WorldWideScience

Sample records for model hi-res size

  1. NASA 3D Models: ISS (Hi-res)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A very high resolution model of the International Space Station in many parts. The download includes an image of the final configuration. This model is provided in...

  2. A high resolution coupled hydrologic-hydraulic model (HiResFlood-UCI) for flash flood modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phu; Thorstensen, Andrea; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Hsu, Kuolin; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sanders, Brett; Koren, Victor; Cui, Zhengtao; Smith, Michael

    2016-10-01

    HiResFlood-UCI was developed by coupling the NWS's hydrologic model (HL-RDHM) with the hydraulic model (BreZo) for flash flood modeling at decameter resolutions. The coupled model uses HL-RDHM as a rainfall-runoff generator and replaces the routing scheme of HL-RDHM with the 2D hydraulic model (BreZo) in order to predict localized flood depths and velocities. A semi-automated technique of unstructured mesh generation was developed to cluster an adequate density of computational cells along river channels such that numerical errors are negligible compared with other sources of error, while ensuring that computational costs of the hydraulic model are kept to a bare minimum. HiResFlood-UCI was implemented for a watershed (ELDO2) in the DMIP2 experiment domain in Oklahoma. Using synthetic precipitation input, the model was tested for various components including HL-RDHM parameters (a priori versus calibrated), channel and floodplain Manning n values, DEM resolution (10 m versus 30 m) and computation mesh resolution (10 m+ versus 30 m+). Simulations with calibrated versus a priori parameters of HL-RDHM show that HiResFlood-UCI produces reasonable results with the a priori parameters from NWS. Sensitivities to hydraulic model resistance parameters, mesh resolution and DEM resolution are also identified, pointing to the importance of model calibration and validation for accurate prediction of localized flood intensities. HiResFlood-UCI performance was examined using 6 measured precipitation events as model input for model calibration and validation of the streamflow at the outlet. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) obtained ranges from 0.588 to 0.905. The model was also validated for the flooded map using USGS observed water level at an interior point. The predicted flood stage error is 0.82 m or less, based on a comparison to measured stage. Validation of stage and discharge predictions builds confidence in model predictions of flood extent and localized velocities

  3. Analysis of large-scale anisotropy of ultra-high energy cosmic rays in HiRes data

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Allen, M; Amann, J F; Archbold, G; Belov, K; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Brusova, O A; Burt, G W; Cannon, C; Cao, Z; Deng, W; Fedorova, Y; Findlay, J; Finley, C B; Gray, R C; Hanlon, W F; Hoffman, C M; Holzscheiter, M H; Hughes, G; Hüntemeyer, P; Ivanov, D; Jones, B F; Jui, C C H; Kim, K; Kirn, M A; Koers, H; Loh, E C; Maestas, M M; Manago, N; Marek, L J; Martens, K; Matthews, J A J; Matthews, J N; Moore, S A; O'Neill, A; Painter, C A; Perera, L; Reil, K; Riehle, R; Roberts, M D; Rodriguez, D; Sasaki, M; Schnetzer, S R; Scott, L M; Sinnis, G; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Song, C; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Thomas, J R; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tupa, D; Wiencke, L R; Zech, A; Zhang, X

    2010-01-01

    Stereo data collected by the HiRes experiment over a six year period are examined for large-scale anisotropy related to the inhomogeneous distribution of matter in the nearby Universe. We consider the generic case of small cosmic-ray deflections and a large number of sources tracing the matter distribution. In this matter tracer model the expected cosmic ray flux depends essentially on a single free parameter, the typical deflection angle theta. We find that the HiRes data with threshold energies of 40 EeV and 57 EeV are incompatible with the matter tracer model at a 95% confidence level unless theta is larger than 10 degrees and are compatible with an isotropic flux. The data set above 10 EeV is compatible with both the matter tracer model and an isotropic flux.

  4. Panofsky Prize Talk: The High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolsky, Pierre

    2008-04-01

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiment was the second-generation air fluorescence experiment proposed, built, and run by the HiRes collaboration, with members from the University of Utah, Columbia University, the University of Illinois, the University of New Mexico, Rutgers University, the University of Tokyo and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. I will report on the history of the project, the technical capabilities of the instrument built in the Utah desert and the physics results, culminating in the discovery of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cut-off. The HiRes experiment also pioneered many of the calibration and atmospheric monitoring techniques now in use by the Pierre Auger experiment and the Telescope Array experiment and I will describe a number of them in my talk.

  5. Radio-controlled xenon flashers for atmospheric monitoring at the HiRes cosmic ray observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Wiencke, L R; Al-Seady, M; Belov, K; Bird, D J; Boyer, J; Chen, G F; Clay, R W; Dai, H Y; Dawson, B R; Denholm, P; Gloyn, J; He, D; Ho, Y; Huang, M A; Jui, C C H; Kidd, M J; Kieda, D B; Knapp, B; Ko, S; Larson, K; Loh, E C; Mannel, E J; Matthews, J N; Meyer, J R; Salman, A; Simpson, K M; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Steenblik, D; Tang, J K K; Taylor, S; Thomas, S B; Wilkinson, C R

    1999-01-01

    Stable, robust ultraviolet light sources for atmospheric monitoring and calibration pose a challenge for experiments that measure air fluorescence from cosmic ray air showers. One type of light source in use at the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) cosmic ray observatory features a xenon flashbulb at the focal point of a spherical mirror to produce a 1 mu s pulse of collimated light that includes a strong UV component. A computer-controlled touch tone radio system provides remote operation of bulb triggering and window heating. These devices, dubbed 'flashers', feature stand-alone operation, +-5% shot-to-shot stability, weather proof construction and are well suited for long-term field use. This paper describes the flashers, the radio control system, and a 12-unit array in operation at the HiRes cosmic ray observatory

  6. Radio-controlled xenon flashers for atmospheric monitoring at the HiRes cosmic ray observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiencke, L. R.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Al-Seady, M.; Belov, K.; Bird, D. J.; Boyer, J.; Chen, G. F.; Clay, R. W.; Dai, H. Y.; Dawson, B. R.; Denholm, P.; Gloyn, J.; He, D.; Ho, Y.; Huang, M. A.; Jui, C. C. H.; Kidd, M. J.; Kieda, D. B.; Knapp, B.; Ko, S.; Larson, K.; Loh, E. C.; Mannel, E. J.; Matthews, J. N.; Meyer, J. R.; Salman, A.; Simpson, K. M.; Smith, J. D.; Sokolsky, P.; Steenblik, D.; Tang, J. K. K.; Taylor, S.; Thomas, S. B.; Wilkinson, C. R.

    1999-06-01

    Stable, robust ultraviolet light sources for atmospheric monitoring and calibration pose a challenge for experiments that measure air fluorescence from cosmic ray air showers. One type of light source in use at the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) cosmic ray observatory features a xenon flashbulb at the focal point of a spherical mirror to produce a 1 μs pulse of collimated light that includes a strong UV component. A computer-controlled touch tone radio system provides remote operation of bulb triggering and window heating. These devices, dubbed "flashers", feature stand-alone operation, ±5% shot-to-shot stability, weather proof construction and are well suited for long-term field use. This paper describes the flashers, the radio control system, and a 12-unit array in operation at the HiRes cosmic ray observatory

  7. Abundances of disk and bulge giants from hi-res optical spectra: I. O, Mg, Ca, and Ti in the Solar neighborhood and Kepler field samples

    CERN Document Server

    Jönsson, H; Nordlander, T; Pehlivan, A; Hartman, H; Jönsson, P; Eriksson, K

    2016-01-01

    The galactic bulge is a significant part of our galaxy, but it is hard to observe, being both distant and covered by dust in the disk. Therefore there do not exist many hi-res optical spectra of bulge stars with large wavelength coverage, whose determined abundances can be compared with nearby, similarly analyzed stellar samples. We aim to determine the, for chemical evolution models, so important alpha elements of a sample of bulge giants using hi-res optical spectra with large wavelength coverage. The abundances found will be compared to similarly derived abundances from similar spectra of similar stars in the local thin and thick disks. In this first paper we focus on the Solar neighborhood reference sample. We use spectral synthesis to derive the stellar parameters as well as the elemental abundances of both the local as well as the bulge samples of giants. Special care is taken to benchmark our method of determining stellar parameters against independent measurements of effective temperatures from angula...

  8. HiRes deconvolved Spitzer images of 89 protostellar jets and outflows: New data on the evolution of the outflow morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velusamy, T.; Langer, W. D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Thompson, T., E-mail: velusamy@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: William.D.Langer@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: timthompson3@verizon.net [1947C East Huntington Drive, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    To study the role of protosellar jets and outflows in the time evolution of the parent cores and the protostars, the astronomical community needs a large enough database of infrared images of protostars at the highest spatial resolution possible to reveal the details of their morphology. Spitzer provides unprecedented sensitivity in the infrared to study both the jet and outflow features, however, its spatial resolution is limited by its 0.85 m mirror. Here, we use a high-resolution deconvolution algorithm, 'HiRes,' to improve the visualization of spatial morphology by enhancing resolution (to subarcsecond levels in the IRAC bands) and removing the contaminating side lobes from bright sources in a sample of 89 protostellar objects. These reprocessed images are useful for detecting (1) wide-angle outflows seen in scattered light, (2) morphological details of H{sub 2} emission in jets and bow shocks, and (3) compact features in MIPS 24 μm images as protostar/disk and atomic/ionic line emission associated with the jets. The HiRes FITS image data of such a large homogeneous sample presented here will be useful to the community in studying these protostellar objects. To illustrate the utility of this HiRes sample, we show how the opening angle of the wide-angle outflows in 31 sources, all observed in the HiRes-processed Spitzer images, correlates with age. Our data suggest a power-law fit to opening angle versus age with an exponent of ∼0.32 and 0.02, respectively, for ages ≤8000 yr and ≥8000 yr.

  9. Percepção da fala de usuários de implante coclear com a estratégia HiRes 120: revisão sistemática Speech perception in cochlear implant users with the HiRes 120 strategy: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mendes de Melo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Apesar dos avanços tecnológicos empregados nas estratégias de processamento do sinal, um dos obstáculos ainda existentes são as lacunas de detalhes espectrais na informação elétrica transmitida. Considerando a sua importância na percepção da fala, pesquisadores investigaram mecanismos para otimizar o detalhamento espectral, por meio dos canais espectrais virtuais. A aplicação clínica desta técnica resultou em uma nova estratégia de processamento de sinal - a HiRes 120. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho auditivo de usuários de Implante Coclear com a HiRes 120. METODOLOGIA: Levantamento bibliográfico conduzido em base eletrônica de dados, com busca padronizada até o ano de 2011, utilizando-se palavras-chave específicas. Para a seleção e avaliação dos estudos científicos levantados na busca, foram estabelecidos critérios, contemplando os aspectos: tipo de estudo, participantes, intervenção adotada e avaliação dos resultados. CONCLUSÃO: As evidências científicas apontam uma melhora do desempenho auditivo nas situações de ruído com a estratégia HiRes 120, mas tal fato não ocorre nas situações de silêncio. A otimização da percepção da fala com o uso da estratégia está intimamente relacionada com a idade do usuário de implante coclear, com o tempo de privação sensorial e o tempo de aclimatização necessário para o aproveitamento das informações espectrais da estratégia.Despite technological advances employed in signal processing strategies, one of the remaining obstacles are spectral gap details on the information transmitted. Considering its importance in speech perception, researchers have investigated mechanisms to optimize spectral details through virtual spectral channels. The clinical application of this technique resulted in a new approach to signal processing - the HiRes 120. OBJECTIVE: To assess the auditory performance of cochlear implant users with the HiRes 120 strategy. METHODOLOGY: The

  10. Tracing glacial disintegration from the LIA to the present using a LIDAR-based hi-res glacier inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fischer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glacier inventories provide the basis for further studies on mass balance and volume change, relevant for local hydrological issues as well as for global calculation of sea level rise. In this study, a new Austrian glacier inventory updating data from 1969 (GI I and 1998 (GI II has been compiled, based on high resolution LiDAR DEMs and orthophotos dating from 2004 to 2011 (GI III. To expand the time series of digital glacier inventories in the past, the glacier inventory of the Little Ice Age maximum state (LIA has been digitalized based on the LiDAR DEM. The resulting glacier area for GI III of 415.11 ± 11.18 km2 is 44% of the LIA area. The area losses show high regional variability, ranging from 11% annual relative loss to less than 1% for the latest period. The glacier sizes reduced from LIA to the latest period, so that in GI III 47% of the glaciers' areas are smaller than 0.1 km2.

  11. sir2016-5029_Hi_Res_Extents: Flood-Inundation Maps for the Coast Fork Willamette River from Creswell, Oregon to Goshen, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) utilized for this Willamette FIS submittal was produced by combining multiple overlapping topographic surveys for the Middle Fork...

  12. Abundances of disk and bulge giants from hi-res optical spectra: II. O, Mg, Ca, and Ti in the bulge sample

    CERN Document Server

    Jönsson, H; Schultheis, M; Zoccali, M

    2016-01-01

    Determining elemental abundances of bulge stars can, via chemical evolution modeling, help to understand the formation and evolution of the bulge. Recently there have been claims both for and against the bulge having a different [$\\alpha$/Fe] vs. [Fe/H]-trend as compared to the local thick disk possibly meaning a faster, or at least different, formation time scale of the bulge as compared to the local thick disk. We aim to determine the abundances of oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium in a sample of 46 bulge K-giants, 35 of which have been analyzed for oxygen and magnesium in previous works, and compare them to homogeneously determined elemental abundances of a local disk sample of 291 K-giants. We use spectral synthesis to determine both the stellar parameters as well as the elemental abundances of the bulge stars analyzed here. The method is exactly the same as was used for analyzing the comparison sample of 291 local K-giants in Paper I of this series. Compared to the previous analysis of the 35 star...

  13. Size Effect in Continuum Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Foulk, James W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Huestis, Edwin M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Connelly, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Song, Bo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Mechanics of Materials; Yang, Nancy Y. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Engineered Materials

    2008-09-01

    The mechanical properties of some materials (Cu, Ni, Ag, etc.) have been shown to develop strong dependence on the geometric dimensions, resulting in a size effect. Several theories have been proposed to model size effects, but have been based on very few experiments conducted at appropriate scales. Some experimental results implied that size effects are caused by increasing strain gradients and have been used to confirm many strain gradient theories. On the other hand, some recent experiments show that a size effect exists in the absence of strain gradients. This report describes a brief analytical and experimental study trying to clarify the material and experimental issues surrounding the most influential size-effect experiments by Fleck et al (1994). This effort is to understand size effects intended to further develop predictive models.

  14. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  15. Modeling and Sizing of Supercapacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PETREUS, D.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Faced with numerous challenges raised by the requirements of the modern industries for higher power and higher energy, supercapacitors study started playing an important role in offering viable solutions for some of these requirements. This paper presents the surface redox reactions based modeling in order to study the origin of high capacity of EDLC (electrical double-layer capacitor for better understanding the working principles of supercapacitors. Some application-dependent sizing methods are also presented since proper sizing can increase the efficiency and the life cycle of the supercapacitor based systems.

  16. Modelling of Size Effect with Regularised Continua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Askes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlocal damage continuum and a viscoplastic damage continuum are used to model size effects. Three-point bending specimens are analysed, whereby a distinction is made between unnotched specimens, specimens with a constant notch and specimens with a proportionally scaled notch. Numerical finite element simulations have been performed for specimen sizes in a range of 1:64. Size effects are established in terms of nominal strength and compared to existing size effect models from the literature. 

  17. Wind and Wind Stress Measurements in HiRes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Sonic anemometers for three-dimensional mean and turbulent winds 2. Cup and vane anemometers for mean winds 3. Candidate propeller-vane anemometer to...2 – Paroscientific Barameter, Campbell Sonic Anemometer ; Level 3- 2x Met One Cup , Met One Vane, RM Young Propeller; Level 4 – 2x Met One Cup ; Level...5 – 2x Paroscientific Barometer; Level 6 – Campbell Sonic Anemometer , Modified Krypton Hygrometer, Met One Cup , Met One Vane; Level 7 – 2x RM Young

  18. A Size-based Ecosystem Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn-Jonsen, Lars

     Ecosystem Management requires models that can link the ecosystem level to the operation level. This link can be created by an ecosystem production model. Because the function of the individual fish in the marine ecosystem, seen in trophic context, is closely related to its size, the model groups...... fish according to size. The model summarises individual predation events into ecosystem level properties, and thereby uses the law of conversation of mass as a framework. This paper provides the background, the conceptual model, basic assumptions, integration of fishing activities, mathematical...... completion, and a numeric implementation. Using two experiments, the model's ability to act as tool for economic production analysis and regulation design testing is demonstrated. The presented model is the simplest possible and is built on the principles of (i) size, as the attribute that determines...

  19. Sample size planning for classification models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beleites, Claudia; Neugebauer, Ute; Bocklitz, Thomas; Krafft, Christoph; Popp, Jürgen

    2013-01-14

    In biospectroscopy, suitably annotated and statistically independent samples (e.g. patients, batches, etc.) for classifier training and testing are scarce and costly. Learning curves show the model performance as function of the training sample size and can help to determine the sample size needed to train good classifiers. However, building a good model is actually not enough: the performance must also be proven. We discuss learning curves for typical small sample size situations with 5-25 independent samples per class. Although the classification models achieve acceptable performance, the learning curve can be completely masked by the random testing uncertainty due to the equally limited test sample size. In consequence, we determine test sample sizes necessary to achieve reasonable precision in the validation and find that 75-100 samples will usually be needed to test a good but not perfect classifier. Such a data set will then allow refined sample size planning on the basis of the achieved performance. We also demonstrate how to calculate necessary sample sizes in order to show the superiority of one classifier over another: this often requires hundreds of statistically independent test samples or is even theoretically impossible. We demonstrate our findings with a data set of ca. 2550 Raman spectra of single cells (five classes: erythrocytes, leukocytes and three tumour cell lines BT-20, MCF-7 and OCI-AML3) as well as by an extensive simulation that allows precise determination of the actual performance of the models in question. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mathematical model of a cell size checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Vilela

    Full Text Available How cells regulate their size from one generation to the next has remained an enigma for decades. Recently, a molecular mechanism that links cell size and cell cycle was proposed in fission yeast. This mechanism involves changes in the spatial cellular distribution of two proteins, Pom1 and Cdr2, as the cell grows. Pom1 inhibits Cdr2 while Cdr2 promotes the G2 → M transition. Cdr2 is localized in the middle cell region (midcell whereas the concentration of Pom1 is highest at the cell tips and declines towards the midcell. In short cells, Pom1 efficiently inhibits Cdr2. However, as cells grow, the Pom1 concentration at midcell decreases such that Cdr2 becomes activated at some critical size. In this study, the chemistry of Pom1 and Cdr2 was modeled using a deterministic reaction-diffusion-convection system interacting with a deterministic model describing microtubule dynamics. Simulations mimicked experimental data from wild-type (WT fission yeast growing at normal and reduced rates; they also mimicked the behavior of a Pom1 overexpression mutant and WT yeast exposed to a microtubule depolymerizing drug. A mechanism linking cell size and cell cycle, involving the downstream action of Cdr2 on Wee1 phosphorylation, is proposed.

  1. Size and complexity in model financial systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Kapadia, Sujit; May, Robert M

    2012-11-06

    The global financial crisis has precipitated an increasing appreciation of the need for a systemic perspective toward financial stability. For example: What role do large banks play in systemic risk? How should capital adequacy standards recognize this role? How is stability shaped by concentration and diversification in the financial system? We explore these questions using a deliberately simplified, dynamic model of a banking system that combines three different channels for direct transmission of contagion from one bank to another: liquidity hoarding, asset price contagion, and the propagation of defaults via counterparty credit risk. Importantly, we also introduce a mechanism for capturing how swings in "confidence" in the system may contribute to instability. Our results highlight that the importance of relatively large, well-connected banks in system stability scales more than proportionately with their size: the impact of their collapse arises not only from their connectivity, but also from their effect on confidence in the system. Imposing tougher capital requirements on larger banks than smaller ones can thus enhance the resilience of the system. Moreover, these effects are more pronounced in more concentrated systems, and continue to apply, even when allowing for potential diversification benefits that may be realized by larger banks. We discuss some tentative implications for policy, as well as conceptual analogies in ecosystem stability and in the control of infectious diseases.

  2. Size and complexity in model financial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Kapadia, Sujit; May, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    The global financial crisis has precipitated an increasing appreciation of the need for a systemic perspective toward financial stability. For example: What role do large banks play in systemic risk? How should capital adequacy standards recognize this role? How is stability shaped by concentration and diversification in the financial system? We explore these questions using a deliberately simplified, dynamic model of a banking system that combines three different channels for direct transmission of contagion from one bank to another: liquidity hoarding, asset price contagion, and the propagation of defaults via counterparty credit risk. Importantly, we also introduce a mechanism for capturing how swings in “confidence” in the system may contribute to instability. Our results highlight that the importance of relatively large, well-connected banks in system stability scales more than proportionately with their size: the impact of their collapse arises not only from their connectivity, but also from their effect on confidence in the system. Imposing tougher capital requirements on larger banks than smaller ones can thus enhance the resilience of the system. Moreover, these effects are more pronounced in more concentrated systems, and continue to apply, even when allowing for potential diversification benefits that may be realized by larger banks. We discuss some tentative implications for policy, as well as conceptual analogies in ecosystem stability and in the control of infectious diseases. PMID:23091020

  3. Size Evolution and Stochastic Models: Explaining Ostracod Size through Probabilistic Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, M.; Decker, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2014-12-01

    The biovolume of animals has functioned as an important benchmark for measuring evolution throughout geologic time. In our project, we examined the observed average body size of ostracods over time in order to understand the mechanism of size evolution in these marine organisms. The body size of ostracods has varied since the beginning of the Ordovician, where the first true ostracods appeared. We created a stochastic branching model to create possible evolutionary trees of ostracod size. Using stratigraphic ranges for ostracods compiled from over 750 genera in the Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology, we calculated overall speciation and extinction rates for our model. At each timestep in our model, new lineages can evolve or existing lineages can become extinct. Newly evolved lineages are assigned sizes based on their parent genera. We parameterized our model to generate neutral and directional changes in ostracod size to compare with the observed data. New sizes were chosen via a normal distribution, and the neutral model selected new sizes differentials centered on zero, allowing for an equal chance of larger or smaller ostracods at each speciation. Conversely, the directional model centered the distribution on a negative value, giving a larger chance of smaller ostracods. Our data strongly suggests that the overall direction of ostracod evolution has been following a model that directionally pushes mean ostracod size down, shying away from a neutral model. Our model was able to match the magnitude of size decrease. Our models had a constant linear decrease while the actual data had a much more rapid initial rate followed by a constant size. The nuance of the observed trends ultimately suggests a more complex method of size evolution. In conclusion, probabilistic methods can provide valuable insight into possible evolutionary mechanisms determining size evolution in ostracods.

  4. Modelling the effect of size-asymmetric competition on size inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Camilla Ruø; Weiner, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The concept of size asymmetry in resource competition among plants, in which larger individuals obtain a disproportionate share of contested resources, appears to be very straightforward, but the effects of size asymmetry on growth and size variation among individuals have proved...... to be controversial. It has often been assumed that competition among individual plants in a population has to be size-asymmetric to result in higher size inequality than in the absence of competition, but here we question this inference. Using very simple, individual-based models, we investigate how size symmetry...... irrespective of their sizes, can, under some assumptions, result in higher size inequality than when competition is absent. We demonstrate our approach by applying it to data from a greenhouse experiment investigating the size symmetry of belowground competition between pairs of Triticum aestivum (wheat...

  5. 46 CFR 160.002-2 - Size and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Life Preservers, Kapok, Adult and Child (Jacket Type), Models 3 and 5 § 160.002-2 Size and models. Each life preserver specified in this subpart is to be a: (a) Model...

  6. Modelling complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of particle-size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Sam; Weltje, Gert Jan

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of particle-size made by operators in the field and laboratory represent a vast and relatively untapped data archive. The wide spatial distribution of particle-size estimates makes them ideal for constructing geological models and soil maps. This study uses a large data set from the Netherlands (n = 4837) containing both operator estimates of particle size and complete particle-size distributions measured by laser granulometry. This study introduces a logit-based constrained-cubic-spline (CCS) algorithm to interpolate complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates. The CCS model is compared to four other models: (i) a linear interpolation; (ii) a log-hyperbolic interpolation; (iii) an empirical logistic function; and (iv) an empirical arctan function. Operator estimates were found to be both inaccurate and imprecise; only 14% of samples were successfully classified using the Dutch classification scheme for fine sediment. Operator estimates of sediment particle-size encompass the same range of values as particle-size distributions measured by laser analysis. However, the distributions measured by laser analysis show that most of the sand percentage values lie between zero and one, so the majority of the variability in the data is lost because operator estimates are made to the nearest 1% at best, and more frequently to the nearest 5%. A method for constructing complete particle-size distributions from operator estimates of sediment texture using a logit constrained cubit spline (CCS) interpolation algorithm is presented. This model and four other previously published methods are compared to establish the best approach to modelling particle-size distributions. The logit-CCS model is the most accurate method, although both logit-linear and log-linear interpolation models provide reasonable alternatives. Models based on empirical distribution functions are less accurate than interpolation algorithms for modelling particle-size distributions in

  7. 46 CFR 160.005-2 - Size and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL LIFESAVING EQUIPMENT Life Preservers, Fibrous Glass, Adult and Child (Jacket Type), Models 52 and 56 § 160.005-2 Size and model. Each life preserver specified in this subpart is a: (a...

  8. Sample Size Determination for Rasch Model Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Clemens

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with supplementing statistical tests for the Rasch model so that additionally to the probability of the error of the first kind (Type I probability) the probability of the error of the second kind (Type II probability) can be controlled at a predetermined level by basing the test on the appropriate number of observations.…

  9. A random energy model for size dependence : recurrence vs. transience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Külske, Christof

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the size dependence of disordered spin models having an infinite number of Gibbs measures in the framework of a simplified 'random energy model for size dependence'. We introduce two versions (involving either independent random walks or branching processes), that can be seen as gener

  10. Hierarchical modeling of cluster size in wildlife surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Clusters or groups of individuals are the fundamental unit of observation in many wildlife sampling problems, including aerial surveys of waterfowl, marine mammals, and ungulates. Explicit accounting of cluster size in models for estimating abundance is necessary because detection of individuals within clusters is not independent and detectability of clusters is likely to increase with cluster size. This induces a cluster size bias in which the average cluster size in the sample is larger than in the population at large. Thus, failure to account for the relationship between delectability and cluster size will tend to yield a positive bias in estimates of abundance or density. I describe a hierarchical modeling framework for accounting for cluster-size bias in animal sampling. The hierarchical model consists of models for the observation process conditional on the cluster size distribution and the cluster size distribution conditional on the total number of clusters. Optionally, a spatial model can be specified that describes variation in the total number of clusters per sample unit. Parameter estimation, model selection, and criticism may be carried out using conventional likelihood-based methods. An extension of the model is described for the situation where measurable covariates at the level of the sample unit are available. Several candidate models within the proposed class are evaluated for aerial survey data on mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

  11. Cluster-size dependent randomization traffic flow model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Kun; Wang Bing-Hong; Fu Chuan-Ji; Lu Yu-Feng

    2007-01-01

    In order to exhibit the meta-stable states, several slow-to-start rules have been investigated as modification to Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model. These models can reproduce some realistic phenomena which are absent in the original NS model. But in these models, the size of cluster is still not considered as a useful parameter. In real traffic,the slow-to-start motion of a standing vehicle often depends on the degree of congestion which can be measured by the clusters'size. According to this idea, we propose a cluster-size dependent slow-to-start model based on the speeddependent slow-to-start rule (VDR) model. It gives expected results through simulations. Comparing with the VDR model, our new model has a better traffic efficiency and shows richer complex characters.

  12. QUANTUM SIZE EFFECTS IN THE ATTRACTIVE HUBBARD-MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BORMANN, D; SCHNEIDER, T; FRICK, M

    1992-01-01

    We investigate superconducting pair correlations in the attractive Hubbard model on a finite square lattice. Our aim is to understand the pronounced size dependence which they display in the weak and intermediate coupling regimes. These size effects originate from the electronic shell structure of f

  13. The theoretical foundations for size spectrum models of fish communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Jacobsen, Nis Sand; Farnsworth, K.D.

    2016-01-01

    assessment of fisheries. We describe the fundamental concepts in size-based models about food encounter and the bioenergetics budget of individuals. Within the general framework three model types have emerged that differs in their degree of complexity: the food-web, the trait-based and the community model....... We demonstrate the differences between the models through examples of their response to fishing and their dynamic behavior. We review implementations of size spectrum models and describe important variations concerning the functional response, whether growth is food-dependent or fixed...

  14. Multipartite geometric entanglement in finite size XY model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasone, Massimo; Dell' Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Giampaolo, Salvatore Marco; Illuminati, Fabrizio, E-mail: blasone@sa.infn.i [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via Ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    We investigate the behavior of the multipartite entanglement in the finite size XY model by means of the hierarchical geometric measure of entanglement. By selecting specific components of the hierarchy, we study both global entanglement and genuinely multipartite entanglement.

  15. A simple model for sizing stand alone photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidrach-de-Cardona, M. [Departamento Fisica Aplicada II, ETSI Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Mora Lopez, Ll. [Departamento Lenguajes y C. Computacion, ETSI Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    1998-08-24

    We consider a general model for sizing a stand-alone photovoltaic system, using as energy input data the information available in any radiation atlas. The parameters of the model are estimated by multivariate linear regression. The results obtained from a numerical sizing method were used as initial input data to fit the model. The expression proposed allows us to determine the photovoltaic array size, with a coefficient of determination ranging from 0.94 to 0.98. System parameters and mean monthly values for daily global radiation on the solar modules surface are taken as independent variables in the model. It is also shown that the proposed model can be used with the same accuracy for other locations not considered in the estimation of the model

  16. Sample size matters: Investigating the optimal sample size for a logistic regression debris flow susceptibility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Tobias; Gegg, Katharina; Becht, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Statistical approaches to landslide susceptibility modelling on the catchment and regional scale are used very frequently compared to heuristic and physically based approaches. In the present study, we deal with the problem of the optimal sample size for a logistic regression model. More specifically, a stepwise approach has been chosen in order to select those independent variables (from a number of derivatives of a digital elevation model and landcover data) that explain best the spatial distribution of debris flow initiation zones in two neighbouring central alpine catchments in Austria (used mutually for model calculation and validation). In order to minimise problems arising from spatial autocorrelation, we sample a single raster cell from each debris flow initiation zone within an inventory. In addition, as suggested by previous work using the "rare events logistic regression" approach, we take a sample of the remaining "non-event" raster cells. The recommendations given in the literature on the size of this sample appear to be motivated by practical considerations, e.g. the time and cost of acquiring data for non-event cases, which do not apply to the case of spatial data. In our study, we aim at finding empirically an "optimal" sample size in order to avoid two problems: First, a sample too large will violate the independent sample assumption as the independent variables are spatially autocorrelated; hence, a variogram analysis leads to a sample size threshold above which the average distance between sampled cells falls below the autocorrelation range of the independent variables. Second, if the sample is too small, repeated sampling will lead to very different results, i.e. the independent variables and hence the result of a single model calculation will be extremely dependent on the choice of non-event cells. Using a Monte-Carlo analysis with stepwise logistic regression, 1000 models are calculated for a wide range of sample sizes. For each sample size

  17. Modeling particle size distributions by the Weibull distribution function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhigang (Rogers Tool Works, Rogers, AR (United States)); Patterson, B.R.; Turner, M.E. Jr (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States))

    1993-10-01

    A method is proposed for modeling two- and three-dimensional particle size distributions using the Weibull distribution function. Experimental results show that, for tungsten particles in liquid phase sintered W-14Ni-6Fe, the experimental cumulative section size distributions were well fit by the Weibull probability function, which can also be used to compute the corresponding relative frequency distributions. Modeling the two-dimensional section size distributions facilitates the use of the Saltykov or other methods for unfolding three-dimensional (3-D) size distributions with minimal irregularities. Fitting the unfolded cumulative 3-D particle size distribution with the Weibull function enables computation of the statistical distribution parameters from the parameters of the fit Weibull function.

  18. Size-specific sensitivity: Applying a new structured population model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterling, M.R.; Ellner, S.P.; Dixon, P.M.

    2000-03-01

    Matrix population models require the population to be divided into discrete stage classes. In many cases, especially when classes are defined by a continuous variable, such as length or mass, there are no natural breakpoints, and the division is artificial. The authors introduce the integral projection model, which eliminates the need for division into discrete classes, without requiring any additional biological assumptions. Like a traditional matrix model, the integral projection model provides estimates of the asymptotic growth rate, stable size distribution, reproductive values, and sensitivities of the growth rate to changes in vital rates. However, where the matrix model represents the size distributions, reproductive value, and sensitivities as step functions (constant within a stage class), the integral projection model yields smooth curves for each of these as a function of individual size. The authors describe a method for fitting the model to data, and they apply this method to data on an endangered plant species, northern monkshood (Aconitum noveboracense), with individuals classified by stem diameter. The matrix and integral models yield similar estimates of the asymptotic growth rate, but the reproductive values and sensitivities in the matrix model are sensitive to the choice of stage classes. The integral projection model avoids this problem and yields size-specific sensitivities that are not affected by stage duration. These general properties of the integral projection model will make it advantageous for other populations where there is no natural division of individuals into stage classes.

  19. Holonic Business Process Modeling in Small to Medium Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Budi Mulyono

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Holonic modeling analysis which is the application of system thinking in design, manage, and improvement, is used in a novel context for business process modeling. An approach and techniques of holon and holarchies is presented specifically for small and medium sized enterprise process modeling development. The fitness of the approach is compared with well known reductionist or task breakdown approach. The strength and weaknesses of the holonic modeling is discussed with illustrating case example in term of its suitability for an Indonesia’s small and medium sized industry. The novel ideas in this paper have great impact on the way analyst should perceive business process. Future research is applying the approach in supply chain context.Key words: Business process, holonic modeling, operations management, small to medium sized enterprise

  20. Holonic Business Process Modeling in Small to Medium Sized Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Nur Budi Mulyono; Tezar Yuliansyah Saputra; Nur Arief Rahmatsyah

    2012-01-01

    Holonic modeling analysis which is the application of system thinking in design, manage, and improvement, is used in a novel context for business process modeling. An approach and techniques of holon and holarchies is presented specifically for small and medium sized enterprise process modeling development. The fitness of the approach is compared with well known reductionist or task breakdown approach. The strength and weaknesses of the holonic modeling is discussed with illustrating case exa...

  1. Response Surface Modelling of Electrosprayed Polyacrylonitrile Nanoparticle Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Khademolqorani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospraying (electrohydrodynamic spraying is a method of liquid atomization by electrical forces. Spraying solutions or suspensions allow production of fine particles, down to nanometer size. These particles are interesting for a wide variety of applications, thanks to their unprecedented chemical and physical behaviour in comparison to their bulk form. Knowledge of the particle size in powders is important in many studies employing nanoparticles. In this paper, the effect of some process parameters on the size of electrosprayed polyacrylonitrile particles is presented in the form of response surface model. The model is achieved by employing a factorial design to evaluate the influence of parameters on the polyacrylonitrile nanoparticle size and response surface methodology. Four electrospraying parameters, namely, applied voltage, electrospraying solution concentration, flow rate, and syringe needle diameter were considered.

  2. Constraints on secondary 10-100 EeV gamma ray flux in the minimal bottom-up model of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashev, O; Semikoz, Dmitry V

    2007-01-01

    In a recently proposed model the cosmic rays spectrum at energies above EeV can be fitted with a minimal number of unknown parameters assuming that the extragalactic cosmic rays are only protons with a power law source spectrum. Within this minimal model, after fitting the observed HiRes spectrum with four parameters (proton injection spectrum power law index, maximum energy, minimum distance to sources and evolution parameter) we compute the flux of ultra-high energy photons due to photon-pion production and e+e- pair production by protons for several radio background models and a range of average extragalactic magnetic fields.

  3. Exploring Explanations of Subglacial Bedform Sizes Using Statistical Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Hillier

    Full Text Available Sediments beneath modern ice sheets exert a key control on their flow, but are largely inaccessible except through geophysics or boreholes. In contrast, palaeo-ice sheet beds are accessible, and typically characterised by numerous bedforms. However, the interaction between bedforms and ice flow is poorly constrained and it is not clear how bedform sizes might reflect ice flow conditions. To better understand this link we present a first exploration of a variety of statistical models to explain the size distribution of some common subglacial bedforms (i.e., drumlins, ribbed moraine, MSGL. By considering a range of models, constructed to reflect key aspects of the physical processes, it is possible to infer that the size distributions are most effectively explained when the dynamics of ice-water-sediment interaction associated with bedform growth is fundamentally random. A 'stochastic instability' (SI model, which integrates random bedform growth and shrinking through time with exponential growth, is preferred and is consistent with other observations of palaeo-bedforms and geophysical surveys of active ice sheets. Furthermore, we give a proof-of-concept demonstration that our statistical approach can bridge the gap between geomorphological observations and physical models, directly linking measurable size-frequency parameters to properties of ice sheet flow (e.g., ice velocity. Moreover, statistically developing existing models as proposed allows quantitative predictions to be made about sizes, making the models testable; a first illustration of this is given for a hypothesised repeat geophysical survey of bedforms under active ice. Thus, we further demonstrate the potential of size-frequency distributions of subglacial bedforms to assist the elucidation of subglacial processes and better constrain ice sheet models.

  4. Modeling size effect in the SMA response: a gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabesh, Majid; Boyd, James G.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) show size effect in their response. The critical stresses, for instance, for the start of martensite and austenite transformations are reported to increase in some SMA wires for diameters below 100 μm. Simulation of such a behavior cannot be achieved using conventional theories that lack an intrinsic length scale in their constitutive modeling. To enable the size effect, a thermodynamically consistent constitutive model is developed, that in addition to conventional internal variables of martensitic volume fraction and transformation strain, contains the spatial gradient of martensitic volume fraction as an internal variable. The developed theory is simplified for 1D cases and analytical solutions for pure bending of SMA beams are presented. The gradient model captures the size effect in the response of the studied SMA structures.

  5. Cuffed Endotracheal Tube Size and Leakage in Pediatric Tracheal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hyun Kim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Object: Cuffed endotracheal tubes are increasingly used in pediatric patients in the hope that they can reduce air leakage and tube size mismatch by just inflating the cuff. Authors compared influence of various tube sizes and different levels of cuff pressures to air leakage around the cuff, in artificial tracheal models. Methods: Six PVC cylinders of different internal diameters (ID: 8.15, 8.50, 9.70, 12.05, 14.50, and 20.00 mm were prepared. An artificial lung connected with cylinder was ventilated with an anesthesia machine. Cuffed endotracheal tubes of different sizes (ID 3.0~8.0 were located in the cylinders and the cuff was inflated with various pressures (15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 cm H2O. Expiratory tidal volume was measured with more than 25% loss of baseline expiratory tidal volume was considered significant air leakage. Results: Tube sizes same as, or larger than ID 5.0 didn’t show significant air leakage for any trachea model, only if the inflated cuff size is larger than the cylinder ID, except ID 5.5 tube at cuff pressure 15 cm H2O and 20 cm H2O, in 12.05 mm cylinder. Tubes sizes same as or smaller than ID 4.5, which have short cuff lengths and sizes than tubes larger than, or same as ID 5.0, leaked significantly at any tracheal models, except ID 4.5 tube at cuff pressure 35 cm H2O, in 8.50 mm cylinder. Conclusion: In PVC pediatric tracheal models, tubes same as, or smaller than ID 4.5 are inferior to tubes same as, or larger than ID 5.0 in preventing air leakage, and may need a higher cuff pressure to reduce air leakage. Further clinical studies could be designed based on our results.

  6. Assumptions behind size-based ecosystem models are realistic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Blanchard, Julia L.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.;

    2016-01-01

    A recent publication about balanced harvesting (Froese et al., ICES Journal of Marine Science; doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsv122) contains several erroneous statements about size-spectrum models. We refute the statements by showing that the assumptions pertaining to size-spectrum models discussed...... by Froese et al. are realistic and consistent. We further show that the assumption about density-dependence being described by a stock recruitment relationship is responsible for determining whether a peak in the cohort biomass of a population occurs late or early in life. Finally, we argue...

  7. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Scott [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  8. Finite size scaling in the planar Lebwohl-Lasher model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Enakshi; Roy, Soumen Kumar

    2003-06-01

    The standard finite size scaling method for second order phase transition has been applied to Monte Carlo data obtained for a planar Lebwohl-Lasher lattice model using the Wolff cluster algorithm. We obtain Tc and the exponents γ, ν, and z and the results are different from those obtained by other investigators.

  9. A Dynamic Lot-Sizing Model with Demand Time Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Y. Lee (Chung-Yee); S. Çetinkaya; A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOne of the basic assumptions of the classical dynamic lot-sizing model is that the aggregate demand of a given period must be satisfied in that period. Under this assumption, if backlogging is not allowed then the demand of a given period cannot be delivered earlier or later than the

  10. A dynamic lot-sizing model with demand time windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Y. Lee (Chung-Yee); S. Cetinkaya; A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOne of the basic assumptions of the classical dynamic lot-sizing model is that the aggregate demand of a given period must be satisfied in that period. Under this assumption, if backlogging is not allowed then the demand of a given period cannot be delivered earlier or later than the

  11. Resilience and Critical Stock Size in a Stochastic Recruitment Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Huiskes, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    A stochastic model for fish recruitment is fitted to data after performing an age-structured stock assessment. The main aim is to investigate the relation between safe levels of spawning stock size and fish stock resilience. Resilience indicators, such as stock recovery time and the frequency that a

  12. A dynamic lot-sizing model with demand time windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Y. Lee (Chung-Yee); S. Cetinkaya; A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOne of the basic assumptions of the classical dynamic lot-sizing model is that the aggregate demand of a given period must be satisfied in that period. Under this assumption, if backlogging is not allowed then the demand of a given period cannot be delivered earlier or later than the pe

  13. A Dynamic Lot-Sizing Model with Demand Time Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Y. Lee (Chung-Yee); S. Çetinkaya; A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractOne of the basic assumptions of the classical dynamic lot-sizing model is that the aggregate demand of a given period must be satisfied in that period. Under this assumption, if backlogging is not allowed then the demand of a given period cannot be delivered earlier or later than the per

  14. Parabolic Free Boundary Price Formation Models Under Market Size Fluctuations

    KAUST Repository

    Markowich, Peter A.

    2016-10-04

    In this paper we propose an extension of the Lasry-Lions price formation model which includes uctuations of the numbers of buyers and vendors. We analyze the model in the case of deterministic and stochastic market size uctuations and present results on the long time asymptotic behavior and numerical evidence and conjectures on periodic, almost periodic, and stochastic uctuations. The numerical simulations extend the theoretical statements and give further insights into price formation dynamics.

  15. Cascades in the Threshold Model for varying system sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis; Sreenivasan, Sameet; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Korniss, Gyorgy

    2015-03-01

    A classical model in opinion dynamics is the Threshold Model (TM) aiming to model the spread of a new opinion based on the social drive of peer pressure. Under the TM a node adopts a new opinion only when the fraction of its first neighbors possessing that opinion exceeds a pre-assigned threshold. Cascades in the TM depend on multiple parameters, such as the number and selection strategy of the initially active nodes (initiators), and the threshold distribution of the nodes. For a uniform threshold in the network there is a critical fraction of initiators for which a transition from small to large cascades occurs, which for ER graphs is largerly independent of the system size. Here, we study the spread contribution of each newly assigned initiator under the TM for different initiator selection strategies for synthetic graphs of various sizes. We observe that for ER graphs when large cascades occur, the spread contribution of the added initiator on the transition point is independent of the system size, while the contribution of the rest of the initiators converges to zero at infinite system size. This property is used for the identification of large transitions for various threshold distributions. Supported in part by ARL NS-CTA, ARO, ONR, and DARPA.

  16. Modeling of Microporosity Size Distribution in Aluminum Alloy A356

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Cockcroft, Steve; Zhu, Jindong; Reilly, Carl

    2011-12-01

    Porosity is one of the most common defects to degrade the mechanical properties of aluminum alloys. Prediction of pore size, therefore, is critical to optimize the quality of castings. Moreover, to the design engineer, knowledge of the inherent pore population in a casting is essential to avoid potential fatigue failure of the component. In this work, the size distribution of the porosity was modeled based on the assumptions that the hydrogen pores are nucleated heterogeneously and that the nucleation site distribution is a Gaussian function of hydrogen supersaturation in the melt. The pore growth is simulated as a hydrogen-diffusion-controlled process, which is driven by the hydrogen concentration gradient at the pore liquid interface. Directionally solidified A356 (Al-7Si-0.3Mg) alloy castings were used to evaluate the predictive capability of the proposed model. The cast pore volume fraction and size distributions were measured using X-ray microtomography (XMT). Comparison of the experimental and simulation results showed that good agreement could be obtained in terms of both porosity fraction and size distribution. The model can effectively evaluate the effect of hydrogen content, heterogeneous pore nucleation population, cooling conditions, and degassing time on microporosity formation.

  17. Investigation of FE model size definition for surface coating application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhong; Zhuang, Weimin; Wang, Shiwen; Lin, Jianguo; Balint, Daniel; Shan, Debin

    2012-09-01

    An efficient prediction mechanical performance of coating structures has been a constant concern since the dawn of surface engineering. However, predictive models presented by initial research are normally based on traditional solid mechanics, and thus cannot predict coating performance accurately. Also, the high computational costs that originate from the exclusive structure of surface coating systems (a big difference in the order of coating and substrate) are not well addressed by these models. To fill the needs for accurate prediction and low computational costs, a multi-axial continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based constitutive model is introduced for the investigation of the load bearing capacity and fracture properties of coatings. Material parameters within the proposed constitutive model are determined for a typical coating (TiN) and substrate (Cu) system. An efficient numerical subroutine is developed to implement the determined constitutive model into the commercial FE solver, ABAQUS, through the user-defined subroutine, VUMAT. By changing the geometrical sizes of FE models, a series of computations are carried out to investigate (1) loading features, (2) stress distributions, and (3) failure features of the coating system. The results show that there is a critical displacement corresponding to each FE model size, and only if the applied normal loading displacement is smaller than the critical displacement, a reasonable prediction can be achieved. Finally, a 3D map of the critical displacement is generated to provide guidance for users to determine an FE model with suitable geometrical size for surface coating simulations. This paper presents an effective modelling approach for the prediction of mechanical performance of surface coatings.

  18. Size reduction techniques for vital compliant VHDL simulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Marvin J.; Misra, Ashutosh

    2006-08-01

    A method and system select delay values from a VHDL standard delay file that correspond to an instance of a logic gate in a logic model. Then the system collects all the delay values of the selected instance and builds super generics for the rise-time and the fall-time of the selected instance. Then, the system repeats this process for every delay value in the standard delay file (310) that correspond to every instance of every logic gate in the logic model. The system then outputs a reduced size standard delay file (314) containing the super generics for every instance of every logic gate in the logic model.

  19. Coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group-Size Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2017-04-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no H-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant regime is reached in which all equilibria are determined by a single scaling profile. This universal profile exhibits power-law behavior crossing over from exponent -2/3 for small size to -3/2 for large size, with an exponential cutoff.

  20. Coagulation-Fragmentation Model for Animal Group-Size Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degond, Pierre; Liu, Jian-Guo; Pego, Robert L.

    2016-10-01

    We study coagulation-fragmentation equations inspired by a simple model proposed in fisheries science to explain data for the size distribution of schools of pelagic fish. Although the equations lack detailed balance and admit no H-theorem, we are able to develop a rather complete description of equilibrium profiles and large-time behavior, based on recent developments in complex function theory for Bernstein and Pick functions. In the large-population continuum limit, a scaling-invariant regime is reached in which all equilibria are determined by a single scaling profile. This universal profile exhibits power-law behavior crossing over from exponent -2/3 for small size to -3/2 for large size, with an exponential cutoff.

  1. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  2. EMPIRICAL MODEL FOR HYDROCYCLONES CORRECTED CUT SIZE CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Carlos Silva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrocyclones are devices worldwide used in mineral processing for desliming, classification, selective classification, thickening and pre-concentration. A hydrocyclone is composed by one cylindrical and one conical section joint together, without any moving parts and it is capable of perform granular material separation in pulp. The mineral particles separation mechanism acting in a hydrocyclone is complex and its mathematical modelling is usually empirical. The most used model for hydrocyclone corrected cut size is proposed by Plitt. Over the years many revisions and corrections to Plitt´s model were proposed. The present paper shows a modification in the Plitt´s model constant, obtained by exponential regression of simulated data for three different hydrocyclones geometry: Rietema, Bradley and Krebs. To validate the proposed model literature data obtained from phosphate ore using fifteen different hydrocyclones geometry are used. The proposed model shows a correlation equals to 88.2% between experimental and calculated corrected cut size, while the correlation obtained using Plitt´s model is 11.5%.

  3. Raindrop size distribution: Fitting performance of common theoretical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adirosi, E.; Volpi, E.; Lombardo, F.; Baldini, L.

    2016-10-01

    Modelling raindrop size distribution (DSD) is a fundamental issue to connect remote sensing observations with reliable precipitation products for hydrological applications. To date, various standard probability distributions have been proposed to build DSD models. Relevant questions to ask indeed are how often and how good such models fit empirical data, given that the advances in both data availability and technology used to estimate DSDs have allowed many of the deficiencies of early analyses to be mitigated. Therefore, we present a comprehensive follow-up of a previous study on the comparison of statistical fitting of three common DSD models against 2D-Video Distrometer (2DVD) data, which are unique in that the size of individual drops is determined accurately. By maximum likelihood method, we fit models based on lognormal, gamma and Weibull distributions to more than 42.000 1-minute drop-by-drop data taken from the field campaigns of the NASA Ground Validation program of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. In order to check the adequacy between the models and the measured data, we investigate the goodness of fit of each distribution using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Then, we apply a specific model selection technique to evaluate the relative quality of each model. Results show that the gamma distribution has the lowest KS rejection rate, while the Weibull distribution is the most frequently rejected. Ranking for each minute the statistical models that pass the KS test, it can be argued that the probability distributions whose tails are exponentially bounded, i.e. light-tailed distributions, seem to be adequate to model the natural variability of DSDs. However, in line with our previous study, we also found that frequency distributions of empirical DSDs could be heavy-tailed in a number of cases, which may result in severe uncertainty in estimating statistical moments and bulk variables.

  4. Ports: Definition and study of types, sizes and business models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Roa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In the world today there are thousands of port facilities of different types and sizes, competing to capture some market share of freight by sea, mainly. This article aims to determine the type of port and the most common size, in order to find out which business model is applied in that segment and what is the legal status of the companies of such infrastructure.Design/methodology/approach: To achieve this goal, we develop a research on a representative sample of 800 ports worldwide, which manage 90% of the containerized port loading. Then you can find out the legal status of the companies that manage them.Findings: The results indicate a port type and a dominant size, which are mostly managed by companies subject to a concession model.Research limitations/implications: In this research, we study only those ports that handle freight (basically containerized, ignoring other activities such as fishing, military, tourism or recreational.Originality/value: This is an investigation to show that the vast majority of the studied segment port facilities are governed by a similar corporate model and subject to pressure from the markets, which increasingly demand efficiency and service. Consequently, we tend to concession terminals to private operators in a process that might be called privatization, but in the strictest sense of the term, is not entirely realistic because the ownership of the land never ceases to be public

  5. A Maximum Entropy Modelling of the Rain Drop Size Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Tapiador

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a maximum entropy approach to Rain Drop Size Distribution (RDSD modelling. It is shown that this approach allows (1 to use a physically consistent rationale to select a particular probability density function (pdf (2 to provide an alternative method for parameter estimation based on expectations of the population instead of sample moments and (3 to develop a progressive method of modelling by updating the pdf as new empirical information becomes available. The method is illustrated with both synthetic and real RDSD data, the latest coming from a laser disdrometer network specifically designed to measure the spatial variability of the RDSD.

  6. Building predictive models of soil particle-size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to build predictive models (PMs of soil particle-size distribution (psd in a region with complex geology and a young and unstable land-surface? The main objective of this study was to answer this question. A set of 339 soil samples from a small slope catchment in Southern Brazil was used to build PMs of psd in the surface soil layer. Multiple linear regression models were constructed using terrain attributes (elevation, slope, catchment area, convergence index, and topographic wetness index. The PMs explained more than half of the data variance. This performance is similar to (or even better than that of the conventional soil mapping approach. For some size fractions, the PM performance can reach 70 %. Largest uncertainties were observed in geologically more complex areas. Therefore, significant improvements in the predictions can only be achieved if accurate geological data is made available. Meanwhile, PMs built on terrain attributes are efficient in predicting the particle-size distribution (psd of soils in regions of complex geology.

  7. Modeling the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Kausch

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregates are mm- to cm-sized microporous structures separated by macropores. Whereas fast advective transport prevails in macropores, advection is inhibited by the low permeability of intra-aggregate micropores. This can lead to mass transfer limitations and the formation of aggregate-scale concentration gradients affecting the distribution and transport of redox sensitive elements. Selenium (Se mobilized through irrigation of seleniferous soils has emerged as a major aquatic contaminant. In the absence of oxygen, the bioavailable oxyanions selenate, Se(VI, and selenite, Se(IV, can be microbially reduced to solid, elemental Se, Se(0, and anoxic microzones within soil aggregates are thought to promote this process in otherwise well aerated soils.

    To evaluate the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium retention, we developed a dynamic 2-D reactive transport model of selenium cycling in a single idealized aggregate surrounded by a macropore. The model was developed based on flow-through-reactor experiments involving artificial soil aggregates (diameter: 2.5 cm made of sand and containing Enterobacter cloacae SLD1a-1 that reduces Se(VI via Se(IV to Se(0. Aggregates were surrounded by a constant flow providing Se(VI and pyruvate under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the model, reactions were implemented with double-Monod rate equations coupled to the transport of pyruvate, O2, and Se-species. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the model were validated with data from experiments and predictive simulations were performed covering aggregate sizes between 1 and 2.5 cm diameter.

