WorldWideScience

Sample records for mode low-frequency waves

  1. Low frequency wave modes of liquid-filled flexible tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yuan-Fang; Peng, Tzu-Huan

    2015-09-01

    Many canals in the human body are liquid-filled thin wall flexible tubes. In general the P-wave and S-wave velocities of tube material are much slower than the sound velocity of the liquid. It is interested to study the dynamic deformation of the wall caused by pressure fluctuation of liquid. In the low frequency range, the liquid pressure is essentially axial symmetric. Therefore, axial symmetric wave propagation modes are investigated. The calculated spectrum shows there are two modes with zero frequency limit. Phase velocities of these two modes are much smaller than the sound velocity of the liquid. They are also slower than the P-wave velocity of the tube material. At very low wave number, radial displacements of both liquid particles and tube are very small compared to their axial counter parts. As the frequency goes higher, boundary waves are observed.

  2. Identification of low-frequency kinetic wave modes in the Earth's ion foreshock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Blanco-Cano

    Full Text Available In this work we use ion and magnetic field data from the AMPTE-UKS mission to study the characteristics of low frequencyr « Ωp waves observed upstream of the Earth's bow shock. We test the application of various plasma-field correlations and magnetic ratios derived from linear Vlasov theory to identify the modes in this region. We evaluate (for a parameter space consistent with the ion foreshock the Alfvén ratio, the parallel compressibility, the cross-helicity, the noncoplanar ratio, the magnetic compression and the polarization for the two kinetic instabilities that can be generated in the foreshock by the interaction of hot diffuse ions with the solar wind: the left-hand resonant and the right-hand resonant ion beam instabilities. Comparison of these quantities with the observed plasma-field correlations and various magnetic properties of the waves observed during 10 intervals on 30 October 1984, where the waves are associated with diffuse ions, allows us to identify regions with Alfvénic waves and regions where the predominant mode is the right-hand resonant instability. In all the cases the waves are transverse, propagating at angles ≤ 33° and are elliptically polarized. Our results suggest that while the observed Alfvén waves are generated locally by hot diffuse ions, the right-handed waves may result from the superposition of waves generated by two different types of beam distribution (i.e. cold beam and diffuse ions. Even when there was good agreement between the values of observed transport ratios and the values given by the theory, some discrepancies were found. This shows that the observed waves are different from the theoretical modes and that mode identification based only on polarization quantities does not give a complete picture of the waves' characteristics and can lead to mode identification of waves whose polarization may agree with theoretical predictions even when

  3. Low frequency magnetic signals associated with Langmuir waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Paul J.; Goetz, K.; Lin, N.; Monson, S. J.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    With the URAP experiment on Ulysses, low frequency signals with a magnetic component in close time correlation with electrostatic Langmuir waves at the plasma frequency are observed. In most, if not all, of these cases, the Langmuir waves are part of a Type III solar burst. This effect is investigated and it is shown that the low frequency waves are in the whistler mode and are most likely due to nonlinear effects involving Langmuir waves.

  4. Van Allen Probes observations of unusually low frequency whistler mode waves observed in association with moderate magnetic storms: Statistical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, C A; Breneman, A W; Thaller, S A; Wygant, J R; Kletzing, C A; Kurth, W S

    2015-09-28

    We show the first evidence for locally excited chorus at frequencies below 0.1 fce (electron cyclotron frequency) in the outer radiation belt. A statistical study of chorus during geomagnetic storms observed by the Van Allen Probes found that frequencies are often dramatically lower than expected. The frequency at peak power suddenly stops tracking the equatorial 0.5 fce and f/fce decreases rapidly, often to frequencies well below 0.1 fce (in situ and mapped to equator). These very low frequency waves are observed both when the satellites are close to the equatorial plane and at higher magnetic latitudes. Poynting flux is consistent with generation at the equator. Wave amplitudes can be up to 20 to 40 mV/m and 2 to 4 nT. We conclude that conditions during moderate to large storms can excite unusually low frequency chorus, which is resonant with more energetic electrons than typical chorus, with critical implications for understanding radiation belt evolution.

  5. Low-Frequency Waves in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiling, Andreas; Lee, Dong-Hun; Nakariakov, Valery

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency waves in space plasmas have been studied for several decades, and our knowledge gain has been incremental with several paradigm-changing leaps forward. In our solar system, such waves occur in the ionospheres and magnetospheres of planets, and around our Moon. They occur in the solar wind, and more recently, they have been confirmed in the Sun's atmosphere as well. The goal of wave research is to understand their generation, their propagation, and their interaction with the surrounding plasma. Low-frequency Waves in Space Plasmas presents a concise and authoritative up-to-date look on where wave research stands: What have we learned in the last decade? What are unanswered questions? While in the past waves in different astrophysical plasmas have been largely treated in separate books, the unique feature of this monograph is that it covers waves in many plasma regions, including: Waves in geospace, including ionosphere and magnetosphere Waves in planetary magnetospheres Waves at the Moon Waves in the solar wind Waves in the solar atmosphere Because of the breadth of topics covered, this volume should appeal to a broad community of space scientists and students, and it should also be of interest to astronomers/astrophysicists who are studying space plasmas beyond our Solar System.

  6. Low frequency ultrasonic multi-mode Lamb wave method for characterizing the ultra-thin transversely isotropic laminate composite: Theory and experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui; WAN Mingxi; CHEN Xiao; CAO Wenwu

    2001-01-01

    A low-frequency multi-mode ultrasonic Lamb wave method suitable for characterizing the thickness, the density and the elastic constants of the ultra-thin transversely isotropic laminate composite is presented, The "ultra-thin" here means that the thickness of the plate is much less than the wavelength of the ultrasonic wave so that the echoes from the front and back faces of the plate can't be separated in the time domain. The dispersion equations for the low frequency ultrasonic Lamb waves with the propagation directions parallel and vertical to the fiber direction are derived. In conjunction with the least square algorithm method, the secant algorithm is used to estimate the parameters of the ultra-thin fiber-reinforced composite layer. The evaluation errors and the sensitivity of the method to different parameters of the thin composite are analyzed. The technique has been used to characterize the ultra-thin grass fiber reinforced PES composite with thickness down to ten percents of the ultrasonic wavelength. It is observed that the agreement between the nominal and the estimation values is reasonably good.

  7. Kinetic Scale Structure of Low-frequency Waves and Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Araneda, Jaime A.; Yoon, Peter H.

    2017-08-01

    The dissipation of solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales is believed to be important for the heating of the corona and for accelerating the wind. The linear Vlasov kinetic theory is a useful tool for identifying various wave modes, including kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, and ion-acoustic (or kinetic slow), and their possible roles in the dissipation. However, the kinetic mode structure in the vicinity of ion-cyclotron modes is not clearly understood. The present paper aims to further elucidate the structure of these low-frequency waves by introducing discrete particle effects through hybrid simulations and Klimontovich formalism of spontaneous emission theory. The theory and simulation of spontaneously emitted low-frequency fluctuations are employed to identify and distinguish the detailed mode structures associated with ion-Bernstein modes versus quasi-modes. The spontaneous emission theory and simulation also confirm the findings of the Vlasov theory in that the kinetic Alfvén waves can be defined over a wide range of frequencies, including the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, especially for high-beta plasmas. This implies that these low-frequency modes may play predominant roles even in the fully kinetic description of kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation despite the fact that cyclotron harmonic and Bernstein modes may also play important roles in wave-particle interactions.

  8. Short wave breaking effects on low frequency waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daly, C.; Roelvink, J.A.; Van Dongeren, A.; Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.; McCall, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of short wave breaking on low frequency waves is investigated using two breaker formulations implemented in a time-dependent numerical model (XBeach): (1) an advective-deterministic approach (ADA) and (2) the probabilistic breaker formulation of Roelvink (1993). Previous research has show

  9. MHD-model for low-frequency waves in a tokamak with toroidal plasma rotation and problem of existence of global geodesic acoustic modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Sorokina, E. A., E-mail: sorokina.ekaterina@gmail.com, E-mail: vilkiae@gmail.com; Ilgisonis, V. I. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Konovaltseva, L. V. [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A set of reduced linear equations for the description of low-frequency perturbations in toroidally rotating plasma in axisymmetric tokamak is derived in the framework of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The model suitable for the study of global geodesic acoustic modes (GGAMs) is designed. An example of the use of the developed model for derivation of the integral conditions for GGAM existence and of the corresponding dispersion relation is presented. The paper is dedicated to the memory of academician V.D. Shafranov.

  10. Low Frequency Scattering Resonance Wave in Strong Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yinbin

    2015-01-01

    Multiple scattering of wave in strong heterogeneity can cause resonance-like wave phenomenon where signal exhibits low frequency, high intensity, and slowly propagating velocity. For example, long period event in volcanic seismology and surface plasmon wave and quantum Hall effect in wave-particle interactions. Collective behaviour in a many-body system is usually thought to be the source for generating the anomaly. However, the detail physical mechanism is not fully understood. Here I show by wave field modeling for microscopic bubble cloud model and 1D heterogeneity that the anomaly is related to low frequency scattering resonance happened in transient regime. This low frequency resonance is a kind of wave coherent scattering enhancement phenomenon in strongly-scattered small-scale heterogeneity. Its resonance frequency is inversely proportional to heterogeneous scale and contrast and will further shift toward lower frequency with random heterogeneous scale and velocity fluctuations. Low frequency scatterin...

  11. Large Amplitude Low Frequency Waves in a Magnetized Nonuniform Electron-Positron-Ion Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Q. Haque; H. Saleem

    2004-01-01

    @@ It is shown that the large amplitude low-frequency electromagnetic drift waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas might give rise to dipolar vortices. A linear dispersion relation of several coupled electrostatic and electromagnetic low-frequency modes is obtained. The relevance of this work to both laboratory and astrophysical situations is pointed out.

  12. Nonlinear Low Frequency Water Waves in a Cylindrical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, H. W.; Wang, D. J.; Lee, C. B.

    The experiment was carried out to study the low frequency surface waves due to the horizontal high frequency excitation. The feature of the phenomenon was that the big amplitude axisymmetric surface wave frequency was typically about 1/50 of the excitation frequency. The viscous effect of water was neglected as a first approximation in the earlier papers on this subject. In contrast, we found the viscosity was important to achieve the low frequency water wave with the cooperation of hundreds of "finger" waves. Photographs were taken with stroboscopic lighting and thereafter relevant quantitative results were obtained based on the measurements with Polytec Scanning Vibrometer PSV 400.

  13. Present and Future Modes of Low Frequency Climate Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cane, Mark A.

    2014-02-20

    This project addressed area (1) of the FOA, “Interaction of Climate Change and Low Frequency Modes of Natural Climate Variability”. Our overarching objective is to detect, describe and understand the changes in low frequency variability between model simulations of the preindustrial climate and simulations of a doubled CO2 climate. The deliverables are a set of papers providing a dynamical characterization of interannual, decadal, and multidecadal variability in coupled models with attention to the changes in this low frequency variability between pre-industrial concentrations of greenhouse gases and a doubling of atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The principle mode of analysis, singular vector decomposition, is designed to advance our physical, mechanistic understanding. This study will include external natural variability due to solar and volcanic aerosol variations as well as variability internal to the climate system. An important byproduct is a set of analysis tools for estimating global singular vector structures from the archived output of model simulations.

  14. Radiative cooling and broadband phenomenon in low-frequency waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the effects of radiative cooling on the pure baroclinic low-frequency waves under the approximation of equatorial -plane and semi-geostrophic condition. The results show that radiative cooling does not, exclusively, provide the damping effects on the development of low-frequency waves. Under the delicate radiative-convective equilibrium, radiative effects will alter the phase speed and wave period, and bring about the broadband of phase velocity and wave period by adjusting the vertical profiles of diabatic heating. when the intensity of diabatic heating is moderate and appropriate, it is conductive to the development and sustaining of the low-frequency waves and their broadband phenomena, not the larger, the better. The radiative cooling cannot be neglected in order to reach the moderate and appropriate intensity of diabatic heating.

  15. Numerical and experimental investigation of nonlinear ultrasonic Lamb waves at low frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Peng; Zhou, Yu; Fan, Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Nonlinear ultrasonic Lamb waves are popular to characterize the nonlinearity of materials. However, the widely used nonlinear Lamb mode suffers from two associated complications: inherent dispersive and multimode natures. To overcome these, the symmetric Lamb mode (S0) at low frequency region is explored. At the low frequency region, the S0 mode is little dispersive and easy to generate. However, the secondary mode still exists, and increases linearly for significant distance. Numerical simulations and experiments are used to validate the nonlinear features and therefore demonstrate an easy alternative for nonlinear Lamb wave applications.

  16. Low-Frequency Waves in HF Heating of the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A. S.; Eliasson, B.; Milikh, G. M.; Najmi, A.; Papadopoulos, K.; Shao, X.; Vartanyan, A.

    2016-02-01

    Ionospheric heating experiments have enabled an exploration of the ionosphere as a large-scale natural laboratory for the study of many plasma processes. These experiments inject high-frequency (HF) radio waves using high-power transmitters and an array of ground- and space-based diagnostics. This chapter discusses the excitation and propagation of low-frequency waves in HF heating of the ionosphere. The theoretical aspects and the associated models and simulations, and the results from experiments, mostly from the HAARP facility, are presented together to provide a comprehensive interpretation of the relevant plasma processes. The chapter presents the plasma model of the ionosphere for describing the physical processes during HF heating, the numerical code, and the simulations of the excitation of low-frequency waves by HF heating. It then gives the simulations of the high-latitude ionosphere and mid-latitude ionosphere. The chapter also briefly discusses the role of kinetic processes associated with wave generation.

  17. Ultra low frequency waves impact on radiation belt energetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental important issues in the space physics is to understand how solar wind energy transports into the inner magnetosphere.Ultra low frequency(ULF)wave in the magnetosphere and its impact on energetic particles,such as the wave-particle resonance,modulation,and particle acceleration,are extremely important topics in the Earth’s radiation belt dynamics and solar wind― magnetospheric coupling.In this review,we briefly introduce the recent advances on ULF waves study. Further,we will explore the density structures and ion compositions around the plasmaspheric boundary layer(PBL)and discuss its possible relation to the ULF waves.

  18. Ultra low frequency waves impact on radiation belt energetic particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG QiuGang; HAO YongQiang; WANG YongFu

    2009-01-01

    One of the most fundamental important issues in the space physics is to understand how solar wind energy transports into the inner magnetosphere.Ultra low frequency(ULF)wave in the magnetosphere and its impact on energetic particles,such as the wave-particle resonance,modulation,and particle acceleration,are extremely important topics in the Earth's radiation belt dynamics and solar windmagnetospheric coupling.In this review,we briefly introduce the recent advances on ULF waves study.Further,we will explore the density structures and ion compositions around the plasmaspheric boundary layer(PBL)and discuss its possible relation to the ULF waves.

  19. Low-frequency fluid waves in fractures and pipes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korneev, Valeri

    2010-09-01

    Low-frequency analytical solutions have been obtained for phase velocities of symmetrical fluid waves within both an infinite fracture and a pipe filled with a viscous fluid. Three different fluid wave regimes can exist in such objects, depending on the various combinations of parameters, such as fluid density, fluid viscosity, walls shear modulus, channel thickness, and frequency. Equations for velocities of all these regimes have explicit forms and are verified by comparisons with the exact solutions. The dominant role of fractures in rock permeability at field scales and the strong amplitude and frequency effects of Stoneley guided waves suggest the importance of including these wave effects into poroelastic theories.

  20. Ultra-low-frequency dust-electromagnetic modes in self-gravitating magnetized dusty plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Banerjee; M N Alam; A A Mamun

    2001-05-01

    Obliquely propagating ultra-low-frequency dust-electromagnetic waves in a self-gravitating, warm, magnetized, two fluid dusty plasma system have been investigated. Two special cases, namely, dust-Alfvén mode propagating parallel to the external magnetic field and dust-magnetosonic mode propagating perpendicular to the external magnetic field have also been considered. It has been shown that effects of self-gravitational field, dust fluid temperature, and obliqueness significantly modify the dispersion properties of these ultra-low-frequency dust-electromagnetic modes. It is also found that in parallel propagating dust-Alfvén mode these effects play no role, but in obliquely propagating dust-Alfvén mode or perpendicular propagating dust-magnetosonic mode the effect of self-gravitational field plays destabilizing role whereas the effect of dust/ion fluid temperature plays stabilizing role.

  1. Averaged two-dimensional low-frequency wave spectrum of wind waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimura, A.

    1984-01-01

    This report deals with second order, two-dimensional low frequency waves induced by the non-linear interactions of the first order component waves in a two-dimensional short wave field. The convolution to calculate the averaged two-dimensional low frequency wave spectrum is developed. Any given two-

  2. Low-frequency sea waves generated by atmospheric convection cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, M. P. C.; Battjes, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    The atmospheric origin of low-frequency sea waves that cause seiches in the Port of Rotterdam is investigated using hydrological and meteorological observations. These observations, combined with weather charts, show that all significant seiche events coincide with the passage of a low-pressure area and a cold front. Following these front passages, increased wind speed fluctuations occur with periods on the order of 1 hour. The records show that enhanced low-frequency wave energy at sea and the seiche events in the harbor occur more or less simultaneously with these strong wind speed fluctuations. These oscillatory wind speed changes are due to convection cells that arise in an unstable lower atmosphere in the area behind a cold front, where cold air moves over the relatively warm sea surface. It is shown that the moving system of a cold front and trailing convection cells generates forced low-frequency waves at sea that can cause seiche events inside the harbor. The occurrence of such events may be predictable operationally on the basis of a criterion for the difference in temperature between the air in the upper atmosphere and the water at the sea surface.

  3. Low-Frequency Gravitational Wave Searches Using Spacecraft Doppler Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses spacecraft Doppler tracking, the current-generation detector technology used in the low-frequency (~millihertz gravitational wave band. In the Doppler method the earth and a distant spacecraft act as free test masses with a ground-based precision Doppler tracking system continuously monitoring the earth-spacecraft relative dimensionless velocity $2 Delta v/c = Delta u/ u_0$, where $Delta u$ is the Doppler shift and $ u_0$ is the radio link carrier frequency. A gravitational wave having strain amplitude $h$ incident on the earth-spacecraft system causes perturbations of order $h$ in the time series of $Delta u/ u_0$. Unlike other detectors, the ~1-10 AU earth-spacecraft separation makes the detector large compared with millihertz-band gravitational wavelengths, and thus times-of-flight of signals and radio waves through the apparatus are important. A burst signal, for example, is time-resolved into a characteristic signature: three discrete events in the Doppler time series. I discuss here the principles of operation of this detector (emphasizing transfer functions of gravitational wave signals and the principal noises to the Doppler time series, some data analysis techniques, experiments to date, and illustrations of sensitivity and current detector performance. I conclude with a discussion of how gravitational wave sensitivity can be improved in the low-frequency band.

  4. The Low Frequency Sensitivity to Gravitational Waves for ASTROD

    CERN Document Server

    Paton, Antonio Pulido

    2007-01-01

    ASTROD is a relativity mission concept encompassing multi-purposes. One of its main purposes is to detect gravitational waves sensitive to low-frequency band similar to LISA, but shifted to lower frequencies. In this aspect, ASTROD would complement LISA in probing the Universe and study strong-field black hole physics. Since ASTROD will be after LISA, in the Cosmic Vision time-frame 2015-2025, a ten-fold improvement over LISA accelerometer noise goal would be possible, allowing us to test relativistic gravity to 1 ppb and improve the gravitational-wave sensitivity. In this paper, we address to this possible improvement, especially in the frequency range below 0.1 mHz. We look into possible thermal noise improvement, magnetic noise improvement, spurious discharging noise improvement and local gravitational noise improvement. We discuss various possibilities of lower-frequency gravitational-wave responses and their significance to potential astrophysical sources.

  5. Low-frequency gravitational-wave science frontiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Scott

    2017-01-01

    With LIGO detecting stellar mass black holes and (soon) other stellar mass compact objects, and with LISA Pathfinder demonstrating important elements of the technology needed to fly a gravitational-wave antenna in space, the case for a low-frequency, space-based gravitational-wave detector - LISA - is stronger than ever. In this talk, I will survey the landscape of low-frequency gravitational-wave astronomy. The LISA frequency band from afew ×10-5 Hz to about 1 Hz is one which is rich with known sources whose measurement will enable new astronomical and physical measurements of important systems. It is also a band with great potential discovery space. In this talk, I will survey the known knowns and known unknowns in the LISA band, describing the frontiers that we can study in advance of the mission, and the frontiers that LISA measurements will unveil. I will also talk about the possible unknown unknowns where surprising discoveries may lurk.

  6. Low-Frequency Waves in Cold Three-Component Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Tang, Ying; Zhao, Jinsong; Lu, Jianyong

    2016-09-01

    The dispersion relation and electromagnetic polarization of the plasma waves are comprehensively studied in cold electron, proton, and heavy charged particle plasmas. Three modes are classified as the fast, intermediate, and slow mode waves according to different phase velocities. When plasmas contain positively-charged particles, the fast and intermediate modes can interact at the small propagating angles, whereas the two modes are separate at the large propagating angles. The near-parallel intermediate and slow waves experience the linear polarization, circular polarization, and linear polarization again, with the increasing wave number. The wave number regime corresponding to the above circular polarization shrinks as the propagating angle increases. Moreover, the fast and intermediate modes cause the reverse change of the electromagnetic polarization at the special wave number. While the heavy particles carry the negative charges, the dispersion relations of the fast and intermediate modes are always separate, being independent of the propagating angles. Furthermore, this study gives new expressions of the three resonance frequencies corresponding to the highly-oblique propagation waves in the general three-component plasmas, and shows the dependence of the resonance frequencies on the propagating angle, the concentration of the heavy particle, and the mass ratio among different kinds of particles. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11303099, 41531071 and 41574158), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS

  7. Effect of Alfvén resonance on low-frequency fast wave current drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. Y.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Stallings, D. C.

    1995-08-01

    The Alfvén resonances may occur on the low- and high-field sides for a low-frequency fast wave current drive scenario proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Nucl. Fusion 31, 1135 (1991)]. At the resonance on the low-field side, the fast wave may be mode converted into a short-wavelength slow wave, which can be absorbed by electrons at the plasma edge, before the fast wave propagates into the core area of the plasma. Such absorption may cause a significant parasitic power loss.

  8. Effect of Alfven resonance on low-frequency fast wave current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.Y.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; Jaeger, E.F.; Stallings, D.C. [Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The Alfven resonances may occur on the low- and high-field sides for a low-frequency fast wave current drive scenario proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Nucl. Fusion {bold 31}, 1135 (1991)]. At the resonance on the low-field side, the fast wave may be mode converted into a short-wavelength slow wave, which can be absorbed by electrons at the plasma edge, before the fast wave propagates into the core area of the plasma. Such absorption may cause a significant parasitic power loss. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  9. Design of Chaotic Cavities with Curved Wave Diffractors for Enhanced Low-Frequency Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaut, L R

    2014-01-01

    Some numerical calculations are presented on the dependence of the average mode count and average mode density of electromagnetic cavities on their specific geometric design, based on the generalized Weyl law. The analysis focuses on a chaotic quasi-cubic cavity furnished with curved wave diffractors placed on its interior surface. The focus is on a design that increases the mode density and Q at relatively low frequencies. The results are of interest in reducing the `lowest usable frequency' and increasing the maximum field strength inside mode-stirred reverberation chambers.

  10. Low-frequency dilatational wave propagation through unsaturated porous media containing two immiscible fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, W.-C.; Sposito, G.; Majer, E.

    2007-02-01

    An analytical theory is presented for the low-frequency behavior of dilatational waves propagating through a homogeneous elastic porous medium containing two immiscible fluids. The theory is based on the Berryman-Thigpen-Chin (BTC) model, in which capillary pressure effects are neglected. We show that the BTC model equations in the frequency domain can be transformed, at sufficiently low frequencies, into a dissipative wave equation (telegraph equation) and a propagating wave equation in the time domain. These partial differential equations describe two independent modes of dilatational wave motion that are analogous to the Biot fast and slow compressional waves in a single-fluid system. The equations can be solved analytically under a variety of initial and boundary conditions. The stipulation of 'low frequency' underlying the derivation of our equations in the time domain is shown to require that the excitation frequency of wave motions be much smaller than a critical frequency. This frequency is shown to be the inverse of an intrinsic time scale that depends on an effective kinematic shear viscosity of the interstitial fluids and the intrinsic permeability of the porous medium. Numerical calculations indicate that the critical frequency in both unconsolidated and consolidated materials containing water and a nonaqueous phase liquid ranges typically from kHz to MHz. Thus engineering problems involving the dynamic response of an unsaturated porous medium to low excitation frequencies (e.g. seismic wave stimulation) should be accurately modeled by our equations after suitable initial and boundary conditions are imposed.

  11. Effect of low-frequency Rossby wave on thermal structure of the upper southwestern tropical Indian Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯俊乔; 白学志; 陈永利; 胡敦欣

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the influence of low-frequency Rossby waves on the thermal structure of the upper southwestern tropical Indian Ocean (SWTIO) using Argo profiles, satellite altimetric data, sea surface temperature, wind field data and the theory of linear vertical normal mode decomposition. Our results show that the SWTIO is generally dominated by the first baroclinic mode motion. As strong downwelling Rossby waves reach the SWTIO, the contribution of the second baroclinic mode motion in this region can be in...

  12. Low Frequency Radio-wave System for subsurface investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Kudelya, Anatoliy; Denisov, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Low frequency radio-wave methods (RWM) allow subsurface investigations in terms of lithological structure characterization, detection of filtration flows of ground water, anthropogenic and natural cavities. In this contribution, we present a RWM that exploits two coils working at frequencies of few MHz as transmitting and receiving antennas. The basic principle of this inductive method is as follows. The primary alternating electromagnetic field radiated by the transmitting coil induces eddy currents in the subsurface mainly due to the conductivity anomalies. These eddy currents generate a secondary (scattered) magnetic field which overlaps to the incident magnetic field and is detected by the receiving coil. Despite the simple operation of the system, the complexity of the electromagnetic scattering phenomenon at hand must be properly modeled to achieve adequate performance. Therefore, an advanced data processing technique, belonging to the class of the inverse scattering approaches, has been developed by the authors in a full 3D geometry. The proposed method allows to deal with data collected on a scanning surface under a dipole inductive profiling (DIP) modality, where the transmitting/receiving coils are moved simultaneously with fixed offset (multi-bistatic configuration). The hardware, called Dipole Inductive Radio-wave System (DIRS), is composed by an electronic unit and transmitting and receiving loop antennas radiating at frequencies of few MHz (2-4 MHz), which are installed on theodolite supports. The compactness of DIRS and its robustness to external electromagnetic interference offers the possibility to perform geophysical research up to the depth of some tens of meters and under several types of ground and water surfaces, vegetation, and weather conditions. The light weight and small size of system (the single antenna with support weights about 5 kg and has a diameter of 0.5m) allows two operators to perform geophysical research without disturbing the

  13. Defects detection in typical positions of bend pipes using low-frequency ultrasonic guided wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗更生; 谭建平; 汪亮; 许焰

    2015-01-01

    In order to analyze the possibility of detecting defects in bend pipe using low-frequency ultrasonic guided wave, the propagation of T(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode through straight-curved-straight pipe sections was studied. FE (finite element) models of bend pipe without defects and those with defects were introduced to analyze energy distribution, mode transition and defect detection of ultrasonic guided wave. FE simulation results were validated by experiments of four different bend pipes with circumferential defects in different positions. It is shown that most energy of T(0,1) mode or L(0,2) mode focuses on extrados of bend but little passes through intrados of bend, and T(0,1) mode or L(0,2) mode is converted to other possible non-axisymmetric modes when propagating through the bend and the defect after bend respectively. Furthermore, L(0,2) mode is more sensitive to circumferential notch than T(0,1) mode. The results of this work are beneficial for practical testing of pipes.

  14. Low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes in a non-uniform magnetized dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Duha; S K Paul; A K Banerjee; A A Mamun

    2004-11-01

    A self-consistent and general description of obliquely propagating low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes in a non-uniform magnetized dusty plasma system has been presented. A number of different situations, which correspond to different low-frequency electrostatic dust-modes, namely, dust-acoustic mode, dust-drift mode, dust-cyclotron mode, dust-lower-hybrid mode, and other associated modes (such as, accelerated and retarded dust-acoustic modes, accelerated and retarded dust-lower-hybrid modes, etc.), have also been investigated. It has been shown that the effects of obliqueness and inhomogeneities in plasma particle number densities introduce new electrostatic dust modes as well as significantly modify the dispersion properties of the other low-frequency electrostatic dust associated modes. The implications of these results to some space and astrophysical dusty plasma systems, especially to planetary ring-systems and cometary tails, are briefly mentioned.

  15. Relativistic Diskoseismology. III. Low-Frequency Fundamental p-Modes

    CERN Document Server

    Ortega-Rodriguez, M; Wagoner, R V; Ortega-Rodriguez, Manuel; Silbergleit, Alexander S.; Wagoner, Robert V.

    2002-01-01

    We extend our investigation of the normal modes of small adiabatic oscillations of relativistic barotropic thin accretion disks to the inertial-pressure (p) modes. We focus here on the lowest frequency fundamental p-modes, those with no axial or vertical nodes in their distribution. Through a variety of analyses, we obtain closed-form expressions for the eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions. These depend on the luminosity and viscosity parameter of the disk as well as the mass and angular momentum of the black hole via detailed formulae for the speed of sound. The effect of a torque on the inner edge of the disk is also included. We compare the p-mode properties to those of the g- and c-modes.

  16. Low frequency waves in streaming quantum dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozina, Ch.; Jamil, M.; Khan, Arroj A.; Zeba, I.; Saman, J.

    2017-09-01

    The influence of quantum effects on the excitation of two instabilities, namely quantum dust-acoustic and quantum dust-lower-hybrid waves due to the free streaming of ion/dust particles in uniformly magnetized dusty plasmas has been investigated using a quantum hydrodynamic model. We have obtained dispersion relations under some particular conditions applied on streaming ions and two contrastreaming dust particle beams at equilibrium and have analyzed the growth rates graphically. We have shown that with the increase of both the electron number density and the streaming speed of ion there is enhancement in the instability due to the fact that the dense plasma particle system with more energetic species having a high speed results in the increase of the growth rate in the electrostatic mode. The application of this work has been pointed out for laboratory as well as for space dusty plasmas.

  17. Dispersion Relations and Polarizations of Low-frequency Waves in Two-fluid Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the dispersion relations and polarizations of low-frequency waves in magnetized plasmas based on two-fluid model are obtained. The properties of waves propagating at different angles (to the ambient magnetic field $\\mathbf{B}_{0}$) and \\beta (the ratio of the plasma to magnetic pressures) values are investigated. It is shown that two linearly polarized waves, namely the fast and Alfv\\'{e}n modes in the low-\\beta $\\left( \\beta \\ll 1\\right)$ plasmas, the fast and slow modes in the \\beta \\sim 1 plasmas, and the Alfv\\'{e}n and slow modes in the high-\\beta $\\left( \\beta \\gg 1\\right)$ plasmas, become circularly polarized at the near-parallel (to $\\mathbf{B}_{0}$) propagation. The negative magnetic-helicity of the Alfv\\'{e}n mode occurs only at small or moderate angles in the low-\\beta plasmas, and the ion cross-helicity of the slow mode is nearly the same as that of the Alfv\\'{e}n mode in the high-\\beta plasmas. It also shown the electric polarization $\\delta E_{z}/\\delta E_{y}$ decreases...

  18. Remote pipeline assessment and condition monitoring using low-frequency axisymmetric waves: a theoretical study of torsional wave motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, J. M.; Rustighi, E.; Gao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Waves that propagate at low frequencies in buried pipes are of considerable interest in a variety of practical scenarios, for example leak detection, remote pipe detection, and pipeline condition assessment and monitoring. Particularly useful are the n = 0, or axisymmetric, modes in which there is no displacement (or pressure) variation over the pipe cross section. Previous work has focused on two of the three axisymmetric wavetypes that can propagate: the s = 1, fluid- dominated wave; and the s = 2, shell-dominated wave. In this paper, the third axisymmetric wavetype, the s = 0 torsional wave, is studied. Whilst there is a large body of research devoted to the study of torsional waves and their use for defect detection in pipes at ultrasonic frequencies, little is known about their behaviour and possible exploitation at lower frequencies. Here, a low- frequency analytical dispersion relationship is derived for the torsional wavenumber for a buried pipe from which both the wavespeed and wave attenuation can be obtained. How the torsional waves subsequently radiate to the ground surface is then investigated, with analytical expressions being presented for the ground surface displacement above the pipe resulting from torsional wave motion within the pipe wall. Example results are presented and, finally, how such waves might be exploited in practice is discussed.

  19. New low-frequency electromagnetic modes associated with neutral dynamics in partially ionised plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shaikh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the low frequency electromagnetic (EM modes in inhomogeneous, magnetised partially ionised plasma by incorporating neutral dynamics. We have derived a general EM dispersion relation by using a two-fluids magnetohydrodynamics (MHD model. Our analysis shows that the neutral dynamics is playing an extremely important role in the physics of magnetised partially ionised plasma by giving rise to new kind of EM modes. We found (1 the new instability is linked with compressibility of neutral particles, the collision between neutral and charged species and the relative streaming in hot/cold, inhomogeneous, magnetised partially ionised plasma, (2 and that neutral dynamics is responsible for the modified (complex inertial effect on magnetic field lines. Its consequences on the propagation characteristics of Alfvén wave and cyclotron frequency are discussed. Furthermore, a new mode similar to the Langmuir mode is reported. Finally, we discuss our results, for limiting cases, that may be appropriate for applications to space plasma environments including probable mechanism of escaping H+ and O− from the Martian atmosphere.

  20. Ultra low frequency waves at Venus: Observations by the Venus Express spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fränz, M.; Echer, E.; Marques de Souza, A.; Dubinin, E.; Zhang, T. L.

    2017-10-01

    The generation of waves with low frequencies (below 100 mHz) has been observed in the environment of most bodies in the solar system and well studied at Earth. These waves can be generated either upstream of the body in the solar wind by ionization of planetary exospheres or ions reflected from a bow shock or in the magnetosheath closer to the magnetic barrier. For Mars and Venus the waves may have special importance since they can contribute to the erosion of the ionopause and by that enhance atmospheric escape. While over the past years many case studies on wave phenomena observed at Venus have been published most statistical studies have been based on magnetic observations only. On the other hand the generation mechanisms and transport of these waves through the magnetosphere can only be quantified using both magnetic and particle observations. We use the long time observations of Venus Express (2006-2014) to determine the predominant processes and transport parameters. First we demonstrate the analysis methods in four case studies, then we present a statistical analysis by determining transport ratios from the complete Venus Express dataset. We find that Alfvenic waves are very dominant (>80%) in the solar wind and in the core magnetosheath. Fast waves are observed mainly at the bow shock (around 40%) but also at the magnetic barrier where they may be most important for the energy transfer into the ionosphere. Their occurrence in the magnetotail may be an artifact of the detection of individual plasma jets in this region. Slow mode waves are rarely dominating but occur with probability of about 10% at the bow shock and in the pile-up-region. Mirror mode waves have probability <20% in the magnetosheath slightly increasing towards the pile-up-boundary.

  1. Toroidal equilibrium with low frequency wave driven currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    In the absence of an emf the parallel current, j/sub parallel/, in a steady state tokamak will consist of a neoclassical portion plus a wave-driven contribution. Using the drift kinetic equation, the quasilinear (wave-driven) current is computed for high phase speed waves in a torus, and this is combined with the neoclassical term to obtain the general expression for the flux surface average . For a given pressure profile this technique fully determines the MHD equilibrium, permitting the study of a new class of toroidal equilibria.

  2. Low frequency waves and gravitational instability in homogeneous magnetized gyrotropic quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prajapati, R. P., E-mail: prajapati-iter@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Central University, Bilaspur-495009 (C.G.) (India)

    2014-11-15

    In this work, the low frequency waves and gravitational (Jeans) instability of a homogeneous gyrotropic, magnetized, quantum plasma is investigated using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic and Chew-Goldberger-Low fluid models. An analytical dispersion relation for the considered system is obtained solving the linearized perturbations equations employing the Fourier transformation. The onset criterion of the “firehose” instability is retained in parallel propagation, which is unaffected due to the presence of quantum corrections. The gravitational mode modified by the quantum corrections is obtained separately along with the “firehose” mode. In perpendicular propagation, the quantum diffraction term is coupled with the Jeans and Alfven modes whereas in parallel propagation, the Alfven mode does not contribute to the dispersion characteristics as it leads to the “firehose” instability criterion in terms of quantum pressure anisotropy. The stabilizing influences of the quantum diffraction parameter and magnetic field on the growth rates of Jeans instability are examined. It is observed that the growth rate stabilizes much faster in transverse mode due to Alfven stabilization as compared to the longitudinal mode of propagation.

  3. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  4. Low frequency piezoresonance defined dynamic control of terahertz wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Moumita; Betal, Soutik; Peralta, Xomalin G.; Bhalla, Amar S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2016-11-01

    Phase modulators are one of the key components of many applications in electromagnetic and opto-electric wave propagations. Phase-shifters play an integral role in communications, imaging and in coherent material excitations. In order to realize the terahertz (THz) electromagnetic spectrum as a fully-functional bandwidth, the development of a family of efficient THz phase modulators is needed. Although there have been quite a few attempts to implement THz phase modulators based on quantum-well structures, liquid crystals, or meta-materials, significantly improved sensitivity and dynamic control for phase modulation, as we believe can be enabled by piezoelectric-resonance devices, is yet to be investigated. In this article we provide an experimental demonstration of phase modulation of THz beam by operating a ferroelectric single crystal LiNbO3 film device at the piezo-resonance. The piezo-resonance, excited by an external a.c. electric field, develops a coupling between electromagnetic and lattice-wave and this coupling governs the wave propagation of the incident THz beam by modulating its phase transfer function. We report the understanding developed in this work can facilitate the design and fabrication of a family of resonance-defined highly sensitive and extremely low energy sub-millimeter wave sensors and modulators.

  5. Low-Frequency Terrestrial Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Harms, Jan; Adhikari, Rana X; Miller, M Coleman; Evans, Matthew; Chen, Yanbei; Müller, Holger; Ando, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Direct detection of gravitational radiation in the audio band is being pursued with a network of kilometer-scale interferometers (LIGO, Virgo, KAGRA). Several space missions (LISA, DECIGO, BBO) have been proposed to search for sub-Hz radiation from massive astrophysical sources. Here we examine the potential sensitivity of three ground-based detector concepts aimed at radiation in the 0.1 -- 10\\,Hz band. We describe the plethora of potential astrophysical sources in this band and make estimates for their event rates and thereby, the sensitivity requirements for these detectors. The scientific payoff from measuring astrophysical gravitational waves in this frequency band is great. Although we find no fundamental limits to the detector sensitivity in this band, the remaining technical limits will be extremely challenging to overcome.

  6. Balloon observations of ultra-low-frequency waves in the electric field above the South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, B.; Benbrrook, J.R.; Bering E.A. III; Byrne, G.J.; Theall, J.R. (Univ. of Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-01-01

    The physics of ultra-low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere, near the cusp and in the polar cap, is important because this region is one where ultra-low-frequency wave energy from the magnetopause can most easily enter the magnetosphere. During the 1985-1986 South Pole balloon campaign, eight stratospheric balloon payloads were launched from Amundsen-Scott Station, South Geographic Pole, Antarctica, to record data on ultra-low-frequency waves. The payloads were instrumented with three-axis double-probe electric field detectors and X-ray scintillation counters. This paper concentrates on the third flight of this series, which was launched at 2205 universal time on 21 December 1985. Good data were received from the payload until the transmitter failed at 0342 universal time on 22 December. During most of the four hours that the balloon was afloat, an intense ultra-low-frequency wave event was in progress. The electric-field data from this period have been examined in detail and compared with magnetic field data, obtained with ground-based fluxgate and induction magnetometers to determine the characteristics of the waves. After float was reached, the electric-field data in figure 1 show large-amplitude, quasi-periodic fluctuations suggesting the presence of intense ultra-low-frequency wave activity. In conclusion, the electric-field signature observed from flight 3 appears to have been essentially an electrostatic event or possibly a short-wavelength hydromagnetic wave with a varying and interesting polarization character. The authors are continuing the analysis of the data to determine the source of the observed ultra-low-frequency waves.

  7. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  8. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2012-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ~0.01mHz - 1Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  9. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10(-5) - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  10. Low frequency energy scavenging using sub-wave length scale acousto-elastic metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riaz U. Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This letter presents the possibility of energy scavenging (ES utilizing the physics of acousto-elastic metamaterial (AEMM at low frequencies (<∼3KHz. It is proposed to use the AEMM in a dual mode (Acoustic Filter and Energy Harvester, simultaneously. AEMM’s are typically reported for filtering acoustic waves by trapping or guiding the acoustic energy, whereas this letter shows that the dynamic energy trapped inside the soft constituent (matrix of metamaterials can be significantly harvested by strategically embedding piezoelectric wafers in the matrix. With unit cell AEMM model, we experimentally asserted that at lower acoustic frequencies (< ∼3 KHz, maximum power in the micro Watts (∼35µW range can be generated, whereas, recently reported phononic crystal based metamaterials harvested only nano Watt (∼30nW power against 10KΩ resistive load. Efficient energy scavengers at low acoustic frequencies are almost absent due to large required size relevant to the acoustic wavelength. Here we report sub wave length scale energy scavengers utilizing the coupled physics of local, structural and matrix resonances. Upon validation of the argument through analytical, numerical and experimental studies, a multi-frequency energy scavenger (ES with multi-cell model is designed with varying geometrical properties capable of scavenging energy (power output from ∼10µW – ∼90µW between 0.2 KHz and 1.5 KHz acoustic frequencies.

  11. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q-G; Zhou, X-Z; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y-X; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Reeves, G D; Blake, J B; Wygant, J R

    2015-12-22

    Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. Our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

  12. Measurement of low-frequency ultrasonic wave in water using an acoustic fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    An acoustic fiber sensor for measurement of ultrasonic waves, which used the approximate Raman-Nath diffraction effect where light diffraction waves were generated in an optical fiber by strain due to the ultrasonic waves, was proposed and examined. In order to characterize the acoustic fiber sensor as a basic study, measurements of low-frequency ultrasonic waves in water were examined using a step index fiber operating as a detection sensor. The results showed that characteristics of detected signals agreed with the theoretical prediction based on Fraunhofer diffraction. This indicates that our proposed fiber sensor can be used for the detection of low-frequency ultrasonic waves as well as the transmission of light diffraction signals.

  13. Experimental Research on the Low Frequency Wave That Radiates into the Air before the Failure of Rock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Shiyu; Tang Linbo; He Xuesong; Su Fang; Sun Wei; Liu Jianxin

    2005-01-01

    Experiments on sonic transmission show that a slabstone can directly transmit part of the energy of a wave excited by knocking or by a transducer into the air. The other part of the wave energy can generate the normal mode of vibration on the slabstone and excite measurable acoustic signals in the air. The dominant frequency is related to the size of the slabstone. These results indicate that the acoustic emission (AE) in rock also displays similar behavior if the source is shallow. It is demonstrated that with the nucleation and propagation of cracks, the dominant frequency of the radiated wave will be lower. When the frequency becomes very low,the wave can be transmitted through the rock into the air and be received by a microphone.According to the theory of similarity of size, there will be low-frequency waves before strong earthquakes because of nucleation of cracks, which can be received by special low-frequency transducers or infrasonic detectors. Before earthquakes, the mechanism of precursors could be very complicated. They might be produced by plastic creep or attributed to liquids but not brittle fracture in most cases. So the periods of the produced waves will be longer. This perhaps accounts for the lack of foreshocks before many strong earthquakes.

  14. Observations of wave transformation over a fringing coral reef and the importance of low-frequency waves and offshore water levels to runup, overwash, and coastal flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia M.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.

    2016-05-01

    Many low-lying tropical islands are susceptible to sea level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, a 5 month deployment of wave gauges and a current meter was conducted across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had waves with maximum heights greater than 6 m with peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly skewed infragravity (0.04-0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004-0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, reached 3.7 m above the reef bed at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3 h time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results (1) demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash, and (2) lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of these extreme events, negatively impacting coastal resources and infrastructure.

  15. Observations of wave transformation over a fringing coral reef and the importance of low-frequency waves and offshore water levels to runup, overwash, and coastal flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia; Storlazzi, Curt; Rosenberger, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Many low-lying tropical islands are susceptible to sea level rise and often subjected to overwash and flooding during large wave events. To quantify wave dynamics and wave-driven water levels on fringing coral reefs, a 5 month deployment of wave gauges and a current meter was conducted across two shore-normal transects on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands. These observations captured two large wave events that had waves with maximum heights greater than 6 m with peak periods of 16 s over the fore reef. The larger event coincided with a peak spring tide, leading to energetic, highly skewed infragravity (0.04–0.004 Hz) and very low frequency (0.004–0.001 Hz) waves at the shoreline, which reached heights of 1.0 and 0.7 m, respectively. Water surface elevations, combined with wave runup, reached 3.7 m above the reef bed at the innermost reef flat adjacent to the toe of the beach, resulting in flooding of inland areas. This overwash occurred during a 3 h time window that coincided with high tide and maximum low-frequency reef flat wave heights. The relatively low-relief characteristics of this narrow reef flat may further drive shoreline amplification of low-frequency waves due to resonance modes. These results (1) demonstrate how the coupling of high offshore water levels with low-frequency reef flat wave energetics can lead to large impacts along fringing reef-lined shorelines, such as island overwash, and (2) lend support to the hypothesis that predicted higher sea levels will lead to more frequent occurrences of these extreme events, negatively impacting coastal resources and infrastructure.

  16. Low-frequency variability of Western Boundary Currents in the turbulent ocean: intrinsic modes and atmospheric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sérazin, Guillaume; Penduff, Thierry; Terray, Laurent; Grégorio, Sandy; Barnier, Bernard; Molines, Jean-Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ocean-atmosphere heat fluxes are particularly strong in Western Boundary Current (WBC) regions where SST front variations influence basin-scale climate variability. Observed low-frequency fluctuations in latitude and strength of these oceanic jets are classically thought to be essentially atmospherically-driven by wind stress curl variability via the oceanic Rossby wave adjustment. Yet academic eddy-resolving process-oriented models with double-gyre configurations have revealed that an idealized WBC may exhibit low-frequency intrinsic fluctuations without low-frequency external forcing (e.g. Berloff et al., 2007, Dijkstra and Ghil, 2005, etc). Experiments with eddying Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs) have also shown that the amount of low-frequency Sea Level Anomaly (SLA) variability is largely intrinsic in WBCs (Penduff et al. 2011; Sérazin et al 2014) and that the frontal-scale (<10°) pattern of the Kuroshio Extension (KE) variability is similar to intrinsic modes (Taguchi et al. 2010). Based on a pair of atmospherically-forced 1/12° OGCM experiments that simulate with accuracy either the intrinsic variability (seasonally-forced) or the observed total variability (forced with the full range of atmospheric timescales), Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis is performed on zonally-averaged SLA fields of four main WBCs (e.g. Gulf Stream, Kuroshio Extension, Agulhas Current and East Australian Current). The first two modes of the KE and GS exhibit a similar spatial structure that is shaped by oceanic intrinsic processes. The frequency content is however different between the intrinsic and total Principal Components, the former containing a wide range of timescales similar to a red noise and the latter being more autocorrelated at interannual-to-decadal timescales. These modes are compared with those obtained from the 20 years of altimetry observation and relationships with low-frequency westward propagative features in the respective oceanic basin are

  17. A test of the Hall-MHD model: Application to low-frequency upstream waves at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, D. S.; Russell, C. T.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Omidi, N.

    1994-01-01

    Early studies suggested that in the range of parameter space where the wave angular frequency is less than the proton gyrofrequency and the plasma beta, the ratio of the thermal to magnetic pressure, is less than 1 magnetohydrodynamics provides an adequate description of the propagating modes in a plasma. However, recently, Lacombe et al. (1992) have reported significant differences between basic wave characteristics of the specific propagation modes derived from linear Vlasov and Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theories even when the waves are only weakly damped. In this paper we compare the magnetic polarization and normalization magnetic compression ratio of ultra low frequency (ULF) upstream waves at Venus with magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio derived from both theories. We find that while the 'kinetic' approach gives magnetic polarization and normalized magnetic compression ratio consistent with the data in the analyzed range of beta (0.5 less than beta less than 5) for the fast magnetosonic mode, the same wave characteristics derived from the Hall-MHD model strongly depend on beta and are consistent with the data only at low beta for the fast mode and at high beta for the intermediate mode.

  18. Higher order contribution to the propagation characteristics of low frequency transverse waves in a dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Misra; A Roy Chowdhury; S N Paul

    2004-09-01

    Characteristic features of low frequency transverse wave propagating in a magnetised dusty plasma have been analysed considering the effect of dust-charge fluctuation. The distinctive behaviours of both the left circularly polarised and right circularly polarised waves have been exhibited through the analysis of linear and non-linear dispersion relations. The phase velocity, group velocity, and group travel time for the waves have been obtained and their propagation characteristics have been shown graphically with the variations of wave frequency, dust density and amplitude of the wave. The change in non-linear wave number shift and Faraday rotation angle have also been exhibited with respect to the plasma parameters. It is observed that the effects of dust particles are significant only when the higher order contributions are considered. This may be referred to as the `dust regime' in plasma.

  19. Stimulation of whistler activity by an artificial ground-based low frequency acoustic wave source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroka, Silvestr; Kim, Vitaly; Khegay, Valery; Kalita, Bogdan

    This paper presents some results of an active experiment aimed to impact the ionosphere with low frequency acoustic waves artificially generated in the near-ground atmosphere. The main goal of the experiment was checking if the artificially generated acoustic waves could affect whistler occurrence at middle latitudes. As a source of acoustic waves we used twin powerful sonic speakers. One of which produced acoustic waves at a frequency of 600 Hz while the other one at a frequency of 624 Hz with intensity of 160 dB at a distance of 1 m away from end of the horn. The duration of sonic pulse was one minute. As a result of acoustic wave interference above the acoustic wave source there appears some kind of a virtual sonic antenna that radiates lower frequency acoustic waves at a frequency being equal to the difference of the two initially generated frequencies (624 Hz - 600 Hz = 24 Hz). The resulting acoustic wave is capable to penetrate to higher altitudes than the initially generated waves do because of its lower frequency. A whistler detector was located at about 100 m far away from the acoustic wave source. We performed the 50 experiments at Lviv (49.50° N, 24.00° E) with acoustic influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system. The obtained results indicate that the emitted low frequency acoustic waves were clearly followed by enhanced whistler occurrence. We suggest that the observations could be interpreted how increase of transparency of ionosphere and upward refraction of VLF spherics resulted from modulation of local atmospheric parameters by the acoustic waves. These two effects produce to the increase of amount of the whistlers.

  20. Solvent friction effects propagate over the entire protein molecule through low-frequency collective modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritsugu, Kei; Kidera, Akinori; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-24

    Protein solvation dynamics has been investigated using atom-dependent Langevin friction coefficients derived directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To determine the effect of solvation on the atomic friction coefficients, solution and vacuum MD simulations were performed for lysozyme and staphylococcal nuclease and analyzed by Langevin mode analysis. The coefficients thus derived are roughly correlated with the atomic solvent-accessible surface area (ASA), as expected from the fact that friction occurs as the result of collisions with solvent molecules. However, a considerable number of atoms with higher friction coefficients are found inside the core region. Hence, the influence of solvent friction propagates into the protein core. The internal coefficients have large contributions from the low-frequency modes, yielding a simple picture of the surface-to-core long-range damping via solvation governed by collective low-frequency modes. To make use of these findings in implicit-solvent modeling, we compare the all-atom friction results with those obtained using Langevin dynamics (LD) with two empirical representations: the constant-friction and the ASA-dependent (Pastor-Karplus) friction models. The constant-friction model overestimates the core and underestimates the surface damping whereas the ASA-dependent friction model, which damps protein atoms only on the solvent-accessible surface, reproduces well the friction coefficients for both the surface and core regions observed in the explicit-solvent MD simulations. Therefore, in LD simulation, the solvent friction coefficients should be imposed only on the protein surface.

  1. A Review of Low Frequency Electromagnetic Wave Phenomena Related to Tropospheric-Ionospheric Coupling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoes, Fernando; Pfaff, Robert; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Klenzing, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of coupling mechanisms between the troposphere and the ionosphere requires a multidisciplinary approach involving several branches of atmospheric sciences, from meteorology, atmospheric chemistry, and fulminology to aeronomy, plasma physics, and space weather. In this work, we review low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere cavity from a troposphere-ionosphere coupling perspective. We discuss electromagnetic wave generation, propagation, and resonance phenomena, considering atmospheric, ionospheric and magnetospheric sources, from lightning and transient luminous events at low altitude to Alfven waves and particle precipitation related to solar and magnetospheric processes. We review in situ ionospheric processes as well as surface and space weather phenomena that drive troposphere-ionosphere dynamics. Effects of aerosols, water vapor distribution, thermodynamic parameters, and cloud charge separation and electrification processes on atmospheric electricity and electromagnetic waves are reviewed. We also briefly revisit ionospheric irregularities such as spread-F and explosive spread-F, sporadic-E, traveling ionospheric disturbances, Trimpi effect, and hiss and plasma turbulence. Regarding the role of the lower boundary of the cavity, we review transient surface phenomena, including seismic activity, earthquakes, volcanic processes and dust electrification. The role of surface and atmospheric gravity waves in ionospheric dynamics is also briefly addressed. We summarize analytical and numerical tools and techniques to model low frequency electromagnetic wave propagation and solving inverse problems and summarize in a final section a few challenging subjects that are important for a better understanding of tropospheric-ionospheric coupling mechanisms.

  2. Low-frequency waves at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Observations compared to numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenders, C.; Perschke, C.; Goetz, C.; Richter, I.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.

    2016-10-01

    Context. A new type of low-frequency wave was detected by the magnetometer of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium at the comet during the initial months after the arrival of the Rosetta spacecraft at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. This large-amplitude, nearly continuous wave activity is observed in the frequency range from 30 mHz to 80 mHz where 40 mHz to 50 mHz is the dominant frequency. This type of low frequency is not closely related to the gyrofrequency of newborn cometary ions, which differs from previous wave activity observed in the interaction region of comets with the solar wind. Aims: This work aims to reveal a global view on the wave activity region using simulations of the comet-solar wind interaction region. Parameters, such as wavelength, propagation direction, and propagation patterns, are within the focus of this study. While the Rosetta observations only provide local information, numerical simulations provide further information on the global wave properties. Methods: Standard hybrid simulations were applied to the comet-solar wind interaction scenario. In the model, the ions were described as particles, which allows us to describe kinetic processes of the ions. The electrons were described as a fluid. Results: The simulations exhibit a threefold wave structure of the interaction region. A Mach cone and a Whistler wing are observed downstream of the comet. The third kind of wave activity found are low-frequency waves at 97 mHz, which corresponds to the waves observed by Richter et al. (2015, Ann. Geophys., 33, 1031). These waves are caused by the initial pick-up of the cometary ions that are perpendicular to the solar wind flow and in the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The associated electric current becomes unstable. The simulations show that wave activity is only detectable in the + E hemisphere and that the Mach cone and whistler wings need to be distinguished from the newly found instability driven wave activity. The movie associated to

  3. Low-frequency elastic waves alter pore-scale colloid mobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Richard Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abdel-fattah, Amr I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roberts, Peter M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ibrahim, Reem [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tarimala, Sownitri [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring seismic events and artificially generated low-frequency elastic waves have been observed to alter the production rates of oil and water wells, sometimes increasing and sometimes decreasing production, and to influence the turbidity of water wells. TEe decreases in production are of particular concern - especially when artificially generated elastic waves are applied as a method for enhanced oil recovery. The exact conditions that result in a decrease in production remain unknown. While the underlying environment is certainly complex, the observed increase in water well turbidity after seismic events suggests the existence of a mechanism that can affect both the subsurface flow paths and mobilization of in-situ colloidal particles. This paper explores the macroscopic and microscopic effects of elastic wave stimulations on the release of colloidal particles and investigates the microscopic mechanism of particle release during stimulation. Experiments on a column packed with 1-mm borosilicate beads loaded with polystyrene microspheres demonstrate that low-frequency elastic wave stimulations enhance the mobilization of captured microspheres. Increasing the intensity of the stimulations increases the number of microspheres released and can also result in cyclical variations in effluent microsphere concentration during and after stimulations. Under a prolonged period of stimulation, the cyclical effluent variations coincided with fluctuations in the column pressure data. This behavior can be attributed to flow pathways fouling and/or rearrangements of the beads in the column. Optical microscopy observations of the beads during low frequency oscillations reveal that the individual beads rotate, thereby rubbing against each other and scraping off portions of the adsorbed microspheres. These results support the theory that mechanical interactions between soil grains are important mechanisms in flow path alteration and the mobilization of naturally

  4. Dispersion of low frequency plasma waves upstream of the quasi-perpendicular terrestrial bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Dimmock

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Low frequency waves in the foot of a supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock front have been observed since the very early in situ observations of the terrestrial bow shock (Guha et al., 1972. The great attention that has been devoted to these type of waves since the first observations is explained by the key role attributed to them in the processes of energy redistribution in the shock front by various theoretical models. In some models, these waves play the role of the intermediator between the ions and electrons. It is assumed that they are generated by plasma instability that exist due to the counter-streaming flows of incident and reflected ions. In the second type of models, these waves result from the evolution of the shock front itself in the quasi-periodic process of steepening and overturning of the magnetic ramp. However, the range of the observed frequencies in the spacecraft frame are not enough to distinguish the origin of the observed waves. It also requires the determination of the wave vectors and the plasma frame frequencies. Multipoint measurements within the wave coherence length are needed for an ambiguous determination of the wave vectors. In the main multi-point missions such as ISEE, AMPTE, Cluster and THEMIS, the spacecraft separation is too large for such a wave vector determination and therefore only very few case studies are published (mainly for AMPTE UKS AMPTE IRM pair. Here we present the observations of upstream low frequency waves by the Cluster spacecraft which took place on 19 February 2002. The spacecraft separation during the crossing of the bow shock was small enough to determine the wave vectors and allowed the identification of the plasma wave dispersion relation for the observed waves. Presented results are compared with whistler wave dispersion and it is shown that contrary to previous studies based on the AMPTE data, the phase velocity in the shock frame is directed downstream. The consequences of this

  5. Low-frequency ultrasonic Bessel-like collimated beam generation from radial modes of piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillara, Vamshi Krishna; Pantea, Cristian; Sinha, Dipen N.

