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Sample records for mobile nitrogen ions

  1. Ion mobility spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eiceman, GA

    2005-01-01

    Key Developments for Faster, More Precise Detection Capabilities Driven by the demand for the rapid and advanced detection of explosives, chemical and biological warfare agents, and narcotics, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) undergone significant refinements in technology, computational capabilities, and understanding of the principles of gas phase ion chemistry and mobility. Beginning with a thorough discussion of the fundamental theories and physics of ion mobility, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, Second Edition describes the recent advances in instrumentation and newly

  2. Ion mobility sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  3. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B [Los Lunas, NM; Rohde, Steven B [Corrales, NM

    2008-08-26

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  4. Ions mobilities in corona discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtaev, Sh. A.; Bochkareva, G. V.; Sydykova, G. K.

    2000-01-01

    Ion mobility in unipolar corona at small inter-electron distances (up to 0.01 m) when as coroning element serves micro-wire is consider. Experimental data of ion mobility in corona discharge external zone in atmospheric air are obtained and its comparative analysis with known data is worked out. (author)

  5. Ion mobilities and ion-atom interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatland, I.R.

    1982-01-01

    The techniques for measuring the mobilities of ions in gases, relating interaction potentials to mobilities, and determining potentials from experimental mobilities are reviewed. Applications are presented for positive alkali ions and negative halogen ions in inert gases. (Auth.)

  6. Proton-bound cluster ions in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. G.; Eiceman, G. A.; Stone, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Gaseous oxygen and nitrogen bases, both singly and as binary mixtures, have been introduced into ion mobility spectrometers to study the appearance of protonated molecules, and proton-bound dimers and trimers. At ambient temperature it was possible to simultaneously observe, following the introduction of molecule A, comparable intensities of peaks ascribable to the reactant ion (H2O)nH+, the protonated molecule AH+ and AH+ H2O, and the symmetrical proton bound dimer A2H+. Mass spectral identification confirmed the identifications and also showed that the majority of the protonated molecules were hydrated and that the proton-bound dimers were hydrated to a much lesser extent. No significant peaks ascribable to proton-bound trimers were obtained no matter how high the sample concentration. Binary mixtures containing molecules A and B, in some cases gave not only the peaks unique to the individual compounds but also peaks due to asymmetrical proton bound dimers AHB+. Such ions were always present in the spectra of mixtures of oxygen bases but were not observed for several mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen bases. The dimers, which were not observable, notable for their low hydrogen bond strengths, must have decomposed in their passage from the ion source to the detector, i.e. in a time less than approximately 5 ms. When the temperature was lowered to -20 degrees C, trimers, both homogeneous and mixed, were observed with mixtures of alcohols. The importance of hydrogen bond energy, and hence operating temperature, in determining the degree of solvation of the ions that will be observed in an ion mobility spectrometer is stressed. The possibility is discussed that a displacement reaction involving ambient water plays a role in the dissociation.

  7. Characterization of nitrogen-ion-implanted aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Breuer, K.; Leonhardt, G.

    1990-01-01

    Aluminium has been implanted with nitrogen ions at different temperatures. The implanted samples have been characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Deconvolution procedures are needed to separate the influence of the ion sputter profiling by AES and XPS from the nitrogen-ion-beam-induced effects. The chemical state of Al, N, O and C was identified by deconvolution of the measured spectra. In general, there were double-peak structures observed for N 1s and O 1s, identified as contributions from nitrides and weakly bound nitrogen, and oxides and weakly bound oxygen, respectively. Auger analysis confirms the influence of the nitrogen ion fluence on the shape of the concentration distribution. The influence of temperature on the chemical state of implanted aluminium and on the concentration distribution is discussed. (orig.)

  8. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P; Barkley, Robert M; Jones, David N M; Hankin, Joseph A; Murphy, Robert C

    2018-04-23

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H] - ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H] - and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H 2 O-CO 2 ] - and [M-H-H 2 O] - displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H 2 O] - ion from LTB 4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H 2 O] - product ions from LTB 4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Ion Mobility Reveals Structural Insight into Eicosanoid Product Ion Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, James P.; Barkley, Robert M.; Jones, David N. M.; Hankin, Joseph A.; Murphy, Robert C.