    Simulations predict that selenium retention scales with aggregate size. Depending on O2, Se(VI, and pyruvate concentrations, selenium retention was 4–23 times higher in 2.5-cm-aggregates compared to 1-cm-aggregates. Under oxic conditions, aggregate size and pyruvate-concentrations were found to have a positive synergistic

  8. Modeling the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausch, M. F.; Pallud, C. E.

    2013-03-01

    Soil aggregates are mm- to cm-sized microporous structures separated by macropores. Whereas fast advective transport prevails in macropores, advection is inhibited by the low permeability of intra-aggregate micropores. This can lead to mass transfer limitations and the formation of aggregate scale concentration gradients affecting the distribution and transport of redox sensitive elements. Selenium (Se) mobilized through irrigation of seleniferous soils has emerged as a major aquatic contaminant. In the absence of oxygen, the bioavailable oxyanions selenate, Se(VI), and selenite, Se(IV), can be microbially reduced to solid, elemental Se, Se(0), and anoxic microzones within soil aggregates are thought to promote this process in otherwise well-aerated soils. To evaluate the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium retention, we developed a dynamic 2-D reactive transport model of selenium cycling in a single idealized aggregate surrounded by a macropore. The model was developed based on flow-through-reactor experiments involving artificial soil aggregates (diameter: 2.5 cm) made of sand and containing Enterobacter cloacae SLD1a-1 that reduces Se(VI) via Se(IV) to Se(0). Aggregates were surrounded by a constant flow providing Se(VI) and pyruvate under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the model, reactions were implemented with double-Monod rate equations coupled to the transport of pyruvate, O2, and Se species. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the model were validated with data from experiments, and predictive simulations were performed covering aggregate sizes 1-2.5 cm in diameter. Simulations predict that selenium retention scales with aggregate size. Depending on O2, Se(VI), and pyruvate concentrations, selenium retention was 4-23 times higher in 2.5 cm aggregates compared to 1 cm aggregates. Under oxic conditions, aggregate size and pyruvate concentrations were found to have a positive synergistic effect on selenium retention. Promoting soil aggregation on

  9. Modeling the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Kausch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregates are mm- to cm-sized microporous structures separated by macropores. Whereas fast advective transport prevails in macropores, advection is inhibited by the low permeability of intra-aggregate micropores. This can lead to mass transfer limitations and the formation of aggregate scale concentration gradients affecting the distribution and transport of redox sensitive elements. Selenium (Se mobilized through irrigation of seleniferous soils has emerged as a major aquatic contaminant. In the absence of oxygen, the bioavailable oxyanions selenate, Se(VI, and selenite, Se(IV, can be microbially reduced to solid, elemental Se, Se(0, and anoxic microzones within soil aggregates are thought to promote this process in otherwise well-aerated soils. To evaluate the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium retention, we developed a dynamic 2-D reactive transport model of selenium cycling in a single idealized aggregate surrounded by a macropore. The model was developed based on flow-through-reactor experiments involving artificial soil aggregates (diameter: 2.5 cm made of sand and containing Enterobacter cloacae SLD1a-1 that reduces Se(VI via Se(IV to Se(0. Aggregates were surrounded by a constant flow providing Se(VI and pyruvate under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the model, reactions were implemented with double-Monod rate equations coupled to the transport of pyruvate, O2, and Se species. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the model were validated with data from experiments, and predictive simulations were performed covering aggregate sizes 1–2.5 cm in diameter. Simulations predict that selenium retention scales with aggregate size. Depending on O2, Se(VI, and pyruvate concentrations, selenium retention was 4–23 times higher in 2.5 cm aggregates compared to 1 cm aggregates. Under oxic conditions, aggregate size and pyruvate concentrations were found to have a positive synergistic effect on selenium retention. Promoting soil

  10. Ultrastructural model for size selectivity in glomerular filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, A; Daniels, B S; Deen, W M

    1999-06-01

    A theoretical model was developed to relate the size selectivity of the glomerular barrier to the structural characteristics of the individual layers of the capillary wall. Thicknesses and other linear dimensions were evaluated, where possible, from previous electron microscopic studies. The glomerular basement membrane (GBM) was represented as a homogeneous material characterized by a Darcy permeability and by size-dependent hindrance coefficients for diffusion and convection, respectively; those coefficients were estimated from recent data obtained with isolated rat GBM. The filtration slit diaphragm was modeled as a single row of cylindrical fibers of equal radius but nonuniform spacing. The resistances of the remainder of the slit channel, and of the endothelial fenestrae, to macromolecule movement were calculated to be negligible. The slit diaphragm was found to be the most restrictive part of the barrier. Because of that, macromolecule concentrations in the GBM increased, rather than decreased, in the direction of flow. Thus the overall sieving coefficient (ratio of Bowman's space concentration to that in plasma) was predicted to be larger for the intact capillary wall than for a hypothetical structure with no GBM. In other words, because the slit diaphragm and GBM do not act independently, the overall sieving coefficient is not simply the product of those for GBM alone and the slit diaphragm alone. Whereas the calculated sieving coefficients were sensitive to the structural features of the slit diaphragm and to the GBM hindrance coefficients, variations in GBM thickness or filtration slit frequency were predicted to have little effect. The ability of the ultrastructural model to represent fractional clearance data in vivo was at least equal to that of conventional pore models with the same number of adjustable parameters. The main strength of the present approach, however, is that it provides a framework for relating structural findings to the size

  11. Statistical traffic modeling of MPEG frame size: Experiments and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haniph A. Latchman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available For guaranteed quality of service (QoS and sufficient bandwidth in a communication network which provides an integrated multimedia service, it is important to obtain an analytical and tractable model of the compressed MPEG data. This paper presents a statistical approach to a group of picture (GOP MPEG frame size model to increase network traffic performance in a communication network. We extract MPEG frame data from commercial DVD movies and make probability histograms to analyze the statistical characteristics of MPEG frame data. Six candidates of probability distributions are considered here and their parameters are obtained from the empirical data using the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE. This paper shows that the lognormal distribution is the best fitting model of MPEG-2 total frame data.

  12. The economic production lot size model with several production rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    should be chosen in the interval between the demand rate and the production rate, which minimize unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed form solutions for the optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost. Finally we......We study an extension of the economic production lot size model, where more than one production rate can be used during a cycle. The production rates and their corresponding runtimes are decision variables. We decompose the problem into two subproblems. First, we show that all production rates...

  13. Ion size effect on colloidal forces within the primitive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.Wu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ion size on the mean force between a pair of isolated charged particles in an electrolyte solution is investigated using Monte Carlo simulations within the framework of the primitive model where both colloidal particles and small ions are represented by charged hard spheres and the solvent is treated as a dielectric continuum. It is found that the short-ranged attraction between like-charged macroions diminishes as the diameter of the intermediating divalent counterions and coions increases and the maximum attractive force is approximately a linear function of the counterion diameter. This size effect contradicts the prediction of the Asakura-Oosawa theory suggesting that an increase in the excluded volume of small ions would lead to a stronger depletion between colloidal particles. Interestingly, the simulation results indicate that both the hard-sphere collision and the electrostatic contributions to the mean force are insensitive to the size disparity of colloidal particles with the same average diameter.

  14. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C

    2014-10-07

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  15. Modeling photoacoustic spectral features of micron-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-10-01

    The photoacoustic signal generated from particles when irradiated by light is determined by attributes of the particle such as the size, speed of sound, morphology and the optical absorption coefficient. Unique features such as periodically varying minima and maxima are observed throughout the photoacoustic signal power spectrum, where the periodicity depends on these physical attributes. The frequency content of the photoacoustic signals can be used to obtain the physical attributes of unknown particles by comparison to analytical solutions of homogeneous symmetric geometric structures, such as spheres. However, analytical solutions do not exist for irregularly shaped particles, inhomogeneous particles or particles near structures. A finite element model (FEM) was used to simulate photoacoustic wave propagation from four different particle configurations: a homogeneous particle suspended in water, a homogeneous particle on a reflecting boundary, an inhomogeneous particle with an absorbing shell and non-absorbing core, and an irregularly shaped particle such as a red blood cell. Biocompatible perfluorocarbon droplets, 3-5 μm in diameter containing optically absorbing nanoparticles were used as the representative ideal particles, as they are spherical, homogeneous, optically translucent, and have known physical properties. The photoacoustic spectrum of micron-sized single droplets in suspension and on a reflecting boundary were measured over the frequency range of 100-500 MHz and compared directly to analytical models and the FEM. Good agreement between the analytical model, FEM and measured values were observed for a droplet in suspension, where the spectral minima agreed to within a 3.3 MHz standard deviation. For a droplet on a reflecting boundary, spectral features were correctly reproduced using the FEM but not the analytical model. The photoacoustic spectra from other common particle configurations such as particle with an absorbing shell and a

  16. A mathematical model to predict the size of the pellets formed in freeze pelletization techniques: parameters affecting pellet size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheboyina, Sreekhar; O'Haver, John; Wyandt, Christy M

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed based on the theory of drop formation to predict the size of the pellets formed in the freeze pelletization process. Further the model was validated by studying the effect of various parameters on the pellet size such as viscosity of the pellet forming and column liquids, surface/interfacial tension, density difference between pellet forming and column liquids; size, shape, and material of construction of the needle tips and temperatures maintained in the columns. In this study, pellets were prepared from different matrices including polyethylene glycols and waxes. The column liquids studied were silicone oils and aqueous glycerol solutions. The surface/interfacial tension, density difference between pellet forming and column liquids and needle tip size were found to be the most important factors affecting pellet size. The viscosity of the column liquid was not found to significantly affect the size of the pellets. The size of the pellets was also not affected by the pellet forming liquids of low viscosities. An increase in the initial column temperature slightly decreased the pellet size. The mathematical model developed was found to successfully predict the size of the pellets with an average error of 3.32% for different matrices that were studied.

  17. Queuing theory models used for port equipment sizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragu, V.; Dinu, O.; Ruscă, A.; Burciu, Ş.; Roman, E. A.

    2017-08-01

    The significant growth of volumes and distances on road transportation led to the necessity of finding solutions to increase water transportation market share together with the handling and transfer technologies within its terminals. It is widely known that the biggest times are consumed within the transport terminals (loading/unloading/transfer) and so the necessity of constantly developing handling techniques and technologies in concordance with the goods flows size so that the total waiting time of ships within ports is reduced. Port development should be achieved by harmonizing the contradictory interests of port administration and users. Port administrators aim profit increase opposite to users that want savings by increasing consumers’ surplus. The difficulty consists in the fact that the transport demand - supply equilibrium must be realised at costs and goods quantities transiting the port in order to satisfy the interests of both parties involved. This paper presents a port equipment sizing model by using queueing theory so that the sum of costs for ships waiting operations and equipment usage would be minimum. Ship operation within the port is assimilated to a mass service waiting system in which parameters are later used to determine the main costs for ships and port equipment.

  18. Numerical modelling of riverbed grain size stratigraphic evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng HU; Zhi-xian CAO; Gareth PENDER; Huai-han LIU

    2014-01-01

    For several decades, quantification of riverbed grain size stratigraphic evolution has been based upon the active layer formulation (ALF), which unfortunately involves considerable uncertainty. While it is the sediment exchange across the bed surface that directly affects the riverbed stratigraphy, it has been assumed in the ALF that the sediment fraction at the lower interface of the active layer is a linear function of the sediment fraction in the flow. Here it is proposed that the sediment fraction of the sediment exchange flux is used directly in estimating the sediment fraction at the lower surface of the active layer. Together with the size-specific mass conservation for riverbed sediment, the modified approach is referred to as the surface-based formulation (SBF). When incorporated into a coupled non-capacity modelling framework for fluvial processes, the SBF leads to results that agree as well or better than those using ALF with laboratory and field observations. This is illustrated for typical cases featuring bed aggradation and degradation due to graded bed-load sediment transport. Systematic experiments on graded sediment transport by unsteady flows are warranted for further testing the modified formulation.

  19. SIMPLIFIED MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF SMALL SIZED UNMANNED AIRCRAFT VEHICLE LAYOUT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong reduction of new aircraft design period using new technology based on artificial intelligence is the key problem mentioned in forecasts of leading aerospace industry research centers. This article covers the approach to devel- opment of quick aerodynamic design methods based on artificial intelligence neural system. The problem is being solved for the classical scheme of small sized unmanned aircraft vehicle (UAV. The principal parts of the method are the mathe- matical model of layout, layout generator of this type of aircraft is built on aircraft neural networks, automatic selection module for cleaning variety of layouts generated in automatic mode, robust direct computational fluid dynamics method, aerodynamic characteristics approximators on artificial neural networks.Methods based on artificial neural networks have intermediate position between computational fluid dynamics methods or experiments and simplified engineering approaches. The use of ANN for estimating aerodynamic characteris-tics put limitations on input data. For this task the layout must be presented as a vector with dimension not exceeding sev-eral hundred. Vector components must include all main parameters conventionally used for layouts description and com- pletely replicate the most important aerodynamics and structural properties.The first stage of the work is presented in the paper. Simplified mathematical model of small sized UAV was developed. To estimate the range of geometrical parameters of layouts the review of existing vehicle was done. The result of the work is the algorithm and computer software for generating the layouts based on ANN technolo-gy. 10000 samples were generated and the dataset containig geometrical and aerodynamic characteristics of layoutwas created.

  20. Effects of Sample Size, Estimation Methods, and Model Specification on Structural Equation Modeling Fit Indexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xitao; Wang, Lin; Thompson, Bruce

    1999-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation study investigated the effects on 10 structural equation modeling fit indexes of sample size, estimation method, and model specification. Some fit indexes did not appear to be comparable, and it was apparent that estimation method strongly influenced almost all fit indexes examined, especially for misspecified models. (SLD)

  1. Modeling the Effects of Beam Size and Flaw Morphology on Ultrasonic Pulse/Echo Sizing of Delaminations in Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetan, Frank J.; Leckey, Cara A.; Barnard, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The size and shape of a delamination in a multi-layered structure can be estimated in various ways from an ultrasonic pulse/echo image. For example the -6dB contours of measured response provide one simple estimate of the boundary. More sophisticated approaches can be imagined where one adjusts the proposed boundary to bring measured and predicted UT images into optimal agreement. Such approaches require suitable models of the inspection process. In this paper we explore issues pertaining to model-based size estimation for delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced laminates. In particular we consider the influence on sizing when the delamination is non-planar or partially transmitting in certain regions. Two models for predicting broadband sonic time-domain responses are considered: (1) a fast "simple" model using paraxial beam expansions and Kirchhoff and phase-screen approximations; and (2) the more exact (but computationally intensive) 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT). Model-to-model and model-to experiment comparisons are made for delaminations in uniaxial composite plates, and the simple model is then used to critique the -6dB rule for delamination sizing.

  2. mizer: an R package for multispecies, trait-based and community size spectrum ecological modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Finlay; Blanchard, Julia L.; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2014-01-01

    1. Size spectrum ecological models are representations of a community of individuals which grow and change trophic level. A key emergent feature of these models is the size spectrum; the total abundance of all individuals that scales negatively with size. The models we focus on are designed...

  3. IBAR: Interacting boson model calculations for large system sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casperson, R. J.

    2012-04-01

    Scaling the system size of the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1) into the realm of hundreds of bosons has many interesting applications in the field of nuclear structure, most notably quantum phase transitions in nuclei. We introduce IBAR, a new software package for calculating the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the IBM-1 Hamiltonian, for large numbers of bosons. Energies and wavefunctions of the nuclear states, as well as transition strengths between them, are calculated using these values. Numerical errors in the recursive calculation of reduced matrix elements of the d-boson creation operator are reduced by using an arbitrary precision mathematical library. This software has been tested for up to 1000 bosons using comparisons to analytic expressions. Comparisons have also been made to the code PHINT for smaller system sizes. Catalogue identifier: AELI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 28 734 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 104 467 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Any computer system with a C++ compiler Operating system: Tested under Linux RAM: 150 MB for 1000 boson calculations with angular momenta of up to L=4 Classification: 17.18, 17.20 External routines: ARPACK (http://www.caam.rice.edu/software/ARPACK/) Nature of problem: Construction and diagonalization of large Hamiltonian matrices, using reduced matrix elements of the d-boson creation operator. Solution method: Reduced matrix elements of the d-boson creation operator have been stored in data files at machine precision, after being recursively calculated with higher than machine precision. The Hamiltonian matrix is calculated and diagonalized, and the requested transition strengths are calculated

  4. The Hierarchy Model of the Size Distribution of Centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1968-01-01

    textabstractWe know that human beings live in centres, that is, cities, towns and villages of different size. Both large and small centres have a number of advantages and disadvantages, different for different people and this is why we have a whole range of sizes. Statistically, we even find that th

  5. Diagnostic value of two modes of cone-beam computed tomography in evaluation of simulated external root resorption: an in vitro study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalili, Zahra; Taramsari, Mehran; Mehr, Seyed Zoheir Mousavi; Salamat, Fatemeh [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Field of view and voxel resolution of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) might affect the diagnostic capability. This study was performed to compare between the standard and HiRes zoom modes in the diagnosis of external root resorption (ERR) using CBCT. Sixty three small cavities (0.25 mm depth and 0.5 mm diameter) were simulated on the buccal, lingual, and proximal surfaces at three different levels of 16 roots of teeth. After covering the root with nail varnish, the roots were inserted in the sockets and the model was placed in a water-containing lacuna. CBCT scans were taken in both standard and HiRes zoom modes using NewTom VG (QR srl Company, Verona, Italy). Then, an observer assessed the images to determine the presence or absence of the cavities. This process was repeated by increasing the size and depth of cavities to 0.5 mm depth and 1 mm diameter. Data were analyzed by McNemar test. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood ratio in evaluation of the simulated cavities were calculated. There was a significant difference between the two imaging modes in diagnosing the shallow cavities (p=0.02). The sensitivity of the standard zoom in detecting the shallow cavities was lower than that of the HiRes zoom. The likelihood ratio of the HiRes zoom was higher in the diagnosis of both cavity types. This study suggested that a smaller voxel size in the HiRes zoom mode of CBCT is preferred for diagnosis of ERR.

  6. A grain size distribution model for non-catalytic gas-solid reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Prins, W.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1993-01-01

    A new model to describe the non-catalytic conversion of a solid by a reactant gas is proposed. This so-called grain size distribution (GSD) model presumes the porous particle to be a collection of grains of various sizes. The size distribution of the grains is derived from mercury porosimetry measur

  7. Sample Size Determination for Regression Models Using Monte Carlo Methods in R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaujean, A. Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A common question asked by researchers using regression models is, What sample size is needed for my study? While there are formulae to estimate sample sizes, their assumptions are often not met in the collected data. A more realistic approach to sample size determination requires more information such as the model of interest, strength of the…

  8. Sample Size Considerations in Prevention Research Applications of Multilevel Modeling and Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Rick H; Gottfredson, Nisha C

    2015-10-01

    When the goal of prevention research is to capture in statistical models some measure of the dynamic complexity in structures and processes implicated in problem behavior and its prevention, approaches such as multilevel modeling (MLM) and structural equation modeling (SEM) are indicated. Yet the assumptions that must be satisfied if these approaches are to be used responsibly raise concerns regarding their use in prevention research involving smaller samples. In this article, we discuss in nontechnical terms the role of sample size in MLM and SEM and present findings from the latest simulation work on the performance of each approach at sample sizes typical of prevention research. For each statistical approach, we draw from extant simulation studies to establish lower bounds for sample size (e.g., MLM can be applied with as few as ten groups comprising ten members with normally distributed data, restricted maximum likelihood estimation, and a focus on fixed effects; sample sizes as small as N = 50 can produce reliable SEM results with normally distributed data and at least three reliable indicators per factor) and suggest strategies for making the best use of the modeling approach when N is near the lower bound.

  9. The application of expanded rank-size model in Turkish urban settlements

    OpenAIRE

    Dokmeci, Vedia; Turk, Sevkiye Sence

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the structure of urban system in Turkey from 1980 to 1997 by using expanded rank-size model. The former studies related to rank-size model in Turkey have illustrated important hierarchical regularities in rank-size relationships. In these studies changes in city- size distributions over time examined noting differences in slope and intercept at the different points in time. Then, these results are interpreted to indicate growth (decline) in entire sys...

  10. Modeling size-dependent photosynthesis: light absorption and the allometric rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Z V; Irwin, A J

    2000-06-07

    Microalgal photosynthesis can be predicted using empirical allometric or mechanistic bio-optic models. These two descriptions are usually considered independently. We compare the size scaling of photosynthesis predicted by these two models. Size scaling exponents for phytoplankton often deviate from the allometric 3/4 rule. This may be because the allometric model does not account for the size dependence of light absorption and its effect on the size scaling of photosynthesis. In contrast to the allometric model and experimental data, the bio-optic model predicts photosynthesis should be independent of cell size when intracellular pigment concentrations are low or inversely related to cell diameter. A composite of the allometric and bio-optic models is described and compared to laboratory data of light-limited nutrient-saturated diatom photosynthesis. The allo-bio-optic model provides a mechanistic explanation for the anomalous size scaling found in laboratory and field studies of microalgal photosynthesis and growth.

  11. State-space size considerations for disease-progression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Eva D; Shechter, Steven M

    2013-09-30

    Markov models of disease progression are widely used to model transitions in patients' health state over time. Usually, patients' health status may be classified according to a set of ordered health states. Modelers lump together similar health states into a finite and usually small, number of health states that form the basis of a Markov chain disease-progression model. This increases the number of observations used to estimate each parameter in the transition probability matrix. However, lumping together observably distinct health states also obscures distinctions among them and may reduce the predictive power of the model. Moreover, as we demonstrate, precision in estimating the model parameters does not necessarily improve as the number of states in the model declines. This paper explores the tradeoff between lumping error introduced by grouping distinct health states and sampling error that arises when there are insufficient patient data to precisely estimate the transition probability matrix. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Modeling of particle size segregation: calibration using the discrete particle method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony; Weinhart, Thomas; Luding, Stefan; Bokhove, Onno

    2012-01-01

    Over the last 25 years a lot of work has been undertaken on constructing continuum models for segregation of particles of different sizes. We focus on one model that is designed to predict segregation and remixing of two differently sized particle species. This model contains two dimensionless param

  13. Applying Model Checking to Industrial-Sized PLC Programs

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079190; Darvas, Daniel; Blanco Vinuela, Enrique; Tournier, Jean-Charles; Bliudze, Simon; Blech, Jan Olaf; Gonzalez Suarez, Victor M

    2015-01-01

    Programmable logic controllers (PLCs) are embedded computers widely used in industrial control systems. Ensuring that a PLC software complies with its specification is a challenging task. Formal verification has become a recommended practice to ensure the correctness of safety-critical software but is still underused in industry due to the complexity of building and managing formal models of real applications. In this paper, we propose a general methodology to perform automated model checking of complex properties expressed in temporal logics (\\eg CTL, LTL) on PLC programs. This methodology is based on an intermediate model (IM), meant to transform PLC programs written in various standard languages (ST, SFC, etc.) to different modeling languages of verification tools. We present the syntax and semantics of the IM and the transformation rules of the ST and SFC languages to the nuXmv model checker passing through the intermediate model. Finally, two real cases studies of \\CERN PLC programs, written mainly in th...

  14. Stability patterns for a size-structured population model and its stage-structured counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lai; Pedersen, Michael; Lin, Zhigui

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we compare a general size-structured population model, where a size-structured consumer feeds upon an unstructured resource, to its simplified stage-structured counterpart in terms of equilibrium stability. Stability of the size-structured model is understood in terms of an equivalent...... delayed system consisting of a renewal equation for the consumer population birth rate and a delayed differential equation for the resource. Results show that the size- and stage-structured models differ considerably with respect to equilibrium stability, although the two models have completely identical...

  15. improved mathematical models for particle-size distribution data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BirukEdimon

    bimodal curve fitting models are shown to give an extremely ... property for assessing the likely behavior of granular ... a need to investigate alternative better models for fitting the .... other in a similar way to the shape parameters used for the ...

  16. Reduced-size kernel models for nonlinear hybrid system identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Van Luong; Bloch, Grard; Lauer, Fabien

    2011-12-01

    This brief paper focuses on the identification of nonlinear hybrid dynamical systems, i.e., systems switching between multiple nonlinear dynamical behaviors. Thus the aim is to learn an ensemble of submodels from a single set of input-output data in a regression setting with no prior knowledge on the grouping of the data points into similar behaviors. To be able to approximate arbitrary nonlinearities, kernel submodels are considered. However, in order to maintain efficiency when applying the method to large data sets, a preprocessing step is required in order to fix the submodel sizes and limit the number of optimization variables. This brief paper proposes four approaches, respectively inspired by the fixed-size least-squares support vector machines, the feature vector selection method, the kernel principal component regression and a modification of the latter, in order to deal with this issue and build sparse kernel submodels. These are compared in numerical experiments, which show that the proposed approach achieves the simultaneous classification of data points and approximation of the nonlinear behaviors in an efficient and accurate manner.

  17. A generalized statistical model for the size distribution of wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, F.; Gallegati, M.; Kaniadakis, G.

    2012-12-01

    In a recent paper in this journal (Clementi et al 2009 J. Stat. Mech. P02037), we proposed a new, physically motivated, distribution function for modeling individual incomes, having its roots in the framework of the κ-generalized statistical mechanics. The performance of the κ-generalized distribution was checked against real data on personal income for the United States in 2003. In this paper we extend our previous model so as to be able to account for the distribution of wealth. Probabilistic functions and inequality measures of this generalized model for wealth distribution are obtained in closed form. In order to check the validity of the proposed model, we analyze the US household wealth distributions from 1984 to 2009 and conclude an excellent agreement with the data that is superior to any other model already known in the literature.

  18. The attention-weighted sample-size model of visual short-term memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Philip L.; Lilburn, Simon D.; Corbett, Elaine A.

    2016-01-01

    exceeded that predicted by the sample-size model for both simultaneously and sequentially presented stimuli. Instead, the set-size effect and the serial position curves with sequential presentation were predicted by an attention-weighted version of the sample-size model, which assumes that one of the items......We investigated the capacity of visual short-term memory (VSTM) in a phase discrimination task that required judgments about the configural relations between pairs of black and white features. Sewell et al. (2014) previously showed that VSTM capacity in an orientation discrimination task was well...... described by a sample-size model, which views VSTM as a resource comprised of a finite number of noisy stimulus samples. The model predicts the invariance of ∑i(di ′)2, the sum of squared sensitivities across items, for displays of different sizes. For phase discrimination, the set-size effect significantly...

  19. From Bacteria to Whales: Using Functional Size Spectra to Model Marine Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Julia L; Heneghan, Ryan F; Everett, Jason D; Trebilco, Rowan; Richardson, Anthony J

    2017-03-01

    Size-based ecosystem modeling is emerging as a powerful way to assess ecosystem-level impacts of human- and environment-driven changes from individual-level processes. These models have evolved as mechanistic explanations for observed regular patterns of abundance across the marine size spectrum hypothesized to hold from bacteria to whales. Fifty years since the first size spectrum measurements, we ask how far have we come? Although recent modeling studies capture an impressive range of sizes, complexity, and real-world applications, ecosystem coverage is still only partial. We describe how this can be overcome by unifying functional traits with size spectra (which we call functional size spectra) and highlight the key knowledge gaps that need to be filled to model ecosystems from bacteria to whales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. NOAA ESRI Grid - sediment size predictions model in New York offshore planning area from Biogeography Branch

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset represents sediment size predictions from a sediment spatial model developed for the New York offshore spatial planning area. The model also includes...

  1. Waif goodbye! Average-size female models promote positive body image and appeal to consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Lee, Christina

    2011-10-01

    Despite consensus that exposure to media images of thin fashion models is associated with poor body image and disordered eating behaviours, few attempts have been made to enact change in the media. This study sought to investigate an effective alternative to current media imagery, by exploring the advertising effectiveness of average-size female fashion models, and their impact on the body image of both women and men. A sample of 171 women and 120 men were assigned to one of three advertisement conditions: no models, thin models and average-size models. Women and men rated average-size models as equally effective in advertisements as thin and no models. For women with average and high levels of internalisation of cultural beauty ideals, exposure to average-size female models was associated with a significantly more positive body image state in comparison to exposure to thin models and no models. For men reporting high levels of internalisation, exposure to average-size models was also associated with a more positive body image state in comparison to viewing thin models. These findings suggest that average-size female models can promote positive body image and appeal to consumers.

  2. Influence of horizontal resolution and ensemble size on model performance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dalton, A

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available southern Africa. Furthermore a comparison is made between forecast skill of the 850 hPa geopotential heights and raw model rainfall outputs. The determination of skill was done by way of empirical post-processing procedures in order to project ensemble mean...

  3. Portfolio size as funktion of the premium: modeling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, Søren; Christensen, Bent Jesper; Taksar, Michael I

    An insurance company has a large number N of potential customers characterized by i.i.d. r.v.'s A1,…,AN giving the arrival rates of claims. Customers are risk averse, and a customer accepts an offered premium p according to his A-value. The modeling further involves a discount rate d>r of customers...

  4. A Note on Sample Size and Solution Propriety for Confirmatory Factor Analytic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dennis L.; Voth, Jennifer; Frey, Marc P.

    2013-01-01

    Determining an appropriate sample size for use in latent variable modeling techniques has presented ongoing challenges to researchers. In particular, small sample sizes are known to present concerns over sampling error for the variances and covariances on which model estimation is based, as well as for fit indexes and convergence failures. The…

  5. Medical Modeling of Particle Size Effects for CB Inhalation Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    of body orientation ( posture ) on deposition, and availability of 30 stochastic lung geometry for more realistic assessment of variation of dose in... hygiene community, with their role of monitoring and protecting workers in the workplace, has had a key role in developing standard models of...M.G., Miller, F.J. and Raabe, O.G. (1995). Particle Inhalability Curves for Humans and Small Laboratory Animals. Annals of Occupational Hygiene 39

  6. Modelling and validation of particle size distributions of supported nanoparticles using the pair distribution function technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamez-Mendoza, Liliana; Terban, Maxwell W.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Martinez-Inesta, Maria

    2017-04-13

    The particle size of supported catalysts is a key characteristic for determining structure–property relationships. It is a challenge to obtain this information accurately andin situusing crystallographic methods owing to the small size of such particles (<5 nm) and the fact that they are supported. In this work, the pair distribution function (PDF) technique was used to obtain the particle size distribution of supported Pt catalysts as they grow under typical synthesis conditions. The PDF of Pt nanoparticles grown on zeolite X was isolated and refined using two models: a monodisperse spherical model (single particle size) and a lognormal size distribution. The results were compared and validated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) results. Both models describe the same trends in average particle size with temperature, but the results of the number-weighted lognormal size distributions can also accurately describe the mean size and the width of the size distributions obtained from STEM. Since the PDF yields crystallite sizes, these results suggest that the grown Pt nanoparticles are monocrystalline. This work shows that refinement of the PDF of small supported monocrystalline nanoparticles can yield accurate mean particle sizes and distributions.

  7. Squares of different sizes: effect of geographical projection on model parameter estimates in species distribution modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budic, Lara; Didenko, Gregor; Dormann, Carsten F

    2016-01-01

    In species distribution analyses, environmental predictors and distribution data for large spatial extents are often available in long-lat format, such as degree raster grids. Long-lat projections suffer from unequal cell sizes, as a degree of longitude decreases in length from approximately 110 km at the equator to 0 km at the poles. Here we investigate whether long-lat and equal-area projections yield similar model parameter estimates, or result in a consistent bias. We analyzed the environmental effects on the distribution of 12 ungulate species with a northern distribution, as models for these species should display the strongest effect of projectional distortion. Additionally we choose four species with entirely continental distributions to investigate the effect of incomplete cell coverage at the coast. We expected that including model weights proportional to the actual cell area should compensate for the observed bias in model coefficients, and similarly that using land coverage of a cell should decrease bias in species with coastal distribution. As anticipated, model coefficients were different between long-lat and equal-area projections. Having progressively smaller and a higher number of cells with increasing latitude influenced the importance of parameters in models, increased the sample size for the northernmost parts of species ranges, and reduced the subcell variability of those areas. However, this bias could be largely removed by weighting long-lat cells by the area they cover, and marginally by correcting for land coverage. Overall we found little effect of using long-lat rather than equal-area projections in our analysis. The fitted relationship between environmental parameters and occurrence probability differed only very little between the two projection types. We still recommend using equal-area projections to avoid possible bias. More importantly, our results suggest that the cell area and the proportion of a cell covered by land should be

  8. Species sensitivity distribution for chlorpyrifos to aquatic organisms: Model choice and sample size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinsong; Chen, Boyu

    2016-03-01

    Species sensitivity distribution (SSD) is a widely used model that extrapolates the ecological risk to ecosystem levels from the ecotoxicity of a chemical to individual organisms. However, model choice and sample size significantly affect the development of the SSD model and the estimation of hazardous concentrations at the 5th centile (HC5). To interpret their effects, the SSD model for chlorpyrifos, a widely used organophosphate pesticide, to aquatic organisms is presented with emphases on model choice and sample size. Three subsets of median effective concentration (EC50) with different sample sizes were obtained from ECOTOX and used to build SSD models based on parametric distribution (normal, logistic, and triangle distribution) and nonparametric bootstrap. The SSD models based on the triangle distribution are superior to the normal and logistic distributions according to several goodness-of-fit techniques. Among all parametric SSD models, the one with the largest sample size based on the triangle distribution gives the most strict HC5 with 0.141μmolL(-1). The HC5 derived from the nonparametric bootstrap is 0.159μmol L(-1). The minimum sample size required to build a stable SSD model is 11 based on parametric distribution and 23 based on nonparametric bootstrap. The study suggests that model choice and sample size are important sources of uncertainty for application of the SSD model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Noise-Induced Transitions in a Population Growth Model Based on Size-Dependent Carrying Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeme Lumi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic dynamics of a population growth model with size-dependent carrying capacity is considered. The effect of a fluctuating environment on population growth is modeled as a multiplicative dichotomous noise. At intermediate values of population size the deterministic counterpart of the model behaves similarly to the Von Foerster model for human population, but at small and very large values of population size substantial differences occur. In the stochastic case, an exact analytical solution for the stationary probability distribution is found. It is established that variation of noise correlation time can cause noise-induced transitions between three different states of the system characterized by qualitatively different behaviors of the probability distributions of the population size. Also, it is shown that, in some regions of the system parameters, variation of the amplitude of environmental fluctuations can induce single unidirectional abrupt transitions of the mean population size.

  10. Determining Replenishment Lot Size and Shipment Policy for an EPQ Inventory Model with Delivery and Rework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Eduardo Cárdenas-Barrón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of production-shipment policies for a vendor-buyer system is dealt within this paper. The main objective is to derive the optimal replenishment lot size and shipment policy for an EPQ inventory model with multiple deliveries and rework. This inventory model contains two decision variables: the replenishment lot size and the number of deliveries. Previous researches solve this inventory model considering both variables to be continuous. However, the number of deliveries must be considered as a discrete variable. In this direction, this paper solves the inventory model considering two cases: Case 1: the replenishment lot size as a continuous variable and the number of shipments as a discrete variable and Case 2: the replenishment lot size and the number of shipments as discrete variables. The final results are two simple and easy-to-apply solution procedures to find the optimal values for the replenishment lot size and the number of deliveries for each case.

  11. Analysis of traffic accident size for Korean highway using structural equation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Yeon; Chung, Jin-Hyuk; Son, Bongsoo

    2008-11-01

    Accident size can be expressed as the number of involved vehicles, the number of damaged vehicles, the number of deaths and/or the number of injured. Accident size is the one of the important indices to measure the level of safety of transportation facilities. Factors such as road geometric condition, driver characteristic and vehicle type may be related to traffic accident size. However, all these factors interact in complicate ways so that the interrelationships among the variables are not easily identified. A structural equation model is adopted to capture the complex relationships among variables because the model can handle complex relationships among endogenous and exogenous variables simultaneously and furthermore it can include latent variables in the model. In this study, we use 2649 accident data occurred on highways in Korea and estimate relationship among exogenous factors and traffic accident size. The model suggests that road factors, driver factors and environment factors are strongly related to the accident size.

  12. Modelling size-dependent cannibalism in barramundi Lates calcarifer: cannibalistic polyphenism and its implication to aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Flavio F; Qin, Jian G

    2013-01-01

    This study quantified size-dependent cannibalism in barramundi Lates calcarifer through coupling a range of prey-predator pairs in a different range of fish sizes. Predictive models were developed using morphological traits with the alterative assumption of cannibalistic polyphenism. Predictive models were validated with the data from trials where cannibals were challenged with progressing increments of prey sizes. The experimental observations showed that cannibals of 25-131 mm total length could ingest the conspecific prey of 78-72% cannibal length. In the validation test, all predictive models underestimate the maximum ingestible prey size for cannibals of a similar size range. However, the model based on the maximal mouth width at opening closely matched the empirical observations, suggesting a certain degree of phenotypic plasticity of mouth size among cannibalistic individuals. Mouth size showed allometric growth comparing with body depth, resulting in a decreasing trend on the maximum size of ingestible prey as cannibals grow larger, which in parts explains why cannibalism in barramundi is frequently observed in the early developmental stage. Any barramundi has the potential to become a cannibal when the initial prey size was cannibal body length, but fish could never become a cannibal when prey were >58% of their size, suggesting that 50% of size difference can be the threshold to initiate intracohort cannibalism in a barramundi population. Cannibalistic polyphenism was likely to occur in barramundi that had a cannibalistic history. An experienced cannibal would have a greater ability to stretch its mouth size to capture a much larger prey than the models predict. The awareness of cannibalistic polyphenism has important application in fish farming management to reduce cannibalism.

  13. Modelling size-dependent cannibalism in barramundi Lates calcarifer: cannibalistic polyphenism and its implication to aquaculture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio F Ribeiro

    Full Text Available This study quantified size-dependent cannibalism in barramundi Lates calcarifer through coupling a range of prey-predator pairs in a different range of fish sizes. Predictive models were developed using morphological traits with the alterative assumption of cannibalistic polyphenism. Predictive models were validated with the data from trials where cannibals were challenged with progressing increments of prey sizes. The experimental observations showed that cannibals of 25-131 mm total length could ingest the conspecific prey of 78-72% cannibal length. In the validation test, all predictive models underestimate the maximum ingestible prey size for cannibals of a similar size range. However, the model based on the maximal mouth width at opening closely matched the empirical observations, suggesting a certain degree of phenotypic plasticity of mouth size among cannibalistic individuals. Mouth size showed allometric growth comparing with body depth, resulting in a decreasing trend on the maximum size of ingestible prey as cannibals grow larger, which in parts explains why cannibalism in barramundi is frequently observed in the early developmental stage. Any barramundi has the potential to become a cannibal when the initial prey size was 58% of their size, suggesting that 50% of size difference can be the threshold to initiate intracohort cannibalism in a barramundi population. Cannibalistic polyphenism was likely to occur in barramundi that had a cannibalistic history. An experienced cannibal would have a greater ability to stretch its mouth size to capture a much larger prey than the models predict. The awareness of cannibalistic polyphenism has important application in fish farming management to reduce cannibalism.

  14. A model to estimate the size of nanoparticle agglomerates in gas−solid fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Lilian de, E-mail: L.DeMartinMonton@tudelft.nl; Ommen, J. Ruud van [Delft University of Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    The estimation of nanoparticle agglomerates’ size in fluidized beds remains an open challenge, mainly due to the difficulty of characterizing the inter-agglomerate van der Waals force. The current approach is to describe micron-sized nanoparticle agglomerates as micron-sized particles with 0.1–0.2-μm asperities. This simplification does not capture the influence of the particle size on the van der Waals attraction between agglomerates. In this paper, we propose a new description where the agglomerates are micron-sized particles with nanoparticles on the surface, acting as asperities. As opposed to previous models, here the van der Waals force between agglomerates decreases with an increase in the particle size. We have also included an additional force due to the hydrogen bond formation between the surfaces of hydrophilic and dry nanoparticles. The average size of the fluidized agglomerates has been estimated equating the attractive force obtained from this method to the weight of the individual agglomerates. The results have been compared to 54 experimental values, most of them collected from the literature. Our model approximates without a systematic error the size of most of the nanopowders, both in conventional and centrifugal fluidized beds, outperforming current models. Although simple, the model is able to capture the influence of the nanoparticle size, particle density, and Hamaker coefficient on the inter-agglomerate forces.

  15. Modeling the effects of size on patch dynamics of an inert tracer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Xiu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesoscale iron enrichment experiments have revealed that additional iron affects the phytoplankton productivity and carbon cycle. However, the role of initial size of fertilized patch in determining the patch evolution is poorly quantified due to the limited time of research vessels at sea. Using a three-dimensional ocean circulation model, we simulated different sizes of inert tracer patches that were only regulated by physical circulation and diffusion. Model results showed that during the first few days since release of inert tracer, the calculated dilution rate was found to be a linear function with time, which was sensitive to the initial patch size with steeper slope for smaller size patch. After the initial phase of rapid decay, the relationship between dilution rate and time became an exponential function, which was also size dependent. Therefore, larger initial size patches can usually last longer and ultimately affect biogeochemical processes much stronger than smaller patches.

  16. On bimodal size distribution of spin clusters in the one dimensional Ising model

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanytskyi, A. I.; Chelnokov, V. O.

    2015-01-01

    The size distribution of geometrical spin clusters is exactly found for the one dimensional Ising model of finite extent. For the values of lattice constant $\\beta$ above some "critical value" $\\beta_c$ the found size distribution demonstrates the non-monotonic behavior with the peak corresponding to the size of largest available cluster. In other words, at high values of lattice constant there are two ways to fill the lattice: either to form a single largest cluster or to create many cluster...

  17. Modelling the size effect on the melting temperature of nanoparticles, nanowires and nanofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safaei, A [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shandiz, M Attarian [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sanjabi, S [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, PO Box 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barber, Z H [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-30

    A model has been developed to account for the dependence of melting temperature on the size of nanosolids (nanoparticles, nanowires and nanofilms). In this model the effect of particle size and shape, lattice and surface packing factor, and the coordination number of the lattice and of the surface crystalline planes are considered. A general equation is proposed, having nonlinear form as a function of the reciprocal of nanosolid size. This model is consistent with reported experimental data for nanoparticles of In and Au, nanowires of Pb and In, and nanofilms of In.

  18. An experimental test of the accumulated copying error model of cultural mutation for Acheulean handaxe size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Marius; Lycett, Stephen; Mesoudi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Archaeologists interested in explaining changes in artifact morphology over long time periods have found it useful to create models in which the only source of change is random and unintentional copying error, or 'cultural mutation'. These models can be used as null hypotheses against which to detect non-random processes such as cultural selection or biased transmission. One proposed cultural mutation model is the accumulated copying error model, where individuals attempt to copy the size of another individual's artifact exactly but make small random errors due to physiological limits on the accuracy of their perception. Here, we first derive the model within an explicit mathematical framework, generating the predictions that multiple independently-evolving artifact chains should diverge over time such that their between-chain variance increases while the mean artifact size remains constant. We then present the first experimental test of this model in which 200 participants, split into 20 transmission chains, were asked to faithfully copy the size of the previous participant's handaxe image on an iPad. The experimental findings supported the model's prediction that between-chain variance should increase over time and did so in a manner quantitatively in line with the model. However, when the initial size of the image that the participants resized was larger than the size of the image they were copying, subjects tended to increase the size of the image, resulting in the mean size increasing rather than staying constant. This suggests that items of material culture formed by reductive vs. additive processes may mutate differently when individuals attempt to replicate faithfully the size of previously-produced artifacts. Finally, we show that a dataset of 2601 Acheulean handaxes shows less variation than predicted given our empirically measured copying error variance, suggesting that other processes counteracted the variation in handaxe size generated by perceptual

  19. A model study of the size and composition distribution of aerosols in an aircraft exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorokin, A.A. [SRC `ECOLEN`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    A two-dimensional, axisymmetric flow field model which includes water and sulphate aerosol formation represented by moments of the size and composition distribution function is used to calculate the effect of radial turbulent jet mixing on the aerosol size distribution and mean modal composition. (author) 6 refs.

  20. Implementing a multispecies size-spectrum model in a data-poor ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chongliang; CHEN Yong; THOMPSON Katherine; REN Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Multispecies ecological models have been used for predicting the effects of fishing activity and evaluating the performance of management strategies. Size-spectrum models are one type of physiologically-structured ecological model that provide a feasible approach to describing fish communities in terms of individual dietary variation and ontogenetic niche shift. Despite the potential of ecological models in improving our understanding of ecosystems, their application is usually limited for data-poor fisheries. As a first step in implementing ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM), this study built a size-spectrum model for the fish community in the Haizhou Bay, China. We describe data collection procedures and model parameterization to facilitate the implementation of such size-spectrum models for future studies of data-poor ecosystems. The effects of fishing on the ecosystem were exemplified with a range of fishing effort and were monitored with a set of ecological indicators. Total community biomass, biodiversity index, W-statistic, LFI (Large fish index), MeanW (mean body weight) and Slope (slope of community size spectra) showed a strong non-linear pattern in response to fishing pressure, and largest fishing effort did not generate the most drastic responses in certain scenarios. We emphasize the value and feasibility of developing size-spectrum models to capture ecological dynamics and suggest limitations as well as potential for model improvement. This study aims to promote a wide use of this type of model in support of EBFM.

  1. Extension of the gurson model accounting for the void size effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Wen; Keh-Chih Hwang; Yonggang Huang

    2005-01-01

    A continuum model of solids with cylindrical microvoids is proposed based on the Taylor dislocation model.The model is an extension of Gurson model in the sense that the void size effect is accounted for. Beside the void volume fraction f, the intrinsic material length l becomes a parameter representing voids since the void size comes into play in the Gurson model. Approximate yield functions in analytic forms are suggested for both solids with cylindrical microvoids and with spherical microvoids. The application to uniaxial tension curves shows a precise agreement between the approximate analytic yield function and the "exact" parametric form of integrals.

  2. NEAMS FPL M2 Milestone Report: Development of a UO₂ Grain Size Model using Multicale Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, Michael R [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes development work funded by the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling Simulation program's Fuels Product Line (FPL) to develop a mechanistic model for the average grain size in UO₂ fuel. The model is developed using a multiscale modeling and simulation approach involving atomistic simulations, as well as mesoscale simulations using INL's MARMOT code.

  3. Modeling size segregation of granular materials: the roles of segregation, advection and diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi; Umbanhowar, Paul B; Ottino, Julio M; Lueptow, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Predicting segregation of granular materials composed of different-sized particles is a challenging problem. In this paper, we develop and implement a theoretical model that captures the interplay between advection, segregation, and diffusion in size bidisperse granular materials. The fluxes associated with these three driving factors depend on the underlying kinematics, whose characteristics play key roles in determining particle segregation configurations. Unlike previous models for segregation, our model uses parameters based on kinematic measures from discrete element method simulations instead of arbitrarily adjustable fitting parameters, and it achieves excellent quantitative agreement with both experimental and simulation results when applied to quasi-two-dimensional bounded heaps. The model yields two dimensionless control parameters, both of which are only functions of physically control parameters (feed rate, particle sizes, and system size) and kinematic parameters (diffusion coefficient, flowing l...

  4. Finite Size Corrected Relativistic Mean-Field Model and QCD Critical End Point

    CERN Document Server

    Uddin, Saeed; Ahmad, Jan Shabir

    2012-01-01

    The effect of finite size of hadrons on the QCD phase diagram is analyzed using relativistic mean field model for the hadronic phase and the Bag model for the QGP phase. The corrections to the EOS for hadronic phase are incorporated in a thermodynamic consistent manner for Van der Waals like interaction. It is found that the effect of finite size of baryons is to shift CEP to higher chemical potential values.

  5. Insular dwarfism in hippos and a model for brain size reduction in Homo floresiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Eleanor M; Lister, Adrian M

    2009-05-07

    Body size reduction in mammals is usually associated with only moderate brain size reduction, because the brain and sensory organs complete their growth before the rest of the body during ontogeny. On this basis, 'phyletic dwarfs' are predicted to have a greater relative brain size than 'phyletic giants'. However, this trend has been questioned in the special case of dwarfism of mammals on islands. Here we show that the endocranial capacities of extinct dwarf species of hippopotamus from Madagascar are up to 30% smaller than those of a mainland African ancestor scaled to equivalent body mass. These results show that brain size reduction is much greater than predicted from an intraspecific 'late ontogenetic' model of dwarfism in which brain size scales to body size with an exponent of 0.35. The nature of the proportional change or grade shift observed here indicates that selective pressures on brain size are potentially independent of those on body size. This study demonstrates empirically that it is mechanistically possible for dwarf mammals on islands to evolve significantly smaller brains than would be predicted from a model of dwarfing based on the intraspecific scaling of the mainland ancestor. Our findings challenge current understanding of brain-body allometric relationships in mammals and suggest that the process of dwarfism could in principle explain small brain size, a factor relevant to the interpretation of the small-brained hominin found on the Island of Flores, Indonesia.

  6. Experimental and modeling studies on number and size spectrum evolutions of aerosol particles within a chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zai; HUANG Zhen; WANG JiaSong

    2007-01-01

    A size-specific aerosol dynamic model is set up to predict the evolution of particle number concentration within a chamber. Particle aggregation is based on the theory of Brownian coagulation, and the model not only comprises particle loss due to coagulation, but also considers the formation of large particles by collision. To validate the model, three different groups of chamber experiments with SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) are conducted. The results indicate that the advantage of the model over the past simple size bin model is its provision of detailed information of size spectrum evolution,and the results can be used to analyze the variations of number concentration and CMD (Count Median Diameter). Furthermore, some aerosol dynamic mechanisms that cannot be measured by instrument can be analyzed by the model simulation, which is significant for better understanding the removal and control mechanisms of ultrafine particles.

  7. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ming; Jia, Ya; Liu, Quan; Zhu, Chun-Lian; Yang, Li-Jian

    2007-07-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25Δ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  8. Modelling the impact of intrinsic size and luminosity correlations on magnification estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlariello, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Spatial correlations of the observed sizes and luminosities of galaxies can be used to estimate the magnification that arises through weak gravitational lensing. However, the intrinsic prop- erties of galaxies can be similarly correlated through local physical effects, and these present a possible contamination to the weak lensing estimation. In an earlier paper (Ciarlariello et al. 2015) we modelled the intrinsic size correlations using the halo model, assuming the galaxy sizes reflect the mass in the associated halo. Here we extend this work to consider galaxy magnitudes and show that these may be even more affected by intrinsic correlations than galaxy sizes, making this a bigger systematic for measurements of the weak lensing signal. We also quantify how these intrinsic correlations are affected by sample selection criteria based on sizes and magnitudes.

  9. Impact of variable body size on pedestrian dynamics by heuristics-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Hu, Mao-Bin; Jiang, Rui

    2017-01-01

    In the real world, pedestrians can arch the shoulders or rotate their bodies actively to across the narrow space. The method is helpful to reduce the effective size of the body. In this paper, the impact of variable body size on the direction choice has been investigated by an improved heuristic-based model. In the model, it is assumed that the cost of adjusting body size is a factor in the process to evaluate the optimal direction. In a typical simulation scenario, the pedestrian reluctant to adjust body size will pass by the blocks. On the contrary, the pedestrian caring little about body size will traverse through the exit. There is a direction-choice change behavior between bypass and traverse considering block width and the initial location of the pedestrian.

  10. A Coarse Estimation of Cell Size Region from a Mesoscopic Stochastic Cell Cycle Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YI Ming; JIA Ya; LIU Quan; ZHU Chun-Lian; YANG Li-Jian

    2007-01-01

    Based on a deterministic cell cycle model of fission yeast, the effects of the finite cell size on the cell cycle regulation in wee1- cdc25△ double mutant type are numerically studied by using of the chemical Langevin equations. It is found that at a certain region of cell size, our numerical results from the chemical Langevin equations are in good qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. The two resettings to the G2 phase from early stages of mitosis can be induced under the moderate cell size. The quantized cycle times can be observed during such a cell size region. Therefore, a coarse estimation of cell size is obtained from the mesoscopic stochastic cell cycle model.

  11. A Bounding Surface Plasticity Model for Intact Rock Exhibiting Size-Dependent Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoumi, Hossein; Douglas, Kurt J.; Russell, Adrian R.

    2016-01-01

    A new constitutive model for intact rock is presented recognising that rock strength, stiffness and stress-strain behaviour are affected by the size of the rock being subjected to loading. The model is formulated using bounding surface plasticity theory. It is validated against a new and extensive set of unconfined compression and triaxial compression test results for Gosford sandstone. The samples tested had diameters ranging from 19 to 145 mm and length-to-diameter ratios of 2. The model captures the continuous nonlinear stress-strain behaviour from initial loading, through peak strength to large shear strains, including transition from brittle to ductile behaviour. The size dependency was accounted for through a unified size effect law applied to the unconfined compressive strength—a key model input parameter. The unconfined compressive strength increases with sample size before peaking and then decreasing with further increasing sample size. Inside the constitutive model two hardening laws act simultaneously, each driven by plastic shear strains. The elasticity is stress level dependent. Simple linear loading and bounding surfaces are adopted, defined using the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, along with a non-associated flow rule. The model simulates well the stress-strain behaviour of Gosford sandstone at confining pressures ranging from 0 to 30 MPa for the variety of sample sizes considered.

  12. Analysis of litter size and average litter weight in pigs using a recursive model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varona, Luis; Sorensen, Daniel; Thompson, Robin

    2007-01-01

    An analysis of litter size and average piglet weight at birth in Landrace and Yorkshire using a standard two-trait mixed model (SMM) and a recursive mixed model (RMM) is presented. The RMM establishes a one-way link from litter size to average piglet weight. It is shown that there is a one......-to-one correspondence between the parameters of SMM and RMM and that they generate equivalent likelihoods. As parameterized in this work, the RMM tests for the presence of a recursive relationship between additive genetic values, permanent environmental effects, and specific environmental effects of litter size...

  13. Influence of Li-ion Battery Models in the Sizing of Hybrid Storage Systems with Supercapacitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Claudio; Barreras, Jorge Varela; de Castro, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the influence of different aggregated electrical circuit battery models in the sizing process of a hybrid energy storage system (ESS), composed by Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors (SCs). The aim is to find the number of cells required to propel......-order dynamics of the battery. Simulation results demonstrate that the adoption of a more accurate battery model in the sizing of hybrid ESSs prevents over-sizing, leading to a reduction in the number of cells of up to 29%, and a cost decrease of up to 10%....

  14. Tumor Microvasculature: Endothelial Leakiness and Endothelial Pore Size Distribution in a Breast Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.E. Uzgiris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor endothelial leakiness is quantified in a rat mammary adenocarcinoma model using dynamic contrast enhancement MRI and contrast agents of widely varying sizes. The contrast agents were constructed to be of globular configuration and have their uptake rate into tumor interstitium be driven by the same diffusion process and limited only by the availability of endothelial pores of passable size. It was observed that the endothelial pore distribution has a steep power law dependence on size, r−β, with an exponent of −4.1. The model of large pore dominance in tumor leakiness as reported in some earlier investigation with fluorescent probes and optical chamber methods is rejected for this tumor model and a number of other tumor types including chemically induced tumors. This steep power law dependence on size is also consistent with observations on human breast cancer.

  15. Confronting AeroCom models with particle size distribution data from surface in situ stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Stephen; Fiebig, Markus; Mann, Graham; Schulz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The size distribution is the most important property for describing any interaction of an aerosol particle population with its surroundings. In first order, it determines both, the aerosol optical properties quantifying the direct aerosol climate effect, and the fraction of aerosol particles acting as cloud condensation nuclei quantifying the indirect aerosol climate effect. Aerosol schemes of modern climate models resolve the aerosol particle size distribution (APSD) explicitly. In improving the skill of climate models, it is therefore highly useful to confront these models with precision APSD data observed at surface stations. Corresponding previous work focussed on comparing size integrated, seasonal particle concentrations at selected sites with ensemble model averages to assess overall model skill. Building on this work, this project intends to refine the approach by comparing median particle size and integral concentration of fitted modal size distributions. It will also look at skill differences between models in order to find reasons for matches and discrepancies. The presentation will outline the project, and will elaborate on input requested from modelling groups to participate in the exercise.

  16. MODEL JOINT ECONOMIC LOT SIZE PADA KASUS PEMASOK-PEMBELI DENGAN PERMINTAAN PROBABILISTIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakhid Ahmad Jauhari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider single vendor single buyer integrated inventory model with probabilistic demand and equal delivery lot size. The model contributes to the current literature by relaxing the deterministic demand assumption which has been used for almost all integrated inventory models. The objective is to minimize expected total costs incurred by the vendor and the buyer. We develop effective iterative procedures for finding the optimal solution. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the benefit of integration. A sensitivity analysis is performed to explore the effect of key parameters on delivery lot size, safety factor, production lot size factor and the expected total cost. The results of the numerical examples indicate that our models can achieve a significant amount of savings. Finally, we compare the results of our proposed model with a simulation model. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Pada penelitian ini akan dikembangkan model gabungan pemasok-pembeli dengan permintaan probabilistik dan ukuran pengiriman sama. Pada model setiap lot pemesanan akan dikirim dalam beberapa lot pengiriman dan pemasok akan memproduksi barang dalam ukuran batch produksi yang merupakan kelipatan integer dari lot pengiriman. Dikembangkan pula suatu algoritma untuk menyelesaikan model matematis yang telah dibuat. Selain itu, pengaruh perubahan parameter terhadap perilaku model diteliti dengan analisis sensitivitas terhadap beberapa parameter kunci, seperti ukuran lot, stok pengaman dan total biaya persediaan. Pada penelitian ini juga dibuat model simulasi untuk melihat performansi model matematis pada kondisi nyata. Kata kunci: model gabungan, permintaan probabilistik, lot pengiriman, supply chain

  17. Women's Preferences for Penis Size: A New Research Method Using Selection among 3D Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Prause

    Full Text Available Women's preferences for penis size may affect men's comfort with their own bodies and may have implications for sexual health. Studies of women's penis size preferences typically have relied on their abstract ratings or selecting amongst 2D, flaccid images. This study used haptic stimuli to allow assessment of women's size recall accuracy for the first time, as well as examine their preferences for erect penis sizes in different relationship contexts. Women (N = 75 selected amongst 33, 3D models. Women recalled model size accurately using this method, although they made more errors with respect to penis length than circumference. Women preferred a penis of slightly larger circumference and length for one-time (length = 6.4 inches/16.3 cm, circumference = 5.0 inches/12.7 cm versus long-term (length = 6.3 inches/16.0 cm, circumference = 4.8 inches/12.2 cm sexual partners. These first estimates of erect penis size preferences using 3D models suggest women accurately recall size and prefer penises only slightly larger than average.

  18. Women's Preferences for Penis Size: A New Research Method Using Selection among 3D Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prause, Nicole; Park, Jaymie; Leung, Shannon; Miller, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Women's preferences for penis size may affect men's comfort with their own bodies and may have implications for sexual health. Studies of women's penis size preferences typically have relied on their abstract ratings or selecting amongst 2D, flaccid images. This study used haptic stimuli to allow assessment of women's size recall accuracy for the first time, as well as examine their preferences for erect penis sizes in different relationship contexts. Women (N = 75) selected amongst 33, 3D models. Women recalled model size accurately using this method, although they made more errors with respect to penis length than circumference. Women preferred a penis of slightly larger circumference and length for one-time (length = 6.4 inches/16.3 cm, circumference = 5.0 inches/12.7 cm) versus long-term (length = 6.3 inches/16.0 cm, circumference = 4.8 inches/12.2 cm) sexual partners. These first estimates of erect penis size preferences using 3D models suggest women accurately recall size and prefer penises only slightly larger than average.