    2017-02-01

    We present a very simple approach to generate a collimated ultrasonic beam that exploits the natural Bessel-like vibration pattern of the radial modes of a piezoelectric disc with lateral clamping. This eliminates the need for the conventional annular Bessel pattern of the electrodes with individual electrode excitation on the piezo-disc, thus simplifying the transducer design. Numerical and experimental studies are carried out to investigate the Bessel-like vibration patterns of these radial modes showing an excellent agreement between these two studies. Measured ultrasonic beam-profiles in water from the radial modes confirm the profile to be a Bessel beam. Collimated beam generation from radial modes is investigated using a coupled electromechanical finite-element model. It is found that clamping the lateral edges of piezoelectric transducers results in a high-degree of collimation with practically no side-lobes similar to a parametric array beam. Ultrasonic beam-profile measurements in water with both free and clamped piezoelectric transducer are presented. The collimated beam generation using the present technique of using the laterally clamped radial modes finds significant applications in low-frequency imaging through highly attenuating materials.

  6. Identification and classification of very low frequency waves on a coral reef flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehn, Matthijs; van Dongeran, Ap; van Rooijen, Arnold; Storlazzi, Curt; Cheriton, Olivia; Reniers, Ad

    2016-01-01

    Very low frequency (VLF, 0.001–0.005 Hz) waves are important drivers of flooding of low-lying coral reef-islands. In particular, VLF wave resonance is known to drive large wave runup and subsequent overwash. Using a 5 month data set of water levels and waves collected along a cross-reef transect on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the observed VLF motions were categorized into four different classes: (1) resonant, (2) (nonresonant) standing, (3) progressive-growing, and (4) progressive-dissipative waves. Each VLF class is set by the reef flat water depth and, in the case of resonance, the incident-band offshore wave period. Using an improved method to identify VLF wave resonance, we find that VLF wave resonance caused prolonged (∼0.5–6.0 h), large-amplitude water surface oscillations at the inner reef flat ranging in wave height from 0.14 to 0.83 m. It was induced by relatively long-period, grouped, incident-band waves, and occurred under both storm and nonstorm conditions. Moreover, observed resonant VLF waves had nonlinear, bore-like wave shapes, which likely have a larger impact on the shoreline than regular, sinusoidal waveforms. As an alternative technique to the commonly used Fast Fourier Transformation, we propose the Hilbert-Huang Transformation that is more computationally expensive but can capture the wave shape more accurately. This research demonstrates that understanding VLF waves on reef flats is important for evaluating coastal flooding hazards.

  7. Identification and classification of very low frequency waves on a coral reef flat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawehn, Matthijs; van Dongeren, Ap; van Rooijen, Arnold; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Cheriton, Olivia M.; Reniers, Ad

    2016-10-01

    Very low frequency (VLF, 0.001-0.005 Hz) waves are important drivers of flooding of low-lying coral reef-islands. In particular, VLF wave resonance is known to drive large wave runup and subsequent overwash. Using a 5 month data set of water levels and waves collected along a cross-reef transect on Roi-Namur Island in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the observed VLF motions were categorized into four different classes: (1) resonant, (2) (nonresonant) standing, (3) progressive-growing, and (4) progressive-dissipative waves. Each VLF class is set by the reef flat water depth and, in the case of resonance, the incident-band offshore wave period. Using an improved method to identify VLF wave resonance, we find that VLF wave resonance caused prolonged (˜0.5-6.0 h), large-amplitude water surface oscillations at the inner reef flat ranging in wave height from 0.14 to 0.83 m. It was induced by relatively long-period, grouped, incident-band waves, and occurred under both storm and nonstorm conditions. Moreover, observed resonant VLF waves had nonlinear, bore-like wave shapes, which likely have a larger impact on the shoreline than regular, sinusoidal waveforms. As an alternative technique to the commonly used Fast Fourier Transformation, we propose the Hilbert-Huang Transformation that is more computationally expensive but can capture the wave shape more accurately. This research demonstrates that understanding VLF waves on reef flats is important for evaluating coastal flooding hazards.

  8. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  9. Low-frequency Raman modes as fingerprints of layer stacking configurations of transition metal dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liangbo; Puretzky, Alexander; Sumpter, Bobby; Meunier, Vincent; Geohegan, David; David B. Geohegan Team; Vincent Meunier Team

    The tunable optoelectronic properties of stacked two-dimensional (2D) crystal monolayers are determined by their stacking orientation, order, and atomic registry. Atomic-resolution Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (AR-Z-STEM) can be used to determine the exact atomic registration between different layers in few-layer 2D stacks; however, fast and relatively inexpensive optical characterization techniques are essential for rapid development of the field. Using two- and three-layer MoSe2 and WSe2 crystals synthesized by chemical vapor deposition, we show that the generally unexplored low-frequency (LF) Raman modes (vibrations can serve as fingerprints to characterize not only the number of layers, but also their stacking configurations [Puretzky and Liang et al, ACS Nano 2015, 9, 6333]. First-principles Raman calculations and group theory analysis corroborate the experimental assignments determined by AR-Z-STEM and show that the calculated LF mode fingerprints are related to the 2D crystal symmetries. Our combined experimental/theoretical work demonstrates the LF Raman modes potentially more effective than HF Raman modes to probe the layer stacking and interlayer interaction for 2D materials. The authors acknowledge support from Eugene P. Wigner Fellowship at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  10. Low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes. (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnø, Leif; Bjelland, C.

    1992-01-01

    A model has been developed for propagation of low-frequency pressure waves in viscoelastic tubes with distensibility of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid. The dispersion and attenuation are shown to be strongly dependent on the viscoelastic properties of the tube wall....... The complex, frequency-dependent moduli of relevant tube materials have been measured in a series of experiments using three different experimental procedures, and the data obtained are compared. The three procedures were: (1) ultrasonic wave propagation, (2) transversal resonance in bar samples, and (3......) moduli determined by stress wave transfer function measurements in simple extension experiments. The moduli are used in the model to produce realistic dispersion relations and frequency dependent attenuation. Signal transfer functions between positions in the liquid-filled tube can be synthesized from...

  11. Low-frequency Gravitational-wave Science with eLISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallisneri, Michele; eLISA Science Study Team

    2013-01-01

    I review the expected science performance of eLISA, the proposed European-led gravitational-wave detector that may be selected as ESA "L2" Cosmic Vision mission. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  12. Torsion-bar antenna for low-frequency gravitational-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masaki; Ishidoshiro, Koji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Kent; Kokuyama, Wataru; Tsubono, Kimio; Takamori, Akiteru

    2010-10-15

    We propose a novel type of gravitational-wave antenna, formed by two bar-shaped test masses and laser-interferometric sensors to monitor their differential angular fluctuations. This antenna has a fundamental sensitivity to low-frequency signals below 1 Hz, even with a ground-based configuration. In addition, it is possible to expand the observation band to a lower limit determined by the observation time, by using modulation and up-conversion of gravitational-wave signals by rotation of the antenna. The potential sensitivity of this antenna is superior to those of current detectors in a 1 mHz-10 Hz frequency band and is sufficient for observations of gravitational waves radiated from in-spiral and merger events of intermediate-mass black holes.

  13. Low frequency sonic waves assisted cloud point extraction of polyhydroxyalkanoate from Cupriavidus necator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Sivananth; Iyyaswami, Regupathi

    2017-08-15

    Low frequency sonic waves, less than 10kHz were introduced to assist cloud point extraction of polyhydroxyalkanoate from Cupriavidus necator present within the crude broth. Process parameters including surfactant system variables and sonication parameters were studied for their effect on extraction efficiency. Introduction of low frequency sonic waves assists in the dissolution of microbial cell wall by the surfactant micelles and release of cellular content, polyhydroxyalkanoate granules released were encapsulated by the micelle core which was confirmed by crotonic acid assay. In addition, sonic waves resulted in the separation of homogeneous surfactant and broth mixture into two distinct phases, top aqueous phase and polyhydroxyalkanoate enriched bottom surfactant rich phase. Mixed surfactant systems showed higher extraction efficiency compared to that of individual Triton X-100 concentrations, owing to increase in the hydrophobicity of the micellar core and its interaction with polyhydroxyalkanoate. Addition of salts to the mixed surfactant system induces screening of charged surfactant head groups and reduces inter-micellar repulsion, presence of ammonium ions lead to electrostatic repulsion and weaker cation sodium enhances the formation of micellar network. Addition of polyethylene glycol 8000 resulted in increasing interaction with the surfactant tails of the micelle core there by reducing the purity of polyhydroxyalkanoate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonlinear low-frequency electrostatic wave dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Samiran, E-mail: sran_g@yahoo.com [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Calcutta, 92, Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata-700 009 (India); Chakrabarti, Nikhil, E-mail: nikhil.chakrabarti@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2016-08-15

    The problem of two-dimensional arbitrary amplitude low-frequency electrostatic oscillation in a quasi-neutral quantum plasma is solved exactly by elementary means. In such quantum plasmas we have treated electrons quantum mechanically and ions classically. The exact analytical solution of the nonlinear system exhibits the formation of dark and black solitons. Numerical simulation also predicts the possible periodic solution of the nonlinear system. Nonlinear analysis reveals that the system does have a bifurcation at a critical Mach number that depends on the angle of propagation of the wave. The small-amplitude limit leads to the formation of weakly nonlinear Kadomstev–Petviashvili solitons.

  15. The strange physics of low frequency mirror mode turbulence in the high temperature plasma of the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror mode turbulence is the lowest frequency perpendicular magnetic excitation in magnetized plasma proposed already about half a century ago by Rudakov and Sagdeev (1958 and Chandrasekhar et al. (1958 from fluid theory. Its experimental verification required a relatively long time. It was early recognized that mirror modes for being excited require a transverse pressure (or temperature anisotropy. In principle mirror modes are some version of slow mode waves. Fluid theory, however, does not give a correct physical picture of the mirror mode. The linear infinitesimally small amplitude physics is described correctly only by including the full kinetic theory and is modified by existing spatial gradients of the plasma parameters which attribute a small finite frequency to the mode. In addition, the mode is propagating only very slowly in plasma such that convective transport is the main cause of flow in it. As the lowest frequency mode it can be expected that mirror modes serve as one of the dominant energy inputs into plasma. This is however true only when the mode grows to large amplitude leaving the linear stage. At such low frequencies, on the other hand, quasilinear theory does not apply as a valid saturation mechanism. Probably the dominant processes are related to the generation of gradients in the plasma which serve as the cause of drift modes thus transferring energy to shorter wavelength propagating waves of higher nonzero frequency. This kind of theory has not yet been developed as it has not yet been understood why mirror modes in spite of their slow growth rate usually are of very large amplitudes indeed of the order of |B/B0|2~O(1. It is thus highly reasonable to assume that mirror modes are instrumental for the development of stationary turbulence in high temperature plasma. Moreover, since the magnetic field in mirror turbulence forms extended though slightly oblique magnetic bottles, low parallel energy particles can be trapped

  16. Low-frequency vibration modulation of guided waves to image nonlinear scatterers for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, J. P.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Neild, S. A.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2009-06-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring offers the prospect of continuous interrogation of large plate-like structures with a sparse network of permanently attached sensors. Currently, the most common approach is to monitor changes in the received signals by subtraction from a reference signal obtained when the structure was known to be defect-free. In this paper a comparison is made between this defect-free subtraction approach and a technique in which low-frequency vibration modulation of guided wave signals is used to detect nonlinear scatterers. The modulation technique potentially overcomes the need for the defect-free reference measurement as the subtraction is now made between different parts of an externally applied low-frequency vibration. Linear defects were simulated by masses bonded onto a plate and nonlinear scatterers were simulated by loading a similar mass against the plate. The experimental results show that the defect-free subtraction technique performs well in detecting the bonded mass whereas the modulation technique is able to discriminate between the bonded and loaded masses. Furthermore, because the modulation technique does not require a defect-free reference, it is shown to be relatively independent of temperature effects, a significant problem for reference based subtraction techniques.

  17. Attenuation Distance of Low Frequency Waves Upstream of the Pre-Dawn Bow Shock: GEOTAIL snd ISEE-3 Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock using both GEOTAIL and ISEE-3 magnetometer data.

  18. Double modulation of X radiation diffracted in a quartz single crystal by high and low frequency acoustic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kocharyan, L A; Bornazyan, H S

    1986-01-01

    The time dependence of X radiation diffracted in a quartz single crystal is experimentally investigated when surface acoustic waves modulated by low frequency oscillations of different frequencies and forms are excited in the crystal.

  19. Low-frequency wave propagation in an elastic plate loaded by a two-layer fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Indeitsev, Dmitrij; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    In several technical applications, for example, in the Arctic off-shore oil industry, it is necessary to predict waveguide properties of floating elastic plates in contact with a relatively thin layer of water, which has a non-uniform density distribution across its depth. The issue of particular...... concern is propagation of low-frequency waves in such a coupled waveguide. In the present paper, we assume that an inhomogeneous fluid may be modelled as two homogeneous, inviscid and incompressible layers with slightly different densities. The lighter layer of fresh water lies on top of the heavier layer...... of salty water. The former one produces fluid loading at the plate, whereas the latter one is bounded by the sea bottom. We employ classical asymptotic methods to identify significant regimes of wave motion in the compound three-component waveguide. The roles of parameters involved in the problem...

  20. TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY IN THE PRESENCE OF ULTRA LOW FREQUENCY WAVES IN THE TERRESTRIAL FORESHOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selzer, L. A.; Hnat, B.; Osman, K. T.; Nakariakov, V. M. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Eastwood, J. P. [Space and Atmospheric Physics, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Burgess, D., E-mail: L.A.Selzer@warwick.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-10

    We report the first study of the correlation between elevated solar wind core plasma temperatures and temperature anisotropy in the terrestrial foreshock. Plasma temperature is enhanced near the fire hose marginal stability threshold in the presence of ultra low frequency (ULF) large amplitude magnetic perturbations, which are intrinsically right-hand circularly polarized. Direct comparison of contemporaneous anisotropic temperatures in the upstream solar wind and the foreshock suggests that the net heating of plasma is mediated via increase of the parallel temperature in the foreshock region where the ULF waves are present. We consider the possibility that a mechanism based on Landau damping, where solar wind plasma temperature parallel to the background magnetic field is increased by interaction with oblique compressible fast magneto-acoustic ULF waves, influences temperature anisotropy.

  1. Low-frequency wiggler modes in the free-electron laser with a dusty magnetoplasma medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, S.

    2015-07-01

    An advanced incremental scheme for generating tunable coherent radiation in a free-electron laser has been presented: the basic concept is the use of a relativistic electron beam propagating through a magnetized dusty plasma channel where dust helicon, dust Alfven and coupled dust cyclotron-Alfven waves can play a role as a low-frequency wiggler, triggering coherent emissions. The wiggler wavelength at the sub-mm level allows one to reach the wavelength range from a few nm down to a few Å with moderately relativistic electrons of kinetic energies of a few tens/hundreds of MeV. The laser gain and the effects of beam self-electric and self-magnetic fields on the gain have been estimated and compared with findings of the helical magnetic and electromagnetic wigglers in vacuum. To study the chaotic regions of the electron motion in the dusty plasma wave wiggler, a time independent Hamiltonian has been obtained. The Poincare surface of a section map has been used numerically to analyze the nonintegrable system where chaotic regions in phase-space emerge. This concept opens a path toward a new generation of synchrotron sources based on compact plasma structures.

  2. Surface-enhnaced Raman scattering from silver electrodes: Potencial and cation dependences of the very-low-frequency mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, M.; Hill, I. R.; Robinson, J.

    1983-05-01

    The very-low-frequency mode observed in SERS experiments near 8 cm -1 is shown to shift both with the nature of the cation and with potential. The assignment of this mode to acoustic vibrations in the metal is discussed with respect to the chemical specificity of the shifts.

  3. Task-Related Modulations of BOLD Low-Frequency Fluctuations within the Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tommasin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous low-frequency Blood-Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD signals acquired during resting state are characterized by spatial patterns of synchronous fluctuations, ultimately leading to the identification of robust brain networks. The resting-state brain networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN, are demonstrated to persist during sustained task execution, but the exact features of task-related changes of network properties are still not well characterized. In this work we sought to examine in a group of 20 healthy volunteers (age 33 ± 6 years, 8 F/12 M the relationship between changes of spectral and spatiotemporal features of one prominent resting-state network, namely the DMN, during the continuous execution of a working memory n-back task. We found that task execution impacted on both functional connectivity and amplitude of BOLD fluctuations within large parts of the DMN, but these changes correlated between each other only in a small area of the posterior cingulate. We conclude that combined analysis of multiple parameters related to connectivity, and their changes during the transition from resting state to continuous task execution, can contribute to a better understanding of how brain networks rearrange themselves in response to a task.

  4. The linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) position sensor for gravitational wave interferometer low-frequency controls

    CERN Document Server

    Tariq, H; Vetrano, F; Wang Chen Yang; Bertolini, A; Calamai, G; DeSalvo, R; Gennai, A; Holloway, L E; Losurdo, G; Marka, S; Mazzoni, M; Paoletti, F; Passuello, D; Sannibale, V; Stanga, R

    2002-01-01

    Low-power, ultra-high-vacuum compatible, non-contacting position sensors with nanometer resolution and centimeter dynamic range have been developed, built and tested. They have been designed at Virgo as the sensors for low-frequency modal damping of Seismic Attenuation System chains in Gravitational Wave interferometers and sub-micron absolute mirror positioning. One type of these linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) has been designed to be also insensitive to transversal displacement thus allowing 3D movement of the sensor head while still precisely reading its position along the sensitivity axis. A second LVDT geometry has been designed to measure the displacement of the vertical seismic attenuation filters from their nominal position. Unlike the commercial LVDTs, mostly based on magnetic cores, the LVDTs described here exert no force on the measured structure.

  5. Scalar and Vector Nonlinear Decays of Low-frequency Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J. S.; Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J.; Wu, D. J.

    2015-02-01

    We found several efficient nonlinear decays for Alfvén waves in the solar wind conditions. Depending on the wavelength, the dominant decay is controlled by the nonlinearities proportional to either scalar or vector products of wavevectors. The two-mode decays of the pump MHD Alfvén wave into co- and counter-propagating product Alfvén and slow waves are controlled by the scalar nonlinearities at long wavelengths ρ i2k0\\perp 2background magnetic field, ω0 is frequency of the pump Alfvén wave, ρ i is ion gyroradius, and ω ci is ion-cyclotron frequency). The scalar decays exhibit both local and nonlocal properties and can generate not only MHD-scale but also kinetic-scale Alfvén and slow waves, which can strongly accelerate spectral transport. All waves in the scalar decays propagate in the same plane, hence these decays are two-dimensional. At shorter wavelengths, ρ i2k0\\perp 2\\gtω 0/ω ci, three-dimensional vector decays dominate generating out-of-plane product waves. The two-mode decays dominate from MHD up to ion scales ρ i k 0 ~= 0.3; at shorter scales the one-mode vector decays become stronger and generate only Alfvén product waves. In the solar wind the two-mode decays have high growth rates >0.1ω0 and can explain the origin of slow waves observed at kinetic scales.

  6. SCALAR AND VECTOR NONLINEAR DECAYS OF LOW-FREQUENCY ALFVÉN WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, J. S.; Wu, D. J. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: js_zhao@pmo.ac.cn [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan 3 Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-02-01

    We found several efficient nonlinear decays for Alfvén waves in the solar wind conditions. Depending on the wavelength, the dominant decay is controlled by the nonlinearities proportional to either scalar or vector products of wavevectors. The two-mode decays of the pump MHD Alfvén wave into co- and counter-propagating product Alfvén and slow waves are controlled by the scalar nonlinearities at long wavelengths ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}<ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci} (k {sub 0} is wavenumber perpendicular to the background magnetic field, ω{sub 0} is frequency of the pump Alfvén wave, ρ {sub i} is ion gyroradius, and ω {sub ci} is ion-cyclotron frequency). The scalar decays exhibit both local and nonlocal properties and can generate not only MHD-scale but also kinetic-scale Alfvén and slow waves, which can strongly accelerate spectral transport. All waves in the scalar decays propagate in the same plane, hence these decays are two-dimensional. At shorter wavelengths, ρ{sub i}{sup 2}k{sub 0⊥}{sup 2}>ω{sub 0}/ω{sub ci}, three-dimensional vector decays dominate generating out-of-plane product waves. The two-mode decays dominate from MHD up to ion scales ρ {sub i} k {sub 0} ≅ 0.3; at shorter scales the one-mode vector decays become stronger and generate only Alfvén product waves. In the solar wind the two-mode decays have high growth rates >0.1ω{sub 0} and can explain the origin of slow waves observed at kinetic scales.

  7. Low-Frequency Gravitational-Wave Science with eLISA/ NGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Aoudia, Sofiane; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J.; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N.; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T.; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K.; Schutz, Bernard F.; Stebbins, Robin; Vallisneri, Michele

    2011-01-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  8. Low-frequency gravitational-wave science with eLISA/NGO

    CERN Document Server

    Amaro-Seoane, Pau; Babak, Stanislav; Binetruy, Pierre; Berti, Emanuele; Bohe, Alejandro; Caprini, Chiara; Colpi, Monica; Cornish, Neil J; Danzmann, Karsten; Dufaux, Jean-Francois; Gair, Jonathan; Jennrich, Oliver; Jetzer, Philippe; Klein, Antoine; Lang, Ryan N; Lobo, Alberto; Littenberg, Tyson; McWilliams, Sean T; Nelemans, Gijs; Petiteau, Antoine; Porter, Edward K; Schutz, Bernard F; Sesana, Alberto; Stebbins, Robin; Sumner, Tim; Vallisneri, Michele; Vitale, Stefano; Volonteri, Marta; Ward, Henry

    2012-01-01

    We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.

  9. Raman scattering studies of the low-frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water—observation of an axial torsion mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, K. T.; Dykeman, Eric C.; Sankey, Otto F.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Lin, Nien-Tsung; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2006-11-01

    Low-wavenumber (detection and characterization of this low-frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly.

  10. Traveling wave tube measurements for low-frequency properties of underwater acoustic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A traveling wave tube measurement technique for measuring acoustic properties of underwater acoustic materials was developed. Water temperature and pressure environments of the ocean can be simulated in a water-filled tube, and the acoustic parameters of samples of underwater acoustic materials are measured in the range of low-frequency. A tested sample is located at central position of the tube. A pair of projectors is separately located at both ends of the tube. Using an active anechoic technique, the sound wave transmitting the tested sample is hardly reflected by the surface of secondary transducer. So the traveling sound field is built up in the tube. By separately calculating the transfer functions of every pair of double hydrophones in the sound fields from the both sides of the sample, its reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients are obtained. In the measurement system, the inside diameter of the tube is Φ208 mm, the working frequency range is from 100 to 4000 Hz, the maximum pressure is 5 MPa. The reflection coefficients and transmission coefficients of a water layer and a stainless steel layer samples are measured actually and calculated theoretically. The results show that the measured values are in good agreement with the values calculated, and the measurement uncertainty is not greater than 1.5 dB.

  11. Viscoelastic characteristics of low-frequency seismic wave attenuation in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Yun; Han Li-Guo; Zhang Yi-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Mesoscopic fluid flow is the major cause of wave attenuation and velocity dispersion at seismic frequencies in porous rocks. The Johnson model provides solutions for the frequency-dependent quality factor and phase velocity in partially saturated porous media with pore patches of arbitrary shapes. We use the Johnson model to derive approximations for the quality factor Q at the high and low frequency limit, and obtain the approximate equation for Qmin based on geophysical and geometric parameters. A more accurate equation for Qmin is obtained after correcting for the linear errors between the exact and approximate Q values. The complexity of the pore patch shape affects the maximum attenuation of Qmin and the transition frequency ftr;furthermore, the effect on ftr is stronger than that on Qmin. Numerical solutions to Biot’s equation are computationally intensive; thus, we build an equivalent viscoelastic model on the basis of the Zener model, which well approximates the wave attenuation and dispersion in porous rocks in the seismic band.

  12. Characterization of compressed earth blocks using low frequency guided acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mansour, Mohamed; Ogam, Erick; Fellah, Z E A; Soukaina Cherif, Amel; Jelidi, Ahmed; Ben Jabrallah, Sadok

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this work was to analyze the influence of compaction pressure on the intrinsic acoustic parameters (porosity, tortuosity, air-flow resistivity, viscous, and thermal characteristic lengths) of compressed earth blocks through their identification by solving an inverse acoustic wave transmission problem. A low frequency acoustic pipe (60-6000 Hz of length 22 m, internal diameter 3.4 cm) was used for the experimental characterization of the samples. The parameters were identified by the minimization of the difference between the transmissions coefficients data obtained in the pipe with that from an analytical interaction model in which the compressed earth blocks were considered as having rigid frames. The viscous and thermal effects in the pores were accounted for by employing the Johnson-Champoux-Allard-Lafarge model. The results obtained by inversion for high-density compressed earth blocks showed some discordance between the model and experiment especially for the high frequency limit of the acoustic characteristics studied. This was as a consequence of applying high compaction pressure rendering them very highly resistive therefore degrading the signal-to-noise ratios of the transmitted waves. The results showed that the airflow resistivity was very sensitive to the degree of the applied compaction pressure used to form the blocks.

  13. Potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaran, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The main aim is to present the available updated knowledge regarding the potential health effects of standing waves generated by low frequency noise (LFN) from an open window in a moving car where the negative effects of LFN induced by heating components and/or heating, ventilation and air-conditioning are assessed. Furthermore, the assessment of noise in chosen enclosed spaces, such as rooms, offices, and classrooms, or other LFN sources and their effect on the human being were investigated. These types of noise are responsible for disturbance during relaxation, sleep, mental work, education, and concentration, which may reflect negatively on the comfort and health of the population and on the mental state of people such as scientific staff and students. The assessment points out the most exposed areas, and analyzes the conditions of standing wave generation in these rooms caused by outdoor and/or indoor sources. Measurements were made for three different enclosed spaces (office, flat, and passenger car) and sources (traffic specific noise at intersections, noise induced by pipe vibration, and aerodynamic noise) and their operating conditions. For the detection of LFN, the A-weighted sound pressure level and vibration were measured and a fast Fourier transform analysis was used. The LFN sources are specified and the direct effects on the human are reported. Finally, this paper suggests the possibilities for the assessment of LFN and some possible measures that can be taken to prevent or reduce them.

  14. Theory of the low frequency mechanical modes and Raman spectra of the M13 bacteriophage capsid with atomic detail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykeman, Eric C; Sankey, Otto F

    2009-01-21

    We present a theoretical study of the low frequency vibrational modes of the M13 bacteriophage using a fully atomistic model. Using ideas from electronic structure theory, the few lowest vibrational modes of the M13 bacteriophage are determined using classical harmonic analysis. The relative Raman intensity is estimated for each of the mechanical modes using a bond polarizability model. Comparison of the atomic mechanical modes calculated here with modes derived from elastic continuum theory shows that a much richer spectrum emerges from an atomistic picture.

  15. Low-frequency relaxation modes and structural disorder in KTa1-xNbxO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, J. P.; Chase, L. L.; Boatner, L. A.

    1990-02-01

    A light-scattering study of the low-frequency excitations in single crystals of cubic and tetragonal KTa1-xNbxO3 (x=0.26 and 0.28) has been carried out by employing a technique which uses an Iodine filter to remove elastically scattered light. Low-frequency Raman and Fabry-Pérot components related to structural disorder in the mixed-crystal tantalate-niobate system were observed. The spectral shape, symmetry properties, and thermal behavior of these components are consistent with an eight-site order-disorder model of the sequence of structural phase transitions observed in ferrodistortive perovskites.

  16. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D V; Andersen, M; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Ashton, G; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Bartlett, J; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Branco, V; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M D; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J M; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Germain, V; Ghosh, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J R; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez, J; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hoelscher-Obermaier, J; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isler, J C; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M B; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Karlen, J L; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kerrigan, J; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J T; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, J P; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Lewis, J B; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macarthur, J; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Madden-Fong, D X; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, A; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Okounkova, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W E; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C T; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patrick, Z; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J H; Poggiani, R; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rodger, A S; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Santiago-Prieto, I; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaffery, P; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepanczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C van den; van der Schaaf, L; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, M; Wade, L E; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, K J; Williams, L; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 Hz and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between $-1.0 \\times 10^{-10}$ Hz/s and $+1.5 \\times 10^{-11}$ Hz/s, and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT), of length 8192 seconds, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, both in the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each dataset a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and...

  17. Global low-frequency modes in weakly ionized magnetized plasmas: effects of equilibrium plasma rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosenko, P.; Pierre, Th. [Universite Marseille, Lab. PIIM - UMR6633 CNRS, Centre Saint Jerome, 13 - Marseille (France); Zagorodny, A. [Nancy-1 Univ. Henri Poincare, Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises (LPMIA, UPRES-A), Nancy 54 (France); International Centre of Physics, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2004-07-01

    The linear and non-linear properties of global low-frequency oscillations in cylindrical weakly ionized magnetized plasmas are investigated analytically for the conditions of equilibrium plasma rotation. The theoretical results are compared with the experimental observations of rotating plasmas in laboratory devices, such as Mistral and Mirabelle in France, and KIWI in Germany. (authors)

  18. Modeling and experiments with low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelland, C; Bjarnø, Leif

    1992-01-01

    A model for wave propagation in a liquid-filled viscoelastic tube with arrays of receivers inside, is being used to analyze the influence of noise generated by in-line vibrational noise sources. In this model, distensibility is of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid....... The dispersion and attenuation is shown to be strongly dependent on the viscoelastic properties of the tube wall. The complex, frequency-dependent moduli of relevant tube materials have been measured in stress wave transfer function experiments. The moduli are used in the model to produce realistic dispersion...... relations and frequency-dependent attenuation. A 12-m-long, liquid-filled tube with interior stress members and connectors in each end is hanging vertically from an upper fixture. The lower end connector is excited by a power vibrator to generate the relevant wave modes. Measurements with reference...

  19. First low frequency all-sky search for continuous gravitational wave signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D. V.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Ashton, G.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Branco, V.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Colombini, M.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Canton, T. Dal; Damjanic, M. D.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J. M.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Gergely, L. Á.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gleason, J. R.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez, J.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the results of the first low frequency all-sky search of continuous gravitational wave signals conducted on Virgo VSR2 and VSR4 data. The search covered the full sky, a frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz with a range of spin-down between -1.0 ×10-10 and +1.5 ×10-11 Hz /s , and was based on a hierarchical approach. The starting point was a set of short fast Fourier transforms, of length 8192 s, built from the calibrated strain data. Aggressive data cleaning, in both the time and frequency domains, has been done in order to remove, as much as possible, the effect of disturbances of instrumental origin. On each data set a number of candidates has been selected, using the FrequencyHough transform in an incoherent step. Only coincident candidates among VSR2 and VSR4 have been examined in order to strongly reduce the false alarm probability, and the most significant candidates have been selected. The criteria we have used for candidate selection and for the coincidence step greatly reduce the harmful effect of large instrumental artifacts. Selected candidates have been subject to a follow-up by constructing a new set of longer fast Fourier transforms followed by a further incoherent analysis, still based on the FrequencyHough transform. No evidence for continuous gravitational wave signals was found, and therefore we have set a population-based joint VSR2-VSR4 90% confidence level upper limit on the dimensionless gravitational wave strain in the frequency range between 20 and 128 Hz. This is the first all-sky search for continuous gravitational waves conducted, on data of ground-based interferometric detectors, at frequencies below 50 Hz. We set upper limits in the range between about 1 0-24 and 2 ×10-23 at most frequencies. Our upper limits on signal strain show an improvement of up to a factor of ˜2 with respect to the results of previous all-sky searches at frequencies below 80 Hz.

  20. Plasma filamentation and shock wave enhancement in microwave rockets by combining low-frequency microwaves with external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    A filamentary plasma is reproduced based on a fully kinetic model of electron and ion transports coupled with electromagnetic wave propagation. The discharge plasma transits from discrete to diffusive patterns at a 110-GHz breakdown, with decrease in the ambient pressure, because of the rapid electron diffusion that occurs during an increase in the propagation speed of the ionization front. A discrete plasma is obtained at low pressures when a low-frequency microwave is irradiated because the ionization process becomes more dominant than the electron diffusion, when the electrons are effectively heated by the low-frequency microwave. The propagation speed of the plasma increases with decrease in the incident microwave frequency because of the higher ionization frequency and faster plasma diffusion resulting from the increase in the energy-absorption rate. An external magnetic field is applied to the breakdown volume, which induces plasma filamentation at lower pressures because the electron diffusion is suppressed by the magnetic field. The thrust performance of a microwave rocket is improved by the magnetic fields corresponding to the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) and its higher-harmonic heating, because slower propagation of the ionization front and larger energy-absorption rates are obtained at lower pressures. It would be advantageous if the fundamental mode of ECR heating is coupled with a lower frequency microwave instead of combining the higher-harmonic ECR heating with the higher frequency microwave. This can improve the thrust performance with smaller magnetic fields even if the propagation speed increases because of the decrease in the incident microwave frequency.

  1. Improving Processes of Mechanized Pulsed Arc Welding of Low-Frequency Range Variation of Mode Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraev, Yu N.; Solodskiy, S. A.; Ulyanova, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    A new technology of low-frequency modulation of the arc current in MAG and MIG welding is presented. The technology provides control of thermal and crystallization processes, stabilizes the time of formation and crystallization of the weld pool. Conducting theoretical studies allowed formulating the basic criteria for obtaining strong permanent joints for high-duty structures, providing conditions for more equilibrium structure of the deposited metal and the smaller width of the HAZ. The stabilization of time of the formation and crystallization of the weld pool improves the formation of the weld and increases productivity in welding thin sheet metal.

  2. Acoustic Energy Harvesting Using Piezoelectric Generator for Low Frequency Sound Waves Energy Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Fazilah Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The applications of electronic devices with low power consumption, such as wireless sensor network and electronic communication devices, are rapidly increasing. Thus, utilizing environmental energy as an alternative to electrochemical battery, which has a finite lifespan, can be a great advantage to these electronic devices. Harvesting environmental energy, such as solar, thermal, wind flow, water current, and raindrops, has attracted increasing research interest in the field of energy harvesting. In this paper, harvesting sound energy in the form of pressure waves is investigated as an alternative to existing energy harvesting methods. In the experimental work, a piezoelectric generator lead zirconate titanate (PZT-5A cantilever type is used to extract sound energy from the loudspeaker from various distances and then to convert this energy into electrical energy. A direct piezoelectric effect operating in 31 coupling mode is used. The maximum voltage generated by the piezoelectric generator occurs when its resonant frequency is operating near the frequency of sound. An analytical method with an appropriate equation is used to determine the resonant frequency and is then validated using the experimental result. The result shows that the maximum output voltage of 26.7 mVrms was obtained with the sound intensity of 78.6 dB at resonant frequency of 62 Hz at 1 cm distance in the first mode. In the second mode, the maximum output voltage of 91 mVrms was obtained with the sound intensity of 102.6 dB at resonant frequency of 374 Hz at 1 cm distance which is larger than that of the first mode. However, for both modes, voltage decreases as distance increases.

  3. A low-frequency wave motion mechanism enables efficient energy transport in carbon nanotubes at high heat fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2012-07-11

    The great majority of investigations of thermal transport in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the open literature focus on low heat fluxes, that is, in the regime of validity of the Fourier heat conduction law. In this paper, by performing nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations we investigated thermal transport in a single-walled CNT bridging two Si slabs under constant high heat flux. An anomalous wave-like kinetic energy profile was observed, and a previously unexplored, wave-dominated energy transport mechanism is identified for high heat fluxes in CNTs, originated from excited low frequency transverse acoustic waves. The transported energy, in terms of a one-dimensional low frequency mechanical wave, is quantified as a function of the total heat flux applied and is compared to the energy transported by traditional Fourier heat conduction. The results show that the low frequency wave actually overtakes traditional Fourier heat conduction and efficiently transports the energy at high heat flux. Our findings reveal an important new mechanism for high heat flux energy transport in low-dimensional nanostructures, such as one-dimensional (1-D) nanotubes and nanowires, which could be very relevant to high heat flux dissipation such as in micro/nanoelectronics applications.

  4. Observation of mode transition and low-frequency oscillations in magnetically constricted anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, S.; Ranjan, M.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Mukherjee, S.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the discharge behaviour and the mode transition observed in a magnetically constricted anode device. With an increase in pressure, the central droplet shaped glow shrunk and abruptly switched to peripheral glow mode for pressure above 5 ×10-2 mbar . This transition is observed when the width of the droplet shaped glow at the anode approaches the diameter of the central magnet. The mode transition is observed as a sudden jump in the discharge current, which obeys a different power law than the previous discharge mode. Further, this new mode is observed to accompany the global oscillations in the range of few kHz.

  5. Applications of a plane wave based room correction system for low frequencies using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    System (CABS) produces uniform sound field at low frequencies. This is performed by utilizing loudspeakers at the front wall and extra loudspeakers at the opposite wall, processed to remove the rear-wall reflection of a rectangular room. Effectiveness of CABS on different room scenarios has been...

  6. Waves of change: immunomodulation of the innate immune response by low frequency electromagnetic field exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golbach, L.A.

    2015-01-01

      In this thesis we investigated possible modulatory roles of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LF EMFs) exposure on the innate immune system. Recent decades have seen a huge increase in the use of electronic devices that nowadays enable us to communicate with distant family, enjoy music ev

  7. Evidence of low frequency waves penetration in the ionosphere observed by Chibis-M satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronenko, Vira; Dudkin, Fedir; Korepanov, Valery

    2016-07-01

    Chibis-M microsatellite (MS) was launched using ISS infrastructure to the 500 km circular orbit with inclination 52° and successfully operated during the years 2012-2014. One of the main tasks of this experiment was the study of how powerful natural and technogenic processes are reflected in the ionosphere. For this study, the magnetic wave complex (MWC) was used which measured one electrical component and three components of the magnetic vector in the frequency range 0.1 Hz-40 kHz. Due to the proximity of the magnetic sensors and the satellite control system, their high sensitivity (up to 0.02 pT/sqrt(Hz)) was not used in full because the level of magnetic noise was about 10 pT/sqrt(Hz) in the low-frequency range. Nevertheless, owing to the symmetric fixation of the electric probes relative to the satellite body, the electrical sensor provided high accuracy measurements (about 0.8-0.04 (µV/m)/sqrt(Hz)) in the frequency range of 0.1-40 000 Hz, despite the very small measurement base of 0.42 m. This allowed us to collect valuable information which revealed a number of interesting physical effects, especially in ultralow frequency (ULF) range. In ULF range the ionospheric emissions with a central frequency of 50 (60) Hz - power line emissions (PLE) and the Schumann resonance harmonics (SR) were detected, though, according to the present model of the ionosphere, they have not penetrate there. A detailed study of the obtained data revealed the features of PLE and SR. The spatial distribution of PLE and their connection with the power lines location on the ground were analyzed. It was found that the intensity of PLE depends on the load characteristics of the power line and usually has a minimum in the morning. The cases of an extra long distance of PLE propagation in the Earth's ionosphere over oceans in the equatorial region have been also observed. Further, it was detected that PLE has been recorded both in the shaded and sunlit parts of the orbits and their

  8. Gravitational Wave Track in the Electromagnetic Field of the Earth in the Infra-Low Frequency Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunskaya, L. V.; Isakevich, V. V.; Isakevich, D. V.; Luk'ianov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    Signals in the infra-low frequency range in the electric and geomagnetic fields of the Earth have been detected, corresponding to frequencies of gravitational waves (GWs) emitted by a series of binary star systems (BSS). The coherence of the detected signals has been investigated. The amplitude characteristics of signals in the electric and geomagnetic fields at GW frequencies of BSS are estimated. The estimates of the amplitudes of the detected signals are in line with model estimates.

  9. Nonlinear coupling of lower hybrid waves to the kinetic low-frequency plasma response in the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanbonmatsu, K. Y.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.

    A hybrid kinetic-fluid model is developed which is relevant to lower hybrid spikelets observed in the topside auroral ionosphere [Vago et al., 1992; Eriksson et al., 1994]. In contrast to previous fluid models [Shapiro et al., 1995; Tam and Chang, 1995; Seyler, 1994; Shapiro et al., 1993] our linear low frequency plasma response is magnetized and kinetic. Fluid theory is used to incorporate the nonlinear wave coupling. Performing a linear stability analysis, we calculate the growth rate for the modulational instability, driven by a lower hybrid wave pump. We find that both the magnetic and kinetic effects inhibit the modulational instability.

  10. Transition and Interaction of Low-Frequency Magnetohydrodynamic Modes during Neutral Beam Injection Heating on HL-2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liming; Chen, Wei; Ding, Xuantong; Ji, Xiaoquan; Shi, Zhongbing; Yu, Deliang; Jiang, Min; Li, Dong; Li, Jiaxian; Li, Yonggao; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Rui; Li, Wei; Feng, Beibin; Huang, Yuan; Song, Xianming; Cao, Jianyong; Rao, Jun; Dong, Jiaqi; Xu, Min; Liu, Yi; Yan, Longwen; Yang, Qingwei; Xu, Yuhong; Duan, Xuru

    2017-02-01

    The strong fishbone mode (FB) and long-lived mode (LLM) have been observed during neutral beam injection (NBI) on the HL-2A tokamak. The FB and LLM can transit between each other. The LLM is identified as an internal kink mode (IKM) with the mode structure obtained using a newly developed electron cyclotron emission radiometer imaging (ECEI) system. The frequency of the LLM (fLLM) is higher than the toroidal rotation frequency (ft) near the q = 1 surface (r ˜ 10 cm). Experimental results show that the LLM is likely to be excited at a higher line-averaged electron density (bar{n}e) than that of the FB when the NBI power is fixed. It is found that the FB and its harmonic as seed magnetic islands can trigger tearing modes (TMs). The mode numbers for the low-frequency and high-frequency TMs are m/n = 2/1 and 3/2, respectively. By further investigation, it is found that there is an m/n = 1/1 IKM coexisting at the same time and with the same frequency as the m/n = 2/1 TM, and the m = 1 mode structure of the IKM in the radial cross section is obtained by the Bayesian tomography method utilizing soft X-ray arrays. The nonlinear coupling conditions are satisfied among the two TMs and IKM.

  11. Cross-polarization scattering from low-frequency waves in a tandem mirror plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogi, Yuichiro; Mase, Atsushi; Bruskin, L.G.; Oyama, Naoyuki; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Itakura, Akiyosi; Hojo, Hitoshi; Tamano, Teruo [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Plasma Research Center

    1997-05-01

    Cross-polarization scattering (CPS) diagnostic was applied to the central-cell plasma of the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror in order to study electromagnetic plasma waves with frequencies of less than 200 kHz. In the CPS process, an incident ordinary (extraordinary) wave is converted to an extraordinary (ordinary) wave by magnetic fluctuations in a plasma. The converted wave propagates through the cutoff layer and reaches the opposite diagnostic port. The experimental data suggest that the power spectral density of the CPS signal satisfies the Bragg condition, while the reflectometer detects the waves near the cutoff layer where the wave number cannot be resolved. (author)

  12. Ultra low frequency waves observed by Double Star TC-1 in the plasmasphere boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The characteristic and properties of ULF waves in the plasmasphere boundary layer during two very quiet periods are present. The ULF waves were detected by Double Star TC-1 when the spacecraft passed through the plasmasphere in an outbound and inbound trajectories, respectively. A clear association between the ULF waves and periodic variations of energetic ions fluxes was observed. The ob-servations showed that the wave frequency was higher inside the plasmasphere than outside. The mechanism generating these ULF waves and possible diagnos-ing of the "classical plasmapause" location with the ULF wave were discussed.

  13. Applications of a plane wave based room correction system for low frequencies using multiple loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2008-01-01

    When low frequency sound is radiated inside small listening spaces by loudspeakers, large uniformities occur over the sound field. This is due to the multiple reflection and diffraction of sound on the walls and different objects in the room. A developed system named Controlled Acoustically Bass...... evaluated by using a computer simulation program based on the Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD). CABS has been simulated in a small car cabin and in an irregular room. Non-ideal placement of loudspeakers in CABS have been evaluated. The influence of utilizing CABS with different types...

  14. Low-Frequency Electrostatic Ion Surface Waves in Magnetized Electron-Positron Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Hee J.

    The dispersion relations of a surface ion wave propagating on the interface between a warm electron-positron plasma and vacuum when a static magnetic field is directed either normal to the interface (x-wave) or parallel to the wave vector (z-wave) are solved analytically, and the influence of the magnetic field on the ion surface wave is investigated in detail using some numerical work. It is shown that ion surface waves do not exist if the magnetic field is large enough to make the ion gyrofrequency greater than the ion plasma frequency. The attenuation constant of x-waves is more attenuated than that of z-waves and the x-wave is more attenuated as the parameter normalized ion gyrofrequency ζ increases toward 1, but this tendency is reversed for the z-wave. The z-wave does not exist for k2λD2< (ζ/(1-ζ))(p + 1) while the x-wave exists over the whole range of k, where the fractional number p is the ratio between the unperturbed positron and the electron number density. Additionally, we compare the ion surface wave properties of electron-positron plasma with conventional electron-ion plasma.

  15. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves through plasma in the near-field region of low-frequency loop antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, DongLin, E-mail: donglinliu@stu.xidian.edu.cn; Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei [School of Aerospace Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2015-10-15

    A high-speed vehicle flying through the atmosphere between 100 and 20 km may suffer from a “communication blackout.” In this paper, a low frequency system with an on-board loop antenna to receive signals is presented as a potential blackout mitigation method. Because the plasma sheath is in the near-field region of the loop antenna, the traditional scattering matrix method that is developed for the far-field region may overestimate the electromagnetic (EM) wave's attenuation. To estimate the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region, EM interference (EMI) shielding theory is introduced. Experiments are conducted, and the results verify the EMI shielding theory's effectiveness. Simulations are also conducted with different plasma parameters, and the results obtained show that the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region is far below than that in the far-field region. The EM wave's attenuation increases with the increase in electron density and decreases with the increase in collision frequency. The higher the frequency, the larger is the EM wave's attenuation. During the entire re-entry phase of a RAM-C module, the EM wave's attenuations are below 10 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 1 MHz and below 1 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 100 kHz. Therefore, the low frequency systems (e.g., Loran-C) may provide a way to transmit some key information to high-speed vehicles even during the communication “blackout” period.

  16. Sub-picosecond ultra-low frequency passively mode-locked fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado-Laborde, Christian; Cruz, José L.; Díez, Antonio; Andrés, Miguel V.

    2016-11-01

    We developed a nonlinear polarization rotation all-fiber mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser, with the purpose to reach a sub-picosecond and sub-megahertz light pulse emission. In the process, we observed three different emission regimes as the net birefringence is changed, namely high-power dissipative soliton resonance, low-power soliton regime, and a mixed combination of both. In the pure solitonic regime, a 0.961 MHz train of chirp-free Gaussian pulses was obtained, with a time width of 0.919 ps at 1564.3 nm.

  17. A Study of Subseasonal Predictability of the Atmospheric Circulation Low-frequency Modes based on SL-AV forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglova, Ekaterina; Kulikova, Irina; Khan, Valentina; Tischenko, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    The subseasonal predictability of low-frequency modes and the atmospheric circulation regimes is investigated based on the using of outputs from global Semi-Lagrangian (SL-AV) model of the Hydrometcentre of Russia and Institute of Numerical Mathematics of Russian Academy of Science. Teleconnection indices (AO, WA, EA, NAO, EU, WP, PNA) are used as the quantitative characteristics of low-frequency variability to identify zonal and meridional flow regimes with focus on control distribution of high impact weather patterns in the Northern Eurasia. The predictability of weekly and monthly averaged indices is estimated by the methods of diagnostic verification of forecast and reanalysis data covering the hindcast period, and also with the use of the recommended WMO quantitative criteria. Characteristics of the low frequency variability have been discussed. Particularly, it is revealed that the meridional flow regimes are reproduced by SL-AV for summer season better comparing to winter period. It is shown that the model's deterministic forecast (ensemble mean) skill at week 1 (days 1-7) is noticeably better than that of climatic forecasts. The decrease of skill scores at week 2 (days 8-14) and week 3( days 15-21) is explained by deficiencies in the modeling system and inaccurate initial conditions. It was noticed the slightly improvement of the skill of model at week 4 (days 22-28), when the condition of atmosphere is more determined by the flow of energy from the outside. The reliability of forecasts of monthly (days 1-30) averaged indices is comparable to that at week 1 (days 1-7). Numerical experiments demonstrated that the forecast accuracy can be improved (thus the limit of practical predictability can be extended) through the using of probabilistic approach based on ensemble forecasts. It is shown that the quality of forecasts of the regimes of circulation like blocking is higher, than that of zonal flow.

  18. Sympathetically-induced changes in microvascular cerebral blood flow and in the morphology of its low-frequency waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deriu, F; Roatta, S; Grassi, C; Urciuoli, R; Micieli, G; Passatore, M

    1996-06-10

    The effect of bilateral cervical sympathetic nerve stimulation on microvascular cerebral blood flow, recorded at various depths in the parietal lobe and in ponto-mesencephalic areas, was investigated by laser-Doppler flowmetry in normotensive rabbits. These areas were chosen as representative of the vascular beds supplied by the carotid and vertebro-basilar systems, which exhibit different degrees of sympathetic innervation, the former being richer than the latter. Sympathetic stimulation at 30 imp/s affects cerebral blood flow in 77% of the parietal lobe and in 43% of the ponto-mesencephalic tested areas. In both cases the predominant effect was a reduction in blood flow (14.7 +/- 5.1% and 4.1 +/- 2.4%, respectively). The extent of the reduction in both areas was less if the stimulation frequency was decreased. Sometimes mean cerebral blood flow showed a small and transient increase, mainly in response to low-frequency stimulation. The morphology was analysed of low-frequency spontaneous oscillations in cerebral blood flow, attributed to vasomotion. Present in 41% of the tested areas (frequency 4-12 cycles/min, peak-to-peak amplitude 10-40% of mean value), these waves decreased in amplitude and increased in frequency during sympathetic stimulation, irrespective of changes in mean flow. The possibility has been proposed that the sympathetic action on low-frequency spontaneous oscillations may contribute to the protective influence that this system is known to exert on the blood-brain barrier in hypertension.

  19. Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Ned E.; Hively, Lee M.

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness.

  20. Mode-locking and Q-switching in multi-wavelength fiber ring laser using low frequency phase modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Chang Su; Kim, Byoung Yoon

    2011-03-28

    We describe experimental investigation of pulsed output from a multi-wavelength fiber ring laser incorporating low frequency phase modulation with large modulation amplitude. The Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) ring laser generated more than 8 wavelength channels with the help of a phase modulator operating at 26.2 kHz and a periodic intra-cavity filter. For most cases, the laser output is pulsed in the form of mode-locking at 5.62 MHz and/or Q-switching at harmonic and sub-harmonic of the phase modulation frequency. Chaotic pulse output is also observed. The behavior of the output pulses are described as functions of pump power and phase modulation amplitude. The relative intensity noise (RIN) value of a single wavelength channel is measured to be under -100 dB/Hz (-140 dB/Hz beyond 1.5 GHz).

  1. Quasi-localized low-frequency vibrational modes of disordered solids II. Study by single-molecule spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, A. V.; Vainer, Yu. G.; Bauer, M.; Kador, L.

    2004-12-01

    By means of single molecule (SM) spectroscopy we investigated elementary matrix excitations in a disordered solid, i.e., quasi-localized low-frequency vibrational modes (LFMs). To this end we recorded the spectra of single tetra-tert-butylterrylene molecules embedded in an amorphous polyisobutylene matrix in a temperature region, where the LFM contribution to line broadening dominates. The individual param- eters of LFMs in a polymer glass can be determined from the temperature-dependent linewidths of single molecules. The magnitude of the LFM contribution to SM spectra was obtained by the statistical analysis of the distribution of linewidths of SMs. Pronounced distributions of LFM frequencies and SM-LFM coupling constants were found. This result can be regarded as the first direct experimental proof of the localized nature of LFMs.

  2. Plate acoustic waves for low frequency delay line delaying signals up to 0.5 ms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, B. D.; Kuznetsova, I. E.; Zemnyukov, N. E.; Proidakov, V. I.; Teplykh, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    At present time there exists the problem of development of main memory elements based on the delay of electromagnetic signal with frequency of ˜100 kHz on hundreds microseconds. This paper is devoted to theoretical and experimental investigation of the possibility of development of corresponding acoustic delay lines. It was supposed to use the antisymmetric acoustic waves of zero order propagating in thin (compared to wavelength) metal plates. In this connection, we theoretically studied the parameters of A0 waves propagating in plates of various metals such as brass, bronze, copper, steel, and aluminum. For analysis of wave propagation in aforementioned plates, we used the standard motion equation and constitutive material equation for investigated medium as well as corresponding mechanical boundary conditions. As a result, the phase and group velocities versus parameter hf (h= plate thickness, f= wave frequency) were calculated for A0 wave propagating in mentioned above plates. It has been found that for steel plate the delay time about 0.5 ms can be achieved at the lengths of waveguide L=0.373, 0.737, and 0.971 m for h=0.175, 0.5, and 1.0 mm, respectively at f=120 kHz. The theoretical results were verified by experiment, which showed the possibility of development of corresponding delay lines with delay time ˜500 mks and acceptable insertion loss. In experiments, the excitation and reception of A0 waves were performed by the standard piezoelectric transducers of longitudinal waves and prismatic steel concentrators. The details of theoretical analysis and experiment are described.

  3. Coupled solitons of intense high-frequency and low-frequency waves in Zakharov-type systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Evgeny; Malomed, Boris

    2016-12-01

    One-parameter families of exact two-component solitary-wave solutions for interacting high-frequency (HF) and low-frequency (LF) waves are found in the framework of Zakharov-type models, which couple the nonlinear Schrödinger equation for intense HF waves to the Boussinesq (Bq) or Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for the LF component through quadratic terms. The systems apply, in particular, to the interaction of surface (HF) and internal (LF) waves in stratified fluids. These solutions are two-component generalizations of the single-component Bq and KdV solitons. Perturbed dynamics and stability of the solitary waves are studied in detail by means of analytical and numerical methods. Essentially, they are stable against separation of the HF and LF components if the latter one is shaped as a potential well acting on the HF field, and unstable, against splitting of the two components, with a barrier-shaped LF one. Collisions between the solitary waves are studied by means of direct simulations, demonstrating a trend to merger of in-phase solitons, and elastic interactions of out-of-phase ones.

  4. Attenuation distance of low frequency waves upstream of the pre-dawn bow shock: GEOTAIL and ISEE 3 comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    We have made a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves (approx. 0.01-0.1 Hz) in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock (-50 Re less than X less than 15 Re) using both GEOTAIL and international sun earth explorer 3 (ISEE-3) magnetometer data. We have found that the wave amplitude dependence on D and X(sub s), where D is the distance from the bow shock and X(sub s) the x-coordinate position of shock foot point of the IMF, can be described by a functional form of A exp (X(sub s)/L(sub X)-D/L(sub D), with the characteristic attenuation distances, L(sub X) = 62 +/- 12 Re and L(sub D) = 59 +/- 38 Re.

  5. Attenuation distance of low frequency waves upstream of the pre-dawn bow shock: GEOTAIL and ISEE comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H. [Univ. of Tokoyo (Japan)] [and others

    1995-01-15

    The authors have made a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves ({approximately}0.01-0.1 Hz) in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock ({minus}50 Rewave amplitude dependence on D and X{sub s}, where D is the distance from the bow shock and X{sub s} the x-coordinate position of shock foot point of the IMF, can be described by a functional form of A exp(X{sub s}/L{sub X}-D/L{sub D}), with the characteristic attenuation distances, L{sub X}=62{plus_minus}12 Re and L{sub D} = 59 {plus_minus} 38 Re. 13 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The dynamical transition in proteins and non-Gaussian behavior of low frequency modes in Self Consistent Normal Mode Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jianguang; Ward, Joshua M; Prohofsky, Earl W

    2010-01-01

    Self Consistent Normal Mode Analysis (SCNMA) is applied to heme c type cytochrome f to study temperature dependent protein motion. Classical Normal Mode Analysis (NMA) assumes harmonic behavior and the protein Mean Square Displacement (MSD) has a linear dependence on temperature. This is only consistent with low temperature experimental results. To connect the protein vibrational motions between low temperature and physiological temperature, we have incorporated a fitted set of anharmonic potentials into SCNMA. In addition, Quantum Harmonic Oscillator (QHO) theory has been used to calculate the displacement distribution for individual vibrational modes. We find that the modes involving soft bonds exhibit significant non-Gaussian dynamics at physiological temperature, which suggests it may be the cause of the non-Gaussian behavior of the protein motions probed by Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS). The combined theory displays a dynamical transition caused by the softening of few "torsional" modes in...