    2018-04-01

    Ion mobility measurements of product ions were used to characterize the collisional cross section (CCS) of various complex lipid [M-H]- ions using traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TWIMS). TWIMS analysis of various product ions derived after collisional activation of mono- and dihydroxy arachidonate metabolites was found to be more complex than the analysis of intact molecular ions and provided some insight into molecular mechanisms involved in product ion formation. The CCS observed for the molecular ion [M-H]- and certain product ions were consistent with a folded ion structure, the latter predicted by the proposed mechanisms of product ion formation. Unexpectedly, product ions from [M-H-H2O-CO2]- and [M-H-H2O]- displayed complex ion mobility profiles suggesting multiple mechanisms of ion formation. The [M-H-H2O]- ion from LTB4 was studied in more detail using both nitrogen and helium as the drift gas in the ion mobility cell. One population of [M-H-H2O]- product ions from LTB4 was consistent with formation of covalent ring structures, while the ions displaying a higher CCS were consistent with a more open-chain structure. Using molecular dynamics and theoretical CCS calculations, energy minimized structures of those product ions with the open-chain structures were found to have a higher CCS than a folded molecular ion structure. The measurement of product ion mobility can be an additional and unique signature of eicosanoids measured by LC-MS/MS techniques. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Ion Mobility Spectrometer Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Nicholas [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; McLain, Derek [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Steeb, Jennifer [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-12-20

    The Morpho Saffran Itemizer 4DX Ion Mobility Spectrometer previously used to detect uranium signatures in FY16 was used at the former New Brunswick Facility, a past uranium facility located on site at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was chosen in an attempt to detect safeguards relevant signatures and has a history of processing uranium at various enrichments, chemical forms, and purities; various chemicals such as nitric acid, uranium fluorides, phosphates and metals are present at various levels. Several laboratories were sampled for signatures of nuclear activities around the laboratory. All of the surfaces that were surveyed were below background levels of the radioanalytical instrumentation and determined to be radiologically clean.

  11. Principle and application of ion mobility spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.; Arnold, G.; Baumbach, J.I.; Doering, H.R.

    1990-01-01

    An outline is given of the principle and application of ion mobility spectroscopy to the selective measurement of single substances in a substance matrix, including advantages and disadvantages of ion mobility detectors for solving analytical problems in the fields of environment, microelectronics, medicine, and military engineering. (orig.) [de

  12. Ion mobility: its role in plasma chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is a review of the basic physical theory underlying plasma chromatography. Essentially, plasma chromatography simply measures ion mobility. The new feature of plasma chromatography, as compared to aqueous electrophoresis, is the existence of a highly-developed and accurate body of theory that connects gaseous ion mobility and diffusion to the ion molecule interactions in the drift tube. Attention is restricted to phenomena occurring in the drift tube portion of the apparatus

  13. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  14. Corrosion behaviour of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    primary ions were used and negative secondary ions were detected. A difference in the distribution of the CrN and the alleged N signal was observed and attributed to CrN acting as a diffusion barrier for nitrogen diffusion. It may be noted here that nitrogen does not form stable elemental negative ions [2] and is thus.

  15. Nitrogen implantation in steel with an impulsive ion implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feugeas, J.N.; Gonzalez, C.O.; Hermida, J.; Nieto, M.; Peyronel, M.F.; Sanchez, G.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes the results of steel implantation with nitrogen, with a pulsed accelerator which provides a continuous ion energy spectrum giving a uniform profile of nitrogen without changing its operative conditions. (Author)

  16. Cytological effect of nitrogen ion implantation into Stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Mei; Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1997-01-01

    Dry seeds of Stevia were implanted by 35∼150 keV nitrogen ion with various doses. The cytological effect on M 1 was studied. The results showed that nitrogen ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with the increased with the increase of ion beam energy and dose. However, there was no significant linear regression relationship between ion dose and aberration rate. The cytological effect of nitrogen ion implantation was lower than that of γ-rays

  17. Behaviour of tetraalkylammonium ions in high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Kapron, James T

    2010-05-30

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an ion-filtering technique recently adapted for use with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to remove interferences during analysis of complex matrices. This is the first systematic study of a series of singly charged tetraalkylammonium ions by FAIMS-MS. The compensation voltage (CV) is the DC offset of the waveform which permits the ion to emerge from FAIMS and it was determined for each member of the series under various conditions. The electrospray ionization conditions explored included spray voltage, vaporizer temperature, and sheath and auxiliary gas pressure. The FAIMS conditions explored included carrier gas flow rate, electrode temperature and composition of the carrier gas. Optimum desolvation was achieved using sufficient carrier gas (flow rate > or = 2 L/min) to ensure stable response. Low-mass ions (m/z 100-200) are more susceptible to changes in electrode temperature and gas composition than high mass ions (m/z 200-700). As a result of this study, ions are reliably analyzed using standard FAIMS conditions (dispersion voltage -5000 V, carrier gas flow rate 3 L/min, 50% helium/50%nitrogen, inner electrode temperature 70 degrees C and outer electrode temperature 90 degrees C). Variation of FAIMS conditions may be of great use for the separation of very low mass tetraalkylammonium (TAA) ions from other TAA ions. The FAIMS conditions do not appear to have a major effect on higher mass ions. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Calibration method for ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, Valery

