both low-pressure and high-pressure tap water hydraulic components and systems for motion control as well as open-ended solutions various industrial applications. The focus...

  15. Hydraulic modelling of the geothermal wells at Kreuzlingen and Konstanz; Hydraulische Modellierung der Geothermiebohrungen Kreuzlingen und Konstanz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megel, T. [Inst. fuer Geophysik, Gruppe fuer Geothermik und Radiometrie, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Wyss, R. [Ingenieurgelogie, ETH Hoenggerberg, Zuerich (Switzerland); Greber, E.; Leu, W. [Geoform, Geologische Beratungen und Studien AG, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    Aussuming an aquifer of minimum 30 km extension, modelling and interpretation of the hydraulic situation at the geothermal wells Konstanz and Kreuzlingen have shown, that there is neither a significant hydraulic nor a thermal interrelation between the two wells (assumed production rate: Konstanz 6.6 l/s, Kreuzlingen 3 l/s). Every hydraulic behaviour of supposed fracture zones between the two wells reduces the interrelated influence. (orig.) [Deutsch] Modellierungen und Interpretationen haben gezeigt, dass unter der Annahme eines mindestens 30 km ausgedehnten Aquifers die Geothermiebohrungen Konstanz und Kreuzlingen auch laengerfristig (30 Jahre) sich gegenseitig weder hydraulisch noch thermisch nennenswert beeinflussen (Konstanz 6.6 l/s, Kreuzlingen 3 l/s). Die Existenz von hydraulisch signifikanten Bruchzonen zwischen den beiden Bohrungen wuerde die gegenseitige Beeinflussung vermindern. (orig.)

  16. Inverse modelling in estimating soil hydraulic functions: a Genetic Algorithm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ines, A. V. M.; Droogers, P.

    The practical application of simulation models in the field is sometimes hindered by the difficulty of deriving the soil hydraulic properties of the study area. The procedure so-called inverse modelling has been investigated in many studies to address the problem where most of the studies were limited to hypothetical soil profile and soil core samples in the laboratory. Often, the numerical approach called forward-backward simulation is employed to generate synthetic data then added with random errors to mimic the real-world condition. Inverse modelling is used to backtrack the expected values of the parameters. This study explored the potential of a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to estimate inversely the soil hydraulic functions in the unsaturated zone. Lysimeter data from a wheat experiment in India were used in the analysis. Two cases were considered: (1) a numerical case where the forward-backward approach was employed and (2) the experimental case where the real data from the lysimeter experiment were used. Concurrently, the use of soil water, evapotranspiration (ET) and the combination of both were investigated as criteria in the inverse modelling. Results showed that using soil water as a criterion provides more accurate parameter estimates than using ET. However, from a practical point of view, ET is more attractive as it can be obtained with reasonable accuracy on a regional scale from remote sensing observations. The experimental study proved that the forward-backward approach does not take into account the effects of model errors. The formulation of the problem is found to be critical for a successful parameter estimation. The sensitivity of parameters to the objective function and their zone of influence in the soil column are major determinants in the solution. Generally, their effects sometimes lead to non-uniqueness in the solution but to some extent are partly handled by GA. Overall, it was concluded that the GA approach is promising to the inverse problem

  17. Inverse modelling in estimating soil hydraulic functions: a Genetic Algorithm approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. M. Ines

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The practical application of simulation models in the field is sometimes hindered by the difficulty of deriving the soil hydraulic properties of the study area. The procedure so-called inverse modelling has been investigated in many studies to address the problem where most of the studies were limited to hypothetical soil profile and soil core samples in the laboratory. Often, the numerical approach called forward-backward simulation is employed to generate synthetic data then added with random errors to mimic the real-world condition. Inverse modelling is used to backtrack the expected values of the parameters. This study explored the potential of a Genetic Algorithm (GA to estimate inversely the soil hydraulic functions in the unsaturated zone. Lysimeter data from a wheat experiment in India were used in the analysis. Two cases were considered: (1 a numerical case where the forward-backward approach was employed and (2 the experimental case where the real data from the lysimeter experiment were used. Concurrently, the use of soil water, evapotranspiration (ET and the combination of both were investigated as criteria in the inverse modelling. Results showed that using soil water as a criterion provides more accurate parameter estimates than using ET. However, from a practical point of view, ET is more attractive as it can be obtained with reasonable accuracy on a regional scale from remote sensing observations. The experimental study proved that the forward-backward approach does not take into account the effects of model errors. The formulation of the problem is found to be critical for a successful parameter estimation. The sensitivity of parameters to the objective function and their zone of influence in the soil column are major determinants in the solution. Generally, their effects sometimes lead to non-uniqueness in the solution but to some extent are partly handled by GA. Overall, it was concluded that the GA approach is promising to the

  18. Modeling of excavation induced coupled hydraulic-mechanical processes in claystone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massmann, Jobst

    2009-07-01

    Concepts for the numerical modeling of excavation induced processes in claystone are investigated. The study has been motivated by the international discussion on the adequacy of claystone as a potential host rock for a final repository of radioactive waste. The processes, which could impact the safety of such a repository, are manifold and strongly interacting. Thus, a multiphysics approach is needed, regarding solid mechanics and fluid mechanics within a geological context. A coupled modeling concept is therefore indispensable. Based on observations and measurements at an argillaceous test site (the underground laboratory Tournemire, operated by the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, France) the modeling concept is developed. Two main processes constitute the basis of the applied model: deformation (linear elasticity considering damage) and fluid flow (unsaturated one-phase flow). Several coupling phenomena are considered: Terzaghi 's effective stress concept, mass conservation of the liquid in a deformable porous media, drying induced shrinkage, and a permeability which depends on deformation and damage. In addition, transversely isotropic material behavior is considered. The numerical simulations are done with the finite element code RockFlow, which is extended to include: an orthotropic non-linear shrinkage model, a continuum damage model, and an orthotropic permeability model. For these new methods the theory and a literature review are presented, followed by applications, which illustrate the capability to model excavation induced processes in principle. In a comprehensive case study, the modeling concept is used to simulate the response of the Tournemire argillite to excavation. The results are compared with observations and measurements of three different excavations (century old tunnel, two galleries excavated in 1996 and 2003). In summary, it can be concluded that the developed model concept provides a prediction of the excavation

  19. Modeling of excavation induced coupled hydraulic-mechanical processes in claystone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massmann, Jobst

    2009-01-01

    Concepts for the numerical modeling of excavation induced processes in claystone are investigated. The study has been motivated by the international discussion on the adequacy of claystone as a potential host rock for a final repository of radioactive waste. The processes, which could impact the safety of such a repository, are manifold and strongly interacting. Thus, a multiphysics approach is needed, regarding solid mechanics and fluid mechanics within a geological context. A coupled modeling concept is therefore indispensable. Based on observations and measurements at an argillaceous test site (the underground laboratory Tournemire, operated by the Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, France) the modeling concept is developed. Two main processes constitute the basis of the applied model: deformation (linear elasticity considering damage) and fluid flow (unsaturated one-phase flow). Several coupling phenomena are considered: Terzaghi 's effective stress concept, mass conservation of the liquid in a deformable porous media, drying induced shrinkage, and a permeability which depends on deformation and damage. In addition, transversely isotropic material behavior is considered. The numerical simulations are done with the finite element code RockFlow, which is extended to include: an orthotropic non-linear shrinkage model, a continuum damage model, and an orthotropic permeability model. For these new methods the theory and a literature review are presented, followed by applications, which illustrate the capability to model excavation induced processes in principle. In a comprehensive case study, the modeling concept is used to simulate the response of the Tournemire argillite to excavation. The results are compared with observations and measurements of three different excavations (century old tunnel, two galleries excavated in 1996 and 2003). In summary, it can be concluded that the developed model concept provides a prediction of the excavation induced

  20. Hydraulic lift in a neotropical savanna: experimental manipulation and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian G. Scholz; Sandra J. Bucci; William A. Hoffmann; Frederick C. Meinzer; Guillermo Goldstein

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude of hydraulic lift in Brazilian savannas (Cerrado) and to test the hypothesis that hydraulic lift by herbaceous plants contributes substantially to slowing the decline of water potential and water storage in the upper soil layers during the dry season. To this effect, field observations of soil water content and...

  1. Using hydraulic modeling to simulate human interactions with water resources in an Omani irrigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulou, Themis; Ertsen, Maurits; Düring, Bleda; Kolen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    In the dry Southern Oman, more than a thousand years ago, a large water system that connected the mountain mass with the coastal region was constructed. Its length (up to 30 km) and the fact that the coastal region has a rich groundwater aquifer create confusion as to why the system was initially built. Nonetheless, it was abandoned a couple of centuries later only to be partially revived by small farming communities in the 17th to 18th century. The focus of our research is one of the irrigation systems that used the water conveyed from the large water system. Not much is known about these small irrigation systems functioning in the Wadi Al Jizzi of the greater Sohar region. There are no written records and we can only make guesses about the way the systems were managed based on ethnographical studies and the traditional Omani techniques. On the other hand, the good preservation state of the canals offers a great opportunity for hydraulic reconstruction of irrigation events. More than that, the material remains suggest and at the same time limit the ways in which humans interacted with the system and the water resources of the region. All irrigation activities and some daily activities had to be realized through the canal system and only if the canal system permits it these actions would have been feasible. We created a conceptual model of irrigation that includes the human agent and feedback mechanisms through hydraulics and then we simulated irrigation events using the Sobek software. Scenarios and sensibility analysis were used to address the unknown aspects of the system. Our research yielded insights about the way the farming community interacted with the larger water system, the levels of co-ordination and co-operation required for successful irrigation and the predisposition of conflict and power relations.

  2. Validation of the Thermal-Hydraulic Model in the SACAP Code with the ISP Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soon-Ho; Kim, Dong-Min; Park, Chang-Hwan [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In safety viewpoint, the pressure of the containment is the important parameter, of course, the local hydrogen concentration is also the parameter of the major concern because of its flammability and the risk of the detonation. In Korea, there have been an extensive efforts to develop the computer code which can analyze the severe accident behavior of the pressurized water reactor. The development has been done in a modularized manner and SACAP(Severe Accident Containment Analysis Package) code is now under final stage of development. SACAP code adopts LP(Lumped Parameter) model and is applicable to analyze the synthetic behavior of the containment during severe accident occurred by thermal-hydraulic transient, combustible gas burn, direct containment heating by high pressure melt ejection, steam explosion and molten core-concrete interaction. The analyses of a number of ISP(International Standard Problem) experiments were done as a part of the SACAP code V and V(verification and validation). In this paper, the SACAP analysis results for ISP-35 NUPEC and ISP-47 TOSQAN are presented including comparison with other existing NPP simulation codes. In this paper, we selected and analyzed ISP-35 NUPEC, ISP-47 TOSQAN in order to confirm the computational performance of SACAP code currently under development. Now the multi-node analysis for the ISP-47 is under process. As a result of simulation, SACAP predicts well the thermal-hydraulic variables such as temperature, pressure, etc. Also, we verify that SACAP code is properly equipped to analyze the gas distribution and condensation.

  3. Modified kinetic-hydraulic UASB reactor model for treatment of wastewater containing biodegradable organic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seddik, Mostafa M; Galal, Mona M; Radwan, A G; Abdel-Halim, Hisham S

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses a modified kinetic-hydraulic model for up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor aimed to treat wastewater of biodegradable organic substrates as acetic acid based on Van der Meer model incorporated with biological granules inclusion. This dynamic model illustrates the biomass kinetic reaction rate for both direct and indirect growth of microorganisms coupled with the amount of biogas produced by methanogenic bacteria in bed and blanket zones of reactor. Moreover, the pH value required for substrate degradation at the peak specific growth rate of bacteria is discussed for Andrews' kinetics. The sensitivity analyses of biomass concentration with respect to fraction of volume of reactor occupied by granules and up-flow velocity are also demonstrated. Furthermore, the modified mass balance equations of reactor are applied during steady state using Newton Raphson technique to obtain a suitable degree of freedom for the modified model matching with the measured results of UASB Sanhour wastewater treatment plant in Fayoum, Egypt.

  4. XFEM modeling of hydraulic fracture in porous rocks with natural fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Liu, ZhanLi; Zeng, QingLei; Gao, Yue; Zhuang, Zhuo

    2017-08-01

    Hydraulic fracture (HF) in porous rocks is a complex multi-physics coupling process which involves fluid flow, diffusion and solid deformation. In this paper, the extended finite element method (XFEM) coupling with Biot theory is developed to study the HF in permeable rocks with natural fractures (NFs). In the recent XFEM based computational HF models, the fluid flow in fractures and interstitials of the porous media are mostly solved separately, which brings difficulties in dealing with complex fracture morphology. In our new model the fluid flow is solved in a unified framework by considering the fractures as a kind of special porous media and introducing Poiseuille-type flow inside them instead of Darcy-type flow. The most advantage is that it is very convenient to deal with fluid flow inside the complex fracture network, which is important in shale gas extraction. The weak formulation for the new coupled model is derived based on virtual work principle, which includes the XFEM formulation for multiple fractures and fractures intersection in porous media and finite element formulation for the unified fluid flow. Then the plane strain Kristianovic-Geertsma-de Klerk (KGD) model and the fluid flow inside the fracture network are simulated to validate the accuracy and applicability of this method. The numerical results show that large injection rate, low rock permeability and isotropic in-situ stresses tend to lead to a more uniform and productive fracture network.

  5. On the role of model depth and hydraulic properties for groundwater flow modelling during glacial climate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidstrand, Patrik (TerraSolve AB (Sweden)); Rhen, Ingvar (SWECO Environment AB (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    twice; first with hydraulic conditions that mimic temperate climate conditions, and second with hydraulic conditions that maximises the potential impact at depth during glacial climate conditions. The key assumptions made regarding the hydraulic conditions during the glacial phase are: 1) a thick ice sheet with a steep profile at the front, 2) a hydraulic pressure beneath the ice sheet that equals 92% of the ice thickness, 3) a low advance rate of the ice sheet margin, and 4) no permafrost beneath the ice sheet or in front of the ice sheet margin. The results vary between the studied cases (model variants). For a model set-up that mimics the current hydrogeological conditions at the Laxemar site, the results are as follows: - The grid cell Darcy flux magnitudes during temperate climate conditions are 10-11 m/s at -0.5 km and 10-13 m/s at -3.0 km. During the ice front passage, the relative increase in Darcy flux is approximately two orders of magnitude at all four monitoring points. The duration of this increase in Darcy flux is approximately 100 years. - The grid cell salinities during temperate climate conditions are approximately 0% by weight at -0.5 km and approximately 7% by weight at -2.5 km. During the ice front passage, the grid cell salinity at -0.5 km first increases to approximately 2% by weight before it returns back to approximately 0% by weight. The duration of this pulse change in salinity is approximately 100 years. At -2.5 km elevation, the grid cell salinity decreases approximately to 6% by weight during the ice front passage. During the long period of complete ice coverage that follows the passage of ice front, the hydraulic gradients at depth are very small; hence it takes several thousand of years before the grid cell salinity at -2.5 km elevation is fully recovered

  6. Are separate-phase thermal-hydraulic models better than mixture-fluid approaches? It depends. Rather not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeld, A.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic theory of single- and especially two-phase flow systems used for plant transient analysis is dominated by separate-phase models. The corresponding mostly very comprehensive codes (TRAC, RELAP, CATHARE, ATHLET etc.) are looked as to be by far more efficient than a 3 eq. mixture-fluid approach and code also if they show deficiencies in describing flow situations within inner loops as for example the distribution into parallel channels (and thus the simulation of 3D thermal-hydraulic phenomena). This may be justified if comparing them to the very simple 'homogeneous equilibrium models (HEM)', but not if looking to the more refined non-homogeneous 'separate-region' mixture-fluid approaches based on appropriate drift-flux correlation packages which can have, on the contrary, enormous advantages with respect to such separate-phase models. Especially if comparing the basic (and starting) eqs. of such theoretical models of both types the differences are remarkable. Single-phase and mixture-fluid models start from genuine conservation eqs. for mass, energy and momentum, demanding (in case of two-phase flow) additionally an adequate drift flux package (in order to get a relation for a fourth independent variable), a heat transfer coefficients package (over the whole range of the possible fields of application) and correlations for single- and two-phase friction. The other types of models are looking at each phase separately with corresponding 'field' eqs. for each phase, connected by exchange (=closure) terms which substitute the classical constitutive packages for drift, heat transfer and friction. That the drift-flux, heat transfer into a coolant channel and friction along a wall and between the phases is described better by a separate-phase approach is at least doubtful. The corresponding mixture-fluid correlations are based over a wide range on a treasure of experience and measurements, their pseudo-stationary treatment can (due to their small time

  7. Hydraulic Geometry, GIS and Remote Sensing, Techniques against Rainfall-Runoff Models for Estimating Flood Magnitude in Ephemeral Fluvial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Garcia-Lorenzo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the combined use of remotely sensed data and hydraulic geometry methods as an alternative to rainfall-runoff models. Hydraulic geometric data and boolean images of water sheets obtained from satellite images after storm events were integrated in a Geographical Information System. Channel cross-sections were extracted from a high resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM and superimposed on the image cover to estimate the peak flow using HEC-RAS. The proposed methodology has been tested in ephemeral channels (ramblas on the coastal zone in south-eastern Spain. These fluvial systems constitute an important natural hazard due to their high discharges and sediment loads. In particular, different areas affected by floods during the period 1997 to 2009 were delimited through HEC-GeoRAs from hydraulic geometry data and Landsat images of these floods (Landsat‑TM5 and Landsat-ETM+7. Such an approach has been validated against rainfall-surface runoff models (SCS Dimensionless Unit Hydrograph, SCSD, Témez gamma HU Tγ and the Modified Rational method, MRM comparing their results with flood hydrographs of the Automatic Hydrologic Information System (AHIS in several ephemeral channels in the Murcia Region. The results obtained from the method providing a better fit were used to calculate different hydraulic geometry parameters, especially in residual flood areas.

  8. Numerical stability analysis of coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics schemes and new neutronic feedback-reactions model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guertin, Chantal

    1995-01-01

    This thesis is part of the validation process of using coupled 3D neutronics and thermal-hydraulics codes for studying accidental situations with boiling. First part is dedicated to a numerical stability analysis of neutronics and thermal-hydraulics coupled schemes. Both explicit and semi-implicit coupling schemes were applied to solve the set of equations describing the linearized neutronics and thermal-hydraulics of point reactor. Point reactor modelling was preferred to obtain analytical expressions of eigenvalues of the discretized Systems. Stability criteria, based on eigenvalues, was calculated as well as neutronic and thermalhydraulic responses of the System following insertion of a reactivity step. Results show no severe restriction of time domain, stability wise. Actual transient calculations using coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics codes, like COCCINELLE and THYC developed at Electricite de France, do not show stability problems. Second part introduces surface spline as a new neutronic feedback model. The cross influences of feedback parameters is now taken into account. Moderator temperature and density were modeled. This method, simple and accurate, allows an homogeneous description of cross-sections overall operating reactor situations including accidents with boiling. (author) [fr

  9. Enhanced Bank-Stability Modeling With Coupled Geotechnical, Hydraulic and Near-Bank Groundwater Sub-Models: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. E.; Simon, A.; Bankhead, N.

    2008-12-01

    Physically-based, deterministic bank-stability models have recently been developed to effectively simulate the driving and resisting forces governing streambank erosion. Significant advances have been made in the manner in which groundwater flow through variably saturated porous media, planar and circular geotechnical failures and fluvial sediment transport are simulated. However, to date, coupling these models has required tedious exporting and conversion of geometries and results and manual remeshing. In this presentation, we introduce the first fully integrated suite of models that deterministically simulate the controlling hydrologic, hydraulic and geotechnical processes that govern streambank erosion and channel-width adjustment. The model suite incorporates routines that: 1. Permit the user to enter between 5 and 23 points to describe the bank cross-sectional geometry; 2. Automatically generate a mesh by which to implicitly discretize the 2-D Richards equation utilizing finite volumes. The resulting pentadiagonal matrix is solved iteratively with Stone's Strongly Implicit Procedure (SIP). Timesteps are automatically adjusted to minimize mass balance and truncation errors; 3. Evaluate the force-equilibrium factor of safety (Fs), permitting the simulation of planar and cantilever shear failures with a horizontal slice method and planar shear failures with tension cracks with a rigorous vertical slice method. A random walk approach is adopted to search for the minimum Fs; 4. Estimate the increase in cohesion due to vegetation with a global load-sharing Fibre Bundle Model; and 5. Simulate the erosion of the bank face and bank toe with an excess shear stress approach. Management options to increase slope stability (through the addition of vegetation) and reduce channel- boundary erodibility (through the addition of natural and artificial structures) are also incorporated. We illustrate the efficacy of the modeling approach with a series of case studies in which

  10. Inconsistency in the average hydraulic models used in nuclear reactor design and safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    One of important inconsistencies in the six-equation model predictions has been found to be the force experienced by a single bubble placed in a convergent stream of liquid. Various sets of governing equations yield different amount of forces to hold the bubble stationary in a convergent nozzle. By using the first order potential flow theory, it is found that the six-equation model can not be used to estimate the force experienced by a deformed bubble. The theoretical value of the particle stress of a bubble in a convergent nozzle flow has been found to be a function of the Weber number when bubble distortion is allowed. This force has been calculated by using different sets of governing equations and compared with the theoretical value. It is suggested in this study that the bubble size distribution function can be used to remove the presented inconsistency by relating the interfacial variables with different moments of the bubble size distribution function. This study also shows that the inconsistencies in the thermal-hydraulic governing equation can be removed by mechanistic modeling of the phasic interface. 11 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  11. Estimating water and nitrate leaching in tree crops using inverse modelled plant and soil hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, Valentin; Kandelous, Maziar; Mairesse, Harmony; Baram, Shahar; Moradi, Ahmad; Pope, Katrin; Hopmans, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater quality is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands in California and many other (semi-)arid regions of the world. The routine application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water in California is likely responsible for the high nitrate concentrations in groundwater, underlying much of its main agricultural areas. To optimize irrigation/fertigation practices, it is essential that irrigation and fertilizers are applied at the optimal concentration, place, and time to ensure maximum root uptake and minimize leaching losses to the groundwater. The applied irrigation water and dissolved fertilizer, root nitrate and water uptake interact with soil and root properties in a complex manner that cannot easily be resolved. It is therefore that coupled experimental-modelling studies are required to allow for unravelling of the relevant complexities that result from typical variations of crop properties, soil texture and layering across farmer-managed fields. A combined field monitoring and modelling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content within the root zone, soil matric potential below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. Plant and soil properties of incremented complexity are optimized with the software HYDRUS in an inverse modelling scheme, which allows estimating leaching under constraint of hydraulic principles. Questions of optimal irrigation and fertilization timing can then be addressed using predictive results and global optimization algorithms.

  12. Hydraulic turbines and auxiliary equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Gaorong [Organization of the United Nations, Beijing (China). International Centre of Small Hydroelectric Power Plants

    1995-07-01

    This document presents a general overview on hydraulic turbines and auxiliary equipment, emphasizing the turbine classification, in accordance with the different types of turbines, standard turbine series in China, turbine selection based on the basic data required for the preliminary design, general hill model curves, chart of turbine series and the arrangement of application for hydraulic turbines, hydraulic turbine testing, and speed regulating device.

  13. Urban micro-scale flood risk estimation with parsimonious hydraulic modelling and census data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Arrighi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of 2007/60/EC Directive requires European countries to implement flood hazard and flood risk maps by the end of 2013. Flood risk is the product of flood hazard, vulnerability and exposure, all three to be estimated with comparable level of accuracy. The route to flood risk assessment is consequently much more than hydraulic modelling of inundation, that is hazard mapping. While hazard maps have already been implemented in many countries, quantitative damage and risk maps are still at a preliminary level. A parsimonious quasi-2-D hydraulic model is here adopted, having many advantages in terms of easy set-up. It is here evaluated as being accurate in flood depth estimation in urban areas with a high-resolution and up-to-date Digital Surface Model (DSM. The accuracy, estimated by comparison with marble-plate records of a historic flood in the city of Florence, is characterized in the downtown's most flooded area by a bias of a very few centimetres and a determination coefficient of 0.73. The average risk is found to be about 14 € m−2 yr−1, corresponding to about 8.3% of residents' income. The spatial distribution of estimated risk highlights a complex interaction between the flood pattern and the building characteristics. As a final example application, the estimated risk values have been used to compare different retrofitting measures. Proceeding through the risk estimation steps, a new micro-scale potential damage assessment method is proposed. This is based on the georeferenced census system as the optimal compromise between spatial detail and open availability of socio-economic data. The results of flood risk assessment at the census section scale resolve most of the risk spatial variability, and they can be easily aggregated to whatever upper scale is needed given that they are geographically defined as contiguous polygons. Damage is calculated through stage–damage curves, starting from census data on building type and

  14. Thermal-hydraulic process modeling in risk analysis: an assessment of the relevant systems, structures, and phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    The MELCOR project is developing a new generation of risk assessment computer programs for analysis of severe accidents at nuclear power plants. This document details the findings in the thermal-hydraulic areas for PWRs and areas common to both PWRs and BWRs. The study was performed by specialists from each of the various nuclear plant design or analysis areas where thermal-hydraulics is important. The study found that the current level of thermal-hydraulic modeling that exists for performing risk assessments is typified by the modeling in the MARCH code. This level of modeling was found to be inadequate for MELCOR because of inconsistent or nonexistent modeling of important phenomena, particularly invessel phenomena, systems, and structures. Pressurized water reactor modeling was found to be more complete than modeling for boiling water reactor designs, particularly in containment. Finally, although reactor cavity modeling was considered essential for risk assessments, the lack of adequate modeling found for the cavity was identified as a serious impediment to the development of second-generation risk codes

  15. Simulation model for the dynamic behavior of the hydraUlic circuito of PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirdes, V.R.T.R.