  7. Observations of Low-Frequency Magnetic Waves due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Ions Using ACE, Ulysses, and Voyager Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles W.; Aggarwal, Poornima; Argall, Matthew R.; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Bzowski, Maciej; Cannon, Bradford E.; Gary, S. Peter; Fisher, Meghan K.; Gilbert, Jason A.; Hollick, Sophia J.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.; Pine, Zackary B.; Richardson, John D.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Sokół, Justyna M.; Taylor, David K.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2017-09-01

    Wave excitation by newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) plays a significant role in theories that attempt to describe IBEX and Voyager observations in the solar wind and heliosheath. The same dynamic processes can be far-reaching and extend into the inner heliosphere to at least 1AU and likely to smaller heliocentric distances. While the high-resolution magnetic field measurements required to study these waves are not yet available in the heliosheath, we have studied a range of available observations and found evidence of waves due to interstellar PUIs using ACE (1998–2015 at 1 AU), Ulysses (1996–2006 at 2 to 5 AU, high and low latitudes) and Voyager (1978–1979 and 2 to 6 AU) observations. Efforts to extend the Voyager observations to 35 AU are ongoing. We have examined these data sets and report on observations of low-frequency waves that result from newborn interstellar pickup H+ and He+ ions. Although not as common as theory originally predicted, we presently have identified 524 independent occurrences. Our conclusion from studying these waves is that they are seen only when the ambient turbulence is sufficiently weak. The instability that generates these waves requires a slow accumulation of wave energy over several to tens of hours to achieve observable wave amplitudes. In regions where the turbulence is moderate to strong, the turbulence absorbs the wave energy before it can reach observable levels and transports the energy to the dissipation scales where it heats the background thermal particles. Only intervals with the weakest turbulence will permit energy accumulation over this time scale. These conditions are most often, but not exclusively, achieved in solar wind rarefaction regions.

  8. Low-frequency wave propagation in an elastic plate loaded by a two-layer fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Indeitsev, Dmitrij; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    of salty water. The former one produces fluid loading at the plate, whereas the latter one is bounded by the sea bottom. We employ classical asymptotic methods to identify significant regimes of wave motion in the compound three-component waveguide. The roles of parameters involved in the problem...

  9. Spin-wave modes of ferromagnetic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, R. E.

    2016-10-01

    The spin-wave modes of ferromagnetic films have been studied for a long time experimentally as well as theoretically, either in the magnetostatic approximation or also considering the exchange interaction. A theoretical method is presented that allows one to determine with ease the exact frequency dispersion relations of dipole-exchange modes under general conditions: an obliquely applied magnetic field, and surface boundary conditions that allow for partial pinning, which may be of different origins. The method is a generalization of Green's theorem to the problem of solving the linear dynamics of ferromagnetic spin-wave modes. Convolution integral equations for the magnetization and the magnetostatic potential of the modes are derived on the surfaces of the film. For the translation-invariant film these become simple local algebraic equations at each in-plane wave vector. Eigenfrequencies result from imposing a 6 ×6 determinant to be null, and spin-wave modes follow everywhere through solving linear 6 ×6 inhomogeneous systems. An interpretation of the results is that the Green's functions represent six independent plane-wave solutions to the equations of motion, with six associated complex perpendicular wave vectors: volume modes correspond to the cases in which two of these are purely real at a given frequency. Furthermore, the convolution extinction equations enforce the boundary conditions: this is possible at specific eigenfrequencies for a given in-plane wave vector. Magnetostatic modes may also be obtained in detail. At low frequencies and for some obliquely applied magnetic fields, magnetostatic and dipole-exchange volume modes may have forward or backward character depending on the frequency range.

  10. Effects of the ISM on Detection of Low-frequency Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Stinebring, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Time variable delays due to radio wave propagation in the ionized interstellar medium are a substantial source of error in pulsar timing array efforts. We describe the physical origin of these effects, discussing dispersive and scattering effects separately. Where possible, we give estimates of the magnitude of timing errors produced by these effects and their scaling with radio frequency. Although there is general understanding of the interstellar medium propagation errors to be expected with pulsar timing array observations, detailed comparison between theory and practice is still in its infancy, particularly with regard to scattering effects.

  11. Programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics using Very Low Frequency Radio Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta; Pal, Sujay; Kanta Maji, Surya; Ray, Suman

    Indian Centre for Space Physics conducted two major VLF campaigns all over Indian Sub-continent to study the propagation effects of VLF radio waves. It made multi-receiver observations during solar eclipse. ICSP not only recorded multitudes of solar flares, it also reproduced VLF observation from ab initio calculation. ICSP extended its study to the field of earthquake predictions using signal anomalies and using case by case studies as well as statistical analysis, showed that anomalies are real and more studies are required to understand them. Using earth as a gigantic detector, it detected ionospheric perturbations due to soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Observation of a New Type of Low Frequency Waves at Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, I; Auster, H -U; Fruehauff, D; Goetz, C; Heinisch, P; Perschke, C; Motschmann, U; Stoll, B; Altwegg, K; Burch, J; Carr, C; Cupido, E; Eriksson, A; Henri, P; Goldstein, R; Lebreton, J -P; Mokashi, P; Nemeth, Z; Nilsson, H; Rubin, M; Szegoe, K; Tsurutani, B T; Vallat, C; Volwerk, M; Glassmeier, K -H

    2015-01-01

    We report on magnetic field measurements made in the innermost coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in its low activity state. Quasi-coherent, large-amplitude ($\\delta B/B \\sim 2$), compressional magnetic field oscillations at $\\sim$ 40 mHz dominate the immediate plasma environment of the nucleus. This differs from previously studied comet-interaction regions where waves at the cometary ion gyro-frequencies are the main feature. Thus classical pick-up ion driven instabilities are unable to explain the observations. We propose a cross-field current instability associated with newborn cometary ion currents as a possible source mechanism.

  13. Interplanetary Nanodust Detection by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/WAVES Low Frequency Receiver

    CERN Document Server

    Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N; Issautier, K; Belheouane, S; Pantellini, F; Maksimovic, M; Zouganelis, I; Bale, S D; Kasper, J C

    2013-01-01

    New measurements using radio and plasma-wave instruments in interplanetary space have shown that nanometer-scale dust, or nanodust, is a significant contributor to the total mass in interplanetary space. Better measurements of nanodust will allow us to determine where it comes from and the extent to which it interacts with the solar wind. When one of these nanodust grains impacts a spacecraft, it creates an expanding plasma cloud, which perturbs the photoelectron currents. This leads to a voltage pulse between the spacecraft body and the antenna. Nanodust has a high charge/mass ratio, and therefore can be accelerated by the interplanetary magnetic field to speeds up to the speed of the solar wind: significantly faster than the Keplerian orbital speeds of heavier dust. The amplitude of the signal induced by a dust grain grows much more strongly with speed than with mass of the dust particle. As a result, nanodust can produce a strong signal, despite their low mass. The WAVES instruments on the twin Solar TErre...

  14. On nonlinear evolution of low-frequency Alfvén waves in weakly-expanding solar wind plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nariyuki, Y. [Faculty of Human Development, University of Toyama, 3190 Toyama City, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    A multi-dimensional nonlinear evolution equation for Alfvén waves in weakly-expanding solar wind plasmas is derived by using the reductive perturbation method. The expansion of solar wind plasma parcels is modeled by an expanding box model, which includes the accelerating expansion. It is shown that the resultant equation agrees with the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin prediction of the low-frequency Alfvén waves in the linear limit. In the cold and one-dimensional limit, a modified derivative nonlinear Schrodinger equation is obtained. Direct numerical simulations are carried out to discuss the effect of the expansion on the modulational instability of monochromatic Alfvén waves and the propagation of Alfvén solitons. By using the instantaneous frequency, it is quantitatively shown that as far as the expansion rate is much smaller than wave frequencies, effects of the expansion are almost adiabatic. It is also confirmed that while shapes of Alfvén solitons temporally change due to the expansion, some of them can stably propagate after their collision in weakly-expanding plasmas.

  15. The possibility of using the equivalent plane wave model to increase the efficiency of taking bearings of low-frequency signals in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, G. N.; Lebedev, O. V.

    2012-09-01

    The possibility of approximating the sound field in the region of interference maxima using the equivalent plane wave model with the actual amplitude and the average "effective" phase velocity calculated or measured by the phase gradient at the array aperture is discussed. The method is substantiated by studying the mode, interference, and phase structures of the low-frequency sound field along with the spatial responses of an extended linear array. For bottom-moored or towed geophysical arrays whose sizes are large compared to the wavelength, both the necessity and the possibility of reducing the error in taking the bearing of a sound source in a waveguide are justified. The use of the proposed model is recommended for approximate matching of the array to the transfer function of the waveguide to reduce the bearing error.

  16. A case study of low-frequency waves at the magnetopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rezeau

    Full Text Available We present the study of one of the first magnetopause crossings observed by the four Cluster spacecraft simultaneously, on 10 December 2000. Although the delays between the crossings are very short, the features of the boundary appear quite different as seen by the different spacecraft, strongly suggesting the presence of a local curvature of the magnetopause at that time. The small-scale fluctuations observed by the STAFF search-coil experiment are placed in relation to this context. A preliminary investigation of their behaviour on the boundary and in the neighbourhood magnetosheath is performed in comparison with the theoretical model of Belmont and Rezeau (2001, which describes the interaction of waves with the boundary.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (transport processes, discontinuities, turbulence

  17. Absolute parametric instability of low-frequency waves in a 2D nonuniform anisotropic warm plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N G Zaki

    2010-05-01

    Using the separation method, absolute parametric instability (API) of electrostatic waves in a magnetized pumped warm plasma is investigated. In this case the effect of static strong magnetic field is considered. The problem of strong magnetic field is solved in two-dimensional (2D) nonuniform plane plasma. Equations which describe the spatial part of the electric potential are obtained. Also, the growth rates and conditions of the parametric instability for periodic and aperiodic cases are obtained. It is found that the spatial nonuniformity of the plasma exerts a stabilizing effect on the API. It is shown that the growth rates of periodic and aperiodic API in warm plasma are less when compared to that in cold plasma.

  18. Analysis of the Interaction between Low-Frequency Waves and Ions in the High-Altitude Cusp Region Observed by Satellite Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Su-Ping; A. Balogh; M. Andre; LIU Zhen-Xing; CAO Jin-Bin; SHI Jian-Kui; LU Li; LI Zhong-Yuan; Q. G. Zong; H. Reme; N. Cornilleau-Wehrlin

    2006-01-01

    @@ The energy transfer between ions (protons) and low frequency waves (LFWs) in the frequency range f1 from 0.3to 10 Hz is observed by Cluster crossing the high-altitude polar cusp. The energy transfer between low frequency waves and ions has two means. One is that the energy is transferred from low frequency waves to ions and ions energy increases. The other is that the energy is transferred from ions to low frequency waves and the ion energy decreases. Ion gyratory motion plays an important role in the energy transfer processes. The electromagnetic field of f1 LFWs can accelerate or decelerate protons along the direction of ambient magneticfield and warm or refrigerate protons in the parallel and perpendicular directions of ambient magnetic field. The peak values of proton number densities have the corresponding peak values of electromagnetic energy of low-frequency waves.This implies that the kinetic Alfven waves and solitary kinetic Alfven waves possibly exist in the high-altitude cusp region.

  19. Ground Based Low-Frequency Gravitational-wave Detector With Multiple Outputs

    CERN Document Server

    Shoda, Ayaka; Ando, Masaki; Eda, Kazunari; Tejima, Kodai; Aso, Yoichi; Itoh, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new gravitaional-wave (GW) detector, TOrsion-Bar Antenna (TOBA), with multiple-output configuration. TOBA is a detector with bar-shaped test masses that rotate by the tidal force of the GWs. In our detector, three independent information about the GW signals can be derived by monitoring multiple rotational degrees of freedom, i.e., horizontal rotations and vertical rotations of the bars. Since the three outputs have different antenna pattern functions, the multi-output system improves the detection rate and the parameter estimation accuracy. It is effective in order to obtain further details of the GW sources, such as population and directions. We successfully operated the multi-output detector continuously for more than 24 hours with stable data quality. Also, the sensitivity of one of the signals is improved to be $1 \\times 10^{-10}$ ${\\rm Hz}^{-1/2}$ at 3 Hz by the combination of the passive and active vibration isolation systems, while sensitivities to possible GW signals derived from ...

  20. Low Frequency Gravitational Wave Detection With Ground Based Atom Interferometer Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Chaibi, W; Canuel, B; Bertoldi, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new detection strategy for gravitational waves (GWs) below few Hertz based on a correlated array of atom interferometers (AIs). Our proposal allows to reduce the Newtonian Noise (NN) which limits all ground based GW detectors below few Hertz, including previous atom interferometry-based concepts. Using an array of long baseline AI gradiometers yields several estimations of the NN, whose effect can thus be reduced via statistical averaging. Considering the km baseline of current optical detectors, a NN rejection of factor 2 could be achieved, and tested with existing AI array geometries. Exploiting the correlation properties of the gravity acceleration noise, we show that a 10-fold or more NN rejection is possible with a dedicated configuration. Considering a conservative NN model and the current developments in cold atom technology, we show that strain sensitivities below $1\\times 10^{-19}/ \\sqrt{\\text{Hz}}$ in the $ 0.3-3 \\ \\text{Hz}$ frequency band can be within reach, with a peak sensitivity o...

  1. On the generation of internal wave modes by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlander, Uwe; Kirschner, Ian; Maas, Christian; Zaussinger, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves play an important role in the ocean since they transport energy and momentum and the can lead to mixing when they break. Surface waves and internal gravity waves can interact. On the one hand, long internal waves imply a slow varying shear current that modifies the propagation of surface waves. Surface waves generated by the atmosphere can, on the other hand, excite internal waves by nonlinear interaction. Thereby a surface wave packet consisting of two close frequencies can resonate with a low frequency internal wave (Phillips, 1966). From a theoretical point of view, the latter has been studied intensively by using a 2-layer model, i.e. a surface layer with a strong density contrast and an internal layer with a comparable weak density contrast (Ball, 1964; Craig et al., 2010). In the present work we analyse the wave coupling for a continuously stratified fluid using a fully non-linear 2D numerical model (OpenFoam) and compare this with laboratory experiments (see Lewis et al. 1974). Surface wave modes are used as initial condition and the time development of the dominant surface and internal waves are studied by spectral and harmonic analysis. For the simple geometry of a box, the results are compared with analytical spectra of surface and gravity waves. Ball, F.K. 1964: Energy transfer between external and internal gravity waves. J. Fluid Mech. 19, 465. Craig, W., Guyenne, P., Sulem, C. 2010: Coupling between internal and surface waves. Natural Hazards 57, 617-642. Lewis, J.E., Lake, B.M., Ko, D.R.S 1974: On the interaction of internal waves and surfacr gravity waves, J. Fluid Mech. 63, 773-800. Phillips, O.M. 1966: The dynamics of the upper ocean, Cambridge University Press, 336pp.

  2. On the dispersion law of low-frequency electron whistler waves in a multi-ion plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Lundin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A new and simple dispersion law for extra-low-frequency electron whistler waves in a multi-ion plasma is derived. It is valid in a plasma with finite ratio ωcpe of electron gyro-to-plasma frequency and is suitable for wave frequencies much less than ωpe but well above the gyrofrequencies of most heavy ions. The resultant contribution of the ions to the dispersion law is expressed by means of the lower hybrid resonance frequency, the highest ion cutoff frequency and the relative content of the lightest ion. In a frequency domain well above the ions' gyrofrequencies, this new dispersion law merges with the "modified electron whistler dispersion law" determined in previous works by the authors. It is shown that it fits well to the total cold plasma electron whistler dispersion law, for different orientations of the wave vectors and different ion constituents, including negative ions or negatively charged dust grains.

  3. Pressure and velocity cross-spectrum of normal modes in low-frequency acoustic vector field of shallow water and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Yu; Qing Ling,; Jiang Xu

    2015-01-01

    The pressure and horizontal particle velocity combined descriptions in the very low frequency acoustic field of shal ow wa-ter integrated with the concept of effective depth of Pekeris wave-guide is proposed, especial y the active component of the pressure and horizontal particle velocity cross-spectrum, also cal ed ho-rizontal complex cross acoustic intensity, when only two normal modes are trapped in the waveguide. Both the approximate theo-retic analysis and the numerical results show that the sign of the horizontal complex cross acoustic intensity active component is independent of the range when vertical y deployed receiving dual sensors are placed in appropriate depths, the sum of which is equal to the waveguide effective depth, so it can be used to tel whether the sound source is near the surface or underwater;while the range rate is expected to be measured by utilizing the sign distribution characteristic of the reactive component. The further robustness analysis of the depth classification algorithm shows that the existence of shear waves in semi infinite basement and the change of acoustic velocity profiles have few effects on the application of this method, and the seabed attenuation wil limit the detection range, but the algorithm stil has a good robustness in the valid detection range.

  4. Inhibition of Salmonella typhi growth using extremely low frequency electromagnetic (ELF-EM) waves at resonance frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, M A; Mohamed, S A; Abdelbacki, A M; El-Sharkawy, A H

    2014-08-01

    Typhoid is a serious disease difficult to be treated with conventional drugs. The aim of this study was to demonstrate a new method for the control of Salmonella typhi growth, through the interference with the bioelectric signals generated from the microbe during cell division by extremely low frequency electromagnetic waves (ELF-EMW-ELF-EM) at resonance frequency. Isolated Salmonella typhi was subjected to square amplitude modulated waves (QAMW) with different modulation frequencies from two generators with constant carrier frequency of 10 MHz, amplitude of 10 Vpp, modulating depth ± 2 Vpp and constant field strength of 200 V m(-1) at 37°C. Both the control and exposed samples were incubated at the same conditions during the experiment. The results showed that there was highly significant inhibition effect for Salm. typhi exposed to 0·8 Hz QAMW for a single exposure for 75 min. Dielectric relaxation, TEM and DNA results indicated highly significant changes in the molecular structure of the DNA and cellular membrane resulting from the exposure to the inhibiting EM waves. It was concluded that finding out the inhibiting resonance frequency of ELF-EM waves that deteriorates Salm. typhi growth will be promising method for the treatment of Salm. typhi infection either in vivo or in vitro. This new non-invasive technique for treatment of bacterial infections is of considerable interest for the use in medical and biotechnological applications. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. A working hypothesis about the cause of Be stars: Episodic outward leakage of low-frequency waves excited by the iron-peak κ-mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahashi, Hiromoto

    2014-02-01

    Observations indicate that a circumstellar disk is formed around a Be star while the stellar rotation is below the break-up velocity. I propose a working hypothesis to explain this mystery by taking account of the effect of leaky waves upon angular momentum transfer. In B-type stars near the main sequence, low-frequency nonradial oscillations are excited by the κ-mechanism in the iron bump. They transport angular momentum from the driving zone to the surface. As a consequence, the angular momentum is gradually deposited near the stellar surface. This results in a gradual increase in the ``critical frequency for g-modes'', and g-modes eventually start to leak outward, long before the surface rotation reaches the break-up velocity. This leads to a substantial amount of angular momentum loss from the star, and a circumstellar disk is formed. The oscillations themselves will be soon damped owing to kinetic energy loss. Then the envelope of the star spins down and angular momentum loss stops soon. The star returns to being quiet and remains calm until nonradial oscillations are newly built up by the κ-mechanism to sufficient amplitude and a new episode begins. According to this view, the interval of episodic Be-star activity corresponds to the growth time of the oscillation, and it seems in good agreement with observations.

  6. Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Timothy F; Collis, Jon M; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Newhall, Arthur E; Lynch, James F; DeFerrari, Harry A

    2012-02-01

    Sound at 85 to 450 Hz propagating in approximately 80-m depth water from fixed sources to a joint horizontal/vertical line array (HLA/VLA) is analyzed. The data are from a continental shelf area east of Delaware Bay (USA) populated with tidally generated long- and short-wavelength internal waves. Sound paths are 19 km in the along-shore (along internal-wave crest) direction and 30 km in the cross-shore direction. Spatial statistics of HLA arrivals are computed as functions of beam steering angle and time. These include array gain, horizontally lagged spatial correlation function, and coherent beam power. These quantities vary widely in magnitude, and vary over a broad range of time scales. For example, correlation scale can change rapidly from forty to five wavelengths, and correlation-scale behavior is anisotropic. In addition, the vertical array can be used to predict correlation expected for adiabatic propagation with cylindrical symmetry, forming a benchmark. Observed variations are in concert with internal-wave activity. Temporal variations of three coherence measures, horizontal correlation length, array gain, and ratio of actual correlation length to predicted adiabatic-mode correlation length, are very strong, varying by almost a factor of ten as internal waves pass.

  7. The impact research of control modes in steam turbine control system (digital electric hydraulic to the low-frequency oscillation of grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Through the analysis of the control theory for steam turbine, the transfer function of the steam turbine control modes in the parallel operation was obtained. The frequency domain analysis indicated that different control modes of turbine control system have different influence on the damping characteristics of the power system. The comparative analysis shows the direction and the degree of the influence under the different oscillation frequency range. This can provide the theory for the suppression of the low-frequency oscillation from turbine side and has a guiding significance for the stability of power system. The results of simulation tests are consistent with the theoretic analysis.

  8. A vertical-mode decomposition to investigate low-frequency internal motion across the Atlantic at 26° N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. B. Szuts

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrographic data from full-depth moorings maintained by the RAPID/MOCHA project that span the Atlantic at 26° N are decomposed into vertical modes, in order to give a dynamical framework for interpreting the observed fluctuations. Vertical modes at each mooring are fit to pressure perturbations using a Gauss-Markov inversion. Away from boundaries, the vertical structure is almost entirely described by the first baroclinic mode, as confirmed by high correlation between the original signal and reconstructions using only the first baroclinic mode. These first baroclinic motions are also highly coherent with altimetric sea surface height (SSH. On both the western and eastern boundaries, however, the decomposition contains significant variance at higher modes, and there is a corresponding decrease in the agreement between SSH and either the original signal or the first baroclinic mode reconstruction. At the boundaries, the transport fluctuations described by the first baroclinic mode represent less than 10% of the variance of the full transport signal. At the eastern boundary, a linear combination of many baroclinic modes is required to explain the observed vertical density profile of the seasonal cycle, a result that is consistent with the oceanic response to wind-forcing not propagating far from the eastern boundary.

  9. Low-frequency guided waves in a fluid-filled borehole: Simultaneous effects of generation and scattering due to multiple fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Shohei; Ghose, Ranajit

    2017-03-01

    Low-frequency, axially-symmetric guided waves which propagate along a fluid-filled borehole (tube waves) are studied in order to characterize the hydraulic fractures intersecting the borehole. We formulate a new equation for the total tube wavefield, which includes simultaneous effects of (1) tube-wave scattering (reflection and transmission) due to wave propagation across hydraulic fractures, and (2) tube-wave generation due to incident plane P waves. The fracture is represented by the nonwelded interface boundary conditions. We use an appropriate form of the representation theorem in order to correctly handle the multiple scattering due to nonwelded interfaces. Our approach can implement any model that has so far been developed. We consider a recent model which includes simultaneous effects of fluid viscosity, dynamic fluid flow, and fracture compliance. The derived equation offers a number of important insights. We recognize that the effective generation amplitude contains the simultaneous effect of both tube-wave generation and scattering. This leads to a new physical understanding indicating that the tube waves are scattered immediately after generation. We show that this scattering is nonlinear with respect to interface compliance. This physical mechanism can be implicitly accounted for by considering more realistic boundary conditions. We also illustrate the application of the new equation in order to predict the complex signature of the total tube wavefield, including generation and scattering at multiple hydraulic fractures. A new formulation for focusing analyses is also derived in order to image and characterize the hydraulic fractures. The obtained results and discussions are important for interpretation, modeling, and imaging using low-frequency guided waves, in the presence of multiple fractures along a cylindrical inclusion.

  10. Propagation of interplanetary shock excited ultra low frequency (ULF) waves in magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere——Multi-spacecraft “Cluster” and ground-based magnetometer observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The ultra low frequency (ULF) wave in magnetosphere can act as an important means for solar wind energy inward transmission.This paper quantitatively analyzes the propagation process of the ULF wave triggered by the interplanetary shock propagating from inner magnetosphere equatorial plane along magnetic field lines to the top of the ionosphere and below ionosphere propagating process and establishes a relatively complete magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere propagation model which can be used to study the relationship between the amplitude of the ULF waves triggered by the interplanetary shock wave in magnetospheric space and the magnetic effect caused by the ULF waves.After a comparison with recent observations,we found that: in the event during November 7,2004 that an interplanetary shock wave interacted with the magnetosphere,Cluster satellites observed that electric field fluctuations and the band-pass filtered result of ground stations meridional component had similar characteristics.Comparing with the geomagnetic measurement near the footprints,we found that the electric field disturbance in the magnetosphere spread along the ground magnetic field lines in the form of the ULF waves and changed into geomagnetic disturbance.The result reveals that the ULF wave is in contact with the ground geomagnetic observation.The ULF waves couple with ionized components in ionosphere and spread to the ground in the form of electromagnetic waves.In this research,we believe that the magnetosphere,ionosphere and ground magnetic effects caused by interplanetary shock wave are the same physical phenomena responding in different locations.Based on the overall consideration of entire electromagnetic response to the interplanetary shock wave,we found that the correlation between CLUSTER multi-satellite observation and geomagnetic station observation is due to the ULF wave propagated in magnetosphere-ionosphere-atmosphere system,and we quantitatively interpreted this response

  11. On the unstable mode merging of gravity-inertial waves with Rossby waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. F. McKenzie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We recapitulate the results of the combined theory of gravity-inertial-Rossby waves in a rotating, stratified atmosphere. The system is shown to exhibit a "local" (JWKB instability whenever the phase speed of the low-frequency-long wavelength westward propagating Rossby wave exceeds the phase speed ("Kelvin" speed of the high frequency-short wavelength gravity-inertial wave. This condition ensures that mode merging, leading to instability, takes place in some intermediate band of frequencies and wave numbers. The contention that such an instability is "spurious" is not convincing. The energy source of the instability resides in the background enthalpy which can be released by the action of the gravitational buoyancy force, through the combined wave modes.

  12. Rayleigh waves ellipticity and mode mis-identification in multi-channel analysis of surface waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Strobbia, Claudio

    dispersion curve which is then inverted. Typically, single component vertical and multi channel receivers are used. In most cases the inversion of the dispersion properties is carried out assuming that the experimental dispersion curve corresponds to a single mode, mostly the fundamental Rayleigh mode......-identification known as ‘osculation’ (‘kissing’). In general it is called ‘osculation point’ the point where the energy peak shifts at low frequencies from the fundamental to the first higher mode. This jump occurs, with a continuous smooth transition, around a well-define frequency where the two modes get very close...... the vertical component of ground motion, as the mode osculation is linked to the Rayleigh wave ellipticity polarization, and therefore we conclude that multi-component data, using also horizontal receivers, can help discern the multi-modal nature of surface waves. Finally we introduce a-priori detectors...

  13. Tunable, Low Frequency Microwave Generation from AWG Based Closely-Spaced Dual-Wavelength Single Longitudinal-Mode Fibre Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, H.; Latif, A. A.; Talib, J. M.; Harun, S. W.

    2013-06-01

    Stable, closely-spaced Dual-Wavelength Fibre Lasers (DWFLs) have high potential for applications such as Radio-over-Fibre and optical sensing. In this work, a DWFL using two Arrayed Waveguide Gratings (AWGs) to generate a closely-spaced dual-wavelength output is proposed and demonstrated. A 1 m long highly doped Leikki Er80-8/125 Erbium Doped Fibre (EDF) is used as the linear gain medium, while two AWGs are used to generate the closely-spaced lasing wavelengths. A Mach-Zehnder modulator, driven at 180 kHz, splits the closely spaced wavelengths into two clearly defined wavelengths, while a 7 cm long un-pumped Leikki Er80-8/125 EDF and sub-ring cavity is used to suppress unwanted side-modes. Close spacing of between 0.01 to 0.03 nm are obtained, with beating frequencies of between 1.4 to 3.2 GHz. The output is highly stable, with almost no fluctuations over the test period.

  14. A Review of Nonlinear Low Frequency (LF) Wave Observations in Space Plasmas: On the Development of Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1995-01-01

    As the lead-off presentation for the topic of nonlinear waves and their evolution, we will illustrate some prominent examples of waves in space plasmas. We will describe recent observations detected within planetary foreshocks, near comets and in interplanetary space. It is believed that the nonlinear LF plasma wave features discussed here are part of and may be basic to the development of plasma turbulence. In this sense, this is one area of space plasma physics that is fundamental, with applications to fusion physics and astrophysics as well. It is hoped that the reader(s) will be stimulated to study nonlinear wave development themselves, if he/she is not already involved.

  15. Investigation of the generation and propagation of low frequency internal waves: A case study for the east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, A.D.; Babu, S.V.; Prasad, K.V.S.R.; Murty, T.V.R.; Sadhuram, Y.; Mahapatra, D.K.

    , this is discernable more in the north, particularly offshore. The current at the coastal boundary is probably hampering the signatures being perceptible there. To understand how the internal wave activity varies along the coast, vertical transects of temperature...

  16. 3-D P- and S-wave velocity structure and low-frequency earthquake locations in the Parkfield, California region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Thurber, Clifford H.; Shelly, David R.; Harrington, Rebecca M.; Cochran, Elizabeth S.; Bennington, Ninfa L.; Peterson, Dana; Guo, Bin; McClement, Kara

    2016-09-01

    To refine the 3-D seismic velocity model in the greater Parkfield, California region, a new data set including regular earthquakes, shots, quarry blasts and low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) was assembled. Hundreds of traces of each LFE family at two temporary arrays were stacked with time-frequency domain phase weighted stacking method to improve signal-to-noise ratio. We extend our model resolution to lower crustal depth with LFE data. Our result images not only previously identified features but also low velocity zones (LVZs) in the area around the LFEs and the lower crust beneath the southern Rinconada Fault. The former LVZ is consistent with high fluid pressure that can account for several aspects of LFE behaviour. The latter LVZ is consistent with a high conductivity zone in magnetotelluric studies. A new Vs model was developed with S picks that were obtained with a new autopicker. At shallow depth, the low Vs areas underlie the strongest shaking areas in the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. We relocate LFE families and analyse the location uncertainties with the NonLinLoc and tomoDD codes. The two methods yield similar results.

  17. A passive low frequency instrument for radio wave sounding the subsurface oceans of the Jovian icy moons: An instrument concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartogh, P.; Ilyushin, Ya. A.

    2016-10-01

    Exploration of subsurface oceans on Jovian icy moons is a key issue of the icy moons' geology. Electromagnetic wave propagation is the only way to probe their icy mantles from the orbit. In the present paper, a principal concept of a passive interferometric instrument for deep sounding of the icy moons' crust is proposed. Its working principle is measuring and correlating Jupiter's radio wave emissions with reflections from the deep sub-surface of the icy moons. A number of the functional aspects of the proposed experiment are studied, in particular, impact of the wave scattering on the surface terrain on the instrument performance and digital sampling of the noisy signal. Results of the test of the laboratory prototype of the instrument are also presented in the paper.

  18. Generation of Intense Low-Frequency Collimated Sound Beams by Nonlinear Acoustics and Detection by a Millimeter-Wave Vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    millimeter wave interferometer for remote vibration sensing, M. Smith, J. Scales, M. Weiss, B. Zadler, in press, Journal of Applied Physics List of...PIERS). Enhancing the nonlinear conversion in ultrasonic parametric arrays, to be submitted to Journal of Applied Physics . (d) Manuscripts Number of

  19. Characterisation of Low Frequency Gravitational Waves from Dual RF Coaxial-Cable Detector: Fractal Textured Dynamical 3-Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Experiments have revealed that the Fresnel drag effect is not present in RF coaxial cables, contrary to a previous report. This enables a very sensitive, robust and compact detector, that is 1st order in v / c and using one clock, to detect the dynamical space passing the earth, revealing the sidereal rotation of the earth, together with significant wave / turbulence e ff ects. These are “gravitational waves”, and previously detected by Cahill 2006, using an Optical-Fibre – RF Coaxial Cable Detector, and Cahill 2009, using a preliminary version of the Dual RF Coaxial Cable Detector. The gravitational waves have a 1 / f spectrum, implying a fractal structure to the textured dynamical 3- space.

  20. Low frequency modulation of transionospheric radio wave amplitude at low-latitudes: possible role of field line oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Sinha

    Full Text Available Ionospheric scintillations of radio waves at low-latitudes are associated with electron density irregularities. These irregularities are field-aligned and can provide excitation energy all along the field line to non-local field-aligned oscillations, such as the local field line oscillations. Eigen-periods of toroidal field line oscillations at low-latitudes, computed by using the dipole magnetic field and ion distributions obtained from the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI for typical nighttime conditions, fall in the range of 20–25 s. When subjected to spectral analysis, signal strength of the radio waves recorded on the 250 MHz beacon at Pondicherry (4.5° N dip, Mumbai (13.4° N dip and Ujjain (18.6° N dip exhibit periodicities in the same range. For the single event for which simultaneous ground magnetic data were available, the geomagnetic field also oscillated at the same periodicity. The systematic presence of a significant peak in the 20–25 s range during periods of strong radio wave scintillations, and its absence otherwise suggests the possibility that field line oscillations are endogenously excited by the irregularities, and the oscillations associated with the excited field line generate the modulation characteristics of the radio waves received on the ground. The frequency of modulation is found to be much lower than the characteristic frequencies that define the main body of scintillations, and they probably correspond to scales that are much larger than the typical Fresnel scale. It is possible that the refractive mechanism associated with larger scale long-lived irregularities could be responsible for the observed phenomenon. Results of a preliminary numerical experiment that uses a sinusoidal phase irregularity in the ionosphere as a refracting media are presented. The results show that phase variations which are large enough to produce a focal plane close to the ground can reproduce features that are not

  1. Very-Low-Frequency Subionospheric Remote Sensing of Thunderstorm-driven Acoustic and Gravity Waves in the D-region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, R. A.; Snively, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present observations of thunderstorm-driven perturbations to the D-region ionosphere measured by VLF subionospheric remote sensing (VLF-SRS). VLF-SRS is sensitive to electron density and collision frequency disturbances in a narrow altitude range near 85 km along the great-circle-path (GCP) between a VLF transmitter and a receiver some thousands of km away. These disturbances are measured as amplitude and/or phase perturbations to the continuous VLF transmitter signal. On March 20, 2001, a prominent event was observed by VLF receivers in Colorado monitoring the VLF transmitter in Puerto Rico, exhibiting unusually strong amplitude perturbations of up to 0.6 dB, with periods of 1-3 minutes, but no detectable phase perturbations. As these periods are well below the minimum Brunt-Vaisala period of about 5 minutes, we hypothesize that they may be associated with thunderstorm-generated acoustic waves (AWs). The GCPs from this transmitter to the receivers passed through two thunderstorms at the time of the AW event, one near the southern tip of Florida and the other over the Florida panhandle. The apparent AW event lasted for about one hour and was observed on four near-parallel GCPs separated by a few tens of km at the thunderstorm location. This data shows that VLF-SRS may provide a new, high-time-resolution (better than 1 Hz) monitoring system for acoustic and gravity waves in the upper atmosphere. To investigate the hypothesized AW source for this event, we use a two-step simulation process. A nonlinear, compressible, atmospheric dynamics model is used to simulate acoustic wave propagation from a defined source near the ground to 200 km altitude. Case studies are constructed to investigate different source configurations and perturbations to ionospheric density profiles. The modified electron and neutral density are then input to a finite-difference electromagnetic code that simulates the VLF transmitter signal propagation to the receiver over a distance of ~5000

  2. Demodulated low frequency currents from electrosurgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, R D; Schmitt, O H; Sievert, C E; Silvis, S E

    1984-07-01

    Low frequency currents produced incidental to electrosurgical procedures are usually only a minor threat unless they are coupled directly into the heart through a catheter or a thoracic surgical procedure. However, should the low frequency blocking capacitors in the electrosurgical generator fail in the conducting state, extremely dangerous low frequency currents of many milliamperes may flow into the patient. Even with properly functioning capacitors, low frequencies up to several milliamperes may be produced by some generators. The results of this study show that the coagulation mode of operation produces greater amounts of low frequency currents than the "pure cutting" mode at the same power setting. These results also demonstrate that the higher the generator power output, the higher the magnitude of the low frequency currents.

  3. Reduced-order computational model in nonlinear structural dynamics for structures having numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency range. Application to fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batou, A., E-mail: anas.batou@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Soize, C., E-mail: christian.soize@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallee (France); Brie, N., E-mail: nicolas.brie@edf.fr [EDF R and D, Département AMA, 1 avenue du général De Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • A ROM of a nonlinear dynamical structure is built with a global displacements basis. • The reduced order model of fuel assemblies is accurate and of very small size. • The shocks between grids of a row of seven fuel assemblies are computed. -- Abstract: We are interested in the construction of a reduced-order computational model for nonlinear complex dynamical structures which are characterized by the presence of numerous local elastic modes in the low-frequency band. This high modal density makes the use of the classical modal analysis method not suitable. Therefore the reduced-order computational model is constructed using a basis of a space of global displacements, which is constructed a priori and which allows the nonlinear dynamical response of the structure observed on the stiff part to be predicted with a good accuracy. The methodology is applied to a complex industrial structure which is made up of a row of seven fuel assemblies with possibility of collisions between grids and which is submitted to a seismic loading.

  4. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Yi

    2014-11-24

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include

  5. An analysis of intrinsic variations of low-frequency shear wave speed in a stochastic tissue model: the first application for staging liver fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Min; Jiang, Jingfeng

    2017-02-01

    Shear wave elastography is increasingly being used to non-invasively stage liver fibrosis by measuring shear wave speed (SWS). This study quantitatively investigates intrinsic variations among SWS measurements obtained from heterogeneous media such as fibrotic livers. More specifically, it aims to demonstrate that intrinsic variations in SWS measurements, in general, follow a non-Gaussian distribution and are related to the heterogeneous nature of the medium being measured. Using the principle of maximum entropy (ME), our primary objective is to derive a probability density function (PDF) of the SWS distribution in conjunction with a lossless stochastic tissue model. Our secondary objective is to evaluate the performance of the proposed PDF using Monte Carlo (MC)-simulated shear wave (SW) data against three other commonly used PDFs. Based on statistical evaluation criteria, initial results showed that the derived PDF fits better to MC-simulated SWS data than the other three PDFs. It was also found that SW fronts stabilized after a short (compared with the SW wavelength) travel distance in lossless media. Furthermore, in lossless media, the distance required to stabilize the SW propagation was not correlated to the SW wavelength at the low frequencies investigated (i.e. 50, 100 and 150 Hz). Examination of the MC simulation data suggests that elastic (shear) wave scattering became more pronounced when the volume fraction of hard inclusions increased from 10 to 30%. In conclusion, using the principle of ME, we theoretically demonstrated for the first time that SWS measurements in this model follow a non-Gaussian distribution. Preliminary data indicated that the proposed PDF can quantitatively represent intrinsic variations in SWS measurements simulated using a two-phase random medium model. The advantages of the proposed PDF are its physically meaningful parameters and solid theoretical basis.

  6. Hydraulic continuity and biological effects of low strength very low frequency electromagnetic waves: Case of microbial biofilm growth in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Merlin; Noamen, Omri; Evelyne, Gonze; Eric, Valette; Gilles, Cauffet; Marc, Henry

    2015-10-15

    This study aims to elucidate the interactions between water, subjected to electromagnetic waves of very low frequency (VLF) (kHz) with low strength electromagnetic fields (3.5 mT inside the coils), and the development of microbial biofilms in this exposed water. Experimental results demonstrate that in water exposed to VLF electromagnetic waves, the biomass of biofilm is limited if hydraulic continuity is achieved between the electromagnetic generator and the biofilm media. The measured amount of the biofilm's biomass is approximately a factor two lower for exposed biofilm than the non-exposed biofilm. Measurements of electromagnetic fields in the air and simulations exhibit very low intensities of fields (electromagnetic generator. Exposure to electric and magnetic fields of the quoted intensities cannot explain thermal and ionizing effects on the biofilm. A variable electrical potential with a magnitude close to 20 mV was detected in the tank in hydraulic continuity with the electromagnetic generator. The application of quantum field theory may help to explain the observed effects in this case.

  7. Modeling the variations of reflection coefficient of Earth's lower ionosphere using very low frequency radio wave data by artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Keyvan; Khakian Ghomi, Mehdi; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Marbouti, Marjan; Tan, Le Minh

    2016-08-01

    The ionized atmosphere lying from 50 to 600 km above surface, known as ionosphere, contains high amount of electrons and ions. Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio waves with frequencies between 3 and 30 kHz are reflected from the lower ionosphere specifically D-region. A lot of applications in long range communications and navigation systems have been inspired by this characteristic of ionosphere. There are several factors which affect the ionization rate in this region, such as: time of day (presence of sun in the sky), solar zenith angle (seasons) and solar activities. Due to nonlinear response of ionospheric reflection coefficient to these factors, finding an accurate relation between these parameters and reflection coefficient is an arduous task. In order to model these kinds of nonlinear functionalities, some numerical methods are employed. One of these methods is artificial neural network (ANN). In this paper, the VLF radio wave data of 4 sudden ionospheric disturbance (SID) stations are given to a multi-layer perceptron ANN in order to simulate the variations of reflection coefficient of D region ionosphere. After training, validation and testing the ANN, outputs of ANN and observed values are plotted together for 2 random cases of each station. By evaluating the results using 2 parameters of pearson correlation coefficient and root mean square error, a satisfying agreement was found between ANN outputs and real observed data.

  8. Harvesting Low-Frequency (Nanogenerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zi, Yunlong; Guo, Hengyu; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-26

    Electromagnetic generators (EMGs) and triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are the two most powerful approaches for harvesting ambient mechanical energy, but the effectiveness of each depends on the triggering frequency. Here, after systematically comparing the performances of EMGs and TENGs under low-frequency motion (10-100 V) and independent of frequency so that most of the generated power can be effectively used to power the devices. Furthermore, a TENG also has advantages of light weight, low cost, and easy scale up through advanced structure designs. All these merits verify the possible killer application of a TENG for harvesting energy at low frequency from motions such as human motions for powering small electronics and possibly ocean waves for large-scale blue energy.

  9. Attenuation of low-frequency electromagnetic wave in the thin sheath enveloping a high-speed vehicle upon re-entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, DongLin; Li, XiaoPing; Liu, YanMing; Xie, Kai; Bai, BoWen

    2017-02-01

    Low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic (EM) waves are suggested as potentially solving "radio blackout" caused by a plasma sheath enveloping a high-speed vehicle on re-entry. However, the traditional plasma absorption theory neglects the fact that the plasma sheath is electrically small compared to LF EM wavelengths. To understand clearly the attenuation of such waves through the plasma sheath, different attenuation mechanisms for the electric field (SE) and magnetic field (SH) were studied using the equivalent circuit approach. Analytical expressions were derived by modeling the plasma sheath as a spherical shell, and numerical simulations were performed to validate the effectiveness of the expressions. SE and SH are calculated for various plasma parameter settings; the EM wave attenuations obtained from plasma absorption theory are used for comparison. Results show that, instead of SE and SH being equal in the plasma absorption theory, SE and SH are no longer the same for electrically small sizes. Whereas |SH| is close to that from plasma absorption theory, |SE| is much higher. Further analysis shows that |SH| is a function of the ratio of electron density (ne) and collision frequency (ve) and increases with increasing ne/ve. Numerical simulations with radio-attenuation-measurement-C-like vehicle's plasma sheath parameters are performed and the results show that the magnetic field attenuation in the front part of the vehicle is much lower than in the rear. So it is suggested to place the magnetic loop antenna in the very front part of the vehicle. Finally, SH at different frequencies are calculated using plasma sheath parameter values simulating the re-entry phase of a radio-attenuation measurement-C vehicle and results show that such a vehicle might overcome radio blackout during the entire re-entry phase if systems operating below 3 MHz and above the L-band are combined with a lower-frequency system working below Earth's ionosphere and a higher-frequency system

  10. Surface acoustic wave mode conversion resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S. J.; Gunshor, R. L.; Melloch, M. R.; Datta, S.; Pierret, R. F.

    1983-08-01

    The fact that a ZnO-on-Si structure supports two distinct surface waves, referred to as the Rayleigh and the Sezawa modes, if the ZnO layer is sufficiently thick is recalled. A description is given of a unique surface wave resonator that operates by efficiently converting between the two modes at the resonant frequency. Since input and output coupling is effected through different modes, the mode conversion resonator promises enhanced out-of-band signal rejection. A Rayleigh wave traversing the resonant cavity in one direction is reflected as a Sezawa wave. It is pointed out that the off-resonance rejection of the mode conversion resonator could be enhanced by designing the transducers to minimize the level of cross coupling between transducers and propagating modes.

  11. Modeling of very low frequency (VLF radio wave signal profile due to solar flares using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation coupled with ionospheric chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palit

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available X-ray photons emitted during solar flares cause ionization in the lower ionosphere (~60 to 100 km in excess of what is expected to occur due to a quiet sun. Very low frequency (VLF radio wave signals reflected from the D-region of the ionosphere are affected by this excess ionization. In this paper, we reproduce the deviation in VLF signal strength during solar flares by numerical modeling. We use GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code to compute the rate of ionization due to a M-class flare and a X-class flare. The output of the simulation is then used in a simplified ionospheric chemistry model to calculate the time variation of electron density at different altitudes in the D-region of the ionosphere. The resulting electron density variation profile is then self-consistently used in the LWPC code to obtain the time variation of the change in VLF signal. We did the modeling of the VLF signal along the NWC (Australia to IERC/ICSP (India propagation path and compared the results with observations. The agreement is found to be very satisfactory.

  12. Amplification of exo-hiss into low-frequency chorus following substorm injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Z.; Su, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves contribute significantly to the acceleration of radiation belt electrons. Chorus with frequency below 0.1 fce (fce is the equatorial electron gyro-frequency) has been identified as the low-frequency chorus. How such low-frequency chorus waves are generated remains an unanswered question. Here we propose a new candidate generation mechanism that exo-hiss waves can serve as the source of low-frequency chorus. Exo-hiss is usually believed to be the leaked plasmaspheric hiss from the high-density plasmasphere into the low-density plasmatrough. Both Van Allen Probes observations and linear instability analyses support that exo-hiss can be effectively amplified into low-frequency chorus by the substorm-injected anisotropic electrons at energies around 100 keV.

  13. Low-Frequency Wave Activity Detected by MMS during Dusk Magnetopause Crossings and its Relation to Heating and Acceleration of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Contel, O.; Roux, A.; Retino, A.; Mirioni, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Chust, T.; Berthomier, M.; Chasapis, A.; Aunai, N.; Leroy, P.; Alison, D.; Lavraud, B.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Vaivads, A.; Marklund, G. T.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Moore, T.; Ergun, R. E.; Needell, J.; Chutter, M.; Rau, D.; Dors, I.; Macri, J.; Russell, C. T.; Magnes, W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Fischer, D.; Leinweber, H. K.; Anderson, B. J.; Nakamura, R.; Argall, M. R.; Le, G.; Slavin, J. A.; Kepko, L.; Baumjohann, W.; Pollock, C. J.; Mauk, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goodrich, K.; Wilder, F. D.

    2015-12-01

    Since the 9th of July, the MMS fleet of four satellites have evolved into a tetrahedral configuration with an average inter-satellite distance of 160 km and an apogee of 12 earth radii on the dusk side. In this study we report on ultra-low (1 mHz to ~10 Hz) and very-low (10 Hz to ~ 4 kHz) frequency wave activity measured by the four satellites during several crossings of the dusk equatorial magnetopause. Since the Larmor radius of magnetosheath protons is of the order of 50 km, this inter-satellite distance allows us to investigate in detail the physics of the magnetopause at proton scales including current structures related to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability as well as other energy transfer processes. From wave polarization analysis, we characterize the different types of emissions and discuss different mechanisms of heating and acceleration of particles. In particular, we focus on the electron heating by kinetic Alfvén waves and lower hybrid waves and the electron acceleration by oblique whistler mode waves, which have been suggested as possible mechanisms from previous Cluster and THEMIS measurements.

  14. Three-dimensional coupled mode analysis of internal-wave acoustic ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmelev, Alexey A; Lynch, James F; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Schmidt, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional coupled mode approach is used in this paper to describe the physics of low frequency acoustic signals propagating through a train of internal waves at an arbitrary azimuth. A three layer model of the shallow water waveguide is employed for studying the properties of normal modes and their coupled interaction due to the presence of nonlinear internal waves. Using a robust wave number integration technique for Fourier transform computation and a direct global matrix approach, an accurate three-dimensional coupled mode full field solution is obtained for the tonal signal propagation through straight and parallel internal waves. This approach provides accurate results for arbitrary azimuth and includes the effects of backscattering. This enables one to provide an azimuthal analysis of acoustic propagation and separate the effects of mode coupled transparent resonance, horizontal reflection and refraction, the horizontal Lloyd's mirror, horizontal ducting and anti-ducting, and horizontal tunneling and secondary ducting.

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic waves driven by p-modes

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Waves are observed at all layers of the solar atmosphere and the magnetic field plays a key role in their propagation. While deep down in the atmosphere the p-modes are almost entirely of acoustic nature, in the upper layers magnetic forces are dominating, leading to a large variety of new wave modes. Significant advances have been made recently in our understanding of the physics of waves interaction with magnetic structures, with the help of analytical theories, numerical simulations, as well as high-resolution observations. In this contribution, we review recent observational findings and current theoretical ideas in the field, with an emphasis on the following questions: (i) Peculiarities of the observed wave propagation in network, plage and facular regions; (ii) Role of the mode transformation and observational evidences of this process; (iii) Coupling of the photosphere, chromosphere, and above by means of waves propagating in magnetic structures.

  16. Whistler mode waves in the Jovian magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Naiguo; Kellogg, P. J.; Thiessen, J. P.; Lengyel-Frey, D.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Phillips, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    During the Ulysses flyby of Jupiter in February 1992, the spacecraft traversed the Jovian magnetosheath for a few hours during the inbound pass and for aa few days during the outbound pass. Burstlike electomagnetic waves at frequencies of approximately 0.1-0.4 of the local electron cyclotron frequency have been observed by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiement. The waves were more often observed in the regions which were probably the outer or the middle magnetosheath, especially near the bow shock, and rarely seen in the magnetosphere/magnetosheath boundary layer. The propagation angles of the waves are estimated by comparing the measurements of the wave electric and magnetic fields in the spacecraft spin plane with the corresponding values calculated using the cold plasma dispersion relation under local field and plasma conditions. It is found that the waves propagate obliquely with wave angles between approximately 30 deg and 50 deg. These waves are likely to be the whistler mode waves which are excited by suprathermal electrons with a few hundred eV and a slight anisotropy (T(sub perp)/T(sub parallel) approximately 1.1-1.5). They are probably similar in nature to the lion roars observed in the Earth's magnetosheath. Signature of coupling between the mirror and the whistler mode have also been observed. The plasma conditions which favor the excitation of the whistler mode instability during the wave events exists as observed by the plasma experiement of Ulysses.

  17. Long wave polar modes in semiconductor heterostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Trallero-Giner, C; Garca̕-Moliner, F 0

    1998-01-01

    Long Wave Polar Modes in Semiconductor Heterostructures is concerned with the study of polar optical modes in semiconductor heterostructures from a phenomenological approach and aims to simplify the model of lattice dynamics calculations. The book provides useful tools for performing calculations relevant to anyone who might be interested in practical applications. The main focus of Long Wave Polar Modes in Semiconductor Heterostructures is planar heterostructures (quantum wells or barriers, superlattices, double barrier structures etc) but there is also discussion on the growing field of quan

  18. A comparison of wave mode identification techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Walker

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The four point measurements available from the Cluster mission enable spatiotemporal effects in data sets to be resolved. One application of these multipoint measurements is the determination of the wave vectors and hence the identification of wave modes that exist within the plasma. Prior to multi-satellite missions, wave identification techniques were based upon the interpretation of observational data using theoretically defined relations. However, such techniques are limited by the quality of the data and the type of plasma model employed. With multipoint measurements, wave modes can be identified and their wave directions determined purely from the available observations. This paper takes two such methods, a phase differencing technique and k-filtering and compares their results. It is shown that both methods can resolve the k vector for the dominant mirror mode present in the data. The phase differencing method shows that the nature of the wave environment is constantly changing and as such both methods result in an average picture of the wave environment in the period analysed. The k-filtering method is able to identify other modes that are present.

  19. Demonstration of Shear Waves, Lamb Waves, and Rayleigh Waves by Mode Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, W. P.

    1980-01-01

    Introduces an experiment that can be demonstrated in the classroom to show that shear waves, Rayleigh waves, and Lamb waves can be easily generated and observed by means of mode conversion. (Author/CS)

  20. Are "EIT Waves" Fast-Mode MHD Waves?

    CERN Document Server

    Wills-Davey, M J; Stenflo, J O

    2007-01-01

    We examine the nature of large-scale, coronal, propagating wave fronts (``EIT waves'') and find they are incongruous with solutions using fast-mode MHD plane-wave theory. Specifically, we consider the following properties: non-dispersive single pulse manifestions, observed velocities below the local Alfven speed, and different pulses which travel at any number of constant velocities, rather than at the ``predicted'' fast-mode speed. We discuss the possibility of a soliton-like explanation for these phenomena, and show how it is consistent with the above-mentioned aspects.

  1. Guided-mode resonant wave plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Robert; Shokooh-Saremi, Mehrdad; Johnson, Eric G

    2010-07-15

    We introduce half-wave and quarter-wave retarders based on the dispersion properties of guided-mode resonance elements. We design the wave plates using numerical electromagnetic models joined with the particle swarm optimization method. The wave plates operate in reflection. We provide computed results for reflectance and phase in the telecommunication spectral region near 1.55 microm wavelength. A surface-relief grating etched in glass and overcoated with silicon yields a half-wave plate with nearly equal amplitudes of the TE and TM polarization components and pi phase difference across a bandwidth exceeding 50 nm. Wider operational bandwidths are obtainable with more complex designs involving glass substrates and mixed silicon/hafnium dioxide resonant gratings. The results indicate a potential new approach to fashion optical retarders.

  2. GENERATION OF EXTREMELY LOW FREQUENCY WAVES BY MODULATED HEATING OF POLAR IONOSPHERIC F REGION%极区电离层F区加热激发极低频波研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐彤; 徐彬; 吴健; 胡艳莉; 许正文

    2014-01-01

    Polar ionospheric heaters operated by HARRP and EISCAT have generated extremely low frequency waves by modulating the auroral electrojet at D and E region altitudes .However , the auroral electrojet often varies over time and is not always present .Alternatively, modulated F-region HF heating can generate ionospheric diamagnetic cur-rent, and the periodic modulation results in a magnetic moment that radiates extremely low frequency waves .Based on a one-dimensional time physical model of polar ionospheric heating and a full-wave model , we analyzed the fea-tures of extremely low frequency waves over Tromsø(69.59°N, 19.23°E).The results showed that extremely low frequency waves on the ground are different from lower ionospheric modulation , i.e., radiation of polar electrojet antenna.Furthermore, effective radiated power (ERP), modulated frequency, and ionospheric background, have significant influence on the generated extremely low frequency wave .%“极区电急流天线”辐射依赖于低电离层D/E区背景电急流,而高电离层F区极低频调制加热,可产生抗磁性电流,形成极低频波辐射源。利用电离层F区一维时变加热数值模型,采用全波解算法研究高纬Tromsø(69.59°N,19.23°E)地区电离层F区极低频调制加热。模拟结果表明,极区高电离层激发的极低频波与极区低电离层激发的结果不同。加热泵波的有效辐射功率( effective radiated power ,ERP)、调制频率及电离层背景对极低频波强度有着重要影响。

  3. Shear-Mode-Based Cantilever Driving Low-Frequency Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Using 0.67Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-0.33PbTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhou; Ren, Bo; Gai, Linlin; Zhao, Xiangyong; Luo, Haosu; Wang, Dong

    2016-08-01

    Energy harvesting from external mechanical excitation has become a hot interest area, and relaxor piezoelectric single crystal ( 1 - x )Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3- x PbTiO3 (PMN- x PT or PMN-PT) has attracted continuous attention due to the well-known ultrahigh shear-mode electromechanical response. To exploit the low-frequency application of excellent shear-mode performance of the PMN-PT single crystal, we proposed a Shear-mode-based CANtilever Driving Low-frequency Energy harvester. The device is composed of two symmetrically assembled sandwich structures and a cantilever, in which sandwich structures can be driven by the cantilever. An analytical method was used to illustrate the high output mechanism, and a finite-element method model of the device was also established to optimize the generated electric energy in this device. The electrical properties of the device under different excitation frequencies and load resistances were studied systematically. The maximum voltage and power density at resonance frequency (43.8 Hz) were measured to be 60.8 V and 10.8 mW/cm(3) under a proof mass of 13.5 g, respectively. Both theoretical and experimental results demonstrate the considerable potential of the resonance-excited shear-mode energy harvester applied to wireless sensors and low-power portable electronics.

  4. Mode selective control of drift wave turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Klinger, T.; Block, D.;

    2001-01-01

    Experiments on spatiotemporal open-loop synchronization of drift wave turbulence in a magnetized cylindrical plasma are reported. The synchronization effect is modeled by a rotating current profile with prescribed mode structure. Numerical simulations of an extended Hasegawa-Wakatani model show g...