  19. Modeling Size-number Distributions of Seeds for Use in Soil Bank Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugo Casco; Alexandra Soveral Dias; Luís Silva Dias

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of soil seed banks is essential to understand the dynamics of plant populations and communities and would greatly benefit from the integration of existing knowledge on ecological correlations of seed size and shape. The present study aims to establish a feasible and meaningful method to describe size-number distributions of seeds in multi-species situations. For that purpose, size-number distributions of seeds with known length, width and thickness were determined by sequential sieving. The most appropriate combination of sieves and seeds dimensions was established, and the adequacy of the power function and the Weibull model to describe size-number distributions of spherical, non.spherical, and all seeds was investigated. We found that the geometric mean of seed length, width and thickness was the most adequate size estimator, providing shape-independent measures of seeds volume directly related to sieves mesh side, and that both the power function and the Weibuli model provide high quality descriptions of size-number distributions of spherical,non-spherical, and all seeds. We also found that, in spite of its slightly lower accuracy, the power function is, at this stage, a more trustworthy model to characterize size-number distributions of seeds in soil banks because in some Weibull equations the estimates of the scale parameter were not acceptable.

  20. Battery Sizing for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in Beijing: A TCO Model Based Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Hou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a total cost of ownership (TCO model for battery sizing of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs. The proposed systematic TCO model innovatively integrates the Beijing driving database and optimal PHEV energy management strategies developed earlier. The TCO, including battery, fuel, electricity, and salvage costs, is calculated in yearly cash flows. The salvage cost, based on battery degradation model, is proposed for the first time. The results show that the optimal battery size for PHEVs in Beijing is 6–8 kWh. Several additional scenarios are also analyzed: (1 10% increase in battery price or discount rate leads to an optimal battery size of 6 kWh, and 10% increase in fuel price shifts the optimal battery size to 8 kWh; (2 the longer and more dispersive daily range distribution in the U.S. increases the optimal battery size to 14 kWh; (3 the subsidy in China results in an optimal battery size of 13 kWh, while that in the U.S. results in 17 kWh, and a fuel savings rate based subsidy policy is innovatively proposed; (4 the optimal battery size with Li4Ti5O12 batteries is 2 kWh, but the TCO of Li4Ti5O12 batteries is higher than that of LiFePO4 batteries.

  1. Geospatial modeling of fire-size distributions in historical low-severity fire regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D.; Kellogg, L. B.; Larkin, N. K.

    2006-12-01

    Low-severity fires are recorded by fire-scarred trees. These records can provide temporal depth for reconstructing fire history because one tree may record dozens of separate fires over time, thereby providing adequate sample size for estimating fire frequency. Estimates of actual fire perimeters from these point-based records are uncertain, however, because fire boundaries can only be located approximately. We indirectly estimate fire-size distributions without attempting to establish individual fire perimeters. The slope and intercept of the interval-area function, a power-law relationship between sample area and mean fire-free intervals for that area, provide surrogates for the moments of a fire-size distribution, given a distribution of fire- free intervals. Analogously, by deconstructing variograms that use a binary distance measure (Sorensen's index) for the similarity of the time-series of fires recorded by pairs of recorder trees, we provide estimates of modal fire size. We link both variograms and interval-area functions to fire size distributions by simulating fire size distributions on neutral landscapes with and without right- censoring to represent topographic controls on maximum fire size. From parameters of the two functions produced by simulations we can back-estimate means and variances of fire sizes on real landscapes. This scale-based modeling provides a robust alternative to empirical and heuristic methods and a means to extrapolate estimates of fire-size distributions to unsampled landscapes.

  2. Applicability of Fractal Models in Estimating Soil Water Retention Characteristics from Particle-Size Distribution Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Soil water retention characteristics are the key information required in hydrological modeling. Frac-tal models provide a practical alternative for indirectly estimating soil water retention characteristics fromparticle-size distribution data. Predictive capabilities of three fractal models, i.e, Tyler-Wheatcraft model,Rieu-Sposito model, and Brooks-Corey model, were fully evaluated in this work using experimental datafrom an international database and literature. Particle-size distribution data were firstly interpolated into20 classes using a van Genuchten-type equation. Fractal dimensions of the tortuous pore wall and the poresurface were then calculated from the detailed particle-size distribution and incorporated as a parameter infractal water retention models. Comparisons between measured and model-estimated water retention cha-racteristics indicated that these three models were applicable to relatively different soil textures and pressurehead ranges. Tyler-Wheatcraft and Brooks-Corey models led to reasonable agreements for both coarse- andmedium-textured soils, while the latter showed applicability to a broader texture range. In contrast, Rieu-Sposito model was more suitable for fine-textured soils. Fractal models produced a better estimation of watercontents at low pressure heads than at high pressure heads.

  3. A multidimensional stability model for predicting shallow landslide size and shape across landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milledge, David G; Bellugi, Dino; McKean, Jim A; Densmore, Alexander L; Dietrich, William E

    2014-11-01

    The size of a shallow landslide is a fundamental control on both its hazard and geomorphic importance. Existing models are either unable to predict landslide size or are computationally intensive such that they cannot practically be applied across landscapes. We derive a model appropriate for natural slopes that is capable of predicting shallow landslide size but simple enough to be applied over entire watersheds. It accounts for lateral resistance by representing the forces acting on each margin of potential landslides using earth pressure theory and by representing root reinforcement as an exponential function of soil depth. We test our model's ability to predict failure of an observed landslide where the relevant parameters are well constrained by field data. The model predicts failure for the observed scar geometry and finds that larger or smaller conformal shapes are more stable. Numerical experiments demonstrate that friction on the boundaries of a potential landslide increases considerably the magnitude of lateral reinforcement, relative to that due to root cohesion alone. We find that there is a critical depth in both cohesive and cohesionless soils, resulting in a minimum size for failure, which is consistent with observed size-frequency distributions. Furthermore, the differential resistance on the boundaries of a potential landslide is responsible for a critical landslide shape which is longer than it is wide, consistent with observed aspect ratios. Finally, our results show that minimum size increases as approximately the square of failure surface depth, consistent with observed landslide depth-area data.

  4. Modeling of LEO Orbital Debris Populations in Centimeter and Millimeter Size Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.-L.; Hill, . M.; Horstman, M.; Krisko, P. H.; Liou, J.-C.; Matney, M.; Stansbery, E. G.

    2010-01-01

    The building of the NASA Orbital Debris Engineering Model, whether ORDEM2000 or its recently updated version ORDEM2010, uses as its foundation a number of model debris populations, each truncated at a minimum object-size ranging from 10 micron to 1 m. This paper discusses the development of the ORDEM2010 model debris populations in LEO (low Earth orbit), focusing on centimeter (smaller than 10 cm) and millimeter size regimes. Primary data sets used in the statistical derivation of the cm- and mm-size model populations are from the Haystack radar operated in a staring mode. Unlike cataloged objects of sizes greater than approximately 10 cm, ground-based radars monitor smaller-size debris only in a statistical manner instead of tracking every piece. The mono-static Haystack radar can detect debris as small as approximately 5 mm at moderate LEO altitudes. Estimation of millimeter debris populations (for objects smaller than approximately 6 mm) rests largely on Goldstone radar measurements. The bi-static Goldstone radar can detect 2- to 3-mm objects. The modeling of the cm- and mm-debris populations follows the general approach to developing other ORDEM2010-required model populations for various components and types of debris. It relies on appropriate reference populations to provide necessary prior information on the orbital structures and other important characteristics of the debris objects. NASA's LEO-to-GEO Environment Debris (LEGEND) model is capable of furnishing such reference populations in the desired size range. A Bayesian statistical inference process, commonly adopted in ORDEM2010 model-population derivations, changes a priori distribution into a posteriori distribution and thus refines the reference populations in terms of data. This paper describes key elements and major steps in the statistical derivations of the cm- and mm-size debris populations and presents results. Due to lack of data for near 1-mm sizes, the model populations of 1- to 3.16-mm

  5. Development of an Autonomous Flight Control System for Small Size Unmanned Helicopter Based on Dynamical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It is devoted to the development of an autonomous flight control system for small size unmanned helicopter based on dynamical model. At first, the mathematical model of a small size helicopter is described. After that simple but effective MTCV control algorithm was proposed. The whole flight control algorithm is composed of two parts:orientation controller based on the model for rotation dynamics and a robust position controller for a double integrator. The MTCV block is also used to achieve translation velocity control. To demonstrate the performance of the presented algorithm, simulation results and results achieved in real flight experiments were presented.

  6. Size-dependent melting of nanoparticles: Hundred years of thermodynamic model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K K Nanda

    2009-04-01

    Thermodynamic model first published in 1909, is being used extensively to understand the size-dependent melting of nanoparticles. Pawlow deduced an expression for the size-dependent melting temperature of small particles based on the thermodynamic model which was then modified and applied to different nanostructures such as nanowires, prism-shaped nanoparticles, etc. The model has also been modified to understand the melting of supported nanoparticles and superheating of embedded nanoparticles. In this article, we have reviewed the melting behaviour of nanostructures reported in the literature since 1909.

  7. Finite population size effects in quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Deem, Michael W.; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2012-04-01

    We consider finite population size effects for Crow-Kimura and Eigen quasispecies models with single-peak fitness landscape. We formulate accurately the iteration procedure for the finite population models, then derive the Hamilton-Jacobi equation (HJE) to describe the dynamic of the probability distribution. The steady-state solution of HJE gives the variance of the mean fitness. Our results are useful for understanding the population sizes of viruses in which the infinite population models can give reliable results for biological evolution problems.

  8. Dynamics of a stochastic tuberculosis model with constant recruitment and varying total population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a mathematical model for a tuberculosis model with constant recruitment and varying total population size by incorporating stochastic perturbations. By constructing suitable stochastic Lyapunov functions, we establish sufficient conditions for the existence of an ergodic stationary distribution as well as extinction of the disease to the stochastic system.

  9. Determining the critical size of a rabbit rib segmental bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengzhen; Chen, Kun; Hou, Lei; Li, Keyi; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xiumei

    2016-10-01

    In order to establish and standardize the rabbit rib segmental bone defect model, it is of vital importance to determine rabbit rib critical size defect (CSD). According to the general time needed for spontaneous long-bone regeneration, three-month observation period was set to determine the CSD. The rabbit rib segmental bone defects with different sizes from 1 to 5 cm with or without periosteum were performed in the eighth rib of 4-month-old male New Zealand rabbits and underwent X-ray examinations at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks postoperatively. The gross and histological examinations at postoperative week 12 were evaluated, which showed that the critical sizes in the rabbit rib models with and without periosteum were 5 and 2 cm, respectively. This study provides prerequisite data for establishing rabbit rib CSD model and evaluating bone materials using this model.

  10. Chaotic dynamics of the size-dependent non-linear micro-beam model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysko, A. V.; Awrejcewicz, J.; Pavlov, S. P.; Zhigalov, M. V.; Krysko, V. A.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a size-dependent model of a Sheremetev-Pelekh-Reddy-Levinson micro-beam is proposed and validated using the couple stress theory, taking into account large deformations. The applied Hamilton's principle yields the governing PDEs and boundary conditions. A comparison of statics and dynamics of beams with and without size-dependent components is carried out. It is shown that the proposed model results in significant, both qualitative and quantitative, changes in the nature of beam deformations, in comparison to the so far employed standard models. A novel scenario of transition from regular to chaotic vibrations of the size-dependent Sheremetev-Pelekh model, following the Pomeau-Manneville route to chaos, is also detected and illustrated, among others.

  11. Test of magnetic susceptibility and grain-size age models of loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ages of the stratigraphic boundary MIS1/2 and MIS3/4 of the Yuanbu loess section in Linxia are used as the basis of the nodal control age. The age of MIS1/2 and MIS3/4 are obtained from the latest international research result-the climatic events recorded in the stalagmite in the Hulu Cave in Nanjing, that MIS1/2 is 11.5 kaB. P. and MIS3/4 is 59.8 kaB.P.. The ages of the two climatic events contain three nodal age control models (Model 1: 0 kaB. P. -59.8 kaB. P.; Model 2: 0 kaB. P. -11.5 kaB. P. and 11.5kaB. P. -59.8 kaB. P.; Model 3: 11.5 kaB. P. -59.8 kaB. P. ), which are used as the nodal control age separately. The deposition times of various stratigraphic horizons are calculated by using the magnetic susceptibility age model and grain-size age model, and then compared with each other. In addition, the AMS14C age, OSL age and the ages of YD and H events are compared with the ages of the corresponding horizons calculated by the three models of nodal control ages. From the analyses of lithologic characters and climatic stages it has been found that both the magnetic susceptibility age model and the grain-size age model have some defects. Because the accurate control ages are selected as the nodal points of the glacial period or interglacial period, the stratigraphic deposition times determined by the high resolution of magnetic susceptibility age model and grain-size age model approximate to the actual ages. As for the relative accuracy of the two age models, the magnetic susceptibility age model is more accurate than the grain-size age model.

  12. Modeling group size and scalar stress by logistic regression from an archaeological perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmarco Alberti

    Full Text Available Johnson's scalar stress theory, describing the mechanics of (and the remedies to the increase in in-group conflictuality that parallels the increase in groups' size, provides scholars with a useful theoretical framework for the understanding of different aspects of the material culture of past communities (i.e., social organization, communal food consumption, ceramic style, architecture and settlement layout. Due to its relevance in archaeology and anthropology, the article aims at proposing a predictive model of critical level of scalar stress on the basis of community size. Drawing upon Johnson's theory and on Dunbar's findings on the cognitive constrains to human group size, a model is built by means of Logistic Regression on the basis of the data on colony fissioning among the Hutterites of North America. On the grounds of the theoretical framework sketched in the first part of the article, the absence or presence of colony fissioning is considered expression of not critical vs. critical level of scalar stress for the sake of the model building. The model, which is also tested against a sample of archaeological and ethnographic cases: a confirms the existence of a significant relationship between critical scalar stress and group size, setting the issue on firmer statistical grounds; b allows calculating the intercept and slope of the logistic regression model, which can be used in any time to estimate the probability that a community experienced a critical level of scalar stress; c allows locating a critical scalar stress threshold at community size 127 (95% CI: 122-132, while the maximum probability of critical scale stress is predicted at size 158 (95% CI: 147-170. The model ultimately provides grounds to assess, for the sake of any further archaeological/anthropological interpretation, the probability that a group reached a hot spot of size development critical for its internal cohesion.

  13. Modeling the dependence of strength on grain sizes in nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Bhole, Sanjeev D; Chen, DaoLun

    2008-01-01

    A model was developed to describe the grain size dependence of hardness (or strength) in nanocrystalline materials by combining the Hall-Petch relationship for larger grains with a coherent polycrystal model for nanoscale grains and introducing a log-normal distribution of grain sizes. The transition from the Hall-Petch relationship to the coherent polycrystal mechanism was shown to be a gradual process. The hardness in the nanoscale regime was observed to increase with decreasing grain boundary affected zone (or effective grain boundary thickness, Δ) in the form of Δ(-1/2). The critical grain size increased linearly with increasing Δ. The variation of the calculated hardness value with the grain size was observed to be in agreement with the experimental data reported in the literature.

  14. Predictive model for the size of bubbles and droplets created in microfluidic T-junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steijn, Volkert; Kleijn, Chris R; Kreutzer, Michiel T

    2010-10-07

    We present a closed-form expression that allows the reader to predict the size of bubbles and droplets created in T-junctions without fitting. Despite the wide use of microfluidic devices to create bubbles and droplets, a physically sound expression for the size of bubbles and droplets, key in many applications, did not yet exist. The theoretical foundation of our expression comprises three main ingredients: continuity, geometrics and recently gained understanding of the mechanism which leads to pinch-off. Our simple theoretical model explains why the size of bubbles and droplets strongly depends on the shape of a T-junction, and teaches how the shape can be tuned to obtain the desired size. We successfully validated our model experimentally by analyzing the formation of gas bubbles, as well as liquid droplets, in T-junctions with a wide variety of shapes under conditions typical to multiphase microfluidics.

  15. Tumor size interpretation for predicting cervical lymph node metastasis using a differentiated thyroid cancer risk model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rong-liang; Qu, Ning; Yang, Shu-wen; Ma, Ben; Lu, Zhong-wu; Wen, Duo; Sun, Guo-hua; Wang, Yu; Ji, Qing-hai

    2016-01-01

    Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is common in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), but management of clinically negative DTC is controversial. This study evaluated primary tumor size as a predictor of LNM. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for DTC patients who were treated with surgery between 2002 and 2012 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, to determine the association of tumor size at 10 mm increments with LNM. A predictive model was then developed to estimate the risk of LNM in DTC, using tumor size and other clinicopathological characteristics identified from the multivariate analysis. We identified 80,565 eligible patients with DTC in the SEER database. Final histology confirmed 9,896 (12.3%) cases affected with N1a disease and 8,194 (10.2%) cases with N1b disease. After the patients were classified into subgroups by tumor size, we found that the percentages of male sex, white race, follicular histology, gross extrathyroidal extension, lateral lymph node metastasis, and distant metastasis gradually increased with size. In multivariate analysis, tumor size was a significant independent prognostic factor for LNM; in particular, the odds ratio for lateral lymph node metastasis continued to increase by size relative to a 1–10 mm baseline. The coefficient for tumor size in the LNM predictive model waŝ0.20, indicating extra change in log(odds ratio) for LNM as 0.2 per unit increment in size relative to baseline. In conclusion, larger tumors are likely to have aggressive features and metastasize to a cervical compartment. Multistratification by size could provide more precise estimates of the likelihood of LNM before surgery. PMID:27574443

  16. Evaluation of char combustion models: measurement and analysis of variability in char particle size and density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, Daniel J; Monazam, Esmail R; Casleton, Kent H; Shaddix, Christopher R

    2008-08-01

    Char samples representing a range of combustion conditions and extents of burnout were obtained from a well-characterized laminar flow combustion experiment. Individual particles from the parent coal and char samples were characterized to determine distributions in particle volume, mass, and density at different extent of burnout. The data were then compared with predictions from a comprehensive char combustion model referred to as the char burnout kinetics model (CBK). The data clearly reflect the particle- to-particle heterogeneity of the parent coal and show a significant broadening in the size and density distributions of the chars resulting from both devolatilization and combustion. Data for chars prepared in a lower oxygen content environment (6% oxygen by vol.) are consistent with zone II type combustion behavior where most of the combustion is occurring near the particle surface. At higher oxygen contents (12% by vol.), the data show indications of more burning occurring in the particle interior. The CBK model does a good job of predicting the general nature of the development of size and density distributions during burning but the input distribution of particle size and density is critical to obtaining good predictions. A significant reduction in particle size was observed to occur as a result of devolatilization. For comprehensive combustion models to provide accurate predictions, this size reduction phenomenon needs to be included in devolatilization models so that representative char distributions are carried through the calculations.

  17. Modeling of an once through helical coil steam generator of a superheated cycle for sizing analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Sik; Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Eui Kwang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A thermal sizing code, named as HSGSA (Helical coil Steam Generator Sizing Analyzer), for a sodium heated helical coil steam generator is developed for KALIMER (Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor) design. The theoretical modeling of the shell and tube sides is described and relevant correlations are presented. For assessment of HSGSA, a reference plant design case is compared to the calculational outputs from HSGSA simulation. 9 refs., 6 figs. (Author)

  18. Comparing the Evolution of the Galaxy Disk Sizes with CDM Models The Hubble Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; Poli, F; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A

    2000-01-01

    The intrinsic sizes of the field galaxies with I-19) galaxies is skewed with respect to the CDM predictions and an excess of small-size disks (R_d<2 kpc) is already present at z~ 0.5. The excess persists up to z~3 and involves brighter galaxies . Such an excess may be reduced if luminosity-dependent effects, like starburst activity in interacting galaxies, are included in the physical mechanisms governing the star formation history in CDM models.

  19. Finite Size Scaling and "perfect" actions the three dimensional Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Ballesteros, H G; Martín-Mayor, V; Muñoz-Sudupe, A

    1998-01-01

    Using Finite-Size Scaling techniques, we numerically show that the first irrelevant operator of the lattice $\\lambda\\phi^4$ theory in three dimensions is (within errors) completely decoupled at $\\lambda=1.0$. This interesting result also holds in the Thermodynamical Limit, where the renormalized coupling constant shows an extraordinary reduction of the scaling-corrections when compared with the Ising model. It is argued that Finite-Size Scaling analysis can be a competitive method for finding improved actions.

  20. Investigation of the charging characteristics of micrometer sized droplets based on parallel plate capacitor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhen; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Xiaolong; Shen, Yang; Ji, Renjie; Cai, Baoping

    2013-02-01

    The charging characteristics of micrometer sized aqueous droplets have attracted more and more attentions due to the development of the microfluidics technology since the electrophoretic motion of a charged droplet can be used as the droplet actuation method. This work proposed a novel method of investigating the charging characteristics of micrometer sized aqueous droplets based on parallel plate capacitor model. With this method, the effects of the electric field strength, electrolyte concentration, and ion species on the charging characteristics of the aqueous droplets was investigated. Experimental results showed that the charging characteristics of micrometer sized droplets can be investigated by this method.

  1. Finite-size scaling study of the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg model

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, C; Holm, Christian; Janke, Wolfhard

    1993-01-01

    We use the single-cluster Monte Carlo update algorithm to simulate the three-dimensional classical Heisenberg model in the critical region on simple cubic lattices of size $L^3$ with $L=12, 16, 20, 24, 32, 40$, and $48$. By means of finite-size scaling analyses we compute high-precision estimates of the critical temperature and the critical exponents, using extensively histogram reweighting and optimization techniques. Measurements of the autocorrelation time show the expected reduction of critical slowing down at the phase transition. This allows simulations on significantly larger lattices than in previous studies and consequently a better control over systematic errors in finite-size scaling analyses.

  2. Finite Size Corrections to the Excitation Energy Transfer in a Massless Scalar Interaction Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maeda, N; Tobita, Y; Ishikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the excitation energy transfer (EET) for a simple model in which a virtual massless scalar particle is exchanged between two molecules. If the time interval is finite, then the finite size effect generally appears in a transition amplitude through the regions where the wave nature of quanta remains. We calculated the transition amplitude for EET and obtained finite size corrections to the standard formula derived by using Fermi's golden rule. These corrections for the transition amplitude appear outside the resonance energy region. The estimation in a photosynthesis system indicates that the finite size correction could reduce the EET time considerably.

  3. The void-size effect on plastic flow localization in the Gurson model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Wen; Yonggang, Huang; Keh-Chih, Hwang

    2004-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that the size of microvoids has a significant effect on the void growth rate. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the void size effect can influence the plastic flow localization in ductile materials. We have used the extended Gurson's dilatational plasticity theory, which accounts for the void size effect, to study the plastic flow localization in porous solids with long cylindrical voids. The localization model of Rice is adopted, in which the material inside the band may display a different response from that outside the band at the incipient plastic flow localization. The present study shows that it has little effect on the shear band angle.

  4. THE VOID-SIZE EFFECT ON PLASTIC FLOW LOCALIZATION IN THE GURSON MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jie; HUANG Yonggang; HWANG Keh-Chih

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the size of microvoids has a significant effect on the void growth rate. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the void size effect can influence the plastic flow localization in ductile materials. We have used the extended Gurson's dilatational plasticity theory, which accounts for the void size effect, to study the plastic flow localization in porous solids with long cylindrical voids. The localization model of Rice is adopted, in which the material inside the band may display a different response from that outside the band at the incipient plastic flow localization. The present study shows that it has little effect on the shear band angle.

  5. Does litter size variation affect models of terrestrial carnivore extinction risk and management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor S Devenish-Nelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Individual variation in both survival and reproduction has the potential to influence extinction risk. Especially for rare or threatened species, reliable population models should adequately incorporate demographic uncertainty. Here, we focus on an important form of demographic stochasticity: variation in litter sizes. We use terrestrial carnivores as an example taxon, as they are frequently threatened or of economic importance. Since data on intraspecific litter size variation are often sparse, it is unclear what probability distribution should be used to describe the pattern of litter size variation for multiparous carnivores. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used litter size data on 32 terrestrial carnivore species to test the fit of 12 probability distributions. The influence of these distributions on quasi-extinction probabilities and the probability of successful disease control was then examined for three canid species - the island fox Urocyon littoralis, the red fox Vulpes vulpes, and the African wild dog Lycaon pictus. Best fitting probability distributions differed among the carnivores examined. However, the discretised normal distribution provided the best fit for the majority of species, because variation among litter-sizes was often small. Importantly, however, the outcomes of demographic models were generally robust to the distribution used. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide reassurance for those using demographic modelling for the management of less studied carnivores in which litter size variation is estimated using data from species with similar reproductive attributes.

  6. A toxin-mediated size-structured population model: Finite difference approximation and well-posedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qihua; Wang, Hao

    2016-08-01

    The question of the effects of environmental toxins on ecological communities is of great interest from both environmental and conservational points of view. Mathematical models have been applied increasingly to predict the effects of toxins on a variety of ecological processes. Motivated by the fact that individuals with different sizes may have different sensitivities to toxins, we develop a toxin-mediated size-structured model which is given by a system of first order fully nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs). It is very possible that this work represents the first derivation of a PDE model in the area of ecotoxicology. To solve the model, an explicit finite difference approximation to this PDE system is developed. Existence-uniqueness of the weak solution to the model is established and convergence of the finite difference approximation to this unique solution is proved. Numerical examples are provided by numerically solving the PDE model using the finite difference scheme.

  7. Modelling the attack success of planktonic predators: patterns and mechanisms of prey size selectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caparroy, P.; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Visser, Andre

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of the attack success of planktonic predators (fish larvae and carnivorous copepods) is proposed. Based on a geometric representation of attack events, the model considers how the escape reaction characteristics (speed and direction) of copepod prey affect their probability...... of being captured. By combining the attack success model with previously published hydrodynamic models of predator and prey perception, we examine how predator foraging behaviour and prey perceptive ability affect the size spectra of encountered and captured copepod prey. We examine food size spectra of (i...... also acts in modifying the prey escape direction. The model demonstrates that the reorientation of the prey escape path towards the centre of the feeding current's flow field results in increased attack success of the predator. Finally, the model examines how variability in the kinetics of approach...

  8. Battery Sizing for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in Beijing: A TCO Model Based Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Hou; Hewu Wang; Minggao Ouyang

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a total cost of ownership (TCO) model for battery sizing of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The proposed systematic TCO model innovatively integrates the Beijing driving database and optimal PHEV energy management strategies developed earlier. The TCO, including battery, fuel, electricity, and salvage costs, is calculated in yearly cash flows. The salvage cost, based on battery degradation model, is proposed for the first time. The results show that the optimal b...

  9. Mathematical modeling of polystyrene particle size distribution produced by suspension polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado R.A.F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distribution (PSD of polystyrene particles produced by suspension polymerization is of fundamental importance in determining suspension stability and product quality attributes. Within a population balance framework, a model is proposed for suspension polymerization reactors to describe the evolution of the PSD. The model includes description of breakage and coalescence rates in terms of reaction kinetics and rheology of the dispersed phase. The model is validated with experimental data of styrene suspension polymerization.

  10. An experimental test of two mathematical models applied to the size-weight illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, V; Heineken, E

    1976-05-01

    Two quantitative models, which make different quantitative predictions for the amount of the size-weight illusion, were tested according to the psychophysical methods employed by the respective authors (magnitude estimation versus category ratings). Both models with their corresponding method were supported. This causes uncertainty over Anderson's chaim that the validity of both a model and the applied scale used is sufficiently test by the socalled joint testing procedure.

  11. Influence of Li-ion Battery Models in the Sizing of Hybrid Storage Systems with Supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Claudio; Barreras, Jorge Varela; Castro, Ricardo; Schaltz, Erik; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Araujo, Rui Esteves

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of the influence of different aggregated electrical circuit battery models in the sizing process of a hybrid energy storage system (ESS), composed by Li-ion batteries and supercapacitors (SCs). The aim is to find the number of cells required to propel a certain vehicle over a predefined driving cycle. During this process, three battery models will be considered. The first consists in a linear static zeroeth order battery model over a restricted operatin...

  12. Battery Sizing for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles in Beijing: A TCO Model Based Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Hou; Hewu Wang; Minggao Ouyang

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a total cost of ownership (TCO) model for battery sizing of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The proposed systematic TCO model innovatively integrates the Beijing driving database and optimal PHEV energy management strategies developed earlier. The TCO, including battery, fuel, electricity, and salvage costs, is calculated in yearly cash flows. The salvage cost, based on battery degradation model, is proposed for the first time. The results show that the optimal b...

  13. Quasi-long-range ordering in a finite-size 2D Heisenberg model

    CERN Document Server

    Kapikranian, O; Holovatch, Yu; Berche, Bertrand; Holovatch, Yurij; Kapikranian, Oleksandr

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the low-temperature behaviour of the Heisenberg model on a two-dimensional lattice of finite size. Presence of a residual magnetisation in a finite-size system enables us to use the spin wave approximation, which is known to give reliable results for the XY model at low temperatures T. For the system considered, we find that the spin-spin correlation function decays as 1/r^eta(T) for large separations r bringing about presence of a quasi-long-range ordering. We give analytic estimates for the exponent eta(T) in different regimes and support our findings by Monte Carlo simulations of the model on lattices of different sizes at different temperatures.

  14. Investigating feedback mechanisms between stress and grain-size: preliminary findings from finite-element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, A. J.; Prior, D. J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is widely accepted that changes in stress and grain size can induce a switch between grain-size insensitive (GSI) and sensitive (GSS) creep mechanisms. Under steady-state conditions, grains evolve to an equilibrium size in the boundary region between GSS and GSI, described by the paleopiezometer for a given material. Under these conditions, significant rheological weakening is not expected, as grain size reduction processes are balanced by grain growth processes. However, it has been shown that the stress field surrounding faults varies through the seismic cycle, with both rapid loading and unloading of stress possible in the co- and post-seismic stages. We propose that these changes in stress in the region of the brittle-ductile transition zone may be sufficient to force a deviation from the GSI-GSS boundary and thereby cause a change in grain size and creep mechanism prior to system re-equilibration. Here we present preliminary findings from numerical modelling of stress and grain size changes in response to loading of mechanical inhomogeneities. Our results are attained using a grain-size evolution (GSE) subroutine incorporated into the SULEC finite-element code developed by Susan Ellis and Susanne Buiter, which utilises an iterative approach of solving for spatial and temporal changes in differential stress, grain size and active creep mechanism. Preliminary models demonstrate that stress changes in response to the opening of a fracture in a flowing medium can be significant enough to cause a switch from GSI to GSS creep. These results are significant in the context of understanding spatial variations and feedback between stress, grain size and deformation mechanisms through the seismic cycle.

  15. Defeaturing CAD models using a geometry-based size field and facet-based reduction operators.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadros, William Roshan; Owen, Steven James

    2010-04-01

    We propose a method to automatically defeature a CAD model by detecting irrelevant features using a geometry-based size field and a method to remove the irrelevant features via facet-based operations on a discrete representation. A discrete B-Rep model is first created by obtaining a faceted representation of the CAD entities. The candidate facet entities are then marked for reduction by using a geometry-based size field. This is accomplished by estimating local mesh sizes based on geometric criteria. If the field value at a facet entity goes below a user specified threshold value then it is identified as an irrelevant feature and is marked for reduction. The reduction of marked facet entities is primarily performed using an edge collapse operator. Care is taken to retain a valid geometry and topology of the discrete model throughout the procedure. The original model is not altered as the defeaturing is performed on a separate discrete model. Associativity between the entities of the discrete model and that of original CAD model is maintained in order to decode the attributes and boundary conditions applied on the original CAD entities onto the mesh via the entities of the discrete model. Example models are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Contact behavior modelling and its size effect on proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Diankai; Peng, Linfa; Yi, Peiyun; Lai, Xinmin; Janßen, Holger; Lehnert, Werner

    2017-10-01

    Contact behavior between the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and bipolar plate (BPP) is of significant importance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Most current studies on contact behavior utilize experiments and finite element modelling and focus on fuel cells with graphite BPPs, which lead to high costs and huge computational requirements. The objective of this work is to build a more effective analytical method for contact behavior in fuel cells and investigate the size effect resulting from configuration alteration of channel and rib (channel/rib). Firstly, a mathematical description of channel/rib geometry is outlined in accordance with the fabrication of metallic BPP. Based on the interface deformation characteristic and Winkler surface model, contact pressure between BPP and GDL is then calculated to predict contact resistance and GDL porosity as evaluative parameters of contact behavior. Then, experiments on BPP fabrication and contact resistance measurement are conducted to validate the model. The measured results demonstrate an obvious dependence on channel/rib size. Feasibility of the model used in graphite fuel cells is also discussed. Finally, size factor is proposed for evaluating the rule of size effect. Significant increase occurs in contact resistance and porosity for higher size factor, in which channel/rib width decrease.

  17. Modified Continuum Mechanics Modeling on Size-Dependent Properties of Piezoelectric Nanomaterials: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhi; Jiang, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Piezoelectric nanomaterials (PNs) are attractive for applications including sensing, actuating, energy harvesting, among others in nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS) because of their excellent electromechanical coupling, mechanical and physical properties. However, the properties of PNs do not coincide with their bulk counterparts and depend on the particular size. A large amount of efforts have been devoted to studying the size-dependent properties of PNs by using experimental characterization, atomistic simulation and continuum mechanics modeling with the consideration of the scale features of the nanomaterials. This paper reviews the recent progresses and achievements in the research on the continuum mechanics modeling of the size-dependent mechanical and physical properties of PNs. We start from the fundamentals of the modified continuum mechanics models for PNs, including the theories of surface piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and non-local piezoelectricity, with the introduction of the modified piezoelectric beam and plate models particularly for nanostructured piezoelectric materials with certain configurations. Then, we give a review on the investigation of the size-dependent properties of PNs by using the modified continuum mechanics models, such as the electromechanical coupling, bending, vibration, buckling, wave propagation and dynamic characteristics. Finally, analytical modeling and analysis of nanoscale actuators and energy harvesters based on piezoelectric nanostructures are presented. PMID:28336861

  18. Modified Continuum Mechanics Modeling on Size-Dependent Properties of Piezoelectric Nanomaterials: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric nanomaterials (PNs are attractive for applications including sensing, actuating, energy harvesting, among others in nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS because of their excellent electromechanical coupling, mechanical and physical properties. However, the properties of PNs do not coincide with their bulk counterparts and depend on the particular size. A large amount of efforts have been devoted to studying the size-dependent properties of PNs by using experimental characterization, atomistic simulation and continuum mechanics modeling with the consideration of the scale features of the nanomaterials. This paper reviews the recent progresses and achievements in the research on the continuum mechanics modeling of the size-dependent mechanical and physical properties of PNs. We start from the fundamentals of the modified continuum mechanics models for PNs, including the theories of surface piezoelectricity, flexoelectricity and non-local piezoelectricity, with the introduction of the modified piezoelectric beam and plate models particularly for nanostructured piezoelectric materials with certain configurations. Then, we give a review on the investigation of the size-dependent properties of PNs by using the modified continuum mechanics models, such as the electromechanical coupling, bending, vibration, buckling, wave propagation and dynamic characteristics. Finally, analytical modeling and analysis of nanoscale actuators and energy harvesters based on piezoelectric nanostructures are presented.

  19. Particle-Size-Grouping Model of Precipitation Kinetics in Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Thomas, Brian G.

    2012-03-01

    The formation, growth, and size distribution of precipitates greatly affects the microstructure and properties of microalloyed steels. Computational particle-size-grouping (PSG) kinetic models based on population balances are developed to simulate precipitate particle growth resulting from collision and diffusion mechanisms. First, the generalized PSG method for collision is explained clearly and verified. Then, a new PSG method is proposed to model diffusion-controlled precipitate nucleation, growth, and coarsening with complete mass conservation and no fitting parameters. Compared with the original population-balance models, this PSG method saves significant computation and preserves enough accuracy to model a realistic range of particle sizes. Finally, the new PSG method is combined with an equilibrium phase fraction model for plain carbon steels and is applied to simulate the precipitated fraction of aluminum nitride and the size distribution of niobium carbide during isothermal aging processes. Good matches are found with experimental measurements, suggesting that the new PSG method offers a promising framework for the future development of realistic models of precipitation.

  20. A prognostic model of the sea ice floe size and thickness distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Horvat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sea ice exhibits considerable seasonal and longer-term variations in extent, concentration, thickness and age, and is characterized by a complex and continuously changing distribution of floe sizes and thicknesses. Models of sea ice used in current climate models keep track of its concentration and of the distribution of ice thicknesses, but do not account for the floe size distribution and its potential effects on air–sea exchange and sea-ice evolution. Accurately capturing sea-ice variability in climate models may require a better understanding and representation of the distribution of floe sizes and thicknesses. We develop and demonstrate a model for the evolution of the joint sea-ice floe size and thickness distribution that depends on atmospheric and oceanic forcing fields. The model accounts for effects due to multiple processes that are active in the marginal and seasonal ice zones: freezing and melting along the lateral side and base of floes, mechanical interactions due to floe collisions (ridging and rafting and sea-ice fracture due to swell propagation into the ice pack. The model is then examined and demonstrated in a series of idealized test cases.

  1. A preliminary model to avoid the overestimation of sample size in bioequivalence studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, E; Abraira, V; Guerra, P; Borobia, A M; Duque, B; López, J L; Mosquera, B; Lubomirov, R; Carcas, A J; Frías, J

    2013-02-01

    Often the only available data in literature for sample size estimations in bioequivalence studies is intersubject variability, which tends to result in overestimation of sample size. In this paper, we proposed a preliminary model of intrasubject variability based on intersubject variability for Cmax and AUC data from randomized, crossovers, bioequivalence (BE) studies. From 93 Cmax and 121 AUC data from test-reference comparisons that fulfilled BE criteria, we calculated intersubject variability for the reference formulation and intrasubject variability from ANOVA. Lineal and exponential models (y=a(1-e-bx)) were fitted weighted by the inverse of the variance, to predict the intrasubject variability based on intersubject variability. To validate the model we calculated the coefficient of cross-validation of data from 30 new BE studies. The models fit very well (R2=0.997 and 0.990 for Cmax and AUC respectively) and the cross-validation correlation were 0.847 for Cmax and 0.572 for AUC. A preliminary model analyses allow us to estimate the intrasubject variability based on intersubject variability for sample size calculation purposes in BE studies. This approximation provides an opportunity for sample size reduction avoiding unnecessary exposure of healthy volunteers. Further modelling studies are desirable to confirm these results especially suggestions of the higher intersubject variability range.

  2. A mathematical model for the product mixing and lot-sizing problem by considering stochastic demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionicio Neira Rodado

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The product-mix planning and the lot size decisions are some of the most fundamental research themes for the operations research community. The fact that markets have become more unpredictable has increaed the importance of these issues, rapidly. Currently, directors need to work with product-mix planning and lot size decision models by introducing stochastic variables related to the demands, lead times, etc. However, some real mathematical models involving stochastic variables are not capable of obtaining good solutions within short commuting times. Several heuristics and metaheuristics have been developed to deal with lot decisions problems, in order to obtain high quality results within short commuting times. Nevertheless, the search for an efficient model by considering product mix and deal size with stochastic demand is a prominent research area. This paper aims to develop a general model for the product-mix, and lot size decision within a stochastic demand environment, by introducing the Economic Value Added (EVA as the objective function of a product portfolio selection. The proposed stochastic model has been solved by using a Sample Average Approximation (SAA scheme. The proposed model obtains high quality results within acceptable computing times.

  3. Statistical tests with accurate size and power for balanced linear mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Keith E; Edwards, Lloyd J; Simpson, Sean L; Taylor, Douglas J

    2007-08-30

    The convenience of linear mixed models for Gaussian data has led to their widespread use. Unfortunately, standard mixed model tests often have greatly inflated test size in small samples. Many applications with correlated outcomes in medical imaging and other fields have simple properties which do not require the generality of a mixed model. Alternately, stating the special cases as a general linear multivariate model allows analysing them with either the univariate or multivariate approach to repeated measures (UNIREP, MULTIREP). Even in small samples, an appropriate UNIREP or MULTIREP test always controls test size and has a good power approximation, in sharp contrast to mixed model tests. Hence, mixed model tests should never be used when one of the UNIREP tests (uncorrected, Huynh-Feldt, Geisser-Greenhouse, Box conservative) or MULTIREP tests (Wilks, Hotelling-Lawley, Roy's, Pillai-Bartlett) apply. Convenient methods give exact power for the uncorrected and Box conservative tests. Simulations demonstrate that new power approximations for all four UNIREP tests eliminate most inaccuracy in existing methods. In turn, free software implements the approximations to give a better choice of sample size. Two repeated measures power analyses illustrate the methods. The examples highlight the advantages of examining the entire response surface of power as a function of sample size, mean differences, and variability.

  4. Determining the optimum cell size of digital elevation model for hydrologic application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arabinda Sharma; K N Tiwari; P B S Bhadoria

    2011-08-01

    Scale is one of the most important but unsolved issues in various scientific disciplines that deal with spatial data. The arbitrary choice of grid cell size for contour interpolated digital elevation models (DEM) is one of the major sources of uncertainty in the hydrologic modelling process. In this paper, an attempt was made to identify methods for determining an optimum cell size for a contour interpolated DEM in prior to hydrologic modelling. Twenty-meter interval contour lines were used to generate DEMs of five different resolutions, viz., 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 m using TOPOGRID algorithm. The obtained DEMs were explored for their intrinsic quality using four different methods, i.e., sink analysis, fractal dimension of derived stream network, entropy measurement and semivariogram modelling. These methods were applied to determine the level artifacts (interpolation error) in DEM surface as well as derived stream network, spatial information content and spatial variability respectively. The results indicated that a 90 m cell size is sufficient to capture the terrain variability for subsequent hydrologic modelling in the study area. The significance of this research work is that it provides methods which DEM users can apply to select an appropriate DEM cell size in prior to detailed hydrologic modelling.

  5. Finite-size scaling analysis of a nonequilibrium phase transition in the naming game model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigatti, E.; Hernández, A.

    2016-11-01

    We realize an extensive numerical study of the naming game model with a noise term which accounts for perturbations. This model displays a nonequilibrium phase transition between an absorbing ordered consensus state, which occurs for small noise, and a disordered phase with fragmented clusters characterized by heterogeneous memories, which emerges at strong noise levels. The nature of the phase transition is studied by means of a finite-size scaling analysis of the moments. We observe a scaling behavior typical of a discontinuous transition and we are able to estimate the thermodynamic limit. The scaling behavior of the clusters size seems also compatible with this kind of transition.

  6. Mathematical modeling of pigment dispersion taking into account the full agglomerate particle size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2017-01-01

    particle size distribution was simulated. Data from two previous experimental investigations were used for model validation. The first concerns two different yellow organic pigments dispersed in nitrocellulose/ethanol vehicles in a ball mill and the second a red organic pigment dispersed in a solvent-based....... The only adjustable parameter used was an apparent rate constant for the linear agglomerate erosion rate. Model simulations, at selected values of time, for the full agglomerate particle size distribution were in good qualitative agreement with the measured values. A quantitative match of the experimental...

  7. Finite size scaling analysis of a nonequilibrium phase transition in the naming game model

    CERN Document Server

    Brigatti, E

    2016-01-01

    We realize an extensive numerical study of the Naming Game model with a noise term which accounts for perturbations. This model displays a non-equilibrium phase transition between an absorbing ordered consensus state, which occurs for small noise, and a disordered phase with fragmented clusters characterized by heterogeneous memories, which emerges at strong noise levels. The nature of the phase transition is studied by means of a finite-size scaling analysis of the moments. We observe a scaling behavior typical of a discontinuous transition and we are able to estimate the thermodynamic limit. The scaling behavior of the clusters size seems also compatible with this kind of transition.

  8. Analysis of wave propagation in micro/nanobeam-like structures: A size-dependent model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing-Lei Wang; Jun-Feng Zhao; Shen-Jie Zhou; Xi Chen

    2012-01-01

    By incorporating the strain gradient elasticity into the classical Bernoulli-Euler beam and Timoshenko beam models,the size-dependent characteristics of wave propagation in micro/nanobeams is studied.The formulations of dispersion relation are explicitly derived for both strain gradient beam models,and presented for different material length scale parameters (MLSPs).For both phenomenological size-dependent beam models,the angular frequency,phase velocity and group velocity increase with increasing wave number.However,the velocity ratios approach different values for different beam models,indicating an interesting behavior of the asymptotic velocity ratio.The present theory is also compared with the nonlocal continuum beam models.

  9. GESP: A computer program for modeling genetic effective population size, inbreeding, and divergence in substructured populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Fredrik; Laikre, Linda; Hössjer, Ola; Ryman, Nils

    2017-03-24

    The genetically effective population size (Ne) is of key importance for quantifying rates of inbreeding and genetic drift, and is often used in conservation management to set targets for genetic viability. The concept was developed for single, isolated populations and the mathematical means for analyzing the expected Ne in complex, subdivided populations have previously not been available. We recently developed such analytical theory and central parts of that work have now been incorporated into a freely available software tool presented here. GESP (Genetic Effective population size, inbreeding, and divergence in Substructured Populations) is R-based and designed to model short and long term patterns of genetic differentiation and effective population size of subdivided populations. The algorithms performed by GESP allow exact computation of global and local inbreeding and eigenvalue effective population size, predictions of genetic divergence among populations (GST) as well as departures from random mating (FIS, FIT) while varying i) subpopulation census and effective size, separately or including trend of the global population size, ii) rate and direction of migration between all pairs of subpopulations, iii) degree of relatedness and divergence among subpopulations, iv) ploidy (haploid or diploid), and v) degree of selfing. Here, we describe GESP and exemplify its use in conservation genetics modeling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling of size dependent failure in cardiovascular stent struts under tension and bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harewood, F J; McHugh, P E

    2007-09-01

    Cardiovascular stents are cylindrical mesh-like metallic structures that are used to treat atherosclerosis. The thickness of stent struts are typically in the range of 50-150 microm. At this microscopic size scale, the tensile failure strain has been shown to be size dependent. Micromechanically representative computational models have captured this size effect in tension. In this paper polycrystalline models incorporating material fracture are used to investigate size effects for realistic stent strut geometries and loading modes. The specific loading a stent undergoes during deployment is uniquely captured and the implications for stent design are considered. Fracture analysis is also performed, identifying trends in terms of strut thickness and loading type. The results show, in addition to the size effect in tension, further size effects in different loading conditions. The results of the loading analyses are combined to produce a tension and bending failure graph. This design safety diagram is presented as a tool to predict failure of stent struts. This study is particularly significant given the current interest in producing smaller stents.

  11. A size-dependent constitutive modelling framework for localised failure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Giang D.; Nguyen, Chi T.; Nguyen, Vinh P.; Bui, Ha H.; Shen, Luming

    2016-08-01

    Localised deformation of materials usually takes place in thin bands during the nonlinear phase of the deformation process. The orientation and size of these localisation bands are important properties characterising the post-localisation behaviour of the materials, and hence should be taken into account in constitutive modelling. In this research, a new approach is proposed for the integration of both size and orientation of a localisation band in the constitutive description beyond the onset of localisation. Since a length scale related to the size of the localisation band appears in the model description, its post-localisation response then scales with both the band size and the size of the volume element containing it. Therefore, size effects are intrinsically included and post-localisation behaviour is correctly captured, which helps ensure convergence of numerical solutions upon discretisation refinement in numerical analysis of boundary value problems. The concept together with implementation features of the framework and its performances at constitutive level and in the analysis of boundary value problems are presented in this paper.

  12. Glassy dynamics of model colloidal polymers: The effect of "monomer" size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Bo-kai; Li, Hui-shu; Chen, Kang; Tian, Wen-de; Tong, Pei-qing

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, attempts have been made to assemble colloidal particles into chains, which are termed "colloidal polymers." An apparent difference between molecular and colloidal polymers is the "monomer" size. Here, we propose a model to represent the variation from molecular polymer to colloidal polymer and study the quantitative differences in their glassy dynamics. For chains, two incompatible local length scales, i.e., monomer size and bond length, are manifested in the radial distribution function and intramolecular correlation function. The mean square displacement of monomers exhibits Rouse-like sub-diffusion at intermediate time/length scale and the corresponding exponent depends on the volume fraction and the monomer size. We find that the threshold volume fraction at which the caging regime emerges can be used as a rescaling unit so that the data of localization length versus volume fraction for different monomer sizes can gather close to an exponential curve. The increase of monomer size effectively increases the hardness of monomers and thus makes the colloidal polymers vitrify at lower volume fraction. Static and dynamic equivalences between colloidal polymers of different monomer sizes have been discussed. In the case of having the same peak time of the non-Gaussian parameter, the motion of monomers of larger size is much less non-Gaussian. The mode-coupling critical exponents for colloidal polymers are in agreement with that of flexible bead-spring chains.

  13. Range and Size Estimation Based on a Coordinate Transformation Model for Driving Assistance Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bing-Fei; Lin, Chuan-Tsai; Chen, Yen-Lin

    This paper presents new approaches for the estimation of range between the preceding vehicle and the experimental vehicle, estimation of vehicle size and its projective size, and dynamic camera calibration. First, our proposed approaches adopt a camera model to transform coordinates from the ground plane onto the image plane to estimate the relative position between the detected vehicle and the camera. Then, to estimate the actual and projective size of the preceding vehicle, we propose a new estimation method. This method can estimate the range from a preceding vehicle to the camera based on contact points between its tires and the ground and then estimate the actual size of the vehicle according to the positions of its vertexes in the image. Because the projective size of a vehicle varies with respect to its distance to the camera, we also present a simple and rapid method of estimating a vehicle's projective height, which allows a reduction in computational time for size estimation in real-time systems. Errors caused by the application of different camera parameters are also estimated and analyzed in this study. The estimation results are used to determine suitable parameters during camera installation to suppress estimation errors. Finally, to guarantee robustness of the detection system, a new efficient approach to dynamic calibration is presented to obtain accurate camera parameters, even when they are changed by camera vibration owing to on-road driving. Experimental results demonstrate that our approaches can provide accurate and robust estimation results of range and size of target vehicles.

  14. Models for Unsaturated Hydraulic Conductivity Based on Truncated Lognormal Pore-size Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya

    2013-01-01

    We develop a closed-form three-parameter model for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity associated with a three-parameter lognormal model of moisture retention, which is based on lognormal grainsize distribution. The derivation of the model is made possible by a slight modification to the theory of Mualem. We extend the three-parameter lognormal distribution to a four-parameter model that also truncates the pore size distribution at a minimum pore radius. We then develop the corresponding four-parameter model for moisture retention and the associated closed-form expression for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. The four-parameter model is fitted to experimental data, similar to the models of Kosugi and van Genuchten. The proposed four-parameter model retains the physical basis of Kosugi's model, while improving fit to observed data especially when simultaneously fitting pressure-saturation and pressure-conductivity data.

  15. Modeling grain size variations of aeolian gypsum deposits at White Sands, New Mexico, using AVIRIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrefat, H.A.; Goodell, P.C.; Hubbard, B.E.; Langford, R.P.; Aldouri, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    also show that there are no significant differences between modeled and laboratory-measured grain size values. Hyperspectral grain size modeling can help to determine dynamic processes shaping the formation of the dunes such as wind directions, and the relative strengths of winds through time. This has implications for studying such processes on other planetary landforms that have mineralogy with unique absorption bands in VNIR-SWIR hyperspectral data. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Failure of intravenous metoprolol to limit acute myocardial infarct size in a nonreperfused porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, K B; Hilwig, R W; Warner, A; Basnight, M; Ewy, G A

    1995-04-01

    The usefulness of intravenous beta-adrenergic receptor blockade in limiting infarct size when neither reperfusion nor collateral flow occurs is unknown. The effect of intravenous metoprolol on limiting myocardial infarct size was therefore examined in a nonreperfused porcine model. Closed-chest techniques were used to occlude the left anterior descending coronary artery, after which animals were randomized at 20 minutes to receive intravenous metoprolol, 0.75 mg/kg, or placebo. Infarct size examined at 5 hours with Evans blue and triphenyltetrazolium staining techniques was expressed as a percentage of total ventricular myocardium at ischemic risk. This percentage was not significantly different between the groups (84% +/- 5% with metoprolol vs 90% +/- 4% with placebo; p = 0.4). Myocardial infarct size was not significantly decreased at 5 hours by early administration of intravenous metoprolol when the infarct artery remained occluded and collateral flow was minimal.

  17. Single-peak distribution model of particulate size for welding aerosols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施雨湘; 李爱农

    2003-01-01

    A large number of particulate size distributions of welding aerosols are measured by means of DMPS method, several distribution types are presented. Among them the single-peak distribution is the basic composing unit of particulate size. The research on the mathematic models and distributions functions shows that the single-peak distribution features the log-normal distribution. The diagram-estimating method (DEM) is a concise approach to dealing with distribution types, obtaining distribution functions for the particulate sizes of welding aerosols. It proves that the distribution function of particulate size possesses the extending property, being from quantity distribution to volume, as well as high-order moment distributions, with K-S method verifying the application of single-peak distribution and of DEM.

  18. New general pore size distribution model by classical thermodynamics application: Activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lordgooei, M.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A model is developed using classical thermodynamics to characterize pore size distributions (PSDs) of materials containing micropores and mesopores. The thermal equation of equilibrium adsorption (TEEA) is used to provide thermodynamic properties and relate the relative pore filling pressure of vapors to the characteristic pore energies of the adsorbent/adsorbate system for micropore sizes. Pore characteristic energies are calculated by averaging of interaction energies between adsorbate molecules and adsorbent pore walls as well as considering adsorbate-adsorbate interactions. A modified Kelvin equation is used to characterize mesopore sizes by considering variation of the adsorbate surface tension and by excluding the adsorbed film layer for the pore size. The modified-Kelvin equation provides similar pore filling pressures as predicted by density functional theory. Combination of these models provides a complete PSD of the adsorbent for the micropores and mesopores. The resulting PSD is compared with the PSDs from Jaroniec and Choma and Horvath and Kawazoe models as well as a first-order approximation model using Polanyi theory. The major importance of this model is its basis on classical thermodynamic properties, less simplifying assumptions in its derivation compared to other methods, and ease of use.

  19. How does language model size effects speech recognition accuracy for the Turkish language?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam ASEFİSARAY

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we aimed at investigating the effect of Language Model (LM size on Speech Recognition (SR accuracy. We also provided details of our approach for obtaining the LM for Turkish. Since LM is obtained by statistical processing of raw text, we expect that by increasing the size of available data for training the LM, SR accuracy will improve. Since this study is based on recognition of Turkish, which is a highly agglutinative language, it is important to find out the appropriate size for the training data. The minimum required data size is expected to be much higher than the data needed to train a language model for a language with low level of agglutination such as English. In the experiments we also tried to adjust the Language Model Weight (LMW and Active Token Count (ATC parameters of LM as these are expected to be different for a highly agglutinative language. We showed that by increasing the training data size to an appropriate level, the recognition accuracy improved on the other hand changes on LMW and ATC did not have a positive effect on Turkish speech recognition accuracy.