    1987-01-01

    The present work consist of the development of a computer code for the simulations of hydraulic transients caused by stoppages of the primary coolant pumps of nuclear reactors and it applied to the hydraulic circuits typical of PWR reactor. The code calculates the time-histories of the mass flux, rotation speed, electric and hydraulic torque and dynamic head of the pumps. It can be used for any combination of active and inactive pumps. Several transients were analysed and the results were compared with comparared with data from the Angra-I nuclear power plant. The results were considered satisfactory. (author) [pt

  16. The Modulated-Input Modulated-Output Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moskowitz, Ira S; Kang, Myong H

    1995-01-01

    .... The data replication problem in database systems is our motivation. We introduce a new queueing theoretic model, the MIMO model, that incorporates burstiness in the sending side and busy periods in the receiving side...

  17. Hydraulic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Sheng-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This book discusses in detail the planning, design, construction and management of hydraulic structures, covering dams, spillways, tunnels, cut slopes, sluices, water intake and measuring works, ship locks and lifts, as well as fish ways. Particular attention is paid to considerations concerning the environment, hydrology, geology and materials etc. in the planning and design of hydraulic projects. It also considers the type selection, profile configuration, stress/stability calibration and engineering countermeasures, flood releasing arrangements and scouring protection, operation and maintenance etc. for a variety of specific hydraulic structures. The book is primarily intended for engineers, undergraduate and graduate students in the field of civil and hydraulic engineering who are faced with the challenges of extending our understanding of hydraulic structures ranging from traditional to groundbreaking, as well as designing, constructing and managing safe, durable hydraulic structures that are economical ...

  18. Atucha II NPP full scope simulator modelling with the thermal hydraulic code TRACRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Pablo Rey; Ruiz, Jose Antonio; Rivero, Norberto

    2011-01-01

    In February 2010 NA-SA (Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A.) awarded Tecnatom the Atucha II full scope simulator project. NA-SA is a public company owner of the Argentinean nuclear power plants. Atucha II is due to enter in operation shortly. Atucha II NPP is a PHWR type plant cooled by the water of the Parana River and has the same design as the Atucha I unit, doubling its power capacity. Atucha II will produce 745 MWe utilizing heavy water as coolant and moderator, and natural uranium as fuel. A plant singular feature is the permanent core refueling. TRAC R T is the first real time thermal hydraulic six-equations code used in the training simulation industry for NSSS modeling. It is the result from adapting to real time the best estimate code TRACG. TRAC R T is based on first principle conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum for liquid and steam phases, with two phase flows under non homogeneous and non equilibrium conditions. At present, it has been successfully implemented in twelve full scope replica simulators in different training centers throughout the world. To ease the modeling task, TRAC R T includes a graphical pre-processing tool designed to optimize this process and alleviate the burden of entering alpha numerical data in an input file. (author)

  19. Assessing the impacts of water abstractions on river ecosystem services: an eco-hydraulic modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carolli, Mauro; Geneletti, Davide; Zolezzi, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The provision of important river ecosystem services (ES) is dependent on the flow regime. This requires methods to assess the impacts on ES caused by interventions on rivers that affect flow regime, such as water abstractions. This study proposes a method to i) quantify the provision of a set of river ES, ii) simulate the effects of water abstraction alternatives that differ in location and abstracted flow, and iii) assess the impact of water abstraction alternatives on the selected ES. The method is based on river modelling science, and integrates spatially distributed hydrological, hydraulic and habitat models at different spatial and temporal scales. The method is applied to the hydropeaked upper Noce River (Northern Italy), which is regulated by hydropower operations. We selected locally relevant river ES: habitat suitability for the adult marble trout, white-water rafting suitability, hydroelectricity production from run-of-river (RoR) plants. Our results quantify the seasonality of river ES response variables and their intrinsic non-linearity, which explains why the same abstracted flow can produce different effects on trout habitat and rafting suitability depending on the morphology of the abstracted reach. An economic valuation of the examined river ES suggests that incomes from RoR hydropower plants are of comparable magnitude to touristic revenue losses related to the decrease in rafting suitability.

  20. Computational models for thermal-hydraulic assessment of TADSEA and its use for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, L.; Gonzalez, D.; Garcia, C.; Gamez, A.; Garcia, L.; Lira, C. A. B. O.

    2015-01-01

    The Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA) is a pebble-bed Accelerator Driven System (ADS) with a graphite-gas configuration, designed for nuclear waste transmutation and for obtaining heat at very high temperatures to produce hydrogen. In previous work, the TADSEA's nuclear core was considered as a porous medium performed with a CFD code and thermal-hydraulic studies of the nuclear core were presented. In this paper, three critical fuel elements groups were defined regarding their position inside the core. In this article, the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant was analyzed for the three core states during normal operation. The heat transfer inside the spherical fuel elements was also studied with a realistic CFD model of the critical elements groups. During the steady state, no critical elements reached the limit temperature of this type of fuel. Also, it is presented a model built in ANSYS for the simulation and optimization of high- temperature electrolysis using the TADSEA as a heat source. A flow diagram of the electrolysis process with the high temperature electrolyzer as the main component using TADSEA as an energy source is finally proposed and discussed. (Author)

  1. Vibration of hydraulic machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yulin; Liu, Shuhong; Dou, Hua-Shu; Qian, Zhongdong

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of Hydraulic Machinery deals with the vibration problem which has significant influence on the safety and reliable operation of hydraulic machinery. It provides new achievements and the latest developments in these areas, even in the basic areas of this subject. The present book covers the fundamentals of mechanical vibration and rotordynamics as well as their main numerical models and analysis methods for the vibration prediction. The mechanical and hydraulic excitations to the vibration are analyzed, and the pressure fluctuations induced by the unsteady turbulent flow is predicted in order to obtain the unsteady loads. This book also discusses the loads, constraint conditions and the elastic and damping characters of the mechanical system, the structure dynamic analysis, the rotor dynamic analysis and the system instability of hydraulic machines, including the illustration of monitoring system for the instability and the vibration in hydraulic units. All the problems are necessary for vibration pr...

  2. A New Physics-Based Modeling of Multiple Non-Planar Hydraulic Fractures Propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jing [University of Utah; Huang, Hai [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Deo, Milind [University of Utah; Jiang, Shu [Energy & Geoscience Institute

    2015-10-01

    Because of the low permeability in shale plays, closely spaced hydraulic fractures and multilateral horizontal wells are generally required to improve production. Therefore, understanding the potential fracture interaction and stress evolution is critical in optimizing fracture/well design and completion strategy in multi-stage horizontal wells. In this paper, a novel fully coupled reservoir flow and geomechanics model based on the dual-lattice system is developed to simulate multiple non-planar fractures propagation. The numerical model from Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to simulate the mechanics of fracture propagations and interactions, while a conjugate irregular lattice network is generated to represent fluid flow in both fractures and formation. The fluid flow in the formation is controlled by Darcy’s law, but within fractures it is simulated by using cubic law for laminar flow through parallel plates. Initiation, growth and coalescence of the microcracks will lead to the generation of macroscopic fractures, which is explicitly mimicked by failure and removal of bonds between particles from the discrete element network. We investigate the fracture propagation path in both homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoirs using the simulator developed. Stress shadow caused by the transverse fracture will change the orientation of principal stress in the fracture neighborhood, which may inhibit or alter the growth direction of nearby fracture clusters. However, the initial in-situ stress anisotropy often helps overcome this phenomenon. Under large in-situ stress anisotropy, the hydraulic fractures are more likely to propagate in a direction that is perpendicular to the minimum horizontal stress. Under small in-situ stress anisotropy, there is a greater chance for fractures from nearby clusters to merge with each other. Then, we examine the differences in fracture geometry caused by fracturing in cemented or uncemented wellbore. Moreover, the impact of

  3. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baroni, G.; Facchi, A.; Gandolfi, C.; Ortuani, B.; Horeschi, D.; Dam, van J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still

  4. The development and calibration of a physical model to assist in optimising the hydraulic performance and design of maturation ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, G J; Lloyd, B J; Guganesharajah, K; Bracho, N

    2005-01-01

    A physical and a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model (HYDRO-3D) were developed to simulate the effects of novel maturation pond configurations, and critical environmental factors (wind speed and direction) on the hydraulic efficiency (HE) of full-scale maturation ponds. The aims of the study were to assess the reliability of the physical model and convergence with HYDRO-3D, as tools for assessing and predicting best hydraulic performance of ponds. The physical model of the open ponds was scaled to provide a similar nominal retention time (NRT) of 52 hours. Under natural conditions, with a variable prevailing westerly wind opposite to the inlet, a rhodamine tracer study on the full-scale prototype pond produced a mean hydraulic retention time (MHRT) of 18.5 hours (HE = 35.5%). Simulations of these wind conditions, but with constant wind speed and direction in both the physical model and HYDRO-3D, produced a higher MHRT of 21 hours in both models and an HE of 40.4%. In the absence of wind tracer studies in the open pond physical model revealed incomplete mixing with peak concentrations leaving the model in several hours, but an increase in MHRT to 24.5-28 hours (HE = 50.2-57.1%). Although wind blowing opposite to the inlet flow increases dispersion (mixing), it reduced hydraulic performance by 18-25%. Much higher HE values were achieved by baffles (67-74%) and three channel configurations (69-92%), compared with the original open pond configuration. Good agreement was achieved between the two models where key environmental and flow parameters can be controlled and set, but it is difficult to accurately simulate full-scale works conditions due to the unpredictability of natural hourly and daily fluctuation in these parameters.

  5. Unsaturated hydraulic behaviour of a permeable pavement: Laboratory investigation and numerical analysis by using the HYDRUS-2D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Michele; Kodešová, Radka; Brunetti, Giuseppe; Nikodem, Antonín; Fér, Miroslav; Piro, Patrizia

    2017-11-01

    An adequate hydrological description of water flow in permeable pavement systems relies heavily on the knowledge of the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the construction materials. Although several modeling tools and many laboratory methods already exist in the literature to determine the hydraulic properties of soils, the importance of an accurate materials hydraulic description of the permeable pavement system, is increasingly recognized in the fields of urban hydrology. Thus, the aim of this study is to propose techniques/procedures on how to interpret water flow through the construction system using the HYDRUS model. The overall analysis includes experimental and mathematical procedures for model calibration and validation to assess the suitability of the HYDRUS-2D model to interpret the hydraulic behaviour of a lab-scale permeable pavement system. The system consists of three porous materials: a wear layer of porous concrete blocks, a bedding layers of fine gravel, and a sub-base layer of coarse gravel. The water regime in this system, i.e. outflow at the bottom and water contents in the middle of the bedding layer, was monitored during ten irrigation events of various durations and intensities. The hydraulic properties of porous concrete blocks and fine gravel described by the van Genuchten functions were measured using the clay tank and the multistep outflow experiments, respectively. Coarse gravel properties were set at literature values. In addition, some of the parameters (Ks of the concrete blocks layer, and α, n and Ks of the bedding layer) were optimized with the HYDRUS-2D model from water fluxes and soil water contents measured during irrigation events. The measured and modeled hydrographs were compared using the Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) index (varied between 0.95 and 0.99) while the coefficient of determination R2 was used to assess the measured water content versus the modelled water content in the bedding layer (R2 = 0.81 ÷ 0.87) . The

  6. An unsaturated hydraulic conductivity model for compacted GMZ01 bentonite with consideration of temperature

    OpenAIRE

    YE, Wei-Min; WAN, Min; CHEN, Bao; CHEN, Yong-Gui; CUI, Yu-Jun; WANG, Ju

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important properties of compacted bentonite used as buffer/backfill materials, hydraulic conductivity is influenced by various factors including temperature, microstructure and suction (or degree of saturation), etc. Based on the readily available results of both temperature-controlled water-retention tests and unsaturated infiltration tests under confined (constant volume) conditions, influences of temperature and microstructure variations on unsaturated hydraulic conducti...

  7. Capacity of textile filters for wastewater Treatment at changeable wastewater level – a hydraulic model

    OpenAIRE

    Marcin Spychała; Maciej Pawlak; Tadeusz Nawrot

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe in a mathematical manner the hydraulic capacity of textile filters for wastewater treatment at changeable wastewater levels during a period between consecutive doses, taking into consideration the decisive factors for flow-conditions of filtering media. Highly changeable and slightly changeable flow-conditions tests were performed on reactors equipped with non-woven geo-textile filters. Hydraulic conductivity of filter material coupons was determined. The ...

  8. Hydraulic modeling of mussel habitat at a bridge-replacement site, Allegheny River, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, John W.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rogers, Megan E.; Zimmerman, Gregory F.

    2010-01-01

    The Allegheny River in Pennsylvania supports a large and diverse freshwater-mussel community, including two federally listed endangered species, Pleurobema clava(Clubshell) and Epioblasma torulosa rangiana (Northern Riffleshell). It is recognized that river hydraulics and morphology play important roles in mussel distribution. To assess the hydraulic influences of bridge replacement on mussel habitat, metrics such as depth, velocity, and their derivatives (shear stress, Froude number) were collected or computed.

  9. The use of sediment deposition maps as auxiliary data for hydraulic model calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukolwe, Micah; Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    One aspect of the French disaster mitigation setup is the statutory Risk Prevention Plans (PPR, Plans de Prévention des Risques); i.e. spatial identification of potential disasters and mitigation measures. The maps are categorised into three zones depicting increasing disaster severity and potential mitigation measures (RTM, 1999). Taking the example of the city of Barcelonnette, in South France (French Alps), floods have been the most frequent occurring natural hazard (Flageollet et al., 1996). Consequently, a case is put forward for the need for accurate flood extent delineation to support the decision making process. For this study, the Barcelonnette case study was considered, whereby the last devastating flooding was in June 1957 (Weber, 1994). Contrary to the recent advances in the proliferation of data to support flood inundation studies (Bates, 2012; Bates, 2004; Di Baldassarre and Uhlenbrook, 2012; Schumann et al., 2009), constraints are faced when analysing flood inundation events that occurred before the 1970's. In absence of frequent flooding, the analysis of historical flood extents may play an important role in shaping the awareness of local stakeholders and support land-use and urban planning. This study is part of a probabilistic flood mapping (e.g. Di Baldassarre et al., 2010, Horrit, 2006) of the valley carried out in a Monte-Carlo framework, while taking into account the peak flow and the parametric uncertainty. The simulations were carried out using the sub-grid channel model extension of the LISFLOOD-FP hydraulic model (Bates et al, 2010; Neal et al., 2012). Sediment deposition maps (Lecarpentier, 1963) were used to analyse the model performance, additionally the graduation of the sediment deposition sizes showed the flood propagation and was used to analyse the model runs. However, there still remains the challenge of quantifying the uncertainty in the sediment deposition map and the actual flood extent.

  10. Modeling and analysis of hydraulic dashpot for impact free operation in a shut-off rod drive mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra K. Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotary hydraulic dashpot used for shut-off rod drive mechanism application of a nuclear reactor has been studied in this paper for impact free operation. The rotary hydraulic dashpot has been modeled as a system with 1 degree of freedom (DOF and the simulation results are experimentally validated. The dashpot is modeled as a hinge joint with moving and fixed vanes as rigid bodies. Shut-off rods are used to shut-down a nuclear reactor and hydraulic dashpot absorbs the energy of freely falling shut-off rod at the end of rod travel. With the increase in the environmental temperature the dashpot becomes underdamped at a point because of reduction in the viscosity of oil and results into impact on mechanism components. Hydraulic dashpot designs are finalized with an optimum combination of dashpot clearances and oil viscosity to meet the drop time criterion and impact free operation at room temperature as well as at elevated temperature. Also with the change in mechanical loads the dashpot becomes underdamped. So the study is further extended to see the effects of various parameters such as moment of inertia, constraint angle and applied moment on the dashpot. Study is focused on obtaining dashpot responses in terms of relative rotation, relative angular velocity and relative angular acceleration at various environmental temperatures. Finite element commercial code COMSOL Multiphysics 5.1 has been used for numerical simulations. Equations for both rigid body dynamics and heat transfer in solids are solved simultaneously. Thus, energy absorbed and local temperature rise in the dashpot operation is also obtained. Both simulation and experimental results at wide range of environmental temperature are presented and compared in this paper. This study forms a good tool to design a hydraulic dashpot, which gives impact free operation in a shut-off rod free fall.

  11. Development and Applications of a General Coupled Thermal-hydraulic/Neutronic Model for the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staalek, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    Coupled calculations are important for the simulation of nuclear power plants when there is a strong feedback between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics. A general coupled model of the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor has been developed for this purpose. The development is outlined in the thesis with details given in the appended papers. A PARCS model was developed for the core calculations and a RELAP5 model for the thermal-hydraulic calculations. The RELAP5 model has 157 channels for modelling the flow in the fuel assemblies. This means that there is a one-one correspondence radially between the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nodalization. This detailed mapping between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics makes it possible to use the model for all kinds of transient. To provide realistic material data to the PARCS model, a cross-section interface was developed. With this interface one can import material data from a binary CASMO-4 library file into PARCS. Due to the one-to-one mapping, any any core loading can easily be considered. The PARCS model was benchmarked against measurements of the steady-state power distribution of Ringhals-3. The power shape was well reproduced by the model. Validational work for steady-state conditions of the thermal-hydraulic was also successfully performed. The most challenging part of the validation of a coupled model is for transients. This is much more difficult since the dynamics of the system becomes very important. Two transients that occurred at Ringhals-3 were chosen for the validational work. The first transient was a Load Rejection Transient. In general the model gave good results but some problems were experienced, e.g. the pressurizer pressure turned out to be more difficult to be correctly simulated. The second transient was a Loss of Feed Water transient. A malfunctioning feed water control valve closed, and therefore shut down the feed water supply to the steam generator in one of the

  12. A time-dependent neutron transport model and its coupling to thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautz, A.

    2001-01-01

    A new neutron transport code for time-dependent analyses of nuclear systems has been developed. The code system is based on the well-known Discrete Ordinates code DORT, which solves the steady-state neutron/photon transport equation in two dimensions for an arbitrary number of energy groups and the most common regular geometries. For the implementation of time-dependence a fully implicit first-order scheme was employed to minimize errors due to temporal discretization. This requires various modifications to the transport equation as well as the extensive use of elaborated acceleration mechanisms. The convergence criteria for fluxes, fission rates etc. had to be strongly tightened to ensure the reliability of results. To perform coupled analyses, an interface to the GRS system code ATHLET has been developed. The nodal power densities from the neutron transport code are passed to ATHLET to calculate thermal-hydraulic system parameters, e.g. fuel and coolant temperatures. These are in turn used to generate appropriate nuclear cross sections by interpolation of pre-calculated data sets for each time step. Finally, to demonstrate the transient capabilities of the coupled code system, the research reactor FRM-II has been analysed. Several design basis accidents were modelled, like the loss of off site power, loss of secondary heat sink and unintended control rod withdrawal. (author)

  13. A fifth equation to model the relative velocity the 3-D thermal-hydraulic code THYC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouhanique, T.; Rascle, P.

    1995-11-01

    E.D.F. has developed, since 1986, a general purpose code named THYC (Thermal HYdraulic Code) designed to study three-dimensional single and two-phase flows in rod tube bundles (pressurised water reactor cores, steam generators, condensers, heat exchangers). In these studies, the relative velocity was calculated by a drift-flux correlation. However, the relative velocity between vapor and liquid is an important parameter for the accuracy of a two-phase flow modelling in a three-dimensional code. The range of application of drift-flux correlations is mainly limited by the characteristic of the flow pattern (counter current flow ...) and by large 3-D effects. The purpose of this paper is to describe a numerical scheme which allows the relative velocity to be computed in a general case. Only the methodology is investigated in this paper which is not a validation work. The interfacial drag force is an important factor of stability and accuracy of the results. This force, closely dependent on the flow pattern, is not entirely established yet, so a range of multiplicator of its expression is used to compare the numerical results with the VATICAN test section measurements. (authors). 13 refs., 6 figs

  14. Water Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents research results using IT-Tools for CAD and dynamic modelling, simulation, analysis, and design of water hydraulic actuators for motion control of machines, lifts, cranes and robots. Matlab/Simulink and CATIA are used as IT-Tools. The contributions include results from on......-going research projects on fluid power and mechatronics based on tap water hydraulic servovalves and linear servo actuators and rotary vane actuators for motion control and power transmission. Development and design a novel water hydraulic rotary vane actuator for robot manipulators. Proposed mathematical...... modelling, control and simulation of a water hydraulic rotary vane actuator applied to power and control a two-links manipulator and evaluate performance. The results include engineering design and test of the proposed simulation models compared with IHA Tampere University’s presentation of research...

  15. Hydraulic turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meluk O, G.

    1998-01-01

    The hydraulic turbines are defined according to the specific speed, in impulse turbines and in reaction turbines. Currently, the Pelton turbines (of impulse) and the Francis and Kaplan turbines (of reaction), they are the most important machines in the hydroelectric generation. The hydraulic turbines are capable of generating in short times, large powers, from its loads zero until the total load and reject the load instantly without producing damages in the operation. When the hydraulic resources are important, the hydraulic turbines are converted in the axle of the electric system. Its combination with thermoelectric generation systems, it allow the continuing supply of the variations in demand of energy system. The available hydraulic resource in Colombia is of 93085 MW, of which solely 9% is exploited, become 79% of all the electrical country generation, 21% remaining is provided by means of the thermoelectric generation

  16. Diffusion model for ultrasound-modulated light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Joseph L; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei; DiMarzio, Charles A

    2014-03-01

    Researchers use ultrasound (US) to modulate diffusive light in a highly scattering medium like tissue. This paper analyzes the US-optical interaction in the scattering medium and derives an expression for the US-modulated optical radiance. The diffusion approximation to the radiative transport equation is employed to develop a Green's function for US-modulated light. The predicted modulated fluence and flux are verified using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The Green's function is then utilized to illustrate the modulated reflectance as the US-optical interaction increases in depth. The intent of this paper is to focus on high US frequencies necessary for high-resolution imaging because they are of interest for applications such as phase conjugation.

  17. Development of NSSS Thermal-Hydraulic Model for KNPEC-2 Simulator Using the Best-Estimate Code RETRAN-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Doo; Jeong, Jae-Jun; Lee, Seung-Wook; Lee, Myeong-Soo; Suh, Jae-Seung; Hong, Jin-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-Kwan

    2004-01-01

    The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) thermal-hydraulic model adopted in the Korea Nuclear Plant Education Center (KNPEC)-2 simulator was provided in the early 1980s. The reference plant for KNPEC-2 is the Yong Gwang Nuclear Unit 1, which is a Westinghouse-type 3-loop, 950 MW(electric) pressurized water reactor. Because of the limited computational capability at that time, it uses overly simplified physical models and assumptions for a real-time simulation of NSSS thermal-hydraulic transients. This may entail inaccurate results and thus, the possibility of so-called ''negative training,'' especially for complicated two-phase flows in the reactor coolant system. To resolve the problem, we developed a realistic NSSS thermal-hydraulic program (named ARTS code) based on the best-estimate code RETRAN-3D. The systematic assessment of ARTS has been conducted by both a stand-alone test and an integrated test in the simulator environment. The non-integrated stand-alone test (NIST) results were reasonable in terms of accuracy, real-time simulation capability, and robustness. After successful completion of the NIST, ARTS was integrated with a 3-D reactor kinetics model and other system models. The site acceptance test (SAT) has been completed successively and confirmed to comply with the ANSI/ANS-3.5-1998 simulator software performance criteria. This paper presents our efforts for the ARTS development and some test results of the NIST and SAT

  18. Thermal hydraulic analysis of the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor using a RELAP5 model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Antonella L.; Reis, Patricia Amelia L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Soares, Humberto V.