  5. Wave impedance retrieving via Bloch modes analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Ha, S.; Sukhorukov, A.

    2011-01-01

    of the Bloch mode, respectively. Case studies prove that our ap-proach can determine material and wave effective parameters of lossy and lossless metamaterials. In some examples when the passivity is violated we made further analysis and showed that this is due to the failure of concept of impedance retrieving...

  6. Analysis of π-mode Stopband in an Asymmetric Millimeter-Wave Helical Slow-Wave Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, S. K.; Kumar, Lalit; Basu, B. N.

    2008-11-01

    A simple closed form formula for the estimation of π-mode stopband in an azimuthally asymmetric helical slow-wave structure (SWS) was developed following coupled-mode analysis of multiple reflections of the degenerate space-harmonic modes from the support rod discontinuities. The method incorporates the effects of circuit loss, and accrues the accuracy of 3D electromagnetic analysis by allowing the use of dispersion characteristics obtainable from any standard electromagnetic modeling. The formula is simple and amenable to easy computation, even using a scientific calculator, and without resorting to exhaustive and time-intensive numerical computation, and at the same time, without sacrificing the accuracy in results. The analysis was benchmarked against published results and excellent agreement observed. The analysis was further used for demonstrating the stopband phenomenon for a typical millimeter-wave helical slow-wave structure. Compared to low frequency structures, the stopband phenomenon for a millimeter-wave structure was found to be more pronounced, and an interesting inference was drawn as to how asymmetry induced stopband might be made to advantage in combating π-mode instabilities in a millimeter-wave traveling-wave tube.

  7. Wave impedance retrieving via Bloch modes analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Ha, S.; Sukhorukov, A.;

    2011-01-01

    of the Bloch mode, respectively. Case studies prove that our ap-proach can determine material and wave effective parameters of lossy and lossless metamaterials. In some examples when the passivity is violated we made further analysis and showed that this is due to the failure of concept of impedance retrieving......-ciples violation, like antiresonance behaviour with Im(ε) mode analysis of periodic metamaterials to extract the dominating (fundamental) Bloch mode. Then it is possible to determine the Bloch and wave impedances by the surface and volume aver-aging of the electromagnetic field......The main bottleneck in the restoration of electromagnetic effective parameters is connected to the impedance retrieving. The S-parameters method gives the input (Bloch) impedance, which, being then used for permittivity and permeability determination, causes some fundamental physics prin...

  8. Automatic determination of important mode-mode correlations in many-mode vibrational wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Carolin; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-04-14

    We introduce new automatic procedures for parameterizing vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) and vibrational configuration interaction wave functions. Importance measures for individual mode combinations in the wave function are derived based on upper bounds to Hamiltonian matrix elements and/or the size of perturbative corrections derived in the framework of VCC. With a threshold, this enables an automatic, system-adapted way of choosing which mode-mode correlations are explicitly parameterized in the many-mode wave function. The effect of different importance measures and thresholds is investigated for zero-point energies and infrared spectra for formaldehyde and furan. Furthermore, the direct link between important mode-mode correlations and coordinates is illustrated employing water clusters as examples: Using optimized coordinates, a larger number of mode combinations can be neglected in the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function than with normal coordinates for the same accuracy. Moreover, the fraction of important mode-mode correlations compared to the total number of correlations decreases with system size. This underlines the potential gain in efficiency when using optimized coordinates in combination with a flexible scheme for choosing the mode-mode correlations included in the parameterization of the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function. All in all, it is found that the introduced schemes for parameterizing correlated many-mode vibrational wave functions lead to at least as systematic and accurate calculations as those using more standard and straightforward excitation level definitions. This new way of defining approximate calculations offers potential for future calculations on larger systems.

  9. A mode filter for plasma waves in the Hall-MHD approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Vocks

    Full Text Available A filter method is presented which allows a qualitative and quantitative identification of wave modes observed with plasma experiments on satellites. Hitherto existing mode filters are based on the MHD theory and thus they are restricted to low frequencies well below the ion cyclotron frequency. The present method is generalized to cover wave modes up to the characteristic ion frequencies. The spectral density matrix determined by the observations is decomposed using the eigenvectors of the linearized Hall-MHD equations. As the wave modes are dispersive in this formalism, a precise determination of the k->-vectors requires the use of multi-point measurements. Therefore the method is particularly relevant to multi-satellite missions. The method is tested using simulated plasma data. The Hall-MHD filter is able to identify the modes excited in the model plasma and to assign the correct energetic contributions. By comparison with the former method it is shown that the simple MHD filter leads to large errors if the frequency is not well below the ion cyclotron frequency. Further the range of validity of the linear theory is examined rising the simulated wave amplitudes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (MHD waves and instabilities; plasma waves and instabilities

  10. First Kepler results on compact pulsators - II. KIC 010139564, a new pulsating subdwarf B (V361 Hya) star with an additional low-frequency mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaler, Stephen; Reed, M.D.; Quint, A.C.;

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of non-radial pulsations in a hot subdwarf B star based on 30.5 d of nearly continuous time series photometry using the Kepler spacecraft. KIC 010139564 is found to be a short-period pulsator of the V361 Hya (EC 14026) class with more than 10 independent pulsation modes...

  11. Analysis of mode-hopping effect in Fabry–Pérot multiple-quantum well laser diodes via low frequency noise investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pralgauskaitė, Sandra; Palenskis, Vilius; Matukas, Jonas;

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive investigation of noise characteristics and radiation spectrum with special attention to the mode-hopping effect of Fabry–Pérot (FP) multiple quantum well laser diodes (LDs) have been carried out: laser radiation spectra, optical and electrical fluctuations and cross-correlation factor...

  12. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangyu, E-mail: cqufangyuli@hotmail.com [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wen, Hao [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Fang, Zhenyun [Institute of Gravitational Physics, Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wei, Lianfu; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Miao [Quantum Optoelectronics Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic) gravitational waves (GWs) to cosmic microwave background (CMB) can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM) response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs) would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  13. Quasi-B-mode generated by high-frequency gravitational waves and corresponding perturbative photon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangyu; Wen, Hao; Fang, Zhenyun; Wei, Lianfu; Wang, Yiwen; Zhang, Miao

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of very low-frequency primordial (relic) gravitational waves (GWs) to cosmic microwave background (CMB) can generate B-mode polarization. Here, for the first time we point out that the electromagnetic (EM) response to high-frequency GWs (HFGWs) would produce quasi-B-mode distribution of the perturbative photon fluxes. We study the duality and high complementarity between such two B-modes, and it is shown that such two effects are from the same physical origin: the tensor perturbation of the GWs and not the density perturbation. Based on this quasi-B-mode in HFGWs and related numerical calculation, it is shown that the distinguishing and observing of HFGWs from the braneworld would be quite possible due to their large amplitude, higher frequency and very different physical behaviors between the perturbative photon fluxes and background photons, and the measurement of relic HFGWs may also be possible though face to enormous challenge.

  14. Compact Polarimetry in a Low Frequency Spaceborne Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, M-L.; Freeman, A.; Dubois-Fernandez, P.; Pottier, E.

    2011-01-01

    Compact polarimetry has been shown to be an interesting alternative mode to full polarimetry when global coverage and revisit time are key issues. It consists on transmitting a single polarization, while receiving on two. Several critical points have been identified, one being the Faraday rotation (FR) correction and the other the calibration. When a low frequency electromagnetic wave travels through the ionosphere, it undergoes a rotation of the polarization plane about the radar line of sight for a linearly polarized wave, and a simple phase shift for a circularly polarized wave. In a low frequency radar, the only possible choice of the transmit polarization is the circular one, in order to guaranty that the scattering element on the ground is illuminated with a constant polarization independently of the ionosphere state. This will allow meaningful time series analysis, interferometry as long as the Faraday rotation effect is corrected for the return path. In full-polarimetric (FP) mode, two techniques allow to estimate the FR: Freeman method using linearly polarized data, and Bickel and Bates theory based on the transformation of the measured scattering matrix to a circular basis. In CP mode, an alternate procedure is presented which relies on the bare surface scattering properties. These bare surfaces are selected by the conformity coefficient, invariant with FR. This coefficient is compared to other published classifications to show its potential in distinguishing three different scattering types: surface, doublebounce and volume. The performances of the bare surfaces selection and FR estimation are evaluated on PALSAR and airborne data. Once the bare surfaces are selected and Faraday angle estimated over them, the correction can be applied over the whole scene. The algorithm is compared with both FP techniques. In the last part of the paper, the calibration of a CP system from the point of view of classical matrix transformation methods in polarimetry is

  15. Compact Polarimetry in a Low Frequency Spaceborne Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, M-L.; Freeman, A.; Dubois-Fernandez, P.; Pottier, E.

    2011-01-01

    Compact polarimetry has been shown to be an interesting alternative mode to full polarimetry when global coverage and revisit time are key issues. It consists on transmitting a single polarization, while receiving on two. Several critical points have been identified, one being the Faraday rotation (FR) correction and the other the calibration. When a low frequency electromagnetic wave travels through the ionosphere, it undergoes a rotation of the polarization plane about the radar line of sight for a linearly polarized wave, and a simple phase shift for a circularly polarized wave. In a low frequency radar, the only possible choice of the transmit polarization is the circular one, in order to guaranty that the scattering element on the ground is illuminated with a constant polarization independently of the ionosphere state. This will allow meaningful time series analysis, interferometry as long as the Faraday rotation effect is corrected for the return path. In full-polarimetric (FP) mode, two techniques allow to estimate the FR: Freeman method using linearly polarized data, and Bickel and Bates theory based on the transformation of the measured scattering matrix to a circular basis. In CP mode, an alternate procedure is presented which relies on the bare surface scattering properties. These bare surfaces are selected by the conformity coefficient, invariant with FR. This coefficient is compared to other published classifications to show its potential in distinguishing three different scattering types: surface, doublebounce and volume. The performances of the bare surfaces selection and FR estimation are evaluated on PALSAR and airborne data. Once the bare surfaces are selected and Faraday angle estimated over them, the correction can be applied over the whole scene. The algorithm is compared with both FP techniques. In the last part of the paper, the calibration of a CP system from the point of view of classical matrix transformation methods in polarimetry is

  16. Low-frequency-noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    From 203 cases of low-frequency complaints a random selection of twenty-one cases were investigated. The main aim of the investigation was to answer the question whether the annoyance is caused by an external physical sound or by a physically non-existing sound, i.e. low-frequency tinnitus. Noise...... of the complainants are annoyed by a physical sound (20-180 Hz), while others suffer from low-frequency tinnitus (perceived frequency 40-100 Hz). Physical sound at frequencies below 20 Hz (infrasound) is not responsible for the annoyance - or at all audible - in any of the investigated cases, and none...... of the complainants has extraordinary hearing sensitivity at low frequencies. For comparable cases of low-frequency noise complaints in general, it is anticipated that physical sound is responsible in a substantial part of the cases, while low-frequency tinnitus is responsible in another substantial part of the cases....

  17. Low Frequency Variability and the Eastern Mediterranean Teleconnection Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzaki, M.; Flocas, H. A.

    2007-12-01

    The long time series analysis of the atmospheric circulation has revealed large scale correlations between the flow at remote locations. These fluctuations belong in the low frequency range of timescale and referred to as teleconnections patterns. They are located in particular places and appear as preferred modes of low-frequency natural variability of the atmospheric circulation with fixed oscillating nodes and antinodes, called poles. These teleconnection patterns describe standing waves oscillating with time scales of a month or longer. It has been recognized that the large scale eddies and their feedback onto the mean flow, the propagation of Rossby waves in the midlatitudes and the stratosphere-troposphere interaction play an important role in understanding low frequency general circulation and variability. In previous studies, the Eastern Mediterranean Teleconnection pattern (EMP) was found with its two poles located in North-eastern Europe and Eastern Mediterranean, and it was predominantly identified at the upper troposphere during winter. An index was defined, based on the exact position of the two poles of the pattern, to represent the strength of the teleconnection pattern and to discriminate its positive and negative phase. The objective of this study is to investigate the large scale dynamics related to the development of EMP. For this purpose, datasets of daily geopotential height, temperature and horizontal wind components at several isobaric levels are employed, as obtained from the NCEP/NCAR and from the ECMWF centres, for the calculation of transient eddy kinetic energy, E-vectors, Rossby wave source and potential vorticity. It was found that the role of the eddy driven mid-latitude jet is important. It is likely that the subtropical jet is passive and that the transient eddies remove much more momentum in the negative phase, when the storm- track comes charging into Europe. Rossby wave propagation seems to determine the differing wave

  18. New Spin-Wave Mode in Weak Ferromagnetic Fermi Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Petkova, Penka I.

    1999-01-01

    We study a phenomenological model for weak ferromagnetic Fermi liquids and investigate the properties of the spin waves in the model. The Landau kinetic equation is used to derive, in addition to the known Goldstone mode, a new spin-wave mode -- the first Silin-like ferromagnetic mode. We discuss the role of the interaction parameter F^a_1 on the behavior of the Goldstone mode and the first Silin-like ferromagnetic mode.

  19. Orbital effects of a monochromatic plane gravitational wave with ultra-low frequency incident on a gravitationally bound two-body system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We analytically compute the long-term orbital variations of a test particle orbiting a central body acted upon by an incident monochromatic plane gravitational wave. We assume that the characteristic size of the perturbed two-body system is much smaller than the wavelength of the wave. Moreover, we also suppose that the wave's frequency νg is much smaller than the particle's orbital one nb. We make neither a priori assumptions about the direction of the wavevector kˆ nor on the orbital configuration of the particle. While the semi-major axis a is left unaffected, the eccentricity e, the inclination I, the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the longitude of pericenter ϖ and the mean anomaly ℳ undergo non-vanishing long-term changes of the form dΨ/dt=F(Kij;e,I,Ω,ω,Ψ=e,I,Ω,ϖ,M, where Kij, i,j=1,2,3 are the coefficients of the tidal matrix K. Thus, in addition to the variations of its orientation in space, the shape of the orbit would be altered as well. Strictly speaking, such effects are not secular trends because of the slow modulation introduced by K and by the orbital elements themselves: they exhibit peculiar long-term temporal patterns which would be potentially of help for their detection in multidecadal analyses of extended data records of planetary observations of various kinds. In particular, they could be useful in performing independent tests of the inflation-driven ultra-low gravitational waves whose imprint may have been indirectly detected in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Earth-based experiment BICEP2. Our calculation holds, in general, for any gravitationally bound two-body system whose orbital frequency nb is much larger than the frequency νg of the external wave, like, e.g., extrasolar planets and the stars orbiting the Galactic black hole. It is also valid for a generic perturbation of tidal type with constant coefficients over timescales of the order of the orbital period of the perturbed particle.

  20. Low-Frequency Vibrational Modes of Poly(glycolic acid) and Thermal Expansion of Crystal Lattice Assigned On the Basis of DFT-Spectral Simulation Aided with a Fragment Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Miyada, Mai; Sato, Harumi; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-02-09

    Low-frequency vibrational modes of lamellar crystalline poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) were measured on Raman and far-infrared (FIR) spectra. Among the observed bands, an FIR band at ∼70 cm(-1) and a Raman band at 125 cm(-1) showed a gradual lower-frequency shift with increasing temperature from 20 °C to the melting point at ∼230 °C. Their polarization direction was perpendicular to the chain axis of PGA. Both spectra were quantum-mechanically simulated with the aid of a fragment method, the Cartesian-coordinate tensor transfer, which enabled an explicit consideration of molecular interactions between two adjacent polymer chains. Good agreement was achieved between the experiment and theory in both spectra. The temperature-sensitive bands at ∼70 cm(-1) in FIR and at 125 cm(-1) in Raman comprise the out-of-plane C═O bending motion. The temperature-dependent shifts of the low-frequency bands were successfully simulated by the DFT-spectral calculation, exploring that the main origin of the shifts is the thermal expansion of the crystal lattice. This result indicates that the thermally shifted bands may be used as an indicator of the lattice expansion of PGA. Possible changes in intermolecular interactions of PGA under temperature rising were ascribed on the basis of natural bond orbital theory. The steric repulsion between the carbonyl O atom in one chain and the H-C bond in the adjacent chain will be a dominant interaction in the lattice-expanding process, which would cause the observed thermal shifts of the bending modes. Comparisons of the spectral assignment for PGA obtained in this study and that for poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) reported by us suggest that crystalline polyesters give vibrational modes composed of out-of-plane bending motion of C═O groups between ∼70 and ∼125 cm(-1), the modes of which are sensitive to the thermal expansion of crystal lattice and its concomitant changes in their intermolecular interactions.

  1. Low frequency sound field control for loudspeakers in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    Rectangular rooms are the most common shape for sound reproduction, but at low frequencies the reflections from the boundaries of the room cause large spatial variations in the sound pressure level.  Variations up to 30 dB are normal, not only at the room modes, but basically at all frequencies....... As sound propagates in time, it seems natural that the problems can best be analyzed and solved in the time domain. A time based room correction system named CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System) has been developed for sound reproduction in rectangular listening rooms. It can control the sound...... distribution in the room at low frequencies by using multiple loudspeakers together with an optimal placement of the loudspeakers.  At low frequencies CABS will create a plane wave from the front wall loudspeakers which will be absorbed by additional loudspeakers at the rear wall giving an almost homogeneous...

  2. The Quest for B Modes from Inflationary Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Kovetz, Ely D.

    2016-09-01

    The search for the curl component (B mode) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization induced by inflationary gravitational waves is described. The canonical single-field slow-roll model of inflation is presented, and we explain the quantum production of primordial density perturbations and gravitational waves. It is shown how these gravitational waves then give rise to polarization in the CMB. We then describe the geometric decomposition of the CMB polarization pattern into a curl-free component (E mode) and curl component (B mode) and show explicitly that gravitational waves induce B modes. We discuss the B modes induced by gravitational lensing and by Galactic foregrounds and show how both are distinguished from those induced by inflationary gravitational waves. Issues involved in the experimental pursuit of these B modes are described, and we summarize some of the strategies being pursued. We close with a brief discussion of some other avenues toward detecting/characterizing the inflationary gravitational-wave background.

  3. Accuracy and precision of gravitational-wave models of inspiraling neutron star -- black hole binaries with spin: comparison with numerical relativity in the low-frequency regime

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Prayush; Bhagwat, Swetha; Afshari, Nousha; Brown, Duncan A; Lovelace, Geoffrey; Scheel, Mark A; Szilágyi, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Coalescing binaries of neutron stars (NS) and black holes (BH) are one of the most important sources of gravitational waves for the upcoming network of ground based detectors. Detection and extraction of astrophysical information from gravitational-wave signals requires accurate waveform models. The Effective-One-Body and other phenomenological models interpolate between analytic results and $10-30$ orbit numerical relativity (NR) merger simulations. In this paper we study the accuracy of these models using new NR simulations that span $36-88$ orbits, with mass-ratios and black hole spins $(q,\\chi_{BH}) = (7, \\pm 0.4), (7, \\pm 0.6)$, and $(5, -0.9)$. We find that: (i) the recently published SEOBNRv1 and SEOBNRv2 models of the Effective-One-Body family disagree with each other (mismatches of a few percent) for black hole spins $\\geq 0.5$ or $\\leq -0.3$, with waveform mismatch accumulating during early inspiral; (ii) comparison with numerical waveforms indicate that this disagreement is due to phasing errors of...

  4. Study of a condition for the mode conversion from purely perpendicular electrostatic waves to electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaee, Mohammad Javad; Katoh, Yuto

    2016-07-01

    One of the mechanisms for generating electromagnetic plasma waves (Z-mode and LO-mode) is mode conversion from electrostatic waves into electromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous plasma. Herein, we study a condition required for mode conversion of electrostatic waves propagating purely perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, by numerically solving the full dispersion relation. An approximate model is derived describing the coupling between electrostatic waves (hot plasma Bernstein mode) and Z-mode waves at the upper hybrid frequency. The model is used to study conditions required for mode conversion from electrostatic waves (electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves, including Bernstein mode) into electromagnetic plasma waves (LO-mode). It is shown that for mode conversion to occur in inhomogeneous plasma, the angle between the boundary surface and the magnetic field vector should be within a specific range. The range of the angle depends on the norm of the k vector of waves at the site of mode conversion in the inhomogeneous region. The present study reveals that inhomogeneity alone is not a sufficient condition for mode conversion from electrostatic waves to electromagnetic plasma waves and that the angle between the magnetic field and the density gradient plays an important role in the conversion process.

  5. Surface-wave mode coupling : modelling and inverting waveforms including body-wave phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marquering, H.A.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a similar problem as addressed by Li & Tanimoto (1993) in the surfacewave mode approach. In this thesis it is shown that surface-wave mode coupling is required when body-wave phases in laterally heterogeneous media are modelled by surface-wave mode summation. An efficie

  6. Mode Identification of Power System Low-Frequency Oscillation Based on Measured Signal%基于实测信号的电力系统低频振荡模态辨识

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡国伟; 杨德友; 张俊丰; 刘铖

    2011-01-01

    Application of wide area measurement system (WAMS) provides strong support to measurement-based power system stability analysis, so it is of great importance for the improvement of real-time monitoring and control of power system low-frequency oscillation to well and truly identify oscillation modals and oscillation parameters based on the information from dynamic measurement. Combining empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with stochastic subspace identification (SSI) algorithm and according to the dynamically measured information of generator active power, the identification and analysis on power system low frequency are researched. The proposed method can effectively overcome the defect that Prony algorithm and auto-regressive and moving average (ARMA) algorithm are apt to be influenced by noise and actual order number of the system as well as the shortcoming that it is difficult for single stochastic subspace to deal with nonlinear and non-stationary oscillation signals, thus the proposed method can truly and accurately extract original oscillation information from the signals, which contain noise, in a shorter time period, meanwhile corresponding oscillation modals of various low-frequency oscillation modes can be obtained. The feasibility of applying the proposed method to the analysis on power system low-frequency oscillation is verified by both results from testing system and simulation.%广域相量测量系统的应用为基于量测的电力系统稳定性分析提供了有力支持.基于动态量测信息准确地辨识电力系统低频振荡模态参数及振型,对提高电力系统低频振荡的实时监测与控制至关重要.结合经验模态分解与随机子空间辨识算法,基丁发电机有功功率的动态量测信息,开展了电力系统低频振荡辨识与分析的研究.该方法能够在较短的时间从含噪信号内提取原系统真实准确的振荡信息,同时能够得到各振荡模式相应的振型,有效地克服Prony

  7. 低频导波在场站管道检测中的应用研究%Apply low-frequency ultrasonic guided wave testing system to inspect pipelines in gas station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋日生; 喻建胜; 何莎; 王文韬; 彭星煜

    2012-01-01

    There is no effective means for wholly comprehensive inspection of pipelines in the gas station because of the complex laying environment. In response to this situation, the UK GUL's WaveMaker G3 low-frequency ultrasonic guided wave testing system was introduced. In order to check the performances of this system, such as detection sensitivity, defects positioning accuracy, detection range and type of defect, and so on, the experiment of inspecting pipelines was carried in the gas station of PetroChina Southwest Oil & Gas Field Company. The test results showed that WaveMaker G3 low -frequency ultrasonic guided wave testing system can be used for inspecting the location of corrosion and the decrease of wall thickness. It also can position the defects precisely through identifying the typical characteristics signal, e.g., welds etc. Thus, the corrosion of the whole pipeline can be inspected. It will provide a strong technical support for detecting and evaluating the station pipelines, gathering & transportation pipelines and long-distance pipelines in oil and gas fields.%针对输气场站内管道敷设环境复杂,一直没有有效的手段进行100%的全面检测这一状况,引进英国GUL公司的WaveMaker G3低频导波检测系统对中国石油西南油气田公司的某场站输气管道进行了检测试验,来验证系统检测灵敏度、缺陷定位准确度、检测距离和检测缺陷类型等性能指标.试验表明:WaveMaker G3低频导波检测系统可以检出管道局部腐蚀以及壁厚减薄情况,并通过对典型的特征信号如焊缝等的识别可以实现对缺陷准确定位,从而掌握管道的整体腐蚀状况,为各大油气田的场站管道、集输管道以及长输管道的维护决策提供技术支持.

  8. 基于形态滤波和Prony算法的低频振荡模式辨识的研究%Research on identifying low frequency oscillation modes based on morphological filtering theory and Prony algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李安娜; 吴熙; 蒋平; 徐钢; 王成亮

    2015-01-01

    针对传统Prony方法对噪声敏感导致辨识精度不高的问题,提出了一种基于形态滤波和Prony算法相结合的低频振荡模式辨识的方法,实现了在有混合噪声干扰情况下低频振荡模式的准确辨识。基于数学形态学,设计了一种基于半圆形结构元素的形态滤波器,在选取合适的元素尺寸情况下,可以有效滤除混合噪声。对于去噪声之后的信号采用Prony算法进行辨识,可准确获取低频振荡各个模式参数。通过Matlab进行算例仿真,表明了对电力信号进行预处理的必要性以及所提出的方法能相对精确地进行振荡模式辨识,验证了其有效性。%A method based on morphological filtering theory and power algorithm is put forward to identify low frequency oscillation modes, aiming at how to avoid the limitation of Prony methods that is sensitive to noise thus to cause the inaccuracy. It realizes accurate identification of oscillation modes in the condition of fixed noises. A morphology filter, which is based on mathematical morphology and hemicycle structure element is designed to effectively suppress the noise in the condition of proper size of the element. Prony algorithm is then used to detect the de-noised signal and obtain the low frequency oscillation parameters of every mode. The Matlab simulation results show that it is very necessary to preprocess the data of electric signal. Effectiveness and relatively accuracy are verified.

  9. Observations and modelling of the wave mode evolution of an impulse-driven 3 mHz ULF wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Wright

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A combination of an HF Doppler sounder, a network of ground magnetometers, upstream solar wind monitors and a numerical model is used to examine the temporal evolution of an Ultra Low Frequency (ULF wave. The event occurred on 16 April 1998 and followed a solar wind density and pressure increase seen in the upstream ACE spacecraft data. The magnetometer and HF Doppler sounder data show that the event develops into a low-m (−6 field line resonance. HF signals that propagate via the ionosphere exhibit Doppler shifts due to a number of processes that give rise to a time-dependent phase path. The ULF electric and magnetic fields are calculated by a one-dimensional model which calculates the wave propagation from the magnetosphere, through the ionosphere to the ground with an oblique magnetic field. These values are then used to determine a model HF Doppler shift which is subsequently compared to HF Doppler observations. The ULF magnetic field at the ground and Doppler observations are then used to provide model inputs at various points throughout the event. We find evidence that the wave mode evolved from a mixture of fast and Alfvén modes at the beginning of the event to an almost purely shear Alfvénic mode after 6 wavecycles (33 min.

  10. Low-frequency noise complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark and in other industrialized countries there are cases where people complain about annoying low-frequency or infrasonic noise in their homes. Besides noise annoyance people often report other adverse effects such as insomnia, headache, lack of concentration etc. In many cases the noise...

  11. Low frequency signal in the GOLF measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grec, G; Provost, J; Renaud, C, E-mail: grec@obs-nice.fr [Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS UMR 6202 Cassiopee, OCA (France)

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows the results obtained using a revisited method to normalize the velocity evaluation extracted from the measurements, for roughly 14 years of GOLF data. For the search of g modes, we calculate the low frequency power spectrum of the signal with 2 different approaches: - . The classical calculation of the power spectrum of the velocity signal. - . An alternative calculation, extracting first the variations along the time of the p-mode; frequencies, then calculating the power spectrum of those frequency modulation. Both spectra are compared to the g-mode frequency spectrum calculated for a solar model. Several observed frequencies are in close agreement with the calculated g modes. A careful statistical analysis of this result should now follow.

  12. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. The DAKOTA optimization software package was used to optimize an axisymmetric geometry to maximize the amplification of the waves at first mode frequencies as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. Finally, all geometric parameters were allowed to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. Since first mode waves are known to be most unstable in the form of oblique wave, the geometries were optimized using a broad range of wave frequencies as well as a wide range of oblique wave angles to determine the geometry that most amplifies the first mode waves. Since first mode waves are seen most often in flows with low Mach numbers at the edge of the boundary layer, the edge Mach number for each geometry was recorded to determine any relationship between edge Mach number and the stability of first mode waves. Results indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose and a slight flare at the aft end under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will lower the Mach number at the edge of the boundary layer to less than 4, and the corresponding stability analysis showed maximum first mode N factors of 3.

  13. The Quest for B Modes from Inflationary Gravitational Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The search for the curl component (B mode) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization induced by inflationary gravitational waves is described. The canonical single-field slow-roll model of inflation is presented, and we explain the quantum production of primordial density perturbations and gravitational waves. It is shown how these gravitational waves then give rise to polarization in the CMB. We then describe the geometric decomposition of the CMB polarization pattern into a curl-free component (E mode) and curl component (B mode) and show explicitly that gravitational waves induce B modes. We discuss the B modes induced by gravitational lensing and by Galactic foregrounds and show how both are distinguished from those induced by inflationary gravitational waves. Issues involved in the experimental pursuit of these B modes are described, and we summarize some of the strategies being pursued. We close with a brief discussion of some other avenues toward detecting/characterizing the inflationary gr...

  14. Multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering simulations using 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara A C; Rogge, Matthew D; Miller, Corey A; Hinders, Mark K

    2012-02-01

    We have implemented three-dimensional (3D) elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) simulations to model Lamb wave scattering for two flaw-types in an aircraft-grade aluminum plate, a rounded rectangle flat-bottom hole and a disbond of the same shape. The plate thickness and flaws explored in this work include frequency-thickness regions where several Lamb wave modes exist and sometimes overlap in phase and/or group velocity. For the case of the flat-bottom hole the depth was incrementally increased to explore progressive changes in multiple-mode Lamb wave scattering due to the damage. The flat-bottom hole simulation results have been compared to experimental data and are shown to provide key insight for this well-defined experimental case by explaining unexpected results in experimental waveforms. For the rounded rectangle disbond flaw, which would be difficult to implement experimentally, we found that Lamb wave behavior differed significantly from the flat-bottom hole flaw. Most of the literature in this field is restricted to low frequency-thickness regions due to difficulties in interpreting data when multiple modes exist. We found that benchmarked 3D EFIT simulations can yield an understanding of scattering behavior for these higher frequency-thickness regions and in cases that would be difficult to set up experimentally. Additionally, our results show that 2D simulations would not have been sufficient for modeling the complicated scattering that occurred.

  15. Plate-mode waves in phononic crystal thin slabs: mode conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiu-Jiu; Bonello, Bernard; Hou, Zhi-Lin

    2008-09-01

    We have computed the dispersion curves of plate-mode waves propagating in periodic composite structures composed of isotropic aluminum cylinders embedded in an isotropic nickel background. The phononic crystal has a square symmetry and the calculation is based on the plane-wave expansion method. Along GammaX or GammaM directions, shear-horizontal modes do not couple to the Lamb wave modes which are polarized in the sagittal plane. Whatever the direction of propagation in between GammaX and GammaM, shear-horizontal modes convert to Lamb waves and couple with the flexural and dilatational modes. This phenomenon is demonstrated both through the mode splitting in the lower-order symmetric band structure and through the calculation of all three components of the particle displacements. The phononic case is different from the pure isotropic plate case where shear-horizontal waves decouple from Lamb waves whatever the direction of propagation.

  16. Alternative theories of atmospheric telecommunications and low-frequency fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Jorgen S.; Webster, Peter J.

    1988-08-01

    for the formation of quasi-stationary low-frequency fluctuations. One of these is the baroclinic-barotropic dipole instability mechanism in which the formation of quasi-stationary mature anomalies is initiated by the upstream development of mid-latitude eastward propagating dipole wave trains which arise through the combined baroclinic-barotropic instability of the three-dimensional atmospheric flow. The other is the westerly duct mechanism in which the initiation of low-frequency variability is caused by tropical disturbances. According to this hypothesis, the longitudinal variation of the basic state flow near the equator causes a ducting of wave energy generated in the tropics to specific zones in the upper tropospheric westerlies; these zones then act as source regions for the emanation of waves into the extratropics. Furthermore, this duct also acts as a waveguide for extratropical modes propagating into or through the tropics.

  17. Full wave simulations of fast wave mode conversion and lower hybrid wave propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, J.C.; Bonoli, P.T.; Brambilla, M.;

    2004-01-01

    Fast wave (FW) studies of mode conversion (MC) processes at the ion-ion hybrid layer in toroidal plasmas must capture the disparate scales of the FW and mode converted ion Bernstein and ion cyclotron waves. Correct modeling of the MC layer requires resolving wavelengths on the order of k(perpendi......Fast wave (FW) studies of mode conversion (MC) processes at the ion-ion hybrid layer in toroidal plasmas must capture the disparate scales of the FW and mode converted ion Bernstein and ion cyclotron waves. Correct modeling of the MC layer requires resolving wavelengths on the order of k......). Two full wave codes, a massively-parallel-processor (MPP) version of the TORIC-2D finite Larmor radius code [M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, 1 (1999)] and also an all orders spectral code AORSA2D [E. F. Jaeger , Phys. Plasmas 9, 1873 (2002)], have been developed which for the first......)] to gain new understanding into the nature of FWMC in tokamaks. The massively-parallel-processor version of TORIC is also now capable of running with sufficient resolution to model planned lower hybrid range of frequencies experiments in the Alcator C-Mod. (C) 2004 American Institute of Physics....

  18. Nonperturbative Bethe-Heitler pair creation in combined high- and low-frequency laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Augustin, Sven

    2014-01-01

    The nonperturbative regime of electron-positron pair creation by a relativistic proton beam colliding with a highly intense bichromatic laser field is studied. The laser wave is composed of a strong low-frequency and a weak high-frequency mode, with mutually orthogonal polarization vectors. We show that the presence of the high-frequency field component can strongly enhance the pair-creation rate. Besides, a characteristic influence of the high-frequency mode on the angular and energy distributions of the created particles is demonstrated, both in the nuclear rest frame and the laboratory frame.

  19. Beam interactions with surface waves and higher-order modes in oversized backward wave oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Kazuo; Kojima, Akihiko; Kawabe, Fumiaki; Yambe, Kiyoyuki [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Amin, Ruhul [Islamic University of Technology, Gazipur (Bangladesh)

    2014-10-15

    Beam interactions with surface waves and higher-order modes in an oversized backward wave oscillator (BWO) are studied. In addition to the well-known Cherenkov interaction, the slow cyclotron interaction occurs due to transverse perturbations of the electron beam. The Cherenkov interaction dominates the slow cyclotron interaction. Growth rates of both the interactions for the higher order modes are small compared with those for the surface-wave modes in an oversized BWO. The coaxial slow-wave structure exhibits a reduced number of higher-order modes, which consequently reduces the mode competition problem and improves beam interactions with higher order modes. For higher values of beam currents, the slow cyclotron wave grows at a faster rate than the Cherenkov waves.

  20. Investigation of dominant spin wave modes by domain walls collision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramu, M.; Purnama, I.; Goolaup, S.; Chandra Sekhar, M.; Lew, W. S., E-mail: wensiang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2014-06-28

    Spin wave emission due to field-driven domain wall (DW) collision has been investigated numerically and analytically in permalloy nanowires. The spin wave modes generated are diagonally symmetric with respect to the collision point. The non-propagating mode has the highest amplitude along the middle of the width. The frequency of this mode is strongly correlated to the nanowire geometrical dimensions and is independent of the strength of applied field within the range of 0.1 mT to 1 mT. For nanowire with film thickness below 5 nm, a second spin wave harmonic mode is observed. The decay coefficient of the spin wave power suggests that the DWs in a memory device should be at least 300 nm apart for them to be free of interference from the spin waves.

  1. PIC simulations of wave-mode conversion on the plasmapause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horký, Miroslav; Omura, Yoshiharu; Santolík, Ondřej

    2017-04-01

    We study a conversion process from the electron Bernstein modes to electromagnetic free space modes using a 2D-3V electromagnetic PIC code with predefined particle density irregularities. We use a Gaussian profile of the particle density irregularity along the external magnetic field. Our results show the electron Bernstein modes generated by the ring-beam instability in the dense plasma region as well as their conversion into the electromagnetic waves. The resulting free space mode waves propagate out of the dense region perpendicular to magnetic field with the corresponding energy flux. Our simulation results are compared with measured data from Cluster and Van Allen Probes spacecraft. This wave mode conversion process might help us to explain generation of electromagnetic waves over the plasmapause density gradient.

  2. Raytracing of extreamely low frequency waves radiated from ionospheric artificial modulation at low latitude%低纬电离层人工调制所激发的ELF波射线追踪

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪枫; 赵正予; 常珊珊; 倪彬彬; 顾旭东

    2012-01-01

    通过大功率极低频(ELF)/甚低频(VLF)高频调幅波能有效地扰动低电离层电流,形成等效的ELF/VLF电离层虚拟天线,辐射ELFNLF波,所辐射出的低频信号能够传播进入到磁层,对其传播特性的研究对于理解辐射带高能电子沉降具有重要意义.本文基于磁层射线追踪理论,通过数值模拟得到在低纬地区所激发出的ELF波在磁层中的射线路径,并对其特征进行分析.数值模拟结果表明,从低纬激发的ELF波在南北半球来回弹跳,并逐渐传播到更远处,对于不同频率的ELF波,频率越高,传播距离越近,频率越低,传播距离越远,在传播过程中,ELF波会逐渐倾向于在一个固定的磁层区域附近来回反射,在此过程中波法向角也逐渐变为90°,射线方向倾向于沿着背景磁场方向传播.%Powerful high-frequency radio waves modulated at extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) can efficiently modify the lower ionospheric current which can act as an equivalent ionospheri'c antenna for the generation of ELF/VLF wave and these signals can propagate into the magnetosphere and the investigation of the propagation properties is of significance for understanding of radiation belt energetic electrons precipitation. In this paper, based on the raytracing theory, the ray paths of ELF waves in the magnetosphere are obtained using numerical modeling and the properties are analyzed. The results shows that the ELF waves generated from the low latitude reflect between the southern and northern hemisphere and propagate to the farther place gradually. For the signals with different frequencies, the higher their frequencies, the shorter their propagation distances are, the lower their frequencies, the longer their propagtion distances are. In the process, ELF waves tend to reflect near a fixed region. The normal angel increases to 90° gradually and ray direction tends to

  3. Whistler Mode Waves in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun; LU Quan-Ming; WANG Shui; WANG Yu-Ming; DOU Xian-Kang

    2004-01-01

    A 21/2-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code is used to investigate the wave phenomena in the plasma sheet of collisionless magnetic reconnection. The results show that these waves have the following characteristics: they are right-hand circularity polarized, with propagation direction nearly parallel to local magnetic field, and frequency between 0.07 and 0.17 times of local electron cyclotron frequency. Therefore we conclude that such waves are Whistler waves, and their possible excitation mechanisms are also discussed.

  4. Resonant mode for gravitational wave detectors based on atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-11-01

    We describe an atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wave packets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes. For instance, a binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to ΩGW˜10-14 for a two-satellite space-based detector.

  5. Phased array tuning for optimal ultrasonic guided wave mode selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostron, J. H.; Rose, J. L.; Moose, C. A.

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have become widely used in a variety of nondestructive evaluation applications due to their efficiency in defect detection, ability to inspect hidden areas, and other reasons. With a thorough understanding of guided wave mechanics, researchers can predict which guided wave modes will have a high probability of success in a particular nondestructive evaluation application. However, work continues to find optimal mode and frequency selection. An "optimal" mode could give the highest sensitivity to defects or the greatest penetration power, increasing inspection efficiency. In this work, we consider the use of guided interface waves for bond evaluation. A phased comb array transducer is used to sweep in the phase velocity - frequency space in an effort to determine optimal modes.

  6. CRRES observations of ion composition during EMIC mode wave events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larsen, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-13

    EMIC mode waves may play an important role in the dynamics of the growth and loss of the radiation belts. CRRES mission analysis has provided extensive information on the distributions of EMIC mode waves. Less well studied and understood is the role that ion composition plays in the formation of the EMIC mode waves. The CRESS plasma mass spectrometer LOMICS measured all ion species of interest up to 45 keV/q. This preliminary study will examine the characteristics of heavy ions during a multitude of wave events, in particular, the effect of ion composition on wave-particle interactions, amplitude, and frequency. The relevance of such data to the upcoming RBSP mission will be highlighted.

  7. Single-mode dispersive waves and soliton microcomb dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xu; Yang, Qi-Fan; Zhang, Xueyue; Yang, Ki Youl; Li, Xinbai; Vahala, Kerry

    2017-03-01

    Dissipative Kerr solitons are self-sustaining optical wavepackets in resonators. They use the Kerr nonlinearity to both compensate dispersion and offset optical loss. Besides providing insights into nonlinear resonator physics, they can be applied in frequency metrology, precision clocks, and spectroscopy. Like other optical solitons, the dissipative Kerr soliton can radiate power as a dispersive wave through a process that is the optical analogue of Cherenkov radiation. Dispersive waves typically consist of an ensemble of optical modes. Here, a limiting case is studied in which the dispersive wave is concentrated into a single cavity mode. In this limit, its interaction with the soliton induces hysteresis behaviour in the soliton's spectral and temporal properties. Also, an operating point of enhanced repetition-rate stability occurs through balance of dispersive-wave recoil and Raman-induced soliton-self-frequency shift. The single-mode dispersive wave can therefore provide quiet states of soliton comb operation useful in many applications.

  8. Ultrawide low frequency band gap of phononic crystal in nacreous composite material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, J.; Huang, J.; Zhang, S., E-mail: zhangs@dlut.edu.cn; Zhang, H.W.; Chen, B.S.

    2014-06-27

    The band structure of a nacreous composite material is studied by two proposed models, where an ultrawide low frequency band gap is observed. The first model (tension-shear chain model) with two phases including brick and mortar is investigated to describe the wave propagation in the nacreous composite material, and the dispersion relation is calculated by transfer matrix method and Bloch theorem. The results show that the frequency ranges of the pass bands are quite narrow, because a special tension-shear chain motion in the nacreous composite material is formed by some very slow modes. Furthermore, the second model (two-dimensional finite element model) is presented to investigate its band gap by a multi-level substructure scheme. Our findings will be of great value to the design and synthesis of vibration isolation materials in a wide and low frequency range. Finally, the transmission characteristics are calculated to verify the results. - Highlights: • A Brick-and-Mortar structure is used to discuss wave propagation through nacreous materials. • A 1D Bloch wave solution of nacreous materials with a tension-shear chain model is obtained. • The band structure and transmission characteristics of nacreous materials with the FE model are examined. • An ultrawide low frequency band gap is found in nacreous materials with both theory and FE model.

  9. Low-frequency electromagnetic field in a Wigner crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Stupka, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Long-wave low-frequency oscillations are described in a Wigner crystal by generalization of the reverse continuum model for the case of electronic lattice. The internal self-consistent long-wave electromagnetic field is used to describe the collective motions in the system. The eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the obtained system of equations are derived. The velocities of longitudinal and transversal sound waves are found.

  10. Ultra-low frequency shock dynamics in degenerate relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S.; Sultana, S.; Mamun, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    A degenerate relativistic three-component plasma model is proposed for ultra-low frequency shock dynamics. A reductive perturbation technique is adopted, leading to Burgers' nonlinear partial differential equation. The properties of the shock waves are analyzed via the stationary shock wave solution for different plasma configuration parameters. The role of different intrinsic plasma parameters, especially the relativistic effects on the linear wave properties and also on the shock dynamics, is briefly discussed.

  11. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ramakrishnan; Parthiban, R.; Sawal Hamid Md Ali; Md. Shabiul Islam; Ajay Achath Mohanan

    2013-01-01

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film...

  12. Mode perturbation method for optimal guided wave mode and frequency selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philtron, J H; Rose, J L

    2014-09-01

    With a thorough understanding of guided wave mechanics, researchers can predict which guided wave modes will have a high probability of success in a particular nondestructive evaluation application. However, work continues to find optimal mode and frequency selection for a given application. This "optimal" mode could give the highest sensitivity to defects or the greatest penetration power, increasing inspection efficiency. Since material properties used for modeling work may be estimates, in many cases guided wave mode and frequency selection can be adjusted for increased inspection efficiency in the field. In this paper, a novel mode and frequency perturbation method is described and used to identify optimal mode points based on quantifiable wave characteristics. The technique uses an ultrasonic phased array comb transducer to sweep in phase velocity and frequency space. It is demonstrated using guided interface waves for bond evaluation. After searching nearby mode points, an optimal mode and frequency can be selected which has the highest sensitivity to a defect, or gives the greatest penetration power. The optimal mode choice for a given application depends on the requirements of the inspection.

  13. Gravitational wave polarization modes in $f(R)$ theories

    CERN Document Server

    Rizwana, Kausar H; Philippe, Jetzer

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out in the literature to evaluate the number of polarization modes of gravitational waves in modified theories, in particular in $f(R)$ theories. In the latter ones, besides the usual two transverse-traceless tensor modes present in general relativity, there are two additional scalar ones: a massive longitudinal mode and a massless transverse mode (the so-called breathing mode). This last mode has often been overlooked in the literature, due to the assumption that the application of the Lorenz gauge implies transverse-traceless wave solutions. We however show that this is in general not possible and, in particular, that the traceless condition cannot be imposed due to the fact that we no longer have a Minkowski background metric. Our findings are in agreement with the results found using the Newman-Penrose formalism, and thus clarify the inconsistencies found so far in the literature.

  14. Amplitude or Higgs modes in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlas, Yafis; Varma, C. M.

    2013-02-01

    In Lorentz-invariant systems spontaneously broken gauge symmetry results in three types of fundamental excitations: density excitations, Higgs bosons (amplitude modes), and Goldstone bosons (phase modes). The density and phase modes are coupled by electromagnetic interactions while the amplitude modes are not. In s-wave superconductors, the Higgs mode, which can be observed only under special conditions, has been detected. We show that unconventional d-wave superconductors, such as the high-temperature cuprate superconductors, should have a rich assortment of Higgs bosons, each in a different irreducible representation of the point-group symmetry of the lattice. We also show that these modes have a characteristic singular spectral structure and discuss conditions for their observability.

  15. Electron acceleration by Landau resonance with whistler mode wave packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Reinleitner, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent observations of electrostatic waves associated with whistler mode chorus emissions provide evidence that electrons are being trapped by Landau resonance interactions with the chorus. In this paper, the trapping, acceleration and escape of electrons in Landau resonance with a whistler mode wave packet are discussed. It is shown that acceleration can occur by both inhomogeneous and dispersive effects. The maximum energy gained is controlled by the points where trapping and escape occur. Large energy changes are possible if the frequency of the wave packet or the magnetic field strength increase between the trapping and escape points. Various trapping and escape mechanisms are discussed.

  16. Holes and chaotic pulses of traveling waves coupled to a long-wave mode

    CERN Document Server

    Herrero, H; Herrero, Henar; Riecke, Hermann

    1997-01-01

    Localized traveling-wave pulses and holes, i.e. localized regions of vanishing wave amplitude, are investigated in a real Ginzburg-Landau equation coupled to a long-wave mode. In certain parameter regimes the pulses exhibit a Hopf bifurcation which leads to a breathing motion. Subsequently the oscillations undergo period-doubling bifurcations and become chaotic.

  17. Pulse mode operation of Love wave devices for biosensing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, MI; McHale, G; Martin, F; Gizeli, E.; Melzak, KA

    2001-01-01

    In this work we present a novel pulse mode Love wave biosensor that monitors both changes in amplitude and phase. A series of concentrations of 3350 molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) solutions are used as a calibration sequence for the pulse mode system using a network analyzer and high frequency oscilloscope. The operation of the pulse mode system is then compared to the continuous wave network analyzer by showing a sequence of deposition and removal of a model mass layer of palmi...

  18. Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, P. K.; Naidu, Arun; Joshi, B. C.; Roy, Jayashree; Kate, G.; Pethe, Kaiwalya; Galande, Shridhar; Jamadar, Sachin; Mahajan, S. P.; Patil, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of Low Frequency Radio Experiment (LORE) payload to probe the corona and the solar disturbances at solar offsets greater than 2 solar radii, i.e., at frequencies below 30 MHz. The LORE can be complimentary to the planned Indian solar mission, “Aditya-L1” and its other payloads as well as synergistic to ground-based interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations, which are routinely carried out by the Ooty Radio Telescope. We discuss the baseline design and technical details of the proposed LORE and its particular suitability for providing measurements on the detailed time and frequency structure of fast drifting type-III and slow drifting type-II radio bursts with unprecedented time and frequency resolutions. We also brief the gonio-polarimetry, which is possible with better-designed antennas and state-of-the-art electronics, employing FPGAs and an intelligent data management system. These would enable us to make a wide range of studies, such as nonlinear plasma processes in the Sun-Earth distance, in-situ radio emission from coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary CME driven shocks, nature of ICMEs driving decelerating IP shocks and space weather effects of solar wind interaction regions.

  19. Stratospheric Annular Modes Induced By Stationary Wave Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körnich, H.; Schmitz, G.

    The variability of the winter stratosphere shows distinguishable features in the north- ern and southern hemisphere. Since these differences are based on the different plan- etary waves of the underlying atmosphere, we explore the mechanism how stationary wave forcing in the troposphere can induce a stratospheric Annular Mode using a simple GCM. The model KMCM (Kühlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model) extends from the ground up to 60 km height and produces a reasonable winter climate. It takes into account the different large-scale wave forcings in the troposphere as prescribed pro- cesses. This allows us to examine the stratospheric Annular-Mode generation depend- ing on different wave forcings under perpetual January conditions. Principal com- ponent analysis is applied to identify the variability patterns of the geopotential and of the zonally averaged zonal wind. By this way, it is shown that the amplitude and composition of the orographic and thermal eddy forcing determines the stratospheric Annular Mode and the related downward propagation in the temperature field. Further model simplifications are introduced in order to understand the mechanism of the stratospheric AM-generation. Using a linear model version we illuminate the influence of the different wave forcing processes on the Annular Modes. Addition- ally, a constant-troposphere model is used to clarify the importance of transient and stationary waves. Finally, the Annular Mode is interpreted in terms of the dynamical coupling of the troposphere and stratosphere.

  20. Dual mode acoustic wave sensor for precise pressure reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Kropelnicki, Piotr; Wang, Yong; Randles, Andrew Benson; Chuan Chai, Kevin Tshun; Cai, Hong; Gu, Yuan Dong

    2014-09-01

    In this letter, a Microelectromechanical system acoustic wave sensor, which has a dual mode (lateral field exited Lamb wave mode and surface acoustic wave (SAW) mode) behavior, is presented for precious pressure change read out. Comb-like interdigital structured electrodes on top of piezoelectric material aluminium nitride (AlN) are used to generate the wave modes. The sensor membrane consists of single crystalline silicon formed by backside-etching of the bulk material of a silicon on insulator wafer having variable device thickness layer (5 μm-50 μm). With this principle, a pressure sensor has been fabricated and mounted on a pressure test package with pressure applied to the backside of the membrane within a range of 0 psi to 300 psi. The temperature coefficient of frequency was experimentally measured in the temperature range of -50 °C to 300 °C. This idea demonstrates a piezoelectric based sensor having two modes SAW/Lamb wave for direct physical parameter—pressure readout and temperature cancellation which can operate in harsh environment such as oil and gas exploration, automobile and aeronautic applications using the dual mode behavior of the sensor and differential readout at the same time.

  1. Single-mode dispersive waves and soliton microcomb dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Xu; Zhang, Xueyue; Yang, Ki Youl; Vahala, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Dissipative Kerr solitons are self-sustaining optical wavepackets in resonators. They use the Kerr nonlinearity to both compensate dispersion and to offset optical loss. Besides providing insights into nonlinear resonator physics, they can be applied in frequency metrology, precision clocks, and spectroscopy. Like other optical solitons, the dissipative Kerr soliton can radiate power in the form of a dispersive wave through a process that is the optical analogue of Cherenkov radiation. Dispersive waves typically consist of an ensemble of optical modes. A limiting case is demonstrated in which the dispersive wave is concentrated into a single cavity mode. In this limit, its interaction with the soliton is shown to induce bistable behavior in the spectral and temporal properties of the soliton. Also, an operating point of enhanced repetition-rate stability is predicted and observed. The single-mode dispersive wave can therefore provide quiet states of soliton comb operation useful in many applications.

  2. Gravitational-wave modes from precessing black-hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Boyle, Michael; Ossokine, Serguei; Pfeiffer, Harald P

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational waves from precessing black-hole binaries exhibit features that are absent in nonprecessing systems. The most prominent of these is a parity-violating asymmetry that beams energy and linear momentum preferentially along or opposite to the orbital angular momentum, leading to recoil of the binary. The asymmetry will appear as amplitude and phase modulations at the orbital frequency. For strongly precessing systems, it accounts for at least 3% amplitude modulation for binaries in the sensitivity band of ground-based gravitational-wave detectors, and can exceed 50% for massive systems. Such asymmetric features are also clearly visible when the waves are decomposed into modes of spin-weighted spherical harmonics, and are inherent in the waves themselves---rather than resulting from residual eccentricity in numerical simulations, or from mode-mixing due to precession. In particular, there is generically no instantaneous frame for which the mode decomposition will have any symmetry. We introduce a met...

  3. Auditory filters at low-frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Prediction and assessment of low-frequency noise problems requires information about the auditory filter characteristics at low-frequencies. Unfortunately, data at low-frequencies is scarce and practically no results have been published for frequencies below 100 Hz. Extrapolation of ERB results......-ear transfer function), the asymmetry of the auditory filter changed from steeper high-frequency slopes at 1000 Hz to steeper low-frequency slopes below 100 Hz. Increasing steepness at low-frequencies of the middle-ear high-pass filter is thought to cause this effect. The dynamic range of the auditory filter...

  4. Coupling between whistler waves and slow-mode solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tenerani, Anna; Pegoraro, Francesco; Contel, Olivier Le

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between electron-scale and ion-scale phenomena is of general interest for both laboratory and space plasma physics. In this paper we investigate the linear coupling between whistler waves and slow magnetosonic solitons through two-fluid numerical simulations. Whistler waves can be trapped in the presence of inhomogeneous external fields such as a density hump or hole where they can propagate for times much longer than their characteristic time scale, as shown by laboratory experiments and space measurements. Space measurements have detected whistler waves also in correspondence to magnetic holes, i.e., to density humps with magnetic field minima extending on ion-scales. This raises the interesting question of how ion-scale structures can couple to whistler waves. Slow magnetosonic solitons share some of the main features of a magnetic hole. Using the ducting properties of an inhomogeneous plasma as a guide, we present a numerical study of whistler waves that are trapped and transported inside pr...

  5. Two-Mode Wave Solutions to the Degasperis-Procesi Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zheng-Di; BI Qin-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    @@ By introducing a new type of solutions, called the multiple-mode wave solutions which can be expressed in nonlinear superposition of single-mode waves with different speeds, we investigate the two-mode wave solutions in Degasperis-Procesi equation and two cases are derived.The explicit expressions for the two-mode waves as well as the existence conditions are presented.It is shown that the two-mode waves may be the nonlinear combinations of many types of single-mode waves, such as periodic waves, solitons, compactons, etc., and more complicated multiple-mode waves can be obtained if higher order or more single-mode waves are taken into consideration.It is pointed out that the two-mode wave solutions can be employed to display the typical mechanism of the interactions between different single-mode waves.

  6. Piezoelectric transducer parameter selection for exciting a single mode from multiple modes of Lamb waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rang Hai-Yan; Yu Jian-Bo

    2011-01-01

    Excitation and propagation of Lamb waves by using rectangular and circular piezoelectric transducers surfacebonded to an isotropic plate are investigated in this work. Analytical stain wave solutions are derived for the two transducer shapes,giving the responses of these transducers in Lamb wave fields. The analytical study is supported by a numerical simulation using the finite element method. Symmetric and antisymmetric components in the wave propagation responses are inspected in detail with respect to test parameters such as the transducer geometry,the length and the excitation frequency. By placing only one piezoelectric transducer on the top or the bottom surface of the plate and weakening the strength of one mode while enhancing the strength of the other modes to find the centre frequency,with which the peak wave amplitude ratio between the S0 and A0 modes is maximum,a single mode excitation from the multiple modes of the Lamb waves can be achieved approximately. Experimental data are presented to show the validity of the analyses. The results are used to optimize the Lamb wave detection system.

  7. Slow-Mode MHD Wave Penetration into a Coronal Null Point due to the Mode Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, Andrey N.; Uralov, Arkadiy M.

    2016-11-01

    Recent observations of magnetohydrodynamic oscillations and waves in solar active regions revealed their close link to quasi-periodic pulsations in flaring light curves. The nature of that link has not yet been understood in detail. In our analytical modelling we investigate propagation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in a solar active region, taking into account wave refraction and transmission of the slow magnetoacoustic mode into the fast one. The wave propagation is analysed in the geometrical acoustics approximation. Special attention is paid to the penetration of waves in the vicinity of a magnetic null point. The modelling has shown that the interaction of slow magnetoacoustic waves with the magnetic reconnection site is possible due to the mode transmission at the equipartition level where the sound speed is equal to the Alfvén speed. The efficiency of the transmission is also calculated.

  8. Whistler modes with wave magnetic fields exceeding the ambient field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, R L; Urrutia, J M; Strohmaier, K D

    2006-03-10

    Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

  9. No further gravitational wave modes in $F(T)$ gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Sáez-Gómez, Diego

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility of further gravitational wave modes in $F(T)$ gravity, where $T$ is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism. It is explicitly demonstrated that gravitational wave modes in $F(T)$ gravity are equivalent to those in General Relativity. This result is achieved by calculating the Minkowskian limit for a class of analytic function of $F(T)$. This consequence is also confirmed by the preservative analysis around the flat background in the weak field limit with the scalar-tensor representation of $F(T)$ gravity.