  20. A simulation study of sample size for multilevel logistic regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moineddin Rahim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies conducted in health and social sciences collect individual level data as outcome measures. Usually, such data have a hierarchical structure, with patients clustered within physicians, and physicians clustered within practices. Large survey data, including national surveys, have a hierarchical or clustered structure; respondents are naturally clustered in geographical units (e.g., health regions and may be grouped into smaller units. Outcomes of interest in many fields not only reflect continuous measures, but also binary outcomes such as depression, presence or absence of a disease, and self-reported general health. In the framework of multilevel studies an important problem is calculating an adequate sample size that generates unbiased and accurate estimates. Methods In this paper simulation studies are used to assess the effect of varying sample size at both the individual and group level on the accuracy of the estimates of the parameters and variance components of multilevel logistic regression models. In addition, the influence of prevalence of the outcome and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC is examined. Results The results show that the estimates of the fixed effect parameters are unbiased for 100 groups with group size of 50 or higher. The estimates of the variance covariance components are slightly biased even with 100 groups and group size of 50. The biases for both fixed and random effects are severe for group size of 5. The standard errors for fixed effect parameters are unbiased while for variance covariance components are underestimated. Results suggest that low prevalent events require larger sample sizes with at least a minimum of 100 groups and 50 individuals per group. Conclusion We recommend using a minimum group size of 50 with at least 50 groups to produce valid estimates for multi-level logistic regression models. Group size should be adjusted under conditions where the prevalence

  1. Modelling of the Bubble Size Distribution in an Aerated Stirred Tank: Theoretical and Numerical Comparison of Different Breakup Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kálal Zbyněk

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main topic of this study is the mathematical modelling of bubble size distributions in an aerated stirred tank using the population balance method. The air-water system consisted of a fully baffled vessel with a diameter of 0.29 m, which was equipped with a six-bladed Rushton turbine. The secondary phase was introduced through a ring sparger situated under the impeller. Calculations were performed with the CFD software CFX 14.5. The turbulent quantities were predicted using the standard k-ε turbulence model. Coalescence and breakup of bubbles were modelled using the MUSIG method with 24 bubble size groups. For the bubble size distribution modelling, the breakup model by Luo and Svendsen (1996 typically has been used in the past. However, this breakup model was thoroughly reviewed and its practical applicability was questioned. Therefore, three different breakup models by Martínez-Bazán et al. (1999a, b, Lehr et al. (2002 and Alopaeus et al. (2002 were implemented in the CFD solver and applied to the system. The resulting Sauter mean diameters and local bubble size distributions were compared with experimental data.

  2. Practical approach to determine sample size for building logistic prediction models using high-throughput data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Dae-Soon; Lee, DongHyuk; Lee, Kyusang; Jung, Sin-Ho; Ahn, Taejin; Lee, Eunjin; Sohn, Insuk; Chung, Jongsuk; Park, Woongyang; Huh, Nam; Lee, Jae Won

    2015-02-01

    An empirical method of sample size determination for building prediction models was proposed recently. Permutation method which is used in this procedure is a commonly used method to address the problem of overfitting during cross-validation while evaluating the performance of prediction models constructed from microarray data. But major drawback of such methods which include bootstrapping and full permutations is prohibitively high cost of computation required for calculating the sample size. In this paper, we propose that a single representative null distribution can be used instead of a full permutation by using both simulated and real data sets. During simulation, we have used a dataset with zero effect size and confirmed that the empirical type I error approaches to 0.05. Hence this method can be confidently applied to reduce overfitting problem during cross-validation. We have observed that pilot data set generated by random sampling from real data could be successfully used for sample size determination. We present our results using an experiment that was repeated for 300 times while producing results comparable to that of full permutation method. Since we eliminate full permutation, sample size estimation time is not a function of pilot data size. In our experiment we have observed that this process takes around 30min. With the increasing number of clinical studies, developing efficient sample size determination methods for building prediction models is critical. But empirical methods using bootstrap and permutation usually involve high computing costs. In this study, we propose a method that can reduce required computing time drastically by using representative null distribution of permutations. We use data from pilot experiments to apply this method for designing clinical studies efficiently for high throughput data.

  3. Finite-size effects in a model for plasticity of amorphous composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyukodi, Botond; Lemarchand, Claire; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the plastic behavior of an amorphous matrix reinforced by hard particles. A mesoscopic depinning-like model accounting for Eshelby elastic interactions is implemented. Only the effect of a plastic disorder is considered. Numerical results show a complex size dependence of the effective...... flow stress of the amorphous composite. In particular, the departure from the mixing law shows opposite trends associated to the competing effects of the matrix and the reinforcing particles, respectively. The reinforcing mechanisms and their effects on localization are discussed. Plastic strain...... is shown to gradually concentrate on the weakest band of the system. This correlation of the plastic behavior with the material structure is used to design a simple analytical model. The latter nicely captures reinforcement size effects in (logN/N)1/2, where N is the linear size of the system, observed...

  4. An Empirical Bayes Mixture Model for Effect Size Distributions in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Wesley K.; Wang, Yunpeng; Schork, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the distribution of effects from genome-wide genotyping data is crucial for understanding important aspects of the genetic architecture of complex traits, such as number or proportion of non-null loci, average proportion of phenotypic variance explained per non-null effect, power...... for discovery, and polygenic risk prediction. To this end, previous work has used effect-size models based on various distributions, including the normal and normal mixture distributions, among others. In this paper we propose a scale mixture of two normals model for effect size distributions of genome...... of variance explained by genotyped SNPs, CD and SZ have a broadly dissimilar genetic architecture, due to differing mean effect size and proportion of non-null loci....

  5. Development of the ECLSS Sizing Analysis Tool and ARS Mass Balance Model Using Microsoft Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, E. P.; Yeh, H. Y.; Lin, C. H.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a Microsoft Excel-compatible Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) sizing analysis "tool" for conceptual design of Mars human exploration missions makes it possible for a user to choose a certain technology in the corresponding subsystem. This tool estimates the mass, volume, and power requirements of every technology in a subsystem and the system as a whole. Furthermore, to verify that a design sized by the ECLSS Sizing Tool meets the mission requirements and integrates properly, mass balance models that solve for component throughputs of such ECLSS systems as the Water Recovery System (WRS) and Air Revitalization System (ARS) must be developed. The ARS Mass Balance Model will be discussed in this paper.

  6. Direct measurement of the critical pore size in a model membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Ilton, Mark; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We study pore nucleation in a model membrane system, a freestanding polymer film. Nucleated pores smaller than a critical size close, while pores larger than the critical size grow. Holes of varying size were purposefully prepared in liquid polymer films, and their evolution in time was monitored using optical and atomic force microscopy to extract a critical radius. The critical radius scales linearly with film thickness for a homopolymer film. The results agree with a simple model which takes into account the energy cost due to surface area at the edge of the pore. The energy cost at the edge of the pore is experimentally varied by using a lamellar-forming diblock copolymer membrane. The underlying molecular architecture causes increased frustration at the pore edge resulting in an enhanced cost of pore formation.

  7. Information Measure for Size Distribution of Avalanches in the Bak-Sneppen Evolution Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; CAI Xu

    2003-01-01

    Information of avalanche size distribution is measured by calculating information entropy (IE) in the Bak-Sneppen evolution model. It is found that the IE increases as the model evolves. Specifically, we establish the relation between the IE and the self-organized threshold fc ? The variation of the IE near the critical point yields an exponent entropy index E = (T - l)/size distribution and avalanche size cutoff, respectively. A new quantity DT(g) (g = 1 - (fc - G)'r-1' , where G is the gap of the current state), denned as 1 - IT(g)/IT(l), with IT(g) and /T(l) being the IE for the current state and the critical one respectively, is suggested that it represents the distance between the state with gap G and the critical one.

  8. The effect of food portion sizes on the obesity prevention using system dynamics modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidin, Norhaslinda Zainal; Zulkepli, Jafri Hj; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2014-09-01

    The rise in income and population growth have increased the demand for food and induced changes in food habits, food purchasing and consumption patterns in Malaysia. With this transition, one of the plausible causes of weight gain and obesity is the frequent consumption of outside food which is synonymous with bigger portion size. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to develop a system dynamics model to analyse the effect of reducing food portion size on weight and obesity prevention. This study combines the different strands of knowledge comprise of nutrition, physical activity and body metabolism. These elements are synthesized into a system dynamics model called SIMULObese. Findings from this study suggested that changes in eating behavior should not emphasize only on limiting the food portion size consumption. The efforts should also consider other eating events such as controlling the meal frequency and limiting intake of high-calorie food in developing guidelines to prevent obesity.

  9. Plastic Damage Model to Evaluate the Fracture Size of Semi-Rigid Base Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple supported beam model has been presented to simulate the response of semi-rigid pavement structure, which are consistent of the upper layer, middle layer, bottom layer, base and sub base course, during the cycle vehicle loading. This mechanics model coupled with plastic-damage mechanics model could simulate the limit broken of the pavement structure in condition that soil base layer losing bearing capacity gradually. In the meanwhile, numerical calculations based on preceding mechanics model, using the FEM software ABAQUS, have been used to define the broken size of beam. The results indicated that: when the size of simple supported beam expanded to 10 m, brittle damage could happen immediately, Just the standard vehicle loading (about 0.7 Mpa has been implement once. Objective of this study is to provide a physical and rather concrete explanation for the style and concept of the semi-rigid pavement brittle broken.

  10. Soil and water assessment tool model calibration results for different catchment sizes in poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostojski, Mieczyslaw S; Niedbala, Jerzy; Orlinska-Wozniak, Paulina; Wilk, Pawel; Gębala, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The watershed model SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) can be used to implement the requirements of international agreements that Poland has ratified. Among these requirements are the establishment of catchment-based, rather than administrative-based, management plans and spatial information systems. Furthermore, Polish law requires that management of water resources be based on catchment systems. This article explores the use of the SWAT model in the implementation of catchment-based water management in Poland. Specifically, the impacts of basin size on calibration and on the results of the simulation process were analyzed. SWAT was set up and calibrated for three Polish watersheds of varying sizes: (i) Gąsawka, a small basin (>593.7 km), (ii) Rega, a medium-sized basin (2766.8 km), and (iii) Warta, a large basin (54,500 km) representing about 17.4% of Polish territory. The results indicated that the size of the catchment has an impact on the calibration process and simulation outputs. Several factors influenced by the size of the catchment affected the modeling results. Among these factors are the number of measurement points within the basin and the length of the measuring period and data quality at checkpoints as determined by the position of the measuring station. It was concluded that the SWAT model is a suitable tool for the implementation of catchment-based water management in Poland regardless of watershed size. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  11. Statistical model of rough surface contact accounting for size-dependent plasticity and asperity interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H.; Vakis, A. I.; Liu, X.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2017-09-01

    The work by Greenwood and Williamson (GW) has initiated a simple but effective method of contact mechanics: statistical modeling based on the mechanical response of a single asperity. Two main assumptions of the original GW model are that the asperity response is purely elastic and that there is no interaction between asperities. However, as asperities lie on a continuous substrate, the deformation of one asperity will change the height of all other asperities through deformation of the substrate and will thus influence subsequent contact evolution. Moreover, a high asperity contact pressure will result in plasticity, which below tens of microns is size dependent, with smaller being harder. In this paper, the asperity interaction effect is taken into account through substrate deformation, while a size-dependent plasticity model is adopted for individual asperities. The intrinsic length in the strain gradient plasticity (SGP) theory is obtained by fitting to two-dimensional discrete dislocation plasticity simulations of the flattening of a single asperity. By utilizing the single asperity response in three dimensions and taking asperity interaction into account, a statistical calculation of rough surface contact is performed. The effectiveness of the statistical model is addressed by comparison with full-detail finite element simulations of rough surface contact using SGP. Throughout the paper, our focus is on the difference of contact predictions based on size-dependent plasticity as compared to conventional size-independent plasticity.

  12. Finite-size scaling of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Pepé, M; Forcrand, Ph. de

    2002-01-01

    We perform a study of the universality of the finite size scaling functions of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model. Close to the hot/cold phase transition, we observe very good agreement with the same scaling functions of the 4d SU(2) Yang--Mills theory at the deconfinement phase transition.

  13. Finite-size scaling of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model

    OpenAIRE

    Pepe, M.; de Forcrand, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    We perform a study of the universality of the finite size scaling functions of interface free energies in the 3d Ising model. Close to the hot/cold phase transition, we observe very good agreement with the same scaling functions of the 4d SU(2) Yang--Mills theory at the deconfinement phase transition.

  14. Sizes and ages of SDSS ellipticals: Comparison with hierarchical galaxy formation models

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco; Bernardi, Mariangela; Dai, Xinyu; Hyde, Joseph B; Sheth, Ravi K

    2009-01-01

    In a sample of about 45,700 early-type galaxies extracted from SDSS, we find that the shape, normalization, and dispersion around the mean size-stellar mass relation is the same for young and old systems, provided the stellar mass is greater than 3*10^10 Msun. This is difficult to reproduce in pure passive evolution models, which generically predict older galaxies to be much more compact than younger ones of the same stellar mass. However, this aspect of our measurements is well reproduced by hierarchical models of galaxy formation. Whereas the models predict more compact galaxies at high redshifts, subsequent minor, dry mergers increase the sizes of the more massive objects, resulting in a flat size-age relation at the present time. At lower masses, the models predict that mergers are less frequent, so that the expected anti-correlation between age and size is not completely erased. This is in good agreement with our data: below 3*10^10 Msun, the effective radius R_e is a factor of ~2 lower for older galaxie...

  15. Using Structural Equation Modeling to Assess Functional Connectivity in the Brain: Power and Sample Size Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridis, Georgios; Simos, Panagiotis; Papanicolaou, Andrew; Fletcher, Jack

    2014-01-01

    The present study assessed the impact of sample size on the power and fit of structural equation modeling applied to functional brain connectivity hypotheses. The data consisted of time-constrained minimum norm estimates of regional brain activity during performance of a reading task obtained with magnetoencephalography. Power analysis was first…

  16. Piecewise log-normal approximation of size distributions for aerosol modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. von Salzen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and accurate method for the representation of particle size distributions in atmospheric models is proposed. The method can be applied, but is not necessarily restricted, to aerosol mass and number size distributions. A piecewise log-normal approximation of the number size distribution within sections of the particle size spectrum is used. Two of the free parameters of the log-normal approximation are obtained from the integrated number and mass concentration in each section. The remaining free parameter is prescribed. The method is efficient in a sense that only relatively few calculations are required for applications of the method in atmospheric models. Applications of the method in simulations of particle growth by condensation and simulations with a single column model for nucleation, condensation, gravitational settling, wet deposition, and mixing are described. The results are compared to results from simulations employing single- and double-moment bin methods that are frequently used in aerosol modelling. According to these comparisons, the accuracy of the method is noticeably higher than the accuracy of the other methods.

  17. Finite size scaling analysis of intermittency moments in the two dimensional Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Burda, Z; Peschanski, R; Wosiek, J

    1993-01-01

    Finite size scaling is shown to work very well for the block variables used in intermittency studies on a 2-d Ising lattice. The intermittency exponents so derived exhibit the expected relations to the magnetic critical exponent of the model. Email contact: pesch@amoco.saclay.cea.fr

  18. Modelling the cutting edge radius size effect for force prediction in micro milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Jan, Slunsky

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model for cutting force prediction in micro milling, taking into account the cutting edge radius size effect, the tool run out and the deviation of the chip flow angle from the inclination angle. A parameterization according to the uncut chip thickness to cutting...

  19. Martensitic transformations in nanostructured nitinol: Finite element modeling of grain size and distribution effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hong-Sheng; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation, it was demonstra...... between the coarse and fine grained regions, and expand inside the region with small grains along the shear band direction....

  20. Growth hormone stimulates bone healing in a critical-sized bone defect model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theyse, L. F. H.; Oosterlaken-Dijksterhuis, M. A.; van Doorn, J.; Dhert, W. J. A.; Hazewinkel, H. A. W.

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone plays an important role in bone metabolism. Treating bone deficits is a major topic in orthopaedic surgery. Our hypothesis was that local continuous growth hormone administration stimulates bone healing in a canine critical-sized bone defect model. Bone formation in the defects was qu

  1. The finite size spectrum of the 2-dimensional O(3) nonlinear sigma-model

    OpenAIRE

    Balog, Janos(Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, MTA Lendület Holographic QFT Group, 1525, Budapest 114, P.O.B. 49, Hungary); Hegedus, Arpad

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear integral equations are proposed for the description of the full finite size spectrum of the 2-dimensional O(3) nonlinear sigma-model in a periodic box. Numerical results for the energy eigenvalues are compared to the rotator spectrum and perturbation theory for small volumes and with the recently proposed generalized Luscher formulas at large volumes.

  2. A Note on "Stability of the Constant Cost Dynamic Lot Size Model" by K. Richter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Hoesel (Stan); A.P.M. Wagelmans (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn a paper by K. Richter the stability regions of the dynamic lot size model with constant cost parameters are analyzed. In particular, an algorithm is suggested to compute the stability region of a so-called generalized solution. In general this region is only a subregion of the stabili

  3. Regularization Methods for Fitting Linear Models with Small Sample Sizes: Fitting the Lasso Estimator Using R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, W. Holmes; Finch, Maria E. Hernandez

    2016-01-01

    Researchers and data analysts are sometimes faced with the problem of very small samples, where the number of variables approaches or exceeds the overall sample size; i.e. high dimensional data. In such cases, standard statistical models such as regression or analysis of variance cannot be used, either because the resulting parameter estimates…

  4. A Mixed Integer Programming Model Formulation for Solving the Lot-Sizing Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammadi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses a mixed integer programming (MIP) formulation for the multi-item uncapacitated lot-sizing problem that is inspired from the trailer manufacturer. The proposed MIP model has been utilized to find out the optimum order quantity, optimum order time, and the minimum total cost of purchasing, ordering, and holding over the predefined planning horizon. This problem is known as NP-hard problem. The model was presented in an optimal software form using LINGO 13.0.

  5. A general multivariate qualitative model for sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidrach-de-Cardona, M. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada II, E.T.S.I. Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Mora Lopez, L. [Dpto. Lenguajes y C. Computacion, E.T.S.I. Informatica, Universidad de Malaga, 29071 Malaga (Spain)

    1999-10-01

    We considered a general model for sizing a stand-alone photovoltaic system, using as energy input data the information available in any irradiation atlas. The parameters of the model are estimated by multivariate linear regression. The results obtained from the numerical loss of load probability size method (LOLP) were used as initial input data to fit the mode. For this fit we have used daily global irradiation data taken from 222 US meteorological stations for the period 1961-1990. The expression proposed allows us to determine the photovoltaic array size, with a coefficient of determination to 0.96. This coefficient is independent of the used LOLP value. System parameters and mean monthly values for daily global irradiation on the modules surface are taken as independent variables in the model. It also shows that the proposed model can be used with the same accuracy for other locations not considered in the estimation of the model. We also propose a model which would allow us to calculate optimum tilts for the array surface taking the latitude into account as well as the variability of the incident irradiation.

  6. Hard-core thinnings of germ-grain models with power-law grain sizes

    CERN Document Server

    Kuronen, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Random sets with long-range dependence can be generated using a Boolean model with power-law grain sizes. We study thinnings of such Boolean models which have the hard-core property that no grains overlap in the resulting germ-grain model. A fundamental question is whether long-range dependence is preserved under such thinnings. To answer this question we study four natural thinnings of a Poisson germ-grain model where the grains are spheres with a regularly varying size distribution. We show that a thinning which favors large grains preserves the slow correlation decay of the original model, whereas a thinning which favors small grains does not. Our most interesting finding concerns the case where only disjoint grains are retained, which corresponds to the well-known Mat\\'ern type I thinning. In the resulting germ-grain model, typical grains have exponentially small sizes, but rather surprisingly, the long-range dependence property is still present. As a byproduct, we obtain new mechanisms for generating hom...

  7. Floc size distributions of suspended kaolinite in an advection transport dominated tank: measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoteng; Maa, Jerome P.-Y.

    2017-09-01

    In estuaries and coastal waters, floc size and its statistical distributions of cohesive sediments are of primary importance, due to their effects on the settling velocity and thus deposition rates of cohesive aggregates. The development of a robust flocculation model that includes the predictions of floc size distributions (FSDs), however, is still in a research stage. In this study, a one-dimensional longitudinal (1-DL) flocculation model along a streamtube is developed. This model is based on solving the population balance equation to find the FSDs by using the quadrature method of moments. To validate this model, a laboratory experiment is carried out to produce an advection transport-dominant environment in a cylindrical tank. The flow field is generated by a marine pump mounted at the bottom center, with its outlet facing upward. This setup generates an axially symmetric flow which is measured by an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). The measurement results provide the hydrodynamic input data required for this 1-DL model. The other measurement results, the FSDs, are acquired by using an automatic underwater camera system and the resulting images are analyzed to validate the predicted FSDs. This study shows that the FSDs as well as their representative sizes can be efficiently and reasonably simulated by this 1-DL model.

  8. An Aggregate Model for the Particle Size Distribution in Saturn's Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Brilliantov, Nikolai; Hayakawa, Hisao; Bodrova, Anna; Spahn, Frank; Schmidt, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Saturn's rings are known to consist of a large number of water ice particles. They form a flat disk, as the result of an interplay of angular momentum conservation and the steady loss of energy in dissipative particle collisions. For particles in the size range from a few centimeters to about a few meters a power law distribution of radii r^(-q), with q = 3, is implied by the light scattering properties of the rings. In contrast, for larger sizes the distribution drops steeply with increasing r. It has been suggested that this size distribution may arise from a balance between aggregation and fragmentation of ring particles, but to date neither the power-law dependence, nor the upper size-cutoff have been explained or quantified within a unique theory. Here we present a new kinetic model for the collisional evolution of the size distribution and show that the exponent q is expected to be constrained to the interval 2.75 < q < 3.5. An exponential cutoff towards larger particle sizes establishes naturally...

  9. Aerosol size distribution in a coagulating plume: Analytical behavior and modeling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Richard P.; Yu, Fangqun

    In a previous paper (Turco and Yu, 1997), a series of analytical solutions were derived for the problem of aerosol coagulation in an expanding plume, as from a jet engine. Those solutions were shown to depend on a single dimensionless time-dependent number, NT, which is related to the particle coagulation kernel and the plume volume. Here, we derive a new analytical expression that describes the particle size distribution in an expanding plume in terms of NT. We show how this solution can be extended to include the effects of soot particles on the evolving volatile sulfuric acid aerosols in an aircraft wake. Our solutions apply primarily to cases where changes in the size distribution—beyond an initial period encompassing emission and prompt nucleation/condensation—is controlled mainly by coagulation. The analytical size distributions allow most of the important properties of an evolving aerosol population—mean size, number greater than a minimum size, surface area density, size dependent reactivities, and optical properties—to be estimated objectively. We have applied our analytical solution to evaluate errors associated with numerical diffusion in a detailed microphysical code, and demonstrate that, if care is not exercised in solving the coagulation equation, substantial errors can result in the predictions at large particle sizes. This effect is particularly important when comparisons between models and field observations are carried out. The analytical expressions derived here can also be employed to initialize models that do not resolve individual aircraft plumes, by providing a simple means for parameterizing the initial aerosol properties after an appropriate mixing time.

  10. Particle-size distribution models for the conversion of Chinese data to FAO/USDA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Wei; Dai, YongJiu; García-Gutiérrez, Carlos; Yuan, Hua

    2014-01-01

    We investigated eleven particle-size distribution (PSD) models to determine the appropriate models for describing the PSDs of 16349 Chinese soil samples. These data are based on three soil texture classification schemes, including one ISSS (International Society of Soil Science) scheme with four data points and two Katschinski's schemes with five and six data points, respectively. The adjusted coefficient of determination r (2), Akaike's information criterion (AIC), and geometric mean error ratio (GMER) were used to evaluate the model performance. The soil data were converted to the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) standard using PSD models and the fractal concept. The performance of PSD models was affected by soil texture and classification of fraction schemes. The performance of PSD models also varied with clay content of soils. The Anderson, Fredlund, modified logistic growth, Skaggs, and Weilbull models were the best.

  11. A socio-hydrologic model of coupled water-agriculture dynamics with emphasis on farm size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, D. R.; Maneta, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural land cover dynamics in the U.S. are dominated by two trends: 1) total agricultural land is decreasing and 2) average farm size is increasing. These trends have important implications for the future of water resources because 1) growing more food on less land is due in large part to increased groundwater withdrawal and 2) larger farms can better afford both more efficient irrigation and more groundwater access. However, these large-scale trends are due to individual farm operators responding to many factors including climate, economics, and policy. It is therefore difficult to incorporate the trends into watershed-scale hydrologic models. Traditional scenario-based approaches are valuable for many applications, but there is typically no feedback between the hydrologic model and the agricultural dynamics and so limited insight is gained into the how agriculture co-evolves with water resources. We present a socio-hydrologic model that couples simplified hydrologic and agricultural economic dynamics, accounting for many factors that depend on farm size such as irrigation efficiency and returns to scale. We introduce an "economic memory" (EM) state variable that is driven by agricultural revenue and affects whether farms are sold when land market values exceed expected returns from agriculture. The model uses a Generalized Mixture Model of Gaussians to approximate the distribution of farm sizes in a study area, effectively lumping farms into "small," "medium," and "large" groups that have independent parameterizations. We apply the model in a semi-arid watershed in the upper Columbia River Basin, calibrating to data on streamflow, total agricultural land cover, and farm size distribution. The model is used to investigate the sensitivity of the coupled system to various hydrologic and economic scenarios such as increasing market value of land, reduced surface water availability, and increased irrigation efficiency in small farms.

  12. Finite-size corrections and scaling for the dimer model on the checkerboard lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmailian, Nickolay Sh.; Wu, Ming-Chya; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2016-11-01

    Lattice models are useful for understanding behaviors of interacting complex many-body systems. The lattice dimer model has been proposed to study the adsorption of diatomic molecules on a substrate. Here we analyze the partition function of the dimer model on a 2 M ×2 N checkerboard lattice wrapped on a torus and derive the exact asymptotic expansion of the logarithm of the partition function. We find that the internal energy at the critical point is equal to zero. We also derive the exact finite-size corrections for the free energy, the internal energy, and the specific heat. Using the exact partition function and finite-size corrections for the dimer model on a finite checkerboard lattice, we obtain finite-size scaling functions for the free energy, the internal energy, and the specific heat of the dimer model. We investigate the properties of the specific heat near the critical point and find that the specific-heat pseudocritical point coincides with the critical point of the thermodynamic limit, which means that the specific-heat shift exponent λ is equal to ∞ . We have also considered the limit N →∞ for which we obtain the expansion of the free energy for the dimer model on the infinitely long cylinder. From a finite-size analysis we have found that two conformal field theories with the central charges c =1 for the height function description and c =-2 for the construction using a mapping of spanning trees can be used to describe the dimer model on the checkerboard lattice.

  13. A simplified experimental model of large-for-size liver transplantation in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jose Goncalves Leal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The ideal ratio between liver graft mass and recipient body weight for liver transplantation in small infants is unknown; however, if this ratio is over 4%, a condition called large-for-size may occur. Experimental models of large-for-size liver transplants have not been described in the literature. In addition, orthotopic liver transplantation is marked by high morbidity and mortality rates in animals due to the clamping of the venous splanchnic system. Therefore, the objective of this study was to create a porcine model of large-for-size liver transplantation with clamping of the supraceliac aorta during the anhepatic phase as an alternative to venovenous bypass. METHOD: Fourteen pigs underwent liver transplantation with whole-liver grafts without venovenous bypass and were divided into two experimental groups: the control group, in which the weights of the donors were similar to the weights of the recipients; and the large-for-size group, in which the weights of the donors were nearly 2 times the weights of the recipients. Hemodynamic data, the results of serum biochemical analyses and histological examination of the transplanted livers were collected. RESULTS: The mortality rate in both groups was 16.5% (1/7. The animals in the large-for-size group had increased serum levels of potassium, sodium, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase after graft reperfusion. The histological analyses revealed that there were no significant differences between the groups. CONCLUSION: This transplant method is a feasible experimental model of large-for-size liver transplantation.

  14. Nature of size effects in compact models of field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torkhov, N. A., E-mail: trkf@mail.ru [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Scientific-Research Institute of Semiconductor Devices, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Babak, L. I.; Kokolov, A. A.; Salnikov, A. S.; Dobush, I. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Novikov, V. A., E-mail: novikovvadim@mail.ru; Ivonin, I. V. [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-07

    Investigations have shown that in the local approximation (for sizes L < 100 μm), AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures satisfy to all properties of chaotic systems and can be described in the language of fractal geometry of fractional dimensions. For such objects, values of their electrophysical characteristics depend on the linear sizes of the examined regions, which explain the presence of the so-called size effects—dependences of the electrophysical and instrumental characteristics on the linear sizes of the active elements of semiconductor devices. In the present work, a relationship has been established for the linear model parameters of the equivalent circuit elements of internal transistors with fractal geometry of the heteroepitaxial structure manifested through a dependence of its relative electrophysical characteristics on the linear sizes of the examined surface areas. For the HEMTs, this implies dependences of their relative static (A/mm, mA/V/mm, Ω/mm, etc.) and microwave characteristics (W/mm) on the width d of the sink-source channel and on the number of sections n that leads to a nonlinear dependence of the retrieved parameter values of equivalent circuit elements of linear internal transistor models on n and d. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the size effects in semiconductors determined by the fractal geometry must be taken into account when investigating the properties of semiconductor objects on the levels less than the local approximation limit and designing and manufacturing field effect transistors. In general, the suggested approach allows a complex of problems to be solved on designing, optimizing, and retrieving the parameters of equivalent circuits of linear and nonlinear models of not only field effect transistors but also any arbitrary semiconductor devices with nonlinear instrumental characteristics.

  15. Nature of size effects in compact models of field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkhov, N. A.; Babak, L. I.; Kokolov, A. A.; Salnikov, A. S.; Dobush, I. M.; Novikov, V. A.; Ivonin, I. V.

    2016-03-01

    Investigations have shown that in the local approximation (for sizes L GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures satisfy to all properties of chaotic systems and can be described in the language of fractal geometry of fractional dimensions. For such objects, values of their electrophysical characteristics depend on the linear sizes of the examined regions, which explain the presence of the so-called size effects—dependences of the electrophysical and instrumental characteristics on the linear sizes of the active elements of semiconductor devices. In the present work, a relationship has been established for the linear model parameters of the equivalent circuit elements of internal transistors with fractal geometry of the heteroepitaxial structure manifested through a dependence of its relative electrophysical characteristics on the linear sizes of the examined surface areas. For the HEMTs, this implies dependences of their relative static (A/mm, mA/V/mm, Ω/mm, etc.) and microwave characteristics (W/mm) on the width d of the sink-source channel and on the number of sections n that leads to a nonlinear dependence of the retrieved parameter values of equivalent circuit elements of linear internal transistor models on n and d. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the size effects in semiconductors determined by the fractal geometry must be taken into account when investigating the properties of semiconductor objects on the levels less than the local approximation limit and designing and manufacturing field effect transistors. In general, the suggested approach allows a complex of problems to be solved on designing, optimizing, and retrieving the parameters of equivalent circuits of linear and nonlinear models of not only field effect transistors but also any arbitrary semiconductor devices with nonlinear instrumental characteristics.

  16. Modelling Inter-Particle Forces and Resulting Agglomerate Sizes in Cement-Based Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Ane Mette; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2005-01-01

    The theory of inter-particle forces versus external shear in cement-based materials is reviewed. On this basis, calculations on maximum agglomerate size present after the combined action of superplasticizers and shear are carried out. Qualitative experimental results indicate that external shear...... affects the particle size distribution of Mg(OH)2 (used as model material) as well as silica, whereas the addition of superplasticizers affects only the smallest particles in cement and thus primarily acts as water reducers and not dispersers....

  17. Study of system- size effects in multi- fragmentation using Quantum Molecular Dynamics model

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, J; Aichelin, Jörg; Singh, Jaivir; Puri, Rajeev K.

    2001-01-01

    We report, for the first time, the dependence of the multiplicity of different fragments on the system size employing a quantum molecular dynamics model. This dependence is extracted from the simulations of symmetric collisions of Ca+Ca, Ni+Ni, Nb+Nb, Xe+Xe, Er+Er, Au+Au and U+U at incident energies between 50 A MeV and 1 A GeV. We find that the multiplicity of different fragments scales with the size of the system which can be parameterized by a simple power law.

  18. A thermo dynamical model for the shape and size effect on melting of boron carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniammal, Paneerselvam; Arivuoli, Dakshanamoorthy

    2012-02-01

    The size and shape dependence of the melting temperature of Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles has been investigated with a numerical thermo dynamical approach. The problem considered in this paper is the inward melting of nanoparticles with spherical and cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical shaped nanoparticle. Comparative investigation of the size dependence of the melting temperature with respect to the two shapes is also been done. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is approximately a dealing function of radius, in a good agreement with prediction of thermo dynamical model.

  19. Investigation of particles size effects in Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) modelling of colloidal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai-Duy, N.; Phan-Thien, N.; Khoo, B. C.

    2015-04-01

    In the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation of suspension, the fluid (solvent) and colloidal particles are replaced by a set of DPD particles and therefore their relative sizes (as measured by their exclusion zones) can affect the maximal packing fraction of the colloidal particles. In this study, we investigate roles of the conservative, dissipative and random forces in this relative size ratio (colloidal/solvent). We propose a mechanism of adjusting the DPD parameters to properly model the solvent phase (the solvent here is supposed to have the same isothermal compressibility to that of water).

  20. Chemical modelling of Alkali Silica reaction: Influence of the reactive aggregate size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyet, S. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SCCME/LECBA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Sellier, A. [UPS, LMDC, INSA Toulouse, F-33077 Bordeaux 4, (France); Capra, B. [Oxand SA, F-77210 Avon (France); Foray, G. [Univ Lyon 1, L2MS, PETRA GC, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Torrenti, J.M. [IRSN, F-92262 Fontenay Aux Roses (France); Cognon, H. [EdF/DER Les Renardieres, F-77818 Moret Sur Loing (France); Bourdarot, E. [CIH Savoie Technolac, F-73373 Le Bourget du Lac (France)

    2007-07-01

    This article presents a new model which aims at predicting the expansion induced by Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR) and describing the chemical evolution of affected concretes. It is based on the description of the transport and reaction of alkalis and calcium ions within a Relative Elementary Volume (REV). It takes into account the influence of the reactive aggregate size grading on ASR, i.e. the effect of the simultaneous presence of different sized reactive aggregates within concrete. The constitutive equations are detailed and fitted using experimental results. Results from numerical simulations are presented and compared with experiments. (authors)

  1. Bayesian hierarchical model used to analyze regression between fish body size and scale size: application to rare fish species Zingel asper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontez B.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Back-calculation allows to increase available data on fish growth. The accuracy of back-calculation models is of paramount importance for growth analysis. Frequentist and Bayesian hierarchical approaches were used for regression between fish body size and scale size for the rare fish species Zingel asper. The Bayesian approach permits more reliable estimation of back-calculated size, taking into account biological information and cohort variability. This method greatly improves estimation of back-calculated length when sampling is uneven and/or small.

  2. First comparison of a global microphysical aerosol model with size-resolved observational aerosol statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Mann, G. W.; Manktelow, P.; Heintzenberg, J.

    2006-09-01

    A statistical synthesis of marine aerosol measurements from experiments in four different oceans is used to evaluate a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP). We compare the model against observed size resolved particle concentrations, probability distributions, and the temporal persistence of different size particles. We attempt to explain the observed size distributions in terms of sulfate and sea spray and quantify the possible contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous material to the number and mass distribution. The model predicts a bimodal size distribution that agrees well with observations as a grand average over all regions, but there are large regional differences. Notably, observed Aitken mode number concentrations are more than a factor 10 higher than in the model for the N Atlantic but a factor 7 lower than the model in the NW Pacific. We also find that modelled Aitken mode and accumulation mode geometric mean diameters are generally smaller in the model by 10-30%. Comparison with observed free tropospheric Aitken mode distributions suggests that the model underpredicts growth of these particles during descent to the MBL. Recent observations of a substantial organic component of free tropospheric aerosol could explain this discrepancy. We find that anthropogenic continental material makes a substantial contribution to N Atlantic marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol, with typically 60-90% of sulfate across the particle size range coming from anthropogenic sources, even if we analyse air that has spent an average of >120 h away from land. However, anthropogenic primary black carbon and organic carbon particles do not explain the large discrepancies in Aitken mode number. Several explanations for the discrepancy are suggested. The lack of lower atmospheric particle formation in the model may explain low N Atlantic particle concentrations. However, the observed and modelled particle persistence at Cape Grim in the Southern Ocean, does not

  3. Model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The restructuring process of the high burnup structure (HBS) formation in UO2 fuel results in sub-micron size grains that accelerate the fission gas swelling, which will raise some concern over the safety of extended the nuclear fuel operation life in the reactor. A mechanistic and engineering model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel based on the experimental observations of the HBS in the literature is presented. The model takes into account dislocations evolution under irradiation and the grain subdivision occur successively at increasing local burnup. It is assumed that the original driving force for subdivision of grain in the HBS of UO2 fuel is the production and accumulation of dislocation loops during irradiation. The dislocation loops can also be annealed through thermal diffusion when the temperature is high enough. The capability of this model is validated by the comparison with the experimental data of temperature threshold of subdivision, dislocation density and sub-grain size as a function of local burnup. It is shown that the calculated results of the dislocation density and subdivided grain size as a function of local burnup are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Fluids with competing interactions. II. Validating a free energy model for equilibrium cluster size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Jonathan A.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Using computer simulations, we validate a simple free energy model that can be analytically solved to predict the equilibrium size of self-limiting clusters of particles in the fluid state governed by a combination of short-range attractive and long-range repulsive pair potentials. The model is a semi-empirical adaptation and extension of the canonical free energy-based result due to Groenewold and Kegel [J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 11702-11709 (2001)], where we use new computer simulation data to systematically improve the cluster-size scalings with respect to the strengths of the competing interactions driving aggregation. We find that one can adapt a classical nucleation like theory for small energetically frustrated aggregates provided one appropriately accounts for a size-dependent, microscopic energy penalty of interface formation, which requires new scaling arguments. This framework is verified in part by considering the extensive scaling of intracluster bonding, where we uncover a superlinear scaling regime distinct from (and located between) the known regimes for small and large aggregates. We validate our model based on comparisons against approximately 100 different simulated systems comprising compact spherical aggregates with characteristic (terminal) sizes between six and sixty monomers, which correspond to wide ranges in experimentally controllable parameters.

  5. The problem of effect size heterogeneity in meta-analytic structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia Joya; Downes, Patrick E; Carter, Kameron M; O'Boyle, Ernest H

    2016-10-01

    Scholars increasingly recognize the potential of meta-analytic structural equation modeling (MASEM) as a way to build and test theory (Bergh et al., 2016). Yet, 1 of the greatest challenges facing MASEM researchers is how to incorporate and model meaningful effect size heterogeneity identified in the bivariate meta-analysis into MASEM. Unfortunately, common MASEM approaches in applied psychology (i.e., Viswesvaran & Ones, 1995) fail to account for effect size heterogeneity. This means that MASEM effect sizes, path estimates, and overall fit values may only generalize to a small segment of the population. In this research, we quantify this problem and introduce a set of techniques that retain both the true score relationships and the variability surrounding those relationships in estimating model parameters and fit indices. We report our findings from simulated data as well as from a reanalysis of published MASEM studies. Results demonstrate that both path estimates and overall model fit indices are less representative of the population than existing MASEM research would suggest. We suggest 2 extension MASEM techniques that can be conducted using online software or in R, to quantify the stability of model estimates across the population and allow researchers to better build and test theory. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. A joint lot-sizing and marketing model with reworks, scraps and imperfect products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Fathollah Bayati

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish an economic production quantity (EPQ based inventory model by considering various types of non-perfect products .We classify products in four groups of perfect, imperfect, defective but reworkable and non-reworkable defective items. The demand is a power function of price and marketing expenditure and production unit cost is considered to be a function of lot size. The objective of this paper is to determine lot size, marketing expenditure, selling price, set up cost and inventory holding cost, simultaneously. The problem is modeled as a nonlinear posynomial geometric programming and an optimal solution is derived. The implementation of the proposed method is demonstrated using a numerical example and the sensitivity analysis is also performed to study the behavior of the model.

  7. Fourth-Order Method for Numerical Integration of Age- and Size-Structured Population Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iannelli, M; Kostova, T; Milner, F A

    2008-01-08

    In many applications of age- and size-structured population models, there is an interest in obtaining good approximations of total population numbers rather than of their densities. Therefore, it is reasonable in such cases to solve numerically not the PDE model equations themselves, but rather their integral equivalents. For this purpose quadrature formulae are used in place of the integrals. Because quadratures can be designed with any order of accuracy, one can obtain numerical approximations of the solutions with very fast convergence. In this article, we present a general framework and a specific example of a fourth-order method based on composite Newton-Cotes quadratures for a size-structured population model.

  8. Approximate solution for frequency synchronization in a finite-size Kuramoto model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengwei; Rubido, Nicolás; Grebogi, Celso; Baptista, Murilo S

    2015-12-01

    Scientists have been considering the Kuramoto model to understand the mechanism behind the appearance of collective behavior, such as frequency synchronization (FS) as a paradigm, in real-world networks with a finite number of oscillators. A major current challenge is to obtain an analytical solution for the phase angles. Here, we provide an approximate analytical solution for this problem by deriving a master solution for the finite-size Kuramoto model, with arbitrary finite-variance distribution of the natural frequencies of the oscillators. The master solution embodies all particular solutions of the finite-size Kuramoto model for any frequency distribution and coupling strength larger than the critical one. Furthermore, we present a criterion to determine the stability of the FS solution. This allows one to analytically infer the relationship between the physical parameters and the stable behavior of networks.

  9. Longitudinal measurements of syrinx size in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Elmira; Bilston, Lynne E; Song, Xin; Bongers, Andre; Stoodley, Marcus A; Cheng, Shaokoon; Hemley, Sarah J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Syringomyelia pathophysiology is commonly studied using rodent models. However, in vivo studies of posttraumatic syringomyelia have been limited by the size of animals and lack of reliable noninvasive evaluation techniques. Imaging the rat spinal cord is particularly challenging because the spinal cord diameter is approximately 1-3 mm, and pathological lesions within the spinal cord parenchyma are even smaller. The standard technique has been histological evaluation, but this has its limitations. The aim of the present study was to determine whether syrinx size could be reliably measured using a preclinical high-field MRI animal system in a rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia. METHODS The authors used an existing rat model of posttraumatic syringomyelia, which was created using a controlled pneumatic compression device to produce the initial spinal cord injury, followed by a subarachnoid injection of kaolin to produce arachnoiditis. T2-weighted MRI was performed on each animal using a 9.4-T scanner at 7, 10, and 13 weeks after injury. Animals were killed and syrinx sizes were calculated from in vivo MRI and histological studies. RESULTS MRI measurements of syrinx volume and length were closely correlated to histological measurements across all time points (Pearson product moment correlation coefficient r = ± 0.93 and 0.79, respectively). CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that high-field T2-weighted MRI can be used to measure syrinx size, and data correlate well with syrinx size measured using histological methods. Preclinical MRI may be a valuable noninvasive technique for tracking syrinx formation and enlargement in animal models of syringomyelia.

  10. A Multi-Product Lot-Sizing Model for a Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Herrera Juan Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an Integer Linear Programming model for a multi-product lot-sizing problem. The problem considers demands, inventory policies, backorder costs and the search of an efficient use of resources (machines and workers. The real-world case used to illustrate the model is from a Colombian company, which produces raw material for the bakery industry. The short term planning for the company under study is critical, because there is a multi-product environment whit shared resources by different products and processes. The computational experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed model.R

  11. Comprehensive Laser-induced Incandescence (LII) modeling for soot particle sizing

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2015-03-30

    To evaluate the current state of the art in LII particle sizing, a comprehensive model for predicting the temporal incandescent response of combustion-generated soot to absorption of a pulsed laser is presented. The model incorporates particle heating through laser absorption, thermal annealing, and oxidation at the surface as well as cooling through sublimation and photodesorption, radiation, conduction and thermionic emission. Thermodynamic properties and the thermal accommodation coefficient utilized in the model are temperature dependent. In addition, where appropriate properties are also phase dependent, thereby accounting for annealing effects during laser heating and particle cooling.

  12. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebi, Sadegh; Aliakbary, Sadegh; Habibi, Jafar

    2013-12-01

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named "Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks," outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  13. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motallebi, Sadegh, E-mail: motallebi@ce.sharif.edu; Aliakbary, Sadegh, E-mail: aliakbary@ce.sharif.edu; Habibi, Jafar, E-mail: jhabibi@sharif.edu [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named “Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks,” outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  14. Large Time Asymptotics for a Continuous Coagulation-Fragmentation Model with Degenerate Size-Dependent Diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Desvillettes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    We study a continuous coagulation-fragmentation model with constant kernels for reacting polymers (see [M. Aizenman and T. Bak, Comm. Math. Phys., 65 (1979), pp. 203-230]). The polymers are set to diffuse within a smooth bounded one-dimensional domain with no-flux boundary conditions. In particular, we consider size-dependent diffusion coefficients, which may degenerate for small and large cluster-sizes. We prove that the entropy-entropy dissipation method applies directly in this inhomogeneous setting. We first show the necessary basic a priori estimates in dimension one, and second we show faster-than-polynomial convergence toward global equilibria for diffusion coefficients which vanish not faster than linearly for large sizes. This extends the previous results of [J.A. Carrillo, L. Desvillettes, and K. Fellner, Comm. Math. Phys., 278 (2008), pp. 433-451], which assumes that the diffusion coefficients are bounded below. © 2009 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  15. Sample size for collecting germplasms – a polyploid model with mixed mating system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R L Sapra; Prem Narain; S V S Chauhan; S K Lal; B B Singh

    2003-03-01

    The present paper discusses a general expression for determining the minimum sample size (plants) for a given number of seeds or vice versa for capturing multiple allelic diversity. The model considers sampling from a large 2 k-ploid population under a broad range of mating systems. Numerous expressions/results developed for germplasm collection/regeneration for diploid populations by earlier workers can be directly deduced from our general expression by assigning appropriate values of the corresponding parameters. A seed factor which influences the plant sample size has also been isolated to aid the collectors in selecting the appropriate combination of number of plants and seeds per plant. When genotypic multiplicity of seeds is taken into consideration, a sample size of even less than 172 plants can conserve diversity of 20 alleles from 50,000 polymorphic loci with a very large probability of conservation (0.9999) in most of the cases.

  16. Laboratory simulation and modeling of size, shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, Manash J.; Gogoi, Ankur; Ahmed, Gazi A.

    2016-06-01

    The computation of the light scattering properties of size and shape distributed interstellar graphite dust analogues using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) is presented. The light scattering properties of dust particles of arbitrary shapes having sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 μm were computed using DDSCAT 7.3.0 software package and an indigenously developed post-processing tool for size and shape averaging. In order to model realistic samples of graphite dust and compute their light scattering properties using DDA, different target geometries were generated to represent the graphite particle composition in terms of surface smoothness, surface roughness and aggregation or their combination, for using as the target for DDSCAT calculations. A comparison of the theoretical volume scattering function at 543.5 nm and 632.8 nm incident wavelengths with laboratory simulation is also presented in this paper.

  17. Simulation step size analysis of a whole-cell computational model of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Raphael; Castro, Maria Clicia S.; Silva, Fabrício Alves B.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how complex phenotypes arise from individual molecules and their interactions is a major challenge in biology and, to meet this challenge, computational approaches are increasingly employed. As an example, a recent paper [1] proposed a whole-cell model Mycoplasma genitalium including all cell components and their interactions. 28 modules representing several cell functions were modeled independently, and then integrated into a single computational model. One assumption considered in the whole-cell model of M.Genitalium is that all 28 modules can be modeled independently given the 1 second step size used in simulations. This is a major assumption, since it simplifies the modeling of several cell functions and makes the modeling of the system as a whole feasible. In this paper we investigate the dependency of experimental results on that assumption. We have simulated the M.Genitalium cell cycle using several simulation time step sizes and compared the results to the ones obtained with the system using 1 second simulation time step.

  18. Investigating the Minimum Size of Study Area for an Activity-Based Travel Demand Forecasting Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Bao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, considerable attention has been paid to the activity-based approach for transportation planning and forecasting by both researchers and practitioners. However, one of the practical limitations of applying most of the currently available activity-based models is their computation time, especially when large amount of population and detailed geographical unit level are taken into account. In this research, we investigated the possibility of restraining the size of the study area in order to reduce the computation time when applying an activity-based model, as it is often the case that only a small territory rather than the whole region is the focus of a specific study. By introducing an accuracy level of the model, we proposed in this research an iteration approach to determine the minimum size of the study area required for a target territory. In the application, we investigated the required minimum size of the study area surrounding each of the 327 municipalities in Flanders, Belgium, with regard to two different transport modes, that is, car as driver and public transport. Afterwards, a validation analysis and a case study were conducted. All the experiments were carried out by using the FEATHERS, an activity-based microsimulation modeling framework currently implemented for the Flanders region of Belgium.

  19. Development and application of an aerosol screening model for size-resolved urban aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanier, Charles O; Lee, Sang-Rin

    2014-06-01

    Predictive models of vehicular ultrafine particles less than 0.1 microm in diameter (UFPs*) and other urban pollutants with high spatial and temporal variation are useful and important in applications such as (1) decision support for infrastructure projects, emissions controls, and transportation-mode shifts; (2) the interpretation and enhancement of observations (e.g., source apportionment, extrapolation, interpolation, and gap-filling in space and time); and (3) the generation of spatially and temporally resolved exposure estimates where monitoring is unfeasible. The objective of the current study was to develop, test, and apply the Aerosol Screening Model (ASM), a new physically based vehicular UFP model for use in near-road environments. The ASM simulates hourly average outdoor concentrations of roadway-derived aerosols and gases. Its distinguishing features include user-specified spatial resolution; use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) meteorologic model for winds estimates; use of a database of more than 100,000 road segments in the Los Angeles, California, region, including freeway ramps and local streets; and extensive testing against more than 9000 hours of observed particle concentrations at 11 sites. After initialization of air parcels at an upwind boundary, the model solves for vehicle emissions, dispersion, coagulation, and deposition using a Lagrangian modeling framework. The Lagrangian parcel of air is subdivided vertically (into 11 levels) and in the crosswind direction (into 3 parcels). It has overall dimensions of 10 m (downwind), 300 m (vertically), and 2.1 km (crosswind). The simulation is typically started 4 km upwind from the receptor, that is, the location at which the exposure is to be estimated. As parcels approach the receptor, depending on the user-specified resolution, step size is decreased, and crosswind resolution is enhanced through subdivision of parcels in the crosswind direction. Hourly concentrations and size

  20. Modeling the light-travel-time effect on the far-infrared size of IRC +10216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    1995-01-01

    Models of the far-infrared emission from the large circumstellar dust envelope surrounding the carbon star IRC +10216 are used to assess the importance of the light-travel-time effect (LTTE) on the observed size of the source. The central star is a long-period variable with an average period of 644 +/- 17 days and a peak-to-peak amplitude of two magnituds, so a large light-travel-time effect is seen at 1 min radius. An attempt is made to use the LTTE to reconcile the discrepancy between the observations of Fazio et al. and Lester et al. regarding the far-infrared source size. This discrepancy is reviewed in light of recent, high-spatial-resolution observations at 11 microns by Danchi et al. We conclude that IRC +10216 has been resolved on the arcminute scale by Fazio et al. Convolution of the model intensity profile at 61 microns with the 60 sec x 90 sec Gaussian beam of Fazio et al. yields an observed source size full width at half maximum (FWHM) that ranges from approximately 67 sec to 75 sec depending on the phase of the star and the assumed distance to the source. Using a simple r(exp -2) dust distribution and the 106 deg phase of the Fazio et al. observations, the LTTE model reaches a peak size of 74.3 sec at a distance of 300 pc. This agrees favorably with the 78 sec x 6 sec size measured by Fazio et al. Finally, a method is outlined for using the LTTE as a distance indicator to IRC +10216 and other stars with extended mass outflows.

  1. Characteristic size and mass of galaxies in the Bose–Einstein condensate dark matter model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Weon Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We study the characteristic length scale of galactic halos in the Bose–Einstein condensate (or scalar field dark matter model. Considering the evolution of the density perturbation we show that the average background matter density determines the quantum Jeans mass and hence the spatial size of galaxies at a given epoch. In this model the minimum size of galaxies increases while the minimum mass of the galaxies decreases as the universe expands. The observed values of the mass and the size of the dwarf galaxies are successfully reproduced with the dark matter particle mass m≃5×10−22 eV. The minimum size is about 6×10−3m/Hλc and the typical rotation velocity of the dwarf galaxies is O(H/m c, where H is the Hubble parameter and λc is the Compton wave length of the particle. We also suggest that ultra compact dwarf galaxies are the remnants of the dwarf galaxies formed in the early universe.

  2. Deformation twinning in small-sized face-centred cubic single crystals: Experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z. Y.; Huang, M. X.

    2015-12-01

    Small-sized crystals generally show deformation behaviour distinct from their bulk counterparts. In addition to dislocation slip, deformation twinning in small-sized face-centred cubic (FCC) single crystals has been reported to follow a different mechanism which involves coherent emission of partial dislocations on successive { 111 } planes from free surface. The present work employed a twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with a low stacking fault energy to systematically investigate the twin evolution in small-sized FCC single crystals. Micrometre-sized single crystal pillars of TWIP steel were fabricated by focus ion beam and then strained to different levels by compression experiments. Detailed transmission electron microscopy characterization was carried out to obtain a quantitative evaluation of the deformation twins, which contribute to most of the plastic strain. Emissions of partial dislocations from free surface (surface sources) and pre-existing perfect dislocations inside the pillar (inner sources) are found as the essential processes for the formation of deformation twins. Accordingly, a physically-based model, which integrates source introduction methods and source activation criterions for partial dislocation emission, is developed to quantitatively predict the twin evolution. The model is able to reproduce the experimental twin evolution, in terms of the total twin formation, the twin morphology and the occurrence of twinning burst.

  3. Finite size corrections in the random energy model and the replica approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Bernard; Mottishaw, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic and exact way of computing finite size corrections for the random energy model, in its low temperature phase. We obtain explicit (though complicated) expressions for the finite size corrections of the overlap functions. In its low temperature phase, the random energy model is known to exhibit Parisi's broken symmetry of replicas. The finite size corrections given by our exact calculation can be reproduced using replicas if we make specific assumptions about the fluctuations (with negative variances!) of the number and sizes of the blocks when replica symmetry is broken. As an alternative we show that the exact expression for the non-integer moments of the partition function can be written in terms of coupled contour integrals over what can be thought of as ‘complex replica numbers’. Parisi's one step replica symmetry breaking arises naturally from the saddle point of these integrals without making any ansatz or using the replica method. The fluctuations of the ‘complex replica numbers’ near the saddle point in the imaginary direction correspond to the negative variances we observed in the replica calculation. Finally our approach allows one to see why some apparently diverging series or integrals are harmless.

  4. A variational constitutive model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2013-07-29

    The evolution of defects or voids, generally recognized as the basic failure mechanism in most metals and alloys, has been intensively studied. Most investigations have been limited to spatially periodic cases with non-random distributions of the radii of the voids. In this study, we use a new form of the incompressibility of the matrix to propose the formula for the volumetric plastic energy of a void inside a porous medium. As a consequence, we are able to account for the weakening effect of the surrounding voids and to propose a general model for the distribution and interactions of multi-sized voids. We found that the single parameter in classical Gurson-type models, namely void volume fraction is not sufficient for the model. The relative growth rates of voids of different sizes, which can in principle be obtained through physical or numerical experiments, are required. To demonstrate the feasibility of the model, we analyze two cases. The first case represents exactly the same assumption hidden in the classical Gurson\\'s model, while the second embodies the competitive mechanism due to void size differences despite in a much simpler manner than the general case. Coalescence is implemented by allowing an accelerated void growth after an empirical critical porosity in a way that is the same as the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model. The constitutive model presented here is validated through good agreements with experimental data. Its capacity for reproducing realistic failure patterns is shown by simulating a tensile test on a notched round bar. © 2013 The Author(s).

  5. Explicit all-atom modeling of realistically sized ligand-capped nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ananth P; Clancy, Paulette

    2012-03-21

    We present a study of an explicit all-atom representation of nanocrystals of experimentally relevant sizes (up to 6 nm), "capped" with alkyl chain ligands, in vacuum. We employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulation methods in concert with a well-tested intermolecular potential model, MM3 (molecular mechanics 3), for the studies presented here. These studies include determining the preferred conformation of an isolated single nanocrystal (NC), pairs of isolated NCs, and (presaging studies of superlattice arrays) unit cells of NC superlattices. We observe that very small NCs (3 nm) behave differently in a superlattice as compared to larger NCs (6 nm and above) due to the conformations adopted by the capping ligands on the NC surface. Short ligands adopt a uniform distribution of orientational preferences, including some that lie against the face of the nanocrystal. In contrast, longer ligands prefer to interdigitate. We also study the effect of changing ligand length and ligand coverage on the NCs on the preferred ligand configurations. Since explicit all-atom modeling constrains the maximum system size that can be studied, we discuss issues related to coarse-graining the representation of the ligands, including a comparison of two commonly used coarse-grained models. We find that care has to be exercised in the choice of coarse-grained model. The data provided by these realistically sized ligand-capped NCs, determined using explicit all-atom models, should serve as a reference standard for future models of coarse-graining ligands using united atom models, especially for self-assembly processes.