    2010-01-01

    The RELAP5 code is widely used for thermal hydraulic studies of commercial nuclear power plants. Current investigations and code adaptations have demonstrated that the RELAP5 code can be also applied for thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear research reactors with good predictions. Therefore, as a contribution to the assessment of RELAP5/MOD3.3 for research reactors analysis, this work presents steady-state and transient calculation results performed using a RELAP5 model to simulate the IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor at 50 kilowatts (kW) of power operation. The reactor is located in the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), Brazil. It is a 250 kW, light water moderated and cooled, graphite-reflected, open pool type research reactor. The development and the assessment of a RELAP5 model for the IPR-R1 TRIGA are presented. Experimental data were considered in the process of the RELAP5 model validation. The RELAP5 results were also compared with calculated data from the STHIRP-1 (Research Reactors Thermal Hydraulic Simulation) code. The results obtained have shown that the RELAP5 model for the IPR-R1 TRIGA reproduces the actual steady-state reactor behavior in good agreement with the available data.

  19. RELAP5 model to simulate the thermal-hydraulic effects of grid spacers and cladding rupture during reflood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nithianandan, C.K.; Klingenfus, J.A.; Reilly, S.S. [B& W Nuclear Technologies, Lynchburg, VA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Droplet breakup at spacer grids and a cladding swelled and ruptured locations plays an important role in the cooling of nuclear fuel rods during the reflooding period of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). During the reflood phase, a spacer grid affects the thermal-hydraulic system behavior through increased turbulence, droplet breakup due to impact on grid straps, grid rewetting, and liquid holdup due to grid form losses. Recently, models to simulate spacer grid effects and blockage and rupture effects on system thermal hydraulics were added to the B&W Nuclear Technologies (BWNT) version of the RELAP5/MOD2 computer code. Several FLECHT-SEASET forced reflood tests, CCTF Tests C1-19 and C2-6, SCTF Test S3-15, and G2 Test 561 were simulated using RELAP5/MOD2-B&W to verify the applicability of the model at the cladding swelled and rupture locations. The results demonstrate the importance of modeling the thermal-hydraulic effects due to grids, and clad swelling and rupture to correctly predict the clad temperature response during the reflood phase of large break LOCA. The RELAP5 models and the test results are described in this paper.

  20. Application of flow network models of SINDA/FLUINT{sup TM} to a nuclear power plant system thermal hydraulic code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Ji Bum [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong Woon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    In order to enhance the dynamic and interactive simulation capability of a system thermal hydraulic code for nuclear power plant, applicability of flow network models in SINDA/FLUINT{sup TM} has been tested by modeling feedwater system and coupling to DSNP which is one of a system thermal hydraulic simulation code for a pressurized heavy water reactor. The feedwater system is selected since it is one of the most important balance of plant systems with a potential to greatly affect the behavior of nuclear steam supply system. The flow network model of this feedwater system consists of condenser, condensate pumps, low and high pressure heaters, deaerator, feedwater pumps, and control valves. This complicated flow network is modeled and coupled to DSNP and it is tested for several normal and abnormal transient conditions such turbine load maneuvering, turbine trip, and loss of class IV power. The results show reasonable behavior of the coupled code and also gives a good dynamic and interactive simulation capabilities for the several mild transient conditions. It has been found that coupling system thermal hydraulic code with a flow network code is a proper way of upgrading simulation capability of DSNP to mature nuclear plant analyzer (NPA). 5 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  1. A Graph Theoretic Approach for Hydraulic Fracturing and Wellbore Leakage Risk Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glosser, D.; Rose, K.; Bauer, J. R.; Warner, T.

    2016-12-01

    Recent large scale development of unconventional formations for fossil energy has raised concerns over the potential for fluid leakage between subsurface systems and wellbores. This is particularly true in regions with extensive drilling history, where spatial densities of wellbores are higher, and where significant uncertainties in the location and mechanical integrity of such wellbores exist. The generation of induced fracture networks during hydraulic fracturing may increase subsurface connectivity, and create the potential for unwanted fluid migration between operational and legacy wellbores and subsurface fracture networks. We present a graph theoretic approach for identifying geospatial regions and wellbores at increased risk for subsurface connectivity based on wellbore proximity and local geologic characteristics. The algorithm transforms user inputted geospatial data (geologic and wellbore x,y,z) to graph structure, where wellbores are represented as nodes, and where potential overlapping fracture network zones are represented as edges. The algorithm can be used to complement existing fracture models to better account for the reach of induced fractures, and to identify spatial extents at increased risk for unwanted subsurface connectivity. Additionally, the model can be used to identify regions in need of geophysical detection methods for locating undocumented wells. As a result, the method can be part of a cumulative strategy to reduce uncertainty inherent to combined geologic and engineered systems. The algorithm has been successfully tested against a known leakage scenario in Pennsylvania. In addition to identifying wells associated with the leakage event, the algorithm identified two other higher risk networks in the region. The algorithm output provides valuable information for industry to develop environmentally safe drilling and injection plans; and for regulators to identify specific wellbores at greater risk for leakage, and to develop targeted

  2. Capturing the complex behavior of hydraulic fracture stimulation through multi-physics modeling, field-based constraints, and model reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, S.; Chiaramonte, L.; Cruz, L.; Izadi, G.

    2016-12-01

    Advances in the accuracy and fidelity of numerical methods have significantly improved our understanding of coupled processes in unconventional reservoirs. However, such multi-physics models are typically characterized by many parameters and require exceptional computational resources to evaluate systems of practical importance, making these models difficult to use for field analyses or uncertainty quantification. One approach to remove these limitations is through targeted complexity reduction and field data constrained parameterization. For the latter, a variety of field data streams may be available to engineers and asset teams, including micro-seismicity from proximate sites, well logs, and 3D surveys, which can constrain possible states of the reservoir as well as the distributions of parameters. We describe one such workflow, using the Argos multi-physics code and requisite geomechanical analysis to parameterize the underlying models. We illustrate with a field study involving a constraint analysis of various field data and details of the numerical optimizations and model reduction to demonstrate how complex models can be applied to operation design in hydraulic fracturing operations, including selection of controllable completion and fluid injection design properties. The implication of this work is that numerical methods are mature and computationally tractable enough to enable complex engineering analysis and deterministic field estimates and to advance research into stochastic analyses for uncertainty quantification and value of information applications.

  3. A reactive transport modelling approach to assess the leaching potential of hydraulic fracturing fluids associated with coal seam gas extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallants, Dirk; Simunek, Jirka; Gerke, Kirill

    2015-04-01

    Coal Seam Gas production generates large volumes of "produced" water that may contain compounds originating from the use of hydraulic fracturing fluids. Such produced water also contains elevated concentrations of naturally occurring inorganic and organic compounds, and usually has a high salinity. Leaching of produced water from storage ponds may occur as a result of flooding or containment failure. Some produced water is used for irrigation of specific crops tolerant to elevated salt levels. These chemicals may potentially contaminate soil, shallow groundwater, and groundwater, as well as receiving surface waters. This paper presents an application of scenario modelling using the reactive transport model for variably-saturated media HP1 (coupled HYDRUS-1D and PHREEQC). We evaluate the fate of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and naturally occurring chemicals in soil as a result of unintentional release from storage ponds or when produced water from Coal Seam Gas operations is used in irrigation practices. We present a review of exposure pathways and relevant hydro-bio-geo-chemical processes, a collation of physico-chemical properties of organic/inorganic contaminants as input to a set of generic simulations of transport and attenuation in variably saturated soil profiles. We demonstrate the ability to model the coupled processes of flow and transport in soil of contaminants associated with hydraulic fracturing fluids and naturally occurring contaminants.

  4. Hydraulic modeling of the flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuykov Andrey L'vovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to hydraulic modeling of flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers. Dynamic similarity criteria of such flows were found by the inspection analysis of the Reynolds equations. It was found that the hydrodynamic similarity criteria for physical modeling of unsteady turbulent circular-longitudinal flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers of viscous incompressible fluid are: Strouhal number - the ratio of forces of local and convective inertia, Rossby number characterizes the ratio of the azimuthal and axial velocity, Froude number - the ratio of forces of convective inertia to the forces of gravity, Euler number - the ratio of pressure forces to the convective forces of inertia, Weber number - the ratio of the convective inertia forces to surface tension forces, Reynolds number - the ratio of the convective inertia forces to the forces of molecular viscosity, Karman number - the ratio of dispersion velocity vector of fluid particles to the flow velocity. The limit value of the Reynolds number was found at the lower boundary conditions of automodel zone of such flow. It is shown that Weber and Rossby criteria for physical modeling of such flows are not determinative. It was found out that turbulent circular-longitudinal flow with counter-rotating coaxial layers are not modeled using Karman criterion. In this connection, there is a need to conduct experimental methodological research of turbulent flows with counter-rotating coaxial layers on stands equipped means of three-dimensional laser Doppler anemometry. Integral criteria of dynamic similarity of circular-longitudinal flows was considered - Heeger-Baer number (swirl number and Abramovich number, characterizing the ratio of the angular momentum and momentum of such flows. In comparison with the swirl number, Heeger-Baer number is more preferable. Abramovich number is equal to the geometric characteristics of the local swirler as similarity criterion of circular

  5. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F.; Love, L.J.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL's flexible/prismatic test stand

  6. Hydraulic manipulator research at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kress, R.L.; Jansen, J.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Love, L.J. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Recently, task requirements have dictated that manipulator payload capacity increase to accommodate greater payloads, greater manipulator length, and larger environmental interaction forces. General tasks such as waste storage tank cleanup and facility dismantlement and decommissioning require manipulator life capacities in the range of hundreds of pounds rather than tens of pounds. To meet the increased payload capacities demanded by present-day tasks, manipulator designers have turned once again to hydraulics as a means of actuation. In order to successfully design, build, and deploy a new hydraulic manipulator (or subsystem), sophisticated modeling, analysis, and control experiments are usually needed. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a history of projects that incorporate hydraulics technology, including mobile robots, teleoperated manipulators, and full-scale construction equipment. In addition, to support the development and deployment of new hydraulic manipulators, ORNL has outfitted a significant experimental laboratory and has developed the software capability for research into hydraulic manipulators, hydraulic actuators, hydraulic systems, modeling of hydraulic systems, and hydraulic controls. The purpose of this article is to describe the past hydraulic manipulator developments and current hydraulic manipulator research capabilities at ORNL. Included are example experimental results from ORNL`s flexible/prismatic test stand.

  7. Application of a new hydraulic conductivity model to simulate rapid groundwater fluctuations in the Eel River watershed in Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrettas, M. D.; Fung, I. Y.

    2015-12-01

    High-frequency multi-year observations of the water table at several wells in the Angelo Coast Range Reserve in the Eel River Watershed in northern California show rapid fluctuations, where the water table, some 10-15 meters below the surface, rises by as much as 1 meter in a day or two after the first storms of the rain season. The observations highlight preferential flow through weathered bedrock, which can store as much as 30% of the moisture in the column ("rock moisture"). This rapid transfer of moisture and storage at depth could have a significant impact on ecosystem dynamics and the water and energy budgets of the atmosphere on various time scales. Despite its high importance, preferential flow through weather bedrock is not routinely captured in most climate models. This work presents a new hydraulic conductivity parameterization that captures the preferential flow, with straightforward implementation into current global climate models. The hydraulic conductivity is represented as a product of the effective saturation (normalized water content) and a background hydraulic conductivity Kbkg, drawn from a depth dependent lognormal distribution. A unique feature of the parameterization is that the variance of hydraulic conductivity is large when there is little rock moisture, and decreases with increasing saturation, mimicking flow through fractures. The new method is applied to seven wells locations on a steep (35 degrees) hill-slope in the Eel River watershed in Northern California, for the duration of six years and estimates of the model parameters are provided by assimilating, into Richards' equation, measurements of precipitation [mm] and water table depths [m] at 30-minute time intervals. The simulation results show that the new approach yields a good agreement of the rapid rise of the observed water table at the tested well locations. Furthermore, the water stored in the weathered bedrock is estimated to be in the range between 32% and 41%, which could

  8. Numerical solution of conservation equations in the transient model for the system thermal - hydraulics in the Korsar computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yudov, Y.V.

    2001-01-01

    The functional part of the KORSAR computer code is based on the computational unit for the reactor system thermal-hydraulics and other thermal power systems with water cooling. The two-phase flow dynamics of the thermal-hydraulic network is modelled by KORSAR in one-dimensional two-fluid (non-equilibrium and nonhomogeneous) approximation with the same pressure of both phases. Each phase is characterized by parameters averaged over the channel sections, and described by the conservation equations for mass, energy and momentum. The KORSAR computer code relies upon a novel approach to mathematical modelling of two-phase dispersed-annular flows. This approach allows a two-fluid model to differentiate the effects of the liquid film and droplets in the gas core on the flow characteristics. A semi-implicit numerical scheme has been chosen for deriving discrete analogs the conservation equations in KORSAR. In the semi-implicit numerical scheme, solution of finite-difference equations is reduced to the problem of determining the pressure field at a new time level. For the one-channel case, the pressure field is found from the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations by using the tri-diagonal matrix method. In the branched network calculation, the matrix of coefficients in the equations describing the pressure field is no longer tri-diagonal but has a sparseness structure. In this case, the system of linear equations for the pressure field can be solved with any of the known classical methods. Such an approach is implemented in the existing best-estimate thermal-hydraulic computer codes (TRAC, RELAP5, etc.) For the KORSAR computer code, we have developed a new non-iterative method for calculating the pressure field in the network of any topology. This method is based on the tri-diagonal matrix method and performs well when solving the thermal-hydraulic network problems. (author)

  9. Basic hydraulics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, P D

    1982-01-01

    BASIC Hydraulics aims to help students both to become proficient in the BASIC programming language by actually using the language in an important field of engineering and to use computing as a means of mastering the subject of hydraulics. The book begins with a summary of the technique of computing in BASIC together with comments and listing of the main commands and statements. Subsequent chapters introduce the fundamental concepts and appropriate governing equations. Topics covered include principles of fluid mechanics; flow in pipes, pipe networks and open channels; hydraulic machinery;

  10. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  11. A phenomenological model of thermal-hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unal, C.; Nelson, R.

    1991-01-01

    After completion of the thermal-hydraulic model developed in a companion paper, the authors performed developmental assessment calculation of the model using steady-state and transient post-critical heat flux (CHF) data. This paper discusses the results of those calculations. The overall interfacial drag model predicted reasonable drag coefficients for both the nucleate boiling and the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The predicted pressure drops agreed reasonably well with the measured data of two transient experiments, CCTF Run 14 and a Lehigh reflood test. The thermal-hydraulic model for post-CHF convective heat transfer predicted the rewetting velocities reasonably well for both experiments. The predicted average slope of the wall temperature traces for these tests showed reasonable agreement with the measured data, indicating that the transient-calculated precursory cooling rates agreed with measured data. The hot-patch model, in conjunction with the other thermal-hydraulic models, was capable of modeling the Winfrith post-CHF hot-patch experiments. The hot-patch model kept the wall temperatures at the specified levels in the hot-patch regions and did not allow any quench-front propagation from either the bottom or the top of the test section. The interfacial heat-transfer model tended to slightly underpredict the vapor temperatures. The maximum difference between calculated and measured vapor temperatures was 20%, with a 10% difference for the remainder of the runs considered. The wall-to-fluid heat transfer was predicted reasonably well, and the predicted wall temperatures were in reasonable agreement with measured data with a maximum relative error of less than 13%

  12. Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical modeling of hydraulic fracturing in quasi-brittle rocks using BPM-DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Tomac

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved understanding of coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical (HTM hydraulic fracturing of quasi-brittle rock using the bonded particle model (BPM within the discrete element method (DEM. BPM has been recently extended by the authors to account for coupled convective–conductive heat flow and transport, and to enable full hydro-thermal fluid–solid coupled modeling. The application of the work is on enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs, and hydraulic fracturing of hot dry rock (HDR is studied in terms of the impact of temperature difference between rock and a flowing fracturing fluid. Micro-mechanical investigation of temperature and fracturing fluid effects on hydraulic fracturing damage in rocks is presented. It was found that fracture is shorter with pronounced secondary microcracking along the main fracture for the case when the convective–conductive thermal heat exchange is considered. First, the convection heat exchange during low-viscosity fluid infiltration in permeable rock around the wellbore causes significant rock cooling, where a finger-like fluid infiltration was observed. Second, fluid infiltration inhibits pressure rise during pumping and delays fracture initiation and propagation. Additionally, thermal damage occurs in the whole area around the wellbore due to rock cooling and cold fluid infiltration. The size of a damaged area around the wellbore increases with decreasing fluid dynamic viscosity. Fluid and rock compressibility ratio was found to have significant effect on the fracture propagation velocity.

  13. Hydraulic Structures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This table is required whenever hydraulic structures are shown in the flood profile. It is also required if levees are shown on the FIRM, channels containing the...

  14. An abstract machine model of dynamic module replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Chris; Kırlı, Dilsun; Gilmore, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we define an abstract machine model for the mλ typed intermediate language. This abstract machine is used to give a formal description of the operation of run-time module replacement for the programming language Dynamic ML. The essential technical device which we employ for module replacement is a modification of two-space copying garbage collection. We show how the operation of module replacement could be applied to other garbage-collected languages such as Java.

  15. A multiscale approach to determine hydraulic conductivity in thick claystone aquitards using field, laboratory, and numerical modeling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.; Barbour, S. L.; Hendry, M. J.; Novakowski, K.; van der Kamp, G.

    2016-07-01

    Characterizing the hydraulic conductivity (K) of aquitards is difficult due to technical and logistical difficulties associated with field-based methods as well as the cost and challenge of collecting representative and competent core samples for laboratory analysis. The objective of this study was to produce a multiscale comparison of vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kv and Kh, respectively) of a regionally extensive Cretaceous clay-rich aquitard in southern Saskatchewan. Ten vibrating wire pressure transducers were lowered into place at depths between 25 and 325 m, then the annular was space was filled with a cement-bentonite grout. The in situ Kh was estimated at the location of each transducer by simulating the early-time pore pressure measurements following setting of the grout using a 2-D axisymmetric, finite element, numerical model. Core samples were collected during drilling for conventional laboratory testing for Kv to compare with the transducer-determined in situ Kh. Results highlight the importance of scale and consideration of the presence of possible secondary features (e.g., fractures) in the aquitard. The proximity of the transducers to an active potash mine (˜1 km) where depressurization of an underlying aquifer resulted in drawdown through the aquitard provided a unique opportunity to model the current hydraulic head profile using both the Kh and Kv estimates. Results indicate that the transducer-determined Kh estimates would allow for the development of the current hydraulic head distribution, and that simulating the pore pressure recovery can be used to estimate moderately low in situ Kh (<10-11 m s-1).

  16. Assessing the influence of the rhizosphere on soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and numerical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Keith R; Mooney, Sacha J; Bennett, Malcolm J; Crout, Neil M J; Roose, Tiina; Tracy, Saoirse R

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the dynamics of water distribution in soil is crucial for enhancing our knowledge of managing soil and water resources. The application of X-ray computed tomography (CT) to the plant and soil sciences is now well established. However, few studies have utilized the technique for visualizing water in soil pore spaces. Here this method is utilized to visualize the water in soil in situ and in three-dimensions at successive reductive matric potentials in bulk and rhizosphere soil. The measurements are combined with numerical modelling to determine the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, providing a complete picture of the hydraulic properties of the soil. The technique was performed on soil cores that were sampled adjacent to established roots (rhizosphere soil) and from soil that had not been influenced by roots (bulk soil). A water release curve was obtained for the different soil types using measurements of their pore geometries derived from CT imaging and verified using conventional methods, such as pressure plates. The water, soil, and air phases from the images were segmented and quantified using image analysis. The water release characteristics obtained for the contrasting soils showed clear differences in hydraulic properties between rhizosphere and bulk soil, especially in clay soil. The data suggest that soils influenced by roots (rhizosphere soil) are less porous due to increased aggregation when compared with bulk soil. The information and insights obtained on the hydraulic properties of rhizosphere and bulk soil will enhance our understanding of rhizosphere biophysics and improve current water uptake models. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Microseismic signatures of hydraulic fracture growth in sediment formations: Observations and modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fischer, Tomáš; Hainzl, S.; Eisner, L.; Shapiro, S. A.; Le Calvez, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. B2 (2008), B02307/1-B02307/12 ISSN 0148-0227 Grant - others:EC(XE) MTKI-CT-2004-517242 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : microseismic data * hydraulic fracture simulation * Texas Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 3.147, year: 2008

  18. Stochastic water demand modelling for a better understanding of hydraulics in water distribution networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokker, E.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    In the water distribution network water quality process take place influenced by de flow velocity and residence time of the water in the network. In order to understand how the water quality changes in the water distribution network, a good understanding of hydraulics is required. Specifically in

  19. Seismicity Induced by Hydraulic Fracturing in Shales: A Bedding Plane Slip Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staněk, František; Eisner, Leo

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 10 (2017), s. 7912-7926 ISSN 2169-9313 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : microseismic * seismicity * hydraulic fracturing * bedding plane slip Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure OBOR OECD: 1.7 Other natural sciences Impact factor: 3.350, year: 2016

  20. Predicting Hydraulic Properties From Soil Physical and Topographical Data With A Neural Network Model For A Hillslope In Basilicata, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, F. J.; Romano, N.; Schaap, M. G.; Palladino, M.

    Italy Infiltration and runoff of water on the slopes of mountains and hills are important components of hydrological models at the catchment and basin scale. The application of such models is being investigated for the Agri River basin in Basilicata. As part of the study, soil physical and other data were collected along the SCorletoT transect on & cedil;a hillslope of the Sauro River, which is the main tributary to the Agri River. The water retention and hydraulic conductivity are important parameters because they determine surface runoff and infiltration as well as subsurface flow. Since the measurement of hydraulic properties requires considerable time and resources, these properties have also been investigated with pedotransfer functions (PTFs). The objective of this study was to develop PTFs that use both basic soil properties and topographical variables. Water contents were measured on undisturbed soil samples at suctions of 1, 2, 5, 9, and 15 kPa with a sand-kaolin box and at 300, 600, and 1200 kPa with a membrane plate apparatus. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was determined according to the falling head method in the laboratory. Among the basic soil properties that were determined are: bulk density, particle density, porosity, organic carbon content, and particle-size distribution. Furthermore terrain attributes such as elevation, slope, as- pect were available from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The retention data were described with the parameters of the van Genuchten equation. Spearman Rank Corre- lations revealed a significant positive correlation between elevation and porosity, or- ganic carbon, silt fraction, and saturated water content and a negative correlation with bulk density, sand fraction and alpha. The slope was positively correlated with Ks and negatively with particle density and saturated water copntent. Retention parameters and hydraulic conductivity were subsequently predicted with a neural network model using various

  1. Uncertainty in the determination of soil hydraulic parameters and its influence on the performance of two hydrological models of different complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baroni

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Data of soil hydraulic properties forms often a limiting factor in unsaturated zone modelling, especially at the larger scales. Investigations for the hydraulic characterization of soils are time-consuming and costly, and the accuracy of the results obtained by the different methodologies is still debated. However, we may wonder how the uncertainty in soil hydraulic parameters relates to the uncertainty of the selected modelling approach. We performed an intensive monitoring study during the cropping season of a 10 ha maize field in Northern Italy. The data were used to: i compare different methods for determining soil hydraulic parameters and ii evaluate the effect of the uncertainty in these parameters on different variables (i.e. evapotranspiration, average water content in the root zone, flux at the bottom boundary of the root zone simulated by two hydrological models of different complexity: SWAP, a widely used model of soil moisture dynamics in unsaturated soils based on Richards equation, and ALHyMUS, a conceptual model of the same dynamics based on a reservoir cascade scheme. We employed five direct and indirect methods to determine soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon of the experimental profile. Two methods were based on a parameter optimization of: a laboratory measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data and b field measured retention and hydraulic conductivity data. The remaining three methods were based on the application of widely used Pedo-Transfer Functions: c Rawls and Brakensiek, d HYPRES, and e ROSETTA. Simulations were performed using meteorological, irrigation and crop data measured at the experimental site during the period June – October 2006. Results showed a wide range of soil hydraulic parameter values generated with the different methods, especially for the saturated hydraulic conductivity Ksat and the shape parameter α of the van Genuchten curve. This is reflected in a variability of

  2. A Direct Method of Hydraulic Conductivity Structure Identification for Subsurface Transport Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Jiao, J.