  10. Quasi-Normal Modes and Gravitational Wave Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrari, V

    2007-01-01

    We review the main results obtained in the literature on quasi-normal modes of compact stars and black holes, in the light of recent exciting developments of gravitational wave detectors. Quasi-normal modes are a fundamental feature of the gravitational signal emitted by compact objects in many astrophysical processes; we will show that their eigenfrequencies encode interesting information on the nature and on the inner structure of the emitting source and we will discuss whether we are ready for a gravitational wave asteroseismology.

  11. No further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Kazuharu, E-mail: bamba@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Capozziello, Salvatore, E-mail: capozziello@na.infn.it [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sez. di Napoli, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); De Laurentis, Mariafelicia, E-mail: felicia@na.infn.it [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” (Italy); INFN Sez. di Napoli, Compl. Univ. di Monte S. Angelo, Edificio G, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Sáez-Gómez, Diego, E-mail: diego.saezgomez@uct.ac.za [Kobayashi–Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC) and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, Cape Town (South Africa); Fisika Teorikoaren eta Zientziaren Historia Saila, Zientzia eta Teknologia Fakultatea, Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, 644 Posta Kutxatila, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2013-11-25

    We explore the possibility of further gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity, where T is the torsion scalar in teleparallelism. It is explicitly demonstrated that gravitational wave modes in F(T) gravity are equivalent to those in General Relativity. This result is achieved by calculating the Minkowskian limit for a class of analytic function of F(T). This consequence is also confirmed by the preservative analysis around the flat background in the weak field limit with the scalar–tensor representation of F(T) gravity.

  12. Wave propagation of coupled modes in the DNA double helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P [Laboratory of Biophysics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon); Mohamadou, A [Condensed Matter Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Douala, PO Box 24157, Douala (Cameroon); Kofane, T C, E-mail: contab408@hotmail.com [Laboratory of Mechanics, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde I, PO Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2011-03-15

    The remarkable dynamics of waves propagating along the DNA molecule is described by the coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equations. We consider both the single and the coupled nonlinear excitation modes and, under numerical simulations of the Peyrard-Bishop model, with the use of realistic values of parameters, their biological implications are studied. Furthermore, the characteristics of the coupled mode solution are discussed and we show that such a solution can describe the local opening observed within the transcription and the replication phenomena.

  13. Optical rogue waves in whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coillet, Aurélien; Dudley, John; Genty, Goëry; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2014-01-01

    We report a theoretical study showing that rogue waves can emerge in whispering-gallery-mode resonators as the result of the chaotic interplay between Kerr nonlinearity and anomalous group-velocity dispersion. The nonlinear dynamics of the propagation of light in a whispering-gallery-mode resonator is investigated using the Lugiato-Lefever equation, and we give evidence of a range of parameters where rare and extreme events associated with non-Gaussian statistics of the field maxima are observed.

  14. Optical Rogue Waves in Whispering-Gallery-Mode Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Coillet, Aurélien; Genty, Goery; Larger, Laurent; Chembo, Yanne K

    2014-01-01

    We report a theoretical study showing that rogue waves can emerge in whispering gallery mode resonators as the result of the chaotic interplay between Kerr nonlinearity and anomalous group-velocity dispersion. The nonlinear dynamics of the propagation of light in a whispering gallery-mode resonator is investigated using the Lugiato-Lefever equation, and we evidence a range of parameters where rare and extreme events associated with a non-gaussian statistics of the field maxima are observed.

  15. Low-frequency sonophoresis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitragotri, Samir; Kost, Joseph

    2004-03-27

    Application of ultrasound enhances skin permeability to a variety of molecules (sonophoresis). The enhancement induced by ultrasound is particularly significant at low-frequencies (feffect of low-frequency ultrasound on transdermal drug delivery and glucose extraction are summarized. Mechanistic insights gained through a number of investigations are also reviewed. Finally, reports on the synergistic effect of low-frequency ultrasound with other enhancers including chemicals and iontophoresis are summarized.

  16. Thermal effects on parallel resonance energy of whistler mode wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devendraa Siingh; Shubha Singh; R P Singh

    2006-02-01

    In this short communication, we have evaluated the effect of thermal velocity of the plasma particles on the energy of resonantly interacting energetic electrons with the propagating whistler mode waves as a function of wave frequency and -value for the normal and disturbed magnetospheric conditions. During the disturbed conditions when the magnetosphere is depleted in electron density, the resonance energy of the electron enhances by an order of magnitude at higher latitudes, whereas the effect is small at low latitudes. An attempt is made to explain the enhanced wave activity observed during magnetic storm periods.

  17. Mean flow generation mechanism by inertial waves and normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Andreas; Ghasemi, Abouzar

    2016-04-01

    The mean flow generation mechanism by nonlinearity of the inertial normal modes and inertial wave beams in a rotating annular cavity with longitudinally librating walls in stable regime is discussed. Inertial normal modes (standing waves) are excited when libration frequency matches eigenfrequencies of the system. Inertial wave beams are produced by Ekman pumping and suction in a rotating cylinder and form periodic orbits or periodic ray trajectories at selected frequencies. Inertial wave beams emerge as concentrated shear layers in a librating annular cavity, while normal modes appear as global recirculation cells. Both (inertial wave beam and mode) are helical and thus intrinsically non-linear flow structures. No second mode or wave is necessary for non-linearity. We considered the low order normal modes (1,1), (2,1) and (2,2) which are expected to be excited in the planetary objects and investigate the mean flow generation mechanism using two independent solutions: 1) analytical solution (Borcia 2012) and 2) the wave component of the flow (ω0 component) obtained from the direct numerical simulation (DNS). It is well known that a retrograde bulk mean flow is generated by the Ekman boundary layer and E1/4-Stewartson layer close to the outer cylinder side wall due to libration. At and around the normal mode resonant frequencies we found additionally a prograde azimuthal mean flow (Inertial Normal Mode Mean Flow: INMMF) in the bulk of the fluid. The fluid in the bulk is in geostrophic balance in the absence of the inertial normal modes. However, when INMMF is excited, we found that the geostrophic balance does not hold in the region occupied by INMMF. We hypothesize that INMMF is generated by the nonlinearity of the normal modes or by second order effects. Expanding the velocity {V}(u_r,u_θ,u_z) and pressure (p) in a power series in ɛ (libration amplitude), the Navier-Stokes equations are segregated into the linear and nonlinear parts at orders ɛ1 and ɛ^2

  18. Investigation into Mass Loading Sensitivity of Sezawa Wave Mode-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ramakrishnan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW device is investigated through finite element method (FEM simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  19. Investigation into mass loading sensitivity of sezawa wave mode-based surface acoustic wave sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanan, Ajay Achath; Islam, Md Shabiul; Ali, Sawal Hamid; Parthiban, R; Ramakrishnan, N

    2013-02-06

    In this work mass loading sensitivity of a Sezawa wave mode based surface acoustic wave (SAW) device is investigated through finite element method (FEM) simulation and the prospects of these devices to function as highly sensitive SAW sensors is reported. A ZnO/Si layered SAW resonator is considered for the simulation study. Initially the occurrence of Sezawa wave mode and displacement amplitude of the Rayleigh and Sezawa wave mode is studied for lower ZnO film thickness. Further, a thin film made of an arbitrary material is coated over the ZnO surface and the resonance frequency shift caused by mass loading of the film is estimated. It was observed that Sezawa wave mode shows significant sensitivity to change in mass loading and has higher sensitivity (eight times higher) than Rayleigh wave mode for the same device configuration. Further, the mass loading sensitivity was observed to be greater for a low ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio. Accordingly, highly sensitive SAW sensors can be developed by coating a sensing medium over a layered SAW device and operating at Sezawa mode resonance frequency. The sensitivity can be increased by tuning the ZnO film thickness to wavelength ratio.

  20. Identification of surface wave higher modes using a methodology based on seismic noise and coda waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, Diane; Campillo, Michel; Sanchez-Sesma, Francisco; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.; Singh, Shri Krishna

    2015-11-01

    Dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves is performed to assess the velocity of complex structures such as sedimentary basins. At short periods several modes of the Rayleigh waves are often exited. To perform a reliable inversion of the velocity structure an identification of these modes is thus required. We propose a novel method to identify the modes of surface waves. We use the spectral ratio of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V) measured on seismic coda. We then compare the observed values with the theoretical H/V ratio for velocity models deduced from surface wave dispersion when assuming a particular mode. We first invert the Rayleigh wave measurements retrieved from ambient noise cross-correlation with the assumptions that (1) the fundamental mode and (2) the first overtone are excited. Then we use these different velocity models to predict theoretical spectral ratios of the ground velocity for the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V). These H/V ratios are computed under the hypothesis of equipartition of a diffuse field in a layered medium. Finally we discriminate between fundamental and higher modes by comparing the theoretical H/V ratio with the H/V ratio measured on seismic coda. In an application, we reconstruct Rayleigh waves from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at seven broad-band stations in the Valley of Mexico. For paths within the soft quaternary sediments basin, the maximum energy is observed at velocities higher than expected for the fundamental mode. We identify that the dominant mode is the first higher mode, which suggests the importance of higher modes as the main vectors of energy in such complex structures.

  1. Triple-mode squeezing with dressed six-wave mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Li, Zepei; Zhang, Yiqi; Gao, Hong; Che, Junling; Che, Junling; Abdulkhaleq, Hasan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Wang, Hongxing

    2016-05-12

    The theory of proof-of-principle triple-mode squeezing is proposed via spontaneous parametric six-wave mixing process in an atomic-cavity coupled system. Special attention is focused on the role of dressed state and nonlinear gain on triple-mode squeezing process. Using the dressed state theory, we find that optical squeezing and Autler-Towns splitting of cavity mode can be realized with nonlinear gain, while the efficiency and the location of maximum squeezing point can be effectively shaped by dressed state in atomic ensemble. Our proposal can find applications in multi-channel communication and multi-channel quantum imaging.

  2. HOW TO ADJUST THE QUARTER WAVE LINE ON THE HALF-WAVE OPERATING MODE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsiuk V.I

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the equations of the established mode the closed formulas for distribution of voltage, currents and active capacity along a non-uniform line with the concentrated elements are received. Inclusion of throttles and condenser batteries in a quarter wave line is examined with the purpose of giving to it of properties half-wave.

  3. Holes and chaotic pulses of traveling waves coupled to a long-wave mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Henar; Riecke, Hermann

    1997-02-01

    It is shown that localized traveling-wave pulses and holes can be stabilized by a coupling to a long-wave mode. Simulations of suitable real Ginzburg-Landau equations reveal a small parameter regime in which the pulses exhibit a breathing motion (presumably related to a front bifurcation), which subsequently becomes chaotic via period-doubling bifurcations.

  4. Low-Frequency Gravitational Radiation from Coalescing Massive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Sesana, A; Madau, P; Volonteri, M

    2005-01-01

    We compute the expected low-frequency gravitational wave signal from coalescing massive black hole (MBH) binaries at the center of galaxies. We follow the merging history of halos and associated holes via cosmological Monte Carlo realizations of the merger hierarchy from early times to the present in a LCDM cosmology. MBHs get incorporated through a series of mergers into larger and larger halos, sink to the centre owing to dynamical friction, accrete a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant to become more massive, and form a binary system. Stellar dynamical processes dominates the orbital evolution of the binary at large separations, while gravitational wave emission takes over at small radii, causing the final coalescence of the system. We discuss the observability of inspiraling MBH binaries by a low-frequency gravitational wave experiment such as the planned Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), discriminating between resolvable sources and unresolved confusion noise. Over a 3-year observing perio...

  5. Quasinormal modes and classical wave propagation in analogue black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, E; Lemos, J P S; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Lemos, Jose' P. S.

    2004-01-01

    Many properties of black holes can be studied using acoustic analogues in the laboratory through the propagation of sound waves. We investigate in detail sound wave propagation in a rotating acoustic (2+1)-dimensional black hole, which corresponds to the ``draining bathtub'' fluid flow. We compute the quasinormal mode frequencies of this system and discuss late-time power-law tails. Due to the presence of an ergoregion, waves in a rotating acoustic black hole can be superradiantly amplified. We also compute reflection coefficients and instability timescales for the acoustic black hole bomb, the equivalent of the Press-Teukolsky black hole bomb. Finally we discuss quasinormal modes and late-time tails in a non-rotating canonical acoustic black hole, corresponding to an incompressible, spherically symmetric (3+1)-dimensional fluid flow.

  6. Guided wave modes in porous cylinders: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, C J; Smeulders, D M J; van Dongen, M E H; Chao, G

    2002-09-01

    In this paper guided wave modes in porous media are investigated. A water-saturated porous cylinder is mounted in the test section of a shock tube. Between the porous sample and the wall of the shock tube a water-filled annulus exists. For very small annulus width, bulk waves are generated and one-dimensional modeling is sufficient. Otherwise two-dimensional effects become important and multiple guided wave modes occur. Using a newly developed traversable positioning system in the shock tube, the frequency-dependent phase velocities and damping coefficients in the 1-120 kHz frequency range were measured. Prony's method was used for data processing. Agreement was found between the experimental data and the two-dimensional modeling of the shock tube which was based on Biot's theory.

  7. Low-frequency cosmology from the moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Wolt, M.; Aminaei, A.; Pourshaghaghi, H.; Koopmans, L.; Falcke, H.

    2013-01-01

    From a low-frequency point of view, the moon provides excess to the virtually unexplored radio frequency domain below 30 MHz that is not accessible from Earth due to the atmospheric cutoff and interference from man-made RFI. We show that with a single low-frequency radio antenna the detection of the

  8. Surface wave and linear operating mode of a plasma antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogachev, N. N., E-mail: bgniknik@yandex.ru; Bogdankevich, I. L.; Gusein-zade, N. G.; Rukhadze, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The relation between the propagation conditions of a surface electromagnetic wave along a finiteradius plasma cylinder and the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna is investigated. The solution to the dispersion relation for a surface wave propagating along a finite-radius plasma cylinder is analyzed for weakly and strongly collisional plasmas. Computer simulations of an asymmetrical plasma dipole antenna are performed using the KARAT code, wherein the dielectric properties of plasma are described in terms of the Drude model. The plasma parameters corresponding to the linear operating mode of a plasma antenna are determined. It is demonstrated that the characteristics of the plasma antenna in this mode are close to those of an analogous metal antenna.

  9. Pulse mode operation of Love wave devices for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, M I; McHale, G; Martin, F; Gizeli, E; Melzak, K A

    2001-12-01

    In this work we present a novel pulse mode Love wave biosensor that monitors both changes in amplitude and phase. A series of concentrations of 3350 molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) solutions are used as a calibration sequence for the pulse mode system using a network analyzer and high frequency oscilloscope. The operation of the pulse mode system is then compared to the continuous wave network analyzer by showing a sequence of deposition and removal of a model mass layer of palmitoyl-oleoyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine (POPC) vesicles. This experimental apparatus has the potential for making many hundreds of measurements a minute and so allowing the dynamics of fast interactions to be observed.

  10. Wave Mode Discrimination of Coded Ultrasonic Guided Waves Using Two-Dimensional Compressed Pulse Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, Sergio; Fateri, Sina; Livadas, Makis; Mares, Cristinel; Gan, Tat-Hean

    2017-07-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves testing is a technique successfully used in many industrial scenarios worldwide. For many complex applications, the dispersive nature and multimode behavior of the technique still poses a challenge for correct defect detection capabilities. In order to improve the performance of the guided waves, a 2-D compressed pulse analysis is presented in this paper. This novel technique combines the use of pulse compression and dispersion compensation in order to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and temporal-spatial resolution of the signals. The ability of the technique to discriminate different wave modes is also highlighted. In addition, an iterative algorithm is developed to identify the wave modes of interest using adaptive peak detection to enable automatic wave mode discrimination. The employed algorithm is developed in order to pave the way for further in situ applications. The performance of Barker-coded and chirp waveforms is studied in a multimodal scenario where longitudinal and flexural wave packets are superposed. The technique is tested in both synthetic and experimental conditions. The enhancements in SNR and temporal resolution are quantified as well as their ability to accurately calculate the propagation distance for different wave modes.

  11. DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 observations of lower hybrid waves excited by VLF whistler mode waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T. F; Inan, U. S.; Lauben, D.; Sonwalkar, V. S.; Helliwell, R. A.; Sobolev, Ya. P.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Gonzalez, S.

    1994-01-01

    Past work demostrates that strong lower hybrid (LH) waves can be excited by electromagnetic whistler mode waves throughout large regions of the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere. The effects of the excited LH waves upon the suprathermal ion population in the topside ionosphere and magnetosphere depend upon the distribution of LH wave amplitude with wavelength lambda. The present work reports plasma wave data from the DE-1 and COSMOS 1809 spacecraft which suggests that the excited LH wave spectrum has components for which lambda less than or equal to 3.5 m when excitation occurs at a frequency roughly equal to the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. This wavelength limit is a factor of approximately 3 below that reported in past work and suggests that the excited LH waves can interact with suprathermal H(+) ions with energy less than or equal to 6 eV. This finding supports recent work concerning the heating of suprathermal ions above thunderstorm cells.

  12. Seismic Noise Generation by Ocean Waves: Views from Normal-mode Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, T.

    2012-12-01

    The continuous seismic records (noise) and the cross-correlation techniques are making a huge impact on study for the crust and upper mantle. Such studies rely on microseisms for frequencies about 0.05-0.3 Hz that are excited by ocean waves but detailed processes for the excitation are still vague. Our views of noise excitation have been influenced by the results in Longuet-Higgins (1950) who showed how colliding ocean waves generate the dominant secondary microseisms. There are two main points to his results; the first is the generation of pressure at deep ocean bottom, even though ocean waves have energy only in the upper 100-200 meters. This result on deep penetrating pressure was originally derived for an incompressible fluid. The second is the existence of specific ocean depths that preferentially excite secondary microseisms (0.15 Hz). This result was derived for a medium with a compressible fluid layer over an elastic half-space. The purpose of this study is to examine these two points from the views of the normal-mode theory. The first point was shown in Tanimoto (2007, GJI). Excitation by the advection term in the Navier-Stokes equation was shown to lead to the equivalent result with Longuet-Higgins (1950). Mathematically, dominant contributions are from colliding ocean waves and the resulting force exactly matches the Longuet-Higgins pressure formula in the low-frequency range (below 0.05 Hz). It is somewhat surprising that a result in an incompressible fluid emerged in the analysis of elastic medium with compressible ocean. However, in the low frequency range, the eigenfunctions of Rayleigh waves become (almost) constant in the ocean, meaning that the entire fluid layer moves coherently up and down just like an incompressible medium. Then the emergence of the Longuet-Higgins pressure formula is not surprising. However, as Longuet-Higgins (1950) noted, such a situation does not apply to noise at 0.15 Hz as it is above such a frequency range. In a

  13. Low-frequency intraseasonal variability in a zonally symmetric aquaplanet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Surajit; Sengupta, Debasis; Chakraborty, A.; Sukhatme, Jai; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-12-01

    We use the aquaplanet version of the community atmospheric model, with perpetual spring equinox forcing and zonally symmetric sea surface temperature (SST), to study tropical intraseasonal oscillations (ISOs). In the first two experiments, we specify zonally symmetric SST profiles that mimic observed climatological July and January SSTs as surface boundary conditions. In the January SST simulation, we find a zonal wavenumber 1 mode with dominant period of 60 days, moving east at about 6 m s-1. This mode, which resembles the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), is absent in the July SST case, although convectively coupled Kelvin waves are prominent in both experiments. To further investigate the influence of tropical SST on ISO and convectively coupled equatorial waves, we conduct experiments with idealised symmetric SST profiles having different widths of warm ocean centered at the equator. In the narrowest SST experiment, the variance of moist activity is predominantly in weather-scale Kelvin waves. When the latitudinal extent of warm SST is comparable to or larger than the equatorial Rossby radius, we find a dominant low frequency (50-80 days) eastward mode that resembles the MJO, as in the January SST experiment. We also find westward propagating waves with intraseasonal (30-120 days) periods and zonal wavenumber 1-3; the structure of these signals projects onto equatorially trapped Rossby waves with meridional mode numbers 1, 3 and 5, associated with convection that is symmetric about the equator. In addition, the model generates 30-80 days westward moving signals with zonal wavenumber 4-7, particularly in the narrow SST experiment. Although these waves are seen in the wavenumber-frequency spectra in the equatorial region, they have largest amplitude in the middle and high latitudes. Thus, our study shows that wider, meridionally symmetric SST profiles support a strong MJO-like eastward propagation, and even in an aquaplanet setting, westward propagating Rossby

  14. Focusing phenomenon and near-trapped modes of SH waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jeng-Tzong; Lee, Jia-Wei; Tu, Ya-Ching

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the null-field boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and the image method are used to solve the SH wave scattering problem containing semi-circular canyons and circular tunnels. To fully utilize the analytical property of circular geometry, the polar coordinates are used to expand the closed-form fundamental solution to the degenerate kernel, and the Fourier series is also introduced to represent the boundary density. By collocating boundary points to match boundary condition on the boundary, a linear algebraic system is constructed. The unknown coefficients in the algebraic system can be easily determined. In this way, a semi-analytical approach is developed. Following the experience of near-trapped modes in water wave problems of the full plane, the focusing phenomenon and near-trapped modes for the SH wave problem of the half-plane are solved, since the two problems obey the same mathematical model. In this study, it is found that the SH wave problem containing two semi-circular canyons and a circular tunnel has the near-trapped mode and the focusing phenomenon for a special incident angle and wavenumber. In this situation, the amplification factor for the amplitude of displacement is over 300.

  15. Kelvin waves in ECMWF analysis: normal-mode diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaauw, Marten; Zagar, Nedjeljka

    2013-04-01

    Equatorial Kelvin waves show a large spread in spatial and temporal variability similar to their source of tropical convective forcing. Once decoupled from their source, Kelvin waves are modulated during their ascent by changes in the background wind and stability. In this presentation, we focus on the seasonal and interannual variability of Kelvin waves in relation with variability of (i) tropical convection and (ii) background zonal wind and static stability. Global data is extracted from ECMWF operational analysis from January 2007 till May 2011 on 91 model levels (top level at 0.01 hPa) and ~ 25 km horizontal resolution. Using three-dimensional orthogonal normal-mode expansions, we project input mass and wind data simultaneously onto balanced rotational modes and unbalanced inertia-gravity modes including Kelvin modes. Next, an inverse transformation of Kelvin modes to physical space is performed under the linearity assumption, allowing a study on the spatial and temporal variability of Kelvin wave zonal wind and temperature. Results show an annual cycle in KW zonal wind in agreement with other studies. Minima resp. maxima in zonal wind amplitudes are found in the Indian ocean resp. Western Pacific and are most pronounced in the tropical tropopause at 150 hPa in January and 100 hPa in July. The annual cycle is enhanced (reduced) through interaction with a descending westerly QBO phase and enhanced (reduced) convective forcing. We also note a gradual eastward shift of KW zonal wind maxima till January 2010 in correspondence with an eastward shift of tropical convection.

  16. Empirical Mode Decomposition of the atmospheric wave field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. McDonald

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the utility of the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD time-series analysis technique to separate the horizontal wind field observed by the Scott Base MF radar (78° S, 167° E into its constituent parts made up of the mean wind, gravity waves, tides, planetary waves and instrumental noise. Analysis suggests that EMD effectively separates the wind field into a set of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs which can be related to atmospheric waves with different temporal scales. The Intrinsic Mode Functions resultant from application of the EMD technique to Monte-Carlo simulations of white- and red-noise processes are compared to those obtained from the measurements and are shown to be significantly different statistically. Thus, application of the EMD technique to the MF radar horizontal wind data can be used to prove that this data contains information on internal gravity waves, tides and planetary wave motions.

    Examination also suggests that the EMD technique has the ability to highlight amplitude and frequency modulations in these signals. Closer examination of one of these regions of amplitude modulation associated with dominant periods close to 12 h is suggested to be related to a wave-wave interaction between the semi-diurnal tide and a planetary wave. Application of the Hilbert transform to the IMFs forms a Hilbert-Huang spectrum which provides a way of viewing the data in a similar manner to the analysis from a continuous wavelet transform. However, the fact that the basis function of EMD is data-driven and does not need to be selected a priori is a major advantage. In addition, the skeleton diagrams, produced from the results of the Hilbert-Huang spectrum, provide a method of presentation which allows quantitative information on the instantaneous period and amplitude squared to be displayed as a function of time. Thus, it provides a novel way to view frequency and amplitude-modulated wave phenomena and potentially non

  17. Visualizing a Dusty Plasma Shock Wave via Interacting Multiple-Model Mode Probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Oxtoby, Neil P.; Ralph, Jason F.; Durniak, Céline; Samsonov, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Particles in a dusty plasma crystal disturbed by a shock wave are tracked using a three-mode interacting multiple model approach. Color-coded mode probabilities are used to visualize the shock wave propagation through the crystal.

  18. Dominant Mode Wave Impedance of Regular Polygonal Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav V. Komarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polygonal metal waveguides are analyzed analytically and numerically. Classical equation for the wave impedance of arbitrary shaped waveguides is completed with approximate expression for the cutoff wavelength of the dominant mode. Proposed approach is tested with the help of 3D finite difference time domain models of microwave waveguides junctions. Obtained data are used for computer-aided design of microwave transition from coaxial line to cylindrical waveguide.

  19. Low-frequency Raman scattering in alkali tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Angelos G Kalampounias

    2008-10-01

    Raman scattering has been employed to study the alkali-cation size dependence and the polarization characteristics of the low-frequency modes for the glass-forming tellurite mixtures, 0.1M2O–0.9TeO2 (M = Na, K, Rb and Cs). The analysis has shown that the Raman coupling coefficient alters by varying the type of the alkali cation. The addition of alkali modifier in the tellurite network leads to the conversion of the TeO4 units to TeO3 units with a varying number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. Emphasis has also been given to the lowfrequency modes and particular points related to the low-frequency Raman phenomenology are discussed in view of the experimental findings.

  20. Low frequency signals analysis from broadband seismometers records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Broadband seismometers record signals over a wide frequency band, in which the high-frequency background noise is usually associated with human activities, such as cars, trains and factory-related activities. Meanwhile, the low-frequency signals are generally linked to the microseisms, atmospheric phenomena and oceanic wave movement. In this study, we selected the broadband seismometer data recorded during the pass of the typhoons with different moving paths, such as Doksuri in 2012, Trami and Kong-Rey in 2013, Hagibis and Matmo in 2014. By comparing the broadband seismic data, the meteorological information, and the marine conditions, we attempt to understand the effect of the meteorological conditions on the low-frequency noise. The result shows that the broadband station located along the southwestern coast of Taiwan usually have relatively higher background noise value, while the inland stations were characterized by lower noise energy. This rapid decay of the noise energy with distance from the coastline suggest that the low frequency noise could be correlated with the oceanic waves. In addition, the noise energy level increases when the distance from the typhoon and the station decreases. The enhanced frequency range is between 0.1~0.3 Hz, which is consistent with the effect caused by the interference of oceanic waves as suggested by the previous studies. This observation indicates that when the pass of typhoon may reinforce the interaction of oceanic waves and caused some influence on the seismic records. The positive correlation between the significant wave height and the noise energy could also give evidence to this observation. However, we found that the noise energy is not necessarily the strongest when the distance from typhoon and the station is the shortest. This phenomenon seems to be related to the typhoon path. When the typhoon track is perpendicular to the coastline, the change of noise energy is generally more significantly; whereas less energy

  1. Simulation of mode conversion process from upper-hybrid waves to LO-mode waves in the vicinity of the plasmapause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Kalaee

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to clarify the role of the mode conversion process in the generation mechanism of LO-mode waves in the equatorial region of the plasmasphere, we have investigated the linear mode conversion process among upper-hybrid-resonance (UHR-mode, Z-mode and LO-mode waves by a numerical simulation solving Maxwell's equations and the equation of motion of a cold electron fluid. The wave coupling process occurring in the cold magnetized plasma are examined in detail. In order to give a realistic initial plasma condition in the numerical experiments, we use initial parameters inferred from observation data obtained around the generation region of LO-mode waves obtained by the Akebono satellite. A density gradient is estimated from the observed UHR frequency, and wave normal angles are estimated from the dispersion relation of cold plasma by comparing observed wave electric fields. Then, we perform numerical experiments of mode conversion processes using the density gradient of background plasma and the wave normal angle of incident upper hybrid mode waves determined from the observation results. We found that the characteristics of reproduced LO-mode waves in each simulation run are consistent with observations.

  2. Wave turbulence in integrable systems: nonlinear propagation of incoherent optical waves in single-mode fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We study theoretically, numerically and experimentally the nonlinear propagation of partially incoherent optical waves in single mode optical fibers. We revisit the traditional treatment of the wave turbulence theory to provide a statistical kinetic description of the integrable scalar NLS equation. In spite of the formal reversibility and of the integrability of the NLS equation, the weakly nonlinear dynamics reveals the existence of an irreversible evolution toward a...

  3. Elastic Wave-equation Reflection Traveltime Inversion Using Dynamic Warping and Wave Mode Decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, T.

    2017-05-26

    Elastic full waveform inversion (EFWI) provides high-resolution parameter estimation of the subsurface but requires good initial guess of the true model. The traveltime inversion only minimizes traveltime misfits which are more sensitive and linearly related to the low-wavenumber model perturbation. Therefore, building initial P and S wave velocity models for EFWI by using elastic wave-equation reflections traveltime inversion (WERTI) would be effective and robust, especially for the deeper part. In order to distinguish the reflection travletimes of P or S-waves in elastic media, we decompose the surface multicomponent data into vector P- and S-wave seismogram. We utilize the dynamic image warping to extract the reflected P- or S-wave traveltimes. The P-wave velocity are first inverted using P-wave traveltime followed by the S-wave velocity inversion with S-wave traveltime, during which the wave mode decomposition is applied to the gradients calculation. Synthetic example on the Sigbee2A model proves the validity of our method for recovering the long wavelength components of the model.

  4. Acoustic mode coupling induced by nonlinear internal waves: evaluation of the mode coupling matrices and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T C

    2014-02-01

    This paper applies the mode coupling equation to calculate the mode-coupling matrix for nonlinear internal waves appearing as a train of solitons. The calculation is applied to an individual soliton up to second order expansion in sound speed perturbation in the Dyson series. The expansion is valid so long as the fractional sound speed change due to a single soliton, integrated over range and depth, times the wavenumber is smaller than unity. Scattering between the solitons are included by coupling the mode coupling matrices between the solitons. Acoustic fields calculated using this mode-coupling matrix formulation are compared with that obtained using a parabolic equation (PE) code. The results agree very well in terms of the depth integrated acoustic energy at the receivers for moving solitary internal waves. The advantages of using the proposed approach are: (1) The effects of mode coupling can be studied as a function of range and time as the solitons travel along the propagation path, and (2) it allows speedy calculations of sound propagation through a packet or packets of solitons saving orders of magnitude computations compared with the PE code. The mode coupling theory is applied to at-sea data to illustrate the underlying physics.

  5. Plasma depletion layer: the role of the slow mode waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding values in the upstream magnetosheath. The depletion layer usually occurs during northward (IMF conditions with low magnetic shear across the magnetopause. We have previously validated the Raeder global model by comparing the computed formation of a magnetosheath density depletion with in-situ observations. We also have performed a detailed force analysis and found the varying roles that different MHD forces play along the path of a plasma parcel flowing around the magnetopause. That study resulted in a new description of the behavior of magnetosheath magnetic flux tubes which better explains the plasma depletion along a flux tube. The slow mode waves have been observed in the magnetosheath and have been used to explain the formation of the PDL in some of the important PDL models. In this study, we extend our former work by investigating the possible role of the slow mode waves for the formation of the PDL, using global MHD model simulations. We propose a new technique to test where a possible slow mode front may occur in the magnetosheath by comparing the slow mode group velocity with the local flow velocity. We find that the slow mode fronts can exist in certain regions in the magnetosheath under certain solar wind conditions. The existence and location of such fronts clearly depend on the IMF. We do not see from our global simulation results either the sharpening of the slow mode front into a slow mode shock or noticeable changes of the flow and field in the magnetosheath across the slow mode front, which implies that the slow mode front is not likely responsible for the formation of the PDL, at least for the stable solar wind conditions used in these simulations. Also, we do not see the two-layered slow mode structures shown in some observations and proposed in certain PDL

  6. Mode Conversion Behavior of Guided Wave in a Pipe Inspection System Based on a Long Waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feiran; Sun, Zhenguo; Chen, Qiang; Murayama, Riichi; Nishino, Hideo

    2016-10-19

    To make clear the mode conversion behavior of S0-mode lamb wave and SH0-plate wave converting to the longitudinal mode guided wave and torsional mode guided wave in a pipe, respectively, the experiments were performed based on a previous built pipe inspection system. The pipe was wound with an L-shaped plate or a T-shaped plate as the waveguide, and the S0-wave and SH0-wave were excited separately in the waveguide. To carry out the objective, a meander-line coil electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) for S0-wave and a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) EMAT for SH0-wave were developed and optimized. Then, several comparison experiments were conducted to compare the efficiency of mode conversion. Experimental results showed that the T(0,1) mode, L(0,1) mode, and L(0,2) mode guided waves can be successfully detected when converted from the S0-wave or SH0-wave with different shaped waveguides. It can also be inferred that the S0-wave has a better ability to convert to the T(0,1) mode, while the SH0-wave is easier to convert to the L(0,1) mode and L(0,2) mode, and the L-shaped waveguide has a better efficiency than T-shaped waveguide.

  7. Mode Conversion Behavior of Guided Wave in a Pipe Inspection System Based on a Long Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feiran Sun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To make clear the mode conversion behavior of S0-mode lamb wave and SH0-plate wave converting to the longitudinal mode guided wave and torsional mode guided wave in a pipe, respectively, the experiments were performed based on a previous built pipe inspection system. The pipe was wound with an L-shaped plate or a T-shaped plate as the waveguide, and the S0-wave and SH0-wave were excited separately in the waveguide. To carry out the objective, a meander-line coil electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT for S0-wave and a periodic permanent magnet (PPM EMAT for SH0-wave were developed and optimized. Then, several comparison experiments were conducted to compare the efficiency of mode conversion. Experimental results showed that the T(0,1 mode, L(0,1 mode, and L(0,2 mode guided waves can be successfully detected when converted from the S0-wave or SH0-wave with different shaped waveguides. It can also be inferred that the S0-wave has a better ability to convert to the T(0,1 mode, while the SH0-wave is easier to convert to the L(0,1 mode and L(0,2 mode, and the L-shaped waveguide has a better efficiency than T-shaped waveguide.

  8. Stimulated low frequency Raman scattering in cupric oxide nanoparticles water suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averyushkin, A. S.; Baranov, A. N.; Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2017-04-01

    Cupric oxide nanoparticles with average size of 213.2 nm, were synthesized in acoustoplasma discharge for investigating their vibrational properties. The low-frequency acoustic mode in cupric oxide (CuO) nanoparticles has been studied by stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS). SLFRS conversion efficiency, threshold and frequency shift of the scattered light are measured.

  9. Homogenization of Two-Dimensional Phononic Crystals at Low Frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Qing; CHENG Jian-Chun

    2005-01-01

    @@ Effective velocities of elastic waves propagating in two-dimensional phononic crystal at low frequencies are analysed theoretically, and exact analytical formulas for effective velocities of elastic waves are derived according to the method presented by Krokhin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 264302]. Numerical calculations for phononic crystals consisted of array of Pb cylinders embedded in epoxy show that the composites have distinct anisotropy at low filling fraction. The anisotropy increases as the filling fraction increases, while as the filling fraction closes to the limitation, the anisotropy decreases.

  10. Selected Papers on Ocean-Seismo Acoustics Low-Frequency Underwater Acoustics Based on the SACLANTCEN Contributions to a Symposium Held by SACLANTCEN on 10-14 June 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    using different techniques, geotechnical analysis and interpreta- tion, and geological description; - Centro de Fisica Applicada (CENFA), Madrid, Spain...speed on a high-speed solid substratum. Th- fundamento " mode ( o ) is an interface wave that in the low-frequency limit, kH + 0, propa- gates as a

  11. Phase coherence of parametric-decay modes during high-harmonic fast-wave heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, J. A., E-mail: carlsson@pppl.gov [Crow Radio and Plasma Science, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Wilson, J. R.; Hosea, J. C.; Greenough, N. L.; Perkins, R. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Third-order spectral analysis, in particular, the auto bicoherence, was applied to probe signals from high-harmonic fast-wave heating experiments in the National Spherical Torus Experiment. Strong evidence was found for parametric decay of the 30 MHz radio-frequency (RF) pump wave, with a low-frequency daughter wave at 2.7 MHz, the local majority-ion cyclotron frequency. The primary decay modes have auto bicoherence values around 0.85, very close to the theoretical value of one, which corresponds to total phase coherence with the pump wave. The threshold RF pump power for onset of parametric decay was found to be between 200 kW and 400 kW.

  12. Mode-selective wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in a multimode silicon waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Xu, Jing; Ou, Haiyan;

    2014-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate all-optical mode-selective wavelength conversion in a silicon waveguide. The mode-selective wavelength conversion relies on strong four-wave mixing when pump and signal light are on the same spatial mode, while weak four-wave mixing is obtained between different modes due...

  13. Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    to the highest level present in a room, rather than a room average level. In order to ensure representative noise measurements, different positions were investigated based on theoretical considerations and observations from numerical room simulations. In addition measurements were performed in three different......Measurement of low-frequency noise in rooms is problematic due to standing wave patterns. The spatial variation in the sound pressure level can typically be as much as 20-30 dB. For assessment of annoyance from low-frequency noise in dwellings, it is important to measure a level close...... rooms. The sound pressure level was measured 1) in three-dimensional corners and 2) according to current Swedish and Danish measurement methods. Furthermore, the entire sound pressure distributions were measured by scanning. The Swedish and Danish measurement methods include a corner measurement...

  14. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fullekrug, M.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Symbalisty, E.M.D.

    2011-01-01

    is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from similar to 10 to 300 kHz at a distance of similar to 800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges...... at a distance of similar to 550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur similar to 4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from similar to 50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical...... ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur similar to 4.5 ms and similar to 3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband...

  15. Oblique interactions of dust density waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhelchui [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yang - Fang [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Hou, Lujing [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Jiang, Ke [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Wu, De - Jin [CHINA; Thomas, Hubertus M [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE; Morfill, Gregor E [MAX-PLANCK INSTITUTE

    2010-01-01

    Self-excited dust density waves (DDWs) are studied in a striped electrode device. In addition to the usual perpendicularly (with respect to the electrode) propagating DDWs, which have been frequently observed in dusty plasma experiments on the ground, a low-frequency oblique mode is also observed. This low-frequency oblique DDW has a frequency much lower than the dust plasma frequency and its spontaneous excitation is observed even with a very low dust density. It is found that the low-frequency oblique mode can exist either separately or together with the usual perpendicular mode. In the latter case, a new mode arises as a result of the interactions between the perpendicular and the oblique modes. The experiments show that these three modes satisfy the wave coupling conditions in both the frequencies and the wave-vectors.

  16. Energy Loss of Solar p Modes due to the Excitation of Magnetic Sausage Tube Waves: Importance of Coupling the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoyne, A.; Jain, R.; Hindman, B. W.

    2014-07-01

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = -z 0).

  17. Energy loss of solar p modes due to the excitation of magnetic sausage tube waves: Importance of coupling the upper atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, A.; Jain, R. [Applied Mathematics Department, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Hindman, B. W., E-mail: a.d.gascoyne@sheffield.ac.uk, E-mail: r.jain@sheffield.ac.uk [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We consider damping and absorption of solar p modes due to their energy loss to magnetic tube waves that can freely carry energy out of the acoustic cavity. The coupling of p modes and sausage tube waves is studied in a model atmosphere composed of a polytropic interior above which lies an isothermal upper atmosphere. The sausage tube waves, excited by p modes, propagate along a magnetic fibril which is assumed to be a vertically aligned, stratified, thin magnetic flux tube. The deficit of p-mode energy is quantified through the damping rate, Γ, and absorption coefficient, α. The variation of Γ and α as a function of frequency and the tube's plasma properties is studied in detail. Previous similar studies have considered only a subphotospheric layer, modeled as a polytrope that has been truncated at the photosphere. Such studies have found that the resulting energy loss by the p modes is very sensitive to the upper boundary condition, which, due to the lack of an upper atmosphere, have been imposed in a somewhat ad hoc manner. The model presented here avoids such problems by using an isothermal layer to model the overlying atmosphere (chromosphere, and, consequently, allows us to analyze the propagation of p-mode-driven sausage waves above the photosphere. In this paper, we restrict our attention to frequencies below the acoustic cut off frequency. We demonstrate the importance of coupling all waves (acoustic, magnetic) in the subsurface solar atmosphere with the overlying atmosphere in order to accurately model the interaction of solar f and p modes with sausage tube waves. In calculating the absorption and damping of p modes, we find that for low frequencies, below ≈3.5 mHz, the isothermal atmosphere, for the two-region model, behaves like a stress-free boundary condition applied at the interface (z = –z{sub 0}).

  18. Amplification of azimuthal modes with odd wave numbers during dynamical bar-mode growth in rotating stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Yasufumi

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear growth of the bar-mode deformation is studied for a differentially rotating star with supercritical rotational energy. In particular, the growth mechanism of some azimuthal modes with odd wave numbers is examined by comparing a simplified mathematical model with a realistic simulation. Mode coupling to even modes, i.e., the bar mode and higher harmonics, significantly enhances the amplitudes of odd modes, unless they are exactly zero initially. Therefore, other modes which are not axially symmetric cannot be neglected at late times in the growth of the unstable bar-mode even when starting from an almost axially symmetric state.

  19. Gravity and low-frequency geodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Teisseyre, Roman

    1989-01-01

    This fourth volume in the series Physics and Evolution of the Earth's Interior, provides a comprehensive review of the geophysical and geodetical aspects related to gravity and low-frequency geodynamics. Such aspects include the Earth's gravity field, geoid shape theory, and low-frequency phenomena like rotation, oscillations and tides.Global-scale phenomena are treated as a response to source excitation in spherical Earth models consisting of several shells: lithosphere, mantle, core and sometimes also the inner solid core. The effect of gravitation and rotation on the Earth's shape is anal

  20. Integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Solin, Pavel; Karban, Pavel; Ulrych, Bohus

    2009-01-01

    A modern presentation of integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics This book provides state-of-the-art knowledge on integral methods in low-frequency electromagnetics. Blending theory with numerous examples, it introduces key aspects of the integral methods used in engineering as a powerful alternative to PDE-based models. Readers will get complete coverage of: The electromagnetic field and its basic characteristics An overview of solution methods Solutions of electromagnetic fields by integral expressions Integral and integrodifferential methods

  1. Auditory filters at low-frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    -ear transfer function), the asymmetry of the auditory filter changed from steeper high-frequency slopes at 1000 Hz to steeper low-frequency slopes below 100 Hz. Increasing steepness at low-frequencies of the middle-ear high-pass filter is thought to cause this effect. The dynamic range of the auditory filter...... was found to steadily decrease with decreasing center frequency. Although the observed decrease in filter bandwidth with decreasing center frequency was only approximately monotonic, the preliminary data indicates the filter bandwidth does not stabilize around 100 Hz, e.g. it still decreases below...

  2. Mode control of guided wave in magnetic hollow cylinder using electromagnetic acoustic transducer array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Akiniri; Kojima, Fumio; Morikawa, Atsushi [Dept. of Systems Science, Graduate School of System Informatics, Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate a method for exciting and receiving torsional and longitudinal mode guided waves with an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) ring array. First of all, a three-dimensional guided wave simulator is developed in order to numerically analyze the propagation of the guided wave. The finite difference time domain method is used for the simulator. Second, two guided wave testing systems using an EMAT ring array are provided: one is for torsional mode (T-mode) guided wave and the other is for longitudinal mode (L-mode). The EMATs used in the both systems are the same in design. A method to generate and receive the T- and L-mode guided waves with the same EMAT is proposed. Finally, experimental and numerical results are compared and discussed. The results of experiments and simulation agree well, showing the potential of the EMAT ring array as a mode controllable guided wave transmitter and receiver.

  3. Variational Symplectic Particle-in-cell Simulation of Nonlinear Mode Conversion from Extraordinary waves to Bernstein Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi; Xiang, Nong

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the nonlinear mode conversion of extraordinary waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied using the variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation. The accuracy of the nonlinear simulation is guaranteed by the long-term accuracy and conservativeness of the symplectic algorithm. The spectra of the electromagnetic wave, the evolution of the wave reflectivity, the energy deposition profile, and the parameter-dependent properties of radio-frequency waves during the nonlinear mode conversion are investigated. It is illustrated that nonlinear effects significantly modify the physics of the radio-frequency injection in magnetized plasmas. The evolutions of the radio-frequency wave reflectivity and the energy deposition are observed, as well as the self-interaction of the Bernstein waves and mode excitations. Even for waves with small magnitude, nonlinear effects can also become important after continuous wave injections, which are common in the realistic radio-frequency wave heating and cur...

  4. Two Mode Resonator and Contact Model for Standing Wave Piezomotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.; Blanke, Mogens; Helbo, J.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents a model for a standing wave piezoelectric motor with a two bending mode resonator. The resonator is modelled using Hamilton's principle and the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The contact is modelled using the Lagrange Multiplier method under the assumption of slip and it is showed how...... to solve the set of differential-algebraic equations. Detailled simulations show resonance frequencies as function of the piezoelement's position, tip trajectories and contact forces. The paper demonstrates that contact stiffness and stick should be included in such model to obtain physically realistic...

  5. Propagation and linear mode conversion of magnetosonic and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves in the radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Richard B.; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2016-10-01

    Magnetosonic waves and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are important for electron acceleration and loss from the radiation belts. It is generally understood that these waves are generated by unstable ion distributions that form during geomagnetically disturbed times. Here we show that magnetosonic waves could be a source of EMIC waves as a result of propagation and a process of linear mode conversion. The converse is also possible. We present ray tracing to show how magnetosonic (EMIC) waves launched with large (small) wave normal angles can reach a location where the wave normal angle is zero and the wave frequency equals the so-called crossover frequency whereupon energy can be converted from one mode to another without attenuation. While EMIC waves could be a source of magnetosonic waves below the crossover frequency, magnetosonic waves could be a source of hydrogen band waves but not helium band waves.

  6. Numerical and experimental characterizations of low frequency MEMS AE sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Ozevin, Didem

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, new MEMS Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors are introduced. The transduction principle of the sensors is capacitance due to gap change. The sensors are numerically modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics software in order to estimate the resonant frequencies and capacitance values, and manufactured using MetalMUMPS process. The process includes thick metal layer (20 μm) made of nickel for freely vibration layer and polysilicon layer as the stationary layer. The metal layer provides a relatively heavy mass so that the spring constant can be designed high for low frequency sensor designs in order to increase the collapse voltage level (proportional to the stiffness), which increases the sensor sensitivity. An insulator layer is deposited between stationary layer and freely vibration layer, which significantly reduces the potential of stiction as a failure mode. As conventional AE sensors made of piezoelectric materials cannot be designed for low frequencies (vacuum packaging. The MEMS sensor responses are compared with similar frequency piezoelectric AE sensors.

  7. Hearing Foreign Languages through Low Frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Claude

    A study to assess the feasibility of the use of low frequencies for teaching foreign language to the hearing impaired is described. The subjects were unimpaired Japanese students, aged 18 and 19, in beginning French language study. Recorded sentences translated into English, French, and Mandarin Chinese were combined in various ways and presented…

  8. Digital Filters for Low Frequency Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyril, Marni; Abildgaard, J.; Rubak, Per

    2001-01-01

    Digital filters with high resolution in the low-frequency range are studied. Specifically, for a given computational power, traditional IIR filters are compared with warped FIR filters, warped IIR filters, and modified warped FIR filters termed warped individual z FIR filters (WizFIR). The results...... indicate that IIR filters are the most effective in a number of situations....

  9. Orbiting low frequency array for radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Rai Thilak; Rajan, Raj; Engelen, Steven; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Verhoeven, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Recently new and interesting science drivers have emerged for very low frequency radio astronomy from 0.3 MHz to 30 MHz. However Earth bound radio observations at these wavelengths are severely hampered by ionospheric distortions, man made interference, solar flares and even complete reflection belo

  10. Orbiting low frequency array for radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajan, Rai Thilak; Engelen, Steven; Bentum, Mark; Verhoeven, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Recently new and interesting science drivers have emerged for very low frequency radio astronomy from 0.3 MHz to 30 MHz. However Earth bound radio observations at these wavelengths are severely hampered by ionospheric distortions, man made interference, solar flares and even complete reflection belo

  11. Digital Filters for Low Frequency Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyril, Marni; Abildgaard, J.; Rubak, Per

    2001-01-01

    Digital filters with high resolution in the low-frequency range are studied. Specifically, for a given computational power, traditional IIR filters are compared with warped FIR filters, warped IIR filters, and modified warped FIR filters termed warped individual z FIR filters (WizFIR). The results...

  12. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; R Singh; D Bora

    2009-12-01

    A magnetized, low- plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and extensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ∼ 1011 cm-3, ∼ 4 × 1010 cm-3 and ∼ 2 × 1010 cm−3 respectively. The experimental investigation of time-averaged plasma parameter reveals that their profiles remain insensitive to ion mass and suggests that saturated slab equilibrium is obtained. Low-frequency (LF) coherent fluctuations ( < ci) are observed and identified as flute modes. Here ci represents ion cyclotron frequency. Our results indicate that these modes get reduced with ion mass. The frequency of the fluctuating mode decreases with increase in the ion mass. Further, an attempt has been made to discuss the theory of flute modes to understand the relevance of some of our experimental observations.

  13. Multimode filter composed of single-mode surface acoustic wave/bulk acoustic wave resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yulin; Bao, Jingfu; Tang, Gongbin; Wang, Yiling; Omori, Tatsuya; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2017-07-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of realizing multimode filters composed of multiple single-mode resonators by using radio frequency surface and bulk acoustic wave (SAW/BAW) technologies. First, the filter operation and design principle are given. It is shown that excellent filter characteristics are achievable by combining multiple single-mode resonators with identical capacitance ratios provided that their resonance frequencies and clamped capacitances are set properly. Next, the effect of balun performance is investigated. It is shown that the total filter performance is significantly degraded by balun imperfections such as the common-mode rejection. Then, two circuits are proposed to improve the common-mode rejection, and their effectiveness is demonstrated.

  14. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Baile

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices.

  15. Exchange anisotropy pinning of a standing spin-wave mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaraggia, R.; Kennewell, K.; Kostylev, M.; Stamps, R. L.; Ali, M.; Greig, D.; Hickey, B. J.; Marrows, C. H.

    2011-02-01

    Standing spin waves in a thin film are used as sensitive probes of interface pinning induced by an antiferromagnet through exchange anisotropy. Using coplanar waveguide ferromagnetic resonance, pinning of the lowest energy spin-wave thickness mode in Ni80Fe20/Ir25Mn75 exchange-biased bilayers was studied for a range of Ir25Mn75 thicknesses. We show that pinning of the standing mode can be used to amplify, relative to the fundamental resonance, frequency shifts associated with exchange bias. The shifts provide a unique “fingerprint” of the exchange bias and can be interpreted in terms of an effective ferromagnetic film thickness and ferromagnet-antiferromagnet interface anisotropy. Thermal effects are studied for ultrathin antiferromagnetic Ir25Mn75 thicknesses, and the onset of bias is correlated with changes in the pinning fields. The pinning strength magnitude is found to grow with cooling of the sample, while the effective ferromagnetic film thickness simultaneously decreases. These results suggest that exchange bias involves some deformation of magnetic order in the interface region.

  16. Electron Bernstein Wave Emission and Mode Conversion Physics on NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diem, S J; Caughman, J B; Efthimion, P; Kugel, H; LeBlanc, B P; Preinhaelter, J; Sabbagh, S A; Urban, J

    2008-05-21

    NSTX is a spherical tokamak (ST) that operates with ne up to 1020 m-3 and BT less than 0.6 T, cutting off low harmonic electron cyclotron (EC) emission widely used for Te measurements on conventional aspect ratio tokamaks. The electron Bernstein wave (EBW) can propagate in ST plasmas and is emitted at EC harmonics. These properties suggest thermal EBW emission (EBE) may be used for local Te measurements in the ST. Practically, a robust Te(R,t) EBE diagnostic requires EBW transmission efficiencies of > 90% for a wide range of plasma conditions. EBW emission and coupling physics were studied on NSTX with an obliquely viewing EBW to O-mode (B-X-O) diagnostic with two remotely steered antennas, coupled to absolutely calibrated radiometers. While Te(R,t) measurements with EBW emission on NSTX were possible, they were challenged by several issues. Rapid fluctuations in edge ne scale length resulted in > 20% changes in the low harmonic B-X-O transmission efficiency. Also, B-X-O transmission efficiency 2 during H-modes was observed to decay by a factor of 5-10 to less than a few percent. The B-X-O transmission behavior during H-modes was reproduced by EBE simulations that predict that EBW collisional damping can significantly reduce emission when Te < 30 eV inside the B-X-O mode conversion (MC) layer. Initial edge lithium conditioning experiments during H-modes have shown that evaporated lithium can increase Te inside the B-X-O MC layer, significantly increasing B-X-O transmission.

  17. Low frequency eigenmodes of thin anisotropic current sheets and Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Zelenyi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The eigenmodes of low frequency perturbations of thin anisotropic current sheets with a finite value of the normal magnetic field, are investigated in this paper. It is shown that two possible polarizations of symmetric and asymmetric modes (sausage and kink exist where the growth rate of instabilities is positive. In addition, we demonstrate that a tearing instability might have a positive growth rate in thin anisotropic current sheets. The class of relatively fast wavy flapping oscillations observed by Cluster is described. The main direction of wave motion coincides with the direction of the current and the typical velocity of this motion is comparable with the plasma drift velocity in the current sheet. The comparison of these characteristics with theoretical predictions of the model of anisotropic thin current sheets, demonstrates that, in principle, the theory adequately describes the observations.

  18. Relativistic runaway breakdown in low-frequency radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllekrug, Martin; Roussel-Dupré, Robert; Symbalisty, Eugene M. D.; Chanrion, Olivier; Odzimek, Anna; van der Velde, Oscar; Neubert, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    The electromagnetic radiation emitted by an electron avalanche beam resulting from relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere is investigated. It is found from theoretical modeling with a computer simulation that the electron beam emits electromagnetic radiation which is characterized by consecutive broadband pulses in the low-frequency radio range from ˜10 to 300 kHz at a distance of ˜800 km. Experimental evidence for the existence of consecutive broadband pulses is provided by low-frequency radio observations of sprite-producing lightning discharges at a distance of ˜550 km. The measured broadband pulses occur ˜4-9 ms after the sprite-producing lightning discharge, they exhibit electromagnetic radiation which mainly spans the frequency range from ˜50 to 350 kHz, and they exhibit complex waveforms without the typical ionospheric reflection of the first hop sky wave. Two consecutive pulses occur ˜4.5 ms and ˜3 ms after the causative lightning discharge and coincide with the sprite luminosity. It is concluded that relativistic runaway breakdown within the Earth's atmosphere can emit broadband electromagnetic pulses and possibly generates sprites. The source location of the broadband pulses can be determined with an interferometric network of wideband low-frequency radio receivers to lend further experimental support to the relativistic runaway breakdown theory.

  19. Charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳; 吕保维; O.Havnes

    1997-01-01

    The charge density fluctuation of low frequency in a dusty plasma, which is derived from the longitudinal dielectric permittivity of the dusty plasma, has been studied by kinetic theory. The results show that the P value, which describes the relative charge density on the dust in the plasma, and the charging frequency of a dust particle Ωc, which describes the ratio of charge changing of the dust particles, determine the character of the charge density fluctuation of low frequency. For a dusty plasma of P<<1, when the charging frequency Ωc is much smaller than the dusty plasma frequency wd, there is a strong charge density fluctuation which is of character of dust acoustic eigen wave. For a dusty plasma of P>>1, when the frequency Ωc, is much larger than wd there are weaker fluctuations with a wide spectrum. The results have been applied to the ionosphere and the range of radius and density of dust particles is found, where a strong charge density fluctuation of low frequency should exist.

  20. Full waveform inversion with extrapolated low frequency data

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yunyue Elita

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low frequency data is an important factor in the success of full waveform inversion (FWI) in the acoustic regime. The low frequencies help determine the kinematically relevant, low-wavenumber components of the velocity model, which are in turn needed to avoid convergence of FWI to spurious local minima. However, acquiring data below 2 or 3 Hz from the field is a challenging and expensive task. In this paper we explore the possibility of synthesizing the low frequencies computationally from high-frequency data, and use the resulting prediction of the missing data to seed the frequency sweep of FWI. As a signal processing problem, bandwidth extension is a very nonlinear and delicate operation. It requires a high-level interpretation of bandlimited seismic records into individual events, each of which is extrapolable to a lower (or higher) frequency band from the non-dispersive nature of the wave propagation model. We propose to use the phase tracking method for the event separation task. The...