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the calibration of the ion mobility spectrometer has been developed. This article describes the working principle, advantages and disadvantages of the calibration method operating in the mode of explosives detection. This method is most suitable for use in portable detectors, due to the small weight, small size parameters and low power consumption.

  19. Maximizing Ion Transmission in Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bradley B.; Londry, Frank; Nazarov, Erkinjon G.; Kang, Yang; Covey, Thomas R.

    2017-10-01

    We provide modeling and experimental data describing the dominant ion-loss mechanisms for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). Ion motion is considered from the inlet region of the mobility analyzer to the DMS exit, and losses resulting from diffusion to electrode surfaces, insufficient effective gap, ion fragmentation, and fringing field effects are considered for a commercial DMS system with 1-mm gap height. It is shown that losses due to diffusion and radial oscillations can be minimized with careful consideration of residence time, electrode spacing, gas flow rate, and waveform frequency. Fragmentation effects can be minimized by limitation of the separation field. When these parameters were optimized, fringing field effects at the DMS inlet contributed the most to signal reduction. We also describe a new DMS cell configuration that improves the gas dynamics at the mobility cell inlet. The new cell provides a gas jet that decreases the residence time for ions within the fringing field region, resulting in at least twofold increase in ion signal as determined by experimental data and simulations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Mixed mobile ion effect in fluorozincate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S; Ghosh, A

    2005-01-01

    The mixed mobile ion effect has been investigated for the first time in zinc fluoride glasses where in addition to alkali cations fluorine anions also participate in the diffusion process, unlike mixed alkali oxide glasses. The minimum in the conductivity, conductivity relaxation frequency, crossover frequency and decoupling index indicates the existence of the mixed mobile ion effect in these fluoride glasses. It has been observed that the non-exponential parameter and the frequency exponent are independent of temperature. It has been established that alkali ions and fluorine anions exhibit lower dimensionality of the conduction pathways in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses than that in the single alkali lithium based zinc fluoride glasses while they are migrating. From the scaling of the conductivity spectra, it has been established that the relaxation dynamics in mixed alkali zinc fluoride glasses is independent of temperature and composition

  1. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2007-08-21

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  2. Identity confirmation of drugs and explosives in ion mobility spectrometry using a secondary drift gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanu, Abu B; Hill, Herbert H

    2007-10-15

    This work demonstrated the potential of using a secondary drift gas of differing polarizability from the primary drift gas for confirmation of a positive response for drugs or explosives by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The gas phase mobilities of response ions for selected drugs and explosives were measured in four drift gases. The drift gases chosen for this study were air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide providing a range of polarizability and molecular weights. Four other drift gases (helium, neon, argon and sulfur hexafluoride) were also investigated but design limitations of the commercial instrument prevented their use for this application. When ion mobility was plotted against drift gas polarizability, the resulting slopes were often unique for individual ions, indicating that selectivity factors between any two analytes varied with the choice of drift gas. In some cases, drugs like THC and heroin, which are unresolved in air or nitrogen, were well resolved in carbon dioxide or nitrous oxide.

  3. Influence of temperature upon the mobilization of nitrogen in peat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armi Kaila

    1953-01-01

    Full Text Available The preliminary experiments the results of which are recorded in the present paper, have been carried out in order to obtain some information on the microbiological and chemical mobilization of peat nitrogen at various temperatures. In the incubation experiment at 5°, 20°, 35°, 50°, and 65CC the accumulation of ammonia nitrogen increased with a rising temperature except in the limed series where a minimum was found at 20°. The maximum of nitrate-nitrogen lay at 20 in both the series. The amount of nitrite-nitrogen was almost negligible in all the samples. The mineral nitrogen in the samples incubated at 50° and 65° represented 10—20 % of the total nitrogen. Thus, the organic nitrogen in peat soils can be mobilized to a marked extent, if the conditions are favourable. Accumulation of mineral nitrogen could be stated also at the lower temperatures where the reutilization of released nitrogen in the synthesis of new microbial substance is always more intensive than in the range of thermophilic organisms. Even at 5° a release of nitrogen was noticable. In these experiments liming did not show any beneficial effect upon the accumulation of mineral nitrogen, on the contrary, the values for total nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen were lower in the limed series. The nitrate formation was generally somewhat higher in the limed samples than in the corresponding unlimed ones. It was supposed that the considerable increase in the ammonia content of the samples incubated at 50° and 65° was partly due to purely chemical transformations, since the mere heating of moist samples at 75° for two hours brought about a marked accumulation of ammonia nitrogen. The treatment with dry heat was less effective except when the temperature was raised to 200° in which case a carbonization of the peat took place. The losses of organic matter and of total nitrogen due to the heating were almost negligible at the temperatures below 150°. At 150° and at 200