    2016-12-01

    Solute transport in aquifers is strongly influenced by the spatial distribution of subsurface hydraulic conductivity (K), while limited drilling in data-sparse environments typically results in lack of data characterizing both the K and the in-situ fluid flow boundary conditions (BC). To characterize such environments, we present an efficient direct inverse method to simultaneously identify aquifer K pattern, its values, and the flow field. The method ensures fluid flow continuity using local approximate solutions of the governing equation conditioned to limited hydraulic measurements, while physics of the flow is enforced making the inverse problem well-posed. A single system of equations is assembled and solved, from which parameters and BC can be simultaneously estimated. For problems with irregular and regular K distributions, inversion is demonstrated for different measurement types, quality, and quantity. When measurement error is increased, the estimated K pattern is largely insensitive to the error, although the inverted flow field suffers greater inaccuracy. Local conductivity and Darcy flux measurements are found to have similar information content, although subtle differences exist in the inverted flow fields when long-term contaminant release is simulated. Local conductivity measurements lead to better identification of conductivity pattern, values, and the hydraulic head field; Darcy flux measurements lead to more accurate estimation of the velocity field and thus improved transport predictions. Overall, the velocity fields estimated based on the hydraulic data can lead to reasonable predictions of contaminant migration and breakthrough under unknown aquifer BC. We further argue that the goal of pattern inversion is to recover a sufficient level of detail to make transport prediction approximately accurate. Depending on the desired accuracy, fine-scale heterogeneity can be recovered only at increased characterization cost. Future work will (1) evaluate

  3. The Role of Electrical Anisotropy in Modeling and Interpreting Controlled-Source Electromagnetic Responses for Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, S., III; Hickey, M. S.; Everett, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    Controlled-Source Electromagnetics (CSEM) can be used to monitor the movement and extent of injection fluid during a hydraulic fracture. The response of the fluid to energization by a CSEM source is dependent upon the electrical conductivity difference between the fluid and background geological formation. An important property that must be taken into account when modeling and interpreting CSEM responses is that electrical conductivity may be anisotropic. We study the effect of electrical anisotropy in both the background formation and the fluid-injection zone. First, various properties of the background formation can affect anisotropy including variations in grain size, composition and bedding-plane orientation. In certain formations, such as shale, the horizontal component of the conductivity can be more than an order of magnitude larger than the vertical component. We study this effect by computing differences in surface CSEM responses using the analytic 1-D anisotropic primary solution of a horizontal electric dipole positioned at the surface. Second, during hydraulic fracturing, the injected fluid can create new fractures and infill existing natural fractures. To include the explicit fracture geometry in modeling, a large increase in the number of nodes and computational time is required which may not be feasible. An alternative is to instead model the large-scale fracture geometry as a uniform slab with an appropriate bulk conductivity. Micro-scale fracture geometry may cause preferential fluid propagation in a single direction or plane which can be represented by electrical anisotropy of the slab. To study such effects of bulk anisotropy on CSEM responses we present results from multiple scenarios of surface to surface hydraulic fracture monitoring using 3-D finite element modeling. The model uses Coulomb-gauged potentials to solve Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain and we have updated the code to allow a triaxial electrical conductivity tensor to

  4. Overview of the hydraulic characteristics of the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil conductors after 15 years of test campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighenti, A.; Bonifetto, R.; Isono, T.; Kawano, K.; Russo, G.; Savoldi, L.; Zanino, R.

    2017-12-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) is a superconducting magnet, layer-wound two-in-hand using Nb3Sn cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs) with the central channel typical of ITER magnets, cooled with supercritical He (SHe) at ∼4.5 K and 0.5 MPa, operating for approximately 15 years at the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology in Naka, Japan. The aim of this work is to give an overview of the issues related to the hydraulic performance of the three different CICCs used in the CSMC based on the extensive experimental database put together during the past 15 years. The measured hydraulic characteristics are compared for the different test campaigns and compared also to those coming from the tests of short conductor samples when available. It is shown that the hydraulic performance of the CSMC conductors did not change significantly in the sequence of test campaigns with more than 50 cycles up to 46 kA and 8 cooldown/warmup cycles from 300 K to 4.5 K. The capability of the correlations typically used to predict the friction factor of the SHe for the design and analysis of ITER-like CICCs is also shown.

  5. Impact of hydraulic redistribution on multispecies vegetation water use in a semi-arid ecosystem: An experimental and modeling synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E.; Kumar, P.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Scott, R. L.; Hendryx, S. M.; Sanchez-Canete, E. P.; Minor, R. L.; Colella, A.

    2017-12-01

    A key challenge in critical zone science is to understand and predict the interaction between aboveground and belowground ecohydrologic processes. One of the links that facilitates the interaction is hydraulic redistribution (HR), a phenomenon by which roots serve as preferential pathways for water movement from wet to dry soil layers. We use a multi-layer canopy model in conjunction with experimental data to examine the influence of HR on eco-hydrologic processes, such as transpiration, soil evaporation, and soil moisture, which characterize the competitive and facilitative dynamics between velvet mesquite and understory bunchgrass. Both measured and simulated results show that hydraulic descent (HD) dominates sap flux during the wet monsoon season, whereas hydraulic lift (HL) occurs between precipitation events. About 17% of precipitation is absorbed as soil-moisture, with the rest of the precipitation returning to the atmosphere as evapotranspiration. In the wet season, 13% of precipitation is transferred to deep soil (>2m) through mesquite roots, and in the dry season, 9% of this redistributed water is transported back to shallow soil depth (competitive advantage over understory bunchgrass through HR.

  6. Determining sources of elevated salinity in pre-hydraulic fracturing water quality data using a multivariate discriminant analysis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, L. K.; Hoke, G. D.; Lu, Z.; Siegel, D. I.

    2013-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing has the potential to introduce saline water into the environment due to migration of deep formation water to shallow aquifers and/or discharge of flowback water to the environment during transport and disposal. It is challenging to definitively identify whether elevated salinity is associated with hydraulic fracturing, in part, due to the real possibility of other anthropogenic sources of salinity in the human-impacted watersheds in which drilling is taking place and some formation water present naturally in shallow groundwater aquifers. We combined new and published chemistry data for private drinking water wells sampled across five southern New York (NY) counties overlying the Marcellus Shale (Broome, Chemung, Chenango, Steuben, and Tioga). Measurements include Cl, Na, Br, I, Ca, Mg, Ba, SO4, and Sr. We compared this baseline groundwater quality data in NY, now under a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, with published chemistry data for 6 different potential sources of elevated salinity in shallow groundwater, including Appalachian Basin formation water, road salt runoff, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, and water softeners. A multivariate random number generator was used to create a synthetic, low salinity ( 20 mg/L Cl) as being affected by formation water, road salt, septic effluent, landfill leachate, animal waste, or water softeners. Single elements or pairs of elements (e.g. Cl and Br) were not effective at discriminating between sources of salinity, indicating multivariate methods are needed. The discriminant analysis model classified most accurately samples affected by formation water and landfill leachate, whereas those contaminated by road salt, animal waste, and water softeners were more likely to be discriminated as contaminated by a different source. Using this approach, no shallow groundwater samples from NY appear to be affected by formation water, suggesting the source of salinity pre-hydraulic fracturing is

  7. Experimental-based Modelling and Simulation of Water Hydraulic Mechatronics Test Facilities for Motion Control and Operation in Environmental Sensitive Applications` Areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conrad, Finn; Pobedza, J.; Sobczyk, A.

    2003-01-01

    proportional valves and servo actuators for motion control and power transmission undertaken in co-operation by Technical University, DTU and Cracow University of Technology, CUT. The results of this research co-operation include engineering design and test of simulation models compared with two mechatronic...... test rig facilities powered by environmental friendly water hydraulic servo actuator system. Test rigs with measurement and data acquisition system were designed and build up with tap water hydraulic components of the Danfoss Nessie® product family. This paper presents selected experimental...... and identifying test results for a water hydraulic system....

  8. Hydraulic Stability of Accropode Armour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T.; Burcharth, H. F.; Frigaard, Peter

    The present report describes the hydraulic model tests of Accropode armour layers carried out at the Hydraulics Laboratory at Aalborg University from November 1995 through March 1996. The objective of the model tests was to investigate the hydraulic stability of Accropode armour layers...... with permeable core (crushed granite with a gradation of 5-8 mm). The outcome of this study is described in "Hydraulic Stability of Single-Layer Dolos and Accropode Armour Layers" by Christensen & Burcharth (1995). In January/February 1996, Research Assistant Thomas Jensen carried out a similar study...

  9. Determining Columbia and Snake River Project Tailrace and Forebay Zones of Hydraulic Influence using MASS2 Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    Although fisheries biology studies are frequently performed at US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects along the Columbia and Snake Rivers, there is currently no consistent definition of the ``forebay'' and ``tailrace'' regions for these studies. At this time, each study may use somewhat arbitrary lines (e.g., the Boat Restriction Zone) to define the upstream and downstream limits of the study, which may be significantly different at each project. Fisheries researchers are interested in establishing a consistent definition of project forebay and tailrace regions for the hydroelectric projects on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The Hydraulic Extent of a project was defined by USACE (Brad Eppard, USACE-CENWP) as follows: The river reach directly upstream (forebay) and downstream (tailrace) of a project that is influenced by the normal range of dam operations. Outside this reach, for a particular river discharge, changes in dam operations cannot be detected by hydraulic measurement. The purpose of this study was to, in consultation with USACE and regional representatives, develop and apply a consistent set of criteria for determining the hydraulic extent of each of the projects in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. A 2D depth-averaged river model, MASS2, was applied to the Snake and Columbia Rivers. New computational meshes were developed most reaches and the underlying bathymetric data updated to the most current survey data. The computational meshes resolved each spillway bay and turbine unit at each project and extended from project to project. MASS2 was run for a range of total river flows and each flow for a range of project operations at each project. The modeled flow was analyzed to determine the range of velocity magnitude differences and the range of flow direction differences at each location in the computational mesh for each total river flow. Maps of the differences in flow direction and velocity magnitude were created. USACE

  10. Norfolk Harbor and Channels Deepening Study. Report 1. Physical Model Results. Chesapeake Bay Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    These mechanisms consist of a feedback system that is entirely self-contained and is not dependent on computer feedback for adjustment. The system...reproducing a variable hydro- graph freshwater inflow through the use of positive feedback control of river discharges. Fresh water normally enters the model...juni of the I IOW patter-1 it Lte in, aI t he )Jillls . ’Ihe othle r t o .Lames ranges , JN02 arnd JG63 , show s I i gilt dt-( I 1ae 1. IAm If I I iti

  11. Development and qualification of a thermal-hydraulic nodalization for modeling station blackout accident in PSB-VVER test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saghafi, Mahdi; Ghofrani, Mohammad Bagher; D’Auria, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermal-hydraulic nodalization for PSB-VVER test facility has been developed. • Station blackout accident is modeled with the developed nodalization in MELCOR code. • The developed nodalization is qualified at both steady state and transient levels. • MELCOR predictions are qualitatively and quantitatively in acceptable range. • Fast Fourier Transform Base Method is used to quantify accuracy of code predictions. - Abstract: This paper deals with the development of a qualified thermal-hydraulic nodalization for modeling Station Black-Out (SBO) accident in PSB-VVER Integral Test Facility (ITF). This study has been performed in the framework of a research project, aiming to develop an appropriate accident management support tool for Bushehr nuclear power plant. In this regard, a nodalization has been developed for thermal-hydraulic modeling of the PSB-VVER ITF by MELCOR integrated code. The nodalization is qualitatively and quantitatively qualified at both steady-state and transient levels. The accuracy of the MELCOR predictions is quantified in the transient level using the Fast Fourier Transform Base Method (FFTBM). FFTBM provides an integral representation for quantification of the code accuracy in the frequency domain. It was observed that MELCOR predictions are qualitatively and quantitatively in the acceptable range. In addition, the influence of different nodalizations on MELCOR predictions was evaluated and quantified using FFTBM by developing 8 sensitivity cases with different numbers of control volumes and heat structures in the core region and steam generator U-tubes. The most appropriate case, which provided results with minimum deviations from the experimental data, was then considered as the qualified nodalization for analysis of SBO accident in the PSB-VVER ITF. This qualified nodalization can be used for modeling of VVER-1000 nuclear power plants when performing SBO accident analysis by MELCOR code.

  12. Water flux characterization through hydraulic head and temperature data assimilation: Numerical modeling and sandbox experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Lei; Zhang, Jiangjiang; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Laosheng; Zeng, Lingzao

    2018-03-01

    Spatial distribution of groundwater recharge/discharge fluxes has an important impact on mass and energy exchanges in shallow streambeds. During the last two decades, extensive studies have been devoted to the quantification of one-dimensional (1-D) vertical exchange fluxes. Nevertheless, few studies were conducted to characterize two-dimensional (2-D) heterogeneous flux fields that commonly exist in real-world cases. In this study, we used an iterative ensemble smoother (IES) to quantify the spatial distribution of 2-D exchange fluxes by assimilating hydraulic head and temperature measurements. Four assimilation scenarios corresponding to different potential field applications were tested. In the first three scenarios, the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields were first inferred from hydraulic head and/or temperature measurements, and then the flux fields were derived through Darcy's law using the estimated conductivity fields. In the fourth scenario, the flux fields were estimated directly from the temperature measurements, which is more efficient and especially suitable for the situation that a complete knowledge of flow boundary conditions is unavailable. We concluded that, the best estimation could be achieved through jointly assimilating hydraulic head and temperature measurements, and temperature data were superior to the head data when they were used independently. Overall, the IES method provided more robust and accurate vertical flux estimations than those given by the widely used analytical solution-based methods. Furthermore, IES gave reasonable uncertainty estimations, which were unavailable in traditional methods. Since temperature can be accurately monitored with high spatial and temporal resolutions, the coupling of heat tracing techniques and IES provides promising potential in quantifying complex exchange fluxes under field conditions.

  13. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic coupling for 3D reactor core modeling combining MCB and fluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Królikowski Igor P.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional simulations of neutronics and thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactors are a tool used to design nuclear reactors. The coupling of MCB and FLUENT is presented, MCB allows to simulate neutronics, whereas FLUENT is computational fluid dynamics (CFD code. The main purpose of the coupling is to exchange data such as temperature and power profile between both codes. Temperature required as an input parameter for neutronics is significant since cross sections of nuclear reactions depend on temperature. Temperature may be calculated in thermal hydraulics, but this analysis needs as an input the power profile, which is a result from neutronic simulations. Exchange of data between both analyses is required to solve this problem. The coupling is a better solution compared to the assumption of estimated values of the temperatures or the power profiles; therefore the coupled analysis was created. This analysis includes single transient neutronic simulation and several steady-state thermal simulations. The power profile is generated in defined points in time during the neutronic simulation for the thermal analysis to calculate temperature. The coupled simulation gives information about thermal behavior of the reactor, nuclear reactions in the core, and the fuel evolution in time. Results show that there is strong influence of neutronics on thermal hydraulics. This impact is stronger than the impact of thermal hydraulics on neutronics. Influence of the coupling on temperature and neutron multiplication factor is presented. The analysis has been performed for the ELECTRA reactor, which is lead-cooled fast reactor concept, where the coolant fl ow is generated only by natural convection

  14. Experimental and modelling studies on the solvent assisted hydraulic pressing of dehulled rubber seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abduh, Muhammad Yusuf; Rasrendra, C. B.; Subroto, Erna; Manurung, Robert; Heeres, Hero J.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic study on the expression of rubber seed oil from dehulled rubber seeds in a hydraulic press was performed in the presence and absence of ethanol. The effect of seed moisture content (0–6 wt%, w.b.), temperature (35–105 °C), pressure (15–25 MPa) and ethanol to seed ratio (0–21%v/w) on the

  15. A framework for modeling connections between hydraulics, water surface roughness, and surface reflectance in open channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl; Mobley, Curtis D.; Overstreet, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for examining connections between the flow field, the texture of the air-water interface, and the reflectance of the water surface and thus evaluating the potential to infer hydraulic information from remotely sensed observations of surface reflectance. We used a spatial correlation model describing water surface topography to illustrate the application of our framework. Nondimensional relations between model parameters and flow intensity were established based on a prior flume study. Expressing the model in the spatial frequency domain allowed us to use an efficient Fourier transform-based algorithm for simulating water surfaces. Realizations for both flume and field settings had water surface slope distributions positively correlated with velocity and water surface roughness. However, most surface facets were gently sloped and thus unlikely to yield strong specular reflections; the model exaggerated the extent of water surface features, leading to underestimation of facet slopes. A ray tracing algorithm indicated that reflectance was greatest when solar and view zenith angles were equal and the sensor scanned toward the Sun to capture specular reflections of the solar beam. Reflected energy was concentrated in a small portion of the sky, but rougher water surfaces reflected rays into a broader range of directions. Our framework facilitates flight planning to avoid surface-reflected radiance while mapping other river attributes, or to maximize this component to exploit relationships between hydraulics and surface reflectance. This initial analysis also highlighted the need for improved models of water surface topography in natural rivers.

  16. A framework for modeling connections between hydraulics, water surface roughness, and surface reflectance in open channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl J.; Mobley, Curtis D.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2017-09-01

    This paper introduces a framework for examining connections between the flow field, the texture of the air-water interface, and the reflectance of the water surface and thus evaluating the potential to infer hydraulic information from remotely sensed observations of surface reflectance. We used a spatial correlation model describing water surface topography to illustrate the application of our framework. Nondimensional relations between model parameters and flow intensity were established based on a prior flume study. Expressing the model in the spatial frequency domain allowed us to use an efficient Fourier transform-based algorithm for simulating water surfaces. Realizations for both flume and field settings had water surface slope distributions positively correlated with velocity and water surface roughness. However, most surface facets were gently sloped and thus unlikely to yield strong specular reflections; the model exaggerated the extent of water surface features, leading to underestimation of facet slopes. A ray tracing algorithm indicated that reflectance was greatest when solar and view zenith angles were equal and the sensor scanned toward the Sun to capture specular reflections of the solar beam. Reflected energy was concentrated in a small portion of the sky, but rougher water surfaces reflected rays into a broader range of directions. Our framework facilitates flight planning to avoid surface-reflected radiance while mapping other river attributes, or to maximize this component to exploit relationships between hydraulics and surface reflectance. This initial analysis also highlighted the need for improved models of water surface topography in natural rivers.

  17. Coupling hydrologic and hydraulic models to take into consideration retention effects on extreme peak discharges in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Guido; Zischg, Andreas; Weingartner, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Estimating peak discharges with very low probabilities is still accompanied by large uncertainties. Common estimation methods are usually based on extreme value statistics applied to observed time series or to hydrological model outputs. However, such methods assume the system to be stationary and do not specifically consider non-stationary effects. Observed time series may exclude events where peak discharge is damped by retention effects, as this process does not occur until specific thresholds, possibly beyond those of the highest measured event, are exceeded. Hydrological models can be complemented and parameterized with non-linear functions. However, in such cases calibration depends on observed data and non-stationary behaviour is not deterministically calculated. Our study discusses the option of considering retention effects on extreme peak discharges by coupling hydrological and hydraulic models. This possibility is tested by forcing the semi-distributed deterministic hydrological model PREVAH with randomly generated, physically plausible extreme precipitation patterns. The resulting hydrographs are then used to force the hydraulic model BASEMENT-ETH (riverbed in 1D, potential inundation areas in 2D). The procedure ensures that the estimated extreme peak discharge does not exceed the physical limit given by the riverbed capacity and that the dampening effect of inundation processes on peak discharge is considered.

  18. Possibilities of Using Low Quality Digital Elevation Models of Floodplains in Hydraulic Numerical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ireneusz Laks

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method for the correction of low quality DEMs, based on aerial photographs, for use in 2D flood modeling. The proposed method was developed and tested on the example of the floodplain of the Warta River, which is the third biggest river in Poland. The correction of DEM is based on a series of a small number of measurements using GPS-RTK, which enable calculations of the global statistics like mean error (ME, root mean square error (RMSE and standard deviation (SD. The impact of DEM accuracy was estimated by using a 2D numerical model. The calculated values of flow velocities, inundation area and volume of floodplain for each tested DEM were compared. The analyses indicate that, after the correction procedure, the predictions of corrected DEM based on poor quality data is in good quantitative and qualitative agreement with the referenced LIDAR DEM. The proposed method may be applied in the areas for which high resolution DEMs based on LIDAR data are not available.

  19. Sigma-delta modulator modeling analysis and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Binjie; Wang Xin'an; Zhang Xing; Feng Xiaoxing; Wang Qingqin

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new method for SC sigma-delta modulator modeling. It studies the integrator's different equivalent circuits in the integrating and sampling phases. This model uses the OP-AMP input pair's tail current (I 0 ) and overdrive voltage (v on ) as variables. The modulator's static and dynamic errors are analyzed. A group of optimized I 0 and v on for maximum SNR and power x area ratio can be obtained through this model. As examples, a MASH21 modulator for digital audio and a second order modulator for RFID baseband are implemented and tested, and they can achieve 91 dB and 72 dB respectively, which verifies the modeling and design criteria. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  20. A Practical Irradiance Model for Bifacial PV Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill; MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris; Asgharzadeh, Amir; Toor, Fatima; Riley, Daniel; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford

    2017-06-21

    A model, suitable for a row or multiple rows of photovoltaic (PV) modules, is presented for estimating the backside irradiance for bifacial PV modules. The model, which includes the effects of shading by the PV rows, is based on the use of configuration factors to determine the fraction of a source of irradiance that is received by the backside of the PV module. Backside irradiances are modeled along the sloped height of the PV module, but assumed not to vary along the length of the PV row. The backside irradiances are corrected for angle-of-incidence losses and may be added to the front side irradiance to determine the total irradiance resource for the PV cell. Model results are compared with the measured backside irradiances for NREL and Sandia PV systems, and with results when using ray tracing software.

  1. A Practical Irradiance Model for Bifacial PV Modules: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marion, Bill; MacAlpine, Sara; Deline, Chris; Asgharzadeh, Amir; Toor, Fatima; Riley, Daniel; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford

    2017-06-15

    A model, suitable for a row or multiple rows of photovoltaic (PV) modules, is presented for estimating the backside irradiance for bifacial PV modules. The model, which includes the effects of shading by the PV rows, is based on the use of configuration factors (CFs) to determine the fraction of a source of irradiance that is received by the backside of the PV module. Backside irradiances are modeled along the sloped height of the PV module, but assumed not to vary along the length of the PV row. The backside irradiances are corrected for angle-of-incidence losses and may be added to the front side irradiance to determine the total irradiance resource for the PV cell. Model results are compared with the measured backside irradiances for NREL and Sandia PV systems, and with results when using the RADIANCE ray tracing program.

  2. Fully Coupled Geomechanics and Discrete Flow Network Modeling of Hydraulic Fracturing for Geothermal Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Hao, Y; Carrigan, C R

    2011-01-18

    The primary objective of our current research is to develop a computational test bed for evaluating borehole techniques to enhance fluid flow and heat transfer in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Simulating processes resulting in hydraulic fracturing and/or the remobilization of existing fractures, especially the interaction between propagating fractures and existing fractures, represents a critical goal of our project. To this end, we are continuing to develop a hydraulic fracturing simulation capability within the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC), a combined FEM/DEM analysis code with explicit solid-fluid mechanics coupling. LDEC simulations start from an initial fracture distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other modifications to the fracture system. The output is transferred to the Non-isothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code to capture heat transfer and flow at the reservoir scale. This approach is intended to offer flexibility in the types of analyses we can perform, including evaluating the effects of different system heterogeneities on the heat extraction rate as well as seismicity associated with geothermal operations. This paper details the basic methodology of our approach. Two numerical examples showing the capability and effectiveness of our simulator are also presented.

  3. The catastrophic failures of plants hydraulic network examined trough an model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienaimé, Diane; Marmottant, Philippe; Brodribb, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Plants live a dangerous game: they have to facilitate water transport in their xylem conduits while minimizing the consequence of hydraulic failure. Indeed, as water flows under negative pressure inside these conduits, cavitation bubbles can spontaneously occur. The failure dynamics of this hydraulic network is poorly studied, while it has important ecological and bioengineering implications. Here, by using dark-field transmission microscopy, we were able to directly visualize the spreading of cavitation bubbles within leaves, where the xylem conduits form a 2D and transparent network. We observe the surprising fact that the probability of cavitation increases in larger veins, where the majority of water flows. Next, in order to understand the physical mechanism of nucleation and propagation, we built artificial networks of channels made in hydrogel, where evaporation generates negative pressures. We find the hydraulic failure follows two stages: first a sudden bubble nucleation relaxing to the elastic stored of the system, and then a slow expansion driven by the flow of water in the surrounding medium. Channel constrictions slow the propagation of the bubble, similarly to the small valves that connect plants conduits. P.M. acknowledges support from the University of Tasmania for a visiting scholar grant.