  6. Explicit all-atom modeling of realistically sized ligand-capped nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of an explicit all-atom representation of nanocrystals of experimentally relevant sizes (up to 6 nm), capped with alkyl chain ligands, in vacuum. We employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulation methods in concert with a well-tested intermolecular potential model, MM3 (molecular mechanics 3), for the studies presented here. These studies include determining the preferred conformation of an isolated single nanocrystal (NC), pairs of isolated NCs, and (presaging studies of superlattice arrays) unit cells of NC superlattices. We observe that very small NCs (3 nm) behave differently in a superlattice as compared to larger NCs (6 nm and above) due to the conformations adopted by the capping ligands on the NC surface. Short ligands adopt a uniform distribution of orientational preferences, including some that lie against the face of the nanocrystal. In contrast, longer ligands prefer to interdigitate. We also study the effect of changing ligand length and ligand coverage on the NCs on the preferred ligand configurations. Since explicit all-atom modeling constrains the maximum system size that can be studied, we discuss issues related to coarse-graining the representation of the ligands, including a comparison of two commonly used coarse-grained models. We find that care has to be exercised in the choice of coarse-grained model. The data provided by these realistically sized ligand-capped NCs, determined using explicit all-atom models, should serve as a reference standard for future models of coarse-graining ligands using united atom models, especially for self-assembly processes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  7. MAID : An effect size based model for microarray data integration across laboratories and platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Aled M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression profiling has the potential to unravel molecular mechanisms behind gene regulation and identify gene targets for therapeutic interventions. As microarray technology matures, the number of microarray studies has increased, resulting in many different datasets available for any given disease. The increase in sensitivity and reliability of measurements of gene expression changes can be improved through a systematic integration of different microarray datasets that address the same or similar biological questions. Results Traditional effect size models can not be used to integrate array data that directly compare treatment to control samples expressed as log ratios of gene expressions. Here we extend the traditional effect size model to integrate as many array datasets as possible. The extended effect size model (MAID can integrate any array datatype generated with either single or two channel arrays using either direct or indirect designs across different laboratories and platforms. The model uses two standardized indices, the standard effect size score for experiments with two groups of data, and a new standardized index that measures the difference in gene expression between treatment and control groups for one sample data with replicate arrays. The statistical significance of treatment effect across studies for each gene is determined by appropriate permutation methods depending on the type of data integrated. We apply our method to three different expression datasets from two different laboratories generated using three different array platforms and two different experimental designs. Our results indicate that the proposed integration model produces an increase in statistical power for identifying differentially expressed genes when integrating data across experiments and when compared to other integration models. We also show that genes found to be significant using our data integration method are of direct

  8. Improving prediction of hydraulic conductivity by constraining capillary bundle models to a maximum pore size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Sascha C.; Peters, Andre; Durner, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    The prediction of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity from the soil water retention curve by pore-bundle models is a cost-effective and widely applied technique. One problem for conductivity predictions from retention functions with continuous derivatives, i.e. continuous water capacity functions, is that the hydraulic conductivity curve exhibits a sharp drop close to water saturation if the pore-size distribution is wide. So far this artifact has been ignored or removed by introducing an explicit air-entry value into the capillary saturation function. However, this correction leads to a retention function which is not continuously differentiable. We present a new parameterization of the hydraulic properties which uses the original saturation function (e.g. of van Genuchten) and introduces a maximum pore radius only in the pore-bundle model. In contrast to models using an explicit air entry, the resulting conductivity function is smooth and increases monotonically close to saturation. The model concept can easily be applied to any combination of retention curve and pore-bundle model. We derive closed-form expressions for the unimodal and multimodal van Genuchten-Mualem models and apply the model concept to curve fitting and inverse modeling of a transient outflow experiment. Since the new model retains the smoothness and continuous differentiability of the retention model and eliminates the sharp drop in conductivity close to saturation, the resulting hydraulic functions are physically more reasonable and ideal for numerical simulations with the Richards equation or multiphase flow models.

  9. A maturity model for SCPMS project-an empirical investigation in large sized Moroccan companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafik Okar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years many studies on maturity model have been carried out. Some refer specifically to maturity models for supply chain and performance measurement system. Starting from an analysis of the existing literature, the aim of this paper is to develop a maturity model for the supply chain performance measurement system (SCPMS project based on the concept of critical success factors (CSFs. This model will be validated by two approaches. The first is a pilot test of the model in a Moroccan supply chain to demonstrate his capacity of assessing the maturity of SCPMS project and whether it can develop an improvement roadmap. The second is an empirical investigation in large sized Moroccan companies by using a survey to depict whether it can evaluate the maturity of SCPMS project in different industries.

  10. Fracture-Based Mesh Size Requirements for Matrix Cracks in Continuum Damage Mechanics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Mabson, Gerald E.; Ramnath, Madhavadas; Hyder, Imran

    2017-01-01

    This paper evaluates the ability of progressive damage analysis (PDA) finite element (FE) models to predict transverse matrix cracks in unidirectional composites. The results of the analyses are compared to closed-form linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) solutions. Matrix cracks in fiber-reinforced composite materials subjected to mode I and mode II loading are studied using continuum damage mechanics and zero-thickness cohesive zone modeling approaches. The FE models used in this study are built parametrically so as to investigate several model input variables and the limits associated with matching the upper-bound LEFM solutions. Specifically, the sensitivity of the PDA FE model results to changes in strength and element size are investigated.

  11. Modelling The Effects of Aggregate Size on Alkali Aggregate Reaction Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Z. Sekrane

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at developing models to predict the potential expansion of concrete containing alkali-reactive aggregates. The paper gives measurements in order to provide experimental data concerning the effect of particle size of an alkali-reactive siliceous limestone on mortar expansion. Results show that no expansion was measured on the mortars using small particles (0.5-1.0 mm while the particles (1.0–2.0 mm gave the largest expansions (0.217%. Two models are proposed, the first one studies the correlations between the measured expansions and the size of aggregates, the second one calculates the thickness of the porous zone necessary to take again all the volume of the gel created.

  12. A Sustainable Financing Credit Rating Model for China’s Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper builds a sustainable financing credit rating index system for small- and medium-sized enterprises in China from the perspective of sustainability. Then, a quantitative model for credit rating evaluation based on our index system is proposed by using fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP, which has the advantage of considering both quantitative and qualitative factors. Our numerical example shows that the index system is effective and practical. Our system improves the existing credit rating system to a certain extent. The evaluation method proposed can play an important guiding role for China's small- and medium-sized enterprises in the current transformation age. In particular, interested stakeholders can use this model to evaluate the investment risk of companies, especially with a focus on sustainability.

  13. Theoretical size distribution of fossil taxa: analysis of a null model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Barry D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article deals with the theoretical size distribution (of number of sub-taxa of a fossil taxon arising from a simple null model of macroevolution. Model New species arise through speciations occurring independently and at random at a fixed probability rate, while extinctions either occur independently and at random (background extinctions or cataclysmically. In addition new genera are assumed to arise through speciations of a very radical nature, again assumed to occur independently and at random at a fixed probability rate. Conclusion The size distributions of the pioneering genus (following a cataclysm and of derived genera are determined. Also the distribution of the number of genera is considered along with a comparison of the probability of a monospecific genus with that of a monogeneric family.

  14. A Bi-modal Model for Chinese Cities: City Size, Car Use and Land Rent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Teqi; WANG Liang; ZHOU Binxue

    2016-01-01

    China is experiencing rapid urbanization and motorization.Urban transport congestion poses a challenge to the cities of China.Policies have been made trying to control the car use and the land use in Chinese cities without sound modelling researches.The existing literature on monocentric city modelling has shown that the parameters are critical for the outcome of the modelling.Following the Alonso-type monocentric model,this paper introduces a bi-modal model to simulate the city size,the distribution of land rent and the modal substitution in Chinese cities.We set the key parameters according to the recent available data of China's cities,and re-explain the hypothesis of the model.Then we make a sensitivity analysis to reveal the impacts of key parameters on the Chinese cities.According to the results,we find that the wage,the price of car use and the agriculture rent have significant impacts on city size.The land supply for the private transport or the public transport has the strongest impacts on car use and the level of transport congestion.The total population of the city and the wage level have strong impacts on land rent.Some results are counter-intuitive,but explainable.We also discuss implication of these results for policy making.

  15. Uncertainty in modeling dust mass balance and radiative forcing from size parameterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Zhao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the uncertainties in simulating mass balance and radiative forcing of mineral dust due to biases in the dust size parameterization. Simulations are conducted quasi-globally (180° W–180° E and 60° S–70° N using the WRF-Chem model with three different approaches to represent dust size distribution (8-bin, 4-bin, and 3-mode. The biases in the 3-mode or 4-bin approaches against a relatively more accurate 8-bin approach in simulating dust mass balance and radiative forcing are identified. Compared to the 8-bin approach, the 4-bin approach simulates similar but coarser size distributions of dust particles in the atmosphere, while the 3-mode approach retains more fine dust particles but fewer coarse dust particles due to its prescribed σg of each mode. Although the 3-mode approach yields up to 10 days longer dust mass lifetime over the remote oceanic regions than the 8-bin approach, the three size approaches produce similar dust mass lifetime (3.2 days to 3.5 days on quasi-global average, reflecting that the global dust mass lifetime is mainly determined by the dust mass lifetime near the dust source regions. With the same global dust emission (∼6000 Tg yr-1, the 8-bin approach produces a dust mass loading of 39 Tg, while the 4-bin and 3-mode approaches produce 3% (40.2 Tg and 25% (49.1 Tg higher dust mass loading, respectively. The difference in dust mass loading between the 8-bin approach and the 4-bin or 3-mode approaches has large spatial variations, with generally smaller relative difference (-2 and atmospheric warming (0.39∼0.96 W m-2 and in a tremendous difference of a factor of ∼10 in dust TOA cooling (-0.24∼-2.20 W m-2. An uncertainty of a factor of 2 is quantified in dust emission estimation due to the different size parameterizations. This study also highlights the uncertainties in modeling dust mass and number loading, deposition fluxes, and radiative forcing resulting from different size

  16. Why Do Model Tropical Cyclones Grow Progressively in Size and Decay in Intensity after Reaching Maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    TROPICAL CYCLONE RESEARCH REPORT TCRR 2: 1–16 (2015) Meteorological Institute Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich Why do model tropical cyclones ...behaviour of tropical cyclones in the prototype problem for cyclone intensification on an f -plane is examined using a nonhydrostatic, three-dimensional...controlling the evolution of size and intensity of a tropical cyclone . It provides also a plausible, and arguably simpler, explanation for the expansion

  17. A multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model

    CERN Document Server

    Faugeras, Blaise

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to present a generic multi-region nonlinear age-size structured fish population model, and to assess its mathematical well-posedness. An initial-boundary-value problem is formulated. Existence and uniqueness of a positive weak solution is proved. Eventually, a comparison result is derived: the population of all regions decreases as the mortality rate increases in at least one region.

  18. Modelling of the costs of decision support for small and medium-sized enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Tomišová

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The support of decision-making activities in small and medium-sized enterprises (SME has its specific features. When suggesting steps for the implementation of decision-support tools in the enterprise, we identified two main ways of decision-making support based on the data analysis: ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning without BI (Business Intelligence and ERP with BI. In our contribution, we present costs models of both mentioned decision support systems and their practical interpretation.

  19. Boundary states and finite size effects in sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Z; Takács, G

    2001-01-01

    The sine-Gordon model with Neumann boundary condition is investigated. Using the bootstrap principle the spectrum of boundary bound states is established. Somewhat surprisingly it is found that Coleman-Thun diagrams and bound state creation may coexist. A framework to describe finite size effects in boundary integrable theories is developed and used together with the truncated conformal space approach to confirm the bound states and reflection factors derived by bootstrap.

  20. Resampling: An improvement of importance sampling in varying population size models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, C; Leblois, R; Rousset, F; Pudlo, P

    2017-04-01

    Sequential importance sampling algorithms have been defined to estimate likelihoods in models of ancestral population processes. However, these algorithms are based on features of the models with constant population size, and become inefficient when the population size varies in time, making likelihood-based inferences difficult in many demographic situations. In this work, we modify a previous sequential importance sampling algorithm to improve the efficiency of the likelihood estimation. Our procedure is still based on features of the model with constant size, but uses a resampling technique with a new resampling probability distribution depending on the pairwise composite likelihood. We tested our algorithm, called sequential importance sampling with resampling (SISR) on simulated data sets under different demographic cases. In most cases, we divided the computational cost by two for the same accuracy of inference, in some cases even by one hundred. This study provides the first assessment of the impact of such resampling techniques on parameter inference using sequential importance sampling, and extends the range of situations where likelihood inferences can be easily performed.

  1. The effects of Antarctic iceberg calving-size distribution in a global climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, A. A.; Adcroft, A.; Sergienko, O.

    2016-08-01

    Icebergs calved from the Antarctic continent act as moving sources of freshwater while drifting in the Southern Ocean. The lifespan of these icebergs strongly depends on their original size during calving. In order to investigate the effects (if any) of the calving size of icebergs on the Southern Ocean, we use a coupled general circulation model with an iceberg component. Iceberg calving length is varied from 62 m up to 2.3 km, which is the typical range used in climate models. Results show that increasing the size of calving icebergs leads to an increase in the westward iceberg freshwater transport around Antarctica. In simulations using larger icebergs, the reduced availability of meltwater in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas suppresses the sea-ice growth in the region. In contrast, the increased iceberg freshwater transport leads to increased sea-ice growth around much of the East Antarctic coastline. These results suggest that the absence of large tabular icebergs with horizontal extent of tens of kilometers in climate models may introduces systematic biases in sea-ice formation, ocean temperatures, and salinities around Antarctica.

  2. Why a steady state void size distribution in irradiated UO2? A modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, S.; Martin, G.; Sabathier, C.

    2016-05-01

    In UO2 pellets irradiated in standard water reactor, Xe nano-bubbles nucleate, grow, coarsen and finally reach a quasi steady state size distribution: transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations typically report a concentration around 10-4 nm-3 and a radius around 0.5 nm. This phenomenon is often considered as a consequence of radiation enhanced diffusion, precipitation of gas atoms and ballistic mixing. However, in UO2 thin foils irradiated with energetic ions at room temperature, a nano-void population whose size distribution reaches a similar steady state can be observed, although quasi no foreign atoms are implanted nor significant cation vacancy diffusion expected in conditions. Atomistic simulations performed at low temperature only address the first stage of the process, supporting the assumption of void heterogeneous nucleation: 25 keV sub-cascades directly produce defect aggregates (loops and voids) even in the absence of gas atoms and thermal diffusion. In this work a semi-empirical stochastic model is proposed to enlarge the time scale covered by simulation up to damage levels where every point in the material undergoes the superposition of a large number of sub-cascade impacts. To account for the accumulation of these impacts, simple rules inferred from the atomistic simulation results are used. The model satisfactorily reproduces the TEM observations of nano-voids size and concentration, which paves the way for the introduction of a more realistic damage term in rate theory models.

  3. Indirect Energy Flows in Niche Model Food Webs: Effects of Size and Connectance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Shevtsov

    Full Text Available Indirect interactions between species have long been of interest to ecologists. One such interaction type takes place when energy or materials flow via one or more intermediate species between two species with a direct predator-prey relationship. Previous work has shown that, although each such flow is small, their great number makes them important in ecosystems. A new network analysis method, dynamic environ approximation, was used to quantify the fraction of energy flowing from prey to predator over paths of length greater than 1 (flow indirectness or FI in a commonly studied food web model. Web structure was created using the niche model and dynamics followed the Yodzis-Innes model. The effect of food web size (10 to 40 species and connectance (0.1 to 0.48 on FI was examined. For each of 250 model realizations run for each pair of size and connectance values, the FI of every predator-prey interaction in the model was computed and then averaged over the whole network. A classification and regression tree (CART analysis was then used to find the best predictors of FI. The mean FI of the model food webs is 0.092, with a standard deviation of 0.0279. It tends to increase with system size but peaks at intermediate connectance levels. Of 27 potential predictor variables, only five (mean path length, dominant eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix, connectance, mean trophic level and fraction of species belonging to intermediate trophic levels were selected by the CART algorithm as best accounting for variation in the data; mean path length and the dominant eigenvalue of the adjacency matrix were dominant.

  4. How well does end-member modelling analysis of grain size data work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Philipp; Dietze, Michael; Dietze, Elisabeth

    2014-05-01

    End-member modelling analysis (EMMA) is a powerful and flexible statistic approach to identify and quantify generic sediment transport processes from multimodal grain-size distributions. EMMA has been introduced over 15 years ago and is now available in different approaches as encapsulated FORTRAN code (Weltje, 1997), Matlab-script (Dietze et al., 2012) and the R-package EMMAgeo (Dietze and Dietze, 2013). EMMA was mainly used to reconstruct past sedimentation processes in a variety of sedimentary environments (marine, aeolian, lacustrine). Typically, it is rather difficult to assess how meaningful and well the model performs in a certain environment, since neither the actual process end-members (generic grain-size distributions sorted by a certain sediment transport) nor their individual contributions to each sample are known a priori. To allow a comprehensive performance test, we sampled a set of four known process end-members: alluvial sand (main mode: 0.70±0.55 φ), dune sand (main mode: 1.35±0.60 φ), loess (main mode: 4.71±0.65 φ) and overbank deposit (main mode: 5.81±1.62 φ). High resolution grain-size information is based on laser-diffraction analysis (116 classes). The four process end-members were artificially mixed with random, but known proportions to yield 100 samples. This mixed data set was measured again with the laser particle size analyser and served as input for EMMA within the R-package EMMAgeo. This contribution discusses the ability of EMMA to identify and characterise the four distinct process end-members and quantify their contributions to each sample. Different ways to estimate uncertainties are presented. Further evaluations focus on the influence of numbers of included samples, numbers of grain-size classes, vertical mixing of samples (simulating turbation) and self-similarity of process end-members. Dietze E, et al. 2012. An end-member algorithm for deciphering modern detrital processes from lake sediments of Lake Donggi Cona, NE

  5. MIQuant--semi-automation of infarct size assessment in models of cardiac ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana S Nascimento

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cardiac regenerative potential of newly developed therapies is traditionally evaluated in rodent models of surgically induced myocardial ischemia. A generally accepted key parameter for determining the success of the applied therapy is the infarct size. Although regarded as a gold standard method for infarct size estimation in heart ischemia, histological planimetry is time-consuming and highly variable amongst studies. The purpose of this work is to contribute towards the standardization and simplification of infarct size assessment by providing free access to a novel semi-automated software tool. The acronym MIQuant was attributed to this application. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice were subject to permanent coronary artery ligation and the size of chronic infarcts was estimated by area and midline-length methods using manual planimetry and with MIQuant. Repeatability and reproducibility of MIQuant scores were verified. The validation showed high correlation (r(midline length = 0.981; r(area = 0.970 and agreement (Bland-Altman analysis, free from bias for midline length and negligible bias of 1.21% to 3.72% for area quantification. Further analysis demonstrated that MIQuant reduced by 4.5-fold the time spent on the analysis and, importantly, MIQuant effectiveness is independent of user proficiency. The results indicate that MIQuant can be regarded as a better alternative to manual measurement. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that MIQuant is a reliable and an easy-to-use software for infarct size quantification. The widespread use of MIQuant will contribute towards the standardization of infarct size assessment across studies and, therefore, to the systematization of the evaluation of cardiac regenerative potential of emerging therapies.

  6. MIQuant – Semi-Automation of Infarct Size Assessment in Models of Cardiac Ischemic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Tiago; de Pina, Maria de Fátima; Guedes, Joana G.; Freire, Ana; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua

    2011-01-01

    Background The cardiac regenerative potential of newly developed therapies is traditionally evaluated in rodent models of surgically induced myocardial ischemia. A generally accepted key parameter for determining the success of the applied therapy is the infarct size. Although regarded as a gold standard method for infarct size estimation in heart ischemia, histological planimetry is time-consuming and highly variable amongst studies. The purpose of this work is to contribute towards the standardization and simplification of infarct size assessment by providing free access to a novel semi-automated software tool. The acronym MIQuant was attributed to this application. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were subject to permanent coronary artery ligation and the size of chronic infarcts was estimated by area and midline-length methods using manual planimetry and with MIQuant. Repeatability and reproducibility of MIQuant scores were verified. The validation showed high correlation (rmidline length = 0.981; rarea = 0.970 ) and agreement (Bland-Altman analysis), free from bias for midline length and negligible bias of 1.21% to 3.72% for area quantification. Further analysis demonstrated that MIQuant reduced by 4.5-fold the time spent on the analysis and, importantly, MIQuant effectiveness is independent of user proficiency. The results indicate that MIQuant can be regarded as a better alternative to manual measurement. Conclusions We conclude that MIQuant is a reliable and an easy-to-use software for infarct size quantification. The widespread use of MIQuant will contribute towards the standardization of infarct size assessment across studies and, therefore, to the systematization of the evaluation of cardiac regenerative potential of emerging therapies. PMID:21980376

  7. MIQuant--semi-automation of infarct size assessment in models of cardiac ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Diana S; Valente, Mariana; Esteves, Tiago; de Pina, Maria de Fátima; Guedes, Joana G; Freire, Ana; Quelhas, Pedro; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpétua

    2011-01-01

    The cardiac regenerative potential of newly developed therapies is traditionally evaluated in rodent models of surgically induced myocardial ischemia. A generally accepted key parameter for determining the success of the applied therapy is the infarct size. Although regarded as a gold standard method for infarct size estimation in heart ischemia, histological planimetry is time-consuming and highly variable amongst studies. The purpose of this work is to contribute towards the standardization and simplification of infarct size assessment by providing free access to a novel semi-automated software tool. The acronym MIQuant was attributed to this application. Mice were subject to permanent coronary artery ligation and the size of chronic infarcts was estimated by area and midline-length methods using manual planimetry and with MIQuant. Repeatability and reproducibility of MIQuant scores were verified. The validation showed high correlation (r(midline length) = 0.981; r(area) = 0.970 ) and agreement (Bland-Altman analysis), free from bias for midline length and negligible bias of 1.21% to 3.72% for area quantification. Further analysis demonstrated that MIQuant reduced by 4.5-fold the time spent on the analysis and, importantly, MIQuant effectiveness is independent of user proficiency. The results indicate that MIQuant can be regarded as a better alternative to manual measurement. We conclude that MIQuant is a reliable and an easy-to-use software for infarct size quantification. The widespread use of MIQuant will contribute towards the standardization of infarct size assessment across studies and, therefore, to the systematization of the evaluation of cardiac regenerative potential of emerging therapies.

  8. Group size, grooming and fission in primates: a modeling approach based on group structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueur, Cédric; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis; Petit, Odile; Couzin, Iain D

    2011-03-21

    In social animals, fission is a common mode of group proliferation and dispersion and may be affected by genetic or other social factors. Sociality implies preserving relationships between group members. An increase in group size and/or in competition for food within the group can result in decrease certain social interactions between members, and the group may split irreversibly as a consequence. One individual may try to maintain bonds with a maximum of group members in order to keep group cohesion, i.e. proximity and stable relationships. However, this strategy needs time and time is often limited. In addition, previous studies have shown that whatever the group size, an individual interacts only with certain grooming partners. There, we develop a computational model to assess how dynamics of group cohesion are related to group size and to the structure of grooming relationships. Groups' sizes after simulated fission are compared to observed sizes of 40 groups of primates. Results showed that the relationship between grooming time and group size is dependent on how each individual attributes grooming time to its social partners, i.e. grooming a few number of preferred partners or grooming equally or not all partners. The number of partners seemed to be more important for the group cohesion than the grooming time itself. This structural constraint has important consequences on group sociality, as it gives the possibility of competition for grooming partners, attraction for high-ranking individuals as found in primates' groups. It could, however, also have implications when considering the cognitive capacities of primates.

  9. Some New Properties for Single Item Economic Lot Sizing Model with Inventory Capacity and Stockouts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiao(刘晓); Wang Chengen; Chu Chengbin

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with a single item inventory capacity economic lot sizing model and sale loss. Unsatisfied demand cannot be backlogged. Although the model with time-dependent bounds is a NP problem, however, when lost sale cost is non-increasing, some new properties are proved in an optimal solution, the problem becomes a stockout case. A dynamic programming algorithm is developed to solve the problem in strongly polynomial with O(T3) time. Some numerical results demonstrate that the approach proposed for stockout problem is efficient and applicable.

  10. Finite-size scaling of entanglement entropy in one-dimensional topological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Gulden, Tobias; Kamenev, Alex

    2017-02-01

    We consider scaling of the entanglement entropy across a topological quantum phase transition for the Kitaev chain model. The change of the topology manifests itself in a subleading term, which scales as L-1 /α with the size of the subsystem L , here α is the Rényi index. This term reveals the scaling function hα(L /ξ ) , where ξ is the correlation length, which is sensitive to the topological index. The scaling function hα(L /ξ ) is independent of model parameters, suggesting some degree of its universality.

  11. Estimating required information size by quantifying diversity in random-effects model meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetterslev, Jørn; Thorlund, Kristian; Brok, Jesper;

    2009-01-01

    an intervention effect suggested by trials with low-risk of bias. METHODS: Information size calculations need to consider the total model variance in a meta-analysis to control type I and type II errors. Here, we derive an adjusting factor for the required information size under any random-effects model meta......-analysis. RESULTS: We devise a measure of diversity (D2) in a meta-analysis, which is the relative variance reduction when the meta-analysis model is changed from a random-effects into a fixed-effect model. D2 is the percentage that the between-trial variability constitutes of the sum of the between...... and interpreted using several simulations and clinical examples. In addition we show mathematically that diversity is equal to or greater than inconsistency, that is D2 >or= I2, for all meta-analyses. CONCLUSION: We conclude that D2 seems a better alternative than I2 to consider model variation in any random...

  12. A Nonlinear Size-Dependent Equivalent Circuit Model for Single-Cell Electroporation on Microfluidic Chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagoshtasbi, Hooman; Deng, Peigang; Lee, Yi-Kuen

    2015-08-01

    Electroporation (EP) is a process of applying a pulsed intense electric field on the cell membrane to temporarily induce nanoscale electropores on the plasma membrane of biological cells. A nonlinear size-dependent equivalent circuit model of a single-cell electroporation system is proposed to investigate dynamic electromechanical behavior of cells on microfluidic chips during EP. This model consists of size-dependent electromechanical components of a cell, electrical components of poration media, and a microfluidic chip. A single-cell microfluidic EP chip with 3D microelectrode arrays along a microchannel is designed and fabricated to experimentally analyze the permeabilization of a cell. Predicted electrical current responses of the model are in good agreement (average error of 6%) with that of single-cell EP. The proposed model can successfully predict the time responses of transmembrane voltage, pore diameter, and pore density at four different stages of permeabilization. These stages are categorized based on electromechanical changes of the lipid membrane. The current-voltage characteristic curve of the cell membrane during EP is also investigated at different EP stages in detail. The model can precisely predict the electric breakdown of different cell lines at a specific critical cell membrane voltage of the target cell lines.

  13. Size distributions of secondary and primary aerosols in Asia: A 3-D modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F.; Luo, G.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Asian aerosols have received increasing attention because of their potential health and climate effects and the rapid increasing of Asian emissions associated with accelerating economic expansion. Aerosol particles appear in the atmosphere due to either in-situ nucleation (i.e, secondary particles) or direct emissions (i.e., primary particles), and their environmental impacts depend strongly on their concentrations, sizes, compositions, and mixing states. A size-resolved (sectional) particle microphysics model with a number of computationally efficient schemes has been incorporated into a global chemistry transport model (GEOS-Chem) to simulate the number size distributions of secondary and primary particles in the troposphere (Yu and Luo, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 10597-10645, 2009). The growth of nucleated particles through the condensation of sulfuric acid vapor and equilibrium uptake of nitrate, ammonium, and secondary organic aerosol is explicitly simulated, along with the coating of primary particles (dust, black carbon, organic carbon, and sea salt) by volatile components via condensation and coagulation with secondary particles. Here we look into the spatiotemporal variations of the size distributions of secondary and primary aerosols in Asia. The annual mean number concentration of the accumulation mode particles (dry diameter > ~ 100 nm) in the lower troposphere over Asia (especially China) is very high and is dominated (~70-90%) by carbonaceous primary particles (with coated condensable species). Coagulation and condensation turn the primary particles into mixed particles and on average increase the dry sizes of primary particles by a factor of ~ 2-2.5. Despite of high condensation sink, sulfuric acid vapor concentration in many parts of Asian low troposphere is very high (annual mean values above 1E7/cm3) and significant new particle formation still occurs. Secondary particles generally dominate the particles small than 100 nm and the equilibrium

  14. Modelling the relationship between soil color and particle size for soil survey in Ferralsol environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kone

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil texture is an important property for evaluating its inherent fertility especially by using pedo-transfers functions requiring particle size data. However, there is no existing quantitative method for in situ estimation of soil particle size, delaying judgement of soil chemical properties in the field. For this purpose, laboratory particle size analyses of 1028 samples from 281 Ferralsol profiles, located between latitudes 7º N and 10º N in Côte d’Ivoire and their respective colour notation by Munsell chart were used to generate prediction models. Multiple Linear Regression Analysis by Group was processed to identify clay, sand and silt contents in the soil based on color hue (2.5YR, 5YR, 7.5YR, and 10YR and Chroma (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. The evaluation was conducted for each horizon coded as H1 (0-20 cm, H2 (20-60 cm, H3 (60-80 cm and H4 (80-150 cm and used as grouping variables. Highly significant (P< 0.001 models were identified for clay and sand. These models were used to estimate successfully clay and sand contents for other Ferralsol samples by comparing calculated and measured mean using the null hypothesis of difference and Tukey’s tests. They were accurate for at all depths, except 80 - 150 cm, for sand in 10YR soils. The method was deemed appropriate for in situ estimation of soil particle size contents in Ferralsol environment for improving reconnaissance agricultural soil surveys.

  15. An explicit solution for calculating optimum spawning stock size from Ricker's stock recruitment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerell, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Stock-recruitment models have been used for decades in fisheries management as a means of formalizing the expected number of offspring that recruit to a fishery based on the number of parents. In particular, Ricker's stock recruitment model is widely used due to its flexibility and ease with which the parameters can be estimated. After model fitting, the spawning stock size that produces the maximum sustainable yield (S MSY) to a fishery, and the harvest corresponding to it (U MSY), are two of the most common biological reference points of interest to fisheries managers. However, to date there has been no explicit solution for either reference point because of the transcendental nature of the equation needed to solve for them. Therefore, numerical or statistical approximations have been used for more than 30 years. Here I provide explicit formulae for calculating both S MSY and U MSY in terms of the productivity and density-dependent parameters of Ricker's model.

  16. Persistence and distribution of a stochastic susceptible-infected-removed epidemic model with varying population size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihong; Wei, Fengying

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the dynamics of a stochastic susceptible-infected-removed model in a population with varying size is investigated. We firstly show that the stochastic epidemic model has a unique global positive solution with any positive initial value. Then we verify that random perturbations lead to extinction when some conditions are being valid. Moreover, we prove that the solution of the stochastic epidemic model is persistent in the mean by building up a suitable Lyapunov function and using generalized Itô's formula. Further, the stochastic epidemic model admits a stationary distribution around the endemic equilibrium when parameters satisfy some sufficient conditions. To end this contribution and to check the validity of the main results, numerical simulations are separately carried out to illustrate these results.

  17. Finite-size effects in the spherical model of finite thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamati, H.

    2008-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the finite-size effects on the bulk critical behaviour of the d-dimensional mean spherical model confined to a film geometry with finite thickness L is reported. Along the finite direction different kinds of boundary conditions are applied: periodic (p), antiperiodic (a) and free surfaces with Dirichlet (D), Neumann (N) and a combination of Neumann and Dirichlet (ND) on both surfaces. A systematic method for the evaluation of the finite-size corrections to the free energy for the different types of boundary conditions is proposed. The free energy density and the equation for the spherical field are computed for arbitrary d. It is found, for 2 finite-size scaling form at the bulk critical temperature only for (p) and (a). For the remaining boundary conditions the standard finite-size scaling hypothesis is not valid. At d = 3, the critical amplitude of the singular part of the free energy (related to the so-called Casimir amplitude) is estimated. We obtain Δ(p) = -2ζ(3)/(5π) = -0.153 051..., Δ(a) = 0.274 543... and Δ(ND) = 0.019 22..., implying a fluctuation-induced attraction between the surfaces for (p) and repulsion in the other two cases. For (D) and (N) we find a logarithmic dependence on L.

  18. Modeling the competition between antenna size mutant and wild type microalgae in outdoor mass culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mooij, Tim; Schediwy, Kira; Wijffels, René H; Janssen, Marcel

    2016-12-20

    Under high light conditions, microalgae are oversaturated with light which significantly reduces the light use efficiency. Microalgae with a reduced pigment content, antenna size mutants, have been proposed as a potential solution to increase the light use efficiency. The goal of this study was to investigate the competition between antenna size mutants and wild type microalgae in mass cultures. Using a kinetic model and literature-derived experimental data from wild type Chlorella sorokiniana, the productivity and competition of wild type cells and antenna size mutants were simulated. Cultivation was simulated in an outdoor microalgal raceway pond production system which was assumed to be limited by light only. Light conditions were based on a Mediterranean location (Tunisia) and a more temperate location (the Netherlands). Several wild type contamination levels were simulated in each mutant culture separately to predict the effect on the productivity over the cultivation time of a hypothetical summer season of 100days. The simulations demonstrate a good potential of antenna size reduction to increase the biomass productivity of microalgal cultures. However, it was also found that after a contamination with wild type cells the mutant cultures will be rapidly overgrown resulting in productivity loss.

  19. Effects of ischemic preconditioning in a pig model of large-for-size liver transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Antonio José Gonçalves; Tannuri, Ana Cristina Aoun; Belon, Alessandro Rodrigo; Guimarães, Raimundo Renato Nunes; Coelho, Maria Cecília Mendonça; de Oliveira Gonçalves, Josiane; Serafini, Suellen; de Melo, Evandro Sobroza; Tannuri, Uenis

    2015-01-01

    : Ischemia-reperfusion injury in this model of large-for-size liver transplantation could be partially attenuated by ischemic preconditioning. PMID:25789522

  20. Effects of ischemic preconditioning in a pig model of large-for-size liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio José Gonçalves Leal

    2015-02-01

    . CONCLUSION: Ischemia-reperfusion injury in this model of large-for-size liver transplantation could be partially attenuated by ischemic preconditioning.

  1. Sample Size Requirements for Estimation of Item Parameters in the Multidimensional Graded Response Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu eJiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Likert types of rating scales in which a respondent chooses a response from an ordered set of response options are used to measure a wide variety of psychological, educational, and medical outcome variables. The most appropriate item response theory model for analyzing and scoring these instruments when they provide scores on multiple scales is the multidimensional graded response model (MGRM. A simulation study was conducted to investigate the variables that might affect item parameter recovery for the MGRM. Data were generated based on different sample sizes, test lengths, and scale intercorrelations. Parameter estimates were obtained through the flexiMIRT software. The quality of parameter recovery was assessed by the correlation between true and estimated parameters as well as bias and root- mean-square-error. Results indicated that for the vast majority of cases studied a sample size of N = 500 provided accurate parameter estimates, except for tests with 240 items when 1,000 examinees were necessary to obtain accurate parameter estimates. Increasing sample size beyond N = 1,000 did not increase the accuracy of MGRM parameter estimates.

  2. Constraints on coronal turbulence models from source sizes of noise storms at 327 MHz

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, Prasad

    2010-01-01

    We seek to reconcile observations of small source sizes in the solar corona at 327 MHz with predictions of scattering models that incorporate refractive index effects, inner scale effects and a spherically diverging wavefront. We use an empirical prescription for the turbulence amplitude $C_{N}^{2}(R)$ based on VLBI observations by Spangler and coworkers of compact radio sources against the solar wind for heliocentric distances $R \\approx$ 10--50 $R_{\\odot}$. We use the Coles & Harmon model for the inner scale $l_{i}(R)$, that is presumed to arise from cyclotron damping. In view of the prevalent uncertainty in the power law index that characterizes solar wind turbulence at various heliocentric distances, we retain this index as a free parameter. We find that the inclusion of spherical divergence effects suppresses the predicted source size substantially. We also find that inner scale effects significantly reduce the predicted source size. An important general finding for solar sources is that the calculat...

  3. Numerical modelling of intergranular fracture in polycrystalline materials and grain size effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Wriggers

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the phenomenon of intergranular fracture in polycrystalline materials is investigated using a nonlinear fracture mechanics approach. The nonlocal cohesive zone model (CZM for finite thickness interfaces recently proposed by the present authors is used to describe the phenomenon of grain boundary separation. From the modelling point of view, considering the dependency of the grain boundary thickness on the grain size observed in polycrystals, a distribution of interface thicknesses is obtained. Since the shape and the parameters of the nonlocal CZM depend on the interface thickness, a distribution of interface fracture energies is obtained as a consequence of the randomness of the material microstructure. Using these data, fracture mechanics simulations are performed and the homogenized stress-strain curves of 2D representative volume elements (RVEs are computed. Failure is the result of a diffuse microcrack pattern leading to a main macroscopic crack after coalescence, in good agreement with the experimental observation. Finally, testing microstructures characterized by different average grain sizes, the computed peak stresses are found to be dependent on the grain size, in agreement with the trend expected according to the Hall-Petch law.

  4. Modeling the seasonal evolution of the Arctic sea ice floe size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlun Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To better simulate the seasonal evolution of sea ice in the Arctic, with particular attention to the marginal ice zone, a sea ice model of the distribution of ice thickness, floe size, and enthalpy was implemented into the Pan-arctic Ice–Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS. Theories on floe size distribution (FSD and ice thickness distribution (ITD were coupled in order to explicitly simulate multicategory FSD and ITD distributions simultaneously. The expanded PIOMAS was then used to estimate the seasonal evolution of the Arctic FSD in 2014 when FSD observations are available for model calibration and validation. Results indicate that the simulated FSD, commonly described equivalently as cumulative floe number distribution (CFND, generally follows a power law across space and time and agrees with the CFND observations derived from TerraSAR-X satellite images. The simulated power-law exponents also correlate with those derived using MODIS images, with a low mean bias of –2%. In the marginal ice zone, the modeled CFND shows a large number of small floes in winter because of stronger winds acting on thin, weak first-year ice in the ice edge region. In mid-spring and summer, the CFND resembles an upper truncated power law, with the largest floes mostly broken into smaller ones; however, the number of small floes is lower than in winter because floes of small sizes or first-year ice are easily melted away. In the ice pack interior there are fewer floes in late fall and winter than in summer because many of the floes are “welded” together into larger floes in freezing conditions, leading to a relatively flat CFND with low power-law exponents. The simulated mean floe size averaged over all ice-covered areas shows a clear annual cycle, large in winter and smaller in summer. However, there is no obvious annual cycle of mean floe size averaged over the marginal ice zone. The incorporation of FSD into PIOMAS results in reduced

  5. Virus-sized colloid transport in a single pore: Model development and sensitivity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N.; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.; Raoof, Amir

    2014-08-01

    A mathematical model is developed to simulate the transport and deposition of virus-sized colloids in a cylindrical pore throat considering various processes such as advection, diffusion, colloid-collector surface interactions and hydrodynamic wall effects. The pore space is divided into three different regions, namely, bulk, diffusion and potential regions, based on the dominant processes acting in each of these regions. In the bulk region, colloid transport is governed by advection and diffusion whereas in the diffusion region, colloid mobility due to diffusion is retarded by hydrodynamic wall effects. Colloid-collector interaction forces dominate the transport in the potential region where colloid deposition occurs. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and solved numerically. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the virus-sized colloid transport and deposition is significantly affected by various pore-scale parameters such as the surface potentials on colloid and collector, ionic strength of the solution, flow velocity, pore size and colloid size. The adsorbed concentration and hence, the favorability of the surface for adsorption increases with: (i) decreasing magnitude and ratio of surface potentials on colloid and collector, (ii) increasing ionic strength and (iii) increasing pore radius. The adsorbed concentration increases with increasing Pe, reaching a maximum value at Pe = 0.1 and then decreases thereafter. Also, the colloid size significantly affects particle deposition with the adsorbed concentration increasing with increasing particle radius, reaching a maximum value at a particle radius of 100 nm and then decreasing with increasing radius. System hydrodynamics is found to have a greater effect on larger particles than on smaller ones. The secondary minimum contribution to particle deposition has been found to increase as the favorability of the surface for adsorption decreases. The sensitivity of the model to a given parameter will be high

  6. Unified approach to thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and finite size corrections for lattice models and field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Destri, C

    1994-01-01

    We present a unified approach to the Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz (TBA) for magnetic chains and field theories that includes the finite size (and zero temperature) calculations for lattice BA models. In all cases, the free energy follows by quadratures from the solution of a {\\bf single} non-linear integral equation (NLIE). [A system of NLIE appears for nested BA]. We derive the NLIE for: a) the six-vertex model with twisted boundary conditions; b) the XXZ chain in an external magnetic field h_z and c) the sine-Gordon-massive Thirring model (sG-mT) in a periodic box of size \\b \\equiv 1/T using the light-cone approach. This NLIE is solved by iteration in one regime (high T in the XXZ chain and low T in the sG-mT model). In the opposite (conformal) regime, the leading behaviors are obtained in closed form. Higher corrections can be derived from the Riemann-Hilbert form of the NLIE that we present.

  7. Finite-size analysis of the detectability limit of the stochastic block model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jean-Gabriel; Desrosiers, Patrick; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Laurence, Edward; Dubé, Louis J.

    2017-06-01

    It has been shown in recent years that the stochastic block model is sometimes undetectable in the sparse limit, i.e., that no algorithm can identify a partition correlated with the partition used to generate an instance, if the instance is sparse enough and infinitely large. In this contribution, we treat the finite case explicitly, using arguments drawn from information theory and statistics. We give a necessary condition for finite-size detectability in the general SBM. We then distinguish the concept of average detectability from the concept of instance-by-instance detectability and give explicit formulas for both definitions. Using these formulas, we prove that there exist large equivalence classes of parameters, where widely different network ensembles are equally detectable with respect to our definitions of detectability. In an extensive case study, we investigate the finite-size detectability of a simplified variant of the SBM, which encompasses a number of important models as special cases. These models include the symmetric SBM, the planted coloring model, and more exotic SBMs not previously studied. We conclude with three appendices, where we study the interplay of noise and detectability, establish a connection between our information-theoretic approach and random matrix theory, and provide proofs of some of the more technical results.

  8. System Dynamics Modeling for Determining Optimal Ship Sizes and Types in Coastal Liner Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-il Park

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of determining the required ship investment for deployment is an ongoing problem faced by governments and ship operators. The nature of ship investment is capital-intensive and the return on investment is often take long time. This paper attempts to establish system dynamics modeling (SDM to simulate and solve this problem in order to help ship operators make effective strategic decisions. A case study of coastal liner services between Incheon and Baengnyeong Island in South Korea was performed. Using scenario analysis, the possible ship sizes (small: 350 tons; large: 2,500 tons and types (new or used were considered by comparing potential revenue with costs. The results indicated that putting a used large-sized ship into operation would accommodate the increasing passenger and cargo volumes, and improve customer services.

  9. The economic production lot size model extended to include more than one production rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    2001-01-01

    btween the demand rate and the production rate which minimizes unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed-form expressions for all optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost. This analysis reveals that it is the size......We study an extension of the economic production lot size model, where more than one production rate can be used during a cycle. Moreover, the production rates, as well as their corresponding runtimes are decision variables. First, we show that all production rates should be choosen in the interval...... of the setup cost that determines the need for being able to use several production rates. Finally, we show how to derive a near-optimal solution of the general problem....

  10. The economic production lot size model extended to include more than one production rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    production rates should be chosen in the interval between the demand rate and the production rate which minimizes unit production costs, and should be used in an increasing order. Then, given the production rates, we derive closed-form expressions for all optimal runtimes as well as the minimum average cost......We study an extension of the economic production lot size model, where more than one production rate can be used during a cycle. Moreover, the production rates, as well as their corresponding runtimes are decision variables. We decompose the problem into two subproblems. First, we show that all....... This analysis reveals that it is the size of the setup cost that determines the need for being able to use several production rates. We also show how to derive a near-optimal solution of the general problem....

  11. Fitts' law model and target size of pointing devices in a vibration environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi No; Lin, Chiuhsiang Joe; Chao, Chin Jung

    2007-12-01

    This study examined models of Fitts' law and effective target widths of three pointing devices in vibration environments. From a research institute 10 employees, ages 26 to 31 years were recruited as paid subjects. Pointing tasks consisted of four square target sizes, four movement distances, and four target angles and were performed on a motion platform using a touch screen, a mouse, and a track ball. The platform simulated two levels of sea wave vibration environments besides a static one. Analysis showed effective target widths increased with vibration, indicating increased variability of the pointing task under vibration. The increase in the track ball was smaller, indicating resistance to motion disturbance. The study also suggests an enlarged target (button) size for the touch screen under the vibration environment. The findings have implications in motor control and human-computer interfacing.

  12. Finite-size effects in the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the Nagel-Schreckenberg traffic model for a variety of maximum speeds. We show that the low-density limit can be described as a dilute gas of vehicles with a repulsive core. At the transition to jamming, we observe finite-size effects in a variety of quantities describing the flow and the density correlations, but only if the maximum speed Vmax is larger than a certain value. A finite-size scaling analysis of several order parameters shows universal behavior, with scaling exponents that depend on Vmax. The jamming transition at large Vmax can be viewed as the nucleation of jams in a background of freely flowing vehicles. For small Vmax no such clean separation into jammed and free vehicles is possible.

  13. Solar Desalination System Model for Sizing of Photovoltaic Reverse Osmosis (PVRO)

    KAUST Repository

    Habib, Abdulelah

    2015-06-28

    The focus of this paper is to optimize the solar energy utilization in the water desalination process. Due to variable nature of solar energy, new system design is needed to address this challenge. Here, reverse osmosis units, as the electrical loads, are considered as an ON/OFF units to track these solar energy variations. Reverse osmosis units are different in sizes and numbers. Various combinations of reverse osmosis units in size and capacity provide different water desalination system performances. To assess each scenario of reverse osmosis units, the total capital cost and operation and maintenance (O&M) cost are considered. The implemented optimization algorithm search all of the possible scenarios to find the best solution. This paper deploys the solar irradiance data which is provided from west coast (Red Sea) of Saudi Arabia for model construction and optimization algorithm implementation.

  14. Multiscale Characterization of Impact of Infarct Size on Myocardial Remodeling in an Ovine Infarct Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Li, Tielou; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-01-01

    The surviving myocardium initially compensates the loss of injured myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI) and gradually becomes progressively dysfunctional. There have been limited studies on the effect of infarct size on temporal and spatial alterations in the myocardium during progressive myocardial remodeling. MI with three infarct sizes, i.e. 15, 25 and 35% of the left ventricular (LV) wall, was created in an ovine infarction model. The progressive LV remodeling over a 12-week period was studied. Echocardiography, sonomicrometry, and histological and molecular analyses were carried out to evaluate cardiac function, regional tissue contractile function, structural remodeling and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and calcium handling proteins. Twelve weeks after MI, the 15, 25 and 35% MI groups had normalized LV end diastole volumes of 1.4 ± 0.2, 1.7 ± 0.3 and 2.0 ± 0.4 ml/kg, normalized end systole volumes of 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.0 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.3 ml/kg and LV ejection fractions of 43 ± 3, 42 ± 6 and 34 ± 4%, respectively. They all differed from the sham group (p strain), larger cardiomyocyte size and altered expression of calcium handing proteins in the adjacent myocardium compared to the remote counterpart from the infarct. A significant correlation was found between cardiomyocyte size and remodeling strain in the adjacent zone. A comparative analysis among the three MI groups showed that a larger infarct size (35 vs. 15% MI) was associated with larger remodeling strain, more serious impairment in the cellular structure and composition, and regional contractile function at regional tissue level and LV function at organ level.

  15. Finite size effects on the phase diagram of the thermodynamical cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, S; Chaudhuri, G

    2016-01-01

    The thermodynamical cluster model is known to present a first-order liquid-gas phase transition in the idealized case of an uncharged, infinitely extended medium. However, in most practical applications of this model, the system is finite and charged. In this paper we study how the phase diagram is modified by finite size and Coulomb effects. We show that the thermodynamic anomalies which are associated to the finite system counterpart of first order phase transitions, are correctly reproduced by this effective model. However, approximations in the calculation of the grandcanonical partition sum prevent obtaining the exact mapping between statistical ensembles which should be associated to finite systems. The ensemble inequivalence associated to the transition persists in the presence of Coulomb, but the phase diagram is deeply modified with respect to the simple liquid-gas phase transition characteristic of the neutral system.

  16. Finite Size Scaling of the Higgs-Yukawa Model near the Gaussian Fixed Point

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, David Y -J; Knippschild, Bastian; Lin, C -J David; Nagy, Attila

    2016-01-01

    We study the scaling properties of Higgs-Yukawa models. Using the technique of Finite-Size Scaling, we are able to derive scaling functions that describe the observables of the model in the vicinity of a Gaussian fixed point. A feasibility study of our strategy is performed for the pure scalar theory in the weak-coupling regime. Choosing the on-shell renormalisation scheme gives us an advantage to fit the scaling functions against lattice data with only a small number of fit parameters. These formulae can be used to determine the universality of the observed phase transitions, and thus play an essential role in future investigations of Higgs-Yukawa models, in particular in the strong Yukawa coupling region.

  17. Cancer screening: a mathematical model relating secreted blood biomarker levels to tumor sizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie M Lutz

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing efforts and financial resources are being invested in early cancer detection research. Blood assays detecting tumor biomarkers promise noninvasive and financially reasonable screening for early cancer with high potential of positive impact on patients' survival and quality of life. For novel tumor biomarkers, the actual tumor detection limits are usually unknown and there have been no studies exploring the tumor burden detection limits of blood tumor biomarkers using mathematical models. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to develop a mathematical model relating blood biomarker levels to tumor burden. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a linear one-compartment model, the steady state between tumor biomarker secretion into and removal out of the intravascular space was calculated. Two conditions were assumed: (1 the compartment (plasma is well-mixed and kinetically homogenous; (2 the tumor biomarker consists of a protein that is secreted by tumor cells into the extracellular fluid compartment, and a certain percentage of the secreted protein enters the intravascular space at a continuous rate. The model was applied to two pathophysiologic conditions: tumor biomarker is secreted (1 exclusively by the tumor cells or (2 by both tumor cells and healthy normal cells. To test the model, a sensitivity analysis was performed assuming variable conditions of the model parameters. The model parameters were primed on the basis of literature data for two established and well-studied tumor biomarkers (CA125 and prostate-specific antigen [PSA]. Assuming biomarker secretion by tumor cells only and 10% of the secreted tumor biomarker reaching the plasma, the calculated minimally detectable tumor sizes ranged between 0.11 mm(3 and 3,610.14 mm(3 for CA125 and between 0.21 mm(3 and 131.51 mm(3 for PSA. When biomarker secretion by healthy cells and tumor cells was assumed, the calculated tumor sizes leading to positive test results ranged

  18. Development of engineering model of medium-sized aperture camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ee-Eul; Choi, Young-Wan; Soon Yang, Ho; Kang, Myung-Seok; Jeong, Seong-Keun; Yang, Seung-Uk; Kim, Jong-Un; Rasheed, Ad. Aziz Ad.; Nasir, Hafizah Md.; Rosdi, Md. Rushdan Md.; Hai, Asma Hani Ad.; Ismail, Ismahadi; Sabirin Arshad, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    SaTReC i and ATSB are developing medium-sized aperture camera (MAC) system for earth observation. Following the first model, the development of the engineering model (EM) was completed. The optical subsystem incorporates a conventional approach of using low-expansion optical and structural materials. It is a 300-mm on-axis system with two aspheric mirrors and two field correction lenses. It has five linear detectors aligned on its focal plane together with proximity electronics. The electronics subsystem consists of five modules; two for management and control in cold redundancy, two for image data storage and one for power supply. EM was developed to have a storage capacity of 16 Gbits, which can be easily increased to 32 Gbits by adding memory packs for following models. EM weighs about 41.9 kg and consumes about 45.4 W of peak power.

  19. Modelling of airborne particulate matter concentration in underground stations using a two size-class conservation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, E; Bogdan, M; Cohen, R

    2017-12-31

    This study presents an attempt of predictive modelling of airborne particulate matter in underground railway stations. The aerosol is represented by a set of simple, ordinary differential equations that describe apparent emission of two particles size-classes in relation with train traffic, ventilation and deposition. The parameters of the equations are identified numerically by a genetic algorithm and comply with their respective expected order of magnitude. A quantitative comparison of numerical results with experimental data from Paris underground station exhibits a good accordance. A qualitative comparison with results from the literature also supports the model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Size Effects on Countercurrent Flow Limitation in PWR Hot Leg Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kinoshita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously done numerical simulations using the two-fluid model implemented in the CFD software FLUENT6.3.26 to investigate effects of shape of a flow channel and its size on CCFL (countercurrent flow limitation characteristics in PWR hot leg models. We confirmed that CCFL characteristics in the hot leg could be well correlated with the Wallis parameters in the diameter range of 0.05 m≤D≤0.75 m. In the present study, we did numerical simulations using the two-fluid model for the air-water tests with D=0.0254 m to determine why CCFL characteristics for D=0.0254 m were severer compared with those in the range, 0.05 m≤D≤0.75 m. The predicted CCFL characteristics agreed with the data for D=0.0254 m and indicated that the CCFL difference between D=0.0254 m and 0.05 mm≤D≤0.75 mm was caused by the size effect and not by other factors.

  1. Modelling the Size Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Micro/Nano Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, Amir Musa; Safavi, Seyed Mohsen; Rezazadeh, Ghader; Villanueva, Luis Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on micro- and nano-mechanical systems (M/NEMS) have shown that their behavior under bending loads departs in many cases from the classical predictions using Euler-Bernoulli theory and Hooke’s law. This anomalous response has usually been seen as a dependence of the material properties on the size of the structure, in particular thickness. A theoretical model that allows for quantitative understanding and prediction of this size effect is important for the design of M/NEMS. In this paper, we summarize and analyze the five theories that can be found in the literature: Grain Boundary Theory (GBT), Surface Stress Theory (SST), Residual Stress Theory (RST), Couple Stress Theory (CST) and Surface Elasticity Theory (SET). By comparing these theories with experimental data we propose a simplified model combination of CST and SET that properly fits all considered cases, therefore delivering a simple (two parameters) model that can be used to predict the mechanical properties at the nanoscale. PMID:26569256

  2. Partner Influence in Diet and Exercise Behaviors: Testing Behavior Modeling, Social Control, and Normative Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Brea; Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Brady, Christy Freadreacea; Garcia, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has documented social contagion in obesity and related health behaviors, but less is known about the social processes underlying these patterns. Focusing on married or cohabitating couples, we simultaneously explore three potential social mechanisms influencing obesity: normative body size, social control, and behavior modeling. We analyze the association between partner characteristics and the obesity-related health behaviors of focal respondents, comparing the effects of partners' body type, partners' attempts to manage respondents' eating behaviors, and partners' own health behaviors on respondents' health behaviors (physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food consumption). Data on 215 partners are extracted from a larger study of social mechanisms of obesity in family and community contexts conducted in 2011 in the United States. Negative binomial regression models indicate that partner behavior is significantly related to respondent behavior (p behavior modeling mechanism in obesity-related patterns of consumption and physical activity. In contrast, we find little support for the influence of normative body size or partner social control in this sample, though generalizations about the relevance of these processes may be inappropriate. These results underscore the importance of policies and interventions that target dyads and social groups, suggesting that adoption of exercise or diet modifications in one individual is likely to spread to others, creating a social environment characterized by mutual reinforcement of healthy behavior.

  3. Effects of the turnover rate on the size distribution of firms: An application of the kinetic exchange models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Anindya S.

    2012-12-01

    We address the issue of the distribution of firm size. To this end we propose a model of firms in a closed, conserved economy populated with zero-intelligence agents who continuously move from one firm to another. We then analyze the size distribution and related statistics obtained from the model. There are three well known statistical features obtained from the panel study of the firms i.e., the power law in size (in terms of income and/or employment), the Laplace distribution in the growth rates and the slowly declining standard deviation of the growth rates conditional on the firm size. First, we show that the model generalizes the usual kinetic exchange models with binary interaction to interactions between an arbitrary number of agents. When the number of interacting agents is in the order of the system itself, it is possible to decouple the model. We provide exact results on the distributions which are not known yet for binary interactions. Our model easily reproduces the power law for the size distribution of firms (Zipf’s law). The fluctuations in the growth rate falls with increasing size following a power law (though the exponent does not match with the data). However, the distribution of the difference of the firm size in this model has Laplace distribution whereas the real data suggests that the difference of the log of sizes has the same distribution.