  4. Biological effect of nitrogen ion implantation on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Shen Mei; Chen Qiufang; Shu Shizhen

    1997-10-01

    Dry seed of stevia were implanted by 35∼150 keV nitrogen ions with various doses. The biological effect in M 1 was studied. The results showed that nitrogen ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with ion beam energy and dose added, but there was on significant linear regression relationship between ion dose and aberration rate. The results indicated the seedling height reduced with the increasing of dose for ion beam. The biological effect of nitrogen ion beam on M 1 stevia was lower than that of γ-rays. (6 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.)

  5. Viscosity, ion mobility, and the lambda transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodstein, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    A model is presented of the lambda transition in superfluid helium in which fluctuations near the transition are approximated by distinct regions of normal fluid and superfluid. The macroscopic viscosity of such a medium is computed. The ion mobility is also computed, taking into account a region of normal fluid around the ion induced by electrostriction. The results are, for the viscosity, eta/sub lambda/ - eta approx. t/sup 0.67/ and for the mobility μ - μ/sub lambda/ approx. t/sup 0.92/, both in excellent agreement with recent experiments. The model suggests that the lambda transition itself is the point at which superfluid regions become macroscopically connected

  6. Sputtering of solid nitrogen by keV helium ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1993-01-01

    Solid nitrogen has become a standard material among the frozen molecular gases for electronic sputtering. We have combined measurements of sputtering yields and energy spectra from nitrogen bombarded by 4-10 keV helium ions. The data show that the erosion is electronic rather than knockon...

  7. Toward an Intelligent Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJunkin, Timothy R.; Scott, Jill R.; Miller, Carla J.

    2003-01-01

    The ultimate goal is to design and build a very smart ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) that can operate autonomously. To accomplish this, software capable of interpreting spectra so that it can be used in control loops for data interpretation as well as adjusting instrument parameters is being developed. Fuzzy logic and fuzzy numbers are used in this IMS spectra classification scheme. Fuzzy logic provides a straight forward method for developing a classification/detection system, whenever rules for classifying the spectra can be described linguistically. Instead of using 'max' and 'min' values, the product of the truth values is used to determine class membership. Using the product allows rule-bases that utilize the AND function to allow each condition to discount truth value in determining membership, while rule-bases with an OR function are allowed to accumulate membership. Fuzzy numbers allow encapsulation of the uncertainties due to ion mobility peak widths as well as measured instrumental parameters, such as pressure and temperature. Associating a peak with a value of uncertainty, in addition to making adjustments to the mobility calculation based on variations in measured parameters, enables unexpected shifts to be more reliably detected and accounted for; thereby, reducing the opportunity for 'false negative' results. The measure of uncertainty is anticipated to serve the additional purpose of diagnosing the operational conditions of the IMS instrument.

  8. Energetic Nitrogen Ions within the Inner Magnetosphere of Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C.; Johnson, R. E.; Richardson, J. D.; Jurac, S.; Moore, M.; Cooper, J. F.; Mauk, B. H.; Smith, H. T.; Michael, M.; Paranicus, C.; Armstrong, T. P.; Tsurutani, B.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    2003-05-01