  4. Hydraulic rams; a comparative investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacke, J.H.P.M.

    1988-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the essential features of hydraulic ram operation is developed in order to clarify the possibilities and limitations of the ram relative to its site and its adjustments. The model distinguishes three different periods in the pumping cycle of the hydraulic ram:

  5. Modeling of a Stacked Power Module for Parasitic Inductance Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-15

    ARL-TR-8138 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Modeling of a Stacked Power Module for Parasitic Inductance Extraction by...not return it to the originator. ARL-TR-8138 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Modeling of a Stacked Power Module for...aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if

  6. Computational hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brebbia, C. A.; Ferrante, A. J.

    Computational hydraulics is discussed in detail, combining classical hydraulics with new methods such as finite elements and boundary elements, both presented in a matrix formulation. The basic properties and concepts of fluids are first reviewed, and pipe flow is treated, giving empirical formulae. Aspects of pipe networks are covered, including energy losses, total systems of equations and their solution, linear and nonlinear analyses and computer programs. Open-channel flow is treated, including Chezy and Manning formulae, optimum hydraulic section, nonuniform flow, and analysis and computation. Potential flow is addressed, including the application of Euler's equations, flow nets, finite element and boundary element solutions and programs. The applications of Navier-Stokes equations to Newtonian fluids and turbulence is considered. Finally, turbomachinery is discussed.

  7. Aquatic Nutrient Simulation Modules (NSMs) Developed for Hydrologic and Hydraulic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    sediment SO4 in layers 1 and 2 can be written as = dt dSOh 11 4 (5.55a) 12 01 1 2 ,21 2 ,2 2 )()(5.0 STH K fvfv K DO L phpshdhdsh SsH TT + + H2S...layer 1, (5.61a) 12 01 1 2 ,21 2 ,2 2 )()(5.0 STH K fvfv K DO L phpshdhdsh SsH TT + − H2S oxidation in layer 1 (CSODH2S), ( )12122212 STHfSTHf phph

  8. Modelling PV modules' performance in Sahelian climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diarra, D.C.; Akuffo, F.O. [Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes the development of a thermo-optical model designed to evaluate the temperature of a photovoltaic (PV) module in an effort to design a cost-effective cooling system for PV modules operating under high ambient temperatures. The power output of a PV module is greatly reduced when its temperature rises. This loss in efficiency is particularly significant in Sahelian regions where PV modules are subjected to high solar radiation intensities and high ambient temperatures. The newly developed thermo-optical model confirms that most of the heat in a PV module is generated in the solar cell. The results of the analysis include: the optical absorption, reflection and transmission of the solar radiation incident on the module; the temperature distribution in the module; and, the heat transfer through the top and bottom of the module. At incidence angles of 60 degrees, approximately three-quarters of the heat is generated in the solar cell. The optical efficiency is 88.44 per cent at normal incidence angle and 82.48 per cent when the incidence angle is 60 degrees. It was determined that the cooling system should be located as close as possible to the solar cell in order to increase the thermal heat flow from the cell. 4 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Saturated hydraulic conductivity model computed from bimodal water retention curves for a range of New Zealand soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollacco, Joseph Alexander Paul; Webb, Trevor; McNeill, Stephen; Hu, Wei; Carrick, Sam; Hewitt, Allan; Lilburne, Linda

    2017-06-01

    Descriptions of soil hydraulic properties, such as the soil moisture retention curve, θ(h), and saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks, are a prerequisite for hydrological models. Since the measurement of Ks is expensive, it is frequently derived from statistical pedotransfer functions (PTFs). Because it is usually more difficult to describe Ks than θ(h) from pedotransfer functions, Pollacco et al. (2013) developed a physical unimodal model to compute Ks solely from hydraulic parameters derived from the Kosugi θ(h). This unimodal Ks model, which is based on a unimodal Kosugi soil pore-size distribution, was developed by combining the approach of Hagen-Poiseuille with Darcy's law and by introducing three tortuosity parameters. We report here on (1) the suitability of the Pollacco unimodal Ks model to predict Ks for a range of New Zealand soils from the New Zealand soil database (S-map) and (2) further adaptations to this model to adapt it to dual-porosity structured soils by computing the soil water flux through a continuous function of an improved bimodal pore-size distribution. The improved bimodal Ks model was tested with a New Zealand data set derived from historical measurements of Ks and θ(h) for a range of soils derived from sandstone and siltstone. The Ks data were collected using a small core size of 10 cm diameter, causing large uncertainty in replicate measurements. Predictions of Ks were further improved by distinguishing topsoils from subsoil. Nevertheless, as expected, stratifying the data with soil texture only slightly improved the predictions of the physical Ks models because the Ks model is based on pore-size distribution and the calibrated parameters were obtained within the physically feasible range. The improvements made to the unimodal Ks model by using the new bimodal Ks model are modest when compared to the unimodal model, which is explained by the poor accuracy of measured total porosity. Nevertheless, the new bimodal model provides an

  10. Saturated hydraulic conductivity model computed from bimodal water retention curves for a range of New Zealand soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. P. Pollacco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Descriptions of soil hydraulic properties, such as the soil moisture retention curve, θ(h, and saturated hydraulic conductivities, Ks, are a prerequisite for hydrological models. Since the measurement of Ks is expensive, it is frequently derived from statistical pedotransfer functions (PTFs. Because it is usually more difficult to describe Ks than θ(h from pedotransfer functions, Pollacco et al. (2013 developed a physical unimodal model to compute Ks solely from hydraulic parameters derived from the Kosugi θ(h. This unimodal Ks model, which is based on a unimodal Kosugi soil pore-size distribution, was developed by combining the approach of Hagen–Poiseuille with Darcy's law and by introducing three tortuosity parameters. We report here on (1 the suitability of the Pollacco unimodal Ks model to predict Ks for a range of New Zealand soils from the New Zealand soil database (S-map and (2 further adaptations to this model to adapt it to dual-porosity structured soils by computing the soil water flux through a continuous function of an improved bimodal pore-size distribution. The improved bimodal Ks model was tested with a New Zealand data set derived from historical measurements of Ks and θ(h for a range of soils derived from sandstone and siltstone. The Ks data were collected using a small core size of 10 cm diameter, causing large uncertainty in replicate measurements. Predictions of Ks were further improved by distinguishing topsoils from subsoil. Nevertheless, as expected, stratifying the data with soil texture only slightly improved the predictions of the physical Ks models because the Ks model is based on pore-size distribution and the calibrated parameters were obtained within the physically feasible range. The improvements made to the unimodal Ks model by using the new bimodal Ks model are modest when compared to the unimodal model, which is explained by the poor accuracy of measured total porosity. Nevertheless, the new bimodal

  11. An overview of the transient thermal-hydraulic analysis code, GINKGO. Fluid model, numerical solution and phenomenal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Zhihao; Kong Xiangyin; Tsai Chiungwen; Ruan Jialei; Li Jinggang; Ma Zhongying; Yan Jianxing; Ma Yinxiang

    2015-01-01

    A system transient thermal-hydraulic analysis code for PWRs named GINKGO is being developed as part of the indigenous effort of China General Nuclear Power Corp. (CGN) to develop a full-spectrum software package for reactor design and safety analysis. Implemented using the Object-Oriented programming technology, GINKGO is designed to be used for simulating all PWR transients except LBLOCA. The primary physical models and key algorithms applied in GINKGO and also the preliminary validation with the phenomena cases are introduced in the paper. To account for reactor coolant transients, the separated phase model under thermal equilibrium is used in the code. The three governing mixture balance equations augmented with Chexal-Lellouche drift-flux model to determine phase velocities are solved at each time step. Thermal equilibrium between the vapor and liquid phases is assumed with the exception of the upper head volume and pressurizer. And two-region non-equilibrium model and multi-region non-equilibrium model are available for the pressurizer simulation. The reactor point kinetics model with six groups of delayed neutrons, the partial derivative approximation of the DNBR model and decay heat model are combined to give a full description for the reactor core. The additional component model, engineered safety system model and models for other auxiliary systems in GINKGO demonstrate a complete capability for PWR safety analysis and thermal-hydraulic design. A fully implicit solution algorithm involving pressure search is applied in GINKGO to improve the stability of the solution method, especially when two-phase conditions with unequal phase velocities exist. Different phenomena cases are set up to demonstrate the capability of GINKGO used in different boundary conditions, steady state achievement, reverse and branch flow, etc. The GINKGO code uses the C/C++ programming language to take advantage of the language's inherent Object Oriented characteristic and to

  12. An Improved Rate-Transient Analysis Model of Multi-Fractured Horizontal Wells with Non-Uniform Hydraulic Fracture Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwei He

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Although technical advances in hydraulically fracturing and drilling enable commercial production from tight reservoirs, oil/gas recovery remains at a low level. Due to the technical and economic limitations of well-testing operations in tight reservoirs, rate-transient analysis (RTA has become a more attractive option. However, current RTA models hardly consider the effect of the non-uniform production on rate decline behaviors. In fact, PLT results demonstrate that production profile is non-uniform. To fill this gap, this paper presents an improved RTA model of multi-fractured horizontal wells (MFHWs to investigate the effects of non-uniform properties of hydraulic fractures (production of fractures, fracture half-length, number of fractures, fracture conductivity, and vertical permeability on rate transient behaviors through the diagnostic type curves. Results indicate obvious differences on the rate decline curves among the type curves of uniform properties of fractures (UPF and non-uniform properties of fractures (NPF. The use of dimensionless production integral derivative curve magnifies the differences so that we can diagnose the phenomenon of non-uniform production. Therefore, it’s significant to incorporate the effects of NPF into the RDA models of MFHWs, and the model proposed in this paper enables us to better evaluate well performance based on long-term production data.

  13. A combined monitoring and modeling approach to quantify water and nitrate leaching using effective soil column hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, V.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.; Baram, S.; Mairesse, H.; Hopmans, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    There is a worldwide growing concern for agricultural lands input to groundwater pollution. Nitrate contamination of groundwater across the Central Valley of California has been related to its diverse and intensive agricultural practices. However, there has been no study comparing leaching of nitrate in each individual agricultural land within the complex and diversely managed studied area. A combined field monitoring and modeling approach was developed to quantify from simple measurements the leaching of water and nitrate below the root zone. The monitored state variables are soil water content at several depths within the root zone, soil matric potential at two depths below the root zone, and nitrate concentration in the soil solution. In the modeling part, unsaturated water flow and solute transport are simulated with the software HYDRUS in a soil profile fragmented in up to two soil hydraulic types, whose effective hydraulic properties are optimized with an inverse modeling method. The applicability of the method will first be demonstrated "in-silico", with synthetic soil water dynamics data generated with HYDRUS, and considering the soil column as the layering of several soil types characterized in-situ. The method will then be applied to actual soil water status data from various crops in California including tomato, citrus, almond, pistachio, and walnut. Eventually, improvements of irrigation and fertilization management practices (i.e. mainly questions of quantity and frequency of application minimizing leaching under constraint of water and nutrient availability) will be investigated using coupled modeling and optimization tools.

  14. Methods and Models for the Coupled Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis of the CROCUS Reactor at EFPL

    OpenAIRE

    Rais, A.; Siefman, D.; Girardin, G.; Hursin, M.; Pautz, A.

    2015-01-01

    In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of the CROCUS reactor, several methods and models need to be developed in the areas of reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, and multiphysics coupling. The long-term objectives of this project are to work towards the development of a modern method for the safety analysis of research reactors and to update the Final Safety Analysis Report of the CROCUS reactor. A first part of the paper deals with generation of a core simulator nuclear...

  15. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of nanofluids as the coolant in VVER-1000 reactor core by the porous media approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahanfarnia, G.; Zarifi, E.; Veysi, F.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a thermal-hydraulic analysis of nanofluids as coolant in the Bushehr VVER-1000 reactor core using the porous media approach. Water-based nanofluids containing various volume fractions of Al 2 O 3 and TiO 2 nanoparticles were analyzed. The conservation equations were discretized by the finite volume method and solved by numerical methods. To validate the approaches applied in this study, the results of the model and COBRA-EN code were compared for pure water. The achieved results show that the temperature of the coolant increases with the concentration of the nanoparticles. (authors)

  16. The perceptual trap: Experimental and modelling examples of soil moisture, hydraulic conductivity and response units in complex subsurface settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Demand, Dominic; Allroggen, Niklas; Loritz, Ralf; Zehe, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    In order to discuss hypothesis testing in hydrology, the question of the solid foundation of such tests has to be answered. But how certain are we about our measurements of the components of the water balance and the states and dynamics of the complex systems? What implicit assumptions or bias are already embedded in our perception of the processes? How can we find light in the darkness of heterogeneity? We will contribute examples from experimental findings, modelling approaches and landscape analysis to the discussion. Example soil moisture and the soil continuum: The definition of soil moisture as fraction of water in the porous medium assumes locally well-mixed conditions. Moreover, a unique relation of soil water retention presumes instant local thermodynamic equilibrium in the pore water arrangement. We will show findings from soil moisture responses to precipitation events, from irrigation experiments, and from a model study of initial infiltration velocities. The results highlight, that the implicit assumption relating soil moisture state dynamics with actual soil water flow is biased towards the slow end of the actual velocity distribution and rather blind for preferential flow acting in a very small proportion of the pore space. Moreover, we highlight the assumption of a well-defined continuum during the extrapolation of point-scale measurements and why spatially and temporally continuous observation techniques of soil water states are essential for advancing our understanding and development of subsurface process theories. Example hydraulic conductivity: Hydraulic conductivity lies at the heart of hydrological research and modelling. Its values can range across several orders of magnitude at a single site alone. Yet, we often consider it a crisp, effective parameter. We have conducted measurements of soil hydraulic conductivity in the lab and in the field. Moreover, we assessed infiltration capacity and conducted plot-scale irrigation experiments to

  17. Integrated remote sensing imagery and two-dimensional hydraulic modeling approach for impact evaluation of flood on crop yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huili; Liang, Zhongyao; Liu, Yong; Liang, Qiuhua; Xie, Shuguang

    2017-10-01

    The projected frequent occurrences of extreme flood events will cause significant losses to crops and will threaten food security. To reduce the potential risk and provide support for agricultural flood management, prevention, and mitigation, it is important to account for flood damage to crop production and to understand the relationship between flood characteristics and crop losses. A quantitative and effective evaluation tool is therefore essential to explore what and how flood characteristics will affect the associated crop loss, based on accurately understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of flood evolution and crop growth. Current evaluation methods are generally integrally or qualitatively based on statistic data or ex-post survey with less diagnosis into the process and dynamics of historical flood events. Therefore, a quantitative and spatial evaluation framework is presented in this study that integrates remote sensing imagery and hydraulic model simulation to facilitate the identification of historical flood characteristics that influence crop losses. Remote sensing imagery can capture the spatial variation of crop yields and yield losses from floods on a grid scale over large areas; however, it is incapable of providing spatial information regarding flood progress. Two-dimensional hydraulic model can simulate the dynamics of surface runoff and accomplish spatial and temporal quantification of flood characteristics on a grid scale over watersheds, i.e., flow velocity and flood duration. The methodological framework developed herein includes the following: (a) Vegetation indices for the critical period of crop growth from mid-high temporal and spatial remote sensing imagery in association with agricultural statistics data were used to develop empirical models to monitor the crop yield and evaluate yield losses from flood; (b) The two-dimensional hydraulic model coupled with the SCS-CN hydrologic model was employed to simulate the flood evolution process

  18. Development of a thermal hydraulic modelling of ground water of the Malm in the Munich metropolitan area; Entwicklung einer thermisch-hydraulischen Grundwassermodellierung des Malm im Grossraum Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dussel, M.; Lueschen, E.; Thomas, R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Angewandte Geophysik, Hannover (DE)] (and others)

    2011-10-24

    The mutual potential influence of geothermal duplicates and the scientific investigation of the relationship between seismic and hydraulic parameters are investigated in the joint research project 'Geothermal characterization of fractured karst limestone aquifers in the Munich metropolitan area'. Thirteen doublets and triplets being in production or sunk illustrate the great geothermal potential and provide important data on the development of a thermal-hydraulic modeling of the reservoir. 3D seismic Unterhaching, 3D structural model, hydrogeological model and a high-resolution 3D temperature model form the basis of the numerical modeling. Different seismic signatures, seismic attributes and variations in the interval velocities characterize the ground geophysically, and were interpreted under consideration of geological and hydrogeological background information as well as borehole measurements in terms of hydraulically conductive homogeneous areas. For the Munich metropolitan area, the numerical modeling is a decision aid for the future optimized and sustainable hydrothermal utilization of the Malm aquifer.

  19. Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-08

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

  20. Soil hydraulic functions determined from measurements of air permeability, capillary modeling, and high-dimensional parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane, J.H.; Vrugt, J.A.; Unsal, E.

    2011-01-01

    Prediction of flow and transport through unsaturated porous media requires knowledge of the water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity functions. In the past few decades many different laboratory procedures have been developed to estimate these hydraulic properties. Most of these

  1. Conversion of the thermal hydraulics components of Almaraz NPP model from RELAP5 into TRAC-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queral, C.; Mulas, J.; Collazo, I.; Concejal, A.; Burbano, N.; Gallego, I.; Lopez Lechas, A.

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of a joint project between the Spanish Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CSN) and the electric energy industry of Spain (UNESA) on the USNRC state-of-the-art thermal hydraulic code, TRAC-M, there is a task relating to the translation of the Spanish NPP models from other TH codes to the new one. As part of this project, our team is working on the translation of Almaraz NPP model from RELAP5/MOD3.2 to TRAC-M. At present, several portions of the input deck have been converted to TRAC-M, and the output data have also been compared with RELAP5 data. This paper refers to the translation of the following thermal hydraulic models: pressurizer, hot and cold legs (including the pumps and the injection systems), and steam generators. The comparison of the results obtained with both codes shows a good agreement. However, some difficulties have been found in the translation of some code components, like pipes, heat structures, pumps, branchs, valves and boundary conditions. In this paper, these translation problems and their solutions are described.(author)

  2. Simplification of one-dimensional hydraulic networks by automated processes evaluated on 1D/2D deterministic flood models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Steffen; Löwe, Roland; Thrysøe, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of pluvial flood risk is often based on computations using 1D/2D urban flood models. However, guidelines on choice of model complexity are missing, especially for one-dimensional (1D) network models. This study presents a new automatic approach for simplification of 1D hydraulic networks...... nodes eliminated connection to some areas. This promoted errors in two-dimensional (2D) flood results with changes in spatial location of flooding in the reduced 1D/2D models. Applying delayed rain inputs to compensate for changes in travel time and preserving network volume by expanding node diameters...... did not improve overall results. Investigations on the expected annual damages (EAD) showed that differences in EAD are smaller than deviations in the simulated flooded areas, suggesting that spatial changes are limited to local displacements. Probably, minor improvements of the simplification...

  3. Simplification of one-dimensional hydraulic networks by automated processes evaluated on 1D/2D deterministic flood models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Steffen; Löwe, Roland; Thrysøe, Cecilie

    2017-01-01

    Evaluation of pluvial flood risk is often based on computations using 1D/2D urban flood models. However, guidelines on choice of model complexity are missing, especially for one-dimensional (1D) network models. This study presents a new automatic approach for simplification of 1D hydraulic networks...... did not improve overall results. Investigations on the expected annual damages (EAD) showed that differences in EAD are smaller than deviations in the simulated flooded areas, suggesting that spatial changes are limited to local displacements. Probably, minor improvements of the simplification...... nodes eliminated connection to some areas. This promoted errors in two-dimensional (2D) flood results with changes in spatial location of flooding in the reduced 1D/2D models. Applying delayed rain inputs to compensate for changes in travel time and preserving network volume by expanding node diameters...

  4. Modeling the hydraulic characteristics of a fractured rock mass with correlated fracture length and aperture: Application in the underground research tunnel at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Sang Hyuk; Jeon, Seok Won; Kwon, Sang Ki

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional discrete fracture network model was developed in order to simulate the hydraulic characteristics of a granitic rock mass at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT). The model N used a three-dimensional discrete fracture network (DFN), assuming a correlation between the length and aperture of the fractures, and a trapezoid flow path in the fractures. These assumptions that previous studies have not considered could make the developed model more practical and reasonable. The geologic and hydraulic data of the fractures were obtained in the rock mass at the KURT. Then, these data were applied to the developed fracture discrete network model. The model was applied in estimating the representative elementary volume (REV), the equivalent hydraulic conductivity tensors, and the amount of groundwater inflow into the tunnel. The developed discrete fracture network model can determine the REV size for the rock mass with respect to the hydraulic behavior and estimate the groundwater flow into the tunnel at the KURT. Therefore, the assumptions that the fracture length is correlated to the fracture aperture and the flow in a fracture occurs in a trapezoid shape appear to be effective in the DFN analysis used to estimate the hydraulic behavior of the fractured rock mass.

  5. A Generic Model Based Tracking Controller for Hydraulic Valve-Cylinder Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Hedegaard; Schmidt, Lasse; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2016-01-01

    The control of hydraulic valve-cylinder drives is still an active subject of research, and various linear and particularly nonlinear approaches has been proposed, especially in the last two-three decades. In many cases the proposed controllers appear to produce excellent tracking ability due...... based linear analysis tools such as bode plots, root loci etc. in order for the controller parameterizations to be realized. However, the analytic approach presented takes offset in such analyzes, but in a generalized fashion. The proposed control structures are focused on industrial applicability...

  6. An Improved Nonlinear Five-Point Model for Photovoltaic Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaros Bogning Dongue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an improved nonlinear five-point model capable of analytically describing the electrical behaviors of a photovoltaic module for each generic operating condition of temperature and solar irradiance. The models used to replicate the electrical behaviors of operating PV modules are usually based on some simplified assumptions which provide convenient mathematical model which can be used in conventional simulation tools. Unfortunately, these assumptions cause some inaccuracies, and hence unrealistic economic returns are predicted. As an alternative, we used the advantages of a nonlinear analytical five-point model to take into account the nonideal diode effects and nonlinear effects generally ignored, which PV modules operation depends on. To verify the capability of our method to fit PV panel characteristics, the procedure was tested on three different panels. Results were compared with the data issued by manufacturers and with the results obtained using the five-parameter model proposed by other authors.

  7. Decorated Ising models with competing interactions and modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tragtenberg, M.H.R.; Yokoi, C.S.O.; Salinas, S.R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The phase diagrams of a variety of decorated Ising lattices are calculated. The competing interactions among the decorating spins may induce different types of modulated orderings. In particular, the effect of an applied field on the phase diagram of the two-dimensional mock ANNNI model is considered, where only the original horizontal bonds on a square lattice are decorated. Some Bravais lattices and Cayley trees where all bonds are equally decorated are then studied. The Bravais lattices display a few stable modulated structures. The Cayley trees, on the other hand, display a large number of modulated phases, which increases with the lattice coordination number. (authors) [pt

  8. Predictive uncertainty reduction in coupled neutron-kinetics/thermal hydraulics modeling of the BWR-TT2 benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Aurelian F., E-mail: aurelian.badea@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Vincenz-Prießnitz-Str. 3, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Cacuci, Dan G. [Center for Nuclear Science and Energy/Dept. of ME, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark. • Substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted transient power. • 6660 uncertain model parameters were calibrated. - Abstract: By applying a comprehensive predictive modeling methodology, this work demonstrates a substantial (up to 50%) reduction of uncertainties in the predicted total transient power in the BWR Turbine Trip 2 (BWR-TT2) benchmark while calibrating the numerical simulation of this benchmark, comprising 6090 macroscopic cross sections, and 570 thermal-hydraulics parameters involved in modeling the phase-slip correlation, transient outlet pressure, and total mass flow. The BWR-TT2 benchmark is based on an experiment that was carried out in 1977 in the NPP Peach Bottom 2, involving the closure of the turbine stop valve which caused a pressure wave that propagated with attenuation into the reactor core. The condensation of the steam in the reactor core caused by the pressure increase led to a positive reactivity insertion. The subsequent rise of power was limited by the feedback and the insertion of the control rods. The BWR-TT2 benchmark was modeled with the three-dimensional reactor physics code system DYN3D, by coupling neutron kinetics with two-phase thermal-hydraulics. All 6660 DYN3D model parameters were calibrated by applying a predictive modeling methodology that combines experimental and computational information to produce optimally predicted best-estimate results with reduced predicted uncertainties. Simultaneously, the predictive modeling methodology yields optimally predicted values for the BWR total transient power while reducing significantly the accompanying predicted standard deviations.