  4. The referential grain size and effective porosity in the Kozeny-Carman model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urumović, Kosta; Urumović, Kosta, Sr.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the results of permeability and specific surface area analyses as functions of granulometric composition of various sediments (from silty clays to very well graded gravels) are presented. The effective porosity and the referential grain size are presented as fundamental granulometric parameters expressing an effect of the forces operating on fluid movement through the saturated porous media. This paper suggests procedures for calculating referential grain size and determining effective (flow) porosity, which result in parameters that reliably determine the specific surface area and permeability. These procedures ensure the successful application of the Kozeny-Carman model up to the limits of validity of Darcy's law. The value of effective porosity in the referential mean grain size function was calibrated within the range of 1.5 µm to 6.0 mm. The reliability of the parameters applied in the KC model was confirmed by a very high correlation between the predicted and tested hydraulic conductivity values (R2 = 0.99 for sandy and gravelly materials; R2 = 0.70 for clayey-silty materials). The group representation of hydraulic conductivity (ranging from 10-12 m s-1 up to 10-2 m s-1) presents a coefficient of correlation of R2 = 0.97 for a total of 175 samples of various deposits. These results present new developments in the research of the effective porosity, the permeability and the specific surface area distributions of porous materials. This is important because these three parameters are critical conditions for successful groundwater flow modeling and contaminant transport. Additionally, from a practical viewpoint, it is very important to identify these parameters swiftly and very accurately.

  5. Subcellular Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2015-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all of its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  6. Inference for Size Demography from Point Pattern Data using Integral Projection Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Souparno; Gelfand, Alan E; Clark, James S

    2012-12-01

    Population dynamics with regard to evolution of traits has typically been studied using matrix projection models (MPMs). Recently, to work with continuous traits, integral projection models (IPMs) have been proposed. Imitating the path with MPMs, IPMs are handled first with a fitting stage, then with a projection stage. Fitting these models has so far been done only with individual-level transition data. These data are used to estimate the demographic functions (survival, growth, fecundity) that comprise the kernel of the IPM specification. Then, the estimated kernel is iterated from an initial trait distribution to project steady state population behavior under this kernel. When trait distributions are observed over time, such an approach does not align projected distributions with these observed temporal benchmarks. The contribution here, focusing on size distributions, is to address this issue. Our concern is that the above approach introduces an inherent mismatch in scales. The redistribution kernel in the IPM proposes a mechanistic description of population level redistribution. A kernel of the same functional form, fitted to data at the individual level, would provide a mechanistic model for individual-level processes. Resulting parameter estimates and the associated estimated kernel are at the wrong scale and do not allow population-level interpretation. Our approach views the observed size distribution at a given time as a point pattern over a bounded interval. We build a three-stage hierarchical model to infer about the dynamic intensities used to explain the observed point patterns. This model is driven by a latent deterministic IPM and we introduce uncertainty by having the operating IPM vary around this deterministic specification. Further uncertainty arises in the realization of the point pattern given the operating IPM. Fitted within a Bayesian framework, such modeling enables full inference about all features of the model. Such dynamic modeling

  7. MODELING PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN HETEROGENEOUS POLYMERIZATION SYSTEMS USING MULTIMODAL LOGNORMAL FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Ferrari

    Full Text Available Abstract This work evaluates the usage of the multimodal lognormal function to describe Particle Size Distributions (PSD of emulsion and suspension polymerization processes, including continuous reactions with particle re-nucleation leading to complex multimodal PSDs. A global optimization algorithm, namely Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO, was used for parameter estimation of the proposed model, minimizing the objective function defined by the mean squared errors. Statistical evaluation of the results indicated that the multimodal lognormal function could describe distinctive features of different types of PSDs with accuracy and consistency.

  8. Steady-State Numerical Modeling of Size Effects in Wire Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Kristian Jørgensen; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    Wire drawing processes at micron scale receive increased interest as micro wires are increasingly required in micro electrical components. At the micron scale, size effects become important and have to be taken into consideration. The goal is to optimize the semi-cone angle of the tool in terms...... of drawing force. The present study employs a steady-state modelling technique that omits the transient regime, thus creating a basis for comprehensive parameter studies. The steady-state procedure is based on the streamline integration method presented by Dean and Hutchinson [1]. This approach allows...

  9. Sediment transport modelling based on grain size trend analysis in Augusta Harbour (Sicily)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Giuseppe; Feo, Roberto; Freni, Gabriele

    2015-12-01

    To support marine civil engineer in pollutant studies, sediment management or dredging operations, is useful to know how the sediments move in accumulation basin. This paper investigates the dynamic of the sediment path using a two-dimensional numeric model: the Grain Size Trend Analysis (GSTA). The GSTA was applied using GiSedTrend plugin, under GIS software. The case study is the Augusta Harbour, which is one of the most polluted Italian harbours. It is the marine part of the Site of National Interest (SNI) of Priolo Gargallo (Siracusa, Italy) and it can be hydrodynamically considered as a lagoon. Two scenarios were obtained by using different geostatistical criteria.

  10. Measurements of accretion disc corona size in LMXB: consequences for Comptonization and LMXB models

    OpenAIRE

    M. J. Church; Balucinska-Church, M.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of measurements of the radial extent of the accretion disc corona in low mass X-ray binaries. These results prove conclusively the extended nature of the ADC, with radial extent varying from 20,000 km in the faintest sources to 700,000 km in the brightest, a substantial fraction of the accretion disc radius, typically 15%. This result rules out the Eastern model for LMXB which is extensively used, in which the Comptonizing region is a small central region. The ADC size depe...

  11. Optimal Harvesting in a Periodic Food Chain Model with Size Structures in Predators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Feng-Qin, E-mail: zhafq@263.net [Yuncheng University, Department of Applied Mathematics (China); Liu, Rong [Lvliang University, Department of Mathematics (China); Chen, Yuming, E-mail: ychen@wlu.ca [Yuncheng University, Department of Applied Mathematics (China)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate a periodic food chain model with harvesting, where the predators have size structures and are described by first-order partial differential equations. First, we establish the existence of a unique non-negative solution by using the Banach fixed point theorem. Then, we provide optimality conditions by means of normal cone and adjoint system. Finally, we derive the existence of an optimal strategy by means of Ekeland’s variational principle. Here the objective functional represents the net economic benefit yielded from harvesting.

  12. Grain Size Effect of Commercial Pure Titanium Foils on Mechanical Properties, Fracture Behaviors and Constitutive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daming, Nie; Zhen, Lu; Kaifeng, Zhang

    2017-02-01

    The constitutive models based on grain size effect are crucial for analyzing the deformation of metal foils. Previous investigations on the constitutive models concentrate on the foils whose thickness/average grain diameter (T/D) ratios are more than 3. In this study, the commercial pure titanium foils with thickness of 0.1 and 0.2 mm were employed as the experimental materials. The mechanical properties of foils with dimensions of nine different T/D ratios categorized into three ranges (T/D mechanisms of the samples with different T/D ratios were compared and analyzed. Besides, three constitutive models incorporating the surface layer effect and grain boundary strengthening effect were established for the three T/D ratio ranges correspondingly. In these models, the thickness of the surface layers is set T for T/D 3, and increases with D linearly in 1 ≤ T/D < 3. The results calculated by the three models were compared. The experiments indicate that those models are all in good agreement.

  13. Grain-size effect in micromechanical modelling of hysteresis in shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stupkiewicz, Stanislaw; Petryk, Henryk [Institute of Fundamental Technological Research (IPPT), Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-10-15

    Size effects in pseudoelastic polycrystalline shape memory alloys are studied by considering a representative spherical laminated domain (subgrain) and its interfacial energy at three scales: at the subgrain boundaries, at the austenite-martensite interfaces, and at the twin boundaries. Two sources of interfacial energy are accounted for, namely the atomic-scale energy of twin and phase boundaries and the elastic strain energy at microstructured interfaces, the latter being predicted theoretically. The evolution of microstructure of the representative domain is determined using the incremental energy minimization rule applied to the sum of the increments in the Helmholtz free energy and rate-independent dissipation. The size-dependent part of dissipation is estimated by assuming that negative increments in interfacial energy, associated with annihilation of interfaces, cannot be reverted back into the bulk free energy and are thus dissipated. Simple analytic formula for the interfacial energy dissipated in a complete forward-reverse transformation cycle is derived and combined with a micromechanical model of a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy. A numerical example illustrating size-dependent hysteresis in the stress-induced martensitic transformation is presented. (orig.)

  14. An inverse modeling procedure to determine particle growth and nucleation rates from measured aerosol size distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Verheggen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical nucleation theory is unable to explain the ubiquity of nucleation events observed in the atmosphere. This shows a need for an empirical determination of the nucleation rate. Here we present a novel inverse modeling procedure to determine particle nucleation and growth rates based on consecutive measurements of the aerosol size distribution. The particle growth rate is determined by regression analysis of the measured change in the aerosol size distribution over time, taking into account the effects of processes such as coagulation, deposition and/or dilution. This allows the growth rate to be determined with a higher time-resolution than can be deduced from inspecting contour plots ('banana-plots''. Knowing the growth rate as a function of time enables the evaluation of the time of nucleation of measured particles of a certain size. The nucleation rate is then obtained by integrating the particle losses from time of measurement to time of nucleation. The regression analysis can also be used to determine or verify the optimum value of other parameters of interest, such as the wall loss or coagulation rate constants. As an example, the method is applied to smog chamber measurements. This program offers a powerful interpretive tool to study empirical aerosol population dynamics in general, and nucleation and growth in particular.

  15. Slip-Size Distribution and Self-Organized Criticality in Block-Spring Models with Quenched Randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Kadowaki, Shuntaro

    2017-07-01

    We study slowly pulling block-spring models in random media. Second-order phase transitions exist in a model pulled by a constant force in the case of velocity-strengthening friction. If external forces are slowly increased, nearly critical states are self-organized. Slips of various sizes occur, and the probability distributions of slip size roughly obey power laws. The exponent is close to that in the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson model. Furthermore, the slip-size distributions are investigated in cases of Coulomb friction, velocity-weakening friction, and two-dimensional block-spring models.

  16. A Mathematical Model for Calculating Deviations of the Shape, Size and Geometric Relationship of Flat Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Kravchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a variety of objectives for measuring deviations of flatness, size and mutual arrangement of flat surfaces, namely: processing accuracy control, machinery condition monitoring, treatment process control in terms of shape deviation, comparative analysis of machine rigidity. If for a processing accuracy control it is sufficient to obtain the flatness deviation, as the maximum adjoining surface deviation, the choice of the adjoining surface as a zero reference datum deviation leads to considerable difficulties in creating devices and in particular devices for measuring size and shape variations. The flat surface is characterized by mutual arrangement of its points and can be represented by equation in the selected coordinate system. The objective of this work is to provide analytical construction of the vector field F, which describes the real surface with an appropriate approximation upon modelling the face milling of the flat surfaces of body parts in conditions of anisotropic rigidity of technological system. To determine the numerical value of shape and size deviation characteristics the average surfaces can serve a basis for the zero reference values of vectors. A mean value theorem allows to obtain measurement information about deviations in shape, size and arrangement of processed flat surfaces in terms of metrology, as well as about the process parameters such as depth of cut, feed, cutting speed, anisotropic rigidity of technological system that characterize the specific processing conditions. The machining center MS 12-250 was used to carry out a number of experiments with processing the surfaces of the prism-shaped body parts (300x300x250 and the subsequent measurements of flatness on the IS-49 optical line to prove the correlation between expected and observed values of the vectors of flatness deviations.

  17. Modeling fractal structure of city-size distributions using correlation functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanguang Chen

    Full Text Available Zipf's law is one the most conspicuous empirical facts for cities, however, there is no convincing explanation for the scaling relation between rank and size and its scaling exponent. Using the idea from general fractals and scaling, I propose a dual competition hypothesis of city development to explain the value intervals and the special value, 1, of the power exponent. Zipf's law and Pareto's law can be mathematically transformed into one another, but represent different processes of urban evolution, respectively. Based on the Pareto distribution, a frequency correlation function can be constructed. By scaling analysis and multifractals spectrum, the parameter interval of Pareto exponent is derived as (0.5, 1]; Based on the Zipf distribution, a size correlation function can be built, and it is opposite to the first one. By the second correlation function and multifractals notion, the Pareto exponent interval is derived as [1, 2. Thus the process of urban evolution falls into two effects: one is the Pareto effect indicating city number increase (external complexity, and the other the Zipf effect indicating city size growth (internal complexity. Because of struggle of the two effects, the scaling exponent varies from 0.5 to 2; but if the two effects reach equilibrium with each other, the scaling exponent approaches 1. A series of mathematical experiments on hierarchical correlation are employed to verify the models and a conclusion can be drawn that if cities in a given region follow Zipf's law, the frequency and size correlations will follow the scaling law. This theory can be generalized to interpret the inverse power-law distributions in various fields of physical and social sciences.

  18. Modeling fractal structure of city-size distributions using correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    Zipf's law is one the most conspicuous empirical facts for cities, however, there is no convincing explanation for the scaling relation between rank and size and its scaling exponent. Using the idea from general fractals and scaling, I propose a dual competition hypothesis of city development to explain the value intervals and the special value, 1, of the power exponent. Zipf's law and Pareto's law can be mathematically transformed into one another, but represent different processes of urban evolution, respectively. Based on the Pareto distribution, a frequency correlation function can be constructed. By scaling analysis and multifractals spectrum, the parameter interval of Pareto exponent is derived as (0.5, 1]; Based on the Zipf distribution, a size correlation function can be built, and it is opposite to the first one. By the second correlation function and multifractals notion, the Pareto exponent interval is derived as [1, 2). Thus the process of urban evolution falls into two effects: one is the Pareto effect indicating city number increase (external complexity), and the other the Zipf effect indicating city size growth (internal complexity). Because of struggle of the two effects, the scaling exponent varies from 0.5 to 2; but if the two effects reach equilibrium with each other, the scaling exponent approaches 1. A series of mathematical experiments on hierarchical correlation are employed to verify the models and a conclusion can be drawn that if cities in a given region follow Zipf's law, the frequency and size correlations will follow the scaling law. This theory can be generalized to interpret the inverse power-law distributions in various fields of physical and social sciences.

  19. A statistical mechanical model for drug release: Investigations on size and porosity dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Filho, Márcio Sampaio; Oliveira, Fernando Albuquerque; Barbosa, Marco Aurélio Alves

    2016-10-01

    A lattice gas model is proposed for investigating the release of drug molecules in capsules covered with semi-permeable membranes. Release patterns in one and two dimensional systems are obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and adjusted to the semi-empirical Weibull distribution function. An analytical solution to the diffusion equation is used to complement and guide simulations in one dimension. Size and porosity dependence analysis was made on the two semi-empirical parameters of the Weibull function, which are related to characteristic time and release mechanism, and our results indicate that a simple scaling law occurs only for systems with almost impermeable membranes, represented in our model by capsules with a single leaking site.

  20. Modelling the Size of Seasonal Thermal Storage in the Solar District Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giedrė Streckienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The integration of a thermal storage system into the solar heating system enables to increase the use of solar thermal energy in buildings and allows avoiding the mismatch between consumers’ demand and heat production in time. The paper presents modelling a seasonal thermal storage tank various sizes of which have been analyzed in the district solar heating system that could cover a part of heat demand for the district of individual houses in Vilnius. A biomass boiler house, as an additional heat source, should allow covering the remaining heat demand. energyPRO software is used for system modelling. The paper evaluates heat demand, climate conditions and technical characteristics.Article in Lithuanian

  1. A Model for Evaluation of Grain Sizes of Aluminum Alloys with Grain Refinement Additions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Based on the assumption that the nucleation substrates are activated by constitutional undercooling generated by an adjacent grain growth and solute distribution during the initial solidification, a model for calculation of the grain size of aluminum alloys with the grain refinement is developed, where the nucleation is dominated by two parameters, I.e. Growth restriction factor Q and the undercooling parameter P. The growth restriction factor Q is proportional to the initial rate of constitutional undercooling development and can be used directly as a criterion of the grain refinement in the alloys with strong potential nucleation particles. The undercooling parameter P can be regarded as the maximum of constitutional undercooling △TC. For weak potential nucleation particles, the use of RGS would be more accurate. The experimental data of the grain refinement of pure aluminum and AISi7 alloys are coincident predicted results with the model.

  2. Universal Finite Size Corrections and the Central Charge in Non-solvable Ising Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Mastropietro, Vieri

    2013-11-01

    We investigate a non-solvable two-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model with nearest neighbor plus weak finite range interactions of strength λ. We rigorously establish one of the predictions of Conformal Field Theory (CFT), namely the fact that at the critical temperature the finite size corrections to the free energy are universal, in the sense that they are exactly independent of the interaction. The corresponding central charge, defined in terms of the coefficient of the first subleading term to the free energy, as proposed by Affleck and Blote-Cardy-Nightingale, is constant and equal to 1/2 for all and λ 0 a small but finite convergence radius. This is one of the very few cases where the predictions of CFT can be rigorously verified starting from a microscopic non solvable statistical model. The proof uses a combination of rigorous renormalization group methods with a novel partition function inequality, valid for ferromagnetic interactions.

  3. Standardizing effect size from linear regression models with log-transformed variables for meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Tobías, Aurelio; Redondo, Daniel; Molina-Portillo, Elena; Sánchez, María José

    2017-03-17

    Meta-analysis is very useful to summarize the effect of a treatment or a risk factor for a given disease. Often studies report results based on log-transformed variables in order to achieve the principal assumptions of a linear regression model. If this is the case for some, but not all studies, the effects need to be homogenized. We derived a set of formulae to transform absolute changes into relative ones, and vice versa, to allow including all results in a meta-analysis. We applied our procedure to all possible combinations of log-transformed independent or dependent variables. We also evaluated it in a simulation based on two variables either normally or asymmetrically distributed. In all the scenarios, and based on different change criteria, the effect size estimated by the derived set of formulae was equivalent to the real effect size. To avoid biased estimates of the effect, this procedure should be used with caution in the case of independent variables with asymmetric distributions that significantly differ from the normal distribution. We illustrate an application of this procedure by an application to a meta-analysis on the potential effects on neurodevelopment in children exposed to arsenic and manganese. The procedure proposed has been shown to be valid and capable of expressing the effect size of a linear regression model based on different change criteria in the variables. Homogenizing the results from different studies beforehand allows them to be combined in a meta-analysis, independently of whether the transformations had been performed on the dependent and/or independent variables.

  4. Urban Optimum Population Size and Development Pattern Based on Ecological Footprint Model: Case of Zhoushan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan LU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The agglomeration of population in the city can reflect the prosperity in the economy, society and culture. However, it has also brought a series of problems like environmental pollution, traffic congestion, housing shortage and jobs crisis. The results can be shown as the failure of urban comprehensive function, the decline of city benefits, and the contradiction between socioeconomic circumstance and ecosystem. Therefore, a reasonable population capacity, which is influenced by ecological resources, urban environment, geographical elements, social and economic factors, etc., is objectively needed. How to deal with the relationship between the utilization of natural capital and development of the city is extremely essential. This paper takes Zhoushan Island as an example, which is the fourth largest island off the coast of China. Firstly, the interactively influencing factors of urban optimal population are illustrated. And method is chosen to study the optimal population size. Secondly, based on the model of ecological footprint (EP, the paper calculates and analyzes the ecological footprint and ecological capacity of the Zhoushan Island, in order to explore the optimal population size of the city. Thirdly, analysis and evaluation of the resources and urban environment carrying capacity is made. Finally, the solution of the existing population problems and the suggestion for the future development pattern of the city are proposed in the urban eco-planning of Zhoushan Island. The main strategies can be summarized in two aspects: one is to reduce the ecological footprint, the other is to increase the ecological supply. The conclusion is that the current population of Zhoushan Island is far beyond the optimum population size calculated by the ecological footprint model. Therefore, sustainable development should be the guidance for urban planning in Zhoushan Island, and a low-carbon development pattern for the city is advocated.

  5. Runoff and sediment yield modeling in a medium-size mediterranean watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ossama M.M. Abdelwahab

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The AnnAGNPS model was used to estimate runoff, peak discharge and sediment yield at the event scale in the Carapelle watershed, a Mediterranean medium-size watershed (506 km2 located in Apulia, Southern Italy. The model was calibrated and validated using five years of runoff and sediment yield data measured at a monitoring station located at Ordona – Ponte dei Sauri Bridge. A total of 36 events was used to estimate the output of the model during the period 2007-2011, in comparison to the corresponding observations at the watershed outlet. The model performed well in predicting runoff, as was testified by the high values of the coefficients of efficiency and determination during the validation process. The peak flows predictions were satisfactory especially for the high flow events; the prediction capability of sediment yield was good, even if a slight over-estimation was observed. Finally, the model was used to evaluate the effectiveness of different Management practices (MPs on the watershed (converting wheat to forest, using vegetated streams, crop rotation corn/soybean, no tillage. While the maximum reduction in sediment yield was achieved converting wheat to forest, the best compromises between soil conservation and agriculture resulted to be crop rotations.

  6. Particle model of full-size ITER-relevant negative ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccogna, F; Minelli, P; Ippolito, N

    2016-02-01

    This work represents the first attempt to model the full-size ITER-relevant negative ion source including the expansion, extraction, and part of the acceleration regions keeping the mesh size fine enough to resolve every single aperture. The model consists of a 2.5D particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision representation of the plane perpendicular to the filter field lines. Magnetic filter and electron deflection field have been included and a negative ion current density of j(H(-)) = 660 A/m(2) from the plasma grid (PG) is used as parameter for the neutral conversion. The driver is not yet included and a fixed ambipolar flux is emitted from the driver exit plane. Results show the strong asymmetry along the PG driven by the electron Hall (E × B and diamagnetic) drift perpendicular to the filter field. Such asymmetry creates an important dis-homogeneity in the electron current extracted from the different apertures. A steady state is not yet reached after 15 μs.

  7. Particle model of full-size ITER-relevant negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taccogna, F., E-mail: francesco.taccogna@nanotec.cnr.it; Minelli, P. [CNR-Nanotec, Bari 70126 (Italy); INFN, Bari 70126 (Italy); Ippolito, N. [INFN, Bari 70126 (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    This work represents the first attempt to model the full-size ITER-relevant negative ion source including the expansion, extraction, and part of the acceleration regions keeping the mesh size fine enough to resolve every single aperture. The model consists of a 2.5D particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision representation of the plane perpendicular to the filter field lines. Magnetic filter and electron deflection field have been included and a negative ion current density of j{sub H{sup −}} = 660 A/m{sup 2} from the plasma grid (PG) is used as parameter for the neutral conversion. The driver is not yet included and a fixed ambipolar flux is emitted from the driver exit plane. Results show the strong asymmetry along the PG driven by the electron Hall (E × B and diamagnetic) drift perpendicular to the filter field. Such asymmetry creates an important dis-homogeneity in the electron current extracted from the different apertures. A steady state is not yet reached after 15 μs.

  8. Partner Influence in Diet and Exercise Behaviors: Testing Behavior Modeling, Social Control, and Normative Body Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Brady, Christy Freadreacea; Garcia, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has documented social contagion in obesity and related health behaviors, but less is known about the social processes underlying these patterns. Focusing on married or cohabitating couples, we simultaneously explore three potential social mechanisms influencing obesity: normative body size, social control, and behavior modeling. We analyze the association between partner characteristics and the obesity-related health behaviors of focal respondents, comparing the effects of partners’ body type, partners’ attempts to manage respondents’ eating behaviors, and partners’ own health behaviors on respondents’ health behaviors (physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food consumption). Data on 215 partners are extracted from a larger study of social mechanisms of obesity in family and community contexts conducted in 2011 in the United States. Negative binomial regression models indicate that partner behavior is significantly related to respondent behavior (p obesity-related patterns of consumption and physical activity. In contrast, we find little support for the influence of normative body size or partner social control in this sample, though generalizations about the relevance of these processes may be inappropriate. These results underscore the importance of policies and interventions that target dyads and social groups, suggesting that adoption of exercise or diet modifications in one individual is likely to spread to others, creating a social environment characterized by mutual reinforcement of healthy behavior. PMID:28033428

  9. Particle model of full-size ITER-relevant negative ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccogna, F.; Minelli, P.; Ippolito, N.

    2016-02-01

    This work represents the first attempt to model the full-size ITER-relevant negative ion source including the expansion, extraction, and part of the acceleration regions keeping the mesh size fine enough to resolve every single aperture. The model consists of a 2.5D particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision representation of the plane perpendicular to the filter field lines. Magnetic filter and electron deflection field have been included and a negative ion current density of jH- = 660 A/m2 from the plasma grid (PG) is used as parameter for the neutral conversion. The driver is not yet included and a fixed ambipolar flux is emitted from the driver exit plane. Results show the strong asymmetry along the PG driven by the electron Hall (E × B and diamagnetic) drift perpendicular to the filter field. Such asymmetry creates an important dis-homogeneity in the electron current extracted from the different apertures. A steady state is not yet reached after 15 μs.

  10. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stresses of large-sized castings in solidification processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    When heavy machines and large scaled receiver system of communication equipment are manufactured, it always needs to produce large- sized steel castings, aluminum castings and etc. Some defects of hot cracking by thermal stress often appear during solidification process as these castings are produced, which results in failure of castings.Therefore predicting the effects of technological parameters for production of castings on the thermal stress during solidification process becomes an important means. In this paper, the mathematical models have been established and numerical calculation of temperature fields by using finite difference method (FDM) and then thermal stress fields by using finite element method (FEM) during solidification process of castings have been carried out. The technological parameters of production have been optimized by the results of calculation and the defects of hot cracking have been eliminated. Modeling and simulation of 3D thermal stress during solidification processes of large-sized castings provided a scientific basis, which promoted further development of advanced manufacturing technique.

  11. A Model of Genome Size Evolution for Prokaryotes in Stable and Fluctuating Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentkowski, Piotr; Van Oosterhout, Cock; Mock, Thomas

    2015-08-04

    Temporal variability in ecosystems significantly impacts species diversity and ecosystem productivity and therefore the evolution of organisms. Different levels of environmental perturbations such as seasonal fluctuations, natural disasters, and global change have different impacts on organisms and therefore their ability to acclimatize and adapt. Thus, to understand how organisms evolve under different perturbations is a key for predicting how environmental change will impact species diversity and ecosystem productivity. Here, we developed a computer simulation utilizing the individual-based model approach to investigate genome size evolution of a haploid, clonal and free-living prokaryotic population across different levels of environmental perturbations. Our results show that a greater variability of the environment resulted in genomes with a larger number of genes. Environmental perturbations were more effectively buffered by populations of individuals with relatively large genomes. Unpredictable changes of the environment led to a series of population bottlenecks followed by adaptive radiations. Our model shows that the evolution of genome size is indirectly driven by the temporal variability of the environment. This complements the effects of natural selection directly acting on genome optimization. Furthermore, species that have evolved in relatively stable environments may face the greatest risk of extinction under global change as genome streamlining genetically constrains their ability to acclimatize to the new environmental conditions, unless mechanisms of genetic diversification such as horizontal gene transfer will enrich their gene pool and therefore their potential to adapt.

  12. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes for modeling a finite-size neuronal network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfora, M F; Pirozzi, E

    2017-08-02

    A Leaky Integrate-and-Fire (LIF) model with stochastic current-based linkages is considered to describe the firing activity of neurons interacting in a (2×2)-size feed-forward network. In the subthreshold regime and under the assumption that no more than one spike is exchanged between coupled neurons, the stochastic evolution of the neuronal membrane voltage is subject to random jumps due to interactions in the network. Linked Gauss-Diffusion processes are proposed to describe this dynamics and to provide estimates of the firing probability density of each neuron. To this end, an iterated integral equation-based approach is applied to evaluate numerically the first passage time density of such processes through the firing threshold. Asymptotic approximations of the firing densities of surrounding neurons are used to obtain closed-form expressions for the mean of the involved processes and to simplify the numerical procedure. An extension of the model to an (N×N)-size network is also given. Histograms of firing times obtained by simulations of the LIF dynamics and numerical firings estimates are compared. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Solar granulation and statistical crystallography: A modeling approach using size-shape relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noever, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    The irregular polygonal pattern of solar granulation is analyzed for size-shape relations using statistical crystallography. In contrast to previous work which has assumed perfectly hexagonal patterns for granulation, more realistic accounting of cell (granule) shapes reveals a broader basis for quantitative analysis. Several features emerge as noteworthy: (1) a linear correlation between number of cell-sides and neighboring shapes (called Aboav-Weaire's law); (2) a linear correlation between both average cell area and perimeter and the number of cell-sides (called Lewis's law and a perimeter law, respectively) and (3) a linear correlation between cell area and squared perimeter (called convolution index). This statistical picture of granulation is consistent with a finding of no correlation in cell shapes beyond nearest neighbors. A comparative calculation between existing model predictions taken from luminosity data and the present analysis shows substantial agreements for cell-size distributions. A model for understanding grain lifetimes is proposed which links convective times to cell shape using crystallographic results.

  14. Measurements of accretion disc corona size in LMXB: consequences for Comptonization and LMXB models

    CERN Document Server

    Church, M J

    2004-01-01

    We present results of measurements of the radial extent of the accretion disc corona in low mass X-ray binaries. These results prove conclusively the extended nature of the ADC, with radial extent varying from 20,000 km in the faintest sources to 700,000 km in the brightest, a substantial fraction of the accretion disc radius, typically 15%. This result rules out the Eastern model for LMXB which is extensively used, in which the Comptonizing region is a small central region. The ADC size depends strongly on the 1 - 30 keV source luminosity via a simple relationship r_ADC = L^{0.88 +/- 0.16} (99% confidence) close to a simple proportionality. We also present limited evidence that the ADC size agrees with the Compton radius r_C, or maximum radius for hydrostatic equilibrium. The results are consistent with models in which an extended ADC is formed by illumination of the disc by the central source. The dependence on luminosity may reflect the known decrease of coronal temperature as the source luminosity increas...

  15. Encapsulated multicellular tumor spheroids as a novel in vitro model to study small size tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markvicheva Elena

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Presently multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS are being widely used in various aspects of tumor biology, including studies in biology and photodynamic therapy. The cellular organization of spheroids allows the recreation of in vivo small tumors much better than all common two-dimensional in vitro models. The cell encapsulation method could be proposed as a novel technique to quickly and easily prepare a large number of spheroids with narrow size distribution within a desirable diameter range. Moreover, the proposed technique for spheroid generation using encapsulated growing tumor cells could provide entirely new avenues to develop a novel spheroid co-culture model (for instance, the in vitro co-cultvation of tumor cells and monocytes, or epithelial cells, or fibroblasts etc. The current research was aimed at developing a simple and reliable method to encapsulate tumor cells and to cultivate them in vitro. In order to generate spheroids, MCF-7 cells were encapsulated and cultivated in 200 ml T-flasks in a 5% CO2 atmosphere at 37°C for 4-5 weeks. The cell proliferation was easily observed using a light microscope. The cells grew in aggregates increasing in size with time. The cell growth resulted in the formation of large cell clusters (spheroids which filled the whole microcapsule volume in 4-5 weeks.

  16. Spreading Speed, Traveling Waves, and Minimal Domain Size in Impulsive Reaction–Diffusion Models

    KAUST Repository

    Lewis, Mark A.

    2012-08-15

    How growth, mortality, and dispersal in a species affect the species\\' spread and persistence constitutes a central problem in spatial ecology. We propose impulsive reaction-diffusion equation models for species with distinct reproductive and dispersal stages. These models can describe a seasonal birth pulse plus nonlinear mortality and dispersal throughout the year. Alternatively, they can describe seasonal harvesting, plus nonlinear birth and mortality as well as dispersal throughout the year. The population dynamics in the seasonal pulse is described by a discrete map that gives the density of the population at the end of a pulse as a possibly nonmonotone function of the density of the population at the beginning of the pulse. The dynamics in the dispersal stage is governed by a nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation in a bounded or unbounded domain. We develop a spatially explicit theoretical framework that links species vital rates (mortality or fecundity) and dispersal characteristics with species\\' spreading speeds, traveling wave speeds, as well as minimal domain size for species persistence. We provide an explicit formula for the spreading speed in terms of model parameters, and show that the spreading speed can be characterized as the slowest speed of a class of traveling wave solutions. We also give an explicit formula for the minimal domain size using model parameters. Our results show how the diffusion coefficient, and the combination of discrete- and continuous-time growth and mortality determine the spread and persistence dynamics of the population in a wide variety of ecological scenarios. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the theoretical results. © 2012 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  17. Percolation segregation in multi-size and multi-component particulate mixtures: Measurement, sampling, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Anjani K.

    Particulate materials are routinely handled in large quantities by industries such as, agriculture, electronic, ceramic, chemical, cosmetic, fertilizer, food, nutraceutical, pharmaceutical, power, and powder metallurgy. These industries encounter segregation due to the difference in physical and mechanical properties of particulates. The general goal of this research was to study percolation segregation in multi-size and multi-component particulate mixtures, especially measurement, sampling, and modeling. A second generation primary segregation shear cell (PSSC-II), an industrial vibrator, a true cubical triaxial tester, and two samplers (triers) were used as primary test apparatuses for quantifying segregation and flowability; furthermore, to understand and propose strategies to mitigate segregation in particulates. Toward this end, percolation segregation in binary, ternary, and quaternary size mixtures for two particulate types: urea (spherical) and potash (angular) were studied. Three coarse size ranges 3,350-4,000 mum (mean size = 3,675 mum), 2,800-3,350 mum (3,075 mum), and 2,360-2,800 mum (2,580 mum) and three fines size ranges 2,000-2,360 mum (2,180 mum), 1,700-2,000 mum (1,850 mum), and 1,400-1,700 mum (1,550 mum) for angular-shaped and spherical-shaped were selected for tests. Since the fines size 1,550 mum of urea was not available in sufficient quantity; therefore, it was not included in tests. Percolation segregation in fertilizer bags was tested also at two vibration frequencies of 5 Hz and 7Hz. The segregation and flowability of binary mixtures of urea under three equilibrium relative humidities (40%, 50%, and 60%) were also tested. Furthermore, solid fertilizer sampling was performed to compare samples obtained from triers of opening widths 12.7 mm and 19.1 mm and to determine size segregation in blend fertilizers. Based on experimental results, the normalized segregation rate (NSR) of binary mixtures was dependent on size ratio, mixing ratio

  18. Adjusting particle-size distributions to account for aggregation in tephra-deposit model forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Van Eaton, Alexa; Durant, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are used to forecast tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. Model accuracy is limited by the fact that fine-ash aggregates (clumps into clusters), thus altering patterns of deposition. In most models this is accounted for by ad hoc changes to model input, representing fine ash as aggregates with density ρagg, and a log-normal size distribution with median μagg and standard deviation σagg. Optimal values may vary between eruptions. To test the variance, we used the Ash3d tephra model to simulate four deposits: 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens; 16–17 September 1992 Crater Peak (Mount Spurr); 17 June 1996 Ruapehu; and 23 March 2009 Mount Redoubt. In 192 simulations, we systematically varied μagg and σagg, holding ρagg constant at 600 kg m−3. We evaluated the fit using three indices that compare modeled versus measured (1) mass load at sample locations; (2) mass load versus distance along the dispersal axis; and (3) isomass area. For all deposits, under these inputs, the best-fit value of μagg ranged narrowly between  ∼  2.3 and 2.7φ (0.20–0.15 mm), despite large variations in erupted mass (0.25–50 Tg), plume height (8.5–25 km), mass fraction of fine ( operational model forecasts. Further research may indicate whether this narrow range also reflects physical constraints on processes in the evolving cloud.

  19. Improving prediction of hydraulic conductivity by constraining capillary bundle models to a maximum pore size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iden, Sascha; Peters, Andre; Durner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Soil hydraulic properties are required to solve the Richards equation, the most widely applied model for variably-saturated flow. While the experimental determination of the water retention curve does not pose significant challenges, the measurement of unsaturated hydraulic conductivity is time consuming and costly. The prediction of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity curve from the soil water retention curve by pore-bundle models is a cost-effective and widely applied technique. A well-known problem of conductivity prediction for retention functions with wide pore-size distributions is the sharp drop in conductivity close to water saturation. This problematic behavior is well known for the van Genuchten model if the shape parameter n assumes values smaller than about 1.3. So far, the workaround for this artefact has been to introduce an explicit air-entry value into the capillary saturation function. However, this correction leads to a retention function which is not continuously differentiable and thus a discontinuous water capacity function. We present an improved parametrization of the hydraulic properties which uses the original capillary saturation function and introduces a maximum pore radius only in the pore-bundle model. Closed-form equations for the hydraulic conductivity function were derived for the unimodal and multimodal retention functions of van Genuchten and have been tested by sensitivity analysis and applied in curve fitting and inverse modeling of multistep outflow experiments. The resulting hydraulic conductivity function is smooth, increases monotonically close to saturation, and eliminates the sharp drop in conductivity close to saturation. Furthermore, the new model retains the smoothness and continuous differentiability of the water retention curve. We conclude that the resulting soil hydraulic functions are physically more reasonable than the ones predicted by previous approaches, and are thus ideally suited for numerical simulations

  20. Adjusting particle-size distributions to account for aggregation in tephra-deposit model forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastin, Larry G.; Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Durant, Adam J.

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models are used to forecast tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. Model accuracy is limited by the fact that fine-ash aggregates (clumps into clusters), thus altering patterns of deposition. In most models this is accounted for by ad hoc changes to model input, representing fine ash as aggregates with density ρagg, and a log-normal size distribution with median μagg and standard deviation σagg. Optimal values may vary between eruptions. To test the variance, we used the Ash3d tephra model to simulate four deposits: 18 May 1980 Mount St. Helens; 16-17 September 1992 Crater Peak (Mount Spurr); 17 June 1996 Ruapehu; and 23 March 2009 Mount Redoubt. In 192 simulations, we systematically varied μagg and σagg, holding ρagg constant at 600 kg m-3. We evaluated the fit using three indices that compare modeled versus measured (1) mass load at sample locations; (2) mass load versus distance along the dispersal axis; and (3) isomass area. For all deposits, under these inputs, the best-fit value of μagg ranged narrowly between ˜ 2.3 and 2.7φ (0.20-0.15 mm), despite large variations in erupted mass (0.25-50 Tg), plume height (8.5-25 km), mass fraction of fine ( water content between these eruptions. This close agreement suggests that aggregation may be treated as a discrete process that is insensitive to eruptive style or magnitude. This result offers the potential for a simple, computationally efficient parameterization scheme for use in operational model forecasts. Further research may indicate whether this narrow range also reflects physical constraints on processes in the evolving cloud.

  1. Nonlocal superelastic model of size-dependent hardening and dissipation in single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Rimoli, Julian J; Chen, Ying; Schuh, Christopher A; Radovitzky, Raul

    2011-02-25

    We propose a nonlocal continuum model to describe the size-dependent superelastic effect observed in recent experiments of single crystal Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys. The model introduces two length scales, one in the free energy and one in the dissipation, which account for the size-dependent hardening and dissipation in the loading and unloading response of micro- and nanopillars subject to compression tests. The information provided by the model suggests that the size dependence observed in the dissipation is likely to be associated with a nonuniform evolution of the distribution of the austenitic and martensitic phases during the loading cycle.

  2. Numerical model of total artificial heart hemodynamics and the effect of its size on stress accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Gil; Chiu, Wei-Che; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a bi-ventricular mechanical circulatory support device that replaces the heart in patients with end-stage congestive heart failure. The device acts as blood pump via pneumatic activation of diaphragms altering the volume of the ventricular chambers. Flow in and out of the ventricles is controlled by mechanical heart valves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the flow regime in the TAH and to estimate the thrombogenic potential during systole. Toward that goal, three numerical models of TAHs of differing sizes, that include the deforming diaphragm and the blood flow from the left chamber to the aorta, are introduced. A multiphase model with injection of platelet particles is employed to calculate their trajectories. The shear stress accumulation in the three models are calculated along the platelets trajectories and their probability density functions, which represent the `thrombogenic footprint' of the device are compared. The calculated flow regime successfully captures the mitral regurgitation and the flows that open and close the aortic valve during systole. Physiological velocity magnitudes are found in all three models, with higher velocities and increased stress accumulation predicted for smaller devices.

  3. Method for experimental investigation of transient operation on Laval test stand for model size turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, R.; Coulaud, M.; Aeschlimann, V.; Lemay, J.; Deschenes, C.

    2016-11-01

    With the growing proportion of inconstant energy source as wind and solar, hydroelectricity becomes a first class source of peak energy in order to regularize the grid. The important increase of start - stop cycles may then cause a premature ageing of runners by both a higher number of cycles in stress fluctuations and by reaching a higher stress level in absolute. Aiming to sustain good quality development on fully homologous scale model turbines, the Hydraulic Machines Laboratory (LAMH) of Laval University has developed a methodology to operate model size turbines on transient regimes such as start-up, stop or load rejection on its test stand. This methodology allows maintaining a constant head while the wicket gates are opening or closing in a representative speed on the model scale of what is made on the prototype. This paper first presents the opening speed on model based on dimensionless numbers, the methodology itself and its application. Then both its limitation and the first results using a bulb turbine are detailed.

  4. Finite-size effects in Luther-Emery phases of Holstein and Hubbard models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greitemann, J.; Hesselmann, S.; Wessel, S.; Assaad, F. F.; Hohenadler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The one-dimensional Holstein model and its generalizations have been studied extensively to understand the effects of electron-phonon interaction. The half-filled case is of particular interest, as it describes a transition from a metallic phase with a spin gap due to attractive backscattering to a Peierls insulator with charge-density-wave order. Our quantum Monte Carlo results support the existence of a metallic phase with dominant power-law charge correlations, as described by the Luther-Emery fixed point. We demonstrate that for Holstein and also for purely fermionic models the spin gap significantly complicates finite-size numerical studies, and explains inconsistent previous results for Luttinger parameters and phase boundaries. On the other hand, no such complications arise in spinless models. The correct low-energy theory of the spinful Holstein model is argued to be that of singlet bipolarons with a repulsive, mutual interaction. This picture naturally explains the existence of a metallic phase, but also implies that gapless Luttinger liquid theory is not applicable.

  5. Energy spectra of KASCADE-Grande based on shower size measurements and different hadronic interaction models

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, D; Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Curcio, C; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, D; Wochele, J

    2013-01-01

    KASCADE-Grande is dedicated for investigations of cosmic-ray air showers in the primary energy range from 10 PeV to 1 EeV. The multi-detector system allows us to reconstruct charged particles, electron and muon numbers for individual air showers with high accuracies. Based on the shower size ($N_{ch}$) spectra of the charged particle component, the all-particle energy spectrum of cosmic rays is reconstructed, where attenuation effects in the atmosphere are corrected by applying the constant intensity cut method. The energy calibration is performed by using CORSIKA simulations with high-energy interaction models QGSJET-II-2, QGSJET-II-4, EPOS 1.99 and SIBYLL 2.1, where FLUKA has been used as low-energy interaction model for all cases. In the different hadronic models, different abundances for shower particles are predicted. Such model differences in the observables will be compared and discussed in this contribution. Furthermore, by using data with increasing statistics, the updated energy spectra by means of ...

  6. Compact modeling of allosteric multisite proteins: application to a cell size checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Enciso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We explore a framework to model the dose response of allosteric multisite phosphorylation proteins using a single auxiliary variable. This reduction can closely replicate the steady state behavior of detailed multisite systems such as the Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model or rule-based models. Optimal ultrasensitivity is obtained when the activation of an allosteric protein by its individual sites is concerted and redundant. The reduction makes this framework useful for modeling and analyzing biochemical systems in practical applications, where several multisite proteins may interact simultaneously. As an application we analyze a newly discovered checkpoint signaling pathway in budding yeast, which has been proposed to measure cell growth by monitoring signals generated at sites of plasma membrane growth. We show that the known components of this pathway can form a robust hysteretic switch. In particular, this system incorporates a signal proportional to bud growth or size, a mechanism to read the signal, and an all-or-none response triggered only when the signal reaches a threshold indicating that sufficient growth has occurred.

  7. Comparison of Turbulence Models in Simulation of Flow in Small-Size Centrifugal Compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Novickii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is the choice of turbulence model for the closure of the Reynoldsaveraged Navier-Stokes equations for calculation of the characteristics of small-size centrifugal compressor. To this were built three-dimensional sectors (as the compressor axisymmetric blade impeller and the diffuser of the centrifugal compressor on the basis of which they were created two grid models. The dimension of the grid model for the calculation models of turbulence komega and SST was 1.4 million. Elements and the dimensionless parameter y + does not exceed 2. turbulence model family k-epsilon model grid was also 1.4 million. Elements, and the dimensionless parameter y + was greater than 20, which corresponds to recommended values. The next part of the work was the task of boundary conditions required for the correct ca lculation. When the impeller inlet pawned pressure working fluid and the total temperature at the outlet and the gas flow rate through the stage. On the side faces sectors pawned boundary cond ition «Periodic», allowing everything except the wheel, but only axisymmetric part, which significantly reduces the required computational time and resources. Accounting clearance in addition to the meridional geometry construction additionally taken into account boundary condition «Counter Rotating Wall», which allows you to leave the domain in the rotating disc fixed coa ting.The next step was to analyze the results of these calculations, which showed that the turbulence model k-epsilon and RNG does not show the velocity vectors in the boundary layer, and "pushes" the flow from the blade using wall functions. At the core of the flow turbulence model k-omega shown for the undisturbed flow, which is not typical for the compressor working on predpompazhnom mode. For viscous gas diffuser vane for turbulence models SST, k-omega, RNG k-epsilon and has a similar character.The paper compares the characteristics of pressure centrifugal compressor

  8. Superior model for fault tolerance computation in designing nano-sized circuit systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, N. S. S., E-mail: narinderjit@petronas.com.my; Muthuvalu, M. S., E-mail: msmuthuvalu@gmail.com [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Asirvadam, V. S., E-mail: vijanth-sagayan@petronas.com.my [Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    As CMOS technology scales nano-metrically, reliability turns out to be a decisive subject in the design methodology of nano-sized circuit systems. As a result, several computational approaches have been developed to compute and evaluate reliability of desired nano-electronic circuits. The process of computing reliability becomes very troublesome and time consuming as the computational complexity build ups with the desired circuit size. Therefore, being able to measure reliability instantly and superiorly is fast becoming necessary in designing modern logic integrated circuits. For this purpose, the paper firstly looks into the development of an automated reliability evaluation tool based on the generalization of Probabilistic Gate Model (PGM) and Boolean Difference-based Error Calculator (BDEC) models. The Matlab-based tool allows users to significantly speed-up the task of reliability analysis for very large number of nano-electronic circuits. Secondly, by using the developed automated tool, the paper explores into a comparative study involving reliability computation and evaluation by PGM and, BDEC models for different implementations of same functionality circuits. Based on the reliability analysis, BDEC gives exact and transparent reliability measures, but as the complexity of the same functionality circuits with respect to gate error increases, reliability measure by BDEC tends to be lower than the reliability measure by PGM. The lesser reliability measure by BDEC is well explained in this paper using distribution of different signal input patterns overtime for same functionality circuits. Simulation results conclude that the reliability measure by BDEC depends not only on faulty gates but it also depends on circuit topology, probability of input signals being one or zero and also probability of error on signal lines.

  9. Grain-Size Based Additivity Models for Scaling Multi-rate Uranyl Surface Complexation in Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Bill X.; Hu, Qinhong

    2016-07-01

    This study statistically analyzed a grain-size based additivity model that has been proposed to scale reaction rates and parameters from laboratory to field. The additivity model assumed that reaction properties in a sediment including surface area, reactive site concentration, reaction rate, and extent can be predicted from field-scale grain size distribution by linearly adding reaction properties for individual grain size fractions. This study focused on the statistical analysis of the additivity model with respect to reaction rate constants using multi-rate uranyl (U(VI)) surface complexation reactions in a contaminated sediment as an example. Experimental data of rate-limited U(VI) desorption in a stirred flow-cell reactor were used to estimate the statistical properties of multi-rate parameters for individual grain size fractions. The statistical properties of the rate constants for the individual grain size fractions were then used to analyze the statistical properties of the additivity model to predict rate-limited U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment, and to evaluate the relative importance of individual grain size fractions to the overall U(VI) desorption. The result indicated that the additivity model provided a good prediction of the U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. However, the rate constants were not directly scalable using the additivity model, and U(VI) desorption in individual grain size fractions have to be simulated in order to apply the additivity model. An approximate additivity model for directly scaling rate constants was subsequently proposed and evaluated. The result found that the approximate model provided a good prediction of the experimental results within statistical uncertainty. This study also found that a gravel size fraction (2-8mm), which is often ignored in modeling U(VI) sorption and desorption, is statistically significant to the U(VI) desorption in the sediment.

  10. Predicting Grid Size-dependent Fracture Strains of DP980 with a Microstructure-based Post-necking Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Guang; Hu, Xiaohua; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Sun, Xin

    2017-10-10

    Ductile fracture is a local phenomenon, and it is well established that fracture strain levels depend on both stress triaxiality and the resolution (grid size) of strain measurements. Two-dimensional plane strain post-necking models with different representative volume element (RVE) sizes are used to predict the size-dependent fracture strain of a commercial dual-phase steel, DP980. The models are generated from the actual microstructures, and the individual phase flow properties and literature-based individual phase damage parameters for the Johnson-Cook model are used for ferrite and martensite. A monotonic relationship is predicted: the smaller the model size, the higher the fracture strain. Thus, a general framework is developed to quantify the size-dependent fracture strains for multiphase materials. In addition to the RVE sizes, the influences of intrinsic microstructure features, i.e., the flow curve and fracture strains of the two constituent phases, on the predicted fracture strains also are examined. Application of the derived fracture strain versus RVE size relationship is demonstrated with large clearance trimming simulations with different element sizes.

  11. Stress release model and proxy measures of earthquake size. Application to Italian seismogenic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varini, Elisa; Rotondi, Renata; Basili, Roberto; Barba, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    This study presents a series of self-correcting models that are obtained by integrating information about seismicity and fault sources in Italy. Four versions of the stress release model are analyzed, in which the evolution of the system over time is represented by the level of strain, moment, seismic energy, or energy scaled by the moment. We carry out the analysis on a regional basis by subdividing the study area into eight tectonically coherent regions. In each region, we reconstruct the seismic history and statistically evaluate the completeness of the resulting seismic catalog. Following the Bayesian paradigm, we apply Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to obtain parameter estimates and a measure of their uncertainty expressed by the simulated posterior distribution. The comparison of the four models through the Bayes factor and an information criterion provides evidence (to different degrees depending on the region) in favor of the stress release model based on the energy and the scaled energy. Therefore, among the quantities considered, this turns out to be the measure of the size of an earthquake to use in stress release models. At any instant, the time to the next event turns out to follow a Gompertz distribution, with a shape parameter that depends on time through the value of the conditional intensity at that instant. In light of this result, the issue of forecasting is tackled through both retrospective and prospective approaches. Retrospectively, the forecasting procedure is carried out on the occurrence times of the events recorded in each region, to determine whether the stress release model reproduces the observations used in the estimation procedure. Prospectively, the estimates of the time to the next event are compared with the dates of the earthquakes that occurred after the end of the learning catalog, in the 2003-2012 decade.

  12. A model of particle removal in a dissolved air flotation tank: importance of stratified flow and bubble size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakghomi, B; Lawryshyn, Y; Hofmann, R

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model and a computational fluid dynamic model of particle removal in dissolved air flotation were developed that included the effects of stratified flow and bubble-particle clustering. The models were applied to study the effect of operating conditions and formation of stratified flow on particle removal. Both modeling approaches demonstrated that the presence of stratified flow enhanced particle removal in the tank. A higher air fraction was shown to be needed at higher loading rates to achieve the same removal efficiency. The model predictions showed that an optimum bubble size was present that increased with an increase in particle size.

  13. Body Size Variability and a Sangamonian Extinction Model for Amblyrhiza,a West Indian Megafaunal Rodent

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Donald A.; MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Ford, Derek C.

    1998-07-01

    The megafaunal rodent Amblyrhiza inundatafrom Anguilla and St. Martin is often cited in lists of late Quaternary human-induced extinctions, but its date of disappearance has never been established. Here, we present a suite of uranium-series disequilibrium dates from three independent Amblyrhizasites in Anguilla, all of which cluster in marine isotope Stage 5. Thus, there is no indication that Amblyrhizasurvived into the late Holocene, when islands of the northern Lesser Antilles were first invaded by humans. We argue that the most probable cause of the extinction of Amblyrhizawas a failure of island populations to adjust to catastrophic reductions in available range which accompanied last interglacial sea-level maxima. We support this argument with quantitative extinction probability estimates drawn from persistence time models. Amblyrhizaexhibits body-size hypervariability, a common but underemphasized feature of island megafaunal species. We argue that hypervariability is a record of morphological response to oscillating natural selection, which in turn is driven by asymmetries in the relationship of population size, body mass, and persistence time. The fate of Amblyrhizastands in marked contrast to that of most other West Indian land mammals, whose losses increasingly appear to have been anthropogenically mediated.

  14. Systematic effects on the size-luminosity relation: dependence on model fitting and morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardi, M; Vikram, V; Huertas-Company, M; Mei, S; Shankar, F; Sheth, R K

    2012-01-01

    We quantify the systematics in the size-luminosity relation of galaxies in the SDSS main sample which arise from fitting different 1- and 2-component model profiles to the images. In objects brighter than L*, fitting a single Sersic profile to what is really a two-component SerExp system leads to biases: the half-light radius is increasingly overestimated as n of the fitted single component increases; it is also overestimated at B/T ~ 0.6. However, the net effect on the R-L relation is small, except for the most luminous tail, where it curves upwards towards larger sizes. We also study how this relation depends on morphological type. Our analysis is one of the first to use Bayesian-classifier derived weights, rather than hard cuts, to define morphology. Crudely, there appear to be only two relations: one for early-types (Es, S0s and Sa's) and another for late-types (Sbs and Scds). However, closer inspection shows that within the early-type sample S0s tend to be 15% smaller than Es of the same luminosity, and,...

  15. Influence of grain size and exchange interaction on the LLB modeling procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Christoph; Abert, Claas; Bruckner, Florian; Suess, Dieter; Praetorius, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    Reliably predicting bit-error rates in realistic heat-assisted magnetic recording simulations is a challenging task. Integrating the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch (LLB) equation, within a coarse graining approach, can reduce the computational effort to determine the magnetization dynamics in the vicinity of the Curie temperature, compared to solving the atomistic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. If the aim is that the dynamics of both approaches coincide, temperature dependent material functions, such as the zero-field equilibrium magnetization as well as the parallel and normal susceptibilities, must be modeled carefully in order to use them as input in the LLB equation. We present an extensive study on how these functions depend on grain size and exchange interactions. We show that, if the size or the exchange constant of a reference grain is modified, the material functions can be scaled, according to the changed Curie temperature, yielding negligible errors. This is shown to be valid for volume changes of up to ±40% and variations of the exchange constant of up to ±10%. Besides the temperature dependent material curves, computed switching probabilities also agree well with probabilities separately determined for each system. Our study suggests that there is no need to recalculate the required LLB input functions for each particle. Within the presented limits, it is sufficient to scale them to the Curie temperature of the altered system.

  16. Modeling development and quantitative trait mapping reveal independent genetic modules for leaf size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L; Leong, Wen Fung; Brock, Marcus T; Markelz, R J Cody; Covington, Michael F; Devisetty, Upendra K; Edwards, Christine E; Maloof, Julin; Welch, Stephen; Weinig, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    Improved predictions of fitness and yield may be obtained by characterizing the genetic controls and environmental dependencies of organismal ontogeny. Elucidating the shape of growth curves may reveal novel genetic controls that single-time-point (STP) analyses do not because, in theory, infinite numbers of growth curves can result in the same final measurement. We measured leaf lengths and widths in Brassica rapa recombinant inbred lines (RILs) throughout ontogeny. We modeled leaf growth and allometry as function valued traits (FVT), and examined genetic correlations between these traits and aspects of phenology, physiology, circadian rhythms and fitness. We used RNA-seq to construct a SNP linkage map and mapped trait quantitative trait loci (QTL). We found genetic trade-offs between leaf size and growth rate FVT and uncovered differences in genotypic and QTL correlations involving FVT vs STPs. We identified leaf shape (allometry) as a genetic module independent of length and width and identified selection on FVT parameters of development. Leaf shape is associated with venation features that affect desiccation resistance. The genetic independence of leaf shape from other leaf traits may therefore enable crop optimization in leaf shape without negative effects on traits such as size, growth rate, duration or gas exchange.