    Titan's interaction with Saturn's magnetosphere will result in the energetic ejection of atomic nitrogen atoms into Saturn's magnetosphere due to dissociation of N2 by electrons, ions, and UV photons. The ejection of N atoms into Saturn's magnetosphere will form a nitrogen torus around Saturn with mean density of about 4 atoms/cm3 with source strength of 4.5x1025 atoms/sec. These nitrogen atoms are ionized by photoionization, electron impact ionization and charge exchange reactions producing an N+ torus of 1-4 keV suprathermal ions centered on Titan's orbital position. We will show Voyager plasma observations that demonstrate presence of a suprathermal ion component within Saturn's outer magnetosphere. The Voyager LECP data also reported the presence of inward diffusing energetic ions from the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, which could have an N+ contribution. If so, when one conserves the first and second adiabatic invariant the N+ ions will have energies in excess of 100 keV at Dione's L shell and greater than 400 keV at Enceladus' L shell. Energetic charged particle radial diffusion coefficients are also used to constrain the model results. But, one must also consider the solar wind as another important source of keV ions, in the form of protons and alpha particles, for Saturn's outer magnetosphere. Initial estimates indicate that a solar wind source could dominate in the outer magnetosphere, but various required parameters for this estimate are highly uncertain and will have to await Cassini results for confirmation. We show that satellite sweeping and charged particle precipitation within the middle and outer magnetosphere will tend to enrich N+ ions relative to protons within Saturn's inner magnetosphere as they diffuse radially inward for radial diffusion coefficients that do not violate observations. Charge exchange reactions within the inner magnetosphere can be an important loss mechanism for O+ ions, but to a lesser degree for N+ ions. Initial LECP

  9. Ion mobility spectrometry after supercritical fluid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this work, a Fourier transform ion mobility spectrometer (FT-IMS) was constructed and evaluated as a detector for supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The FT-IMS provides both quantitative and qualitative data of a wide range of compounds, selective and nonselective modes of chromatographic detection, and it is compatible with a wide range of SFC mobile phases. Drift spectra are presented for a number of samples, including polymers, lipids, herbicides, antibiotics, and pharmaceuticals. The unique properties of supercritical fluids made it possible to introduce these compounds into the spectrometer. While the drift spectra presented are generally simple, showing only a quasi-molecular ion, a few are surprising complex. Examples of selective and non-selective detection demonstrate the usefulness of the detector. Examples are presented for fish oil concentrate, bacon grease extract, soil extract, and polymer mixtures. In the case of Triton X-100, a non-ionic surfactant, the FT-IMS was able to selectively detect individual oligomers in the polymer mixture. In the case of a polydimethylsilicone mixture the detector isolated a contaminant in the mixture

  10. Elastic properties of sub-stoichiometric nitrogen ion implanted silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarmanova, M.F., E-mail: marina.sarmanova@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Karl, H. [University Augsburg, Institute of Physics, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Mändl, S.; Hirsch, D. [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); Mayr, S.G.; Rauschenbach, B. [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, D-04318 Leipzig (Germany); University Leipzig, Institute for Experimental Physics II, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Elastic properties of sub-stoichiometric nitrogen implanted silicon were measured with nanometer-resolution using contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) as function of ion fluence and post-annealing conditions. The determined range of indentation moduli was between 100 and 180 GPa depending on the annealing duration and nitrogen content. The high indentation moduli can be explained by formation of Si–N bonds, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  11. Nitrogen transport during ion nitriding of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parascandola, S.

    2001-09-01

    The work is structured as follows: In Chapter 2 fundamental transport concepts and phenomena and approaches to transport modeling are introduced. In Chapter 3 details are presented concerning the material under investigation, the material modification process, and the ion beam analytical techniques. In Chapter 4 experimental and modeling results are presented and discussed. Issues that are directly addressed include: The structural nature of the nitrogen enriched layer. The diffusion mechanism of nitrogen. The role of potential incorporation and release mechanisms. The evolution of the thickness of the nitrogen enriched layer. The role of the surface oxide layer. (orig.)

  12. Nitrogen ion implantation effect on friction coefficient of tool steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velichko, N.I.; Udovenko, V.F.; Markus, A.M.; Presnyakova, G.N.; Gamulya, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of nitrogen molecular ion implantation into KhVSG steel on the friction coefficient in the air and vacuum is investigated. Irradiation is carried out by the N 2 + beam with energy 120 keV and flux density 5 μ/cm 2 at room temperature in vacuum 5x10 -4 Pa. The integral dose of irradiation is 10 17 particle/cm 2 . Nitrogen ion implantation is shown to provide the formation of the modified layer changing friction properties of steel. The friction coefficient can either increase or decrease depending on implantation and test conditions. 4 refs.; 2 figs