  9. Thermal hydraulic and neutron kinetic simulation of the Angra 2 reactor using a RELAP5/PARCS coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Patricia A.L.; Costa, Antonella L.; Hamers, Adolfo R.; Pereira, Claubia; Rodrigues, Thiago D.A.; Mantecon, Javier G.; Veloso, Maria A.F., E-mail: patricialire@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: adolforomerohamers@hotmail.com, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: thiagodanielbh@gmail.com, E-mail: mantecon1987@gmail.com, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT/CNPq), Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Miro, Rafael; Verdu, Gumersindo, E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The computational advances observed in the last two decades have been provided direct impact on the researches related to nuclear simulations, which use several types of computer codes, including coupled between them, allowing representing with very accuracy the behavior of nuclear plants. Studies of complex scenarios in nuclear reactors have been improved by the use of thermal-hydraulic (TH) and neutron kinetics (NK) coupled codes. This technique consists in incorporating three-dimensional (3D) neutron modeling of the reactor core into codes, mainly to simulate transients that involve asymmetric core spatial power distributions and strong feedback effects between neutronics and reactor thermal-hydraulics. Therefore, this work presents preliminary results of TH RELAP5 and the NK PARCS calculations applied to model of the Angra 2 reactor. The WIMSD-5B code has been used to generate the macroscopic cross sections used in the NK code. The results obtained are satisfactory and represent important part of the development of this methodology. The next step is to couple the codes. (author)

  10. Measurement of unsaturated hydraulic properties and evaluation of property-transfer models for deep sedimentary interbeds, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kimberlie; Johnson, Brittany D.; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2014-01-01

    Operations at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have the potential to contaminate the underlying Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Methods to quantitatively characterize unsaturated flow and recharge to the ESRP aquifer are needed to inform water-resources management decisions at INL. In particular, hydraulic properties are needed to parameterize distributed hydrologic models of unsaturated flow and transport at INL, but these properties are often difficult and costly to obtain for large areas. The unsaturated zone overlying the ESRP aquifer consists of alternating sequences of thick fractured volcanic rocks that can rapidly transmit water flow and thinner sedimentary interbeds that transmit water much more slowly. Consequently, the sedimentary interbeds are of considerable interest because they primarily restrict the vertical movement of water through the unsaturated zone. Previous efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have included extensive laboratory characterization of the sedimentary interbeds and regression analyses to develop property-transfer models, which relate readily available physical properties of the sedimentary interbeds (bulk density, median particle diameter, and uniformity coefficient) to water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curves.

  11. A method to calibrate channel friction and bathymetry parameters of a Sub-Grid hydraulic model using SAR flood images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.; Neal, J. C.; Hostache, R.; Corato, G.; Chini, M.; Giustarini, L.; Matgen, P.; Wagener, T.; Bates, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites are capable of all-weather day and night observations that can discriminate between land and smooth open water surfaces over large scales. Because of this there has been much interest in the use of SAR satellite data to improve our understanding of water processes, in particular for fluvial flood inundation mechanisms. Past studies prove that integrating SAR derived data with hydraulic models can improve simulations of flooding. However while much of this work focusses on improving model channel roughness values or inflows in ungauged catchments, improvement of model bathymetry is often overlooked. The provision of good bathymetric data is critical to the performance of hydraulic models but there are only a small number of ways to obtain bathymetry information where no direct measurements exist. Spatially distributed river depths are also rarely available. We present a methodology for calibration of model average channel depth and roughness parameters concurrently using SAR images of flood extent and a Sub-Grid model utilising hydraulic geometry concepts. The methodology uses real data from the European Space Agency's archive of ENVISAT[1] Wide Swath Mode images of the River Severn between Worcester and Tewkesbury during flood peaks between 2007 and 2010. Historic ENVISAT WSM images are currently free and easy to access from archive but the methodology can be applied with any available SAR data. The approach makes use of the SAR image processing algorithm of Giustarini[2] et al. (2013) to generate binary flood maps. A unique feature of the calibration methodology is to also use parameter 'identifiability' to locate the parameters with higher accuracy from a pre-assigned range (adopting the DYNIA method proposed by Wagener[3] et al., 2003). [1] https://gpod.eo.esa.int/services/ [2] Giustarini. 2013. 'A Change Detection Approach to Flood Mapping in Urban Areas Using TerraSAR-X'. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote

  12. Management of a water distribution network by coupling GIS and hydraulic modeling: a case study of Chetouane in Algeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaki, Chérifa; Benchaib, Mohamed Mouâd; Benziada, Salim; Mahmoudi, Hacène; Goosen, Mattheus

    2017-06-01

    For more effective management of water distribution network in an arid region, Mapinfo GIS (8.0) software was coupled with a hydraulic model (EPANET 2.0) and applied to a case study region, Chetouane, situated in the north-west of Algeria. The area is characterized not only by water scarcity but also by poor water management practices. The results showed that a combination of GIS and modeling permits network operators to better analyze malfunctions with a resulting more rapid response as well as facilitating in an improved understanding of the work performed on the network. The grouping of GIS and modeling as an operating tool allows managers to diagnosis a network, to study solutions of problems and to predict future situations. The later can assist them in making informed decisions to ensure an acceptable performance level for optimal network operation.

  13. ANN Model for Predicting the Impact of Submerged Aquatic Weeds Existence on the Hydraulic Performance of Branched Open Channel System Accompanied by Water Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdeen, Mostafa A. M.; Abdin, Alla E.

    2007-01-01

    The existence of hydraulic structures in a branched open channel system urges the need for considering the gradually varied flow criterion in evaluating the different hydraulic characteristics in this type of open channel system. Computations of hydraulic characteristics such as flow rates and water surface profiles in branched open channel system with hydraulic structures require tremendous numerical effort especially when the flow cannot be assumed uniform. In addition, the existence of submerged aquatic weeds in this branched open channel system adds to the complexity of the evaluation of the different hydraulic characteristics for this system. However, this existence of aquatic weeds can not be neglected since it is very common in Egyptian open channel systems. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been widely utilized in the past decade in civil engineering applications for the simulation and prediction of the different physical phenomena and has proven its capabilities in the different fields. The present study aims towards introducing the use of ANN technique to model and predict the impact of submerged aquatic weeds existence on the hydraulic performance of branched open channel system. Specifically the current paper investigates a branched open channel system that consists of main channel supplies water to two branch channels that are infested by submerged aquatic weeds and have water structures such as clear over fall weirs and sluice gates. The results of this study showed that ANN technique was capable, with small computational effort and high accuracy, of predicting the impact of different infestation percentage for submerged aquatic weeds on the hydraulic performance of branched open channel system with two different hydraulic structures

  14. Integrating deterministic lithostratigraphic models in stochastic realizations of subsurface heterogeneity. Impact on predictions of lithology, hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Marco; Kearsey, Timothy; Kingdon, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Realistic representations of geological complexity are important to address several engineering and environmental challenges. The spatial distribution of properties controlling physical and geochemical processes can be effectively described by the geological structure of the subsurface. In this work, we present an approach to account for geological structure in geostatistical simulations of categorical variables. The approach is based on the extraction of information from a deterministic conceptualization of the subsurface, which is then used in the geostatistical analysis for the development of models of spatial correlation and as soft conditioning data. The approach was tested to simulate the distribution of four lithofacies in highly heterolithic Quaternary deposits. A transition probability-based stochastic model was implemented using hard borehole data and soft data extracted from a 3-D deterministic lithostratigraphic model. Simulated lithofacies distributions were also used as input in a flow model for numerical simulation of hydraulic head and groundwater flux. The outputs from these models were compared to corresponding values from models based exclusively on borehole data. Results show that soft lithostratigraphic information increases the accuracy and reduces the uncertainty of these predictions. The representation of the geological structure also allows a more precise definition of the spatial distribution of prediction uncertainty, here quantified with a metric based on Shannon information entropy. Correlations between prediction uncertainties for lithofacies, hydraulic heads and groundwater fluxes were also investigated. The results from this analysis provide useful insights about the incorporation of soft geological data into stochastic realizations of subsurface heterogeneity, and emphasize the critical importance of this type of information for reducing the uncertainty of simulations considering flux-dependent processes.

  15. Parameter Estimation for Single Diode Models of Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Clifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photovoltaic and Distributed Systems Integration Dept.

    2015-03-01

    Many popular models for photovoltaic system performance employ a single diode model to compute the I - V curve for a module or string of modules at given irradiance and temperature conditions. A single diode model requires a number of parameters to be estimated from measured I - V curves. Many available parameter estimation methods use only short circuit, o pen circuit and maximum power points for a single I - V curve at standard test conditions together with temperature coefficients determined separately for individual cells. In contrast, module testing frequently records I - V curves over a wide range of irradi ance and temperature conditions which, when available , should also be used to parameterize the performance model. We present a parameter estimation method that makes use of a fu ll range of available I - V curves. We verify the accuracy of the method by recov ering known parameter values from simulated I - V curves . We validate the method by estimating model parameters for a module using outdoor test data and predicting the outdoor performance of the module.

  16. Effects of uncertain topographic input data on two-dimensional modeling of flow hydraulics, habitat suitability, and bed mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, C. J.; McDonald, R.; Kyriakidis, P. C.; Nelson, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Numerical models of flow and sediment transport increasingly are used to inform studies of aquatic habitat and river morphodynamics. Accurate topographic information is required to parameterize such models, but this fundamental input is typically subject to considerable uncertainty, which can propagate through a model to produce uncertain predictions of flow hydraulics. In this study, we examined the effects of uncertain topographic input on the output from FaSTMECH, a two-dimensional, finite difference flow model implemented on a regular, channel-centered grid; the model was applied to a simple, restored gravel-bed river. We adopted a spatially explicit stochastic simulation approach because elevation differences (i.e., perturbations) at one node of the computational grid influenced model predictions at nearby nodes, due to the strong coupling between proximal locations dictated by the governing equations of fluid flow. Geostatistical techniques provided an appropriate framework for examining the impacts of topographic uncertainty by generating many, equally likely realizations, each consistent with a statistical model summarizing the variability and spatial structure of channel morphology. By applying the model to each realization in turn, a distribution of model outputs was generated for each grid node. One set of realizations, conditioned to the available survey data and progressively thinned versions thereof, was used to quantify the effects of sampling strategy on topographic uncertainty and hence the uncertainty of model predictions. This analysis indicated that as the spacing between surveyed cross-sections increased, the reach-averaged ensemble standard deviation of water surface elevation, depth, velocity, and boundary shear stress increased as well, for both baseflow conditions and for a discharge of ~75% bankfull. A second set of realizations was generated by retaining randomly selected subsets of the original survey data and used to investigate the

  17. Hydraulic and Vegetative Models of Historic Environmental Conditions Isolate the Role of Riparian Vegetation in Inducing Channel Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manners, R.; Schmidt, J. C.; Wheaton, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    An enduring question in geomorphology is the role of riparian vegetation in inducing or exacerbating channel narrowing. It is typically difficult to isolate the role of vegetation in causing channel narrowing, because narrowing typically occurs where there are changes in stream flow, sediment supply, the invasion of non-native vegetation, and sometimes climate change. Therefore, linkages between changes in vegetation communities and changes in channel form are often difficult to identify. We took a mechanistic approach to isolate the role of the invasive riparian shrub tamarisk (Tamarix spp) in influencing channel narrowing in the Colorado River basin. Detailed geomorphic reconstructions of two sites on the Yampa and Green Rivers, respectively, in Dinosaur National Monument show that channel narrowing has been progressive and that tamarisk encroachment has also occurred; at the same time, dams have been constructed, diversions increased, and spring snowmelt runoff has been occurring earlier in spring. We simulated hydraulic and sediment transport conditions during the two largest floods of record -- 1984 and 2011. Two-dimensional hydraulic models were built to reflect these conditions and allowed us to perform sensitivity tests to determine the dominant determinants of the observed patterns of erosion and deposition. Channel and floodplain topography were constrained through detailed stratigraphic analysis, including precise dating of deposits based on dating of buried tamarisk plants in a series of floodplain trenches and pits. We also used historical air photos to establish past channel topography. To parameterize the influence of riparian vegetation, we developed a model that links detailed terrestrial laser scan (TLS) measurements of stand structure and its corresponding hydraulic roughness at the patch scale to reach-scale riparian vegetation patterns determined from airborne LiDaR (ALS). This model, in conjunction with maps of the ages and establishment

  18. Comparison of alternative representations of hydraulic-conductivity anisotropy in folded fractured-sedimentary rock: Modeling groundwater flow in the Shenandoah Valley (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, R.M.; Voss, C.I.; Southworth, S.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical representation that explicitly represents the generalized three-dimensional anisotropy of folded fractured-sedimentary rocks in a groundwater model best reproduces the salient features of the flow system in the Shenandoah Valley, USA. This conclusion results from a comparison of four alternative representations of anisotropy in which the hydraulic-conductivity tensor represents the bedrock structure as (model A) anisotropic with variable strikes and dips, (model B) horizontally anisotropic with a uniform strike, (model C) horizontally anisotropic with variable strikes, and (model D) isotropic. Simulations using the US Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport model SUTRA are based on a representation of hydraulic conductivity that conforms to bedding planes in a three-dimensional structural model of the valley that duplicates the pattern of folded sedimentary rocks. In the most general representation, (model A), the directions of maximum and medium hydraulic conductivity conform to the strike and dip of bedding, respectively, while the minimum hydraulic-conductivity direction is perpendicular to bedding. Model A produced a physically realistic flow system that reflects the underlying bedrock structure, with a flow field that is significantly different from those produced by the other three models. ?? Springer-Verlag 2009.

  19. Hydraulic-based empirical model for sediment and soil organic carbon loss on steep slopes for extreme rainstorms on the Chinese loess Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Li, Z. W.; Nie, X. D.; He, J. J.; Huang, B.; Chang, X. F.; Liu, C.; Xiao, H. B.; Wang, D. Y.

    2017-11-01

    Building a hydraulic-based empirical model for sediment and soil organic carbon (SOC) loss is significant because of the complex erosion process that includes gravitational erosion, ephemeral gully, and gully erosion for loess soils. To address this issue, a simulation of rainfall experiments was conducted in a 1 m × 5 m box on slope gradients of 15°, 20°, and 25° for four typical loess soils with different textures, namely, Ansai, Changwu, Suide, and Yangling. The simulated rainfall of 120 mm h-1 lasted for 45 min. Among the five hydraulic factors (i.e., flow velocity, runoff depth, shear stress, stream power, and unit stream power), flow velocity and stream power showed close relationships with SOC concentration, especially the average flow velocity at 2 m from the outlet where the runoff attained the maximum sediment load. Flow velocity controlled SOC enrichment by affecting the suspension-saltation transport associated with the clay and silt contents in sediments. In consideration of runoff rate, average flow velocity at 2 m location from the outlet, and slope steepness as input variables, a hydraulic-based sediment and SOC loss model was built on the basis of the relationships of hydraulic factors to sediment and SOC loss. Nonlinear regression models were built to calculate the parameters of the model. The difference between the effective and dispersed median diameter (δD50) or the SOC content of the original soil served as the independent variable. The hydraulic-based sediment and SOC loss model exhibited good performance for the Suide and Changwu soils, that is, these soils contained lower amounts of aggregates than those of Ansai and Yangling soils. The hydraulic-based empirical model for sediment and SOC loss can serve as an important reference for physical-based sediment models and can bring new insights into SOC loss prediction when serious erosion occurs on steep slopes.

  20. The development of a thermal hydraulic feedback mechanism with a quasi-fixed point iteration scheme for control rod position modeling for the TRIGSIMS-TH application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karriem, Veronica V.

    Nuclear reactor design incorporates the study and application of nuclear physics, nuclear thermal hydraulic and nuclear safety. Theoretical models and numerical methods implemented in computer programs are utilized to analyze and design nuclear reactors. The focus of this PhD study's is the development of an advanced high-fidelity multi-physics code system to perform reactor core analysis for design and safety evaluations of research TRIGA-type reactors. The fuel management and design code system TRIGSIMS was further developed to fulfill the function of a reactor design and analysis code system for the Pennsylvania State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). TRIGSIMS, which is currently in use at the PSBR, is a fuel management tool, which incorporates the depletion code ORIGEN-S (part of SCALE system) and the Monte Carlo neutronics solver MCNP. The diffusion theory code ADMARC-H is used within TRIGSIMS to accelerate the MCNP calculations. It manages the data and fuel isotopic content and stores it for future burnup calculations. The contribution of this work is the development of an improved version of TRIGSIMS, named TRIGSIMS-TH. TRIGSIMS-TH incorporates a thermal hydraulic module based on the advanced sub-channel code COBRA-TF (CTF). CTF provides the temperature feedback needed in the multi-physics calculations as well as the thermal hydraulics modeling capability of the reactor core. The temperature feedback model is using the CTF-provided local moderator and fuel temperatures for the cross-section modeling for ADMARC-H and MCNP calculations. To perform efficient critical control rod calculations, a methodology for applying a control rod position was implemented in TRIGSIMS-TH, making this code system a modeling and design tool for future core loadings. The new TRIGSIMS-TH is a computer program that interlinks various other functional reactor analysis tools. It consists of the MCNP5, ADMARC-H, ORIGEN-S, and CTF. CTF was coupled with both MCNP and ADMARC-H to provide the

  1. Thermal modelling of PV module performance under high ambient temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diarra, D.C.; Harrison, S.J. [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering Solar Calorimetry Lab; Akuffo, F.O. [Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    When predicting the performance of photovoltaic (PV) generators, the actual performance is typically lower than test results conducted under standard test conditions because the radiant energy absorbed in the module under normal operation raises the temperature of the cell and other multilayer components. The increase in temperature translates to a lower conversion efficiency of the solar cells. In order to address these discrepancies, a thermal model of a characteristic PV module was developed to assess and predict its performance under real field-conditions. The PV module consisted of monocrystalline silicon cells in EVA between a glass cover and a tedlar backing sheet. The EES program was used to compute the equilibrium temperature profile in the PV module. It was shown that heat is dissipated towards the bottom and the top of the module, and that its temperature can be much higher than the ambient temperature. Modelling results indicate that 70-75 per cent of the absorbed solar radiation is dissipated from the solar cells as heat, while 4.7 per cent of the solar energy is absorbed in the glass cover and the EVA. It was also shown that the operating temperature of the PV module decreases with increased wind speed. 2 refs.

  2. Numerical discretization analysis of a HTR steam generator model for the thermal-hydraulics code trace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esch Markus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For future high temperature reactor projects, e. g., for electricity production or nuclear process heat applications, the steam generator is a crucial component. A typical design is a helical coil steam generator consisting of several tubes connected in parallel forming cylinders of different diameters. This type of steam generator was a significant component used at the thorium high temperature reactor. In the work presented the temperature profile is being analyzed by the nodal thermal hydraulics code TRACE for the thorium high temperature reactor steam generator. The influence of the nodalization is being investigated within the scope of this study and compared to experimental results from the past. The results of the standard TRACE code are compared to results using a modified Nusselt number for the primary side. The implemented heat transfer correlation was developed within the past German HTR program. This study shows that both TRACE versions are stable and provides a discussion of the nodalization requirements.

  3. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  4. Water related triggering mechanisms of shallow landslides: Numerical modelling of hydraulic flows in slopes verified with field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broennimann, C.; Tacher, L.

    2009-04-01

    element software. Different scenarios of groundwater flow pattern and hydraulic head distribution in the saturated and unsaturated zones were modelled considering transient hydraulic conditions. The hydraulic pressure boundary conditions can then be introduced in a geomechanical model in order to evaluate mass movements and to estimate the soil stability. In a next step, a 10 x 30 m large test side situated inside the above mentioned study area was chosen to investigate the slopes behaviour during a triggering field experiment carried out in October 2008. With the aim to provoke a shallow landslide the test site with a mean inclination of 35° was intensely irrigated with sprinklers during 5 days (20 - 30 mm/hr). Transient soil parameters such as suction, pore water pressure and saturation at different depth, water infiltration rate, ground water table and soil movements in a mm-scale were measured. During this first field experiment, the slope remained stable. At this state the results of experiment and models suggest that: - At the experiment scale, heavy rainfall is not sufficient to trigger a mass movement if the hydrogeological conditions inside the substratum (bedrock) are not in a critical state as well. During the experiment, the bedrock was not saturated and played a draining role. - The behaviour of the local area, at the experiment scale, must be modelled within a regional scale (e.g. kilometric) to consider the role of hydraulic pressures inside the bedrock. The results obtained from the experiment will be used to refine the numeric models and to design future field experiments.

  5. Development of models for the sodium version of the two-phase three-dimensional thermal hydraulics code THERMIT. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, G.J.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1980-05-01

    Several different models and correlations were developed and incorporated in the sodium version of THERMIT, a thermal-hydraulics code written at MIT for the purpose of analyzing transients under LMFBR conditions. This includes: a mechanism for the inclusion of radial heat conduction in the sodium coolant as well as radial heat loss to the structure surrounding the test section. The fuel rod conduction scheme was modified to allow for more flexibility in modelling the gas plenum regions and fuel restructuring. The formulas for mass and momentum exchange between the liquid and vapor phases were improved. The single phase and two phase friction factors were replaced by correlations more appropriate to LMFBR assembly geometry.

  6. Geologically based model of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity in an alluvial setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Graham E.; Noyes, Charles D.; Carle, Steven F.

    Information on sediment texture and spatial continuity are inherent to sedimentary depositional facies descriptions, which are therefore potentially good predictors of spatially varying hydraulic conductivity (K). Analysis of complex alluvial heterogeneity in Livermore Valley, California, USA, using relatively abundant core descriptions and field pumping-test data, demonstrates a depositional-facies approach to characterization of subsurface heterogeneity. Conventional textural classifications of the core show a poor correlation with K; however, further refinement of the textural classifications into channel, levee, debris-flow, and flood-plain depositional facies reveals a systematic framework for spatial modeling of K. This geologic framework shows that most of the system is composed of very low-K flood-plain materials, and that the K measurements predominantly represent the other, higher-K facies. Joint interpretation of both the K and geologic data shows that spatial distribution of K in this system could not be adequately modeled without geologic data and analysis. Furthermore, it appears that K should not be assumed to be log-normally distributed, except perhaps within each facies. Markov chain modeling of transition probability, representing spatial correlation within and among the facies, captures the relevant geologic features while highlighting a new approach for statistical characterization of hydrofacies spatial variability. The presence of fining-upward facies sequences, cross correlation between facies, as well as other geologic attributes captured by the Markov chains provoke questions about the suitability of conventional geostatistical approaches based on variograms or covariances for modeling geologic heterogeneity. Résumé Les informations sur la texture des sédiments et leur continuité spatiale font partie des descriptions de faciès sédimentaires de dépôt. Par conséquent, ces descriptions sont d'excellents prédicteurs potentiels des

  7. Design and control of a point absorber wave energy converter with an open loop hydraulic transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, YaJun; Mu, AnLe; Ma, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Point absorber wave energy converter is presented. • Piston pump module captures and converts wave energy. • Hydraulic accumulator stores/releases the surplus energy. • Fuzzy controller adjusts the displacement of hydraulic motor. • Generator outputs meet the electricity demand precisely. - Abstract: In this paper, a point absorber wave energy converter combined with offshore wind turbine is proposed. In the system, the wave energy is captured and converted into hydraulic energy by a piston pump module, which is combined with a wind turbine floating platform, and then the hydraulic energy is converted into electricity energy by a variable displacement hydraulic motor and induction generator. In order to smooth and stabilize the captured wave energy, a hydraulic accumulator is applied to store and release the excess energy. In order to meet the demand power a fuzzy controller is designed to adjust the displacement of hydraulic motor and controlled the output power. Simulation under irregular wave condition has been carried out to verify the validity of the mathematical model and the effectiveness of the controller strategy. The results show that the wave energy converter system could deliver the required electricity power precisely as the motor output torque is controlled. The accumulator could damp out all the fluctuations in output power, so the wave energy would become a dispatchable power source.

  8. Combined measurement and modeling of the hydrological impact of hydraulic redistribution using CLM4.5 at eight AmeriFlux sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congsheng Fu; Guiling Wang; Michael L. Goulden; Russell L. Scott; Kenneth Bible; Zoe G. Cardon

    2016-01-01

    Effects of hydraulic redistribution (HR) on hydrological, biogeochemical, and ecological processes have been demonstrated in the field, but the current generation of standard earth system models does not include a representation of HR. Though recent studies have examined the effect of incorporating HR into land surface models, few (if any) have done cross-site...

  9. Estimation of '"effective"" soil hydraulic properties by top soil moisture and evaporation modelling applied to an arable site in Central Spain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouweleeuw, B.T.; vd Griend, A.A.; Owe, M.