  17. A scaling theory for the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols suggests climate models underestimate the size of the global dust cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F

    2010-01-01

    Mineral dust aerosols impact Earth's radiation budget through interactions with clouds, ecosystems, and radiation, which constitutes a substantial uncertainty in understanding past and predicting future climate changes. One of the causes of this large uncertainty is that the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols is poorly understood. The present study shows that regional and global circulation models (GCMs) overestimate the emitted fraction of clay aerosols (< 2 {\\mu}m diameter) by a factor of ~2 - 8 relative to measurements. This discrepancy is resolved by deriving a simple theoretical expression of the emitted dust size distribution that is in excellent agreement with measurements. This expression is based on the physics of the scale-invariant fragmentation of brittle materials, which is shown to be applicable to dust emission. Because clay aerosols produce a strong radiative cooling, the overestimation of the clay fraction causes GCMs to also overestimate the radiative cooling of a given quantity o...

  18. Two catesories of fractal models of rock and soil expressing volume and size-distribution of pores and grains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO GaoLiang; ZHANG JiRu

    2009-01-01

    Based on the Sierpinski carpet and Menger sponge models, two categories of fractal models of rock and soil which are composed of the volume fractal model of pores, the volume fractal model of grains, pore-size or particle-size distribution fractal models are established and their relations are clarified in this paper. Through comparison and analysis, it is found that previous models can be unified by the two categories of fractal models, so the unified fractal models are formed. Experimental results presented by Katz indicate that the first category of fractal models can be used to express the fractal behavior of sandstone. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) will be used to study the microstructure of soft clay and it will be testified that the fractal behavior of soft clay suits the second category of fractal models.

  19. Improving fishing effort descriptors: Modelling engine power and gear-size relations of five European trawl fleets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Rihan, Dominic; Graham, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Based on information from an international inventory of gears currently deployed by trawlers in five European countries, the relationship between vessel engine power and trawl size is quantified for different trawl types, trawling techniques and target species. Using multiplicative modelling...

  20. Analysis of an Age Structured SEIRS Epidemic Model with Varying Total Population Size and Vaccination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Zhi Li; Geni Gupur; Guang-Tian Zhu

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on the study of an age structured SEIRS epidemic model with a vaccination program when the total population size is not kept at constant. We first give the explicit expression of the reproduction number R((ψ),(λ))in the presence of vaccine((λ))is the exponent of growth of total population), and show that the infection-free steady state is linearly stable if R ((ψ),(λ))1, then we apply the theoretical results to vaccination policies to determine the optimal age or ages at which an individual should be vaccinated. It is shown that the optimal strategy can be either one-or two-age strategies.

  1. Detailed measurements and modelling of thermo active components using a room size test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitzmann, Peter; Svendsen, Svend

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation of thermo active components based on prefabricated hollow core concrete decks. Recent years have given an increased awareness of the use of thermo active components as an alternative to mechanical cooling systems in office buildings. The investigation covers...... measurements in an office sized test facility with thermo active ceiling and floor as well as modelling of similar conditions in a computer program designed for analysis of building integrated heating and cooling systems. A method for characterizing the cooling capacity of thermo active components is described...... based on measurements of the energy balance of the thermo active deck. A cooling capacity of around 60W/m² at a temperature difference of 10K between room and fluid temperature has been found. It is also shown, that installing a lowered acoustic ceiling covering around 50% of the ceiling surface area...

  2. Finite size scaling analysis on Nagel-Schreckenberg model for traffic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana

    2015-03-01

    The traffic flow problem as a many-particle non-equilibrium system has caught the interest of physicists for decades. Understanding the traffic flow properties and though obtaining the ability to control the transition from the free-flow phase to the jammed phase plays a critical role in the future world of urging self-driven cars technology. We have studied phase transitions in one-lane traffic flow through the mean velocity, distributions of car spacing, dynamic susceptibility and jam persistence -as candidates for an order parameter- using the Nagel-Schreckenberg model to simulate traffic flow. The length dependent transition has been observed for a range of maximum velocities greater than a certain value. Finite size scaling analysis indicates power-law scaling of these quantities at the onset of the jammed phase.

  3. Sizes of main-belt asteroids by combining shape models and Keck adaptive aptics observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hanuš, J; Ďurech, J

    2013-01-01

    We select 50 main-belt asteroids with a diameter between 20 and 400 km for which we have (i) shape models derived by the lightcurve inversion method (LI) and (ii) resolved observations of good quality collected with the Keck II adaptive optics (AO) system in the near-infrared. We derive the size of these asteroids by minimizing the difference between the contours from deconvolved AO images and the projected silhouettes calculated from the shape model at the time of the AO observations. We compute the volume-equivalent diameters for 48 of these asteroids. For 15 of them, we remove the ambiguity of the pole orientation typical for shape models derived by the LI. We have found that our equivalent diameters are smaller by 3%, 7%, and 2% compared with the effective diameters derived from mid-IR photometric observations provided by IRAS, WISE and AKARI. For 40 asteroids with previously determined mass estimates, we compute their bulk densities and discuss the mass-density dependence with respect to taxonomic types.

  4. Modelling studies to proper size a hydrogen generator for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, G.; Recupero, V.; Di Leonardo, R.; Lagana, M. [Istituto CNR-TAE, Lucia, Messina (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Based upon an extensive survey of literature a mathematical model has been developed to study the temperature profile along the catalytic bed of a reactor for the methane partial oxidation. The model allowed a preliminary design of a 5 Nm{sup 3} syngas/h prototype to be integrated with second generation fuel cells as hydrogen generator (in the framework of the EC-JOU2 contract). This design was based on some target features, including the choice of a GHSV (gas hour space velocity) equal to 80000 h{sup -1}, a catalyst particle size of 1/8inches, a molar air/methane ratio of 2.7 (i.e. O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0.53), a linear velocity in the catalytic bed of about 2 m/sec, and an inert/catalyst ratio 3:1. Starting from this data, the work has been concerned with the identification of the controlling regime (kinetic or diffusional), and then with the estimation of the gas composition and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison between experimental and model results has also been accomplished.

  5. Regularization Methods for Fitting Linear Models with Small Sample Sizes: Fitting the Lasso Estimator Using R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Holmes Finch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and data analysts are sometimes faced with the problem of very small samples, where the number of variables approaches or exceeds the overall sample size; i.e. high dimensional data. In such cases, standard statistical models such as regression or analysis of variance cannot be used, either because the resulting parameter estimates exhibit very high variance and can therefore not be trusted, or because the statistical algorithm cannot converge on parameter estimates at all. There exist an alternative set of model estimation procedures, known collectively as regularization methods, which can be used in such circumstances, and which have been shown through simulation research to yield accurate parameter estimates. The purpose of this paper is to describe, for those unfamiliar with them, the most popular of these regularization methods, the lasso, and to demonstrate its use on an actual high dimensional dataset involving adults with autism, using the R software language. Results of analyses involving relating measures of executive functioning with a full scale intelligence test score are presented, and implications of using these models are discussed.

  6. Mathematical human body models representing a mid size male and a small female for frontal, lateral and rearward impact loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happee, R.; Morsink, P.L.J.; Lange, R. de; Bours, R.; Ridella, S.; Nayef, A.; Hoof, J. van

    2000-01-01

    A human body model representing a mid size male has been presented at the 1998 STAPP conference. A combination of modeling techniques was applied using rigid bodies for most segments, but describing the thorax as a deformable structure. In this paper, this modeling strategy was employed to also deve

  7. State-space modeling of population sizes and trends in Nihoa Finch and Millerbird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorresen, P. Marcos; Brinck, Kevin W.; Camp, Richard J.; Farmer, Chris; Plentovich, Sheldon M.; Banko, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Both of the 2 passerines endemic to Nihoa Island, Hawai‘i, USA—the Nihoa Millerbird (Acrocephalus familiaris kingi) and Nihoa Finch (Telespiza ultima)—are listed as endangered by federal and state agencies. Their abundances have been estimated by irregularly implemented fixed-width strip-transect sampling from 1967 to 2012, from which area-based extrapolation of the raw counts produced highly variable abundance estimates for both species. To evaluate an alternative survey method and improve abundance estimates, we conducted variable-distance point-transect sampling between 2010 and 2014. We compared our results to those obtained from strip-transect samples. In addition, we applied state-space models to derive improved estimates of population size and trends from the legacy time series of strip-transect counts. Both species were fairly evenly distributed across Nihoa and occurred in all or nearly all available habitat. Population trends for Nihoa Millerbird were inconclusive because of high within-year variance. Trends for Nihoa Finch were positive, particularly since the early 1990s. Distance-based analysis of point-transect counts produced mean estimates of abundance similar to those from strip-transects but was generally more precise. However, both survey methods produced biologically unrealistic variability between years. State-space modeling of the long-term time series of abundances obtained from strip-transect counts effectively reduced uncertainty in both within- and between-year estimates of population size, and allowed short-term changes in abundance trajectories to be smoothed into a long-term trend.

  8. Modeling solute transport in distribution networks with variable demand and time step sizes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyton, Chad E.; Bilisoly, Roger Lee; Buchberger, Steven G. (University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Yarrington, Lane

    2004-06-01

    The effect of variable demands at short time scales on the transport of a solute through a water distribution network has not previously been studied. We simulate flow and transport in a small water distribution network using EPANET to explore the effect of variable demand on solute transport across a range of hydraulic time step scales from 1 minute to 2 hours. We show that variable demands at short time scales can have the following effects: smoothing of a pulse of tracer injected into a distribution network and increasing the variability of both the transport pathway and transport timing through the network. Variable demands are simulated for these different time step sizes using a previously developed Poisson rectangular pulse (PRP) demand generator that considers demand at a node to be a combination of exponentially distributed arrival times with log-normally distributed intensities and durations. Solute is introduced at a tank and at three different network nodes and concentrations are modeled through the system using the Lagrangian transport scheme within EPANET. The transport equations within EPANET assume perfect mixing of the solute within a parcel of water and therefore physical dispersion cannot occur. However, variation in demands along the solute transport path contribute to both removal and distortion of the injected pulse. The model performance measures examined are the distribution of the Reynolds number, the variation in the center of mass of the solute across time, and the transport path and timing of the solute through the network. Variation in all three performance measures is greatest at the shortest time step sizes. As the scale of the time step increases, the variability in these performance measures decreases. The largest time steps produce results that are inconsistent with the results produced by the smaller time steps.

  9. Insights into plant size-density relationships from models and agricultural crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianming; Zuo, Wenyun; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fan, Zhexuan; Ji, Mingfei; Wang, Genxuan; Ran, Jinzhi; Zhao, Changming; Liu, Jianquan; Niklas, Karl J; Hammond, Sean T; Brown, James H

    2012-05-29

    There is general agreement that competition for resources results in a tradeoff between plant mass, M, and density, but the mathematical form of the resulting thinning relationship and the mechanisms that generate it are debated. Here, we evaluate two complementary models, one based on the space-filling properties of canopy geometry and the other on the metabolic basis of resource use. For densely packed stands, both models predict that density scales as M(-3/4), energy use as M(0), and total biomass as M(1/4). Compilation and analysis of data from 183 populations of herbaceous crop species, 473 stands of managed tree plantations, and 13 populations of bamboo gave four major results: (i) At low initial planting densities, crops grew at similar rates, did not come into contact, and attained similar mature sizes; (ii) at higher initial densities, crops grew until neighboring plants came into contact, growth ceased as a result of competition for limited resources, and a tradeoff between density and size resulted in critical density scaling as M(-0.78), total resource use as M(-0.02), and total biomass as M(0.22); (iii) these scaling exponents are very close to the predicted values of M(-3/4), M(0), and M(1/4), respectively, and significantly different from the exponents suggested by some earlier studies; and (iv) our data extend previously documented scaling relationships for trees in natural forests to small herbaceous annual crops. These results provide a quantitative, predictive framework with important implications for the basic and applied plant sciences.

  10. Modeling of magnetic fields on a cylindrical surface and associated parameter estimation for development of a size sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Rajamani, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    This paper develops analytical sensing principles for estimation of circumferential size of a cylindrical surface using magnetic sensors. An electromagnet and magnetic sensors are used on a wearable band for measurement of leg size. In order to enable robust size estimation during rough real-world use of the wearable band, three estimation algorithms are developed based on models of the magnetic field variation over a cylindrical surface. The magnetic field models developed include those for a dipole and for a uniformly magnetized cylinder. The estimation algorithms used include a linear regression equation, an extended Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. Experimental laboratory tests show that the size sensor in general performs accurately, yielding sub-millimeter estimation errors. The unscented Kalman filter yields the best performance that is robust to bias and misalignment errors. The size sensor developed herein can be used for monitoring swelling due to fluid accumulation in the lower leg and a number of other biomedical applications.

  11. Rheotaxis performance increases with group size in a coupled phase model with sensory noise. The effects of noise and group size on rheotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicoli, A.; Bak-Coleman, J.; Coombs, S.; Paley, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many fish exhibit rheotaxis, a behavior in which fish orient themselves relative to flow. Rheotaxis confers many benefits, including energetic cost savings and interception of drifting prey. Despite the fact that most species of fish school during at least some portion of their life, little is known about the importance of rheotactic behavior to schooling fish and, conversely, how the presence of nearby conspecifics affects rheotactic behavior. Understanding how rheotaxis is modified by social factors is thus of ecological importance. Here we present a mathematical model in the form of an all-to-all, coupled-oscillator framework over the non-Euclidean space of fish orientations to model group rheotactic behavior. Individuals in the model measure the orientation of their neighbors and the flow direction relative to their own orientation. These measures are corrupted by sensory noise. We study the effect of sensory noise and group size on internal (i.e., within the school) and external (i.e., with the flow) disagreement in orientation. We find that under noisy environmental conditions, increased group size improves rheotaxis. Results of this study have implications for understanding animal behavior, as well as for potential applications in bio-inspired engineering.

  12. A global off-line model of size-resolved aerosol microphysics: I. Model development and prediction of aerosol properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A GLObal Model of Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP has been developed as an extension to the TOMCAT 3-D Eulerian off-line chemical transport model. GLOMAP simulates the evolution of the global aerosol size distribution using a sectional two-moment scheme and includes the processes of aerosol nucleation, condensation, growth, coagulation, wet and dry deposition and cloud processing. We describe the results of a global simulation of sulfuric acid and sea spray aerosol. The model captures features of the aerosol size distribution that are well established from observations in the marine boundary layer and free troposphere. Modelled condensation nuclei (CN>3nm vary between about 250–500 cm-3 in remote marine boundary layer regions and are generally in good agreement with observations. Modelled continental CN concentrations are lower than observed, which may be due to lack of some primary aerosol sources or the neglect of nucleation mechanisms other than binary homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid-water particles. Remote marine CN concentrations increase to around 2000–10 000 cm (at standard temperature and pressure in the upper troposphere, which agrees with typical observed vertical profiles. Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN at 0.2% supersaturation vary between about 1000 cm-3 in polluted regions and between 10 and 500 cm-3 in the remote marine boundary layer. New particle formation through sulfuric acid-water binary nucleation occurs predominantly in the upper troposphere, but the model results show that these particles contribute greatly to aerosol concentrations in the marine boundary layer. For this sulfur-sea salt system it is estimated that sea spray emissions account for only ~10% of CCN in the tropical marine boundary layer, but between 20 and 75% in the mid-latitude Southern Ocean. In a run with only natural sulfate and sea salt emissions the global mean surface CN concentration is more than 60% of that from a run with 1985 anthropogenic

  13. Finite-size, chemical-potential and magnetic effects on the phase transition in a four-fermion interacting model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, E.B.S. [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para, Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Maraba (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Linhares, C.A. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, A.P.C. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas-CBPF/MCTI, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Instituto de Fisica, Salvador (Brazil); Santana, A.E. [Universidade de Brasilia, Instituto de Fisica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    We study effects coming from finite size, chemical potential and from a magnetic background on a massive version of a four-fermion interacting model. This is performed in four dimensions as an application of recent developments for dealing with field theories defined on toroidal spaces. We study effects of the magnetic field and chemical potential on the size-dependent phase structure of the model, in particular, how the applied magnetic field affects the size-dependent critical temperature. A connection with some aspects of the hadronic phase transition is established. (orig.)

  14. An adaptive artificial neural network model for sizing stand-alone photovoltaic systems: application for isolated sites in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellit, A. [Univ. Center of Medea, Inst. of Engineering Sciences, Ain Dahab (Algeria); Benghanem, M. [Univ. of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Algiers (Algeria); Arab, A. Hadj [Development Center of Renewable Energy (CDER), Algiers (Algeria); CIEMAT, Dept. de Energias Renerables, Madrid (Spain); Guessoum, A. [Ministry for the Higher Education and Scientific Research, Algiers (Algeria)

    2005-08-01

    In this paper we investigate, the possibility of using an adaptive Artificial Neural Network (ANN), in order to find a suitable model for sizing Stand-Alone Photovoltaic (SAPV) systems, based on a minimum of input data. The model combines Radial Basis Function (RBF) network and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filter in order to accelerate the convergence of the network. For the sizing of a photovoltaic (PV) systems, we need to determine the optimal sizing coefficients (K{sub PV}, K{sub B}). These coefficients allow us to determine the number of solar panels and storage batteries necessary to satisfy a given consumption, especially in isolated sites where the global solar radiation data is not always available. These coefficients are considered the most important parameters for sizing a PV system. Results obtained by classical models (analytical, numerical, analytical-numerical, B-spline function) and new models like feed-forward (MLP), radial basis function (RBF), MLP-IIR and RBF-IIR are compared with experimental sizing coefficients in order to illustrate the accuracy of the new developed model. This model has been trained by using 200 known optimal sizing coefficients corresponding to 200 locations in Algeria. In this way, the adaptive model was trained to accept and handle a number of unusual cases. The unknown validation sizing coefficients set produced very accurate estimation with a correlation coefficient of 98%. This result indicates that the proposed method can be successfully used for the estimation of optimal sizing coefficients of SAPV systems for any locations in Algeria. The methodology proposed in this paper however, can be generalized using different locations of the world. (Author)

  15. Women's Preferences for Penis Size: A New Research Method Using Selection among 3D Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole Prause; Jaymie Park; Shannon Leung; Geoffrey Miller

    2015-01-01

    Women's preferences for penis size may affect men's comfort with their own bodies and may have implications for sexual health. Studies of women's penis size preferences typically have relied on their abstract ratings or selecting amongst 2D, flaccid images. This study used haptic stimuli to allow assessment of women's size recall accuracy for the first time, as well as examine their preferences for erect penis sizes in different relationship contexts. Women (N = 75) selected amongst 33, 3D mo...

  16. Phase behavior and critical properties of size-asymmetric, primitive-model electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yuan; Prausnitz, John M.

    2004-04-01

    The theory of J. Jiang et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116, 7977 (2002)] for size-symmetric electrolytes is extended to size-asymmetric electrolytes. When compared to molecular-simulation results, this extension gives the correct trend of critical properties with size asymmetry.

  17. A review of mouse critical size defect models in weight bearing bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jonathan S; Bemenderfer, Thomas B; Wessel, Alexander R; Kacena, Melissa A

    2013-07-01

    Current and future advances in orthopedic treatment are aimed at altering biological interactions to enhance bone healing. Currently, several clinical scenarios exist for which there is no definitive treatment, specifically segmental bone loss from high-energy trauma or surgical resection - and it is here that many are aiming to find effective solutions. To test experimental interventions and better understand bone healing, researchers employ critical size defect (CSD) models in animal studies. Here, an overview of CSDs is given that includes the specifications of varying models, a discussion of current scaffold and bone graft designs, and current outcome measures used to determine the extent of bone healing. Many promising graft designs have been discovered along with promising adjunctive treatments, yet a graft that offers biomechanical support while allowing for neovascularization with eventual complete resorption and remodeling remains to be developed. An overview of this important topic is needed to highlight current advances and provide a clear understanding of the ultimate goal in CSD research--develop a graft for clinical use that effectively treats the orthopedic conundrum of segmental bone loss.

  18. A new way of using modelling to estimate the size of a motoneurone's EPSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Peter B C

    2002-01-01

    Earlier modelling of a noisy motoneurone has been extended to provide a new measure of excitability. The distance-to-threshold estimate of an MN's AHP, derived from its interval histogram, is used to create a simplified daughter model to mimic the behaviour of its parent and determine a new measure of an MN's response to a stimulus. This Estimated Potential (EP) provides a linear measure of the size of the parent's underlying EPSP, irrespective of its firing rate, and thereby improves on the classic firing index from which it is derived. The EP is applicable with both random and spike-triggered stimulation. It is emphasized that in the presence of noise a tonically firing MN's average responsiveness at a given time during its AHP depends upon what may be termed the "survivor's mean trajectory", rather than upon the "distance to threshold" AHP found in the absence of noise; these differ because noise-induced spiking eliminates individual trajectories when they reach threshold.

  19. Statistical Analysis and Calculation Model of Flexibility Coefficient of Low- and Medium-Sized Arch Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Huaizhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The flexibility coefficient is popularly used to implement the macroevaluation of shape, safety, and economy for arch dam. However, the description of flexibility coefficient has not drawn a widely consensus all the time. Based on a large number of relative instance data, the relationship between influencing factor and flexibility coefficient is analyzed by means of partial least-squares regression. The partial least-squares regression equation of flexibility coefficient in certain height range between 30 m and 70 m is established. Regressive precision and equation stability are further investigated. The analytical model of statistical flexibility coefficient is provided. The flexibility coefficient criterion is determined preliminarily to evaluate the shape of low- and medium-sized arch dam. A case study is finally presented to illustrate the potential engineering application. According to the analysis result of partial least-squares regression, it is shown that there is strong relationship between flexibility coefficient and average thickness of dam, thickness-height ratio of crown cantilever, arc height ratio, and dam height, but the effect of rise-span ratio is little relatively. The considered factors in the proposed model are more comprehensive, and the applied scope is clearer than that of the traditional calculation methods. It is more suitable for the analogy analysis in engineering design and the safety evaluation for arch dam.

  20. MODELING, SIMULATON AND SIZING OF PHOTOVOLTAIC/WIND/FUEL CELL HYBRID GENERATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr.S.LATHA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The depleting fossil fuel reserves and increasing concern towards global warming have created the need to surge for the alternative power generation options. Renewable energy sources like Wind, Solar-PV, Biomass and fuel cells are gaining prominence nowadays, as they are more energy efficient, reduce pollution and also they serveas a promising solution to the toughest energy crisis faced during the recent years. This paper focuses on the modeling and simulation of solar – photovoltaic, wind and fuel cell hybrid energy systems using MATLAB/Simulink software. The intermittent nature of solar and wind energy sources make them unreliable. Hence Maximum Power Point Tracking (MPPT is used to extract maximum power from the wind and sunwhen it is available. The standard perturb and observe method of MPPT is used for the PV system and for the wind generation system. The simulation results of the PV/Wind /Fuel cell hybrid system are presented in graph showing the effectiveness of the proposed system model. Also, hardware implementation of microcontroller based MPPT for solar-PV alone and unit sizing of the hybrid system for the PG simulation lab in EEE Dept. of Thiagarajar College of Engineering is depicted in the paper.

  1. A Parametric Sizing Model for Molten Regolith Electrolysis Reactors to Produce Oxygen from Lunar Regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, Samuel S.; Dominguez, Jesus A.; Sibille, Laurent; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a parametric sizing model for a Molten Electrolysis Reactor that produces oxygen and molten metals from lunar regolith. The model has a foundation of regolith material properties validated using data from Apollo samples and simulants. A multiphysics simulation of an MRE reactor is developed and leveraged to generate a vast database of reactor performance and design trends. A novel design methodology is created which utilizes this database to parametrically design an MRE reactor that 1) can sustain the required mass of molten regolith, current, and operating temperature to meet the desired oxygen production level, 2) can operate for long durations via joule heated, cold wall operation in which molten regolith does not touch the reactor side walls, 3) can support a range of electrode separations to enable operational flexibility. Mass, power, and performance estimates for an MRE reactor are presented for a range of oxygen production levels. The effects of several design variables are explored, including operating temperature, regolith type/composition, batch time, and the degree of operational flexibility.

  2. Custom sizing of lower limb exoskeleton actuators using gait dynamic modelling of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, B; Achiche, S; Parent, A; Ballaz, L; Chouinard, U; Raison, M

    2016-11-01

    The use of exoskeletons as an aid for people with musculoskeletal disorder is the subject to an increasing interest in the research community. These devices are expected to meet the specific needs of users, such as children with cerebral palsy (CP) who are considered a significant population in pediatric rehabilitation. Although these exoskeletons should be designed to ease the movement of people with physical shortcoming, their design is generally based on data obtained from healthy adults, which leads to oversized components that are inadequate to the targeted users. Consequently, the objective of this study is to custom-size the lower limb exoskeleton actuators based on dynamic modeling of the human body for children with CP on the basis of hip, knee, and ankle joint kinematics and dynamics of human body during gait. For this purpose, a multibody modeling of the human body of 3 typically developed children (TD) and 3 children with CP is used. The results show significant differences in gait patterns especially in knee and ankle with respectively 0.39 and -0.33 (Nm/kg) maximum torque differences between TD children and children with CP. This study provides the recommendations to support the design of actuators to normalize the movement of children with CP.

  3. Study on the combined influence of battery models and sizing strategy for hybrid and battery-based electric vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Cláudio; Barreras, Jorge V.; de Castro, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the combined influence of battery models and sizing strategy for hybrid and battery-based electric vehicles. In particular, the aim is to find the number of battery (and supercapacitor) cells to propel a light vehicle to run two different standard driving cycles....... Despite the same tendency, when a hybrid vehicle is taken into account, the influence of the battery models is dependent on the sizing strategy. In this work, two sizing strategies are evaluated: dynamic programming and filter-based. For the latter, the complexity of the battery model has a clear....... Three equivalent circuit models are considered to simulate the battery electrical performance: linear static, non-linear static and non-linear with first-order dynamics. When dimensioning a battery-based vehicle, less complex models may lead to a solution with more battery cells and higher costs...

  4. Calculation method for particle mean diameter and particle size distribution function under dependent model algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Tang; Xiaogang Sun; Guibin Yuan

    2007-01-01

    In total light scattering particle sizing technique, the relationship among Sauter mean diameter D32, mean extinction efficiency Q, and particle size distribution function is studied in order to inverse the mean diameter and particle size distribution simply. We propose a method which utilizes the mean extinction efficiency ratio at only two selected wavelengths to solve D32 and then to inverse the particle size distribution associated with (Q) and D32. Numerical simulation results show that the particle size distribution is inversed accurately with this method, and the number of wavelengths used is reduced to the greatest extent in the measurement range. The calculation method has the advantages of simplicity and rapidness.

  5. Tree Size Inequality Reduces Forest Productivity: An Analysis Combining Inventory Data for Ten European Species and a Light Competition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdier, Thomas; Cordonnier, Thomas; Kunstler, Georges; Piedallu, Christian; Lagarrigues, Guillaume; Courbaud, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Plant structural diversity is usually considered as beneficial for ecosystem functioning. For instance, numerous studies have reported positive species diversity-productivity relationships in plant communities. However, other aspects of structural diversity such as individual size inequality have been far less investigated. In forests, tree size inequality impacts directly tree growth and asymmetric competition, but consequences on forest productivity are still indeterminate. In addition, the effect of tree size inequality on productivity is likely to vary with species shade-tolerance, a key ecological characteristic controlling asymmetric competition and light resource acquisition. Using plot data from the French National Geographic Agency, we studied the response of stand productivity to size inequality for ten forest species differing in shade tolerance. We fitted a basal area stand production model that included abiotic factors, stand density, stand development stage and a tree size inequality index. Then, using a forest dynamics model we explored whether mechanisms of light interception and light use efficiency could explain the tree size inequality effect observed for three of the ten species studied. Size inequality negatively affected basal area increment for seven out of the ten species investigated. However, this effect was not related to the shade tolerance of these species. According to the model simulations, the negative tree size inequality effect could result both from reduced total stand light interception and reduced light use efficiency. Our results demonstrate that negative relationships between size inequality and productivity may be the rule in tree populations. The lack of effect of shade tolerance indicates compensatory mechanisms between effect on light availability and response to light availability. Such a pattern deserves further investigations for mixed forests where complementarity effects between species are involved. When studying the

  6. Tree Size Inequality Reduces Forest Productivity: An Analysis Combining Inventory Data for Ten European Species and a Light Competition Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bourdier

    Full Text Available Plant structural diversity is usually considered as beneficial for ecosystem functioning. For instance, numerous studies have reported positive species diversity-productivity relationships in plant communities. However, other aspects of structural diversity such as individual size inequality have been far less investigated. In forests, tree size inequality impacts directly tree growth and asymmetric competition, but consequences on forest productivity are still indeterminate. In addition, the effect of tree size inequality on productivity is likely to vary with species shade-tolerance, a key ecological characteristic controlling asymmetric competition and light resource acquisition. Using plot data from the French National Geographic Agency, we studied the response of stand productivity to size inequality for ten forest species differing in shade tolerance. We fitted a basal area stand production model that included abiotic factors, stand density, stand development stage and a tree size inequality index. Then, using a forest dynamics model we explored whether mechanisms of light interception and light use efficiency could explain the tree size inequality effect observed for three of the ten species studied. Size inequality negatively affected basal area increment for seven out of the ten species investigated. However, this effect was not related to the shade tolerance of these species. According to the model simulations, the negative tree size inequality effect could result both from reduced total stand light interception and reduced light use efficiency. Our results demonstrate that negative relationships between size inequality and productivity may be the rule in tree populations. The lack of effect of shade tolerance indicates compensatory mechanisms between effect on light availability and response to light availability. Such a pattern deserves further investigations for mixed forests where complementarity effects between species are

  7. Controls on benthic biomass size spectra in shelf and deep-sea sediments – a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Kelly-Gerreyn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling biomass distributions in marine benthic organisms (meio- to macro-fauna, 1 μg–32 mg wet weight were investigated through observations and allometric modelling. Biomass (and abundance size spectra were measured at three locations: the Faroe-Shetland Channel in the north-east Atlantic (FSC, water depth 1600 m, September 2000; the Fladen Ground in the North Sea (FG, 150 m, September 2000; and the hypoxic Oman Margin (OM, 500 m, September 2002 in the Arabian Sea. Biomass increased with body size through a power law at FG (allometric exponent, b = 0.16 and at FSC (b = 0.32, but less convincingly at OM (b was not significantly different from −1/4 or 0. Our results question the assumption that metazoan biomass spectra are bimodal in marine sediments.

    The model incorporated 16 metazoan size classes, as derived from the observed spectra, all reliant on a common detrital food pool. All physiological (ingestion, mortality, assimilation and respiration parameters scaled to body size following optimisation to the data at each site, the resulting values being consistent within expectations from the literature. For all sites, body size related changes in mortality played the greatest role in determining the trend of the biomass size spectra. The body size trend in the respiration rate was most sensitive to allometry in both mortality and ingestion, and the trend in body size spectra of the production: biomass ratio was explained by the allometry in ingestion.

    Our results suggest that size-scaling mortality and ingestion are important factors determining the distribution of biomass across the meiofauna to macrofauna size range in marine sedimentary communities, in agreement with the general observation that biomass tends to accumulates in larger rather than smaller size classes in these environments.

  8. Prey size and availability limits maximum size of rainbow trout in a large tailwater: insights from a drift-foraging bioenergetics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodrill, Michael J.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Kennedy, Theodore A.; Haye, John W

    2016-01-01

    The cold and clear water conditions present below many large dams create ideal conditions for the development of economically important salmonid fisheries. Many of these tailwater fisheries have experienced declines in the abundance and condition of large trout species, yet the causes of these declines remain uncertain. Here, we develop, assess, and apply a drift-foraging bioenergetics model to identify the factors limiting rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) growth in a large tailwater. We explored the relative importance of temperature, prey quantity, and prey size by constructing scenarios where these variables, both singly and in combination, were altered. Predicted growth matched empirical mass-at-age estimates, particularly for younger ages, demonstrating that the model accurately describes how current temperature and prey conditions interact to determine rainbow trout growth. Modeling scenarios that artificially inflated prey size and abundance demonstrate that rainbow trout growth is limited by the scarcity of large prey items and overall prey availability. For example, shifting 10% of the prey biomass to the 13 mm (large) length class, without increasing overall prey biomass, increased lifetime maximum mass of rainbow trout by 88%. Additionally, warmer temperatures resulted in lower predicted growth at current and lower levels of prey availability; however, growth was similar across all temperatures at higher levels of prey availability. Climate change will likely alter flow and temperature regimes in large rivers with corresponding changes to invertebrate prey resources used by fish. Broader application of drift-foraging bioenergetics models to build a mechanistic understanding of how changes to habitat conditions and prey resources affect growth of salmonids will benefit management of tailwater fisheries.

  9. The probabilistic niche model reveals the niche structure and role of body size in a complex food web.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Williams

    Full Text Available The niche model has been widely used to model the structure of complex food webs, and yet the ecological meaning of the single niche dimension has not been explored. In the niche model, each species has three traits, niche position, diet position and feeding range. Here, a new probabilistic niche model, which allows the maximum likelihood set of trait values to be estimated for each species, is applied to the food web of the Benguela fishery. We also developed the allometric niche model, in which body size is used as the niche dimension. About 80% of the links in the empirical data are predicted by the probabilistic niche model, a significant improvement over recent models. As in the niche model, species are uniformly distributed on the niche axis. Feeding ranges are exponentially distributed, but diet positions are not uniformly distributed below the predator. Species traits are strongly correlated with body size, but the allometric niche model performs significantly worse than the probabilistic niche model. The best-fit parameter set provides a significantly better model of the structure of the Benguela food web than was previously available. The methodology allows the identification of a number of taxa that stand out as outliers either in the model's poor performance at predicting their predators or prey or in their parameter values. While important, body size alone does not explain the structure of the one-dimensional niche.

  10. The probabilistic niche model reveals the niche structure and role of body size in a complex food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard J; Anandanadesan, Ananthi; Purves, Drew

    2010-08-09

    The niche model has been widely used to model the structure of complex food webs, and yet the ecological meaning of the single niche dimension has not been explored. In the niche model, each species has three traits, niche position, diet position and feeding range. Here, a new probabilistic niche model, which allows the maximum likelihood set of trait values to be estimated for each species, is applied to the food web of the Benguela fishery. We also developed the allometric niche model, in which body size is used as the niche dimension. About 80% of the links in the empirical data are predicted by the probabilistic niche model, a significant improvement over recent models. As in the niche model, species are uniformly distributed on the niche axis. Feeding ranges are exponentially distributed, but diet positions are not uniformly distributed below the predator. Species traits are strongly correlated with body size, but the allometric niche model performs significantly worse than the probabilistic niche model. The best-fit parameter set provides a significantly better model of the structure of the Benguela food web than was previously available. The methodology allows the identification of a number of taxa that stand out as outliers either in the model's poor performance at predicting their predators or prey or in their parameter values. While important, body size alone does not explain the structure of the one-dimensional niche.

  11. Sample Size and Statistical Conclusions from Tests of Fit to the Rasch Model According to the Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Model (Rumm) Program in Health Outcome Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagell, Peter; Westergren, Albert

    Sample size is a major factor in statistical null hypothesis testing, which is the basis for many approaches to testing Rasch model fit. Few sample size recommendations for testing fit to the Rasch model concern the Rasch Unidimensional Measurement Models (RUMM) software, which features chi-square and ANOVA/F-ratio based fit statistics, including Bonferroni and algebraic sample size adjustments. This paper explores the occurrence of Type I errors with RUMM fit statistics, and the effects of algebraic sample size adjustments. Data with simulated Rasch model fitting 25-item dichotomous scales and sample sizes ranging from N = 50 to N = 2500 were analysed with and without algebraically adjusted sample sizes. Results suggest the occurrence of Type I errors with N less then or equal to 500, and that Bonferroni correction as well as downward algebraic sample size adjustment are useful to avoid such errors, whereas upward adjustment of smaller samples falsely signal misfit. Our observations suggest that sample sizes around N = 250 to N = 500 may provide a good balance for the statistical interpretation of the RUMM fit statistics studied here with respect to Type I errors and under the assumption of Rasch model fit within the examined frame of reference (i.e., about 25 item parameters well targeted to the sample).

  12. Sizing of rock fragmentation modeling due to bench blasting using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karami Alireza; Afiuni-Zadeh Somaieh

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important characters of blasting, a basic step of surface mining, is rock fragmentation because it directly effects on the costs of drilling and economics of the subsequent operations of loading, hauling and crushing in mines. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and radial basis function (RBF) show potentials for modeling the behavior of complex nonlinear processes such as those involved in fragmentation due to blasting of rocks. We developed ANFIS and RBF methods for modeling of sizing of rock fragmentation due to bench blasting by estimation of 80%passing size (K80) of Golgohar iron mine of Sirjan, Iran. Comparing the results of ANFIS and RBF models shows that although the statistical parame-ters RBF model is acceptable but ANFIS proposed model is superior and also simpler because ANFIS model is constructed using only two input parameters while seven input parameters used for construction of RBF model.

  13. A spatiotemporal model for snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) stock size in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadigan, Noel G.; Wade, Elmer; Nielsen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We develop a high-resolution spatiotemporal model of stock size and harvest rates for snow crab (Chionoecetes opilio) in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, which supports an economically important fishery off the east coast of Canada. It is a spatial and weekly model during 1997–2014 that utilize...

  14. Modeling the Floe-Size Distribution to Improve the Prediction of Sea Ice in the Marginal Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-30

    in basin-scale, rheology-type sea ice models. Lateral ablation and sea ice mechanics depend on the size of floes and yet their distribution in present-day models is assumed to be homogeneous in space and constant in time .

  15. The effect of apical preparation size on irrigant flow in root canals evaluated using an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Gogos, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To evaluate the effect of apical preparation size on irrigant flow inside a root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two different needles types, using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methodology  A validated CFD model was used to simulate the irrigant flow from either

  16. Statistical properties of the Green function in finite size for Anderson localization models with multifractal eigenvectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    For Anderson localization models with multifractal eigenvectors on disordered samples containing N sites, we analyze in a unified framework the consequences for the statistical properties of the Green function. We focus in particular on the imaginary part of the Green function at coinciding points GxxI≤ft(E-\\text{i}η \\right) and study the scaling with the size N of the moments of arbitrary indices q when the broadening follows the scaling η =\\frac{c}{{{N}δ}} . For the standard scaling regime δ =1 , we find in the two limits c\\ll 1 and c\\gg 1 that the moments are governed by the anomalous exponents Δ (q) of individual eigenfunctions, without the assumption of strong correlations between the weights of consecutive eigenstates at the same point. For the non-standard scaling regimes 0function follows some Fréchet distribution in the typical region, while rare events are important to obtain the scaling of the moments. We describe the application to the case of Gaussian multifractality and to the case of linear multifractality.

  17. Evaluation of borate bioactive glass scaffolds with different pore sizes in a rat subcutaneous implantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliormanli, Aylin M; Liu, Xin; Rahaman, Mohamed N

    2014-01-01

    Borate bioactive glass has been shown to convert faster and more completely to hydroxyapatite and enhance new bone formation in vivo when compared to silicate bioactive glass (such as 45S5 and 13-93 bioactive glass). In this work, the effects of the borate glass microstructure on its conversion to hydroxyapatite (HA) in vitro and its ability to support tissue ingrowth in a rat subcutaneous implantation model were investigated. Bioactive borate glass scaffolds, designated 13-93B3, with a grid-like microstructure and pore widths of 300, 600, and 900 µm were prepared by a robocasting technique. The scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously for 4 weeks in Sprague Dawley rats. Silicate 13-93 glass scaffolds with the same microstructure were used as the control. The conversion of the scaffolds to HA was studied as a function of immersion time in a simulated body fluid. Histology and scanning electron microscopy were used to evaluate conversion of the bioactive glass implants to hydroxyapatite, as well as tissue ingrowth and blood vessel formation in the implants. The pore size of the scaffolds was found to have little effect on tissue infiltration and angiogenesis after the 4-week implantation.

  18. Modeling incubation temperature: the effects of incubator design, embryonic development, and egg size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, N A

    1997-01-01

    A simple model to describe the relationship between the temperature of the developing embryo, incubator temperature, embryo heat production, and thermal conductivity of the egg and surrounding air is presented. During early incubation, embryo temperature is slightly lower than incubator temperature because of evaporative cooling. However, from midincubation onwards, metabolic heat production from the embryo raises embryo temperature above incubator temperature. The extent of the rise in embryo temperature depends on thermal conductivity, which, in turn, is mainly influenced by the air speed over the egg. The importance of air speed and restrictions to air flow within artificial incubators is discussed. Exact determinations of optimum incubation temperatures from studies reported in the literature are difficult because only incubator temperatures are reported. Embryo temperatures can differ from incubator temperature because of differences in thermal conductivity between different incubation systems and differences between incubators in their ability to control temperatures uniformly. It is suggested that shell surface temperatures are monitored in experiments to investigate temperature effects to allow consistent comparisons between trials. Monitoring shell temperatures would also make it easier to translate optimum temperatures derived in small experimental incubators to the large commercial incubators used by the poultry industry. The relationship between egg temperature, the metabolism of the developing embryo and egg size is discussed.

  19. Tuning surface reactivity by finite size effects: role of orbital symmetry in the d - band model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Paul; Yin, Xiangshi; Cooper, Valentino; Weitering, Hanno

    Catalytic activity depends sensitively on the strength of the interactions between reactant molecules and catalyst surface: too weak and the catalyst cannot capture enough molecules to react; too strong and the reaction products do not desorb, blocking further reactions. The ability to control the binding strength of molecules to metal surfaces is thus fundamental to the design of efficient and selective catalysts. Catalyst design often relies on increasing the interaction strength on relatively non-reactive materials by introducing active sites. Here, we present a complementary approach: we exploit finite size effects in the electronic structure of ultrathin Pd(111) films grown on Ru(0001) to tune their reactivity by changing the film thickness one atom layer at a time. While bulk Pd(111) is reactive toward oxygen, we find that Pd films thinner than 6 atom layers are surprisingly inert to oxidation. This observation can be explained with the d-band model only when it is applied to the orbitals directly involved in the bonding. The insight into orbital specific contributions to surface reactivity could be useful in the design of catalysts. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  20. Effective site-energy model: A thermodynamic approach applied to size-mismatched alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, F.; Creuze, J.; Legrand, B.

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel energetic model that takes into account atomistic relaxations to describe the thermodynamic properties of AcB1 -c binary alloys. It requires the calculation of the energies on each site of a random solid solution after relaxation as a function of both the local composition and the nominal concentration. These site energies are obtained by molecular static simulations using N -body interatomic potentials derived from the second-moment approximation (SMA) of the tight-binding scheme. This new model allows us to determine the effective pair interactions (EPIs) that drive the short-range order (SRO) and to analyze the relative role of the EPIs' contribution to the mixing enthalpy, with respect to the contribution due to the lattice mismatch between the constituents. We apply this formalism to Au-Ni and Ag-Cu alloys, both of them tending to phase separate in the bulk and exhibiting a large size mismatch. Rigid-lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations lead to phase diagrams that are in good agreement with both those obtained by off-lattice SMA-MC simulations and the experimental ones. While the phase diagrams of Au-Ni and Ag-Cu alloys are very similar, we show that phase separation is mainly driven by the elastic contribution for Au-Ni and by the EPIs' contribution for Ag-Cu. Furthermore, for Au-Ni, the analysis of the SRO shows an inversion between the tendency to order and the tendency to phase separate as a function of the concentration.

  1. Modeling loggerhead turtle movement in the Mediterranean: importance of body size and oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Scott A; Moore, Jeffrey E; Dunn, Daniel C; van Buiten, Ricardo Sagarminaga; Eckert, Karen L; Halpin, Patrick N

    2008-03-01

    Adapting state-space models (SSMs) to telemetry data has been helpful for dealing with location error and for modeling animal movements. We used a combination of two hierarchical Bayesian SSMs to estimate movement pathways from Argos satellite-tag data for 15 juvenile loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) in the western Mediterranean Sea, and to probabilistically assign locations to one of two behavioral movement types and relate those behaviors to environmental features. A Monte Carlo procedure helped propagate location uncertainty from the first SSM into the estimation of behavioral states and environment--behavior relationships in the second SSM. Turtles using oceanic habitats of the Balearic Sea (n = 9 turtles) within the western Mediterranean were more likely to exhibit "intensive search" behavior as might occur during foraging, but only larger turtles responded to variations in sea-surface height. This suggests that they were better able than smaller turtles to cue on environmental features that concentrate prey resources or were more dependent on high-quality feeding areas. These findings stress the importance of individual heterogeneity in the analysis of movement behavior and, taken in concert with descriptive studies of Pacific loggerheads, suggest that directed movements toward patchy ephemeral resources may be a general property of larger juvenile loggerheads in different populations. We discovered size-based variation in loggerhead distribution and documented use of the western Mediterranean Sea by turtles larger than previously thought to occur there. With one exception, only individuals > 57 cm curved carapace length used the most westerly basin in the Mediterranean (western Alborán Sea). These observations shed new light on loggerhead migration phenology.

  2. Culture of Dermal Papilla Cells from Ovine Wool Follicles: An In Vitro Model for Papilla Size Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufaut, Nicholas W; Nixon, Allan J; Sinclair, Rodney D

    2016-01-01

    Common human balding or hair loss is driven by follicle miniaturization. Miniaturization is thought to be caused by a reduction in dermal papilla size. The molecular mechanisms that regulate papilla size are poorly understood, and their elucidation would benefit from a tractable experimental model. We have found that dermal papilla cells from sheep spontaneously aggregate in culture to form papilla-like structures. Here, we describe methods for microdissecting dermal papillae from wool follicles, for initiating and maintaining cultures of ovine papilla cells, and for using these cells in an in vitro assay to measure the effect of bioactive molecules on aggregate size.

  3. Grain-Size Based Additivity Models for Scaling Multi-rate Uranyl Surface Complexation in Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Bill X.; Hu, Qinhong

    2016-07-31

    The additivity model assumed that field-scale reaction properties in a sediment including surface area, reactive site concentration, and reaction rate can be predicted from field-scale grain-size distribution by linearly adding reaction properties estimated in laboratory for individual grain-size fractions. This study evaluated the additivity model in scaling mass transfer-limited, multi-rate uranyl (U(VI)) surface complexation reactions in a contaminated sediment. Experimental data of rate-limited U(VI) desorption in a stirred flow-cell reactor were used to estimate the statistical properties of the rate constants for individual grain-size fractions, which were then used to predict rate-limited U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. The result indicated that the additivity model with respect to the rate of U(VI) desorption provided a good prediction of U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. However, the rate constants were not directly scalable using the additivity model. An approximate additivity model for directly scaling rate constants was subsequently proposed and evaluated. The result found that the approximate model provided a good prediction of the experimental results within statistical uncertainty. This study also found that a gravel-size fraction (2 to 8 mm), which is often ignored in modeling U(VI) sorption and desorption, is statistically significant to the U(VI) desorption in the sediment.

  4. A Comparative Study of Power and Sample Size Calculations for Multivariate General Linear Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Gwowen

    2003-01-01

    Repeated measures and longitudinal studies arise often in social and behavioral science research. During the planning stage of such studies, the calculations of sample size are of particular interest to the investigators and should be an integral part of the research projects. In this article, we consider the power and sample size calculations for…

  5. A quantitative test of the size efficiency hypothesis by means of a physiologically structured model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hülsmann, S.; Rinke, K.; Mooij, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    According to the size-efficiency hypothesis (SEH) larger bodied cladocerans are better competitors for food than small bodied species. In environments with fish, however, the higher losses of the large bodied species due to size-selective predation may shift the balance in favor of the small bodied

  6. Model independent determination of colloidal silica size distributions via analytical ultracentrifugation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planken, K.L.; Kuipers, B.W.M.; Philipse, A.P.

    2008-01-01

    We report a method to determine the particle size distribution of small colloidal silica spheres via analytical ultracentrifugation and show that the average particle size, variance, standard deviation, and relative polydispersity can be obtained from a single sedimentation velocity (SV) analytical

  7. Classifying and modeling setups and cleanings in lot sizing and scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stefansdottir, Bryndis; Grunow, Martin; Akkerman, Renzo

    2017-01-01

    Much attention in the lot sizing and scheduling literature has been focused on reducing the number and size of setups. Cleanings, in contrast, remain a key cost driver in large parts of the process industries such as the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Here, quality and safety considerations lead

  8. A method of manufacturing process modeling based on activity network for large-sized and complex products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Min; TONG Zhen-bo; WANG Gang

    2008-01-01

    Simulation technique is an efficient approach to realize the planning and scheduling of manufacturing process of products. An appropriate and efficient manufacturing process model is the basis and key of manufac-turing process simulation. By analyzing the features of large-sized and complex products, a method of manufac-turing process modeling based on activity network is presented and a mapping algorithm of translating BOM/ BOP into the manufacturing process model is designed in detail.

  9. Collaborative e-Business Process Modelling: A Holistic Analysis Framework focused on Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Volker; Christ, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we propose a holistic analysis framework for collaborative e-Business process modelling approaches that takes into account the specific challenges small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) are facing with regard to modelling inter-organizational processes. Based on concepts of the management approach Balanced Scorecard (BSC) four different perspectives are derived from empirical studies, conceptual research results and completed with modelling experiences of an EU-funded proje...

  10. A scaling theory for the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols suggests climate models underestimate the size of the global dust cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F

    2011-01-18

    Mineral dust aerosols impact Earth's radiation budget through interactions with clouds, ecosystems, and radiation, which constitutes a substantial uncertainty in understanding past and predicting future climate changes. One of the causes of this large uncertainty is that the size distribution of emitted dust aerosols is poorly understood. The present study shows that regional and global circulation models (GCMs) overestimate the emitted fraction of clay aerosols (climate predictions in dusty regions. On a global scale, the dust cycle in most GCMs is tuned to match radiative measurements, such that the overestimation of the radiative cooling of a given quantity of emitted dust has likely caused GCMs to underestimate the global dust emission rate. This implies that the deposition flux of dust and its fertilizing effects on ecosystems may be substantially larger than thought.

  11. On the Size Dependences of the Metallic Nanoparticle Evaporation and Sublimation Heats: Thermodynamics and Atomistic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembel, A. G.

    2017-02-01

    Size dependences of the nanocrystal sublimation and the evaporation heats of the corresponding nanodrops are investigated using the isothermal molecular dynamics and the tight-binding potential (on examples of Ni and Au nanoparticles). Results of computer simulation demonstrating linear dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats on the particle reciprocal radius are compared with results of thermodynamic calculations as well as with experimental data for bulk phases of the same metals. It has been found that the size dependences of the evaporation and sublimation heats are directly related with the behavior of the size dependence of the melting heat that in its turn correlates with structural transformations in nanoparticles induced by the change of their size. The conclusion is drawn that there is some characteristic nanoparticle size (of the order of 1 nm) at which its crystal and liquid states become indistinguishable.

  12. Bottles as models: predicting the effects of varying swimming speed and morphology on size selectivity and filtering efficiency in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paig-Tran, E W Misty; Bizzarro, Joseph J; Strother, James A; Summers, Adam P

    2011-05-15

    We created physical models based on the morphology of ram suspension-feeding fishes to better understand the roles morphology and swimming speed play in particle retention, size selectivity and filtration efficiency during feeding events. We varied the buccal length, flow speed and architecture of the gills slits, including the number, size, orientation and pore size/permeability, in our models. Models were placed in a recirculating flow tank with slightly negatively buoyant plankton-like particles (~20-2000 μm) collected at the simulated esophagus and gill rakers to locate the highest density of particle accumulation. Particles were captured through sieve filtration, direct interception and inertial impaction. Changing the number of gill slits resulted in a change in the filtration mechanism of particles from a bimodal filter, with very small (≤ 50 μm) and very large (>1000 μm) particles collected, to a filter that captured medium-sized particles (101-1000 μm). The number of particles collected on the gill rakers increased with flow speed and skewed the size distribution towards smaller particles (51-500 μm). Small pore sizes (105 and 200 μm mesh size) had the highest filtration efficiencies, presumably because sieve filtration played a significant role. We used our model to make predictions about the filtering capacity and efficiency of neonatal whale sharks. These results suggest that the filtration mechanics of suspension feeding are closely linked to an animal's swimming speed and the structural design of the buccal cavity and gill slits.

  13. Size dependent skin penetration of nanoparticles in murine and porcine dermatitis models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Try, Céline; Moulari, Brice; Béduneau, Arnaud; Fantini, Oscar; Pin, Didier; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-03-01

    A major limitation in the current topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases is the inability to selectively deliver the drug to the inflammation site. Recently, smart drug delivery systems such as nanocarriers are being investigated to enhance the selective deposition of anti-inflammatory drugs in inflamed areas of the skin to achieve higher therapeutic efficacy with minimal side effects. Of such systems, polymeric nanoparticles are considered very efficient carriers for the topical drug delivery. In the current work, poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles of nominal sizes of 70nm (NP70) and 300nm (NP300) were studied for their intra-epidermal distribution in murine and pig atopic dermatitis models over time against the respective healthy controls. Confocal laser scanning microscopical examination of skin biopsies was utilized for the qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of nanoparticles skin deposition and penetration depth. While no skin penetration was found for any of the particles in healthy skin, the accumulation of NP70 was significantly higher than NP300 in inflamed skin (15-fold in mice, 5-fold in pigs). Penetration depth of NP70 decreased over time in mice from 55±3μm to 20±2μm and similar tendencies were observed for the other formulations. In inflamed pig skin, a similar trend was found for the penetration depth (NP70: 46±12μm versus NP300: 23±3μm); however, the NP amount remained constant for the whole analyzed period. Their ability to penetrate specifically into inflamed skin combined with minimal effects on healthy skin underlines small polymeric nanoparticles' potential as selective drug carriers in future treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis.

  14. Particle-size dependent effects in the Balb/c murine model of inhalational melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eThomas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of Burkholderia pseudomallei within either the lungs or nasal passages of the Balb/c murine model resulted in different infection kinetics. The infection resulting from the inhalation of B. pseudomallei within a 12 um particle aerosol was prolonged compared to a 1 um particle aerosol with a mean time-to-death (MTD of 73.8 ± 11.3 h and 174.7 ± 14.9 h respectively. Inhalation of B. pseudomallei within 1 um or 12 um particle aerosols resulted in a median lethal dose (MLD of 4 and 12 cfu respectively. The 12 mm particle inhalational infection was characterised by involvement of the respiratory epithelium and inflammation of the neurological path leading from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb (100%, culminating in abscessation of the brain (33%. Initial involvement of the upper respiratory tract lymphoid tissues (nasal-associated lymphoid tissue and cervical lymph nodes was observed in both the 1 and 12 um particle inhalational infections (80-85%. Necrotising alveolitis and bronchiolitis were evident in both inhalational infections however lung pathology was greater after inhalation of the 1 mm particle aerosol with pronounced involvement of the mediastinal lymph node (50%. Terminal disease was characterised by bacteraemia in both inhalational infections with dissemination to the spleen, liver, kidneys and thymus. Treatment with co-trimoxazole was more effective than treatment with doxycycline irrespective of the size of the particles inhaled. Doxycycline was more effective against the 12 um particle inhalational infection as evidenced by increased time to death. However, both treatment regimes exhibited significant relapse when therapy was discontinued with massive enlargement and abscessation of the lungs, spleen and cervical lymph nodes observed.

  15. Analysis of a stochastic model for bacterial growth and the lognormality in the cell-size distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Ken

    2016-01-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell divisions and linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We derive that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values which give good lognormal approximation, so the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  16. Sample Size Determination Within the Scope of Conditional Maximum Likelihood Estimation with Special Focus on Testing the Rasch Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Clemens; Alexandrowicz, Rainer W

    2015-12-01

    This paper refers to the exponential family of probability distributions and the conditional maximum likelihood (CML) theory. It is concerned with the determination of the sample size for three groups of tests of linear hypotheses, known as the fundamental trinity of Wald, score, and likelihood ratio tests. The main practical purpose refers to the special case of tests of the class of Rasch models. The theoretical background is discussed and the formal framework for sample size calculations is provided, given a predetermined deviation from the model to be tested and the probabilities of the errors of the first and second kinds.

  17. A measurement model for real estate bubble size based on the panel data analysis: An empirical case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengyun; Liu, Deqiang; Malekian, Reza; Li, Zhixiong; Wang, Deqing

    2017-01-01

    Employing the fundamental value of real estate determined by the economic fundamentals, a measurement model for real estate bubble size is established based on the panel data analysis. Using this model, real estate bubble sizes in various regions in Japan in the late 1980s and in recent China are examined. Two panel models for Japan provide results, which are consistent with the reality in the 1980s where a commercial land price bubble appeared in most area and was much larger than that of residential land. This provides evidence of the reliability of our model, overcoming the limit of existing literature with this method. The same models for housing prices in China at both the provincial and city levels show that contrary to the concern of serious housing price bubble in China, over-valuing in recent China is much smaller than that in 1980s Japan.