  13. Aspirated capacitor measurements of air conductivity and ion mobility spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aplin, K.L.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of ions in atmospheric air are used to investigate atmospheric electricity and particulate pollution. Commonly studied ion parameters are (1) air conductivity, related to the total ion number concentration, and (2) the ion mobility spectrum, which varies with atmospheric composition. The physical principles of air ion instrumentation are long established. A recent development is the computerized aspirated capacitor, which measures ions from (a) the current of charged particles at a sensing electrode, and (b) the rate of charge exchange with an electrode at a known initial potential, relaxing to a lower potential. As the voltage decays, only ions of higher and higher mobility are collected by the central electrode and contribute to the further decay of the voltage. This enables extension of the classical theory to calculate ion mobility spectra by inverting voltage decay time series. In indoor air, ion mobility spectra determined from both the voltage decay inversion, and an established voltage switching technique, were compared and shown to be of similar shape. Air conductivities calculated by integration were: 5.3±2.5 and 2.7±1.1 fSm -1 , respectively, with conductivity determined to be 3 fSm -1 by direct measurement at a constant voltage. Applications of the relaxation potential inversion method include air ion mobility spectrum retrieval from historical data, and computation of ion mobility spectra in planetary atmospheres

  14. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  15. Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Corrosion behavior of low energy, high temperature nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 304 stainless steel. M GHORANNEVISS1, A SHOKOUHY1,∗, M M LARIJANI1,2,. S H HAJI HOSSEINI 1, M YARI1, A ANVARI4, M GHOLIPUR SHAHRAKI1,3,. A H SARI1 and M R HANTEHZADEH1. 1Plasma Physics Research Center, Science ...

  16. Ion mobility spectrometer for online monitoring of trace compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, F.; Xie, Z.; Schmidt, H.; Sielemann, S.; Baumbach, J.I.

    2002-01-01

    The principle, character and developments of the instrumentation of ion mobility spectrometry are reviewed. The application of ion mobility spectrometers in monitoring chemical warfare agents, explosives, drugs, environmental hazardous compounds and industrial process control are discussed. Process applications with respect to miniaturization of the instrument are presented

  17. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuemei, Zhu; Jian, Zheng [The Third Research Inst. of Ministry of Public Security, Shanghai (China); Yongjie, Lv; Yangqin, Chen [Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Optical and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, East China Normal Univ., Shanghai (China)

    2007-10-15

    A {sup 63}Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  18. Application of ion mobility spectrometer for rapid drug detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuemei; Zheng Jian; Lv Yongjie; Chen Yangqin

    2007-01-01

    A 63 Ni source-based high resolution ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was developed and applied to drug detection. The drugs included opium, morphine, heroin, methamphetamine, MDMA, MDEA, ketamine and cannabis. Their ion mobility spectra were acquired, ion types were derived and reduced mobilities were calculated, which are in good agreement with the data reported in literatures. The results indicate that the IMS can detect effectively a variety of drugs, especially for the amphetamine derivatives. And the reduced mobility standard database of drugs was established. (authors)

  19. EPDM Rubber Modified by Nitrogen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondyurin, Alexey

    2018-04-24

    Ethylene-propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM) was treated by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) with nitrogen ions of 20 keV energy and fluence from 10 13 to 10 16 ions/cm². The Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectra, atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy showed significant structure changes of the surface. The analysis of an interface of PIII treated EPDM rubber with polyurethane binder showed a cohesive character of the adhesion joint fracture at the presence of solvent and interpreted as covalent bond network formation between the PIII treated rubber and the adhesive.

  20. EPDM Rubber Modified by Nitrogen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Kondyurin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene-propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM was treated by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII with nitrogen ions of 20 keV energy and fluence from 1013 to 1016 ions/cm2. The Fourier-transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectra, atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy showed significant structure changes of the surface. The analysis of an interface of PIII treated EPDM rubber with polyurethane binder showed a cohesive character of the adhesion joint fracture at the presence of solvent and interpreted as covalent bond network formation between the PIII treated rubber and the adhesive.

  1. Electron attachment rate constant measurement by photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Desheng; Niu, Wenqi; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Chengyin; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2012-01-01

    Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS), with a source of photoelectrons induced by vacuum ultraviolet radiation on a metal surface, has been developed to study electron attachment reaction at atmospheric pressure using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Based on the negative ion mobility spectra, the rate constants for electron attachment to tetrachloromethane and chloroform were measured at ambient temperature as a function of the average electron energy in the range from 0.29 to 0.96 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. - Highlights: ► Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS) was developed to study electron attachment reaction. ► The rate constants of electron attachment to CCl 4 and CHCl 3 were determined. ► The present experimental results are in good agreement with the previously reported data.