  1. Wave Propagation and Quasinormal Mode Excitation on Schwarzschild Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Sam R

    2011-01-01

    To seek a deeper understanding of wave propagation on the Schwarzschild spacetime, we investigate the relationship between (i) the lightcone of an event and its caustics (self-intersections), (ii) the large-$l$ asymptotics of quasinormal (QN) modes, and (iii) the singular structure of the retarded Green function (GF) for the scalar field. First, we recall that the GF has a (partial) representation as a sum over QN modes. Next, we extend a recently-developed expansion method to obtain asymptotic expressions for QN wavefunctions and their residues. We employ these asymptotics to show (approximately) that the QN mode sum is singular on the lightcone, and to obtain approximations for the GF which are valid close to the lightcone. These approximations confirm a little-known prediction: the singular part of the GF undergoes a transition each time the lightcone passes through a caustic, following a repeating four-fold sequence. We conclude with a discussion of implications and extensions of this work.

  2. Higher Order Mode Coupler Heating in Continuous Wave Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyak, N.; Awida, M.; Hocker, A.; Khabibobulline, T.; Lunin, A.

    Electromagnetic heating due to higher order modes (HOM) propagation is particularly a concern for continuous wave (CW) particle accelerator machines. Power on the order of several watts could flow out of the cavity's HOM ports in CW operations. The upgrade of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS-II) at SLAC requires a major modification of the design of the higher order mode (HOM) antenna and feed through of the conventional ILC elliptical 9-cell cavity in order to utilize it for LCLS-II. The HOM antenna is required to bear higher RF losses, while relatively maintaining the coupling level of the higher order modes. In this paper, we present a detailed analysis of the heating expected in the HOM coupler with a thorough thermal quench study in comparison with the conventional ILC design. We discuss also how the heat will be removed from the cavity through RF cables with specially designed cooling straps. Finally, we report on the latest experimental results of cavity testing in vertical and horizontal cryostats.

  3. 基于数学形态学滤波技术和TLS-ESPRIT算法的低频振荡模式辨识研究%Research on identifying low frequency oscillation modes based on mathematical morphology filtering technique and TLS-ESPRIT algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董超; 刘涤尘; 廖清芬; 党杰; 张彪; 孙文涛

    2012-01-01

    针对传统Prony方法对噪声敏感和辨识精度不高的局限性,提出一种新的低频振荡模式辨识方法,实现了在有噪声干扰情况下低频振荡模式的准确辨识.该方法基于数学形态学设计出一种多结构元素的并行复合形态滤波器,可有效滤除多种噪声,保留更多的有用信息.对消噪后的信号采用基于总体最小二乘法-旋转不变技术的信号参数估计(TLS-ESPRIT)算法进行辨识,从而获取低频振荡各个模式参数.通过算例仿真,说明所提出的方法是可行和有效的.%Aiming at how to avoid the limitations of Prony method that is sensitive to noise and not so accurate, a new method for identifying low frequency oscillation modes is proposed. It realizes accurate identification of oscillation modes with mass of noise. The method is based on mathematical morphology to design a class of generalized multi-structuring-elements parallel complex morphology filter. The morphological filter is applied to effectively suppress the noises and retain the main characteristic components of signal. TLS-ESPRIT algorithm is then used to detect the de-noised signal and obtain the low frequency oscillation modes. The simulative results have shown that the method is feasible and effective.

  4. Composite 3D-printed metastructures for low-frequency and broadband vibration absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlack, Kathryn H.; Bauhofer, Anton; Krödel, Sebastian; Palermo, Antonio; Daraio, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Architected materials that control elastic wave propagation are essential in vibration mitigation and sound attenuation. Phononic crystals and acoustic metamaterials use band-gap engineering to forbid certain frequencies from propagating through a material. However, existing solutions are limited in the low-frequency regimes and in their bandwidth of operation because they require impractical sizes and masses. Here, we present a class of materials (labeled elastic metastructures) that supports the formation of wide and low-frequency band gaps, while simultaneously reducing their global mass. To achieve these properties, the metastructures combine local resonances with structural modes of a periodic architected lattice. Whereas the band gaps in these metastructures are induced by Bragg scattering mechanisms, their key feature is that the band-gap size and frequency range can be controlled and broadened through local resonances, which are linked to changes in the lattice geometry. We demonstrate these principles experimentally, using advanced additive manufacturing methods, and inform our designs using finite-element simulations. This design strategy has a broad range of applications, including control of structural vibrations, noise, and shock mitigation.

  5. Unusual Low-frequency Magnetic Perturbations in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Takahashi; E.D. Fredrickson; M.S. Chance

    2001-02-12

    Low-frequency magnetic perturbations (less than or equal to 30 kHz) observed in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) tokamak do not always conform to expectations from Magneto-Hydro-Dynamic (MHD) modes. The discrepancy between observations and expectations arises from the existence of three classes of magnetic perturbations in TFTR: (1) 'Edge Originated Magnetic Perturbations' (EOMP's), (2) 'Kink-like Modes' (KLM's), and (3) Tearing Modes (TM's). The EOMP class has unusual magnetic phenomenon including up/down asymmetry in poloidal intensity variation that MHD modes alone cannot generate. The contributions of MHD modes in plasma edge regions are too small to explain the magnitude of observed EOMP perturbations. At least two-thirds, possibly nearly all, of magnetic perturbations in a typical EOMP originate from sources other than MHD modes. An EOMP has a unity toroidal harmonic number and a poloidal harmonic number close to a discharge's edge q-value. It produces little temperature fluctuations, except possibly in edge regions. The KLM class produces temperature fluctuations, mostly confined within the q=1 surface with an ideal-mode-like structure, but generates little external magnetic perturbations. The TM class conforms generally to expectations from MHD modes. We propose that current flowing in the Scrape-off-layer (SOL) plasma is a possible origin of EOMP's.

  6. Nonlinear Modelling of Low Frequency Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Erling Sandermann

    1997-01-01

    In the Danish LoDist project on distortion from dynamic low-frequency loudspeakers, a detailed nonlinear model of loudspeakers has been developed. The model has been implemented in a PC program so that it can be used to create signals for listening tests and analysis. Also, different methods...... for describing the nonlinearities have been developed. Different aspects of modelling loudspeaker nonlinearities are discussed, and the program is briefly described....

  7. Nonlinear Modelling of Low Frequency Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Erling Sandermann

    1997-01-01

    In the Danish LoDist project on distortion from dynamic low frequency loudspeakers a detailed nonlinear model of loudspeakers has been developed. The model has been implemented in a PC program so that it can be used to create signals for listening tests and analysis. Also, different methods...... for describing the nonlinearities have been developed. Different aspects of modelling loudspeaker nonlinearities are discussed and the program is briefly demonstrated....

  8. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscattering from Tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, K; Pao, H

    2007-01-16

    Low-frequency electromagnetic scattering from one or more tunnels in a lossy dielectric half-space is considered. The tunnel radii are assumed small compared to the wavelength of the electromagnetic field in the surrounding medium; a tunnel can thus be modeled as a thin scatterer, described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. We examine the normalized backscattering width for cases in which the air-ground interface is either smooth or rough.

  9. LOFAR: The LOw-Frequency ARray

    CERN Document Server

    van Haarlem, M P; Gunst, A W; Heald, G; McKean, J P; Hessels, J W T; de Bruyn, A G; Nijboer, R; Swinbank, J; Fallows, R; Brentjens, M; Nelles, A; Beck, R; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Hörandel, J; Mann, L V E Koopmans G; Miley, G; Röttgering, H; Stappers, B W; Wijers, R A M J; Zaroubi, S; Akker, M van den; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Anderson, K; van Ardenne, A; Arts, M; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Batejat, F; Bähren, L; Bell, M E; Bell, M R; van Bemmel, I; Bennema, P; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bîrzan, L; Bonafede, A; Boonstra, A -J; Braun, R; Bregman, J; Breitling, F; van de Brink, R H; Broderick, J; Broekema, P C; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; van Cappellen, W; Ciardi, B; Coenen, T; Conway, J; Coolen, A; Corstanje, A; Damstra, S; Davies, O; Deller, A T; Dettmar, R -J; van Diepen, G; Dijkstra, K; Donker, P; Doorduin, A; Dromer, J; Drost, M; van Duin, A; Eislöffel, J; van Enst, J; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Gankema, H; Garrett, M A; de Gasparin, F; Gerbers, M; de Geus, E; Grießmeier, J -M; Grit, T; Gruppen, P; Hamaker, J P; Hassall, T; Hoeft, M; Holties, H; Horneffer, A; van der Horst, A; van Houwelingen, A; Huijgen, A; Iacobelli, M; Intema, H; Jackson, N; Jelic, V; de Jong, A; Kant, D; Karastergiou, A; Koers, A; Kollen, H; Kondratiev, V I; Kooistra, E; Koopman, Y; Koster, A; Kuniyoshi, M; Kramer, M; Kuper, G; Lambropoulos, P; Law, C; van Leeuwen, J; Lemaitre, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Macario, G; Markoff, S; Masters, J; McKay-Bukowski, D; Meijering, H; Meulman, H; Mevius, M; Millenaar, R; Miller-Jones, J C A; Mohan, R N; Mol, J D; Morawietz, J; Morganti, R; Mulcahy, D D; Mulder, E; Munk, H; Nieuwenhuis, L; van Nieuwpoort, R; Noordam, J E; Norden, M; Noutsos, A; Offringa, A R; Olofsson, H; Omar, A; Orrú, E; Overeem, R; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A; Rafferty, D; Rawlings, S; Reich, W; de Reijer, J -P; Reitsma, J; Renting, A; Riemers, P; Rol, E; Romein, J W; Roosjen, J; Ruiter, M; Scaife, A; van der Schaaf, K; Scheers, B; Schellart, P; Schoenmakers, A; Schoonderbeek, G; Serylak, M; Shulevski, A; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Sobey, C; Spreeuw, H; Steinmetz, M; Sterks, C G M; Stiepel, H -J; Stuurwold, K; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thomas, I; Thoudam, S; Toribio, M C; van der Tol, B; Usov, O; van Veelen, M; van der Veen, A -J; ter Veen, S; Verbiest, J P W; Vermeulen, R; Vermaas, N; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; de Vos, M; van der Wal, E; van Weeren, R; Weggemans, H; Weltevrede, P; White, S; Wijnholds, S J; Wilhelmsson, T; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P; Zensus, A; van Zwieten, J

    2013-01-01

    LOFAR, the LOw-Frequency ARray, is a new-generation radio interferometer constructed in the north of the Netherlands and across europe. Utilizing a novel phased-array design, LOFAR covers the largely unexplored low-frequency range from 10-240 MHz and provides a number of unique observing capabilities. Spreading out from a core located near the village of Exloo in the northeast of the Netherlands, a total of 40 LOFAR stations are nearing completion. A further five stations have been deployed throughout Germany, and one station has been built in each of France, Sweden, and the UK. Digital beam-forming techniques make the LOFAR system agile and allow for rapid repointing of the telescope as well as the potential for multiple simultaneous observations. With its dense core array and long interferometric baselines, LOFAR achieves unparalleled sensitivity and angular resolution in the low-frequency radio regime. The LOFAR facilities are jointly operated by the International LOFAR Telescope (ILT) foundation, as an ob...

  10. A variable passive low-frequency absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric R.; Gade, Anders Christian

    2005-04-01

    Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They can host classical music concerts, rock concerts and spoken word performances in a matter of a short period. These different performance types require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both the performers and the audience. A recommended reverberation time for classical music may be in the range of 1.5-2 s for empty halls, where rock music sounds best with a reverberation time around 0.8-1 s. Modern rhythmic music often contains high levels of sound energy in the low frequency bands but still requires a high definition for good sound quality. Ideally, the absorption of the hall should be adjustable in all frequency bands in order to provide good sound quality for all types of performances. The mid and high frequency absorption is easily regulated, but adjusting the low-frequency absorption has typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. Measurements were made on a variable low-frequency absorber to develop a practical solution to the dilemma. The paper will present the results of the measurements as well as a possible design.

  11. The Physics of Alfvén Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Cramer, Neil F

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency wave modes of magnetized inhomogeneous plasmas have been subject to intense study in the last decade because they play important roles in the transport of energy in the plasmas. The "Alfvén wave heating" scheme has been investigated as a supplementary heating scheme for fusion plasma devices, and it has been invoked as a model of the heating of the solar and stellar coronae.This book covers the latest research into the properties and applications of low-frequency wave modes in magnetized plasmas, the Alfvén waves and magneto-acoustic waves, in the context of laborat

  12. Temperature effects on the pickup process of water group and hydrogen ions - Extensions of 'A theory for low-frequency waves observed at Comet Giacobini-Zinner' by M. L. Goldstein and H. K. Wong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinca, Armando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1988-01-01

    Cometary heavy ions can resonantly excite hydromagnetic wave activity with spacecraft frequency spectra strongly deviating from the ion cyclotron frequency. The influence of the newborn particle temperature on this effect is assessed, its relevance to the interpretation of the observations is discussed, and an alternative, more efficient mechanism to generate spacecraft frequencies of the order of the proton cyclotron frequency is suggested.

  13. Temperature effects on the pickup process of water group and hydrogen ions - Extensions of 'A theory for low-frequency waves observed at Comet Giacobini-Zinner' by M. L. Goldstein and H. K. Wong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinca, Armando L.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    1988-01-01

    Cometary heavy ions can resonantly excite hydromagnetic wave activity with spacecraft frequency spectra strongly deviating from the ion cyclotron frequency. The influence of the newborn particle temperature on this effect is assessed, its relevance to the interpretation of the observations is discussed, and an alternative, more efficient mechanism to generate spacecraft frequencies of the order of the proton cyclotron frequency is suggested.

  14. Corrugated waveguide mode purifier for TEM output in a dual-mode operation overmoded coaxial millimeter-wave generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zhen; Zhang, Jun; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Dian

    2017-01-01

    A coaxial corrugated waveguide mode purifier is designed for a dual-mode operation overmoded coaxial millimeter-wave generator. With the purifier, the mixed TEM and TM01 modes output are purified into a pure TEM mode. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation shows that the purifier would not decrease the total output power of the generator, and plays an independent role to the upstream structure. Effects of mode composition ratio and phase difference on the purification ability of the purifier are also researched by both electromagnetism and PIC simulations, which show that the purifier has a certain tolerance for both the mode composition ratio and phase difference.

  15. Wave propagation in gravitational systems completeness of quasinormal modes

    CERN Document Server

    Ching, E S C; Suen, W M; Young, K

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of relativistic stars and black holes are often studied in terms of the quasinormal modes (QNM's) of the Klein-Gordon (KG) equation with different effective potentials V(x). In this paper we present a systematic study of the relation between the structure of the QNM's of the KG equation and the form of V(x). In particular, we determine the requirements on V(x) in order for the QNM's to form complete sets, and discuss in what sense they form complete sets. Among other implications, this study opens up the possibility of using QNM expansions to analyse the behavior of waves in relativistic systems, even for systems whose QNM's do {\\it not} form a complete set. For such systems, we show that a complete set of QNM's can often be obtained by introducing an infinitesimal change in the effective potential.

  16. Clamped seismic metamaterials: ultra-low frequency stop bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaoui, Y.; Antonakakis, T.; Brûlé, S.; Craster, R. V.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2017-06-01

    The regularity of earthquakes, their destructive power, and the nuisance of ground vibration in urban environments, all motivate designs of defence structures to lessen the impact of seismic and ground vibration waves on buildings. Low frequency waves, in the range 1-10 Hz for earthquakes and up to a few tens of Hz for vibrations generated by human activities, cause a large amount of damage, or inconvenience; depending on the geological conditions they can travel considerable distances and may match the resonant fundamental frequency of buildings. The ultimate aim of any seismic metamaterial, or any other seismic shield, is to protect over this entire range of frequencies; the long wavelengths involved, and low frequency, have meant this has been unachievable to date. Notably this is scalable and the effects also hold for smaller devices in ultrasonics. There are three approaches to obtaining shielding effects: bragg scattering, locally resonant sub-wavelength inclusions and zero-frequency stop-band media. The former two have been explored, but the latter has not and is examined here. Elastic flexural waves, applicable in the mechanical vibrations of thin elastic plates, can be designed to have a broad zero-frequency stop-band using a periodic array of very small clamped circles. Inspired by this experimental and theoretical observation, all be it in a situation far removed from seismic waves, we demonstrate that it is possible to achieve elastic surface (Rayleigh) wave reflectors at very large wavelengths in structured soils modelled as a fully elastic layer periodically clamped to bedrock. We identify zero frequency stop-bands that only exist in the limit of columns of concrete clamped at their base to the bedrock. In a realistic configuration of a sedimentary basin 15 m deep we observe a zero frequency stop-band covering a broad frequency range of 0-30 Hz.

  17. New nonlinear mechanisms of midlatitude atmospheric low-frequency variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterk, A. E.; Vitolo, R.; Broer, H. W.; Simó, C.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    2010-05-01

    This paper studies the dynamical mechanisms potentially involved in the so-called atmospheric low-frequency variability, occurring at midlatitudes in the Northern Hemisphere. This phenomenon is characterised by recurrent non-propagating and temporally persistent flow patterns, with typical spatial and temporal scales of 6000-10 000 km and 10-50 days, respectively. We study a low-order model derived from the 2-layer shallow-water equations on a β-plane channel. The main ingredients of the low-order model are a zonal flow, a planetary scale wave, orography, and a baroclinic-like forcing. A systematic analysis of the dynamics of the low-order model is performed using techniques and concepts from dynamical systems theory. Orography height ( h0) and magnitude of zonal wind forcing ( U0) are used as control parameters to study the bifurcations of equilibria and periodic orbits. Along two curves of Hopf bifurcations an equilibrium loses stability ( U0≥12.5 m/s) and gives birth to two distinct families of periodic orbits. These periodic orbits bifurcate into strange attractors along three routes to chaos: period doubling cascades, breakdown of 2-tori by homo- and heteroclinic bifurcations, or intermittency ( U0≥14.5 m/s and h0≥800 m). The observed attractors exhibit spatial and temporal low-frequency patterns comparing well with those observed in the atmosphere. For h0≤800 m the periodic orbits have a period of about 10 days and patterns in the vorticity field propagate eastward. For h0≥800 m, the period is longer (30-60 days) and patterns in the vorticity field are non-propagating. The dynamics on the strange attractors are associated with low-frequency variability: the vorticity fields show weakening and strengthening of non-propagating planetary waves on time scales of 10-200 days. The spatio-temporal characteristics are “inherited” (by intermittency) from the two families of periodic orbits and are detected in a relatively large region of the parameter

  18. Frequency conversion through spontaneous degenerate four wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin;

    2014-01-01

    Frequency conversion through spontaneous degenerate four wave mixing (FWM) is investigated in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers. Different FWM processes are observed, phasematching between fiber modes of orthogonal polarization, intermodal phasematching across bandgaps, and intramodal...

  19. Identification of Low Frequency Oscillation Modes Based on NExT and TLS-ESPRIT Algorithm%基于自然激励技术和 TLS-ESPRIT 方法的低频振荡模式辨识

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王祥超; 张鹏; 甄威; 王晓茹

    2015-01-01

    An approach to identifying low frequency oscillation modes based on the stochastic response signals of the system is presented.First,the free oscillation signals are extracted from the stochastic response signals of the system by the natural excitation technique(NExT).Then the mode parameters of the obtained free oscillation signals are identified by the total least squares-estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques(TLS-ESPRIT)algorithm.Finally,the frequencies and damping ratios of low frequency oscillations are obtained.The effectiveness of the proposed method has been verified by the simulation data from a 1 6-machine system and the measurement data in Sichuan power grid.Compared with the random decrement technique(RDT)and Prony method,the proposed method is more accurate in identifying the damping ratios and has a better noise immunity performance.%提出了一种利用系统随机响应信号辨识低频振荡模式的方法。利用自然激励技术(NExT)从系统随机响应信号中获得自由振荡信号,采用总体最小二乘—旋转不变技术的信号参数估计(TLS-ESPRIT)方法对所获得的自由振荡信号进行模式辨识,得到低频振荡模式的频率和阻尼比。采用16机系统仿真数据和四川电网实测数据验证了所提方法的有效性;与随机减量技术(RDT)结合 Prony 方法对比表明,所提方法对阻尼比估计更准确且抗噪性更强。

  20. Prediction of the Fundamental Mode Lamb Wave Reflection from a Crack-Like Discontinuity Using Eigen-Mode Expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Seok [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Chang Heui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Po [ANSCO Corp., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Based on the idea of eigen-mode expansion, a method to analyze the reflection of Lamb wave from a finite vertical discontinuity of plate is theoretically derived and verified by experiment. The theoretical prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result, and this strongly suggests that eigen-mode expansion method could be used for solution of inverse scattering problem for ultrasonic testing using Lamb wave

  1. 体感音乐低频声波对30例健康人心经及小肠经循经微循环的影响研究%Low-frequency Sound Waves of Somatosensory Music in Microcirculation of Heart and Small Intestine Meridian of 30 Healthy Human

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许继宗; 陈雪; 张波; 汤心钰; 郭雁冰; 李玉华; 李洁; 杨戈; 李新艳; 司英奎; 刘亚峰

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the low-frequency sound waves of somatosensory music (16 -160Hz)on microcirculation of heart and small intestine meridian of healthy human,and biophysical mechanisms of somatosensory music treatment in aspects of meridians and collatorals.Methods:Low-frequency sound waves of somatosensory music was played on the pathway of heart and small intestine me-ridians in 30 healthy people,at the same time the laser Doppler was measuring the meridian acupoints of microcirculation,and statistical analysis of experimental data was conducted.Results:The different frequencies of low frequency acoustic wave had different effects on heart and small intestine;the same frequency of waves had similar effects on different acupoints of the same main and collateral channel. The F1 (43.65Hz)had the most significant impact on the Heart Sutra,and F2 (87.31Hz)had the most significant influence on the small intestine meridian.Conclusion:The heart and small intestine have selective absorption effect on low-frequency sound waves,spe-cific frequency sound waves can cause heart and small intestine by resonance.Resonance frequency channel was F1 (43.65Hz),and resonance frequency of small intestine was F2 (87.31Hz).%目的:探讨体感音乐低频声波(16~160 Hz)对健康人心经及小肠经循经微循环的影响,以及体感音乐治疗疾病的经络生物物理机制。方法:在30例健康人的心经及小肠经附近,按顺序播放体感音乐低频声波,同时以激光多普勒血流仪分析循经穴位的微循环变化,统计分析实验数据。结果:不同频率的低频声波对心经及小肠经有不同影响,差异显著;同一频率对同一经络上的不同穴位影响相似。其中 F1(43.65 Hz)对心经影响最显著,F2(87.31 Hz)对小肠经影响最显著。结论:心经及小肠经对不同频率的低频声波具有选择性吸收特性,特定频率声波可引起心经及小肠经共振

  2. The role of low-frequency variation in the manifestation of warming trend and ENSO amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sae-Rim; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Kim, Kwang-Yul; Kim, WonMoo

    2017-08-01

    Despite the increase in greenhouse gas concentration, the sea surface temperature (SST) over the tropical eastern Pacific during the period of 1999-2014 exhibits less warming trend compared to the earlier decades. It has been noted that this warming hiatus is accompanied by a negative phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), which represents low-frequency variability over the Pacific. On the other hand, the 2015/2016 El Niño is among the strongest comparable to the 1997/1998 event, which coincides with the recently altered PDO phase from negative to positive. These observational evidences have generated substantial interest in the role of low-frequency variations in modulating El Niño-Southern Oscillation amplitude as well as manifestation of warming signal in the tropical Pacific. Therefore, it is necessary to appropriately separate low-frequency variability and global warming signal from SST records. Here, we present three primary modes of global SST that include secular warming trend, low-frequency variability, and biennial oscillation. Based on the independent behavior of these three modes, global warming is clearly continuing but its manifestation is enhanced (depressed) when the low-frequency variation is in the positive (negative) phase. Further, possibility of strong El Niño increases under the positive phase of the low-frequency mode, which amplifies warming over the tropical eastern Pacific. Indeed, the strong 2015/2016 El Niño is largely attributed to the positive phase of the low-frequency mode. In order to examine the climate models' ability to simulate the three SST modes as obtained in the observational record, the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) datasets are also analyzed. The spatial and temporal characteristics of the three modes have been replicated closely by the selected CMIP5 models forced by the historical condition, which provides an analogy of the interplay of three modes in the observed tropical Pacific SST.

  3. Sound field control for a low-frequency test facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Møller, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The two largest problems in controlling the reproduction of low-frequency sound for psychoacoustic experiments is the effect of the room due to standing waves and the relatively large sound pressure levels needed. Anechoic rooms are limited downward in frequency and distortion may be a problem even...... at moderate levels, while pressure-field playback can give higher sound pressures but is limited upwards in frequency. A new solution that addresses both problems has been implemented in the laboratory of Acoustics, Aalborg University. The solution uses one wall with 20 loudspeakers to generate a plane wave...... that is actively absorbed when it reaches the 20 loudspeakers on the opposing wall. This gives a homogeneous sound field in the majority of the room with a flat frequency response in the frequency range 2-300 Hz. The lowest frequencies are limited to sound pressure levels in the order of 95 dB. If larger levels...

  4. Measuring low-frequency noise indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Steffen; Møller, Henrik; Persson-Waye, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    that is exceeded in 10% of the volume of a room (L10) is proposed as a rational and objective target for a measurement method. In Sweden and Denmark rules exist for measuring low-frequency noise indoors. The performance of these procedures was investigated in three rooms. The results from the Swedish method were...... close to the L10 target, but, due to a doubtful use of C-weighting in the scanning, it may give too low results in case of complex sounds. The Danish method was found to have a high risk of giving results substantially below the target, unless complainants can precisely appoint measurement positions...

  5. LOFAR, a new low frequency radio telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Röttgering, H J A

    2003-01-01

    LOFAR, the Low Frequency Array, is a large radio telescope consisting of approximately 100 soccer-field sized antenna stations spread over a region of 400 km in diameter. It will operate at frequencies from ~10 to 240 MHz, with a resolution at 240 MHz of better than an arcsecond. Its superb sensitivity will allow for studies of a broad range of astrophysical topics, including reionisation, transient radio sources and cosmic rays, distant galaxies and AGNs. In this contribution a status rapport of the LOFAR project and an overview of the science case is presented.

  6. A variable passive low-frequency absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Werner; Thompson, Eric Robert; Gade, Anders

    2005-01-01

    typically been too expensive or requires too much space to be practical for multi-purpose halls. Measurements were made on a variable low-frequency absorber to develop a practical solution to the dilemma. The paper will present the results of the measurements as well as a possible design.......Multi-purpose concert halls face a dilemma. They can host classical music concerts, rock concerts and spoken word performances in a matter of a short period. These different performance types require significantly different acoustic conditions in order to provide the best sound quality to both...

  7. Minimization of nanosatellite low frequency magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyayev, S. M., E-mail: belyayev@isr.lviv.ua [Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research, Lviv 79060 (Ukraine); Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm 11428 (Sweden); Dudkin, F. L. [Lviv Centre of Institute for Space Research, Lviv 79060 (Ukraine)

    2016-03-15

    Small weight and dimensions of the micro- and nanosatellites constrain researchers to place electromagnetic sensors on short booms or on the satellite body. Therefore the electromagnetic cleanliness of such satellites becomes a central question. This paper describes the theoretical base and practical techniques for determining the parameters of DC and very low frequency magnetic interference sources. One of such sources is satellite magnetization, the reduction of which improves the accuracy and stability of the attitude control system. We present design solutions for magnetically clean spacecraft, testing equipment, and technology for magnetic moment measurements, which are more convenient, efficient, and accurate than the conventional ones.

  8. Power system low frequency oscillation monitoring and analysis based on multi-signal online identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The advance in the wide-area measurement system (WAMS) is driving the power system to the trend of wide-area monitoring and control.The Prony method is usually used for low frequency oscillation online identification.However,the identified amplitude and phase information is not sufficiently used.In this paper,the amplitude is adopted to detect the occurrence of the oscillation and to obtain the mode observability of the sites.The phase is adopted to identify the oscillation generator grouping and to obtain the mode shapes.The time varying characteristics of low frequency oscillations are studied.The behaviors and the characters of low frequency oscillations are displayed by dynamic visual techniques.Demonstrations on the "11.9" low frequency oscillation of the Guizhou Power Grid substantiate the feasibility and the validation of the proposed methods.

  9. 超短波、低频脉冲电疗联合电针治疗腓总神经麻痹的疗效%Therapeutic effect of ultrashort wave,low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy on common peroneal nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏; 李嵩; 张玉淼; 刘春辉; 石汉文

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effectiveness of ultrashort wave, low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy in treatment of patients with common peroneal nerve palsy. Methods Forty patients with common peroneal nerve palsy were randomly divided into two groups: treatment group (20 cases) and control group (20 cases). The patients in treatment group were treated with ultrashort wave, low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy, while those in control group were treated mainly with drug. All patients were scored with MMT and MCRR pre and post treatment. Results It was shown that the lower limb motor function of all patients was significantly improved after treatment and MMT and MCRR scores of patients in treatment group were higher than those in control group (P<0. 05). Furthermore, the excellent and good rate was 85.00% in treatment group, while it was 60.00% in control group ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion Ultrashort wave, low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy can effectively improve the lower limb motor function in patients with common peroneal nerve palsy.%目的 观察超短波、低频脉冲电疗联合电针治疗腓总神经麻痹的疗效.方法 随机选择治疗组20例、对照组20例腓总神经麻痹患者,治疗组在常规药物治疗同时配合超短波、低频脉冲电疗和电针治疗,对照组用常规药物治疗并早期康复治疗.治疗前及治疗8周后用徒手肌力法(MMT)和神经功能愈合标准评分法(MCRR标准)对下肢功能进行评定.结果 治疗后,治疗组MMT评分值较对照组明显增高(P<0.05),治疗组优良率为85.00%,对照组为60.00%,两组间差异有显著性意义(P<0.05).结论 超短波、低频脉冲电疗联合电针治疗可以有效改善腓总神经麻痹患者下肢的运动功能.

  10. Destabilization kinetics of polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine in a field of low frequency impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeev, G. N.; Ermolaeva, V. I.; Boldyrev, V. S.; Sinkevich, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    Experimental results on the destabilization kinetics of compounds with chelate structure (polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine) in the field of the impact of low-frequency vibrations (from 2 to 45 Hz) are presented. The optimum frequencies at which the process rate is greatest are found for different impact modes. Based on the experimental data, conclusions are drawn as to the effect the energy of low-frequency impacts has on the studied clathrate and chelate structures.

  11. Antisymmetric-Symmetric Mode Conversion of Ultrasonic Lamb Waves and Negative Refraction on Thin Steel Plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young H. [Dept. of Physics and Earth Science, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Jin Woo [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul, (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    In this study, focusing of ultrasonic Lamb wave by negative refraction with mode conversion from antisymmetric to symmetric mode was investigated. When a wave propagates backward by negative refraction, the energy flux is antiparallel to the phase velocity. Backward propagation of Lamb wave is quite well known, but the behavior of backward Lamb wave at an interface has rarely been investigated. A pin-type transducer is used to detect Lamb wave propagating on a steel plate with a step change in thickness. Conversion from forward to backward propagating mode leads to negative refraction and thus wave focusing. By comparing the amplitudes of received Lamb waves at a specific frequency measured at different distance between transmitter and interface, the focusing of Lamb wave due to negative refraction was confirmed.

  12. Mode-selective wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in a multimode silicon waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yunhong; Xu, Jing; Ou, Haiyan; Peucheret, Christophe

    2014-01-13

    We propose and demonstrate all-optical mode-selective wavelength conversion in a silicon waveguide. The mode-selective wavelength conversion relies on strong four-wave mixing when pump and signal light are on the same spatial mode, while weak four-wave mixing is obtained between different modes due to phase mismatch. A two-mode division multiplexing circuit with tapered directional coupler based (de)multiplexers and a multimode waveguide is designed and fabricated for this application. Experimental results show clear eye-diagrams and moderate power penalties for the wavelength conversion of both modes.

  13. Intermodal four-wave mixing in a higher-order-mode fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Ji; Pedersen, Martin E. V.; Charan, Kriti; Wang, Ke; Xu, Chris; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars; Jakobsen, Dan

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-efficiency intermodal four-wave-mixing process in an all-fiber system, comprising a picosecond fiber laser and a high-order-mode (HOM) fiber. Two pump photons in the LP01 mode of the fiber can generate an anti-Stokes photon in the LP01 mode and a Stokes photon in the LP02 mode. The wavelength dependent mode profiles of the HOM fiber produce significant spatial overlap between the modes involved. The anti-Stokes wave at 941 nm is generated with 20% conversion efficiency w...

  14. The VLA Low-frequency Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, A S; Cotton, W D; Kassim, N E; Lazio, T J W; Perley, R A; Condon, J J; Erickson, W C

    2007-01-01

    The Very Large Array (VLA) Low-frequency Sky Survey (VLSS) has imaged 95% of the 3*pi sr of sky north of declination = -30 degrees at a frequency of 74 MHz (4 meter wavelength). The resolution is 80" (FWHM) throughout, and the typical RMS noise level is ~0.1 Jy/beam. The typical point-source detection limit is 0.7 Jy/beam and so far nearly 70,000 sources have been catalogued. This survey used the 74 MHz system added to the VLA in 1998. It required new imaging algorithms to remove the large ionospheric distortions at this very low frequency throughout the entire ~11.9 degree field of view. This paper describes the observation and data reduction methods used for the VLSS and presents the survey images and source catalog. All of the calibrated images and the source catalog are available online (http://lwa.nrl.navy.mil/VLSS) for use by the astronomical community.

  15. Low frequency variability of Southern Ocean jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. F.; Richards, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    Both observations and high resolution numerical models show that the Southern Ocean circumpolar flow is concentrated in a large number (approximately 8 to 12) of narrow filamentary jets. It is shown here that coherent jets exhibit a range of low frequency variability, on time scales of months to years, that can lead to displacement and to intermittent formation and dissipation of jets. Using output from an eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model in local regions near topographic features, the impact of energy exchange between eddy and mean flow components on jet persistence and variability is examined. A novel approach that uses a time-dependent definition of the mean flow provides a clearer picture of eddy-mean flow interactions in regions with spatially and temporally varying flow structure. The dynamics are largely consistent with those in idealized quasi-geostrophic models, including topographically-organized and surface-enhanced Reynolds stress forcing of the mean flow. Jets form during periods of enhanced eddy activity, but may persist long after the eddy activity has decayed. Similarly, jets may evolve in a downstream sense, with jet formation localized near topography and undergoing modification in response to changing bathymetry. The evolution of both temperature and potential vorticity is used to show that the low-frequency variability of the jets impacts water mass structure and tracer transport. This study highlights various examples of Southern Ocean dynamics that will prove difficult to capture through existing parameterizations in coarser climate models.

  16. Simple Low-Frequency Beam Pickup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, A.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC; Aleksandrov, A.; /Oak Ridge

    2011-10-12

    Detection of the field induced by a beam outside of the beam pipe can be used as a beam diagnostic. Wires placed in longitudinal slots in the outside wall of the beam pipe can be used as a beam pickup. This has a very small beam-coupling impedance and avoids complications of having a feedthrough. The signal can be reasonably high at low frequencies. We present a field waveform at the outer side of a beam pipe, obtained as a result of calculations and measurements. We calculate the beam-coupling impedance due to a long longitudinal slot in the resistive wall and the signal induced in a wire placed in such a slot and shielded by a thin screen from the beam. These results should be relevant for impedance calculations of the slot in an antechamber and for slots in the PEP-II distributed ion pump screens. The design of the low-frequency beam position monitor is very simple. It can be used in storage rings, synchrotron light sources, and free electron lasers, like LINAC coherent light source.

  17. Identification of low frequency oscillation modes in large transmission systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Guillermo Calderón-Guizar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Existe un comportamiento dinámico típico asociado a todo sistema. Las oscilaciones son fenómenos inherentes a los sistemas dinámicos, por lo que el análisis de estos resulta fundamental para entender el comportamiento dinámico de un sistema en particular. El conocimiento de la frecuencia de oscilación y su correspondiente razón de amortiguamiento, asociados con los modos naturales del sistema, resulta fundamental para inferir el comportamiento dinámico del sistema después de que ha experimentado un disturbio. En un sistema eléctrico de potencia los cambios topológicos en la red de transmisión son bastante comunes debido a los requerimientos operativos. Esto ocasiona cambios en los valores tanto de la frecuencia de oscilación como el amortiguamiento de los modos naturales del sistema. En el pasado, cambios normales en la condición de operación del sistema mexicano han dado como resultado la aparición de oscilaciones de potencia no amortiguadas, por esta razón el conocer el amortiguamiento asociado con los modos críticos del sistema resulta de vital importancia. Este artículo reporta la aplicación del análisis modal y simulaciones en el dominio del tiempo para el rastreo de las oscilaciones de baja frecuencia dominantes, también conocidas como modos inter-área, en el sistema eléctrico mexicano durante diferentes condiciones de operación. Los resultados obtenidos permiten identificar a las variables del sistema de potencia más importantes sobre las oscilaciones de baja frecuencia.

  18. Bench Measurements of Low Frequency Transverse Impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm; Mostacci, A

    2003-01-01

    For frequencies below 10 MHz the classical two wire transmission line method is subject to difficulties in sensitivity and measurement uncertainties. Thus for evaluation of the low frequency transverse impedance properties of the LHC dump kicker a modified version of the two wire transmission line has been used. It consists, in the present case, of a 10 turn loop of approximately 1 meter length and 2 cm width. The change of input impedance of the loop is measured as a function of the surroundings and by using a proper reference (metallic beampipe) these changes are converted into a meaningful transverse beam coupling impedance. Measurements of several calibration objects have shown close agreement with theoretical results.

  19. Mode Selective Actuator-Sensor System for Lamb Wave-Based Structural Health Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Daniel; Wierach, Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) based on Lamb waves, a type of ultrasonic guided waves, is a promising method for in-service inspection of composite structures. In this study mode selective actuators and sensors are investigated to excite a particular Lamb wave mode in composite plates. The actuator and sensor exhibit an interdigital transducer design. In order to describe the complex displacement fields of

  20. Acceleration of relativistic electrons due to resonant interaction with oblique monochromatic whistler-mode waves generated in the ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Shklyar, David

    2016-04-01

    One of the most challenging problems of the radiation belt studies is the problem of particles energization. Being related to the process of particle precipitation and posing a threat to scientific instruments on satellites, the problem of highly energetic particles in the radiation belts turns out to be very important. A lot of progress has been made in this field, but still some aspects of the energization process remain open. The main mechanism of particle energization in the radiation belts is the resonant interaction with different waves, mainly, in whistler frequency range. The problem of special interest is the resonant wave-particle interaction of the electrons of relativistic energies. Relativistic resonance condition provides some important features such as the so-called relativistic turning acceleration discovered by Omura et al. [1, 2]. This process appears to be a very efficient mechanism of acceleration in the case of interaction with the whistler-mode waves propagating along geomagnetic field lines. But some whistler-mode waves propagate obliquely to the magnetic field lines, and the efficiency of relativistic turning acceleration in this case is to be studied. In this report, we present the Hamiltonian theory of the resonant interaction of relativistic electrons with oblique monochromatic whistler-mode waves. We have shown that the presence of turning point requires a special treatment when one aims to derive the resonant Hamiltonian, and we have obtained two different resonant Hamiltonians: one to be applied far enough from the turning point, while another is valid in the vicinity of the turning point. We have performed numerical simulation of relativistic electron interaction with whistler-mode waves generated in the ionosphere by a monochromatic source. It could be, for example, a low-frequency transmitter. The wave-field distribution along unperturbed particle trajectory is calculated by means of geometrical optics. We show that the obliquity of

  1. Controlling Spiral Waves by Modulations Resonant with the Intrinsic System Mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jing-Hua; HU Gang; HU Bam-Bi

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the spiral wave control in the two-dimensional complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. External drivings which are not resonant with spiral waves but with intrinsic system modes are used to successfully annihilate spiral waves and direct the system to various target states. The novel control mechanism is intuitively explained and the richness and flexibility the control results are emphasized.

  2. Guiding, bending, and splitting of coupled defect surface modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Zhang, Baile, E-mail: blzhang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2016-01-25

    We experimentally demonstrate a type of waveguiding mechanism for coupled surface-wave defect modes in a surface-wave photonic crystal. Unlike conventional spoof surface plasmon waveguides, waveguiding of coupled surface-wave defect modes is achieved through weak coupling between tightly localized defect cavities in an otherwise gapped surface-wave photonic crystal, as a classical wave analogue of tight-binding electronic wavefunctions in solid state lattices. Wave patterns associated with the high transmission of coupled defect surface modes are directly mapped with a near-field microwave scanning probe for various structures including a straight waveguide, a sharp corner, and a T-shaped splitter. These results may find use in the design of integrated surface-wave devices with suppressed crosstalk.

  3. 不同音色低频声波对健康人委中微循环及经皮氧分压的影响%Effects of Low Frequency Sound Waves of Different Timbres on Weizhong Microcirculation and Transcutaneous Oxygen Partial Pressure of Healthy People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王普艳; 陈雪; 许继宗; 汤心钰; 张波; 李玉华; 司英奎; 李洁; 杨戈; 李新艳; 刘亚峰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To discuss different effects of low frequency sound waves of different timbres on microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen partial pressure of Weizhong (BL40) of healthy people;To study the mechanism of somatosensory music therapy. Methods The same frequency (98.00 Hz), different timbres (sounds of guqin, flute, ocarina, bell, and drum were simulated) low frequency sound waves were played near Weizhong acupoint of 30 healthy persons. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to analyze microcirculation and the changes of transcutaneous oxygen pressure of meridian acupoints, when each timbre was played for 60, 120, 180, 240 and 300 s. Results Sound waves of bell, drum, and flute made point microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen pressure gradually increase, and the influence of drum>bell>flute;timbre waves of ocarina and guqin made the point microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen pressure decrease gradually decrease, and the decrease of ocarina was more significant than that of guqin. In the same time point, sound waves of bell made point microcirculation and transcutaneous oxygen pressure increase more than the other sound waves (P<0.01). Conclusion Low frequency sounds of different timbres belong to different properties of five elements. They have different components in frequency spectrum, and can create different effects on acupoints.%目的:观察频率相同的情况下不同音色的低频声波对健康人委中微循环及经皮氧分压的影响,探讨体感音乐疗法的作用机理。方法在30例健康人的委中附近,播放频率相同(98.00 Hz)、音色不同(分别模拟古琴、箫、埙、钟、鼓的音色)的低频声波,各音色分别播放至60、120、180、240、300 s时,以激光多普勒血流仪分析委中微循环及经皮氧分压的变化。结果钟、鼓、箫的音色声波使委中微循环量、经皮氧分压逐渐升高,且鼓>钟>箫;埙、古琴的音色声波使委中微循环量、经皮氧

  4. Whistler mode waves driven by anisotropic electrons in the Martian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J. S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Espley, J. R.; DiBraccio, G. A.; McFadden, J. P.; Brain, D. A.; Xu, S.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Larson, D. E.; Lillis, R. J.; Hara, T.; Livi, R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present MAVEN observations of narrowband electromagnetic waves at frequencies between the local electron cyclotron and lower hybrid frequencies in the Martian magnetosphere. Although Phobos-2 first measured bursts of electric field waves below the electron cyclotron frequency, the lack of magnetic field wave data hindered definitive identification of the wave mode and generation mechanisms. We analyze electric and magnetic field wave spectra obtained by MAVEN and demonstrate that the observed narrowband waves have properties consistent with whistler mode. We utilize electron measurements to compute linear growth rates of whistler mode and show that cyclotron resonance with anisotropic electrons on open and closed field lines can produce the observed narrowband features. Additionally, a statistical survey reveals that the narrowband wave events and anisotropic electrons have similar spatial distributions, providing further support for this scenario. Interestingly, some of the observed waves display complex frequency-time structures that resemble whistler-mode chorus waves in the terrestrial inner magnetosphere, including discrete elements of rising tones and two bands above and below half the electron cyclotron frequency. Whistler mode waves driven by anisotropic electrons, previously observed in intrinsic magnetospheres and at unmagnetized airless bodies, are now confirmed by MAVEN at Mars.

  5. Improving room acoustics at low frequencies with multiple loudspeakers and time based room correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    Small and medium size rectangular rooms are often used for sound reproduction. These rooms have substantial acoustical problems at low frequencies primarily caused by the reflections from the room boundaries. The spatial variation in sound pressure level (SPL) can be up to 30 dB in a room at low...... frequencies, and appear not only at modal frequencies. The problem is an acoustical issue in time, and should therefore be analyzed in the time-domain, instead of the traditional steady state frequency domain. The construction of a finite-difference time-domain approximation program (FDTD) has lead...... to a simple and untraditional solution called CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System) that makes use of multiple loudspeakers. With the proper placement of low frequency loudspeakers, CABS can create a plane wave from the front wall which will be absorbed by additional low frequency loudspeakers at the back...

  6. Improving room acoustics at low frequencies with multiple loudspeakers and time based room correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal; Celestinos, Adrian

    2008-01-01

    to a simple and untraditional solution called CABS (Controlled Acoustical Bass System) that makes use of multiple loudspeakers. With the proper placement of low frequency loudspeakers, CABS can create a plane wave from the front wall which will be absorbed by additional low frequency loudspeakers at the back......Small and medium size rectangular rooms are often used for sound reproduction. These rooms have substantial acoustical problems at low frequencies primarily caused by the reflections from the room boundaries. The spatial variation in sound pressure level (SPL) can be up to 30 dB in a room at low...... frequencies, and appear not only at modal frequencies. The problem is an acoustical issue in time, and should therefore be analyzed in the time-domain, instead of the traditional steady state frequency domain. The construction of a finite-difference time-domain approximation program (FDTD) has lead...

  7. Observation of low frequency electromagnetic activity at 1000 km altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ivchenko

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of low frequency fluctuations of electric and magnetic fields, commonly interpreted as Alfvénic activity. The data base consists of six months of electric and magnetic field measurements by the Astrid-2 microsatellite. The occurrence of the events is studied with respect to the location and general activity. Large regions of broadband Alfvénic activity are persistently observed in the cusp/cleft and, during the periods of high geo-magnetic activity, also in the pre-midnight sector of the auroral oval.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere – Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  8. Broadband fractal acoustic metamaterials for low-frequency sound attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gang Yong; Cheng, Qiang; Huang, Bei; Dong, Hui Yuan; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-09-01

    We fabricate and experimentally characterize a broadband fractal acoustic metamaterial that can serve to attenuate the low-frequency sounds at selective frequencies ranging from 225 to 1175 Hz. The proposed metamaterials are constructed by the periodic Hilbert fractal elements made of photosensitive resin via 3D printing. In analogy to electromagnetic fractal structures, it is shown that multiple resonances can also be excited in the acoustic counterpart due to their self-similar properties, which help to attenuate the acoustic energy in a wide spectrum. The confinement of sound waves in such subwavelength element is evidenced by both numerical and experimental results. The proposed metamaterial may provide possible alternative for various applications such as the noise attenuation and the anechoic materials.

  9. Man-induced low-frequency seismic events in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre, Diana; Amato, Alessandro; Cattaneo, Marco; Carannante, Simona; Michelini, Alberto

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional seismic events in Italy are detected by scanning three years of continuous waveforms recorded by the Italian National Seismic Network. Cross correlation of signal templates with continuous seismic records has evidenced unusual events with similar low-frequency characteristics in several Italian regions. Spectral analysis and spatiotemporal distribution of these events, some of which are previously interpreted as tectonic long-period transients, suggest that they are not natural, but produced by huge cement factories. Since there are at least 57 full-cycle cement plants operating in Italy, each affecting areas of about 1250 to 2800 km2, we argue that significant portions of the Italian territory (23% to 51%) can be affected by this man-made noise. Seismic noise analyses, such as those used for microzonation or crustal structure investigations, as well as data mining techniques used to retrieve anomalous transient signals, should thus take into account this peculiar and pervasive source of seismic waves.

  10. Bayesian inference on EMRI signals using low frequency approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Asad; Meyer, Renate; Röver, Christian; 10.1088/0264-9381/29/14/145014

    2013-01-01

    Extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) are thought to be one of the most exciting gravitational wave sources to be detected with LISA. Due to their complicated nature and weak amplitudes the detection and parameter estimation of such sources is a challenging task. In this paper we present a statistical methodology based on Bayesian inference in which the estimation of parameters is carried out by advanced Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms such as parallel tempering MCMC. We analysed high and medium mass EMRI systems that fall well inside the low frequency range of LISA. In the context of the Mock LISA Data Challenges, our investigation and results are also the first instance in which a fully Markovian algorithm is applied for EMRI searches. Results show that our algorithm worked well in recovering EMRI signals from different (simulated) LISA data sets having single and multiple EMRI sources and holds great promise for posterior computation under more realistic conditions. The search and estimation meth...

  11. 基于改进小波系数奇异值分解和小波去噪的低频振荡时变模式辨识%A Method to Identify Time-Varying Mode of Low Frequency Oscillation by Continuous Wavelet Transform Based on Raising Singular Value Decomposition of Wavelet Coefficient and Wavelet Denoising

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾某德; 刘涤尘; 廖清芬; 董超; 欧阳利平

    2012-01-01

    Based on the combination of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) with singular value decomposition (SVD), a new algorithm to identify oscillation frequency of signal, extract mode information and denoise signal by raising SVD of wavelet coefficient is proposed. The condition that under high noise level or closely spaced mode of noise, the wavelet ridges are unsharp and even the frequency is hard to extract due to the aliasing and intersection of wavelet ridges can be overcome by the proposed method, and the frequencies of oscillation modes in different orders can be identified according to frequency vectors of the raised SVD of wavelet coefficients. Meanwhile the wavelet energy coefficient is chosen to identify the dominant oscillation mode, and signal denoising is performed by use of wavelet soft-thresholding denoising and restructured matrix after the SVD of wavelet coefficient. CWT can be used to deal with time-varying low-frequency oscillation signals containing time-varying oscillation mode, and the identification accuracy of mode parameters is high. Both effectiveness and applicability of the proposed algorithm are verified by simulation results.%提出了一种基于连续小波变换(continuouswalelettranSform,CwT)和奇异值分解(Singularvaluedecomposition,SVD)相结合的提升小波系数SVD辨识信号振荡频率和模式信息提取及信号去噪的新方法。克服了噪声较大或者密集模态时,小波脊线不清晰甚至会出现混叠和交叉难以提取频率的情况,根据提升的小波系数奇异值分解频率向量识别各阶振荡模式的频率。同时选用小波能量系数来识别主导振荡模式,用小波软阈值去噪和SVD分解后矩阵重构来进行信号去噪。CWT可以处理含时变振荡模式的低频振荡信号,且对模式参数具有较高的辨识精度。仿真算例验证了算法的有效性和适用性。

  12. Imaging Jupiter Radiation Belts At Low Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J. N.; de Pater, I.; Zarka, P.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sault, R.; Hess, S.; Cecconi, B.; Fender, R.; Pewg, Lofar

    2014-04-01

    , at different epochs only provided, each time, glimpses of the spectral content in different observational configurations. As the synchrotron emission frequency peaks at Vmax / E2B (with Vmax in MHz, E, the electron energy in MeV and B, the magnetic field in Gauss), the low frequency content of this emission is associated with low energy electron populations inside the inner belt and the energetic electrons located in regions of weaker magnetic field (at few jovian radii). Therefore, there is much interest in extending and completing the current knowledge of the synchrotron emission from the belts, with low frequency resolved observations. LOFAR, the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) [6], is a giant flexible and digital ground-based radio interferometer operating in the 30-250 MHz band. It brings very high time (~ μs), frequency (~ kHz) and angular resolutions (~1") and huge sensitivity (mJy). In November 2011, a single 10-hour track enabled to cover an entire planetary rotation and led to the first resolved image of the radiation belts between 127- 172 MHz [7,8]. In Feb 2013, an 2×5h30 joint LOFAR/ WSRT observing campaign seized the state of the radiation belts from 45 MHz up to 5 GHz. We will present the current state of the study (imaging, reconstruction method and modeling) of the radiation belts dynamic with this current set of observations. LOFAR can contribute to the understanding of the physics taking place in the inner belt as well as possibly providing a fast and a systematic "diagnostic" of the state of the belts. The latter represents an opportunity to give context and ground-based support for the arrival of JUNO (NASA) scheduled in July 2016 and also for future missions, such as JUICE (ESA), at the vicinity of Jupiter by the exploration of its icy satellites.

  13. Well-posedness and generalized plane waves simulations of a 2D mode conversion model

    CERN Document Server

    Imbert-Gérard, Lise-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Certain types of electro-magnetic waves propagating in a plasma can undergo a mode conversion process. In magnetic confinement fusion, this phenomenon is very useful to heat the plasma, since it permits to transfer the heat at or near the plasma center. This work focuses on a mathematical model of wave propagation around the mode conversion region, from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It aims at developing, for a well-posed equation, specific basis functions to study a wave mode conversion process. These basis functions, called generalized plane waves, are intrinsically based on variable coefficients. As such, they are particularly adapted to the mode conversion problem. The design of generalized plane waves for the proposed model is described in detail. Their implementation within a discontinuous Galerkin method then provides numerical simulations of the process. These first 2D simulations for this model agree with qualitative aspects studied in previous works.

  14. Low-frequency characteristics extension for vibration sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨学山; 高峰; 候兴民

    2004-01-01

    Traditional magneto-electric vibration sensors and servo accelerometers have severe shortcomings when used to measure vibration where low frequency components predominate. A low frequency characteristic extension for velocity vibration sensors is presented in this paper. The passive circuit technology, active compensation technology and the closedcycle pole compensation technology are used to extend the measurable range and to improve low frequency characteristics of sensors. Thses three types of low frequency velocity vibration sensors have been developed and widely adopted in China.

  15. Rayleigh surface waves, phonon mode conversion, and thermal transport in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Leon; Knezevic, Irena

    We study the effects of phonon mode conversion and Rayleigh (surface) waves on thermal transport in nanostructures. We present a technique to calculate thermal conductivity in the elastic-solid approximation: a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) solution of the elastic or scalar wave equations combined with the Green-Kubo formula. The technique is similar to an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, captures phonon wave behavior, and scales well to nanostructures that are too large to simulate with many other techniques. By imposing fixed or free boundary conditions, we can selectively turn off mode conversion and Rayleigh waves to study their effects. In the example case of graphenelike nanoribbons with rough edges, we find that mode conversion among bulk modes has little effect on thermal transport, but that conversion between bulk and Rayleigh waves can significantly reduce thermal conductivity. With increasing surface disorder, Rayleigh waves readily become trapped by the disorder and draw energy away from the propagating bulk modes, which lowers thermal conductivity. We discuss the implications on the accuracy of popular phonon-surface scattering models that stem from scalar wave equations and cannot capture mode conversion to Rayleigh waves.

  16. Phase-delayed laser diode array allows ultrasonic guided wave mode selection and tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Pasi; Salmi, Ari; Moilanen, Petro; Karppinen, Timo; Zhao, Zuomin; Myllylä, Risto; Timonen, Jussi; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-04-01

    Selecting and tuning modes are useful in ultrasonic guided wave non-destructive testing (NDT) since certain modes at various center frequencies are sensitive to specific types of defects. Ideally one should be able to select both the mode and the center frequency of the launched waves. We demonstrated that an affordable laser diode array can selectively launch either the S0 or A0 ultrasonic wave mode at a chosen center frequency into a polymer plate. A fiber-coupled diode array (4 elements) illuminated a 2 mm thick acrylic plate. A predetermined time delay matching the selected mode and frequency was employed between the output of the elements. The generated ultrasound was detected by a 215 kHz piezo receiver. Our results imply that this array permits non-contacting guided wave ultrasonic NDT. The solution is small, affordable, and robust in comparison to conventional pulsed lasers. In addition, it does not require experienced operators.

  17. Ultrasonic guided wave propagation across waveguide transitions: energy transfer and mode conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthillath, Padmakumar; Galan, Jose M; Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J; Rose, Joseph L

    2013-05-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave inspection of structures containing adhesively bonded joints requires an understanding of the interaction of guided waves with geometric and material discontinuities or transitions in the waveguide. Such interactions result in mode conversion with energy being partitioned among the reflected and transmitted modes. The step transition between an aluminum layer and an aluminum-adhesive-aluminum multi-layer waveguide is analyzed as a model structure. Dispersion analysis enables assessment of (i) synchronism through dispersion curve overlap and (ii) wavestructure correlation. Mode-pairs in the multi-layer waveguide are defined relative to a prescribed mode in a single layer as being synchronized and having nearly perfect wavestructure matching. Only a limited number of mode-pairs exist, and each has a unique frequency range. A hybrid model based on semi-analytical finite elements and the normal mode expansion is implemented to assess mode conversion at a step transition in a waveguide. The model results indicate that synchronism and wavestructure matching is associated with energy transfer through the step transition, and that the energy of an incident wave mode in a single layer is transmitted almost entirely to the associated mode-pair, where one exists. This analysis guides the selection of incident modes that convert into transmitted modes and improve adhesive joint inspection with ultrasonic guided waves.

  18. Low Frequency Plasma Oscillations in a 6-kW Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The oscillations from 0-100 kHz in a 6-kW magnetically shielded thruster are experimen- tally characterized. Changes in plasma parameters that result from the magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters have the potential to significantly alter thruster transients. A detailed investigation of the resulting oscillations is necessary both for the purpose of determin- ing the underlying physical processes governing time-dependent behavior in magnetically shielded thrusters as well as for improving thruster models. In this investigation, a high speed camera and a translating ion saturation probe are employed to examine the spatial extent and nature of oscillations from 0-100 kHz in the H6MS thruster. Two modes are identified at 8 kHz and 75-90 kHz. The low frequency mode is azimuthally uniform across the thruster face while the high frequency oscillation is concentrated close to the thruster centerline with an m = 1 azimuthal dependence. These experimental results are discussed in the context of wave theory as well as published observations from an unshielded variant of the H6MS thruster.