  18. Modeling on the size dependent properties of InP quantum dots: a hybrid functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunseog; Jang, Hyosook; Lee, Junho; Jang, Eunjoo

    2013-05-01

    Theoretical calculations based on density functional theory were performed to provide better understanding of the size dependent electronic properties of InP quantum dots (QDs). Using a hybrid functional approach, we suggest a reliable analytical equation to describe the change of energy band gap as a function of size. Synthesizing colloidal InP QDs with 2-4 nm diameter and measuring their optical properties was also carried out. It was found that the theoretical band gaps showed a linear dependence on the inverse size of QDs and gave energy band gaps almost identical to the experimental values.

  19. The temperature and size distribution of large water clusters from a non-equilibrium model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimelshein, N. [Gimel, Inc., San Jose, California 95124 (United States); Gimelshein, S., E-mail: gimelshe@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Pradzynski, C. C.; Zeuch, T., E-mail: tzeuch1@gwdg.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Universität Göttingen, Tammanstr. 6, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Buck, U., E-mail: ubuck@gwdg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Am Faßberg 17, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-06-28

    A hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian approach is used to examine the properties of water clusters formed in neon-water vapor mixtures expanding through microscale conical nozzles. Experimental size distributions were reliably determined by the sodium doping technique in a molecular beam machine. The comparison of computed size distributions and experimental data shows satisfactory agreement, especially for (H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters with n larger than 50. Thus validated simulations provide size selected cluster temperature profiles in and outside the nozzle. This information is used for an in-depth analysis of the crystallization and water cluster aggregation dynamics of recently reported supersonic jet expansion experiments.

  20. On microphysical processes of noctilucent clouds (NLC: observations and modeling of mean and width of the particle size-distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baumgarten

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Noctilucent clouds (NLC in the polar summer mesopause region have been observed in Norway (69° N, 16° E between 1998 and 2009 by 3-color lidar technique. Assuming a mono-modal Gaussian size distribution we deduce mean and width of the particle sizes throughout the clouds. We observe a quasi linear relationship between distribution width and mean of the particle size at the top of the clouds and a deviation from this behavior for particle sizes larger than 40 nm, most often in the lower part of the layer. The vertically integrated particle properties show that 65% of the data follows the linear relationship with a slope of 0.42±0.02 for mean particle sizes up to 40 nm. For the vertically resolved particle properties (Δz = 0.15 km the slope is comparable and about 0.39±0.03. For particles larger than 40 nm the distribution width becomes nearly independent of particle size and even decreases in the lower part of the layer. We compare our observations to microphysical modeling of noctilucent clouds and find that the distribution width depends on turbulence, the time that turbulence can act (cloud age, and the sampling volume/time (atmospheric variability. The model results nicely reproduce the measurements and show that the observed slope can be explained by eddy diffusion profiles as observed from rocket measurements.

  1. Mathematical Modelling of Nonstationary Physico Chemical Processes in Large Sized SPRM Pyrotechnical Ignition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey M. Lipanov

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the laws of the unstable wave processes accompanying the combustion abnormal mode in the large-sized solid propellant rocket motor {SPRM pyrotechnical ignition system {IS are investigated by numerical method. The IS contains the main {cylindrical channel (MC having uniform perforation over the lateral surface, The left MC boundary is blocked and the right boundary is uniformly perforated. The whole perforation is hermetically sealed from outside. The additional {cylindrical channel {AC {an initial impulse amplifier with uniform perforation over the lateral surface is installed into the MC cavity, coaxially to MC. The right AC boundary is blocked, and the time-varying high-temperature gas flow, containing incandescent 'particles is supplied from initiator, equipped with a fast burning compound, through AC left perforated boundary. To imitate the exploitation conditions, the IS is placed in cylindrical imitation chamber {imitative SPRM. In a number of cases, before the beginning of the IS operation, a situation can be realised when the pelletised solid propellant {PSP mass is non-uniformly distributed along the IS AC length, and the greater part of the AC lateral perforation is blocked by the PSP inserted in the IS MC. Under these conditions, the effect of abnormal strengthening of the pressure waves at the AC boundaries is possible. For describing the abnormal nonstationary physico-chemical processes, a mathematical model is developed. For the check-up of this complex model, the numerical calculation results have been compared with the results of the fire stand tests for the regular IS and the engine. The numerical analysis of the unstable wave process development in the AC has shown that the rise of the pressure with an ever increasing amplitude is realised at the moment, when a shock wave reflects alternately, on the left and on the right AC boundaries. The effect of the pressure waves' abnormal strengthening can result in the

  2. Influences of finite-size effectson the self-organized critical-ity of forest-fire model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The influences of finite-size effects on the self-organized criticality (SOC) of the traditional forest-fire model are investigated by means of a new method. The forest size is originally set to a value much greater than the correlation length of the forest. Finite-size effects are then studied by equally dividing the forest into more and more separate subsystems on condition that the forest size, igniting probability and planting probability are invariant. A new phenomenon, i.e. the finite-size effects with one-side frequency peak, is observed. The boundary between two neighboring subsystems can be regarded as a firebreak. The concept of 'separation ability' is introduced to represent the probability for the firebreak to block off the fire successfully. Restraining effects of separation ability on finite-size effects are analyzed. Finite-size effects and separation ability, as well as their relations are found to have practical importance to the actual forest-fire protection.

  3. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models which employ exactly the same aerosol microphysics module, but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emission, sulfur chemistry, and deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify the influence of these differences on the aerosol simulation. Number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all three models are able to capture the basic features of the observed spatial distribution. The magnitude of number concentration is consistent among the three models in all size ranges, although quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse and accumulation modes, inter-model discrepancies result primarily from the different parameterization schemes for sea salt and dust emission, and are also linked to the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. As for the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of model results appear largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is directly related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. Aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared against observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions of clean, polluted and transition areas.

  4. Geostatistical modeling of regionalized grain-size distributions using Min/Max Autocorrelation Factors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Desbarats, A J

    2001-01-01

    .... Since the number of classes may be large and abundances in adjacent classes may be highly cross-correlated, practical simulation of regionalized grain-size distributions requires an efficient method...

  5. MinSORTING: an Excel macro for modelling sediment composition and grain-size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resentini, Alberto; Malusà, Marco G.; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Detrital mineral analyses are gaining increasing attention in the geosciences as new single-grain analytical techniques are constantly improving their resolution, and consequently widening their range of application, including sedimentary petrology, tectonic geomorphology and archaeology (Mange and Wright, 2007; von Eynatten and Dunkl, 2012). We present here MinSORTING, a new tool to quickly predict the size distribution of various minerals and rock fragments in detrital sediments, based on the physical laws that control sedimentation by tractive wind or water currents (Garzanti et al., 2008). The input values requested by the software are the sediment mean size, sorting, fluid type (seawater, freshwater, air) and standard sediment composition chosen from a given array including nine diverse tectonic settings. MinSORTING calculates the bulk sediment density and the settling velocity. The mean size of each single detrital component, assumed as lognormally-distributed, is calculated from its characteristic size-shift with respect to bulk sediment mean size, dependent in turn on its density and shape. The final output of MinSORTING is the distribution of each single detrital mineral in each size classes (at the chosen 0.25, 0.5 or 1 phi intervals). This allows geochronolgists to select the most suitable grain size of sediment to be sampled in the field, as well as the most representative size-window for analysis. Also, MinSORTING provides an estimate of the volume/weight of the fractions not considered in both sizes finer and coarser than the selected size-window. A beta version of the software is available upon request from: alberto.resentini@unimib.it Mange, M., and Wright, D. (eds), 2007. Heavy minerals in use. Developments in Sedimentology Series, 58. Elsevier, Amsterdam. Garzanti, E., Andò, S., Vezzoli, G., 2008. Settling-equivalence of detrital minerals and grain-size dependence of sediment composition. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 273, 138-151. von

  6. Modified Continuum Mechanics Modeling on Size-Dependent Properties of Piezoelectric Nanomaterials: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Yan; Liying Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Piezoelectric nanomaterials (PNs) are attractive for applications including sensing, actuating, energy harvesting, among others in nano-electro-mechanical-systems (NEMS) because of their excellent electromechanical coupling, mechanical and physical properties. However, the properties of PNs do not coincide with their bulk counterparts and depend on the particular size. A large amount of efforts have been devoted to studying the size-dependent properties of PNs by using experimental characteri...

  7. Size- and concentration-dependent deposition of fluorescent silica colloids in saturated sand columns: transport experiments and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorge, Elsa; Szenknect, Stéphanie; Martins, Jean M F; Gaudet, Jean-Paul

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates the size and concentration effects on the transport of silica colloids in columns of sandy aquifer material. Colloid transport experiments were performed with specifically developed fluorescent labeled silica colloids in columns of a repacked natural porous medium under hydro-geochemical conditions representative of sandy aquifers. Breakthrough curves and vertical deposition profiles of colloids were measured for various colloid concentrations and sizes. The results showed that for a given colloid concentration injected, deposition increased when increasing the size of the colloids. For a given colloid size, retention was also shown to be highly concentration-dependent with a non-monotonous pattern presenting low and high concentration specificities. Deposition increases when increasing both size and injected concentration, until a threshold concentration is reached, above which retention decreases, thus increasing colloid mobility. Results observed above the threshold concentration agree with a classical blocking mechanism typical of a high concentration regime. Results observed at lower colloid concentrations were not modeled with a classical blocking model and a depth- and time-dependent model with a second order kinetic law was necessary to correctly fit the experimental data in the entire range of colloid concentrations with a single set of parameters for each colloidal size. The colloid deposition mechanisms occuring at low concentrations were investigated through a pore structure analysis carried out with Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and image analysis. The determined pore size distribution permitted estimation of the maximal retention capacity of the natural sand as well as some low flow zones. Altogether, these results stress the key role of the pore space geometry of the sand in controlling silica colloids deposition under hydro-geochemical conditions typical of sandy aquifers. Our results also showed originally that colloid

  8. Development and validation of a size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme for applications in aerosol transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petroff

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme is developed, which has been designed for inclusion in large-scale air quality and climate models, where the size distribution and fate of the atmospheric aerosol is of concern. The "resistance" structure is similar to what is proposed by Zhang et al. (2001, 2003, while a new "surface" deposition velocity (or surface resistance is derived by simplification of a one-dimensional aerosol transport model (Petroff et al., 2008b, 2009. Collection efficiencies are given for the 26 Land Use Categories that decribe the earth surface. Validation of this model with existing measurements is performed on desert, grass, coniferous forest and liquid water surfaces. A comparison of this model with measurements on snow and ice is also given. Even though a qualitative agreement is reached, further size-segegated measurements are needed in order to confirm the model accuracy on this surface. The present analytical model provides more accurate predictions of the aerosol deposition on these surfaces than previous models.

  9. Integrating batch marks and radio tags to estimate the size of a closed population with a movement model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Carl James; Cope, Scott; Fratton, Glenda

    2013-12-01

    Movement models require individually identifiable marks to estimate the movement rates among strata. But they are relatively expensive to apply and monitor. Batch marks can be readily applied, but individual animal movements cannot be identified. We describe a method to estimate population size in a stratified population when movement takes place among strata and animals are marked with a combination of batch and individually identifiable tags. A hierarchical model with Bayesian inference is developed that pools information across segments on the detection efficiency based on radio-tagged fish and also uses the movement of the radio-tagged fish to impute the movement of the batch-marked fish to provide estimates of the population size on a segment and river level. The batch marks provide important information to help estimate the movement rates, but contribute little to the overall estimate of the population size. In this case, the approximate equal catchability among strata in either sample obviates the need for stratification.

  10. Dynamic finite element modeling of the effects of size on the upper shelf energy of pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidener, S.E. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Kumar, A.S. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Oglesby, D.B. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Schubert, L.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hamilton, M.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rosinski, S.T. [Electric Power Research Inst., Inc. (EPRI), Charlotte, NC (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Dynamic finite element modeling (FEM) of the fracture behavior of fatigue-precracked Charpy specimens was performed to determine the effect of single variable changes in ligament size, width, span, and thickness on the upper shelf energy. A tensile fracture-strain based method for modeling crack initiation and propagation was used. It was found that the upper shelf energy of precracked specimens (USE{sub p}) is proportional to b{sup n}, where b is ligament size and n varies from about 1.6 for subsize to 1.9 for full size specimens. The USE{sub p} was found to be proportional to (width){sup 2.5}. The dependence on span was found to be non-linear. The dependence on thickness was found to be linear for all cases studied. Some of the data from the FEM analysis were compared with experimental data and were found to be in reasonable agreement. (orig.).

  11. Finite element modeling of wall-loss sizing in a steam generator tube using a pulsed eddy current probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbar, V. K.; Lepine, B.; Buck, J.; Underhill, P. R.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2015-03-01

    Inspection of steam generator (SG) tubes by conventional eddy current may, in general, involve analysis of indications from volumetric wall loss, cracks, fouling and support-plate degradation; however, it may be difficult to size or quantify effects from support-to-tube gap and tube tilt, especially in the presence of support plates. Pulsed eddy current (PEC) technology is being developed to investigate such complex tube and flaw geometries. The present work employs finite element modeling to investigate the effectiveness of PEC in identifying and sizing the outer diameter wall-loss in SG tubes. The signals analyzed using a modified principal components analysis (PCA) method reveal the potential success of a PEC-PCA combination to produce scores that can be used to size the wall-loss in the presence of support plates. The modeling results are in good agreement with experimental observations.

  12. Effect of tail size reductions on longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a three surface F-15 model with nonaxisymmetric nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinelli, Mark C.; Carson, George T., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of horizontal and vertical tail size reductions on the longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics of a modified F-15 model with canards and 2-D convergent-divergent nozzles. Quantifying the drag decrease at low angles of attack produced by tail size reductions was the primary focus. The model was tested at Mach numbers of 0.40, 0.90, and 1.20 over an angle of attack of -2 degree to 10 degree. The nozzle exhaust flow was simulated using high pressure air at nozzle pressure ratios varying from 1.0 (jet off) to 7.5. Data were obtained on the baseline configuration with and without tails as well as with reduced horizontal and/or vertical tail sizes that were 75, 50, and 25 percent of the baseline tail areas.

  13. Evaluation of a global aerosol microphysics model against size-resolved particle statistics in the marine atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Spracklen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A statistical synthesis of marine aerosol measurements from experiments in four different oceans is used to evaluate a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP. We compare the model against observed size resolved particle concentrations, probability distributions, and the temporal persistence of different size particles. We attempt to explain the observed sub-micrometre size distributions in terms of sulfate and sea spray and quantify the possible contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous material to the number and mass distribution. The model predicts a bimodal size distribution that agrees well with observations as a grand average over all regions, but there are large regional differences. Notably, observed Aitken mode number concentrations are more than a factor 10 higher than in the model for the N Atlantic but a factor 7 lower than the model in the NW Pacific. We also find that modelled Aitken mode and accumulation mode geometric mean diameters are generally smaller in the model by 10–30%. Comparison with observed free tropospheric Aitken mode distributions suggests that the model underpredicts growth of these particles during descent to the marine boundary layer (MBL. Recent observations of a substantial organic component of free tropospheric aerosol could explain this discrepancy. We find that anthropogenic continental material makes a substantial contribution to N Atlantic MBL aerosol, with typically 60–90% of sulfate across the particle size range coming from anthropogenic sources, even if we analyse air that has spent an average of >120 h away from land. However, anthropogenic primary black carbon and organic carbon particles (at the emission size and quantity assumed here do not explain the large discrepancies in Aitken mode number. Several explanations for the discrepancy are suggested. The lack of lower atmospheric particle formation in the model may explain low N Atlantic particle concentrations. However, the

  14. Evaluation of a global aerosol microphysics model against size-resolved particle statistics in the marine atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Mann, G. W.; Manktelow, P.; Heintzenberg, J.

    2007-04-01

    A statistical synthesis of marine aerosol measurements from experiments in four different oceans is used to evaluate a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP). We compare the model against observed size resolved particle concentrations, probability distributions, and the temporal persistence of different size particles. We attempt to explain the observed sub-micrometre size distributions in terms of sulfate and sea spray and quantify the possible contributions of anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous material to the number and mass distribution. The model predicts a bimodal size distribution that agrees well with observations as a grand average over all regions, but there are large regional differences. Notably, observed Aitken mode number concentrations are more than a factor 10 higher than in the model for the N Atlantic but a factor 7 lower than the model in the NW Pacific. We also find that modelled Aitken mode and accumulation mode geometric mean diameters are generally smaller in the model by 10-30%. Comparison with observed free tropospheric Aitken mode distributions suggests that the model underpredicts growth of these particles during descent to the marine boundary layer (MBL). Recent observations of a substantial organic component of free tropospheric aerosol could explain this discrepancy. We find that anthropogenic continental material makes a substantial contribution to N Atlantic MBL aerosol, with typically 60-90% of sulfate across the particle size range coming from anthropogenic sources, even if we analyse air that has spent an average of >120 h away from land. However, anthropogenic primary black carbon and organic carbon particles (at the emission size and quantity assumed here) do not explain the large discrepancies in Aitken mode number. Several explanations for the discrepancy are suggested. The lack of lower atmospheric particle formation in the model may explain low N Atlantic particle concentrations. However, the observed and modelled

  15. Finite size scaling study of dynamical phase transitions in two dimensional models: ferromagnet, symmetric and non symmetric spin glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, A.U.; Derrida, B.

    1988-10-01

    We study the time evolution of two configurations submitted to the same thermal noise for several two dimensional models (Ising ferromagnet, symmetric spin glass, non symmetric spin glass). For all these models, we find a non zero critical temperature above which the two configurations always meet. Using finite size scaling ideas, we determine for these three models this dynamical phase transition and some of the critical exponents. For the ferromagnet, the transition T/sub c/ approx. = 2.25 coincides with the Curie temperature whereas for the two spin glass models +- J distribution of bonds) we obtain T/sub c/ approx. = 1.5-1.7.

  16. Semivarying coefficient models for capture-recapture data: colony size estimation for the little penguin Eudyptula minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoklosa, Jakub; Dann, Peter; Huggins, Richard

    2014-09-01

    To accommodate seasonal effects that change from year to year into models for the size of an open population we consider a time-varying coefficient model. We fit this model to a capture-recapture data set collected on the little penguin Eudyptula minor in south-eastern Australia over a 25 year period using Jolly-Seber type estimators and nonparametric P-spline techniques. The time-varying coefficient model identified strong changes in the seasonal pattern across the years which we further examined using functional data analysis techniques. To evaluate the methodology we also conducted several simulation studies that incorporate seasonal variation.

  17. A size-dependent model for beam-like MEMS driven by electrostatic and piezoelectric forces: A variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tenghao; Wang, Binglei; Zhou, Shenjie; Zhao, Moli

    2016-10-01

    A size-dependent model of a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) actuated by both electrostatic and piezoelectric forces is proposed based on the modified couple stress. The governing equation and boundary conditions are derived with the help of the Hamilton principle and solved numerically by employing the Galerkin method and Newton downhill method. A material length scale parameter (MLSP) is incorporated in the model to capture the size effect in microstructures. An excellent agreement is found between the results of the present model and the experimental data, providing the validity of this model. The results reveal that the introduction of the MLSP stiffens the system and increases the pull-in voltage. The size-effect is significant when the dimension of the beam is comparable to the MLSP but it becomes smaller as the beam size increases. Besides, the static characteristic of the micro-switch is studied. It is found that the piezoelectric material attached on the beam can reduce the pull-in voltage remarkably, which may guide the design of the micro-structure when the system is on the order of micron or submicron.

  18. Sample Sizes Required to Detect Interactions between Two Binary Fixed-Effects in a Mixed-Effects Linear Regression Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Andrew C; Heo, Moonseong

    2009-01-15

    Mixed-effects linear regression models have become more widely used for analysis of repeatedly measured outcomes in clinical trials over the past decade. There are formulae and tables for estimating sample sizes required to detect the main effects of treatment and the treatment by time interactions for those models. A formula is proposed to estimate the sample size required to detect an interaction between two binary variables in a factorial design with repeated measures of a continuous outcome. The formula is based, in part, on the fact that the variance of an interaction is fourfold that of the main effect. A simulation study examines the statistical power associated with the resulting sample sizes in a mixed-effects linear regression model with a random intercept. The simulation varies the magnitude (Δ) of the standardized main effects and interactions, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ρ ), and the number (k) of repeated measures within-subject. The results of the simulation study verify that the sample size required to detect a 2 × 2 interaction in a mixed-effects linear regression model is fourfold that to detect a main effect of the same magnitude.

  19. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  20. Comparative modeling of combined transport of water and graded-size molecules across the glomerular capillary wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mageed, Samir M; Mohamed, Ehab I

    2016-04-07

    Chronic kidney disease is a common and growing problem worldwide that necessitates recognition of individual risk and appropriate laboratory testing before its progression to end-stage renal failure, requiring dialysis or transplantation for survival. Clearance studies using various graded-size probe molecules established that the passage of molecules/proteins across the glomerular capillary barrier of mammalian kidneys is increasingly restricted as their size increase. Few mathematical models were developed to describe the dynamics of the size-selective functions of macromolecules across membranes and gelatins. In the present study, we compare the behavior of three mathematical descriptions for the Fiber Matrix theory, an Extended Fiber Matrix theory, and an Alternative Statistical Physics analysis to describe the size-selective function of the glomerular capillary barrier; using mainly its hemodynamic, morphometric and hydrodynamic variables; in two experimental rat models. The glomerular basement membrane was represented as a homogeneous three-dimensional network of fibers of uniform length (Lf), radius (Rf), total fractional solid volume of fibers (Vf) and characteristic Darcy permeability. The models were appropriate for simulating in vivo fractional clearance data of neutral Dextran and Ficoll macromolecules from two experimental rat models. We believe that the Lf, Rf and Vf best-fit numerical values may signify new insights for the diagnosis of human nephropathies.

  1. Finite-size effects for the gap in the excitation spectrum of the one-dimensional Hubbard model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colomé-Tatché, M.; Matveenko, S.I.; Shlyapnikov, G.V.

    2010-01-01

    We study finite-size effects for the gap of the quasiparticle excitation spectrum in the weakly interacting regime one-dimensional Hubbard model with on-site attraction. Two types of corrections to the result of the thermodynamic limit are obtained. Aside from a power law (conformal) correction due

  2. Finite-size scaling relations for a four-dimensional Ising model on Creutz cellular automatons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdan, Z.; Güzelsoy, E.

    2011-06-01

    The four-dimensional Ising model is simulated on Creutz cellular automatons using finite lattices with linear dimensions 4 ≤ L ≤ 8. The temperature variations and finite-size scaling plots of the specific heat and the Binder parameter verify the theoretically predicted expression near the infinite lattice critical temperature for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations. Approximate values for the critical temperature of the infinite lattice of Tc(∞) = 6.6965(35), 6.6961(30), 6.6960(12), 6.6800(3), 6.6801(2), 6.6802(1) and 6.6925(22) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6921(22) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6909(2) (without the logarithmic factor), 6.6822(13) (with the logarithmic factor), 6.6819(11) (with the logarithmic factor), and 6.6808(8) (with the logarithmic factor) are obtained from the intersection points of the specific heat curves, the Binder parameter curves, and straight line fits of specific heat maxima for 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the results, 6.6802(1) and 6.6808(8), are in very good agreement with the results of a series expansion of Tc(∞), 6.6817(15) and 6.6802(2), the dynamic Monte Carlo value Tc(∞) = 6.6803(1), the cluster Monte Carlo value Tc(∞) = 6.680(1), and the Monte Carlo value using the Metropolis-Wolff cluster algorithm Tc(∞) = 6.6802632 ± 5 . 10-5. The average values calculated for the critical exponent of the specific heat are α =- 0.0402(15), - 0.0393(12), - 0.0391(11) with 7, 14, and 21 independent simulations, respectively. As the number of independent simulations increases, the result, α =- 0.0391(11), agrees with the series expansions result, α =- 0.12 ± 0.03 and the Monte Carlo result using the Metropolis-Wolff cluster algorithm, α ≥ 0 ± 0.04. However, α =- 0.0391(11) is inconsistent with the renormalization group prediction of α = 0.

  3. Herd size and sero-prevalence of Salmonella enterica in Danish swine herds: a random-effects model for register data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Bendix; Christensen, Jette

    1998-01-01

    The association between herd size and sero-prevalence of Salmonella was assessed in a random-effects model with herd size, county and date of slaughter as fixed effects. A total of 510915 meat-juice samples from 14593 herds located in 13 counties in Denmark was included in the study. A random......-effects model was developed from separate models for smaller strata of data from herds with approximately equal sizes. The combined model was analysed and the results reported. Herd size was positively associated with the sere-prevalence of Salmonella enterica, but the size of the association was biologically...

  4. Effect of dichloracetate on infarct size in a primate model of focal cerebral ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandy M

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis is a major contributing factor towards spread of the ischaemic focus in the brain. Drugs that increase pyruvate dehydrogenase activity could decrease the formation of lactic acidosis. The sodium salt of dichloracetic acid (DCA has been found to be effective in reducing lactate. This study was undertaken to study the efficacy of DCA in reducing infarct size in experimental focal ischaemia in monkeys. Macaca radiata monkeys in the treatment group were given 35 mg per kilogram of dichloracetate intravenously immediately before occluding and interrupting the middle cerebral artery, and the control group was given saline as placebo under similar conditions. Mean infarct size expressed as a percentage of the size of the hemisphere in all the three brain slices was 35.38 in the control group as against l2.06 in the treated group (p=0. 0008.

  5. Size reduction of the transfer matrix of two-dimensional Ising and Potts models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaemi

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available  A new algebraic method is developed to reduce the size of the transfer matrix of Ising and three-state Potts ferromagnets on strips of width r sites of square and triangular lattices. This size reduction has been set up in such a way that the maximum eigenvalues of both the reduced and the original transfer matrices became exactly the same. In this method we write the original transfer matrix in a special blocked form in such a way that the sums of row elements of a block of the original transfer matrix be the same. The reduced matrix is obtained by replacing each block of the original transfer matrix with the sum of the elements of one of its rows. Our method results in significant matrix size reduction which is a crucial factor in determining the maximum eigenvalue.

  6. On The Robustness of z=0-1 Galaxy Size Measurements Through Model and Non-Parametric Fits

    CERN Document Server

    Mosleh, Moein; Franx, Marijn

    2013-01-01

    We present the size-stellar mass relations of nearby (z=0.01-0.02) SDSS galaxies, for samples selected by color, morphology, Sersic index n, and specific star formation rate. Several commonly-employed size measurement techniques are used, including single Sersic fits, two-component Sersic models and a non-parametric method. Through simple simulations we show that the non-parametric and two-component Sersic methods provide the most robust effective radius measurements, while those based on single Sersic profiles are often overestimates, especially for massive red/early-type galaxies. Using our robust sizes, we show that for all sub-samples, the mass-size relations are shallow at low stellar masses and steepen above ~3-4 x 10^{10}\\Msun. The mass-size relations for galaxies classified as late-type, low-n, and star-forming are consistent with each other, while blue galaxies follow a somewhat steeper relation. The mass-size relations of early-type, high-n, red, and quiescent galaxies all agree with each other but ...

  7. Surface chemistry and size influence the release of model therapeutic nanoparticles from poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Jeerage, Kavita M., E-mail: jeerage@boulder.nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division, Material Measurement Laboratory (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Nanoparticles have emerged as promising therapeutic and diagnostic tools, due to their unique physicochemical properties. The specific core and surface chemistries, as well as nanoparticle size, play critical roles in particle transport and interaction with biological tissue. Localized delivery of therapeutics from hydrogels is well established, but these systems generally release molecules with hydrodynamic radii less than {approx}5 nm. Here, model nanoparticles with biologically relevant surface chemistries and diameters between 10 and 35 nm are analyzed for their release from well-characterized hydrogels. Functionalized gold nanoparticles or quantum dots were encapsulated in three-dimensional poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with varying mesh size. Nanoparticle size, surface chemistry, and hydrogel mesh size all influenced the release of particles from the hydrogel matrix. Size influenced nanoparticle release as expected, with larger particles releasing at a slower rate. However, citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles were not released from hydrogels. Negatively charged carboxyl or positively charged amine-functionalized quantum dots were released from hydrogels at slower rates than neutrally charged PEGylated nanoparticles of similar size. Transmission electron microscopy images of gold nanoparticles embedded within hydrogel sections demonstrated uniform particle distribution and negligible aggregation, independent of surface chemistry. The nanoparticle-hydrogel interactions observed in this work will aid in the development of localized nanoparticle delivery systems.

  8. Surface chemistry and size influence the release of model therapeutic nanoparticles from poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles have emerged as promising therapeutic and diagnostic tools, due to their unique physicochemical properties. The specific core and surface chemistries, as well as nanoparticle size, play critical roles in particle transport and interaction with biological tissue. Localized delivery of therapeutics from hydrogels is well established, but these systems generally release molecules with hydrodynamic radii less than 5 nm. Here, model nanoparticles with biologically relevant surface chemistries and diameters between 10 and 35 nm are analyzed for their release from well-characterized hydrogels. Functionalized gold nanoparticles or quantum dots were encapsulated in three-dimensional poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with varying mesh size. Nanoparticle size, surface chemistry, and hydrogel mesh size all influenced the release of particles from the hydrogel matrix. Size influenced nanoparticle release as expected, with larger particles releasing at a slower rate. However, citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles were not released from hydrogels. Negatively charged carboxyl or positively charged amine-functionalized quantum dots were released from hydrogels at slower rates than neutrally charged PEGylated nanoparticles of similar size. Transmission electron microscopy images of gold nanoparticles embedded within hydrogel sections demonstrated uniform particle distribution and negligible aggregation, independent of surface chemistry. The nanoparticle-hydrogel interactions observed in this work will aid in the development of localized nanoparticle delivery systems.

  9. Constitutive modeling of rate dependence and microinertia effects in porous-plastic materials with multi-sized voids (MSVs)

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxing

    2012-11-27

    Micro-voids of varying sizes exist in most metals and alloys. Both experiments and numerical studies have demonstrated the critical influence of initial void sizes on void growth. The classical Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model summarizes the influence of voids with a single parameter, namely the void-volume fraction, excluding any possible effects of the void-size distribution. We extend our newly proposed model including the multi-sized void (MSV) effect and the void-interaction effect for the capability of working for both moderate and high loading rate cases, where either rate dependence or microinertia becomes considerable or even dominant. Parametric studies show that the MSV-related competitive mechanism among void growth leads to the dependence of the void growth rate on void size, which directly influences the void\\'s contribution to the total energy composition. We finally show that the stress-strain constitutive behavior is also affected by this MSV-related competitive mechanism. The stabilizing effect due to rate sensitivity and microinertia is emphasized. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Constitutive modeling of rate dependence and microinertia effects in porous-plastic materials with multi-sized voids (MSVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. X.; El Sayed, T.

    2013-01-01

    Micro-voids of varying sizes exist in most metals and alloys. Both experiments and numerical studies have demonstrated the critical influence of initial void sizes on void growth. The classical Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model summarizes the influence of voids with a single parameter, namely the void-volume fraction, excluding any possible effects of the void-size distribution. We extend our newly proposed model including the multi-sized void (MSV) effect and the void-interaction effect for the capability of working for both moderate and high loading rate cases, where either rate dependence or microinertia becomes considerable or even dominant. Parametric studies show that the MSV-related competitive mechanism among void growth leads to the dependence of the void growth rate on void size, which directly influences the void's contribution to the total energy composition. We finally show that the stress-strain constitutive behavior is also affected by this MSV-related competitive mechanism. The stabilizing effect due to rate sensitivity and microinertia is emphasized.

  11. A Hot Spots Ignition Probability Model for Low-Velocity Impacted Explosive Particles Based on the Particle Size and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fu Guo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle size and distribution play an important role in ignition. The size and distribution of the cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX particles were investigated by Laser Particle Size Analyzer Malvern MS2000 before experiment and calculation. The mean size of particles is 161 μm. Minimum and maximum sizes are 80 μm and 263 μm, respectively. The distribution function is like a quadratic function. Based on the distribution of micron scale explosive particles, a microscopic model is established to describe the process of ignition of HMX particles under drop weight. Both temperature of contact zones and ignition probability of powder explosive can be predicted. The calculated results show that the temperature of the contact zones between the particles and the drop weight surface increases faster and higher than that of the contact zones between two neighboring particles. For HMX particles, with all other conditions being kept constant, if the drop height is less than 0.1 m, ignition probability will be close to 0. When the drop heights are 0.2 m and 0.3 m, the ignition probability is 0.27 and 0.64, respectively, whereas when the drop height is more than 0.4 m, ignition probability will be close to 0.82. In comparison with experimental results, the two curves are reasonably close to each other, which indicates our model has a certain degree of rationality.

  12. A new model for sizing of stand-alone photovoltaic systems using neural network adaptive frame wavelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellit, A. [University Center of Medea, Institute of Engineering Sciences, Ain Dahab (Algeria); Benghanem, M. [University of Sciences Technology Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Faculty of ElectricalEngineering, El-Alia, Algiers (Algeria); Hadj Arab, A. [Development Center of Renewable Energy (CDER), Bouzareah, Algiers (Algeria); Guessoum, A. [Ministry for the Higher Education and Scientific Research, Algiers (Algeria)

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work is to train the MLP-IIR model to learn the estimation and modeling of the optimal sizing coefficients of stand-alone PV system with a minimum of input data. Once trained, the MLP-IIR estimates these coefficients faster. The validation of the model was performed with unknown sizing coefficient, which the network has not seen before. The ability of the network to make acceptable estimations even in an unusual day is an advantage of the present method. It should be stressed that the training of the network required about 1 minute on a Pentium III 800MHz machine. The estimation with correlation coefficient of 98 % was obtained. This accuracy is well within the acceptable level used by design engineers. The traditional methods of sizing PV system (empirical, analytical, numerical and hybrid) allows to estimate the sizing of PV system for one given site, and requires the availability of several parameters such as the daily solar radiation data, altitude, longitude, the load, the characteristics of stand alone PV system, the inclination of the panels and to take very much computing time for estimation of optimal coefficients. On the other hand, the model that we developed allows estimating the PV-array area and the storage capacity from a minimum input data (altitude, longitude) based on the optimal sizing coefficients and does not take much time for simulation. The advantage of this model is to estimate of the PV-array area and the storage capacity in any site in Algeria particularly in isolated sites, where the global solar radiation data is not always available. Also, this presents a good result compared between other neural network architecture. The results have been obtained for Algerian meteorological data, but the methodology can be applied to any geographical area. (orig.)

  13. Improving Genetic Evaluation of Litter Size Using a Single-step Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Xiangyu; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Ostersen, Tage

    A recently developed single-step method allows genetic evaluation based on information from phenotypes, pedigree and markers simultaneously. This paper compared reliabilities of predicted breeding values obtained from single-step method and the traditional pedigree-based method for two litter size...... traits, total number of piglets born (TNB), and litter size at five days after birth (Ls 5) in Danish Landrace and Yorkshire pigs. The results showed that the single-step method combining phenotypic and genotypic information provided more accurate predictions than the pedigree-based method, not only...

  14. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Tunable Size Synthesis and Analysis in Terms of the Core-Shell Structure and Mixed Coercive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, P. T.; Oanh, V. T. K.; Lam, T. D.; Phuc, N. X.; Tung, L. D.; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.; Manh, D. H.

    2017-04-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are currently a very active research field. To date, a comprehensive study of iron oxide NPs is still lacking not only on the size dependence of structural phases but also in the use of an appropriate model. Herein, we report on a systematic study of the structural and magnetic properties of iron oxide NPs prepared by a co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the NPs have an inverse spinel structure of iron oxide phase (Fe3O4) with average crystallite sizes ( D XRD) of 6-19 nm, while grain sizes ( D TEM) are of 7-23 nm. In addition, the larger the particle size, the closer the experimental lattice constant value is to that of the magnetite structure. Magnetic field-dependent magnetization data and analysis show that the effective anisotropy constants of the Fe3O4 NPs are about five times larger than that of their bulk counterpart. Particle size ( D) dependence of the magnetization and the non-saturating behavior observed in applied fields up to 50 kOe are discussed using the core-shell structure model. We find that with decreasing D, while the calculated thickness of the shell of disordered spins ( t ˜ 0.3 nm) remains almost unchanged, the specific surface areas S a increases significantly, thus reducing the magnetization of the NPs. We also probe the coercivity of the NPs by using the mixed coercive Kneller and Luborsky model. The calculated results indicate that the coercivity rises monotonously with the particle size, and are well matched with the experimental ones.

  15. Effects of copepod size on fish growth: A model based on data for North Sea sandeel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deurs, Mikael van; Jørgensen, C.; Fiksen, Ø.

    2015-01-01

    mechanistic models from relevant data: (1) a model of the bioenergetics and stomach filling/evacuation dynamics, and (2) a Holling type II functional response model that encompasses visual range from basic principles. The model predicts that going from a situation where large Calanus copepods (2 mm) dominate...

  16. Theoretical Models of Light Scattering Applied in Sizing Particles in Coal Water Slurry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王仁哲; 张荣曾; 徐志强

    2004-01-01

    Advantges and disadvantage of Mie scattering model and Fraunhofer diffraction model are discussed. The result shows that 1) the Fraunhofer diffraction model is simple in design and fast in operation, which is quite suitable for on-line control and 2) the intensity and energy distribution of diffracted light of both the Mie scattering model and the Fraunhofer theoretical model are compared and researched. Feasibility of using the Fraunhofer diffraction model to replace the Mie scattering model in measuring particles in coal water slurry is demonstrated.

  17. Early outcome in renal transplantation from large donors to small and size-matched recipients - a porcine experimental model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravlo, Kristian; Chhoden, Tashi; Søndergaard, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Kidney transplantation from a large donor to a small recipient, as in pediatric transplantation, is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis and DGF. We established a porcine model for renal transplantation from an adult donor to a small or size-matched recipient with a high risk of DGF...... and studied GFR, RPP using MRI, and markers of kidney injury within 10 h after transplantation. After induction of BD, kidneys were removed from ∼63-kg donors and kept in cold storage for ∼22 h until transplanted into small (∼15 kg, n = 8) or size-matched (n = 8) recipients. A reduction in GFR was observed...

  18. Visualizing multifactorial and multi-attribute effect sizes in linear mixed models with a view towards sensometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and straightforward idea is to interpret effects relative to the residual error and to choose the proper effect size measure. For multi-attribute bar plots of F-statistics this amounts, in balanced settings, to a simple transformation of the bar heights to get them transformed into depicting what can be seen...... better comparable for factors with differences in number of levels. For mixed models, where in general the relevant error terms for the fixed effects are not the pure residual error, it is suggested to base the d-prime-like interpretation on the residual error. The methods are illustrated...... mechanisms inherently challenging effect size measure estimates in ANOVA settings....

  19. Finite-size scaling of the magnetization probability density for the critical Ising model in slab geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Cardozo, David; Holdsworth, Peter C. W.

    2016-04-01

    The magnetization probability density in d  =  2 and 3 dimensional Ising models in slab geometry of volume L\\paralleld-1× {{L}\\bot} is computed through Monte-Carlo simulation at the critical temperature and zero magnetic field. The finite-size scaling of this distribution and its dependence on the system aspect-ratio ρ =\\frac{{{L}\\bot}}{{{L}\\parallel}} and boundary conditions are discussed. In the limiting case ρ \\to 0 of a macroscopically large slab ({{L}\\parallel}\\gg {{L}\\bot} ) the distribution is found to scale as a Gaussian function for all tested system sizes and boundary conditions.

  20. Sizing of photovoltaic system coupled with hydrogen/oxygen storage based on the ORIENTE model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darras, C.; Sailler, S.; Thibault, C.; Muselli, M.; Poggi, P. [University of Corsica, UMR CNRS SPE 6134, Route des Sanguinaires, F-20000 Ajaccio (France); Hoguet, J.C.; Melscoet, S. [HELION Hydrogen Power, Domaine du Petit Arbois - Batiment Jules Verne, BP 71, 13545 Aix en Provence (France); Pinton, E.; Grehant, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/LITEN), 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gailly, F.; Turpin, C.; Astier, S.; Fontes, G. [Universite de Toulouse, INP, UPS, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), ENSEEIHT, 2 rue Charles Camichel, BP 7122, F-31071 Toulouse Cedex 7 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31071 Toulouse (France)

    2010-04-15

    PEPITE is a project funded by the French ANR PAN-H research program. This project concerns, among various other tasks, a demonstration of a weather station electricity supply with help of a PV/FC/EL hybrid system located at the CEA center of Cadarache (France). To design a relevant sizing for this demonstration system, a complete sizing tool has been developed via a new numerical optimizing code named ORIENTE. It uses Matlab software based on sequential running time. The demonstration system will be composed of a PV array, a PEM fuel cell system and a PEM electrolyzer, batteries, storage tanks for H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, as well as associated converters. This paper presents the obtained optimal sizing curves for the hybrid system (P{sub pv} [kWp], Q{sub H{sub 2}}{sub max} [kg]) by taking into account the predefined constant load (6.5 kW) functioning 24/24 hours and the system energy balance for a loss-of-load probability LLP = 0. These results give the sizes of each subsystem and will make possible to build the best energy flows control mode. (author)

  1. A model for the impact of the nanostructure size on its gas sensing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alenezi, Mohammad R.; Alzanki, T.H.; Almeshal, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The size of a metal oxide nanostructure plays a key role in its performance as a gas sensor. ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies including nanowires at different diameters and nanodisks at different thicknesses were synthesized hydrothermally. Gas sensors based on individual nanostruct...

  2. The Evolution of the Galaxy Sizes in the NTT Deep Field a Comparison with CDM Models

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, F; Menci, N; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A

    1999-01-01

    The sizes of the field galaxies with I<25 have been measured in the NTT Deep Field. Intrinsic sizes have been obtained after deconvolution of the PSF with a multigaussian method. The reliability of the method has been tested using both simulated data and HST observations of the same field. The distribution of the half light radii is peaked at r_{hl} 0.3 arcsec, in good agreement with that derived from HST images at the same magnitude. An approximate morphological classification has been obtained using the asymmetry and concentration parameters. The intrinsic sizes of the galaxies are shown as a function of their redshifts and absolute magnitudes using photometric redshifts derived from the multicolor catalog. While the brighter galaxies with morphological parameters typical of the normal spirals show a flat distribution in the range r_{d}=1-6 kpc, the fainter population at 0.4sizes. To explore the significance of this behaviour, an analytical rendition of the standard CDM mo...

  3. Systematic Modelling and Crystal Size Distribution Control for Batch Crystallization Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Samad, Noor Asma Fazli; Singh, Ravendra; Sin, Gürkan

    Crystallization processes form an important class of separation methods that are frequently used in the chemical, the pharmaceutical and the food industry. The specifications of the crystal product are usually given in terms of crystal size, shape and purity. In order to predict the desired cryst...

  4. Modeling grain-size dependent bias in estimating forest area: a regional application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daolan Zheng; Linda S. Heath; Mark J. Ducey

    2008-01-01

    A better understanding of scaling-up effects on estimating important landscape characteristics (e.g. forest percentage) is critical for improving ecological applications over large areas. This study illustrated effects of changing grain sizes on regional forest estimates in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan of the USA using 30-m land-cover maps (1992 and 2001)...

  5. Multivariate models for prediction of rheological characteristics of filamentous fermentation broth from the size distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nanna; Stocks, S.; Gernaey, Krist

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to demonstrate that principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) can be used to extract information from particle size distribution data and predict rheological properties. Samples from commercially relevant Aspergillus oryzae...

  6. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  7. The Effect of Small Sample Size on Measurement Equivalence of Psychometric Questionnaires in MIMIC Model: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Jamali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating measurement equivalence (also known as differential item functioning (DIF is an important part of the process of validating psychometric questionnaires. This study aimed at evaluating the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC model for DIF detection when latent construct distribution is nonnormal and the focal group sample size is small. In this simulation-based study, Type I error rates and power of MIMIC model for detecting uniform-DIF were investigated under different combinations of reference to focal group sample size ratio, magnitude of the uniform-DIF effect, scale length, the number of response categories, and latent trait distribution. Moderate and high skewness in the latent trait distribution led to a decrease of 0.33% and 0.47% power of MIMIC model for detecting uniform-DIF, respectively. The findings indicated that, by increasing the scale length, the number of response categories and magnitude DIF improved the power of MIMIC model, by 3.47%, 4.83%, and 20.35%, respectively; it also decreased Type I error of MIMIC approach by 2.81%, 5.66%, and 0.04%, respectively. This study revealed that power of MIMIC model was at an acceptable level when latent trait distributions were skewed. However, empirical Type I error rate was slightly greater than nominal significance level. Consequently, the MIMIC was recommended for detection of uniform-DIF when latent construct distribution is nonnormal and the focal group sample size is small.

  8. Development and validation of a size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme for application in aerosol transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petroff

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme is developed for inclusion in large-scale air quality and climate models where the size distribution and fate of atmospheric aerosols is of concern. The "resistance" structure is similar to what is proposed by Zhang et al. (2001, while a new "surface" deposition velocity (or surface resistance is derived by simplification of a one-dimensional aerosol transport model (Petroff et al., 2008b, 2009. Compared to Zhang et al.'s model, the present model accounts for the leaf size, shape and area index as well as the height of the vegetation canopy. Consequently, it is more sensitive to the change of land covers, particularly in the accumulation mode (0.1–1 micron. A drift velocity is included to account for the phoretic effects related to temperature and humidity gradients close to liquid and solid water surfaces. An extended comparison of this model with experimental evidence is performed over typical land covers such as bare ground, grass, coniferous forest, liquid and solid water surfaces and highlights its adequate prediction. The predictions of the present model differ from Zhang et al.'s model in the fine mode, where the latter tends to over-estimate in a significant way the particle deposition, as measured by various investigators or predicted by the present model. The present development is thought to be useful to modellers of the atmospheric aerosol who need an adequate parameterization of aerosol dry removal to the earth surface, described here by 26 land covers. An open source code is available in Fortran90.

  9. Fitting state-space integral projection models to size-structured time series data to estimate unknown parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J Wilson; Nickols, Kerry J; Malone, Daniel; Carr, Mark H; Starr, Richard M; Cordoleani, Flora; Baskett, Marissa L; Hastings, Alan; Botsford, Louis W

    2016-12-01

    Integral projection models (IPMs) have a number of advantages over matrix-model approaches for analyzing size-structured population dynamics, because the latter require parameter estimates for each age or stage transition. However, IPMs still require appropriate data. Typically they are parameterized using individual-scale relationships between body size and demographic rates, but these are not always available. We present an alternative approach for estimating demographic parameters from time series of size-structured survey data using a Bayesian state-space IPM (SSIPM). By fitting an IPM in a state-space framework, we estimate unknown parameters and explicitly account for process and measurement error in a dataset to estimate the underlying process model dynamics. We tested our method by fitting SSIPMs to simulated data; the model fit the simulated size distributions well and estimated unknown demographic parameters accurately. We then illustrated our method using nine years of annual surveys of the density and size distribution of two fish species (blue rockfish, Sebastes mystinus, and gopher rockfish, S. carnatus) at seven kelp forest sites in California. The SSIPM produced reasonable fits to the data, and estimated fishing rates for both species that were higher than our Bayesian prior estimates based on coast-wide stock assessment estimates of harvest. That improvement reinforces the value of being able to estimate demographic parameters from local-scale monitoring data. We highlight a number of key decision points in SSIPM development (e.g., open vs. closed demography, number of particles in the state-space filter) so that users can apply the method to their own datasets. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  10. Zooplankton are not fish: improving zooplankton realism in size-spectrum models mediates energy transfer in food webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan F Heneghan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for an equal distribution of biomass from bacteria to whales has led to development of size-spectrum models that represent the dynamics of the marine ecosystem using size rather than species identity. Recent advances have improved the realism of the fish component of the size-spectrum, but these often assume that small fish feed on an aggregated plankton size-spectrum, without any explicit representation of zooplankton dynamics. In these models, small zooplankton are grouped with phytoplankton as a resource for larval fish, and large zooplankton are parameterized as small fish. Here we investigate the impact of resolving zooplankton and their feeding traits in a dynamic size-spectrum model. First, we compare a base model, where zooplankton are parameterized as smaller fish, to a model that includes zooplankton-specific feeding parameters. Second, we evaluate how the parameterization of zooplankton feeding characteristics, specifically the predator-prey mass ratio (PPMR, assimilation efficiency and feeding kernel width, affects the productivity and stability of the fish community. Finally, we compare how feeding characteristics of different zooplankton functional groups mediate increases in primary production and fishing pressure. Incorporating zooplankton-specific feeding parameters increased productivity of the fish community, but also changed the dynamics of the entire system from a stable to an oscillating steady-state. The inclusion of zooplankton feeding characteristics mediated a trade-off between the productivity and resilience of the fish community, and its stability. Fish communities with increased productivity and lower stability were supported by zooplankton with a larger PPMR and a narrower feeding kernel – specialized herbivores. In contrast, fish communities that were stable had lower productivity, and were supported by zooplankton with a lower PPMR and a wider feeding kernel – generalist carnivores. Herbivorous

  11. Finite size dependence of scaling functions of the three dimensional O(4) model in an external field

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, J

    2014-01-01

    We calculate universal finite size scaling functions for the order parameter and the longitudinal susceptibility of the three-dimensional O(4) model. The phase transition of this model is supposed to be in the same universality class as the chiral transition of two-flavor QCD. The scaling functions serve as a testing device for QCD simulations on small lattices, where, for example, pseudocritical temperatures are difficult to determine. In addition, we have improved the infinite volume limit parametrization of the scaling functions by using newly generated high statistics data for the 3d O(4) model in the high temperature region on an L=120 lattice.

  12. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Zhang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are.

    The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation.

    The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas. Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance

  13. Multi products single machine economic production quantity model with multiple batch size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Allah Taleizadeh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a multi products single machine economic order quantity model with discrete delivery is developed. A unique cycle length is considered for all produced items with an assumption that all products are manufactured on a single machine with a limited capacity. The proposed model considers different items such as production, setup, holding, and transportation costs. The resulted model is formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear programming model. Harmony search algorithm, extended cutting plane and particle swarm optimization methods are used to solve the proposed model. Two numerical examples are used to analyze and to evaluate the performance of the proposed model.

  14. Incorporation of the Pore Size Variation to Modeling of the Elastic Behavior of Metallic Open-Cell Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćwieka K.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we present the approach for modeling of the elastic behavior of open-cell metallic foams concerning non-uniform pore size distribution. This approach combines design of foam structures and numerical simulations of compression tests using finite element method (FEM. In the design stage, Laguerre-Voronoi tessellations (LVT were performed on several sets of packed spheres with defined variation of radii, bringing about a set of foam structures with porosity ranging from 74 to 98% and different pore size variation quantified by the coefficient of pore volume variation, CV(V, from 0.5 to 2.1. Each structure was numerically subjected to uni-axial compression test along three directions within the elastic region. Basing on the numerical response, the effective Young’s modulus, Eeff, was calculated for each structure. It is shown that the Eeff is not only dependent on the porosity but also on the pore size variation.

  15. Interplay of Natural Organic Matter with Flow Rate and Particle Size on Colloid Transport: Experimentation, Visualization, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyao; Zhang, Yimeng; Chen, Fangmin; Yang, Yuesuo

    2015-11-17

    The investigation on factors that affect the impact of natural organic matter (NOM) on colloid transport in complex hydraulic flow systems remains incomplete. Using our previously established approach, the interplay of flow rate and particle size on the NOM effect was quantified, using flow rates of 1 and 2 mL/min and particle sizes of 50 and 200 nm to represent small nanoparticles (1-100 nm) and large non-nano-microspheres (100-1000 nm) in the low-flow groundwater environment. Latex particles, Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA), and iron oxide-coated sand were used as model particles, NOM, and the aquifer medium, respectively. The quantitative results show NOM blocked more sites for large particles at a high flow rate: 1 μg of SRHA blocked 5.95 × 10(9) microsphere deposition sites at 2 mL/min but only 7.38 × 10(8) nanoparticle deposition sites at 1 mL/min. The particle size effect dominated over the flow rate, and the overall effect of the two is antagonistic. Granule-scale visualization of the particle packing on the NOM-presented sand surface corroborates the quantification results, revealing a more dispersed status of large particles at a high flow rate. We interpret this phenomenon as a polydispersivity effect resulting from the differential size of the particles and NOM: high flow and a high particle size enlarge the ratio of particle-blocked to NOM-blocked areas and thus the NOM blockage. To our knowledge, this is the first model-assisted quantification on the interplay of NOM, flow rate, and particle size on colloid transport. These findings are significant for nanorisk assessment and nanoremediation practices.

  16. Population Balance Modeling of Polydispersed Bubbly Flow in Continuous-Casting Using Multiple-Size-Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongqiu; Li, Linmin; Qi, Fengsheng; Li, Baokuan; Jiang, Maofa; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka

    2015-02-01

    A population balance model based on the multiple-size-group (MUSIG) approach has been developed to investigate the polydispersed bubbly flow inside the slab continuous-casting mold and bubble behavior including volume fraction, breakup, coalescence, and size distribution. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach is used to describe the equations of motion of the two-phase flow. All the non-drag forces (lift force, virtual mass force, wall lubrication force, and turbulent dispersion force) and drag force are incorporated in this model. Sato and Sekiguchi model is used to account for the bubble-induced turbulence. Luo and Svendsen model and Prince and Blanch model are used to describe the bubbles breakup and coalescence behavior, respectively. A 1/4th water model of the slab continuous-casting mold was applied to investigate the distribution and size of bubbles by injecting air through a circumferential inlet chamber which was made of the specially-coated samples of mullite porous brick, which is used for the actual upper nozzle. Against experimental data, numerical results showed good agreement for the gas volume fraction and local bubble Sauter mean diameter. The bubble Sauter mean diameter in the upper recirculation zone decreases with increasing water flow rate and increases with increasing gas flow rate. The distribution of bubble Sauter mean diameter along the width direction of the upper mold increases first, and then gradually decreases from the SEN to the narrow wall. Close agreements between the predictions and measurements demonstrate the capability of the MUSIG model in modeling bubbly flow inside the continuous-casting mold.

  17. Steady-state numerical modeling of size effects in micron scale wire drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Kristian Jørgensen; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2017-01-01

    Wire drawing processes at the micron scale have received increased interest as micro wires are increasingly required in electrical components. It is well-established that size effects due to large strain gradient effects play an important role at this scale and the present study aims to quantify...... these effects for the wire drawing process. Focus will be on investigating the impact of size effects on the most favourable tool geometry (in terms of minimizing the drawing force) for various conditions between the wire/tool interface. The numerical analysis is based on a steady-state framework that enables...... convergence without dealing with the transient regime, but still fully accounts for the history dependence as-well as the elastic unloading. Thus, it forms the basis for a comprehensive parameter study. During the deformation process in wire drawing, large plastic strain gradients evolve in the contact region...

  18. Modeling fractal structure of city-size distributions using correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    Zipf's law is one the most conspicuous empirical facts for cities, however, there is no convincing explanation for the scaling relation between rank and size and its scaling exponent. Based on the idea from general fractals and scaling, this paper proposes a dual competition hypothesis of city develop to explain the value intervals and the special value, 1, of the power exponent. Zipf's law and Pareto's law can be mathematically transformed into one another. Based on the Pareto distribution, a frequency correlation function can be constructed. By scaling analysis and multifractals spectrum, the parameter interval of Pareto exponent is derived as (0.5, 1]; Based on the Zipf distribution, a size correlation function can be built, and it is opposite to the first one. By the second correlation function and multifractals notion, the Pareto exponent interval is derived as [1, 2). Thus the process of urban evolution falls into two effects: one is Pareto effect indicating city number increase (external complexity), a...

  19. The model-size effect on traditional and modified tests of covariance structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Anne; Reinecke, Sven; Herzog, W.

    2007-01-01

    According to Kenny and McCoach (2003), chi-square tests of structural equation models produce inflated Type I error rates when the degrees of freedom increase. So far, the amount of this bias in large models has not been quantified. In a Monte Carlo study of confirmatory factor models with a range o

  20. Hierarchical modelling of temperature and habitat size effects on population dynamics of North Atlantic cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantzouni, Irene; Sørensen, Helle; O'Hara, Robert B.;

    2010-01-01

    and Beverton and Holt stock–recruitment (SR) models were extended by applying hierarchical methods, mixed-effects models, and Bayesian inference to incorporate the influence of these ecosystem factors on model parameters representing cod maximum reproductive rate and carrying capacity. We identified...