  2. Depth distribution of nitrogen in silicon from plasma ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajo, J.J.; Williams, J.D.; Wei, R.; Wilson, R.G.; Matossian, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma Ion Implantation (PII) is an ion implantation technique that eliminates the line-of-sight restriction of conventional ion-beam implantation and therefore allows for cost effective surface modification of large-scale objects or large-number of small-scale objects. In PII, a part to be implanted is immersed in a low-pressure (10 -4 --10 -5 Torr), partially-ionized plasma that surrounds the part with a plasma sheath. The part is negatively pulse biased up to 100 keV using a repetitive train (100--1,000 Hz) of short-duration (10--40 μsec) voltage pulses. The applied voltage develops across the sheath and accelerates plasma ions into the surface, implanting them omnidirectionally and simultaneously over the entire surface of the part. The depth distribution of the implanted ions influences the extent and type of surface modification achieved and depends upon many factors. These include three rise and fall time of the voltage-pulse waveform, the voltage-pulse amplitude, the ion specie, the ion density, and the temperature of the target. Understanding the contributions to the depth distribution from each of these factors will enable prediction of conditions that will be useful for implantation of large complex parts. To investigate the contributions to the measured depth distributions from these factors nitrogen, predominantly as N + 2 , has been implanted into silicon using PII at 50 and 100 keV (25 and 50 keV per N atom). The implanted depth distributions have been determined using secondary ion mass spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. The distributions differ from the typical, approximately Gaussian, profiles that result from conventional mass selected monoenergetic ion beam implantation. In comparison with ion beam implants and numerical simulations the profiles appear ''filled-in'' with an approximately constant nitrogen concentration for depths less than the expected average ion range

  3. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valizadeh, R.; Colligon, J.S.; Katardiev, I.V.; Faunce, C.A.; Donnelly, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm -2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm -2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C 3 N 4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C 3 N 4 matrix was predominantly sp 2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  4. Mutagenic effects of nitrogen and carbon ions on stevia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Shen Mei; Lu Ting; Shu Shizhen

    1998-06-01

    Dry seeds of stevia were implanted by 60∼100 keV nitrogen ion and 75 keV carbon ion with various doses. The biological effects in M 1 and mutation in M 2 were studied. The results showed that ion beam was able to induce variation on chromosome structure and inhibited mitosis action in root tip cells. The rate of cells with chromosome aberration was increased with the increase of ion beam energy and dose. Energy effects of mitosis were presented between 75 keV and 60, 100 keV. As compared with γ-rays, the effects of ion beam were lower on chromosomal aberration but were higher on frequency of the mutation. The rate of cell with chromosome aberration and M 2 useful mutation induced by implantation of carbon ion was higher than those induced by implantation of nitrogen ion. Mutagenic effects of Feng 1 x Ri Yuan and of Ri Yuan x Feng 2 are higher than that of Ji Ning and Feng 2

  5. Chemical characterization of 4140 steel implanted by nitrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nino, Ely Dannier V.; Duran, Fernando [Grupo de Investigacion en Tecnologia del Plasma (GINTEP), Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Pinto, Jose L.C. [Grupo de Investigacion en Quimica Estructural (GIQUE), Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Dugar-Zhabon, V.; Garnica, Hernan [Grupo de Fisica y Tecnologia del Plasma (FITEK), Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2010-07-01

    AISI-SAE 4140 sample surfaces of different roughness which are implanted by nitrogen ions of 20 keV and 30 keV at a dose of 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} through a three dimensional ion implantation technique are studied. Crystal phases of nitrogen compositions of the implanted samples, obtained with help of an x-ray diffraction method, are confronted with the data reported by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), PDF-2. It is observed that the implanted into the metal nitrogen atoms produce changes in orientation of crystal planes that is manifested as variations of the intensity of the refracted rays and of cell dimensions (a displacement of 2 theta of the maximum intensity position). An analysis for determining nitrogen atoms implanted by high-voltage pulsed discharges at low pressures in the crystal structure of the solid surface was carried out by X-Ray Diffraction due to this technique permits to assess the possibility of formation of new compounds. (author)

  6. Chemical characterization of 4140 steel implanted by nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nino, Ely Dannier V.; Duran, Fernando; Pinto, Jose L.C.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.; Garnica, Hernan

    2010-01-01

    AISI-SAE 4140 sample surfaces of different roughness which are implanted by nitrogen ions of 20 keV and 30 keV at a dose of 10"1"7 ions/cm"2 through a three dimensional ion implantation technique are studied. Crystal phases of nitrogen compositions of the implanted samples, obtained with help of an x-ray diffraction method, are confronted with the data reported by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), PDF-2. It is observed that the implanted into the metal nitrogen atoms produce changes in orientation of crystal planes that is manifested as variations of the intensity of the refracted rays and of cell dimensions (a displacement of 2 theta of the maximum intensity position). An analysis for determining nitrogen atoms implanted by high-voltage pulsed discharges at low pressures in the crystal structure of the solid surface was carried out by X-Ray Diffraction due to this technique permits to assess the possibility of formation of new compounds. (author)