  19. A low frequency rotational energy harvesting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbo, M.; Machado, S. P.; Ramirez, J. M.; Gatti, C. D.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a rotary power scavenging unit comprised of two systems of flexible beams connected by two masses which are joined by means of a spring, considering a PZT (QP16N, Midé Corporation) piezoelectric sheet mounted on one of the beams. The energy harvesting (EH) system is mounted rigidly on a rotating hub. The gravitational force on the masses causes sustained oscillatory motion in the flexible beams as long as there is rotary motion. The intention is to use the EH system in the wireless autonomous monitoring of wind turbines under different wind conditions. Specifically, the development is oriented to monitor the dynamic state of the blades of a wind generator of 30 KW which rotates between 50 and 150 rpm. The paper shows a complete set of experimental results on three devices, modifying the amount of beams in the frame supporting the system. The results show an acceptable sustained voltage generation for the expected range, in the three proposed cases. Therefore, it is possible to use this system for generating energy in a low-frequency rotating environment. As an alternative, the system can be easily adapted to include an array of piezoelectric sheets to each of the beams, to provide more power generation.

  20. Effects of static and dynamic higher-order optical modes in balanced homodyne readout for future gravitational waves detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Danilishin, Stefan L.; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Barr, Bryan W.; Bell, Angus S.; Dupej, Peter; Gräf, Christian; Hennig, Jan-Simon; Houston, E. Alasdair; Huttner, Sabina H.; Leavey, Sean S.; Pascucci, Daniela; Sorazu, Borja; Spencer, Andrew; Wright, Jennifer; Strain, Kenneth A.; Hild, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    With the recent detection of gravitational waves (GWs), marking the start of the new field of GW astronomy, the push for building more sensitive laser-interferometric gravitational wave detectors (GWDs) has never been stronger. Balanced homodyne detection (BHD) allows for a quantum-noise (QN) limited readout of arbitrary light field quadratures, and has therefore been suggested as a vital building block for upgrades to Advanced LIGO and third-generation observatories. In terms of the practical implementation of BHD, we develop a full framework for analyzing the static optical high-order modes (HOMs) occurring in the BHD paths related to the misalignment or mode matching at the input and output ports of the laser interferometer. We find the effects of HOMs on the quantum-noise limited sensitivity is independent of the actual interferometer configuration; e.g. Michelson and Sagnac interferometers are affected in the same way. We show that misalignment of the output ports of the interferometer (output misalignment) only affects the high-frequency part of the quantum-noise limited sensitivity (detection noise). However, at low frequencies, HOMs reduce the interferometer response and the radiation pressure noise (back-action noise) by the same amount and hence the quantum-noise limited sensitivity is not negatively affected in that frequency range. We show that the misalignment of the laser into the interferometer (input misalignment) produces the same effect as output misalignment and additionally decreases the power inside the interferometer. We also analyze dynamic HOM effects, such as beam jitter created by the suspended mirrors of the BHD. Our analyses can be directly applied to any BHD implementation in a future GWD. Moreover, we apply our analytical techniques to the example of the speed meter proof-of-concept experiment under construction in Glasgow. We find that for our experimental parameters, the performance of our seismic isolation system in the BHD paths is

  1. Intermodal four-wave mixing in a higher-order-mode fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji; Pedersen, Martin E V; Charan, Kriti; Wang, Ke; Xu, Chris; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars; Jakobsen, Dan

    2012-10-15

    We demonstrate a high-efficiency intermodal four-wave-mixing process in an all-fiber system, comprising a picosecond fiber laser and a high-order-mode (HOM) fiber. Two pump photons in the LP(01) mode of the fiber can generate an anti-Stokes photon in the LP(01) mode and a Stokes photon in the LP(02) mode. The wavelength dependent mode profiles of the HOM fiber produce significant spatial overlap between the modes involved. The anti-Stokes wave at 941 nm is generated with 20% conversion efficiency with input pulse energy of 20 nJ. The guidance of the anti-Stokes and Stokes waves in the HOM fiber enhances system stability.

  2. Time delay controlled annular array transducers for omnidirectional guided wave mode control in plate like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Jaya P.; Rose, Joseph L.

    2014-10-01

    Guided waves in plate like structures offer several modes with unique characteristics that can be taken advantage for nondestructive inspection applications. Conditions relating to the structure under inspection like the surrounding media, liquid loading, coatings etc require the use of special modes for successful inspection. Therefore, transducers that can excite mode controlled guided waves are essential for defect detection and discrimination in structures. Array transducers with annular elements can generate omnidirectional guided waves in plate like structures. However, the wave modes excited are limited to a particular wavelength governed by the element spacing. This limitation on the annular array transducers can be overcome by controlling the phase at each element relative to one another. In this work, annular array transducer construction techniques are theoretically examined and the optimum phase delays between the annular elements to excite a desired guided wave mode are calculated. A five element comb type annular array transducer is fabricated utilizing 1-3 type piezocomposite material. The mode control capability of the transducer is experimentally verified by selectively exciting the A0 and S0 guided wave modes in an aluminum plate like structure.

  3. SAR Imaging of Wave Tails: Recognition of Second Mode Internal Wave Patterns and Some Mechanisms of their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jose C. B.; Magalhaes, J. M.; Buijsman, M. C.; Garcia, C. A. E.

    2016-08-01

    Mode-2 internal waves are usually not as energetic as larger mode-1 Internal Solitary Waves (ISWs), but they have attracted a great deal of attention in recent years because they have been identified as playing a significant role in mixing shelf waters [1]. This mixing is particularly effective for mode-2 ISWs because the location of these waves in the middle of the pycnocline plays an important role in eroding the barrier between the base of the surface mixed layer and the stratified deep layer below. An urgent problem in physical oceanography is therefore to account for the magnitude and distribution of ISW-driven mixing, including mode-2 ISWs. Several generation mechanisms of mode-2 ISWs have been identified. These include: (1) mode-1 ISWs propagating onshore (shoaling) and entering the breaking instability stage, or propagating over a steep sill; (2) a mode-1 ISW propagating offshore (antishoaling) over steep slopes of the shelf break, and undergoing modal transformation; (3) intrusion of the whole head of a gravity current into a three-layer fluid; (4) impingement of an internal tidal beam on the pycnocline, itself emanating from critical bathymetry; (5) nonlinear disintegration of internal tide modes; (6) lee wave mechanism. In this paper we provide methods to identify internal wave features denominated "Wave Tails" in SAR images of the ocean surface, which are many times associated with second mode internal waves. The SAR case studies that are presented portray evidence of the aforementioned generation mechanisms, and we further discuss possible methods to discriminate between the various types of mode-2 ISWs in SAR images, that emerge from these physical mechanisms. Some of the SAR images correspond to numerical simulations with the MITgcm in fully nonlinear and nonhydrostatic mode and in a 2D configuration with realistic stratification, bathymetry and other environmental conditions.Results of a global survey with some of these observations are presented

  4. Energy flow, energy density of Timoshenko beam and wave mode incoherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Rao, Zhushi; Ta, Na

    2015-10-01

    Time-averaged energy flow and energy density are of significance in vibration analysis. The wave decomposition method is more fruitful and global in physical sense than the state variables depicted point by point. By wave approach, the Timoshenko beam vibration field is decomposed into two distinct modes: travelling and evanescent waves. Consequently, the power and energy functions defined on these waves' amplitude and phase need to be established. However, such formulas on Timoshenko beam are hardly found in literatures. Furthermore, the incoherence between these two modes is of theoretical and practical significance. This characteristic guarantees that the resultant power or energy of a superposed wave field is equal to the sum of the power or energy that each wave mode would generate individually. Unlike Euler-Bernoulli beam, such incoherence in the Timoshenko beam case has not been theoretically proved so far. Initially, the power and energy formulas based on wave approach and the corresponding incoherence proof are achieved by present work, both in theoretical and numerical ways. Fortunately, the theoretical and numerical results show that the travelling and evanescent wave modes are incoherent with each other both on power and energy functions. Notably, the energy function is unconventional and self-defined in order to obtain the incoherence. Some remarkable power transmission characteristics of the evanescent wave are also illustrated meanwhile.

  5. 基于频域分解法和广域稳态量测的低频振荡模式辨识%Identification of low-frequency oscillation modes based on frequency domain decomposition method and wide area ambient measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈刚; 吴小辰; 柳勇军; 李鹏; 廖瑞金; 王予疆; 何潜

    2011-01-01

    Frequency Domain Decomposition(FDD) is introduced to identify low-frequency oscillation modes by analysis of steady-state ambient measurements in power system and some modifications to FDD are made.The relation expression between maximum singular value of PSD matrix and system eigenvalue under poorly damped mode is presented by detailed derivation of the relations among frequency response funcfion(FRF), output power spectral density (PSD), and system eigenvalues.Modal Amplitude Coherence (MAC) is used to determine mode area size in the neighborhood of peak point on maximum SVD curve.Finally, the exact modal frequency and damping ratio can be estimated using least square method.The technique is illustrated on linear time-invariant system, WECC 9-bus system and ambient PMU measurements, to show its effectiveness.The suggested method is suitable for identification of poorly damped oscillatory modes, and is robust to noise, and has important value for real-time application.%对广域稳态量测信号将频域分解方法引入电网低频振荡模式辨识并进行了改进完善.推导了系统的频响函数、输出功率谱密度矩阵、特征量之间的关系,给出了弱阻尼模式下功率谱密度矩阵的最大奇异值与特征量之间的关系表达式;采用模态幅值相干系数以确定奇异值曲线谱峰附近单模态区域大小,最后采用最小二乘方法求取准确的模式频率和阻尼系数.线性时不变系统时域仿真、WECC 9节点系统时域仿真以及实测PMU数据分析表明,所提方法适用于弱阻尼振荡模式辨识,对噪声具有较强鲁棒性,是一种极具实用价值的在线应用方法.

  6. Optical Synthesis of Terahertz and Millimeter-Wave Frequencies with Discrete Mode Diode Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    O'Brien, Stephen; Bitauld, David; Brandonisio, Nicola; Amann, Andreas; Phelan, Richard; Kelly, Brian; O'Gorman, James

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that optical synthesis of terahertz and millimeter-wave frequencies can be achieved using two-mode and mode-locked discrete mode diode lasers. These edge-emitting devices incorporate a spatially varying refractive index profile which is designed according to the spectral output desired of the laser. We first demonstrate a device which supports two primary modes simultaneously with high spectral purity. In this case sinusoidal modulation of the optical intensity at terahertz frequencies can be obtained. Cross saturation of the material gain in quantum well lasers prevents simultaneous lasing of two modes with spacings in the millimeter-wave region. We show finally that by mode-locking of devices that are designed to support a minimal set of four primary modes, we obtain a sinusoidal modulation of the optical intensity in this frequency region.

  7. Data-driven prediction strategies for low-frequency patterns of North Pacific climate variability

    CERN Document Server

    Comeau, Darin; Giannakis, Dimitrios; Majda, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The North Pacific exhibits patterns of low-frequency variability on the intra-annual to decadal time scales, which manifest themselves in both model data and the observational record, and prediction of such low-frequency modes of variability is of great interest to the community. While parametric models, such as stationary and non-stationary autoregressive models, possibly including external factors, may perform well in a data-fitting setting, they may perform poorly in a prediction setting. Ensemble analog forecasting, which relies on the historical record to provide estimates of the future based on past trajectories of those states similar to the initial state of interest, provides a promising, nonparametric approach to forecasting that makes no assumptions on the underlying dynamics or its statistics. We apply such forecasting to low-frequency modes of variability for the North Pacific sea surface temperature and sea ice concentration fields extracted through Nonlinear Laplacian Spectral Analysis. We find ...

  8. Two-mode polarized traveling wave deflecting structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建豪; 顾强; 方文程; 童德春; 赵振堂

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a two-mode polarizable deflecting structure, as a new concept for bunch measure-ment and beam control. With two modes of HEM11 and HEM12 operating in the same structure on horizontal and vertical directions, respectively, the operation status can be switched between the two polarization modes. They can be operated simultaneously with two independent input power sources. With two-mode deflecting structure, the bunch distortion caused by the geometric wake-fields in the accelerating structure can be mea-sured by one structure.

  9. Intermodal parametric gain of degenerate four wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2013-01-01

    Intermodal degenerate four wave mixing (FWM) is investigated numerically in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers. The dispersion is controlled independently of core size, and thus allows for power scaling of the FWM process.

  10. Low-frequency (0.7-7.4 mHz geomagnetic field fluctuations at high latitude: frequency dependence of the polarization pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cafarella

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of the polarization pattern of low-frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations (0.7-7.4 mHz covering the entire 24-h interval was performed at the Antarctic station Terra Nova Bay (80.0°S geomagnetic latitude throughout 1997 and 1998. The results show that the polarization pattern exhibits a frequency dependence, as can be expected from the frequency dependence of the latitude where the coupling between the magnetospheric compressional mode and the field line resonance takes place. The polarization analysis of single pulsation events shows that wave packets with different polarization sense, depending on frequency, can be simultaneously observed.

  11. Low-frequency (0.7-7.4 mHz) geomagnetic field fluctuations at high latitude. Frequency dependence of the polarization pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepidi, S.; Cafarella, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, L' Aquila (Italy); Francia, P. [L' Aquila Univ., L' Aquila (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-06-01

    A statistical analysis of the polarization pattern of low-frequency geomagnetic field fluctuations (0.7-7.4 m Hz) covering the entire 24-h interval was performed at the Antarctic station Terra Nova Bay (80.0{sup 0}S geomagnetic latitude) throughout 1997 and 1998. The results show that the polarization pattern exhibits a frequency dependence, as can be expected from the frequency dependence of the latitude where the coupling between the magnetospheric compressional mode and the field line resonance takes place. The polarization analysis of single pulsation events shows that wave packets with different polarization sense, depending on frequency, can be simultaneously observed.

  12. Chiral Low Frequency Resonance on an Anisotropically Conductive Cylinder with a Thin Longitudinal Slot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-29

    electromagnetic waves by a Narrow anisotropically conductive strip," Radiotekh. Elektron ., vol. 44, no. 7, pp. 800-805, 1999. [3] A. N. Sivov, A. D...Chuprin, and A. D. Shatrov, "Low-frequency resonance in a hollow circular cylinder with perfect conductivity along helical lines," Radiotekh. Elektron

  13. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Sounding for Planetary Volatiles (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    EM sounding is divided by loss tangent penetrating radars) and >> 1 (inductive methods). The former have high resolution and responses dominated by dielectric permittivity. They have been useful for sounding the polar caps of Mars and are very promising to image the shells of icy satellites as well as the uppermost crusts of silicate bodies. The latter have poorer resolution but greater penetration depth, responses dominated by electrical conductivity, and are the subject of this talk. Low-frequency inductive methods are further divided by comparing the source-receiver separation to the skin depth. Large separations are parametric in frequency so that the variation of EM response with frequency is translated to change in conductivity with depth. Parametric soundings can exploit natural sources from the solar wind, magnetosphere, ionosphere, or atmosphere. Small source-sensor separations are geometric with transmitter-receiver positions: both conductivity and permittivity can be recovered as a function of frequency (a dielectric spectrum), but at greater resource requirements. Subsurface liquid water is an optimal low-frequency EM target because even small quantities of dissolved ions make it a powerful electrical conductor compared to dry, resistive, silicate crusts. Water at kms or even tens of kms can be detected using the magnetotelluric, geomagnetic-depth sounding, or wave-tilt methods: these are all natural-source soundings using different combinations of field components and receiver geometries. If natural sources are weak or absent, a transmitter can be used to obtain high SNR; the time-domain EM (TDEM) method has been used extensively for terrestrial groundwater exploration. Using a ballistically deployed 200-m diameter transmitter loop, TDEM can detect groundwater at depths of several km. If landed in a region of strong local crustal magnetism, the characteristic Larmor frequency of liquid water can be detected with a TDEM-like setup using nuclear magnetic

  14. Intermodal parametric gain of degenerate four wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard

    2013-01-01

    Intermodal degenerate four wave mixing (FWM) is investigated numerically in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers. The dispersion is controlled independently of core size, and thus allows for power scaling of the FWM process.......Intermodal degenerate four wave mixing (FWM) is investigated numerically in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers. The dispersion is controlled independently of core size, and thus allows for power scaling of the FWM process....

  15. Mode Selectivity with Quantum-state-preserving Frequency Conversion Using Four-wave Mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Reddy, Dileep V.; McKinstrie, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    We consider quantum frequency conversion using four-wave mixing Bragg scattering and the prospects for multiplexing using the temporal modes.We find that there is an optimal strength parameter, but that the fiber length is less critical.......We consider quantum frequency conversion using four-wave mixing Bragg scattering and the prospects for multiplexing using the temporal modes.We find that there is an optimal strength parameter, but that the fiber length is less critical....

  16. Realization of Arbitrary Inverse Unitary Transformation of Single Mode Fibre by Using Three Wave Plates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shao-Kai; REN Ji-Gang; PENG Cheng-Zhi; JIANG Shuo; WANG Xiang-Bin

    2007-01-01

    We report a method to realize the arbitrary inverse unitary transformation imposed by a single-mode fibre on photon's polarization by the succession of two quarter-wave plates and a half-wave plate. The process of realization by polarization state vector. The method is meaningful in quantum communication experiment such as quantum teleportation, in which an unknown arbitrary quantum state should be kept to be unchanged in the case of using a single-mode fibre for time delay.

  17. Impact of neutron star crust on gravizational waves from the axial w-modes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen De-Hua; Fu Hong-Yang; Chen Wei

    2011-01-01

    The imprints of the neutron star crust on the gravitational waves emitted from the axial w-modes are investigated by adopting two typical equations of state (EOSs) of the crust matter and two representative EOSs of the core matter. It is shown that there is a significant effect of the crust EOSs on the gravitational waves from the axial w-mode oscillation for a stiff core EOS.

  18. The propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams in earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, R. L.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, the propagation and growth of whistler mode waves generated by electron beams within earth's bow shock is investigated using a planar model for the bow shock and a model electron distribution function. Within the shock, the model electron distribution function possesses a field-aligned T greater than T beam that is directed toward the magnetosheath. Waves with frequencies between about 1 and 100 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via Landau and anomalous cyclotron resonances. However, because the growth rate is small and because the wave packets traverse the shock quickly, these waves do not attain large amplitudes. Waves with frequencies between about 30 and 150 Hz with a wide range of wave normal angles are generated by the beam via the normal cyclotron resonance. The ray paths for most of these waves are directed toward the solar wind although some wave packets, due to plasma convection travel transverse to the shock normal. These wave packets grow to large amplitudes because they spend a long time in the growth region. The results suggest that whistler mode noise within the shock should increase in amplitude with increasing upstream theta sub Bn. The study provides an explanation for the origin of much of the whistler mode turbulence observed at the bow shock.

  19. The Generation of Coronal Loop Waves below the Photosphere by p-Mode Forcing

    CERN Document Server

    Hindman, Bradley W

    2008-01-01

    Recent observations of coronal-loop waves by TRACE and within the corona as a whole by CoMP clearly indicate that the dominant oscillation period is 5 minutes, thus implicating the solar p modes as a possible source. We investigate the generation of tube waves within the solar convection zone by the buffeting of p modes. The tube waves--in the form of longitudinal sausage waves and transverse kink waves--are generated on the many magnetic fibrils that lace the convection zone and pierce the solar photosphere. Once generated by p-mode forcing, the tube waves freely propagate up and down the tubes, since the tubes act like light fibers and form a waveguide for these magnetosonic waves. Those waves that propagate upward pass through the photosphere and enter the upper atmosphere where they can be measured as loop oscillations and other forms of propagating coronal waves. We treat the magnetic fibrils as vertically aligned, thin flux tubes and compute the energy flux of tube waves that can generated and driven in...

  20. Parametric instability induced by X-mode wave heating at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Zhou, Chen; Liu, Moran; Honary, Farideh; Ni, Binbin; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we present results of parametric instability induced by X-mode wave heating observed by EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association) radar at Tromsø, Norway. Three typical X-mode ionospheric heating experiments on 22 October 2013, 19 October 2012, and 21 February 2013 are investigated in details. Both parametric decay instability (PDI) and oscillating two-stream instability are observed during the X-mode heating period. We suggest that the full dispersion relationship of the Langmuir wave can be employed to analyze the X-mode parametric instability excitation. A modified kinetic electron distribution is proposed and analyzed, which is able to satisfy the matching condition of parametric instability excitation. Parallel electric field component of X-mode heating wave can also exceed the parametric instability excitation threshold under certain conditions.

  1. Low frequency signal spectrum analysis for strong earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Hayakawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    We examined changes in the spectral composition of the low frequency (LF subionospheric signals from the NRK transmitter (37.5 kHz in Iceland that were received in Bari (Italy relative to the earthquake that occurred in L’Aquila on April 6, 2009. In our previous studies, we have reported the occurrence of preseismic night-time anomalies using observations from three receivers located in Bari, Graz (Austria and Moscow (Russia. The strongest anomalies in the signals were observed in the NRK-Bari propagation path during the period 5-6 days before the L’Aquila earthquake, as well as during the series of aftershocks. During this period, similar very low frequency (VLF/LF amplitude anomalies were also observed along several other propagation paths that crossed the L’Aquila seismogenic zone. Spectral analysis of the LF signals filtered in the frequency range 0.28 mHz to 15 mHz shows differences in the spectra for seismo-disturbed days when compared to those for either quiet or geomagnetically disturbed days. These spectral anomalies, which are only observed in the propagation path between NRK and Bari, contain signals with periods of about 10 min to 20 min. These periodic signals are absent both in the spectra of the undisturbed signals for the control paths, and in the spectra of the signals received during geomagnetic storms. The same changes in the spectral composition were observed in the analysis of LF (40 kHz signals from the JJY transmitter in Japan that were received in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (Russia during the occurrence of three strong earthquakes with M ≥7.0. The results of this study support the theoretical prediction that the possible mechanism for energy penetration from the origin of an earthquake through the atmosphere and into the ionosphere is based on the excitation and upward propagation of internal gravity waves.

     

  2. Kinetic full wave analyses of O-X-B mode conversion of EC waves in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Atsushi; Khan, Shabbir Ahmad; Igami, Hiroe; Idei, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    For heating and current drive in a high-density plasma of tokamak, especially spherical tokamak, the use of electron Bernstein waves and the O-X-B mode conversion were proposed and experimental observations have been reported. In order to evaluate the power deposition profile and the current drive efficiency, kinetic full wave analysis using an integral form of dielectric tensor has been developed. The incident angle dependence of wave structure and O-X-B mode conversion efficiency is examined using one-dimensional analysis in the major radius direction. Two-dimensional analyses on the horizontal plane and the poloidal plane are also conducted, and the wave structure and the power deposition profile are compared with those of previous analyses using ray tracing method and cold plasma approximation. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP26630471.

  3. Plasma heating via electron Bernstein wave heating using ordinary and extraodinary mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically confined plasma can be heated with high power microwave sources. In spherical torus the electron plasma frequency exeeds the electron cyclotron frequency (EC and, as a consequence, electromagnetic waves at fundamental and low harmonic EC cannot propagate within the plasma. In contrast, electron Bernstein waves (EBWs readily propagate in spherical torus plasma and are absorbed strongly at the electron cyclotron resonances. In order to proagate EBWs beyond the upper hybrid resonance (UHR, that surrounds the plasma, the EBWs must convert via one of two processes to either ordinary (O-mode or extraordinary (X-mode electromagnetic waves. O-mode and X-mode electromagnetic waves lunched at the plasma edge can convert to the electron Bernstein waves (EBWs which can propagate without and cut-off into the core of the plasma and damp on electrons. Since the electron Bernstein wave (EBW has no cut-off limits, it is well suited to heat an over-dense plasma by resonant absorption. An important problem is to calculate mode conversion coefficient that is very sensitive to density. Mode conversion coefficient depends on Budden parameter ( ñ and density scale length (Ln in upper hybrid resonance (UHR. In Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, the optimized conversion efficiency approached 72.5% when Ln was 4.94 cm and the magnetic field was 0.475 Tesla in the core of the plasma.

  4. Application of Fault Location Mode Based on Travelling Waves for Neutral Non-effective Grounding Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>Fault location for distribution feeders short circuit especially single-phase grounding fault is an important task in distribution system with non-effectively grounded neutral.Fault location mode for distribution feeders using fault generated current and voltage transient traveling waves was investigated.The characteristics of transient traveling waves resulted from each short circuit fault and their transmission disciplinarian in distribution feeders are analyzed.This paper proposed that double end travelling waves theory which measures arriving time of fault initiated surge at both ends of the monitored line is fit for distribution feeders but single end traveling waves theory not.According to different distribution feeders,on the basis of analyzing original traveling waves reflection rule in line terminal, Current-voltage mode,voltage-voltage mode and current-current mode for fault location based on traveling waves are proposed and aerial mode component of original traveling waves is used to realize fault location.Experimental test verify the feasibility and correctness of the proposed method.

  5. Thermal chiral vortical and magnetic waves: new excitation modes in chiral fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2016-01-01

    In certain circumstances, chiral (parity-violating) medium can be described hydrodynamically as a chiral fluid with microscopic quantum anomalies. Possible examples of such systems include strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma, liquid helium 3He-A, neutron stars and the Early Universe. We study first-order hydrodynamics of a chiral fluid on a vortex background and in a external magnetic field. We show that there are two previously undiscovered modes describing heat waves propagating along the vortex and magnetic field. We call them the Thermal Chiral Vortical Wave and Thermal Chiral Magnetic Wave. We also identify known gapless excitations of density, the chiral vortical and chiral magnetic waves. We demonstrate that the velocity of the chiral vortical wave is zero, when the full hydrodynamic framework is applied, and hence the excitation reduces to a charge diffusion mode or is completely absent. We also correct the dispersion relation for the chiral magnetic wave.

  6. Emission of Whistler-mode waves and diffusion of electrons around interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, F.; Solomon, J.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Canu, P.; Scime, E. E.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.; Forsyth, R.

    1995-01-01

    Whistler-mode wave emissions are frequently observed at and downstream of interplanetary shocks. Using electron distribution functions measured onboard Ulysses in the energy range 1.6 to 862 eV, we calculate the temperature anisotropy and the wave growth rate of the electromagnetic electron cyclotron instability, Results of the calculations are compared to the whistler wave spectra observed simultaneously. For the studied events there is a good correlation between the wave growth rates and the wave spectra. Particularly, upstream of the shock front where no wave emissions are observed, the anisotropy lies below the wave instability threshold, i.e. the critical anisotropy Ac; on the contrary, downstream of the shock, the anisotropy exceeds Ac in some frequency range. Moreover. the tact that the anisotropy is close to Ac in a large frequency range gives prominence to the effect of velocity space diffusion of the electrons by the waves.

  7. A Study of Saturn's Normal Mode Oscillations and Their Forcing of Density Waves in the Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, Andrew James; Cao, Lyra

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) ring occultation profiles has revealed the presence of spiral density waves in Saturn's C ring that are consistent with being driven by gravitational perturbations associated with normal-mode oscillations of the planet [1]. These waves allow the C ring to serve as a sort of seismometer, since their pattern speeds (i.e., azimuthal phase speeds) can in principle be mapped onto the frequencies of the predominant normal oscillations of the planet. The resonant mode frequencies in turn are sensitive to Saturn's internal structure and rotational state. Characterization of the normal modes responsible for the forcing holds the potential to supply important new constraints on Saturn's internal structure and rotation. We perform numerical calculations to determine the resonant frequencies of the normal modes of a uniformly rotating planet for various assumptions regarding its internal stratification and compare the implied pattern speeds to those of density waves observed in the C ring. A question of particular interest that we address is whether quasi-toroidal modes are responsible for exciting a mysterious class of slowly propagating density waves in the ring. We also explore the implications of avoided crossings between modes for explaining observed fine splitting in the pattern speeds of spiral density waves having the same number of spiral arms, and weigh the role that convective overstability may play in exciting large-scale quasi-toroidal modes in Saturn. [1] Hedman, M.M. and Nicholson, P.D. 2014. MNRAS 444, 1369.

  8. Vibration-induced drop atomization and the numerical simulation of low-frequency single-droplet ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ashley J.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    2003-02-01

    Vibration-induced droplet ejection is a novel way to create a spray. In this method, a liquid drop is placed on a vertically vibrating solid surface. The vibration leads to the formation of waves on the free surface. Secondary droplets break off from the wave crests when the forcing amplitude is above a critical value. When the forcing frequency is small, only low-order axisymmetric wave modes are excited, and a single secondary droplet is ejected from the tip of the primary drop. When the forcing frequency is high, many high-order non-axisymmetric modes are excited, the motion is chaotic, and numerous small secondary droplets are ejected simultaneously from across the surface of the primary drop. In both frequency regimes a crater may form that collapses to create a liquid spike from which droplet ejection occurs. An axisymmetric, incompressible, Navier Stokes solver was developed to simulate the low-frequency ejection process. A volume-of-fluid method was used to track the free surface, with surface tension incorporated using the continuum-surface-force method. A time sequence of the simulated interface shape compared favourably with an experimental sequence. The dynamics of the droplet ejection process was investigated, and the conditions under which ejection occurs and the effect of the system parameters on the process were determined.

  9. Transformation of mode-2 internal solitary wave over a pseudo slope-shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Hung; Hsieh, Chih-Min; Hsu, John R.-C.; Hwang, Robert R.

    2017-09-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to investigate the effect of wave amplitude in a numerical wave tank on the evolution of a convex mode-2 internal solitary wave (ISW) propagating over a pseudo slope-shelf. A finite volume method based on a Cartesian grid system is adopted to solve the Navier-Stokes equations using Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation model for the turbulent closure. Numerical results reveal three types of waveform during wave generation on the flat bottom: (1) pseudo vortex shedding in the case of very large initial amplitude; (2) PacMan phenomenon in large amplitude; and (3) smooth mode-2 ISW for small amplitude. During wave propagation on the plateau, the first type of waveform induces a quasi-elevated mode-1 ISW; the second generates chaotic internal waves with significant reduction in amplitude; while the third renders a slightly deformed mode-2 ISW across the plateau. Moreover, the decrease in the magnitude of leading trough is more intense than that in the leading crest due to strong wave-obstacle interaction in the case of very large initial wave amplitude.

  10. ANALYSIS OF SENSITIVITY AND CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTI-MODE DISPERSION CURVES OF SURFACE WAVE%面波多模频散曲线的敏感性及特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨奎

    2012-01-01

    At present, surface wave exploration has been widely applied to the selection of site, the seismic safety evaluation, etc. More attention is paid to for the Raylcigh wave applications, but less attention is paid to the Love wave. The research in paper shows the analysis of sensitivity and characteristics of multi-mode dispersion wave of surface wave for the rate model and the low-velocity model, and achieved the media response of multi-mode wave in half-space models. The characteristics of base mode and higher mode in high frequency and low frequency were analyzed, and that refined the high frequency of multi-mode wave theory the lowest speed. Some general conclusions of surface wave supporting the surface wave are achieved.%面波勘探现在已经被广泛应用于工程选址及地震安全评价等方面,但其大多是针对Rayleigh波的应用,对Love波的关注较少.针对面波信息中的两种主要成份Rayleigh波和Love波对速度递增模型和存在低速层模型进行多模频散曲线的敏感性和特征分析,得到了多模式波对半空间介质模型和多层介质的响应特征,而且还对其基模式波和高模式波在高频和低频上的速度趋势进行了分析,细化了高频时的多模式波的理论最低速,得出了一些具有普遍性的结论,并为面波信息的综合利用提供了有力支持.

  11. Tracing p-mode Waves from the Photosphere to the Corona in Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junwei; Felipe, Tobías; Chen, Ruizhu; Khomenko, Elena

    2016-10-01

    Atmosphere above sunspots is abundant with different types of waves. Among these waves are running penumbral waves in the chromosphere, quasi-periodic oscillations in the lower coronal loops, and recently reported running waves in sunspots’ photosphere, all of which were interpreted as magnetoacoustic waves by some authors. Are these waves in different atmospheric layers related to each other, what is the nature of these waves, and where are the ultimate sources of these waves? Applying a time–distance helioseismic analysis over a suite of multi-wavelength observations above a sunspot, we demonstrate that the helioseismic p-mode waves are able to channel up from the photosphere through the chromosphere and transition region into the corona, and that the magnetoacoustic waves observed in different atmospheric layers are a same wave originating from the photosphere but exhibiting differently under different physical conditions. We also show waves of different frequencies travel along different paths, which can be used to derive the physical properties of the atmosphere above sunspots. Our numerical simulation of traveling of waves from a subphotospheric source qualitatively resembles the observed properties of the waves and offers an interpretation of the shapes of the wavefronts above the photosphere.

  12. Traveling Wave Modes of a Plane Layered Anelastic Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    variable in the standing wave free oscillation problem is the frequency , which makes the eigenvalue problem nonlinear. The choice of the wavenumber as...38) By making the assignment Irn = κn Iqn, (39) the quadratic generalized eigenvalue problem Eq. (34) can be converted to a linear generalized...elastic eigenfunctions and the complex frequency dependent elastic moduli. The lateral standing-wave nature of the earth free oscillation problem leads to

  13. Diffuse auroral precipitation by resonant interaction with electron cyclotron harmonic and whistler mode waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Singh, K. P.; Singh, O. N.

    2013-05-01

    Bounce-averaged pitch angle diffusion coefficients of electrons due to resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode waves have been calculated. Temporal growth rates obtained by solving the appropriate dispersion relation have been used to represent the distribution of wave energy with frequency. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L=4.6 and L=6.8. The results obtained suggest that ECH waves can put electrons on strong pitch angle diffusion at both spatial locations. However, at L=4.6, electrons with energy <100 eV and at L=6.8 electrons with energy up to ∼500 eV can be put on strong diffusion contributing to diffuse auroral precipitation. Whistler mode waves can put electrons of energy ≤5 keV on strong pitch angle diffusion at L=6.8 whereas at L=4.6 observed wave fields are insufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion. ECH waves contribute up to 17% of the total electron energy precipitation flux due to both ECH and whistler mode waves. A case study has been performed to calculate pitch angle diffusion coefficients using Gaussian function to represent wave energy distribution with frequency. It is found that, for electron energy <500 eV, the calculated diffusion coefficients using Gaussian function to represent ECH wave energy distribution are several orders of magnitude smaller or negligible as compared to diffusion coefficients calculated by temporal growth rates. However, the calculated pitch angle diffusion coefficients using Gaussian function for whistler mode wave energy distribution are in very good agreement with diffusion coefficients calculated by temporal growth rates. It is concluded that representing the ECH wave energy distribution with frequency by a Gaussian function grossly underestimates the low energy (<500 eV) electron precipitation flux due to ECH waves.

  14. Temperature Compensation of Aluminum Nitride Lamb Wave Resonators Utilizing the Lowest-Order Symmetric Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    82. D. P. Morgan, Surface- Wave Devices for Signal Processing, Holland: Elsevier, 1991. 83. L. E. McNeil, M. Grimsditch, and R. H. French ... Vibrational spectroscopy of aluminum nitride,” J. Am. Ceram. Soc., vol. 76, pp. 1132–1136, May 1993. 84. K. Hashimoto, Surface Acoustic Wave Devices in...Temperature Compensation of Aluminum Nitride Lamb Wave Resonators Utilizing the Lowest-Order Symmetric Mode Chih-Ming Lin Electrical Engineering and

  15. Electron Whistler Mode Waves Associated with Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jun; YU Bin; GUO Guang-Hai; ZHAO Bo

    2011-01-01

    @@ The results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are presented on the evolution of the electron whistler waves during the collisionless magnetic reconnection.The simulation results show that the electron whistler waves with frequency higher than the lower hybrid frequency are found to occur in the electrons outflow region.Moreover, the present results indicate that these electron whistler waves with high-frequency in the region greater than an ion inertial scale of the x-line are irrelevant to the fast reconnection, but are generated as a result of the reconnection processes.%The results of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are presented on the evolution of the electron whistler waves during the collisionless magnetic reconnection. The simulation results show that the electron whistler waves with frequency higher than the lower hybrid frequency are found to occur in the electrons outflow region. Moreover,the present results indicate that these electron whistler waves with high-frequency in the region greater than an ion inertial scale of the x-line are irrelevant to the fast reconnection, but are generated as a result of the reconnection processes.

  16. Spatial mode structures of electrostatic drift waves in a collisional cylindrical helicon plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, C.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.;

    2004-01-01

    In a cylindrical helicon plasma, mode structures of coherent drift waves are studied in the poloidal plane, the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The mode structures rotate with a constant angular velocity in the direction of the electron diamagnetic drift and show significant...

  17. Mode-Selective Wavelength Conversion Based on Four-Wave Mixing in a Multimode Silicon Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Xu, Jing; Ou, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    We report all-optical mode-selective wavelength conversion based on four-wave mixing in a multimode Si waveguide. A two-mode division multiplexing circuit using tapered directional coupler based (de)multiplexers is used for the application. Experimental results show clear eye-diagrams and moderate...

  18. Circumferential resonance modes of solid elastic cylinders excited by obliquely incident acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Honarvar, Farhang; Sinclair, Anthony N; Jafari, Mohammad-Reza

    2003-01-01

    When an immersed solid elastic cylinder is insonified by an obliquely incident plane acoustic wave, some of the resonance modes of the cylinder are excited. These modes are directly related to the incidence angle of the insonifying wave. In this paper, the circumferential resonance modes of such immersed elastic cylinders are studied over a large range of incidence angles and frequencies and physical explanations are presented for singular features of the frequency-incidence angle plots. These features include the pairing of one axially guided mode with each transverse whispering gallery mode, the appearance of an anomalous pseudo-Rayleigh in the cylinder at incidence angles greater than the Rayleigh angle, and distortional effects of the longitudinal whispering gallery modes on the entire resonance spectrum of the cylinder. The physical explanations are derived from Resonance Scattering Theory (RST), which is employed to determine the interior displacement field of the cylinder and its dependence on insonification angle.

  19. All-optical mode conversion via spatially-multimode four-wave mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Danaci, Onur; Glasser, Ryan T

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the conversion of a Gaussian beam to an approximate Bessel-Gauss mode by making use of a non-collinear four-wave mixing process in hot atomic vapor. The presence of a strong, spatially non-Gaussian pump both converts the probe beam into a non-Gaussian mode, and generates a conjugate beam that is in a similar non-Gaussian mode. The resulting probe and conjugate modes are compared to the output of a Gaussian beam incident on an annular aperture that is then spatially filtered according to the phase-matching conditions imposed by the four-wave mixing process. We find that the resulting experimental data agrees well with both numerical simulations, as well as analytical formulae describing the effects of annular apertures on Gaussian modes. These results show that spatially-multimode gain platforms may be used as a new method of mode conversion.

  20. One Atomic Beam as a Detector of Classical Harmonic Vibrations with Micro Amplitudes and Low Frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Werner

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simplest detector of harmonic vibrations with micro amplitudes and low frequencies, i.e. the detector consisting of one atomic beam. Here the atomic beam is induced by a plane harmonic wave and has a classical collective harmonic vibrations, which vibrant directions are perpendicular to the wave vectors of atomic beam. Compared with the detector consisting of atomic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the new detector has two advantages: (1) it is suitable for the detection of the harmonic vibrations induced either by a longitudinal plane harmonic wave or by a transverse plane harmonic wave; (2) the quantum noise fluctuation of the atomic beam is exactly zero.

  1. 典型甚低频电磁波对辐射带高能电子的散射损失效应%Diffusing loss effects of radiation b elt energetic electrons caused by typical very low frequency electromagnetic wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗旭东; 牛胜利; 左应红

    2015-01-01

    辐射带中高能电子与空间甚低频电磁波由于波粒共振相互作用发生投掷角散射,进而沉降入稠密大气而损失.为研究甚低频电磁波对辐射带中高能电子的散射作用机制,本文基于准线性扩散理论,利用库仑作用和波粒共振相互作用扩散系数的物理模型,得到了两组典型甚低频电磁波与高能电子波粒共振相互作用的赤道投掷角弹跳周期平均扩散系数,并分析了甚低频电磁波共振散射作用与大气库仑散射作用对不同磁壳及不同能量的辐射带电子扩散损失的影响规律.以磁壳参数L=2.2,能量E =0.5 MeV的辐射带电子作为算例,采用有限差分方法数值求解扩散方程,计算分析了电子单向通量和全向通量随时间的沉降损失演化规律.研究结果表明:当电子能量大于0.5 MeV,磁壳参数大于1.6时,甚低频电磁波的共振散射作用显著;随着磁壳参数或电子能量的增大,斜传播甚低频电磁波引起的高阶共振相互作用越来越大;电子全向通量近似随时间呈指数函数形式衰减.%Radiation belt energetic electrons can interact with very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic wave due to wave-particle resonance; then the particles are imposed to enter into the loss cone and sink to dense atmosphere resulting from changing of its pitch angle. To investigate the diffusion mechanism of interaction of VLF electromagnetic wave with radiation belt energetic electrons, according to quasi-linear diffusion theory, in this paper we use a physical model to calculate diffusion coefficients of Coulomb scatting and wave-particle resonance interaction. Bounce-averaged pitch angle diffusion coefficients of energetic electrons due to the interaction of wave-particle resonance with two groups of VLF electromagnetic waves are obtained. The influence of interaction caused by VLF electromagnetic wave and Coulomb scatting on diffusion of radiation belt energetic electrons for

  2. Elastic envelope inversion using multicomponent seismic data without low frequency

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Low frequency is a key issue to reduce the nonlinearity of elastic full waveform inversion. Hence, the lack of low frequency in recorded seismic data is one of the most challenging problems in elastic full waveform inversion. Theoretical derivations and numerical analysis are presented in this paper to show that envelope operator can retrieve strong low frequency modulation signal demodulated in multicomponent data, no matter what the frequency bands of the data is. With the be...

  3. Phased annular array transducers for omnidirectional guided wave mode control in isotropic plate like structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, Jaya P.; Momeni, Sepandarmaz; Rose, Joseph L.

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves are fast emerging as a reliable tool for continuous structural health monitoring. Their multi-modal nature along with their long range propagation characteristics offer several possibilities for interrogating structures. Transducers commonly used to generate guided waves in structures excite multiple modes at any frequency; their complex scattering and reflection from defects and boundaries often complicates the extraction of useful information. Often it is desirable to control the guided wave modes propagating in a structure to take advantage of their unique properties for different applications. Earlier attempts at guided wave mode control involved developing fixed wavelength linear and annular array transducers. Their only disadvantage is that the transducer is limited to a particular wavelength and a change in wavelength necessitates a change in the transducer. In this paper, we propose the development of an annular array transducer that can generate mode controlled omnidirectional guided waves by independently controlling the amplitude and phase of the array elements. A simplified actuator model that approximates the transducer loading on the structure to a constant pressure load under the array elements is assumed and an optimization problem is set up to compute the excitation voltage and phase of the elements. A five element annular array transducer is designed utilizing 1-3 type piezocomposite materials. The theoretical computations are experimentally verified on an aluminum plate like structure by exciting A0 and S0 guided wave modes.

  4. Study of Rotating-Wave Electromagnetic Modes for Applications in Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazco, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Rotating waves are circularly polarized electromagnetic wave fields that behave like traveling waves but have discrete resonant frequencies of standing waves. In JPL's Communications Ground Systems Section (333), we are making use of this peculiar type of electromagnetic modes to develop a new generation of devices and instruments for direct applications in space exploration. In this article, we present a straightforward analysis about the phase velocity of these wave modes. A derivation is presented for the azimuthal phase velocity of transverse magnetic rotating modes inside cylindrical cavity resonators. Computer simulations and experimental measurements are also presented that corroborate the theory developed. It is shown that the phase velocity of rotating waves inside cavity resonators increases with radial position within the cavity and decreases when employing higher-order operating modes. The exotic features of rotating modes, once better understood, have the potential to enable the implementation of a plethora of new devices that range from amplifiers and frequency multipliers to electron accelerators and ion thrusters.

  5. Wave Damping Observed in Upwardly Propagating Sausage-mode Oscillations Contained within a Magnetic Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Moreels, M. G.; Morton, R. J.; Christian, D. J.; Giagkiozis, I.; Verth, G.; Fedun, V.; Keys, P. H.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Erdélyi, R.

    2015-06-01

    We present observational evidence of compressible MHD wave modes propagating from the solar photosphere through to the base of the transition region in a solar magnetic pore. High cadence images were obtained simultaneously across four wavelength bands using the Dunn Solar Telescope. Employing Fourier and wavelet techniques, sausage-mode oscillations displaying significant power were detected in both intensity and area fluctuations. The intensity and area fluctuations exhibit a range of periods from 181 to 412 s, with an average period ˜290 s, consistent with the global p-mode spectrum. Intensity and area oscillations present in adjacent bandpasses were found to be out of phase with one another, displaying phase angles of 6.°12, 5.°82, and 15.°97 between the 4170 Å continuum-G-band, G-band-Na i D1, and Na i D1-Ca ii K heights, respectively, reiterating the presence of upwardly propagating sausage-mode waves. A phase relationship of ˜0° between same-bandpass emission and area perturbations of the pore best categorizes the waves as belonging to the “slow” regime of a dispersion diagram. Theoretical calculations reveal that the waves are surface modes, with initial photospheric energies in excess of 35,000 W m-2. The wave energetics indicate a substantial decrease in energy with atmospheric height, confirming that magnetic pores are able to transport waves that exhibit appreciable energy damping, which may release considerable energy into the local chromospheric plasma.

  6. Standing Slow-Mode Waves in Hot Coronal Loops: Observations, Modeling, and Coronal Seismology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Tongjiang

    2010-01-01

    Strongly damped Doppler shift oscillations are observed frequently associated with flarelike events in hot coronal loops. In this paper, a review of the observed properties and the theoretical modeling is presented. Statistical measurements of physical parameters (period, decay time, and amplitude) have been obtained based on a large number of events observed by SOHO/SUMER and Yohkoh/BCS. Several pieces of evidence are found to support their interpretation in terms of the fundamental standing longitudinal slow mode. The high excitation rate of these oscillations in small- or micro-flares suggest that the slow mode waves are a natural response of the coronal plasma to impulsive heating in closed magnetic structure. The strong damping and the rapid excitation of the observed waves are two major aspects of the waves that are poorly understood, and are the main subject of theoretical modeling. The slow waves are found mainly damped by thermal conduction and viscosity in hot coronal loops. The mode coupling seems ...

  7. Coupled analysis of high and low frequency resonant ultrasound spectroscopy: Application to the detection of defects in ceramic balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deneuville, Francois; Duquennoy, Marc; Ouaftouh, Mohammadi; Jenot, Frederic; Ourak, Mohamed [IEMN-DOAE (UMR CNRS 8520), Universite de Valenciennes, 59313 Valenciennes cedex 9 (France); Desvaux, Sebastien [SKF Aeroengine France, Z. I. no. 2, Rouvignies, 59309 Valenciennes (France)

    2009-05-15

    A coupled analysis of high and low frequency resonant ultrasound spectroscopy of spheroidal modes is presented in this paper. Experimentally, by using an ultrasonic probe for the excitation (piezoelectric transducer) and a heterodyne optic probe for the receiver (interferometer), it was possible to take spectroscopic measurements of spheroidal vibrations over a large frequency range of 100 kHz-45 MHz in a continuous regime. This wide analysis range enabled variations in velocity due to the presence of defects to be differentiated from the inherent characteristics of the balls and consequently, it offers the possibility of detecting cracks independently of production variations. This kind of defect is difficult to detect because the C-shaped surface crack is very small and narrow (500x5 {mu}m{sup 2}), and its depth does not exceed 50 {mu}m. The proposed methodology can excite spheroidal vibrations in the ceramic balls and detect such vibrations over a large frequency range. On the one hand, low frequency resonances are used in order to estimate the elastic coefficients of the balls according to various inspection depths. This method has the advantage of providing highly accurate evaluations of the elastic coefficients over a wide frequency range. On the other hand, high frequency vibrations are considered because they are similar to the surface waves propagating in the surface zone of the ceramic balls and consequently can be used to detect C-crack defects.

  8. A Resonant Mode for Gravitational Wave Detectors based on Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Peter W; Kasevich, Mark A; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wavepackets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes without changing hardware. For instance, a new binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to $\\Omega_\\text{GW} ...

  9. Survivability mode and extreme loads on the mooring lines of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeggiani, S.; Kofoed, J.P.

    2010-11-15

    This report is a product of the cooperation agreement between Wave Dragon and Aalborg University regarding phase 2 of the development of the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter. The research is carried out by testing the 1:51.8 scale model of the Wave Dragon, aiming at the assessment of the survivability of the device in extreme waves and evaluation of the design loads for the mooring component. The outcome of the research will be used as input for future research work aimed at the design of the mooring system and the certification of the structural design for the full scale Wave Dragon demonstrator. (Author)

  10. Spatio-temporal evolutions of non-orthogonal equatorial wave modes derived from observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Cory

    Equatorial waves have been studied extensively due to their importance to the tropical climate and weather systems. Historically, their activity is diagnosed mainly in the wavenumber-frequency domain. Recently, many studies have projected observational data onto parabolic cylinder functions (PCFs), which represent the meridional structure of individual wave modes, to attain time-dependent spatial wave structures. The non-orthogonality of wave modes has yet posed a problem when attempting to separate data into wave fields where the waves project onto the same structure functions. We propose the development and application of a new methodology for equatorial wave expansion of instantaneous flows using the full equatorial wave spectrum. By creating a mapping from the meridional structure function amplitudes to the equatorial wave class amplitudes, we are able to diagnose instantaneous wave fields and determine their evolution. Because all meridional modes are shared by some subset of the wave classes, we require constraints on the wave class amplitudes to yield a closed system with a unique solution for all waves' spatial structures, including IG waves. A synthetic field is analyzed using this method to determine its accuracy for data of a single vertical mode. The wave class spectra diagnosed using this method successfully match the correct dispersion curves even if the incorrect depth is chosen for the spatial decomposition. In the case of more than one depth scale, waves with varying equivalent depth may be similarly identified using the dispersion curves. The primary vertical mode is the 200 m equivalent depth mode, which is that of the peak projection response. A distinct spectral power peak along the Kelvin wave dispersion curve for this value validates our choice of equivalent depth, although the possibility of depth varying with time and height is explored. The wave class spectra diagnosed assuming this depth scale mostly match their expected dispersion curves

  11. Analytical and numerical studies of approximate phase velocity matching based nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves for the detection of evenly distributed microstructural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, X.; Tse, P. W.; Xu, G. H.; Tao, T. F.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-04-01

    Most previous studies on nonlinear Lamb waves are conducted using mode pairs that satisfying strict phase velocity matching and non-zero power flux criteria. However, there are some limitations in existence. First, strict phase velocity matching is not existed in the whole frequency bandwidth; Second, excited center frequency is not always exactly equal to the true phase-velocity-matching frequency; Third, mode pairs are isolated and quite limited in number; Fourth, exciting a single desired primary mode is extremely difficult in practice and the received signal is quite difficult to process and interpret. And few attention has been paid to solving these shortcomings. In this paper, nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves at low-frequency range satisfying approximate phase velocity matching is proposed for the purpose of overcoming these limitations. In analytical studies, the secondary amplitudes with the propagation distance considering the fundamental frequency, the maximum cumulative propagation distance (MCPD) with the fundamental frequency and the maximum linear cumulative propagation distance (MLCPD) using linear regression analysis are investigated. Based on analytical results, approximate phase velocity matching is quantitatively characterized as the relative phase velocity deviation less than a threshold value of 1%. Numerical studies are also conducted using tone burst as the excitation signal. The influences of center frequency and frequency bandwidth on the secondary amplitudes and MCPD are investigated. S1-S2 mode with the fundamental frequency at 1.8 MHz, the primary S0 mode at the center frequencies of 100 and 200 kHz are used respectively to calculate the ratios of nonlinear parameter of Al 6061-T6 to Al 7075-T651. The close agreement of the computed ratios to the actual value verifies the effectiveness of nonlinear S0 mode Lamb waves satisfying approximate phase velocity matching for characterizing the material nonlinearity. Moreover, the ratios derived from

  12. Air-Coupled Low Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers and Arrays with PMN-32%PT Piezoelectric Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rymantas J. Kazys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Air-coupled ultrasonic techniques are being increasingly used for material characterization, non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using guided waves as well as for distance measurements. Application of those techniques is mainly limited by the big losses of ultrasonic signals due to attenuation and mismatch of the acoustic impedances of ultrasonic transducers and air. One of the ways to solve this problem is by application of novel more efficient piezoelectric materials like lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT type crystals. The objective of this research was the development and investigation of low frequency (<50 kHz wide band air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and arrays with an improved performance using PMN-32%PT crystals. Results of finite element modelling and experimental investigations of the developed transducers and arrays are presented. For improvement of the performance strip-like matching elements made of low acoustic impedance, materials such as polystyrene foams were applied. It allowed to achieve transduction losses for one single element transducer −11.4 dB, what is better than of commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the acoustic fields radiated by the eight element ultrasonic array demonstrated not only a good performance of the array in a pulse mode, but also very good possibilities to electronically focus and steer the ultrasonic beam in space.

  13. Air-Coupled Low Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers and Arrays with PMN-32%PT Piezoelectric Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazys, Rymantas J.; Sliteris, Reimondas; Sestoke, Justina

    2017-01-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic techniques are being increasingly used for material characterization, non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using guided waves as well as for distance measurements. Application of those techniques is mainly limited by the big losses of ultrasonic signals due to attenuation and mismatch of the acoustic impedances of ultrasonic transducers and air. One of the ways to solve this problem is by application of novel more efficient piezoelectric materials like lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) type crystals. The objective of this research was the development and investigation of low frequency (<50 kHz) wide band air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and arrays with an improved performance using PMN-32%PT crystals. Results of finite element modelling and experimental investigations of the developed transducers and arrays are presented. For improvement of the performance strip-like matching elements made of low acoustic impedance, materials such as polystyrene foams were applied. It allowed to achieve transduction losses for one single element transducer −11.4 dB, what is better than of commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the acoustic fields radiated by the eight element ultrasonic array demonstrated not only a good performance of the array in a pulse mode, but also very good possibilities to electronically focus and steer the ultrasonic beam in space. PMID:28067807

  14. Air-Coupled Low Frequency Ultrasonic Transducers and Arrays with PMN-32%PT Piezoelectric Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazys, Rymantas J; Sliteris, Reimondas; Sestoke, Justina

    2017-01-06

    Air-coupled ultrasonic techniques are being increasingly used for material characterization, non-destructive evaluation of composite materials using guided waves as well as for distance measurements. Application of those techniques is mainly limited by the big losses of ultrasonic signals due to attenuation and mismatch of the acoustic impedances of ultrasonic transducers and air. One of the ways to solve this problem is by application of novel more efficient piezoelectric materials like lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) type crystals. The objective of this research was the development and investigation of low frequency (<50 kHz) wide band air-coupled ultrasonic transducers and arrays with an improved performance using PMN-32%PT crystals. Results of finite element modelling and experimental investigations of the developed transducers and arrays are presented. For improvement of the performance strip-like matching elements made of low acoustic impedance, materials such as polystyrene foams were applied. It allowed to achieve transduction losses for one single element transducer -11.4 dB, what is better than of commercially available air-coupled ultrasonic transducers. Theoretical and experimental investigations of the acoustic fields radiated by the eight element ultrasonic array demonstrated not only a good performance of the array in a pulse mode, but also very good possibilities to electronically focus and steer the ultrasonic beam in space.

  15. Whistler-Mode Waves Growth by a Generalized Relativistic Kappa-Type Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qing-Hua; JIANG Bin; SHI Xiang-Hua; LI Jun-Qiu

    2009-01-01

    The instability of field-aligned Whistler-mode waves in space plasmas is studied by using a recently developed generalized relativistic kappa-type (KT) distribution. Numerical calculations are performed for a direct compar-ison between the new KT distribution and the current kappa distribution. We show that the wave growth for the KT distribution tends to occur in the lower wave frequency (e.g., ω 0.1Ωe) due to a larger fractional num-ber of the resonant electrons ηrel (which controls the wave growth), while primarily locating in the higher wave frequency for the kappa distribution. Moreover, the relativistic anisotropy Arel by the KT distribution is found to be smaller than that by the kappa distribution, leading to a smaller peak of wave growth. The results present a further understanding of plasma wave instability particularly in those plasmas where relativistic electrons are present.

  16. Spatial-mode-interaction-induced dispersive-waves and their active tuning in microresonators

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Qi-Fan; Yang, Ki Youl; Vahala, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear propagation of optical pulses in dielectric waveguides and resonators provides a laboratory to investigate a wide range of remarkable interactions. Many of the resulting phenomena find applications in optical systems. One example is dispersive wave generation, the optical analog of Cherenkov radiation. These waves have an essential role in fiber spectral broadeners that are routinely used in spectrocopy and metrology. Dispersive waves form when a soliton pulse begins to radiate power as a result of higher-order dispersion. Recently, dispersive wave generation in microcavities has been reported by phase matching the waves to dissipative Kerr cavity (DKC) solitons. Here, it is shown that spatial mode interactions within a microcavity can also be used to induce dispersive waves. These interactions are normally avoided altogether in DKC soliton generation. The soliton self frequency shift is also shown to induce fine tuning control of the dispersive wave frequency. Both this mechanism and spatial mo...

  17. Rayleigh-wave mode separation by high-resolution linear radon transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Liu, J.; Liu, Q.