    1996-01-01

    A surface moisture model for large-scale semiarid land application has been extended with a moisture flow routine for capillary flow. The model has been applied to a field-scale data set of topsoil moisture and latent heat flux of an arable site in central Spain. A comparison of the soil hydraulic

  10. Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation at the kISMET Site Using a Fully Coupled 3D Network-Flow and Quasi- Static Discrete Element Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jing [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Huang, Hai [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mattson, Earl [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Herb F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Haimson, Bezalel C. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Doe, Thomas W. [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, VA (United States); Oldenburg, Curtis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dobson, Patrick F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Aimed at supporting the design of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the kISMET site, ~1500 m below ground in a deep mine, we performed pre-experimental hydraulic fracturing simulations in order to estimate the breakdown pressure, propagation pressure, fracture geometry, and the magnitude of induced seismicity using a newly developed fully coupled three-dimensional (3D) network flow and quasi-static discrete element model (DEM). The quasi-static DEM model, which is constructed by Delaunay tessellation of the rock volume, considers rock fabric heterogeneities by using the “disordered” DEM mesh and adding random perturbations to the stiffness and tensile/shear strengths of individual DEM elements and the elastic beams between them. A conjugate 3D flow network based on the DEM lattice is constructed to calculate the fluid flow in both the fracture and porous matrix. One distinctive advantage of the model is that fracturing is naturally described by the breakage of elastic beams between DEM elements. It is also extremely convenient to introduce mechanical anisotropy into the model by simply assigning orientation-dependent tensile/shear strengths to the elastic beams. In this paper, the 3D hydraulic fracturing model was verified against the analytic solution for a penny-shaped crack model. We applied the model to simulate fracture propagation from a vertical open borehole based on initial estimates of rock mechanical properties and in-situ stress conditions. The breakdown pressure and propagation pressure are directly obtained from the simulation. In addition, the released elastic strain energies of individual fracturing events were calculated and used as a conservative estimate for the magnitudes of the potential induced seismic activities associated with fracturing. The comparisons between model predictions and experimental results are still ongoing.

  11. A Novel Energy Recovery System for Parallel Hybrid Hydraulic Excavator

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Wei; Cao, Baoyu; Zhu, Zhencai; Chen, Guoan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic excavator energy saving is important to relieve source shortage and protect environment. This paper mainly discusses the energy saving for the hybrid hydraulic excavator. By analyzing the excess energy of three hydraulic cylinders in the conventional hydraulic excavator, a new boom potential energy recovery system is proposed. The mathematical models of the main components including boom cylinder, hydraulic motor, and hydraulic accumulator are built. The natural frequency of the pro...

  12. Multi module model for ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Magas, V K; Strottman, D D

    2001-01-01

    The Multi Module Model for Ultra-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at RHIC and LHC energies is presented. It uses the Effective String Rope Model for the calculation of the initial stages of the reaction; the output of this model is used as the initial state for the subsequent one-fluid calculations. It is shown that such an initial state leads to the creation of the third flow component. The hydrodynamical evolution of the energy density distribution is also presented.

  13. Hydraulic Model for Drinking Water Networks, Including Household Connections; Modelo hidraulico para redes de agua potable con tomas domiciliarias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero Angulo, Jose Oscar [Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloa (Mexico); Arreguin Cortes, Felipe [Instituto Mexicano de Tecnologia del Agua, Jiutepec, Morelos (Mexico)

    2002-03-01

    This paper presents a hydraulic simulation model for drinking water networks, including elements that are currently not considered household connections, spatially variable flowrate distribution pipelines, and tee secondary network. This model is determined by solving the equations needed for a conventional model following an indirect procedure for the solution of large equations systems. Household connection performance is considered as dependent of water pressure and the way in which users operate the taps of such intakes. This approach allows a better a acquaintance with the drinking water supply networks performance as well as solving problems that demand a more precise hydraulic simulation, such as water quality variations, leaks in networks, and the influence of home water tanks as regulating devices. [Spanish] Se presenta un modelo de simulacion hidraulica para redes de agua potable en el cual se incluyen elementos que no se toman en cuenta actualmente, como las tomas domiciliarias, los tubos de distribucion con gastos espacialmente variado y la red secundaria, resolviendo el numero de ecuaciones que seria necesario plantear en un modelo convencional mediante un procedimiento indirecto para la solucion de grandes sistemas de ecuaciones. En las tomas domiciliarias se considera que su funcionamiento depende de las presiones y la forma en que los usuarios operan las llaves de las mismas. Este planteamiento permite conocer mejor el funcionamiento de las redes de abastecimiento de agua potable y solucionar problemas que requieren de una simulacion hidraulica mas precisa, como el comportamiento de la calidad del agua, las fugas en las redes y la influencia reguladora de los tinacos de las casas.

  14. Investigation of solar photovoltaic module power output by various models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakhrani, A.Q.; Othman, A.K.; Rigit, A.R.H.; Baini, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate the power output of a solar photovoltaic module by various models and to formulate a suitable model for predicting the performance of solar photovoltaic modules. The model was used to correct the configurations of solar photovoltaic systems for sustainable power supply. Different types of models namely the efficiency, power, fill factor and current-voltage characteristic curve models have been reviewed. It was found that the examined models predicted a 40% yield of the rated power in cloudy weather conditions and up to 80% in clear skies. The models performed well in terms of electrical efficiency in cloudy days if the influence of low irradiance were incorporated. Both analytical and numerical methods were employed in the formulation of improved model which gave +- 2% error when compared with the rated power output of solar photovoltaic module. The proposed model is more practical in terms of number of variables used and acceptable performance in humid atmospheres. Therefore, it could be useful for the estimation of power output of the solar photovoltaic systems in Sarawak region. (author)

  15. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 2. UNIT IX, AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSIONS--HYDRAULIC SYSTEM (PART I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human Engineering Inst., Cleveland, OH.

    THIS MODULE OF A 25-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OIL FLOW WITHIN HYDRAULIC TRANSMISSIONS USED ON DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE GENERAL DESCRIPTION, HYDRAULIC CIRCUITS, AND BRAKE HYDRAULIC CIRCUIT AND OPERATION. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMED TRAINING FILM "LEARNING ABOUT THE ALLISON…

  16. On the Modelling and Control of a Laboratory Prototype of a Hydraulic Canal Based on a TITO Fractional-Order Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres San-Millan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a two-input, two-output (TITO fractional order mathematical model of a laboratory prototype of a hydraulic canal is proposed. This canal is made up of two pools that have a strong interaction between them. The inputs of the TITO model are the pump flow and the opening of an intermediate gate, and the two outputs are the water levels in the two pools. Based on the experiments developed in a laboratory prototype the parameters of the mathematical models have been identified. Then, considering the TITO model, a first control loop of the pump is closed to reproduce real-world conditions in which the water level of the first pool is not dependent on the opening of the upstream gate, thus leading to an equivalent single input, single output (SISO system. The comparison of the resulting system with the classical first order systems typically utilized to model hydraulic canals shows that the proposed model has significantly lower error: about 50%, and, therefore, higher accuracy in capturing the canal dynamics. This model has also been utilized to optimize the design of the controller of the pump of the canal, thus achieving a faster response to step commands and thus minimizing the interaction between the two pools of the experimental platform.

  17. Thermal-hydraulic models for use in simplified reactivity calculations under secondary break conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.G.; Harris, K.P.; Mansur, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    PWR accident analyses for breaks in the secondary system are characterized by extreme cooling of the core, large inlet temperature gradients, asymmetric stuck control rods and primary coolant flow predictions ranging from a few percent of nominal to full flow. For several years Combustion Engineering has been using the Hermite code to compute reacitvities, power distributions and flow distributions in 3-D for far off nominal thermal-hydraulic and neutronic conditions. These 3-D methods, while costly, have been very successful in analyzing a large class of PWR secondary break accidents. They indicate a much reduced post-scram return-to-power compared to less detailed, bounding core average feedback methods. The availability of a growing number of 3-D calculations has made it possible to develop and benchmark faster running of 2-D methods which account for many of the same effects seen in 3-D. Two such methods are described and evaluated in this paper and one method is shown to be realiable over a wide range of conditions. (orig.) [de

  18. Integrated Modeling and Experiments to Characterize Coupled Thermo-hydro-geomechanical-chemical processes in Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, H. S.; Carey, J. W.; Karra, S.; Porter, M. L.; Rougier, E.; Kang, Q.; Makedonska, N.; Hyman, J.; Jimenez Martinez, J.; Frash, L.; Chen, L.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing phenomena involve fluid-solid interactions embedded within coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes over scales from microns to tens of meters. Feedbacks between processes result in complex dynamics that must be unraveled if one is to predict and, in the case of unconventional resources, facilitate fracture propagation, fluid flow, and interfacial transport processes. The proposed work is part of a broader class of complex systems involving coupled fluid flow and fractures that are critical to subsurface energy issues, such as shale oil, geothermal, carbon sequestration, and nuclear waste disposal. We use unique LANL microfluidic and triaxial core flood experiments integrated with state-of-the-art numerical simulation to reveal the fundamental dynamics of fracture-fluid interactions to characterize the key coupled processes that impact hydrocarbon production. We are also comparing CO2-based fracturing and aqueous fluids to enhance production, greatly reduce waste water, while simultaneously sequestering CO2. We will show pore, core and reservoir scale simulations/experiments that investigate the contolling mechanisms that control hydrocarbon production.

  19. Flexible parallel implicit modelling of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical processes in fractured rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Mauro; Jacquey, Antoine B.

    2017-09-01

    Theory and numerical implementation describing groundwater flow and the transport of heat and solute mass in fully saturated fractured rocks with elasto-plastic mechanical feedbacks are developed. In our formulation, fractures are considered as being of lower dimension than the hosting deformable porous rock and we consider their hydraulic and mechanical apertures as scaling parameters to ensure continuous exchange of fluid mass and energy within the fracture-solid matrix system. The coupled system of equations is implemented in a new simulator code that makes use of a Galerkin finite-element technique. The code builds on a flexible, object-oriented numerical framework (MOOSE, Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment) which provides an extensive scalable parallel and implicit coupling to solve for the multiphysics problem. The governing equations of groundwater flow, heat and mass transport, and rock deformation are solved in a weak sense (either by classical Newton-Raphson or by free Jacobian inexact Newton-Krylow schemes) on an underlying unstructured mesh. Nonlinear feedbacks among the active processes are enforced by considering evolving fluid and rock properties depending on the thermo-hydro-mechanical state of the system and the local structure, i.e. degree of connectivity, of the fracture system. A suite of applications is presented to illustrate the flexibility and capability of the new simulator to address problems of increasing complexity and occurring at different spatial (from centimetres to tens of kilometres) and temporal scales (from minutes to hundreds of years).

  20. Bilinear modulation models for seasonal tables of counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.D. Marx (Brian); P.H.C. Eilers (Paul); J. Gampe (Jutta); R. Rau (Roland)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe propose generalized linear models for time or age-time tables of seasonal counts, with the goal of better understanding seasonal patterns in the data. The linear predictor contains a smooth component for the trend and the product of a smooth component (the modulation) and a periodic

  1. An NCME Instructional Module on Polytomous Item Response Theory Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfield, Randall David

    2014-01-01

    A polytomous item is one for which the responses are scored according to three or more categories. Given the increasing use of polytomous items in assessment practices, item response theory (IRT) models specialized for polytomous items are becoming increasingly common. The purpose of this ITEMS module is to provide an accessible overview of…

  2. Graphene-based THz modulator analyzed by equivalent circuit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Binggang; Chen, Jing; Xie, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    A terahertz (THz) modulator based on graphene is proposed and analysed by use of equivalent transmission line of a homogeneous mediumand the local anisotropic model of the graphene conductivity. The result calculated by the equivalent circuit is consistent with that obtained byFresnel transfer...

  3. Modelling of a transmembrane evaporation module for desalination of seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guijt, C.M.; Racz, I.G.; van Heuven, Jan Willem; Reith, T.; de Haan, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    Transmembrane evaporation (often called membrane distillation) carried out in a countercurrent flow module, in which incoming cold seawater is heated by the condensing product water flow, is a promising technology for low-cost seawater desalination. This paper presents a model for preliminary design

  4. Modeling hydraulic transport and anaerobic uptake by PAOs and GAOs during wastewater feeding in EBPR granular sludge reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbrodt, David G; Holliger, Christof; Morgenroth, Eberhard

    2017-08-01

    New-generation bioprocesses using granular sludge aim for a high-rate removal of nutrients from wastewater with low footprint. Achieving enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) relies on the design of sludge beds and wastewater feeding conditions to optimally load the biomass and to select for polyphosphate- (PAOs) over glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) and over other heterotrophs. A hydraulic-metabolic mathematical model was developed to elucidate the impact of hydraulic transport patterns and environmental conditions on the PAO/GAO competition during up-flow feeding through an EBPR granular sludge bed. Tracer experiments highlighted plug-flow regimes with dispersion under both rapid (9 m h -1 , Re bed  = 1.6, Pe z  = 7.2, Pe t  = 4.6) and slow (0.9 m h -1 , Re bed  = 0.2, Pe z  = 21.3, Pe t  = 3.4) feeding. Non-turbulent regimes (Re bed  impacted bacterial competition for carbon uptake under anaerobic slow feeding. Feeding duration should be designed to avoid full depletion of intracellular storage polymers within static granules. PAOs bear twice longer feeding than GAOs by using both polyphosphate and glycogen hydrolysis to sustain anaerobic C-uptake. Alkaline conditions (pH 7.25-8.0) by, e.g., dosing lime in the feed select for PAOs independently of temperature (10-30°C). A twice higher bed is required for full anaerobic conversions at 10 rather than 20°C. Biosystem responses for anaerobic C-uptake can be anticipated using the model toward designing robust anaerobic selectors to manage the microbial resource in EBPR granular sludge. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1688-1702. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Interpretation of Microseismicity Observed From Surface and Borehole Seismic Arrays During Hydraulic Fracturing in Shale - Bedding Plane Slip Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, F.; Jechumtalova, Z.; Eisner, L.

    2017-12-01

    We present a geomechanical model explaining microseismicity induced by hydraulic fracturing in shales developed from many datasets acquired with two most common types of seismic monitoring arrays, surface and dual-borehole arrays. The geomechanical model explains the observed source mechanisms and locations of induced events from two stimulated shale reservoirs. We observe shear dip-slip source mechanisms with nodal planes aligned with location trends. We show that such seismicity can be explained as a shearing along bedding planes caused by aseismic opening of vertical hydraulic fractures. The source mechanism inversion was applied only to selected high-quality events with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. We inverted P- and P- and S-wave arrival amplitudes to full-moment tensor and decomposed it to shear, volumetric and compensated linear vector dipole components. We also tested an effect of noise presented in the data to evaluate reliability of non-shear components. The observed seismicity from both surface and downhole monitoring of shale stimulations is very similar. The locations of induced microseismic events are limited to narrow depth intervals and propagate along distinct trend(s) showing fracture propagation in direction of maximum horizontal stress from injection well(s). The source mechanisms have a small non-shear component which can be partly explained as an effect of noise in the data, i.e. events represent shearing on faults. We observe predominantly dip-slip events with a strike of the steeper (almost vertical) nodal plane parallel to the fracture propagation. Therefore the other possible nodal plane is almost horizontal. The rake angles of the observed mechanisms divide these dip-slips into two groups with opposite polarities. It means that we observe opposite movements on the nearly identically oriented faults. Realizing a typical structural weakness of shale in horizontal planes, we interpret observed microseismicity as a result of shearing

  6. Space Station Solar Dynamic Module modelling and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tylim, A.

    1989-01-01

    Efforts to model and simulate the Solar Dynamic Power Module (SDPM) for the Space Station are discussed. The SDPM configuration is given and the SDPM subsytems are described, including the concentrator assembly, the fine pointing and tracking system, the power generation system, the heat rejection assembly, the electrical equipment, the interface structure and integration hardware, and the beta gimbal assembly. Performance requirements and design considerations are given. The development of models to simulate the SDPM is examined, noting research on models such as the Electric Power System Transient Analysis Model, the Electric Power System on Orbit Performance model, and a spatial flux distribution function.

  7. Hydraulic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.K.; Srikrishnamurty, G.

    1990-01-01

    Successful operation of nuclear plant is largely dependent on safe handling of radio-active material. In order to reduce this handling problem and minimise the exposure of radiation, various handling equipment and manipulators have been developed according to the requirements. Manufacture of nuclear fuel, which is the most important part of the nuclear industry, involves handling of uranium ingots weighing approximately 250 kg. This paper describes a specially designed hydraulic manipulator for handling of the ingots in a limited space. It was designed to grab and handle the ingots in any position. This has following drive motions: (1)gripping and releasing, (2)lifting and lowering (z-motion), (3)rotation about the horizontal axis (azimuth drive), (4)rotation about the job axis, and (5)rotation about the vertical axis. For horizontal motion (X and Y axis motion) this equipment is mounted on a motorised trolley, so that it can move inside the workshop. For all drives except the rotation about the job axis, hydraulic cylinders have been used with a battery operated power pack. Trolley drive is also given power from same battery. This paper describes the design aspects of this manipulator. (author). 4 figs

  8. Modulational instability in the nonlocal chi(2)-model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyller, John Andreas; Krolikowski, Wieslaw; Bang, Ole

    2007-01-01

    We investigate in detail the linear regime of the modulational instability (MI) properties of the plane waves of the nonlocal model for chi((2))- media formulated in Nikolov et al. [N.I. Nikolov, D. Neshev, O. Bang, W.Z. Krolikowski, Quadratic solitons as nonlocal solitons, Phys. Rev. E 68 (2003...... in the parameter space for which a fundamental gain band exists, and regions for which higher order gain bands and modulational stability exist. We also show that the MI analysis for the nonlocal model is applicable in the finite walk-off case. Finally, we show that the plane waves of the nonlocal chi((2))-model...... are recovered as the asymptotic limit of one of the branches of the plane waves (i.e. the adiabatic branch or the acoustic branch) of the full chi((2))-model by means of a singular perturbational approach. It is also proven that the stability results for the adiabatic branch continuously approach those...

  9. Steam generator thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inch, W.W.; Scott, D.A.; Carver, M.B.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses a code for detailed numerical modelling of steam generator thermal-hydraulics, and describes related experimental programs designed to promote in-depth understanding of three-dimensional two-phase flow. (auth)

  10. Methods and Models for the Coupled Neutronics and Thermal-Hydraulics Analysis of the CROCUS Reactor at EFPL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rais

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of the CROCUS reactor, several methods and models need to be developed in the areas of reactor physics, thermal-hydraulics, and multiphysics coupling. The long-term objectives of this project are to work towards the development of a modern method for the safety analysis of research reactors and to update the Final Safety Analysis Report of the CROCUS reactor. A first part of the paper deals with generation of a core simulator nuclear data library for the CROCUS reactor using the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code and also with reactor core modeling using the PARCS code. PARCS eigenvalue, radial power distribution, and control rod reactivity worth results were benchmarked against Serpent 2 full-core model results. Using the Serpent 2 model as reference, PARCS eigenvalue predictions were within 240 pcm, radial power was within 3% in the central region of the core, and control rod reactivity worth was within 2%. A second part reviews the current methodology used for the safety analysis of the CROCUS reactor and presents the envisioned approach for the multiphysics modeling of the reactor.

  11. Didactic speech synthesizer – acoustic module, formants model

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, João Paulo; Fernandes, Anildo

    2013-01-01

    Text-to-speech synthesis is the main subject treated in this work. It will be presented the constitution of a generic text-to-speech system conversion, explained the functions of the various modules and described the development techniques using the formants model. The development of a didactic formant synthesiser under Matlab environment will also be described. This didactic synthesiser is intended for a didactic understanding of the formant model of speech production.

  12. Pressure Fluctuations on the Bed of Surge Tank at the H.P. Zimapan, Hgo., with Different Arrangements Studied on Hydraulic Model, with the Lowest Operation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Marengo–Mogollón

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the pressure fluctuations of the surge tank in the Zimapan Hydroelectric Project are compared in a hydraulic model. The shaft is located lateral, over the conduction tunnel and in the simple form (permitting the tunnel entering the shaft, with and without orifice plates taking into account the demand and supply condition of energy with the minimum level of water of the conduction. It was determined the hydraulic efficiency and it was found that it was the best constructive option.

  13. Benzodiazepine modulation of partial agonist efficacy and spontaneously active GABAA receptors supports an allosteric model of modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Downing, Scott S; Lee, Yan T; Farb, David H; Gibbs, Terrell T

    2005-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZDs) have been used extensively for more than 40 years because of their high therapeutic index and low toxicity. Although BZDs are understood to act primarily as allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors, the mechanism of modulation is not well understood.The applicability of an allosteric model with two binding sites for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and one for a BZD-like modulator was investigated.This model predicts that BZDs should enhance the efficacy of partial agonists.C...

  14. Effects of ring-porous and diffuse-porous stem wood anatomy on the hydraulic parameters used in a water flow and storage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steppe, Kathy; Lemeur, Raoul

    2007-01-01

    Calibration of a recently developed water flow and storage model based on experimental data for a young diffuse-porous beech tree (Fagus sylvatica L.) and a young ring-porous oak tree (Quercus robur L.) revealed that differences in stem wood anatomy between species strongly affect the calibrated values of the hydraulic model parameters. The hydraulic capacitance (C) of the stem storage tissue was higher in oak than in beech (939.8 versus 212.3 mg MPa(-1)). Model simulation of the elastic modulus (epsilon) revealed that this difference was linked to the higher elasticity of the stem storage tissue of oak compared with beech. Furthermore, the hydraulic resistance (R (x)) of beech was about twice that of oak (0.1829 versus 0.1072 MPa s mg(-1)). To determine the physiological meaning of the R (x) parameter identified by model calibration, we analyzed the stem wood anatomy of the beech and oak trees. Calculation of stem specific hydraulic conductivity (k (s)) of beech and oak with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation confirmed the differences in R (x) predicted by the model. The contributions of different vessel diameter classes to the total hydraulic conductivity of the xylem were calculated. As expected, the few big vessels contributed much more to total conductivity than the many small vessels. Compared with beech, the larger vessels of oak resulted in a higher k (s) (10.66 versus 4.90 kg m(-1) s(-1) MPa(-1)). The calculated ratio of k (s) of oak to beech was 2, confirming the R (x) ratio obtained by model calibration. Thus, validation of the R (x) parameter of the model led to identification of its physiological meaning.

  15. THE THREE DIMENSIONAL THERMAL HYDRAULIC CODE BAGIRA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALINICHENKO,S.D.; KOHUT,P.; KROSHILIN,A.E.; KROSHILIN,V.E.; SMIRNOV,A.V.

    2003-05-04

    BAGIRA - a thermal-hydraulic program complex was primarily developed for using it in nuclear power plant simulator models, but is also used as a best-estimate analytical tool for modeling two-phase mixture flows. The code models allow consideration of phase transients and the treatment of the hydrodynamic behavior of boiling and pressurized water reactor circuits. It provides the capability to explicitly model three-dimensional flow regimes in various regions of the primary and secondary circuits such as, the mixing regions, circular downcomer, pressurizer, reactor core, main primary loops, the steam generators, the separator-reheaters. In addition, it is coupled to a severe-accident module allowing the analysis of core degradation and fuel damage behavior. Section II will present the theoretical basis for development and selected results are presented in Section III. The primary use for the code complex is to realistically model reactor core behavior in power plant simulators providing enhanced training tools for plant operators.

  16. Hydraulic modelling of the spatial and temporal variability in Atlantic salmon parr habitat availability in an upland stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabris, Luca; Malcolm, Iain Archibald; Buddendorf, Willem Bastiaan; Millidine, Karen Jane; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Soulsby, Chris

    2017-12-01

    We show how spatial variability in channel bed morphology affects the hydraulic characteristics of river reaches available to Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar) under different flow conditions in an upland stream. The study stream, the Girnock Burn, is a long-term monitoring site in the Scottish Highlands. Six site characterised by different bed geometry and morphology were investigated. Detailed site bathymetries were collected and combined with discharge time series in a 2D hydraulic model to obtain spatially distributed depth-averaged velocities under different flow conditions. Available habitat (AH) was estimated for each site. Stream discharge was used according to the critical displacement velocity (CDV) approach. CDV defines a velocity threshold above which salmon parr are not able to hold station and effective feeding opportunities or habitat utilization are reduced, depending on fish size and water temperature. An average value of the relative available habitat () for the most significant period for parr growth - April to May - was used for inter-site comparison and to analyse temporal variations over 40years. Results show that some sites are more able than others to maintain zones where salmon parr can forage unimpeded by high flow velocities under both wet and dry conditions. With lower flow velocities, dry years offer higher values of than wet years. Even though can change considerably across the sites as stream flow changes, the directions of change are consistent. Relative available habitat (RAH) shows a strong relationship with discharge per unit width, whilst channel slope and bed roughness either do not have relevant impact or compensate each other. The results show that significant parr habitat was available at all sites across all flows during this critical growth period, suggesting that hydrological variability is not a factor limiting growth in the Girnock. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Linking hydraulic traits to tropical forest function in a size-structured and trait-driven model (TFS v.1-Hydro)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoffersen, Bradley O.; Gloor, Manuel; Fauset, Sophie; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Galbraith, David R.; Baker, Timothy R.; Kruijt, Bart; Rowland, Lucy; Fisher, Rosie A.; Binks, Oliver J.; Sevanto, Sanna; Xu, Chonggang; Jansen, Steven; Choat, Brendan; Mencuccini, Maurizio; McDowell, Nate G.; Meir, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Forest ecosystem models based on heuristic water stress functions poorly predict tropical forest response to drought partly because they do not capture the diversity of hydraulic traits (including variation in tree size) observed in tropical forests. We developed a continuous porous media

  18. On Markov Modulated Mean-Reverting Price-Difference Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. P. Malcom

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a stochastic model incorporating a double-Markov modulated mean-reversion model. Unlike a price process the basis process X can take positive or negative values. This model is based on an explicit discretisation of the corresponding continuous time dynamics. The new feature in our model is that we suppose the mean reverting level in our dynamics as well as the noise coefficient can change according to the states of some finite-state Markov processes which could be the economy and some other unseen random phenomenon.