    2009-01-01

    Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method is an effective tool for obtaining vertical shear wave profiles from a single non-invasive measurement. One key step of the MASW method is generation of a dispersion image and extraction of a reliable dispersion curve from raw multichannel shot records. Because different Rayleigh-wave modes normally interfere with each other in the time and space domain, it is necessary to perform mode separation and reconstruction to increase the accuracy of phase velocities determined from a dispersion image. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of high-resolution linear Radon transform (LRT) as a means of separating and reconstructing multimode, dispersive Rayleigh-wave energy. We first introduce high-resolution LRT methods and Rayleigh-wave mode separation using high-resolution LRT. Next, we use synthetic data and a real-world example to demonstrate the effectiveness of Rayleigh-wave mode separation using high-resolution LRT. Our synthetic and real-world results demonstrate that (1) high-resolution LRT successfully separates and reconstructs multimode dispersive Rayleigh-wave energy with high resolution allowing the multimode energy to be more accurately determined. The horizontal resolution of the Rayleigh-wave method can be increased by extraction of dispersion curves from a pair of traces in the mode-separated shot gather and (2) multimode separation and reconstruction expand the usable frequency range of higher mode dispersive energy, which increases the depth of investigation and provides a means for accurately determining cut-off frequencies. ?? 2009 The Authors Journal compilation ?? 2009 RAS.

  18. Head-on collision of the second mode internal solitary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terletska, Kateryna; Maderich, Vladimir; Jung, Kyung Tae

    2017-04-01

    Second mode internal waves are widespread in offshore areas, and they frequently follow the first mode internal waves on the oceanic shelf. Large amplitude internal solitary waves (ISW) of second mode containing trapped cores associated with closed streamlines can also transport plankton and nutrients. An interaction of ISWs with trapped cores takes place in a specific manner. It motivated us to carry out a computational study of head-on collision of ISWs of second mode propagating in a laboratory-scale numerical tank using the nonhydrostatic 3D numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations for a continuously stratified fluid. Three main classes of ISW of second mode propagating in the pycnocline layer of thickness h between homogeneous deep layers can be identified: (i) the weakly nonlinear waves; (ii) the stable strongly nonlinear waves with trapped cores; and (iii) the shear unstable strongly nonlinear waves (Maderich et al., 2015). Four interaction regimes for symmetric collision were separated from simulation results using this classification: (A) an almost elastic interaction of the weakly nonlinear waves; (B) a non-elastic interaction of waves with trapped cores when ISW amplitudes were close to critical non-dimensional amplitude a/h; (C) an almost elastic interaction of stable strongly nonlinear waves with trapped cores; (D) non-elastic interaction of the unstable strongly nonlinear waves. The unexpected result of simulation was that relative loss of energy due to the collision was maximal for regime B. New regime appeared when ISW of different amplitudes belonged to class (ii) collide. In result of interaction the exchange of mass between ISW occurred: the trapped core of smaller wave was entrained by core of larger ISW without mixing forming a new ISW of larger amplitude whereas in smaller ISW core of smaller wave totally substituted by fluid from larger wave. Overall, the wave characteristics induced by head-on collision agree well with the

  19. Lunar Radar Cross Section at Low Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, P.; Kennedy, E. J.; Kossey, P.; McCarrick, M.; Kaiser, M. L.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Tokarev, Y. V.

    2002-01-01

    Recent bistatic measurements of the lunar radar cross-section have extended the spectrum to long radio wavelength. We have utilized the HF Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) radar facility near Gakona, Alaska to transmit high power pulses at 8.075 MHz to the Moon; the echo pulses were received onboard the NASA/WIND spacecraft by the WAVES HF receiver. This lunar radar experiment follows our previous use of earth-based HF radar with satellites to conduct space experiments. The spacecraft was approaching the Moon for a scheduled orbit perturbation when our experiment of 13 September 2001 was conducted. During the two-hour experiment, the radial distance of the satellite from the Moon varied from 28 to 24 Rm, where Rm is in lunar radii.

  20. Surface water waves interaction in a circular vessel with oscillating walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denissenko, Petr; Hsieh, Din-Yu

    1998-11-01

    Surface water waves appeared in a circular elastic vessel (modelled after the Chinese antique "Dragon Wash") are studied experimentally. Interaction of different wave modes are investigated. For small amplitude of wall oscillations, only the axisymmetric capillary wave mode, which is hardly visible to naked eyes, exists. When the amplitude is increased, half-frequency circumferential wave appears. Further increase of amplitude leads to chaotic behavior of surface waves. For large amplitudes, water drops jumping from edge regions are observed. Then, excitation of different modes of low frequency axisymmetric gravity waves may be obtained. Conditions for appearance of these gravity waves are investigated. Optical methods were applied for water surface diagnostics.

  1. Diffuse auroral electron scattering by electron cyclotron harmonic and whistler mode waves during an isolated substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R. B.; Thorne, R. M.; Meredith, N. P.; Anderson, R. R.

    2003-07-01

    There are two main theories for the origin of diffuse auroral electron precipitation: precipitation by electrostatic ECH waves and precipitation by whistler mode waves. Here we analyze a case event where whistler mode hiss, chorus, and ECH waves are intensified during a weak substorm injection event to identify the source of particle precipitation. Examination of the particle data shows that there are three sources of free energy: a temperature anisotropy, a loss cone, and a pancake distribution. Instability analysis shows that the temperature anisotropy excites whistler mode hiss whereas both the temperature anisotropy and the pancake distribution contribute to the excitation of chorus. ECH waves are driven unstable by the loss cone. Wave propagation studies show that the path integrated gain of hiss and chorus is almost unaffected by changes in the depth of the loss cone, whereas ECH waves are very sensitive. Analysis of the changes in the resonant energy during propagation shows that the hiss resonates with electrons above a few keV while chorus resonates below a few hundred eV. As a result, neither hiss nor chorus are likely to cause significant electron precipitation from a few hundred eV to a few keV for this event. On the other hand, ECH waves resonate with electrons in the energy range between that for chorus and hiss. ECH waves can scatter electrons with pitch angles of up to 80° into the loss cone. We conclude that ECH waves are responsible for the formation of the pancake distribution and are probably the main component of diffuse auroral precipitation during this event. We suggest that substorm-injected electrons are responsible for the intensification of hiss and ECH waves and that rapid scattering of electrons by ECH waves forms the pancake distribution which then excites chorus. We also suggest that rapid pitch angle scattering by ECH waves could be responsible for double frequency banded chorus emissions.

  2. Observation of Relativistic Electron Microbursts in Conjunction with Intense Radiation Belt Whistler-Mode Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, K.; Cattell, C. A.; Breneman, A.; Goetz, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Wygant, J. R.; Wilson, L. B., III; Blake, J. B.; Looper, M. D.; Roth, I.

    2011-01-01

    We present multi-satellite observations of large amplitude radiation belt whistler-mode waves and relativistic electron precipitation. On separate occasions during the Wind petal orbits and STEREO phasing orbits, Wind and STEREO recorded intense whistler-mode waves in the outer nightside equatorial radiation belt with peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 300 mV/m. During these intervals of intense wave activity, SAMPEX recorded relativistic electron microbursts in near magnetic conjunction with Wind and STEREO. This evidence of microburst precipitation occurring at the same time and at nearly the same magnetic local time and L-shell with a bursty temporal structure similar to that of the observed large amplitude wave packets suggests a causal connection between the two phenomena. Simulation studies corroborate this idea, showing that nonlinear wave.particle interactions may result in rapid energization and scattering on timescales comparable to those of the impulsive relativistic electron precipitation.

  3. Finite-Difference Simulation of Elastic Wave with Separation in Pure P- and S-Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Yang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastic wave equation simulation offers a way to study the wave propagation when creating seismic data. We implement an equivalent dual elastic wave separation equation to simulate the velocity, pressure, divergence, and curl fields in pure P- and S-modes, and apply it in full elastic wave numerical simulation. We give the complete derivations of explicit high-order staggered-grid finite-difference operators, stability condition, dispersion relation, and perfectly matched layer (PML absorbing boundary condition, and present the resulting discretized formulas for the proposed elastic wave equation. The final numerical results of pure P- and S-modes are completely separated. Storage and computing time requirements are strongly reduced compared to the previous works. Numerical testing is used further to demonstrate the performance of the presented method.

  4. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, A.; Peña Arellano, F. E.; Rodionov, A. V.; Shaner, M.; Sobacchi, E.; Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R.; Asadoor, M.; Bhawal, A.; Gong, P.; Kim, C.; Lottarini, A.; Minenkov, Y.; Murphy, C.

    2014-07-01

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  5. Design and initial characterization of a compact, ultra high vacuum compatible, low frequency, tilt accelerometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Toole, A., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Peña Arellano, F. E. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Rodionov, A. V.; Kim, C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Shaner, M.; Asadoor, M. [Mayfield Senior School, 500 Bellefontaine Street Pasadena, California 91105 (United States); Sobacchi, E. [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Dergachev, V.; DeSalvo, R., E-mail: amandajotoole@gmail.com, E-mail: riccardo.desalvo@gmail.com [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-36, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bhawal, A. [Arcadia High School, 180 Campus Drive, Arcadia, California 91007 (United States); Gong, P. [Department of Precision Instrument, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lottarini, A. [Department of Computer Science, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Minenkov, Y. [Sezione INFN Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientfica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Murphy, C. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, Perth, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2014-07-15

    A compact tilt accelerometer with high sensitivity at low frequency was designed to provide low frequency corrections for the feedback signal of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory active seismic attenuation system. It has been developed using a Tungsten Carbide ceramic knife-edge hinge designed to avoid the mechanical 1/f noise believed to be intrinsic in polycrystalline metallic flexures. Design and construction details are presented; prototype data acquisition and control limitations are discussed. The instrument's characterization reported here shows that the hinge is compatible with being metal-hysteresis-free, and therefore also free of the 1/f noise generated by the dislocation Self-Organized Criticality in the metal. A tiltmeter of this kind will be effective to separate the ground tilt component from the signal of horizontal low frequency seismometers, and to correct the ill effects of microseismic tilt in advanced seismic attenuation systems.

  6. Low frequency sound reproduction in irregular rooms using CABS (Control Acoustic Bass System)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celestinos, Adrian; Nielsen, Sofus Birkedal

    2011-01-01

    loudspeakers well positioned at the end of the room a virtual array is formed propagating plane waves along the length of the room in one direction. This will correct the sound field distribution in the room. When plane wave arrives to the end wall two more loudspeakers have to be placed connected......Early investigations on low frequency sound reproduction in rectangular rooms using CABS (Controlled Acoustic Bass System) have shown good results on simulations and measurements in real rooms. CABS takes the advantage of having a rectangular room with parallel walls. By using two low frequency...... with the same signal in counter phase and with a delay corresponding to approximately the length of the room. This is to cancel the reflection and maintain the plane wave propagating along the room. Real life rooms are not necessary rectangular and can be of different shapes. In this paper simulations...

  7. Reduced models of extratropical low-frequency variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strounine, Kirill

    Low-frequency variability (LFV) of the atmosphere refers to its behavior on time scales of 10-100 days, longer than the life cycle of a mid-latitude cyclone but shorter than a season. This behavior is still poorly understood and hard to predict. It has been helpful in gaining understanding that might improve prediction to use various simplified models. The present study compares and contrasts various mode reduction strategies that help derive systematically such simplified models of LFV. Three major strategies have been applied to reduce a fairly realistic, high-dimensional, quasi-geostrophic, 3-level (QG3) atmospheric model to lower dimensions: (i) a purely empirical, multi-level regression procedure, which specifies the functional form of the reduced model and finds the model coefficients by multiple polynomial regression; (ii) an empirical-dynamical method, which retains only a few components in the projection of the full QG3 model equations onto a specified basis (the so-called bare truncation), and finds the linear deterministic and additive stochastic corrections empirically; and (iii) a dynamics-based technique, employing the stochastic mode reduction strategy of Majda et al. (2001; MTV). Subject to the assumption of significant time-scale separation in the physical system under consideration, MTV derives the form of the reduced model and finds its coefficients with minimal statistical fitting. The empirical-dynamical and dynamical reduced models were further improved by sequential parameter estimation and benchmarked against multi-level regression models; the extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used for the parameter estimation. In constructing the reduced models, the choice of basis functions is also important. We considered as basis functions a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These EOFs were computed using (a) an energy norm; and (b) a potential-enstrophy norm. We also devised a method, using singular value decomposition of the full

  8. Massive, massless and ghost modes of gravitational waves from higher-order gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanos, Charalampos; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia; Nesseris, Savvas

    2009-01-01

    We linearize the field equations for higher order theories that contain scalar invariants other than the Ricci scalar. We find that besides a massless spin-2 field (the standard graviton), the theory contains also spin-0 and spin-2 massive modes with the latter being, in general, ghost modes. Then, we investigate the possible detectability of such additional polarization modes of a stochastic gravitational wave by ground-based and space interferometric detectors. Finally, we extend the formalism of the cross-correlation analysis, including the additional polarization modes, and calculate the detectable energy density of the spectrum for a stochastic background of the relic gravity waves that corresponds to our model. For the situation considered here, we find that these massive modes are certainly of interest for direct detection by the LISA experiment.

  9. Exploitation of transverse spatial modes in spontaneous four wave mixing photon-pair sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramirez, Hector; Ramirez-Alarcon, Roberto; Cruz-Delgado, Daniel; Monroy-Ruz, Jorge; Ortiz-Ricardo, Erasto; Dominguez-Serna, Francisco; Garay-Palmett, Karina; U'Ren, Alfred B.

    2016-09-01

    We present a source for which multiple spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) processes are supported in a few mode birefringent fiber, each process associated with a particular combination of transverse modes for the four participating waves. Within the weakly guiding regime, for which the propagation modes may be well approximated by linearly polarized (LP) modes, the departure from circular symmetry due to the fiber birefringence translates into orbital angular momentum (OAM) and parity conservation rules, i.e. reflecting elements from both azimuthal and rectangular symmetries. In our source: i) each process is group-velocity-matched so that it is, by design, nearly-factorable, and ii) the spectral separation between neighboring processes is greater than the marginal spectral width of each process. Consequently, there is a direct correspondence between the joint amplitude of each process and each of the Schmidt mode pairs of the overall two-photon state. The present paper covers work presented in Refs.1 and.2

  10. Guided Waves in Asymmetric Hyperbolic Slab Waveguides. The TM Mode Case

    CERN Document Server

    Lyashko, Ekaterina I

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear guided wave modes in an asymmetric slab waveguide formed by an isotropic dielectric layer placed on a linear or nonlinear substrate and covered by a hyperbolic material are investigated. Optical axis is normal to the slab plane. The dispersion relations for TM waves are found. It is shown that there are additional cut-off frequencies for each TM mode. The effects of the nonlinearity on the dispersion relations are investigated and discussed. There are the modes, which are corresponded with situation where the peak of electric field is localized in the nonlinear substrate. These modes are absent in the linear waveguide. To excite these modes the power must exceed certain threshold value.

  11. Color M-mode and pulsed wave tissue Doppler echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, J E; Søndergaard, E; Poulsen, S H;

    2001-01-01

    To assess the association between color M-mode flow propagation velocity and the early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E(m)) obtained with tissue Doppler echocardiography and to assess the prognostic implications of the indexes, echocardiography was performed on days 1 and 5, and 1 and 3 months...

  12. Transformed eddy-PV flux and positive synoptic eddy feedback onto low-frequency flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Hong-Li [University of Hawaii, School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology, Honolulu, HI (United States); China Meteorological Administration, Laboratory for Climate Studies, National Climate Center, Beijing (China); Jin, Fei-Fei [University of Hawaii, School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology, Honolulu, HI (United States); Kug, Jong-Seong [Korea Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Gao, Li [University of Hawaii, School of Ocean and Earth Sciences and Technology, Honolulu, HI (United States); China Meteorological Administration, Numerical Prediction Center, National Meteorological Center, Beijing (China)

    2011-06-15

    Interaction between synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) has been the subject of many studies. In this study, we further examine the interaction by introducing a transformed eddy-potential-vorticity (TEPV) flux that is obtained from eddy-potential-vorticity flux through a quasi-geostrophic potential-vorticity inversion. The main advantage of using the TEPV flux is that it combines the effects of the eddy-vorticity and heat fluxes into the net acceleration of the low-frequency flow in such a way that the TEPV flux tends to be analogous to the eddy-vorticity fluxes in the barotropic framework. We show that the anomalous TEPV fluxes are preferentially directed to the left-hand side of the low-frequency flow in all vertical levels throughout the troposphere for monthly flow anomalies and for climate modes such as the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Furthermore, this left-hand preference of the TEPV flux direction is a convenient three-dimensional indicator of the positive reinforcement of the low-frequency flow by net eddy-induced acceleration. By projecting the eddy-induced net accelerations onto the low-frequency flow anomalies, we estimate the eddy-induced growth rates for the low frequency flow anomalies. This positive eddy-induced growth rate is larger (smaller) in the lower (upper) troposphere. The stronger positive eddy feedback in the lower troposphere may play an important role in maintaining an equivalent barotropic structure of the low-frequency atmospheric flow by balancing some of the strong damping effect of surface friction. (orig.)

  13. Transformed eddy-PV flux and positive synoptic eddy feedback onto low-frequency flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hong-Li; Jin, Fei-Fei; Kug, Jong-Seong; Gao, Li

    2011-06-01

    Interaction between synoptic eddy and low-frequency flow (SELF) has been the subject of many studies. In this study, we further examine the interaction by introducing a transformed eddy-potential-vorticity (TEPV) flux that is obtained from eddy-potential-vorticity flux through a quasi-geostrophic potential-vorticity inversion. The main advantage of using the TEPV flux is that it combines the effects of the eddy-vorticity and heat fluxes into the net acceleration of the low-frequency flow in such a way that the TEPV flux tends to be analogous to the eddy-vorticity fluxes in the barotropic framework. We show that the anomalous TEPV fluxes are preferentially directed to the left-hand side of the low-frequency flow in all vertical levels throughout the troposphere for monthly flow anomalies and for climate modes such as the Arctic Oscillation (AO). Furthermore, this left-hand preference of the TEPV flux direction is a convenient three-dimensional indicator of the positive reinforcement of the low-frequency flow by net eddy-induced acceleration. By projecting the eddy-induced net accelerations onto the low-frequency flow anomalies, we estimate the eddy-induced growth rates for the low frequency flow anomalies. This positive eddy-induced growth rate is larger (smaller) in the lower (upper) troposphere. The stronger positive eddy feedback in the lower troposphere may play an important role in maintaining an equivalent barotropic structure of the low-frequency atmospheric flow by balancing some of the strong damping effect of surface friction.

  14. High-Energy Four-Wave Mixing, with Large-Mode-Area Higher-Order Modes in Optical Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Steinvurzel, P. E.; Chen, Y.;

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate, for the first time, four-wave mixing, in the 1-μm spectral regime, in an LMA silica fiber. Pumping a 618-μm2 LP07 mode (λo = 1038.4 nm) with a 1064.6-nm Nd:YAG laser results in the generation of modulation instability, and multiple Stokes/anti-Stokes lines, opening up the prospect...

  15. Observational evidence for travelling wave modes bearing distance proportional shifts

    CERN Document Server

    Guruprasad, V

    2015-01-01

    Discrepancies of range between the Space Surveillance Network radars and the Deep Space Network in tracking the 1998 earth flyby of NEAR, and between ESA's Doppler and range data in Rosetta's 2009 flyby, reveal a consistent excess delay, or lag, equal to instantaneous one-way travel time in the telemetry signals. These lags readily explain all details of the flyby anomaly, and are shown to be symptoms of chirp d'Alembertian travelling wave solutions, relating to traditional sinusoidal waves by a rotation of the spectral decomposition due to the clock acceleration caused by the Doppler rates during the flybys. The lags thus relate to special relativity, but yield distance proportional shifts like those of cosmology at short range.

  16. Propagation of Superluminous L-O Mode Waves During Geomagnetic Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fuliang; CHEN Lunjin; ZHENG Huinan; ZHOU Qinghua; WANG Shui

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the azimuthal angle ψ of the wave vector k on the propagation characteristics of the superluminous L-O mode waves (together with a case of the R-X mode) during different geomagnetic activities using a three-dimensional (3D) ray-tracing method is investigated.This work is primarily an extension of our previous two-dimensional study in which the wave azimuthal angle was not considered.We present numerical simulations for this mode which is generated in the source cavity along a 70° night geomagnetic field line at the specific altitude of 1.5RE (where RE is the Earth's radius).It is found that,as in the two-dimensional case,the trajectory of L-O mode starting in the source meridian plane (or the wave azimuthal angle ψ=180°) can reach the lowest latitude;whereas it basically stays at relatively higher latitudes starting off the source meridian plane (or ψ≠180°).The results reveal that under appropriate conditions,the superluminous L-O mode waves may exist in the radiation belts of the Earth,but this remains to be supplemented by observational data.

  17. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  18. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  19. High Sensitivity Very Low Frequency Receiver for Earthquake Data Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, A.; Najmurrokhman, A.

    2017-03-01

    high sensitivity very low frequency (VLF) receiver is developed based on AD744 monolithic operational amplifier (Op-Amp) for earthquake data acquisition. In research related natural phenomena such as atmospheric noise, lightning and earthquake, a VLF receiver particularly with high sensitivity is utterly required due to the low power of VLF wave signals received by the antenna. The developed receiver is intended to have high sensitivity reception for the signals in frequency range of 10-30kHz allocated for earthquake observation. The VLF receiver which is portably designed is also equipped with an output port connectable to the soundcard of personal computer for further data acquisition. After obtaining the optimum design, the hardware realization is implemented on a printed circuit board (PCB) for experimental characterization. It shows that the sensitivity of realized VLF receiver is almost linear in the predefined frequency range for the input signals lower than -12dBm and to be quadratic for the higher level input signals.

  20. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  1. Impacts of SST and SST Anomalies on Low-Frequency Oscillation in the Tropical Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Jinhai; YU Jingjing; SHEN Xinyong

    2007-01-01

    Considering the multiscale character of LFO (low-frequency oscillation) in the tropical atmosphere, the effects of SST on LFO in the tropical atmosphere are discussed by using an absolute ageostrophic, baroclinic model. Here, SST effects include sea surface heating and forcing of SST anomalies (SSTAs). Studies of the influences of sea surface heating on LFO frequency and stability show that sea surface heating can slow the speed of waves and lower their frequency when SST is comparatively low; while higher SST leads to unstable waves and less periods of LFO. Since the impact of a SSTA on ultra-long waves is more evident than that on kilometer-scale waves, long-wave approximation is used when we continue to study the effect of SSTAs. Results indicate that SSTAs can lead to a longer period of LFO, and make waves unstable. In other words,positive (negative) SSTAs can make waves decay (grow).

  2. Low-frequency high-definition power Doppler in visualizing and defining fetal pulmonary venous connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; He, Yihua; Li, Zhian; Gu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lianzhong

    2014-07-01

    The use of low-frequency high-definition power Doppler in assessing and defining pulmonary venous connections was investigated. Study A included 260 fetuses at gestational ages ranging from 18 to 36 weeks. Pulmonary veins were assessed by performing two-dimensional B-mode imaging, color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI), and low-frequency high-definition power Doppler. A score of 1 was assigned if one pulmonary vein was visualized, 2 if two pulmonary veins were visualized, 3 if three pulmonary veins were visualized, and 4 if four pulmonary veins were visualized. The detection rate between Exam-1 and Exam-2 (intra-observer variability) and between Exam-1 and Exam-3 (inter-observer variability) was compared. In study B, five cases with abnormal pulmonary venous connection were diagnosed and compared to their anatomical examination. In study A, there was a significant difference between CDFI and low-frequency high-definition power Doppler for the four pulmonary veins observed (P frequency high-definition power Doppler was higher than that when employing two-dimensional B-mode imaging or CDFI. There was no significant difference between the intra- and inter-observer variabilities using low-frequency high-definition power Doppler display of pulmonary veins (P > 0.05). The coefficient correlation between Exam-1 and Exam-2 was 0.844, and the coefficient correlation between Exam-1 and Exam-3 was 0.821. In study B, one case of total anomalous pulmonary venous return and four cases of partial anomalous pulmonary venous return were diagnosed by low-frequency high-definition power Doppler and confirmed by autopsy. The assessment of pulmonary venous connections by low-frequency high-definition power Doppler is advantageous. Pulmonary venous anatomy can and should be monitored during fetal heart examination.

  3. MYOELECTRIC ALTERATIONS AFTER VOLUNTARY INDUCED HIGH - AND LOW - FREQUENCY FATIGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Strojnik

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to find whether voluntary induced high- and low-frequency peripheral fatigue exhibit specific alteration in surface EMG signal (SEMG during evoked and maximum voluntary contractions. Ten male students of physical education performed 60 s long stretch-shortening cycle (SSC exercise with maximal intensity and 30 s long concentric (CON exercise with maximal intensity. To verify voluntary induced peripheral fatigue, knee torques during low- (T20 and high-frequency electrical stimulation (T100 of relaxed vastus lateralis muscle (VL were obtained. Contractile properties of the VL were measured with passive twitch and maximal voluntary knee extension test (MVC. Changes in M-waves and SEMG during MVC test were used to evaluate the differences in myoelectrical signals. T100/T20 ratio decreased by 10.9 ± 8.4 % (p < 0.01 after the SSC exercise and increased by 35.9 ± 17.5 % (p < 0.001 after the CON exercise. Significant SEMG changes were observed only after the CON exercise where peak to peak time of the M-waves increased by 9.2 ± 13.3 % (p < 0.06, SEMG amplitude during MVC increased by 32.9 ± 21.6 % (p < 0.001 and SEMG power spectrum median frequency decreased by 11.0 ± 10.5 % (p < 0.05. It is concluded that high frequency fatigue wasn't reflected in SEMG, however the SEMG changes after the CON seemed to reflect metabolic changes due to acidosis

  4. Surfing gravitational waves: can bigravity survive growing tensor modes?

    CERN Document Server

    Amendola, Luca; Martinelli, Matteo; Pettorino, Valeria; Zumalacarregui, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The theory of bigravity offers one of the simplest possibilities to describe a massive graviton while having self-accelerating cosmological solutions without a cosmological constant. However, it has been shown recently that bigravity is affected by early-time fast growing modes on the tensor sector. Here we argue that we can only trust the linear analysis up to when perturbations are in the linear regime and use a cut-off to stop the growing of the metric perturbations. This analysis, although more consistent, still leads to growing tensor modes that are unacceptably large for the theory to be compatible with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), both in temperature and polarization spectra. In order to suppress the growing modes and make the model compatible with CMB spectra, we find it necessary to either fine-tune the initial conditions, modify the theory or set the cut-off for the tensor perturbations of the second metric much lower than unity. Initial conditions such that the growing mod...

  5. The influences of low frequency noise on mental performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hatami

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Although the evolution of industrial systems toward digital technologies decreased the exposure to high levels of noise, it has created some problems encountered with low level and provoking noise (low frequency noise. In the present work, the mental performance of students exposed to low frequency and reference noises at low and high levels (45 & 65 dB were studied. Additionally, other factors such as annoyance, sensitivity to low frequency noise and hearing status of participants were considered.Materials and Methods: After generating low frequency and reference noises required for the study, a pilot study was conducted. Then, 54 students participated in the main study after preliminary tests. Their mental performances were evaluated with standard psychological tests while they were exposed to low frequency and reference noises at 45 and 65 dBA.Results: The results showed that noise annoyance and low frequency noise sensitivity do not have a significant correlation with age and sex. The results also revealed that, low frequency noise at 65 dB can decrease concentration (P=0.003 and increase response time (P=0.039 of performance in comparison with low frequency noise at 45 dB. On the other hand, reference noise at 65 dB can increase speed (P<0.001 of performance in comparison with reference noise at 45 dB.Conclusion: Low frequency noise can reduce the mental performance and increase its response time.Key words: Low Frequency Noise, Reference Noise, Noise Annoyance, Mental PerformanceJ Mazand Univ Med Sci 2008; 18(63: 55-65(Persian

  6. Plasma production by helicon waves with single mode number in low magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, G; Hatakeyama, R; Sato, Genta; Oohara, Wataru; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2004-01-01

    Radio-frequency discharges are performed in low magnetic fields (0-10 mT) using three types of helicon-wave exciting antennas with the azimuthal mode number of $|m|$ = 1. The most pronounced peak of plasma density is generated in the case of phased helical antenna at only a few mT, where the helicon wave with $|m| = 1$ is purely excited and propagates. An analysis based on the dispersion relation well explains the density-peak phenomenon in terms of the correspondence between the antenna one-wavelength and the helicon wavelength. The $m=+1$ helicon wave propagates even in high magnetic fields where the density peaks are not observed, but the $m=-1$ helicon wave disappers. It is expected theoretically that the $m=-1$ helicon wave shows cutoff behavior in a low density region, [M. Kramer, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1052 (1999)], and the cutoff of $m=-1$ helicon wave experimentally observed coincides with the calculated one.

  7. Consideration of some factors affecting low-frequency fuselage noise transmission for propeller aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixson, J. S.; Roussos, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    Possible reasons for disagreement between measured and predicted trends of sidewall noise transmission at low frequency are investigated using simplified analysis methods. An analytical model combining incident plane acoustic waves with an infinite flat panel is used to study the effects of sound incidence angle, plate structural properties, frequency, absorption, and the difference between noise reduction and transmission loss. Analysis shows that these factors have significant effects on noise transmission but they do not account for the differences between measured and predicted trends at low frequencies. An analytical model combining an infinite flat plate with a normally incident acoustic wave having exponentially decaying magnitude along one coordinate is used to study the effect of a localized source distribution such as is associated with propeller noise. Results show that the localization brings the predicted low-frequency trend of noise transmission into better agreement with measured propeller results. This effect is independent of low-frequency stiffness effects that have been previously reported to be associated with boundary conditions.

  8. Delamination detection in composite laminates using dispersion change based on mode conversion of Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Yoji; Fujibayashi, Keiji; Shimazaki, Mamoru; Soejima, Hideki; Ogisu, Toshimichi

    2010-11-01

    A new ultrasonic propagation system has been constructed using macrofiber composite (MFC) actuators and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The MFCs and FBGs can be integrated into composite laminates because of their small size and high fracture strain. The developed system can send and receive broadband Lamb waves. In this research, this system was used to detect delamination damage in composite laminates. First, the multiple modes of Lamb waves in a carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) quasi-isotropic laminate were identified by transmitting and receiving the symmetric and antisymmetric modes separately. Then, the mode conversions at both tips of a delamination were investigated through an experiment and a two-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA). A new delamination detection method was proposed on the basis of the mode conversions, and experiments were carried out on laminates with an artificial delamination. When antisymmetric modes were excited, the frequency dispersion of the received A1 mode changed, depending on the delamination length owing to the mode conversion between the A1 mode and the S0 mode. This phenomenon was confirmed through the FEA and these results prove that this new method is effective in detecting a delamination in CFRP laminates.

  9. Higher-order Laguerre-Gauss mode generation and interferometry for gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Granata, Massimo; Ward, Robert; Barsuglia, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first demonstration of higher-order Laguerre-Gauss (LG) mode generation and interferometry in a table-top experimental setup and in a manner scalable to the requirements of gravitational wave detection. Because higher-order LG modes have a wider spatial profile than the fundamental Gaussian mode, interferometric gravitational wave detectors which use higher-order LG modes will be less susceptible to mirror thermal noise, which is expected to limit the sensitivity of all currently planned terrestrial detectors. In our experiment we used a diffractive optical element to convert a fundamental LG00 Gaussian beam into an LG33 mode, with a purity of 88%. We then injected this mode into a mode-cleaner cavity, increasing the purity of the transmitted LG33 beam up to 98%. The ratio between the power of the LG00 mode delivered by our laser and the power of the LG33 transmitted by the cavity was 36%. By measuring the transmission of our setup using the LG00 mode, we inferred that the conversion efficien...

  10. Use of low-frequency Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for the quantification of crystallinity in amorphous griseofulvin tablets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mah, Pei T.; Fraser, Sara J.; Reish, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which directly probes phonon lattice modes of crystal structures, has much unexplored potential for sensitive qualitative and quantitative analysis of crystallinity in drugs and excipients. In this study, the level of crystallinity in tablets containing amorphous......, the much stronger Raman scattering in the low-frequency region combined with the intrinsic spectral differences between amorphous and crystalline materials may prove advantageous for some analyses.......Low-frequency Raman spectroscopy, which directly probes phonon lattice modes of crystal structures, has much unexplored potential for sensitive qualitative and quantitative analysis of crystallinity in drugs and excipients. In this study, the level of crystallinity in tablets containing amorphous...... in stored amorphous samples earlier than the mid-frequency 785 nm Raman system. Overall, this study suggests that low-frequency Raman spectroscopy has at least equally good performance compared to mid-frequency Raman for quantitative analysis of crystallinity in the pharmaceutical setting. More generally...

  11. Extreme Loads on the Mooring Lines and Survivability Mode for the Wave Dragon Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Stefano; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Friis-Madsen, E.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main challenges Wave Energy Converters have to face on the road towards commercialization is to ensure survivability in extreme condition at a reasonable capital costs. For a floating device like the Wave Dragon, a reliable mooring system is essential. The control strategy of the Wave...... by approximately 20-30% by lowering the crest level and balancing the device to lean a little towards the front....

  12. What can we Learn From Dynamic Triggering of Low-Frequency Earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, M.; Brodsky, E. E.; Mori, J.

    2008-12-01

    Remote triggering of small low-frequency seismic events near the seismic-aseismic transition zone of subduction zones, by surface waves from large distant earthquakes, has been reported in southwest Japan and the Cascadia region. Recent observed triggering in southwest Japan from three large earthquakes (2003 Tokachi-oki (Mw 8.1), 2007 Solomon (Mw 8.1), and 2008 Wenchuan (Mw 7.9)) covering wide azimuthal information that is necessary to distinguish the triggering processes, shows significant triggering from Rayleigh waves rather than Love waves. This observation provides strong evidence for the influence of fluids in the source area because fluid can be affected by normal stress changes and not by shear stress changes. In the Cascadia region, it has been reported that seismic tremor associated with episodic slip is triggered by shear stress changes from Love waves. The low-frequency events both in southwest Japan and the Cascade region are though to be fluid related events. The Coulomb failure stress analyses suggest the effective friction coefficient is large for southwest Japan and small for the Cascadia region, which could be related to the amount of fluid in the source regions of the low-frequency events.

  13. Diffusion Simulation of Outer Radiation Belt Electron Dynamics Induced by Superluminous L-O Mode Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fu-Liang; HE Zhao-Guo; ZHANG Sai; SU Zhen-Peng; CHEN Liang-Xu

    2011-01-01

    Temporal evolution of outer radiation belt electron dynamics resulting from superluminous L-O mode waves is simulated at L=6.5. Diffusion rates are evaluated and then used as inputs to solve a 2D momentum-pitch-angle diffusion equation, particularly with and without cross diffusion terms. Simulated results demonstrate that phase space density(PSD) of energetic electrons due to L-O mode waves can enhance significantly within 24 h, covering a broader pitch-angle range in the absence of cross terms than that in the presence of cross terms. PSD evolution is also determined by the peak wave frequency, particularly at high kinetic energies. This result indicates that superluminous waves can be a potential candidate responsible for outer radiation belt electron dynamics.

  14. Dynamic evolution of outer radiation belt electrons driven by superluminous R-X mode waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present initial results on the temporal evolution of the phase space density (PSD) of the outer radiation belt energetic electrons driven by the superluminous R-X mode waves. We calculate diffusion rates in pitch angle and momentum assuming the standard Gaussian distributions in both wave frequency and wave normal angle at the location L=6.5. We solve a 2D momentum-pitch-angle Fokker-Planck equation using those diffusion rates as inputs. Numerical results show that R-X mode can produce significant acceleration of relativistic electrons around geostationary orbit,supporting previous findings that superluminous waves potentially contribute to dramatic variation in the outer radiation belt electron dynamics.

  15. Ion-Acoustic Wave Scattering description using Case-Van Kampen modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Skiff, Fred

    2016-10-01

    We present an experimental characterization of the ion acoustic wave scattering using Case-Van Kampen modes. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical, magnetized, singly-ionized Argon inductively-coupled gas discharge plasma that is weakly collisional with typical conditions: n 109cm-3 Te 7 eV and B 1 kG. A 5 ring antenna with diameter similar to the plasma diameter is used for launching the waves. A survey of the ion velocity distribution function's zeroth and first order as well as density fluctuations at different frequencies is done using Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) as the main diagnostics method. Analysis of the scattering of the waves and its dependence on wave frequency is done utilizing Case-Van Kampen modes and the use of Morrison's G-transform. This research is supported by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DOE DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  16. Laser vibrometer measurement of guided wave modes in rail track

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Loveday, PW

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available in 19 rails [11]. Development of transducers or transducer arrays to effectively excite or 20 sense specific modes of propagation may also be based on SAFE models of the rail. 21 Three – dimensional finite elements were used to model piezoelectric... piezoelectric sandwich transducer comprising a back mass, four 12 piezoelectric ceramic rings, a front mass and a centre bolt was used to excite the rail. 13 The transducer, which resembles an ultrasonic cleaning transducer, was attached 14 under the head...

  17. Polarization switch of four-wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sidsel Rübner; Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Olausson, Christina Bjarnal Thulin;

    2015-01-01

    Degenerate spontaneous four-wave mixing is considered in a large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fiber. Numerical and experimental results show birefringence assisted four-wave mixing for a certain polarization state of the pump field. The parametric gain can be turned on and off by switching...... the polarization state of the pump field between the two principal axis of the hybrid photonic crystal fiber. (C) 2015 Optical Society of America...

  18. Polarization switch of four-wave mixing in large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Sidsel R; Alkeskjold, Thomas T; Olausson, Christina B; Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2015-02-15

    Degenerate spontaneous four-wave mixing is considered in a large mode area hybrid photonic crystal fiber. Numerical and experimental results show birefringence assisted four-wave mixing for a certain polarization state of the pump field. The parametric gain can be turned on and off by switching the polarization state of the pump field between the two principal axis of the hybrid photonic crystal fiber.

  19. Blockage, trapping and waveguide modes for flexural waves in a semi-infinite double grating

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Ian S; Movchan, Alexander B

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a novel view on the scattering of a flexural wave in a Kirchhoff plate by a semi-infinite discrete system. Blocking and channelling of flexural waves are of special interest. A quasi-periodic two-source Green's function is used in the analysis of the waveguide modes. An additional "effective waveguide" approximation has been constructed. Comparisons are presented for these two methods in addition to an analytical solution for a finite truncated system.

  20. Quantitative Mode Stability for the Wave Equation on the Kerr Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Shlapentokh-Rothman, Yakov

    2013-01-01

    We give a quantitative refinement and simple proofs of mode stability type statements for the wave equation on Kerr backgrounds in the full sub-extremal range (|a| < M). As an application, we are able to quantitatively control the energy flux along the horizon and null infinity and establish integrated local energy decay for solutions to the wave equation in any bounded-frequency regime.

  1. Size dependence of spin-wave modes in Ni80Fe20 nanodisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, P.; Kumar, D.; Adeyeye, A. O.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the radial and azimuthal spin-wave (SW) resonance modes in permalloy (Py: Ni80Fe20) disks at zero external magnetic field, as function of disk diameter and thickness, using broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. We observed, from both experimental and micromagnetic simulation results that the number of SW absorption peaks increases with disk diameter. Numerically calculated SW mode profiles revealed a characteristic minimum size, which does not scale proportionately with the increasing disk diameter. We show that higher order modes could thus be avoided with an appropriate choice of the disk diameter (smaller than the minimum mode size). Moreover, based on the mode profiles, the existence of azimuthal SW modes with even number of crests or troughs can be ruled out. These results could be useful in enhancing our fundamental understanding as well as engineering of new magnonic devices.

  2. Size dependence of spin-wave modes in Ni80Fe20 nanodisks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lupo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the radial and azimuthal spin-wave (SW resonance modes in permalloy (Py: Ni80Fe20 disks at zero external magnetic field, as function of disk diameter and thickness, using broadband ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy. We observed, from both experimental and micromagnetic simulation results that the number of SW absorption peaks increases with disk diameter. Numerically calculated SW mode profiles revealed a characteristic minimum size, which does not scale proportionately with the increasing disk diameter. We show that higher order modes could thus be avoided with an appropriate choice of the disk diameter (smaller than the minimum mode size. Moreover, based on the mode profiles, the existence of azimuthal SW modes with even number of crests or troughs can be ruled out. These results could be useful in enhancing our fundamental understanding as well as engineering of new magnonic devices.

  3. Degeneration of Four Wave Mixing in 500 m Step Index Two Mode Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jamaludin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Four wave mixing (FWM in two-mode fiber was experimentally demonstrated at 24.7 dBm of output Erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA. The 0.5 km two mode fiber in laser cavity enhances the performance of four wave mixing by suppressing the homogenous broadening effect in erbium-doped fiber and perform a stable oscillation. At output EDFA approaches to 24.7 dBm, FWM is generated and the increasing of output EDFA induced the optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR of all laser peaks.

  4. The slow-mode nature of compressible wave power in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Howes, G G; Klein, K G; Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; TenBarge, J M

    2011-01-01

    We use a large, statistical set of measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU, and supporting synthetic spacecraft data based on kinetic plasma theory, to show that the compressible component of inertial range solar wind turbulence is primarily in the kinetic slow mode. The zero-lag cross correlation C(delta n, delta B_parallel) between proton density fluctuations delta n and the field-aligned (compressible) component of the magnetic field delta B_parallel is negative and close to -1. The typical dependence of C(delta n,delta B_parallel) on the ion plasma beta_i is consistent with a spectrum of compressible wave energy that is almost entirely in the kinetic slow mode. This has important implications for both the nature of the density fluctuation spectrum and for the cascade of kinetic turbulence to short wavelengths, favoring evolution to the kinetic Alfven wave mode rather than the (fast) whistler mode.

  5. Overmoded subterahertz surface wave oscillator with pure TM{sub 01} mode output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guangqiang; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Dongyang [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P. O. Box 69-1, Xi' an 710024 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Xi' an 710024 (China); Wang, Jianguo, E-mail: wanguiuc@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P. O. Box 69-1, Xi' an 710024 (China); School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Li, Shuang [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, P. O. Box 69-1, Xi' an 710024 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Xi' an 710024 (China); School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Overmoded O-type Cerenkov generators using annular electron beams are facing the problem of multi-modes output due to the inevitable structural discontinuities. A simple but effective method to achieve the pure TM{sub 01} mode output is applied on the 0.14 THz overmoded surface wave oscillator (SWO) in this paper. In spite of still using an overmoded slow wave structure to ensure the easy fabrication, the followed smooth circular waveguide is shrinkingly tapered to the output waveguide with appropriate radius that it cuts off other higher modes except TM{sub 01} mode. Moreover, the modified device here has the same power capacity as the previous one according to the numerical analysis. By optimized lengths of the transition waveguide and tapered waveguide, particle-in-cell simulation results indicate that the subterahertz wave with output power increased 14.2% at the same frequency is obtained from the proposed SWO under the previous input conditions, and importantly, the output power is all carried by TM{sub 01} mode as expected. Further simulation results in the pulse regime confirm the feasibility of the optimized structure in the actual experiments. This simple and viable design is also applicable to overmoded devices in the lower frequency band of subterahertz wave.

  6. Pairwise entanglement and readout of atomic-ensemble and optical wave-packet modes in traveling-wave Raman interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    We analyze quantum entanglement of Stokes light and atomic electronic polarization excited during single-pass, linear-regime, stimulated Raman scattering in terms of optical wave-packet modes and atomic-ensemble spatial modes. The output of this process is confirmed to be decomposable into multiple discrete, bosonic mode pairs, each pair undergoing independent evolution into a two-mode squeezed state. For this we extend the Bloch-Messiah reduction theorem, previously known for discrete linear systems (S. L. Braunstein, Phys. Rev. A, vol. 71, 055801 (2005)). We present typical mode functions in the case of one-dimensional scattering in an atomic vapor. We find that in the absence of dispersion, one mode pair dominates the process, leading to a simple interpretation of entanglement in this continuous-variable system. However, many mode pairs are excited in the presence of dispersion-induced temporal walkoff of the Stokes, as witnessed by the photon-count statistics. We also consider the readout of the stored at...

  7. Voltage mode electronically tunable full-wave rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Predrag B.; Vesković, Milan; Đukić, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a new realization of bipolar full-wave rectifier of input sinusoidal signals, employing one MO-CCCII (multiple output current controlled current conveyor), a zero-crossing detector (ZCD), and one resistor connected to fixed potential. The circuit provides the operating frequency up to 10 MHz with increased linearity and precision in processing of input voltage signal, with a very low harmonic distortion. The errors related to the signal processing and errors bound were investigated and provided in the paper. The PSpice simulations are depicted and agree well with the theoretical anticipation. The maximum power consumption of the converter is approximately 2.83 mW, at ±1.2 V supply voltages.

  8. Testing of a multi-stage low-frequency isolator using Euler spring and self-damped pendulums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, J C; Lee, K T; Winterflood, J; Ju, L; Blair, D G; Jacob, J [ACIGA, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)

    2004-03-07

    We present performance measurements of a three-stage low-frequency vibration isolation chain which will form the low-frequency isolation part of an advanced isolator design developed for the Australian International Gravitational Observatory (AIGO). Each stage is a combination of a vertical Euler-spring stage and a self-damped pendulum. Experimental results demonstrate all horizontal normal modes including the fundamental pendulum mode to be strongly damped. Measurements below 10 Hz show vertical and horizontal performance close to theoretical expectations without extraneous normal mode peaks.

  9. Propagating modes in a periodic wave guide in the semi-classical limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Frederic [LPMMC, Maison des Magisteres Jean Perrin, CNRS, BP 166, Grenoble (France)]. E-mail: frederic.faure@ujf-grenoble.fr

    2002-02-15

    It is well known that the number of propagating modes in a uniform wave guide is the transverse section divided by the wavelength {lambda} (for a two-dimensional (2D) wave guide). In this paper we study the number of propagating modes N{sub modes} in the limit of small {lambda}, in the case where the section is non-constant but periodic. Using results of a study done by Asch and Knauf (Asch J and Knauf A 1998 Nonlinearity 11 175-200), we show that for small {lambda}, N{sub modes} grows like {mu}{sub b}/{lambda} where {mu}{sub b} is the measure of the ballistic classical trajectories inside the guide. In the case of an ergodic wave guide, where there are no ballistic trajectories but only diffusive trajectories, we show that N{sub modes} grows like {radical}D/{radical}{lambda}where D is the diffusion constant. These results are generalized for any Hamiltonian periodic in one direction, and numerical results with the kicked Harper model are given. N{sub modes} can be related to the Landauer conductance. (author)

  10. Gravitational waves from the evolution of the f-mode instability in neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Passamonti, A; Kokkotas, K

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamical evolution of the gravitational-wave driven instability of the f-mode in rapidly rotating relativistic stars. With an approach based on linear perturbation theory we describe the evolution of the mode amplitude and follow the trajectory of a newborn neutron star through its instability window. The influence on the f-mode instability of the magnetic field and the presence of an unstable r-mode is also considered. Two different configurations are studied in more detail; a standard N = 1 polytrope with a typical mass and radius and a more extreme polytropic N = 2/3 model which describes a supramassive neutron star. We study several evolutions with different initial rotation rates and temperature and determine the gravitational waves radiated during the instability. For reasonable values of the mode saturation amplitude, i.e. with a mode energy of about 1e6 Msun c^2, the gravitational-wave signal can be detected by the Einstein Telescope detector from the Virgo cluster. The magnetic field af...

  11. Standing wave plasmon modes interact in an antenna-coupled nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jared; Large, Nicolas; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi

    2015-03-01

    In a standing wave optical cavity, the coupling of cavity modes, e.g. through a nonlinear medium, results in a rich variety of nonlinear dynamical phenomena, such as frequency pushing and pulling, mode-locking and pulsing, and modal instabilities. Metallic nanowires of finite length support a hierarchy of longitudinal surface plasmon modes with standing wave properties: the plasmonic analog of a Fabry-Pérot cavity. Here we show that positioning the nanowire within the gap of a plasmonic nanoantenna introduces a passive, hybridization-based coupling of the standing-wave nanowire plasmon modes with the antenna structure, mediating an interaction between the nanowire plasmon modes themselves. Frequency pushing and pulling, and the enhancement and suppression of specific plasmon modes, can be controlled and manipulated by nanoantenna position and shape. Dark-field spectroscopy, CL spectroscopy and imaging, and finite-difference time-domain calculations are performed to investigate these surface plasmon ``drift.'' Near-field coupling of nanoantennas to nanowire optical cavities shows that plasmon hybridization is a powerful strategy for controlling the radiative LDOS of nanowires, and could ultimately enable strategies for active control of emission properties in nanowire-based devices. Work funded by the Welch Foundation (C-1220, C-1222), the NSSEFF (N00244-09-1-0067), the ONR (N00014-10-1-0989), and the NSF (ECCS-1040478, CNS-0821727).

  12. Characterization of the low-frequency unsteadines in LES data of supersonic and hypersonic STBLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Clara; Martin, Pino

    2016-11-01

    In a recent study, Priebe et al. (JFM 2016) used Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) to analyze DNS data of a Mach 3 ramp-generated shock and turbulent boundary layer interaction (STBLI). The authors found that the reconstructed low-frequency DMD modes took on the form of Görtler-like vortices downstream of separation. The five reconstructed modes reproduced the low-frequency dynamics of the separation bubble accurately. Martín et al. (AIAA2016-3341) and Martín et al. (APS, DFD 2016) show that the low-frequency unsteadiness in STBLI results from an inviscid centrifugal instability similar to that found in separated subsonic and laminar flows, and that the turbulence is modulated but passive to the global mode. In this work we further characterize the Görtler-like vortices using LES data of Mach 3 and Mach 7 separated STBLIs. We find that the Görtler-like vortices are unsteady, and we quantify the wavelength, amplitude and the aperiodic development of these structures. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant AF9550-15-1-0284.

  13. Thickness Measurement of a Film on a Substrate by Low-Frequency Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming-Xuan; WANG Xiao-Min; MAO Jie

    2004-01-01

    @@ We describe a new simple technique for the low-frequency ultrasonic thickness measurement of an air-backed soft thin layer attached on a hard substrate of finite thickness through the frequency-shifts of the substrate resonances by the substrate-side insonification. A plane compressive wave impinging normally on the substrate surface from a liquid is studied. Low frequency here means an interrogating acoustical wave frequency of less than half of coating to the substrate. Equations for the frequency-shifts are derived and solved by the Newton iterative method and the Taylor expansion method, respectively, indicating satisfactory agreement within the range of interest of thickness ratio of the thin layer to the substrate for a polymer-aluminium structure. An experimental setup is constructed to verify the validity of the technique.

  14. Mirror waves and mode transition observed in the magnetosheath by Double Star TC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Du

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Double Star TC-1 magnetosheath pass on 26 February 2004 is used to investigate magnetic field fluctuations. Strong compressional signatures which last for more than an hour have been found near the magnetopause behind a quasi-perpendicular bow shock. These compressional structures are most likely mirror mode waves. There is a clear wave transition in the magnetosheath which probably results from the change of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF cone angle. The wave characteristics in the magnetosheath are strongly controlled by the type of the upstream bow shock.

  15. WAVE DAMPING OBSERVED IN UPWARDLY PROPAGATING SAUSAGE-MODE OSCILLATIONS CONTAINED WITHIN A MAGNETIC PORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, S. D. T.; Jess, D. B.; Keys, P. H. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Moreels, M. G.; Doorsselaere, T. Van [Center for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Mathematics Department, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Morton, R. J. [Mathematics and Information Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 8ST (United Kingdom); Christian, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Giagkiozis, I.; Verth, G.; Erdélyi, R. [Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SPRC), The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Fedun, V., E-mail: sgrant19@qub.ac.uk [Space Systems Laboratory, Department of Automatic Control and Systems Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-10

    We present observational evidence of compressible MHD wave modes propagating from the solar photosphere through to the base of the transition region in a solar magnetic pore. High cadence images were obtained simultaneously across four wavelength bands using the Dunn Solar Telescope. Employing Fourier and wavelet techniques, sausage-mode oscillations displaying significant power were detected in both intensity and area fluctuations. The intensity and area fluctuations exhibit a range of periods from 181 to 412 s, with an average period ∼290 s, consistent with the global p-mode spectrum. Intensity and area oscillations present in adjacent bandpasses were found to be out of phase with one another, displaying phase angles of 6.°12, 5.°82, and 15.°97 between the 4170 Å continuum–G-band, G-band–Na i D{sub 1}, and Na i D{sub 1}–Ca ii K heights, respectively, reiterating the presence of upwardly propagating sausage-mode waves. A phase relationship of ∼0° between same-bandpass emission and area perturbations of the pore best categorizes the waves as belonging to the “slow” regime of a dispersion diagram. Theoretical calculations reveal that the waves are surface modes, with initial photospheric energies in excess of 35,000 W m{sup −2}. The wave energetics indicate a substantial decrease in energy with atmospheric height, confirming that magnetic pores are able to transport waves that exhibit appreciable energy damping, which may release considerable energy into the local chromospheric plasma.

  16. Noncontact excitation of guided waves (A0 mode) using an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Fatigue damage can develop in aircraft structures at locations of stress concentration, such as fasteners, and has to be detected before reaching a critical size to ensure safe aircraft operation. Guided ultrasonic waves offer an efficient method for the detection and characterization of such defects in large aerospace structures. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT) for the noncontact excitation of guided ultrasonic waves were developed. The transducer development for the specific excitation of the A0 Lamb wave mode with an out-of-plane Lorentz force is explained. The achieved radial and angular dependency of the excited guided wave pulses were measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Based on the induced eddy currents in the plate a theoretical model was developed. The application of the developed transducers for defect detection in aluminum components using fully noncontact guided wave measurements was demonstrated. Excitation of the A0 Lamb wave mode was achieved using the developed EMAT transducer and the guided wave propagation and scattering was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer.

  17. Partial Reflection and Trapping of a Fast-mode Wave in Solar Coronal Arcade Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first direct observation of a fast-mode wave propagating along and perpendicular to cool (171 {\\AA}) arcade loops observed by the SDO/AIA. The wave was associated with an impulsive/compact flare, near the edge of a sunspot. The EUV wavefront expanded radially outward from the flare center and decelerated in the corona from 1060-760 km/s within ~3-4 minute. Part of the EUV wave propagated along a large-scale arcade of cool loops and was partially reflected back to the flare site. The phase speed of the wave was about 1450 km/s, which is interpreted as a fast-mode wave. A second overlying loop arcade, orientated perpendicular to the cool arcade, is heated and becomes visible in the AIA hot channels. These hot loops sway in time with the EUV wave, as it propagated to and fro along the lower loop arcade. We suggest that an impulsive energy release at one of the footpoints of the arcade loops causes the onset of an EUV shock wave that propagates along and perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  18. Thermal chiral vortical and magnetic waves: New excitation modes in chiral fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran, E-mail: tigran@caltech.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois, 845 W Taylor Street, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, M/S 298, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Murchikova, Elena [TAPIR, California Institute of Technology, MC 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    In certain circumstances, chiral (parity-violating) medium can be described hydrodynamically as a chiral fluid with microscopic quantum anomalies. Possible examples of such systems include strongly coupled quark–gluon plasma, liquid helium {sup 3}He-A, neutron stars and the Early Universe. We study first-order hydrodynamics of a chiral fluid on a vortex background and in an external magnetic field. We show that there are two previously undiscovered modes describing heat waves propagating along the vortex and magnetic field. We call them the Thermal Chiral Vortical Wave and Thermal Chiral Magnetic Wave. We also identify known gapless excitations of density (chiral vortical and chiral magnetic waves) and transverse velocity (chiral Alfvén wave). We demonstrate that the velocity of the chiral vortical wave is zero, when the full hydrodynamic framework is applied, and hence the wave is absent and the excitation reduces to the charge diffusion mode. We also comment on the frame-dependent contributions to the obtained propagation velocities.

  19. Interaction of a mode-2 internal solitary wave with narrow isolated topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepwell, David; Stastna, Marek; Carr, Magda; Davies, Peter A.

    2017-07-01

    Numerical and experimental studies of the transit of a mode-2 internal solitary wave over an isolated ridge are presented. All studies used a quasi-two-layer fluid with a pycnocline centred at the mid-depth. The wave amplitude and total fluid depth were both varied, while the topography remained fixed. The strength of the interaction between the internal solitary waves and the hill was found to be characterized by three regimes: weak, moderate, and strong interactions. The weak interaction exhibited negligible wave modulation and bottom surface stress. The moderate interaction generated weak and persistent vorticity in the lower layer, in addition to negligible wave modulation. The strong interaction clearly showed material from the trapped core of the mode-2 wave extracted in the form of a thin filament while generating a strong vortex at the hill. A criterion for the strength of the interaction was found by non-dimensionalizing the wave amplitude by the lower layer depth, a /ℓ . A passive tracer was used to measure the conditions for resuspension of boundary material due to the interaction. The speed and prevalence of cross boundary layer transport increased with a /ℓ .

  20. Weak-Coupling Theory for Low-Frequency Periodically Driven Two-Level Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ai-Xi; HUANG Ke-Lin; WANG Zhi-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We generalize the Wu-Yang strong-coupling theory to solve analytically periodically driven two-level systems in the weak-coupling and low-frequency regimes for single- and multi-period periodic driving of continuous-wave-type and pulse-type including ultrashort pulses of a few cycles. We also derive a general formula of the AC Stark shift suitable for such diverse situations.