  19. AN AB INITIO MODEL FOR COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, N. E.; Burger, R. A. [Center for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520 (South Africa)

    2013-07-20

    A proper understanding of the effects of turbulence on the diffusion and drift of cosmic rays (CRs) is of vital importance for a better understanding of CR modulation in the heliosphere. This study presents an ab initio model for CR modulation, incorporating for the first time the results yielded by a two-component turbulence transport model. This model is solved for solar minimum heliospheric conditions, utilizing boundary values chosen so that model results are in reasonable agreement with spacecraft observations of turbulence quantities in the solar ecliptic plane and along the out-of-ecliptic trajectory of the Ulysses spacecraft. These results are employed as inputs for modeled slab and two-dimensional (2D) turbulence energy spectra. The modeled 2D spectrum is chosen based on physical considerations, with a drop-off at the very lowest wavenumbers. There currently exist no models or observations for the wavenumber where this drop-off occurs, and it is considered to be the only free parameter in this study. The modeled spectra are used as inputs for parallel mean free path expressions based on those derived from quasi-linear theory and perpendicular mean free paths from extended nonlinear guiding center theory. Furthermore, the effects of turbulence on CR drifts are modeled in a self-consistent way, also employing a recently developed model for wavy current sheet drift. The resulting diffusion and drift coefficients are applied to the study of galactic CR protons and antiprotons using a 3D, steady-state CR modulation code, and sample solutions in fair to good agreement with multiple spacecraft observations are presented.

  20. Stochastic inverse modelling of hydraulic conductivity fields taking into account independent stochastic structures: A 3D case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis-Albert, C.; Capilla, J. E.

    2010-09-01

    SummaryMajor factors affecting groundwater flow through fractured rocks include the geometry of each fracture, its properties and the fracture-network connectivity together with the porosity and conductivity of the rock matrix. When modelling fractured rocks this is translated into attaining a characterization of the hydraulic conductivity ( K) as adequately as possible, despite its high heterogeneity. This links with the main goal of this paper, which is to present an improvement of a stochastic inverse model, named as Gradual Conditioning (GC) method, to better characterise K in a fractured rock medium by considering different K stochastic structures, belonging to independent K statistical populations (SP) of fracture families and the rock matrix, each one with its own statistical properties. The new methodology is carried out by applying independent deformations to each SP during the conditioning process for constraining stochastic simulations to data. This allows that the statistical properties of each SPs tend to be preserved during the iterative optimization process. It is worthwhile mentioning that so far, no other stochastic inverse modelling technique, with the whole capabilities implemented in the GC method, is able to work with a domain covered by several different stochastic structures taking into account the independence of different populations. The GC method is based on a procedure that gradually changes an initial K field, which is conditioned only to K data, to approximate the reproduction of other types of information, i.e., piezometric head and solute concentration data. The approach is applied to the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL) in Sweden, where, since the middle nineties, many experiments have been carried out to increase confidence in alternative radionuclide transport modelling approaches. Because the description of fracture locations and the distribution of hydrodynamic parameters within them are not accurate enough, we address the

  1. Implicit Treatment of Technical Specification and Thermal Hydraulic Parameter Uncertainties in Gaussian Process Model to Estimate Safety Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A. Fynan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gaussian process model (GPM is a flexible surrogate model that can be used for nonparametric regression for multivariate problems. A unique feature of the GPM is that a prediction variance is automatically provided with the regression function. In this paper, we estimate the safety margin of a nuclear power plant by performing regression on the output of best-estimate simulations of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident with sampling of safety system configuration, sequence timing, technical specifications, and thermal hydraulic parameter uncertainties. The key aspect of our approach is that the GPM regression is only performed on the dominant input variables, the safety injection flow rate and the delay time for AC powered pumps to start representing sequence timing uncertainty, providing a predictive model for the peak clad temperature during a reflood phase. Other uncertainties are interpreted as contributors to the measurement noise of the code output and are implicitly treated in the GPM in the noise variance term, providing local uncertainty bounds for the peak clad temperature. We discuss the applicability of the foregoing method to reduce the use of conservative assumptions in best estimate plus uncertainty (BEPU and Level 1 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA success criteria definitions while dealing with a large number of uncertainties.

  2. Finite-time adaptive sliding mode force control for electro-hydraulic load simulator based on improved GMS friction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shuo; Yan, Hao; Dong, Lijing; Li, Changchun

    2018-03-01

    This paper addresses the force tracking problem of electro-hydraulic load simulator under the influence of nonlinear friction and uncertain disturbance. A nonlinear system model combined with the improved generalized Maxwell-slip (GMS) friction model is firstly derived to describe the characteristics of load simulator system more accurately. Then, by using particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm ​combined with the system hysteresis characteristic analysis, the GMS friction parameters are identified. To compensate for nonlinear friction and uncertain disturbance, a finite-time adaptive sliding mode control method is proposed based on the accurate system model. This controller has the ability to ensure that the system state moves along the nonlinear sliding surface to steady state in a short time as well as good dynamic properties under the influence of parametric uncertainties and disturbance, which further improves the force loading accuracy and rapidity. At the end of this work, simulation and experimental results are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed sliding mode control strategy.

  3. Modelled hydraulic redistribution by sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) matches observed data only after including night-time transpiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Rebecca B; Cardon, Zoe G; Teshera-Levye, Jennifer; Rockwell, Fulton E; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Holbrook, N Michele

    2014-04-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, whereas the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two ecotypes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modelling formulation developed by Ryel et al. matched experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive night-time transpiration, and although over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that night-time transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. formulation does not include the effect of night-time transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of night-time transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and night-time stomatal behaviour changed, both influencing HR. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The use of three-parameter rating table lookup programs, RDRAT and PARM3, in hydraulic flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Subroutines RDRAT and PARM3 enable computer programs such as the BRANCH open-channel unsteady-flow model to route flows through or over combinations of critical-flow sections, culverts, bridges, road- overflow sections, fixed spillways, and(or) dams. The subroutines also obstruct upstream flow to simulate operation of flapper-type tide gates. A multiplier can be applied by date and time to simulate varying numbers of tide gates being open or alternative construction scenarios for multiple culverts. The subroutines use three-parameter (headwater, tailwater, and discharge) rating table lookup methods. These tables may be manually prepared using other programs that do step-backwater computations or compute flow through bridges and culverts or over dams. The subroutine, therefore, precludes the necessity of incorporating considerable hydraulic computational code into the client program, and provides complete flexibility for users of the model for routing flow through almost any affixed structure or combination of structures. The subroutines are written in Fortran 77 language, and have minimal exchange of information with the BRANCH model or other possible client programs. The report documents the interpolation methodology, data input requirements, and software.

  5. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.mcmahon@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Butterworth, Karl T. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O' Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  6. A Computational Model of Cellular Response to Modulated Radiation Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Trainor, Colman; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a model to describe the response of cell populations to spatially modulated radiation exposures of relevance to advanced radiotherapies. Materials and Methods: A Monte Carlo model of cellular radiation response was developed. This model incorporated damage from both direct radiation and intercellular communication including bystander signaling. The predictions of this model were compared to previously measured survival curves for a normal human fibroblast line (AGO1522) and prostate tumor cells (DU145) exposed to spatially modulated fields. Results: The model was found to be able to accurately reproduce cell survival both in populations which were directly exposed to radiation and those which were outside the primary treatment field. The model predicts that the bystander effect makes a significant contribution to cell killing even in uniformly irradiated cells. The bystander effect contribution varies strongly with dose, falling from a high of 80% at low doses to 25% and 50% at 4 Gy for AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This was verified using the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine to inhibit the bystander effect in cells exposed to different doses, which showed significantly larger reductions in cell killing at lower doses. Conclusions: The model presented in this work accurately reproduces cell survival following modulated radiation exposures, both in and out of the primary treatment field, by incorporating a bystander component. In addition, the model suggests that the bystander effect is responsible for a significant portion of cell killing in uniformly irradiated cells, 50% and 70% at doses of 2 Gy in AGO1522 and DU145 cells, respectively. This description is a significant departure from accepted radiobiological models and may have a significant impact on optimization of treatment planning approaches if proven to be applicable in vivo.

  7. Testing a hydraulic trait based model of stomatal control: results from a controlled drought experiment on aspen (Populus tremuloides, Michx.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, Douglas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, D. M.; Venturas, M.; Sperry, J.; Wang, Y.; Anderegg, W.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling approaches for tree stomatal control often rely on empirical fitting to provide accurate estimates of whole tree transpiration (E) and assimilation (A), which are limited in their predictive power by the data envelope used to calibrate model parameters. Optimization based models hold promise as a means to predict stomatal behavior under novel climate conditions. We designed an experiment to test a hydraulic trait based optimization model, which predicts stomatal conductance from a gain/risk approach. Optimal stomatal conductance is expected to maximize the potential carbon gain by photosynthesis, and minimize the risk to hydraulic transport imposed by cavitation. The modeled risk to the hydraulic network is assessed from cavitation vulnerability curves, a commonly measured physiological trait in woody plant species. Over a growing season garden grown plots of aspen (Populus tremuloides, Michx.) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa, Douglas) were subjected to three distinct drought treatments (moderate, severe, severe with rehydration) relative to a control plot to test model predictions. Model outputs of predicted E, A, and xylem pressure can be directly compared to both continuous data (whole tree sapflux, soil moisture) and point measurements (leaf level E, A, xylem pressure). The model also predicts levels of whole tree hydraulic impairment expected to increase mortality risk. This threshold is used to estimate survivorship in the drought treatment plots. The model can be run at two scales, either entirely from climate (meteorological inputs, irrigation) or using the physiological measurements as a starting point. These data will be used to study model performance and utility, and aid in developing the model for larger scale applications.

  8. Determination of the saturated film conductivity to improve the EMFX model in describing the soil hydraulic properties over the entire moisture range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Guan, Huade; Zhu, Gaofeng

    2017-06-01

    Difficulty in measuring hydraulic conductivity, particularly under dry conditions, calls for methods of predicting the conductivity from easily obtained soil properties. As a complement to the recently published EMFX model, a method based on two specific suction conditions is proposed to estimate saturated film conductivity from the soil water retention curve. This method reduces one fitting parameter in the previous EMFX model, making it possible to predict the hydraulic conductivity from the soil water retention curve over the complete moisture range. Model performance is evaluated with published data of soils in a broad texture range from sand to clay. The testing results indicate that 1) the modified EMFX model (namely the EMFX-K model), incorporating both capillary and adsorption forces, provides good agreement with the conductivity data over the entire moisture range; 2) a value of 0.5 for the tortuosity factor in the EMFX-K model as that in the Mualem's model gives comparable estimation of the relative conductivity associated with the capillary force; and 3) a value of -1.0 × 10-20 J for the Hamaker constant, rather than the commonly used value of -6.0 × 10-20 J, appears to be more appropriate to represent solely the effect of the van der Waals forces and to predict the film conductivity. In comparison with the commonly used van Genuchten-Mualem model, the EMFX-K model significantly improves the prediction of hydraulic conductivity under dry conditions. The sensitivity analysis result suggests that the uncertainty in the film thickness estimation is important in explaining the model underestimation of hydraulic conductivity for the soils with fine texture, in addition to the uncertainties from the measurements and the model structure. High quality data that cover the complete moisture range for a variety of soil textures are required to further test the method.

  9. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  10. Modeling and Parameter Identification of the Vibration Characteristics of Armature Assembly in a Torque Motor of Hydraulic Servo Valves under Electromagnetic Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Peng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The resonance of the armature assembly is the main problem leading to the fatigue of the spring pipe in a torque motor of hydraulic servo valves, which can cause the failure of servo valves. To predict the vibration characteristics of the armature assembly, this paper focuses on the mathematical modeling of the vibration characteristics of armature assembly in a hydraulic servo valve and the identification of parameters in the models. To build models more accurately, the effect of the magnetic spring is taken into account. Vibration modal analysis is performed to obtain the mode shapes and natural frequencies, which are necessary to implement the identification of damping ratios in the mathematical models. Based on the mathematical models for the vibration characteristics, the harmonic responses of the armature assembly are analyzed using the finite element method and measured under electromagnetic excitations. The simulation results agree well with the experimental studies.

  11. GIFMod: A Flexible Modeling Framework For Hydraulic and Water Quality Performance Assessment of Stormwater Green Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    A flexible framework has been created for modeling multi-dimensional hydrological and water quality processes within stormwater green infrastructures (GIs). The framework models a GI system using a set of blocks (spatial features) and connectors (interfaces) representing differen...

  12. A phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling during the quenching of hot rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.A.; Unal, C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, a phenomenological model of the thermal hydraulics of convective boiling in the post-critical-heat-flux (post-CHF) regime is developed and discussed. The model was implemented in the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 computer code (an advanced best-estimate computer program written for the analysis of pressurized water reactor systems). The model was built around the determination of flow regimes downstream of the quench front. The regimes were determined from the flow-regime map suggested by Ishii and his coworkers. Heat transfer in the transition boiling region was formulated as a position-dependent model. The propagation of the CHF point was strongly dependent on the length of the transition boiling region. Wall-to-fluid film boiling heat transfer was considered to consist of two components: first, a wall-to-vapor convective heat-transfer portion and, second, a wall-to-liquid heat transfer representing near-wall effects. Each contribution was considered separately in each of the inverted annular flow (IAF) regimes. The interfacial heat transfer was also formulated as flow-regime dependent. The interfacial drag coefficient model upstream of the CHF point was considered to be similar to flow through a roughened pipe. A free-stream contribution was calculated using Ishii's bubbly flow model for either fully developed subcooled or saturated nucleate boiling. For the drag in the smooth IAF region, a simple smooth-tube correlation for the interfacial friction factor was used. The drag coefficient for the rough-wavy IAF was formulated in the same way as for the smooth IAF model except that the roughness parameter was assumed to be proportional to liquid droplet diameter entrained from the wavy interface. The drag coefficient in the highly dispersed flow regime considered the combined effects of the liquid droplets within the channel and a liquid film on wet unheated walls. 431 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs

  13. THREE-PARAMETER CREEP DAMAGE CONSTITUTIVE MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION IN HYDRAULIC TUNNELLING

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Gang; Chen Liang

    2016-01-01

    Rock deformation is a time-dependent process, generally referred to as rheology. Especially for soft rock strata, design and construction of tunnel shall take full account of rheological properties of adjoining rocks. Based on classic three-parameter HK model (generalized Kelvin model), this paper proposes a three-parameter H-K damage model of which parameters attenuate with increase of equivalent strain, provides attenuation equation of model parameters in the first, second and third stage o...

  14. Impact of uncertainty description on assimilating hydraulic head in the MIKE SHE distributed hydrological model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.

    2015-01-01

    The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is a popular data assimilation (DA) technique that has been extensively used in environmental sciences for combining complementary information from model predictions and observations. One of the major challenges in EnKF applications is the description of model un...... with respect to performance and sensitivity. Results show that inappropriate definition of model uncertainty can greatly degrade the assimilation performance, and an appropriate combination of different model uncertainty sources is advised....

  15. Weighted recalibration of the Rosetta pedotransfer model with improved estimates of hydraulic parameter distributions and summary statistics (Rosetta3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonggen; Schaap, Marcel G.

    2017-04-01

    Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) have been widely used to predict soil hydraulic parameters in favor of expensive laboratory or field measurements. Rosetta (Schaap et al., 2001, denoted as Rosetta1) is one of many PTFs and is based on artificial neural network (ANN) analysis coupled with the bootstrap re-sampling method which allows the estimation of van Genuchten water retention parameters (van Genuchten, 1980, abbreviated here as VG), saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), and their uncertainties. In this study, we present an improved set of hierarchical pedotransfer functions (Rosetta3) that unify the water retention and Ks submodels into one. Parameter uncertainty of the fit of the VG curve to the original retention data is used in the ANN calibration procedure to reduce bias of parameters predicted by the new PTF. One thousand bootstrap replicas were used to calibrate the new models compared to 60 or 100 in Rosetta1, thus allowing the uni-variate and bi-variate probability distributions of predicted parameters to be quantified in greater detail. We determined the optimal weights for VG parameters and Ks, the optimal number of hidden nodes in ANN, and the number of bootstrap replicas required for statistically stable estimates. Results show that matric potential-dependent bias was reduced significantly while root mean square error (RMSE) for water content were reduced modestly; RMSE for Ks was increased by 0.9% (H3w) to 3.3% (H5w) in the new models on log scale of Ks compared with the Rosetta1 model. It was found that estimated distributions of parameters were mildly non-Gaussian and could instead be described rather well with heavy-tailed α-stable distributions. On the other hand, arithmetic means had only a small estimation bias for most textures when compared with the mean-like "shift" parameter of the α-stable distributions. Arithmetic means and (co-)variances are therefore still recommended as summary statistics of the estimated distributions. However, it

  16. Two-fluid modeling of thermal-hydraulic phenomena for best-estimate LWR safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.; Andreani, M.

    1989-01-01

    Two-fluid formulation of the conservation equations has allowed modelling of the two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena and situations involving strong departures in thermal and velocity equilibrium between the phases. The paper reviews the state of the art in modelling critical flows, and certain phase separation phenomena, as well as post-dryout heat transfer situations. Although the two-fluid models and the codes have the potential for correctly modelling such situations, this potential has not always been fully used in practice. (orig.)

  17. Modelling aqueous solubility of sodium chloride in clays at thermodynamic conditions of hydraulic fracturing by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moučka, Filip; Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin

    2017-06-28

    To address the high salinity of flow-back water during hydraulic fracturing, we have studied the equilibrium partitioning of NaCl and water between the bulk phase and clay pores. In shale rocks, such a partitioning can occur between fractures with a bulk-like phase and clay pores. We use an advanced Grand Canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) technique based on fractional exchanges of dissolved ions and water molecules. We consider a typical shale gas reservoir condition of a temperature of 365 K and pressure of 275 bar, and we represent clay pores by pyrophyllite and Na-montmorillonite slits of a width ranging from about 7 to 28 Å, covering clay pores from dry clay to clay pores with a bulk-like layer in the middle of the pore. We employ the Joung-Cheatham model for ions, SPC/E model for water and CLAYFF for the clay pores. We first determine the chemical potentials for NaCl and water in the bulk phase using Osmotic Ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. The chemical potentials are then used in GCMC to simulate the adsorption of ions and water molecules in the clay pores, and in turn to predict the salt solubility in confined solutions. Besides the thermodynamic properties, we evaluate the structure and in-plane diffusion of the adsorbed fluids, and ion conductivities.

  18. Nonlinear Modeling and Coordinate Optimization of a Semi-Active Energy Regenerative Suspension with an Electro-Hydraulic Actuator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farong Kou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to coordinate the damping performance and energy regenerative performance of energy regenerative suspension, this paper proposes a structure of a vehicle semi-active energy regenerative suspension with an electro-hydraulic actuator (EHA. In light of the proposed concept, a specific energy regenerative scheme is designed and a mechanical properties test is carried out. Based on the test results, the parameter identification for the system model is conducted using a recursive least squares algorithm. On the basis of the system principle, the nonlinear model of the semi-active energy regenerative suspension with an EHA is built. Meanwhile, linear-quadratic-Gaussian control strategy of the system is designed. Then, the influence of the main parameters of the EHA on the damping performance and energy regenerative performance of the suspension is analyzed. Finally, the main parameters of the EHA are optimized via the genetic algorithm. The test results show that when a sinusoidal is input at the frequency of 2 Hz and the amplitude of 30 mm, the spring mass acceleration root meam square value of the optimized EHA semi-active energy regenerative suspension is reduced by 22.23% and the energy regenerative power RMS value is increased by 40.51%, which means that while meeting the requirements of vehicle ride comfort and driving safety, the energy regenerative performance is improved significantly.

  19. PREMIUM - Benchmark on the quantification of the uncertainty of the physical models in the system thermal-hydraulic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek, Tomasz; Crecy, Agnes de

    2013-01-01

    PREMIUM (Post BEMUSE Reflood Models Input Uncertainty Methods) is an activity launched with the aim to push forward the methods of quantification of physical models uncertainties in thermal-hydraulic codes. It is endorsed by OECD/NEA/CSNI/WGAMA. The benchmark PREMIUM is addressed to all who applies uncertainty evaluation methods based on input uncertainties quantification and propagation. The benchmark is based on a selected case of uncertainty analysis application to the simulation of quench front propagation in an experimental test facility. Application to an experiment enables evaluation and confirmation of the quantified probability distribution functions on the basis of experimental data. The scope of the benchmark comprises a review of the existing methods, selection of potentially important uncertain input parameters, preliminary quantification of the ranges and distributions of the identified parameters, evaluation of the probability density function using experimental results of tests performed on FEBA test facility and confirmation/validation of the performed quantification on the basis of blind calculation of Reflood 2-D PERICLES experiment. (authors)

  20. Implications of the "observer effect" on modelling a long-term pumping test with hydraulically conductive boreholes in a discrete fracture network system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, D.; Frampton, A.; Cvetkovic, V.

    2006-12-01

    The Onkalo underground research facility for rock characterisation for nuclear waste disposal is located at Olkiluoto island, just off the Finnish coast in the Baltic Sea. Prior to the start of the excavation of the Onkalo facility, an extensive amount of hydraulic data has been collected during various pumping experiments from a large number of boreholes placed throughout an area of approximately 10 km2, reaching depths of 1000 meters below sea level. In particular, the hydraulic borehole data includes classical measurements of pressure, but also new measurements of flow rate and flow direction in boreholes (so called flow-logging). These measurements indicate large variations in heterogeneity and are a clear reflection of the discrete nature of the system. Here we present results from an ongoing project which aims to explore and asses the implications of these new flow-logging measurements to site descriptive modelling and modelling at performance assessment scales. The main challange of the first phase of this project is to obtain a greater understanding of a strongly heterogenious and anisotropic groundwater system in which open boreholes are located; that is, a system in which the observation boreholes themselves create new hydraulic conductive features of the groundwater system. The results presented are from recent hydraulic flow modelling simulations with a combined continuous porous media and discrete fracture network approach using a commercial finite-element software. An advantage of this approach is we may adapt a continuum mesh on the regional scale, were only a few conductive features are known, together with a local scale discrete fracture network approach, where detailed site-investigation has revealed a large amount of conductive features. Current findings indicate the system is sensitive to certain combinations of hydraulic features, and we quantify the significance of including these variations in terms of their implications for reduction of

  1. Hydraulic fracturing to enhance geothermal energy recovery in deep and tight formations. Modell approach in petrothermy research project OPTIRISS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiee, M.M.; Schmitz, S.; Barsch, M. [DBI - Gastechnologisches Institut gGmbH, Freiberg (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    In Germany numerous projects were successfully conducted in developments of geothermal energy which applied so far mostly for the hydrothermal deposit type. In Thuringia and Saxony there are currently project developments of geothermal resource taking into account for deep, tight formations in petrothermy and Enhanced geothermal system, (EGS). One of the potential tasks in generating these petrothermal producers and in the design of the underground power plant appears to be hydraulic fracturing with multi frac method. This is to create the heat exchanger surfaces in the rock and ensure maximum volumetric flow through it. Therefore it is very important for a sustainable heat production. However the promise of its adequate conductivity in the deep formation is one of the dominant contests in geothermal energy industry. In a multi frac method, two wells (normally horizontal wellbores at different depths) are drilled in direction of minimum horizontal stress of the formation rock. By multiple frac operation in separate sections, flow paths are generated between the wells through which it is possible to extract the heat from the rock. The numerical simulation of hydraulic fracture propagation processes in the rock is mainly from the research in the area of oil and gas industry. These techniques are mainly used for very low permeable formations in petroleum engineering (e.g. Shale gas). The development is at the beginning for EGS (e.g. granites). In this work single and multi fracking propagation processes in a synthetic example of deep hard formation are investigated. The numerical simulation is carried out to design and characterize frac processes and frac dimensions. Sensitivities to various rock parameters and different process designs are examined and optimum criteria are concluded. This shows that the minimum stress profile has the most effective role and should be modelled properly. The analysis indicates the optimum fracture length and height for adequate thermal