  7. Using different drift gases to change separation factors (alpha) in ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbury; Hill

    2000-02-01

    The use of different drift gases to alter separation factors (alpha) in ion mobility spectrometry has been demonstrated. The mobility of a series of low molecular weight compounds and three small peptides was determined in four different drift gases. The drift gases chosen were helium, argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide. These drift gases provide a range of polarizabilities and molecular weights. In all instances, the compounds showed the greatest mobility in helium and the lowest mobility in carbon dioxide; however the percentage change of mobility for each compound was different, effectively changing the alpha value. The alpha value changes were primarily due to differences in drift gas polarizability but were also influenced by the mass of the drift gas. In addition, gas-phase ion radii were calculated in each of the different drift gases. These radii were then plotted against drift gas polarizability producing linear plots with r2 values greater than 0.99. The intercept of these plots provides the gas-phase radius of an ion in a nonpolarizing environment, whereas the slope is indicative of the magnitude of the ion's mobility change related to polarizability. It therefore, should be possible to separate any two compounds that have different slopes with the appropriate drift gas.

  8. Comparing the effect of pressure and temperature on ion mobilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Rouholahnejad, Fereshteh

    2005-01-01

    The effect of pressure on ion mobilities has been investigated and compared with that of temperature. In this connection, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) cell, which employs a corona discharge as the ionization source, has been designed and constructed to allow varying pressure inside the drift region. IMS spectra were recorded at various pressures ranging from 15 Torr up to atmospheric pressure. The results show that IMS peaks shift perfectly linear with pressure which is in excellent agreement with the ion mobility theory. However, experimental ion mobilities versus temperature show deviation from the theoretical trend. The deviation is attributed to formation of clusters. The different behaviour of pressure and temperature was explained on the basis of the different impact of pressure and temperature on hydration and clustering of ions. Pressure affects the clustering reactions linearly but temperature affects it exponentially

  9. Mobilities of positive ions in gas ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumegi, Asao

    1990-01-01

    Observed ion mobilities of organic molecules in Ar are compared with a complete polarization model to examine the performance of the model, and its applicability is discussed. In spite of its simplicity, the polarization model (small sphere limit) is found to agree satisfactorily with observed mobilities in the case of alkali ions in Ar. However, the model fails to account for the mobility of Ar + in Ar due to a resonant charge transfer interaction between the ion and the parent gas. On the other hand, the values of k, a parameter which depends on the kinetic and the potential energy of the relevant ion, derived from observed ion mobilities of organic molecules in Ar and in the parent gas are found to be close to each other. Except for few cases, it appears that the complete polarization model gives a reasonable approximation for the positive ion mobilities of organic molecules in Ar, though the importance of the ion mass identification is significant in considering the applicability of the model to the positive ion mobility of those organic molecules in Ar used in a gas ionization chamber. (N.K.)

  10. Chemical characterization of 4140 steel implanted by nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niño, E D V; Dugar-Zhabon, V; Pinto, J L; Henao, J A

    2012-01-01

    AISI SAE 4140 steel samples of different surface roughness which are implanted with 20 keV and 30 keV nitrogen ions at a dose of 10 17 ions/cm 2 are studied. The crystal phases of nitrogen compositions of the implanted samples, obtained with help of an x-ray diffraction method, are confronted with the data reported by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD) PDF-2. The implantation treatment is realized in high-voltage pulsed discharges at low pressures. The crystal structure of the implanted solid surfaces is analyzed by the x-ray diffraction technique which permits to identify the possible newly formed compounds and to identify any change in the surface structure of the treated samples. A decrease in the intensity of the plane (110), a reduction of the cell unity in values of 2-theta and a diminishing of the crystallite dimensions in comparison with non-implanted samples are observed.

  11. Chemical characterization of 4140 steel implanted by nitrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño, E. D. V.; Pinto, J. L.; Dugar-Zhabon, V.; Henao, J. A.

    2012-06-01

    AISI SAE 4140 steel samples of different surface roughness which are implanted with 20 keV and 30 keV nitrogen ions at a dose of 1017 ions/cm2 are studied. The crystal phases of nitrogen compositions of the implanted samples, obtained with help of an x-ray diffraction method, are confronted with the data reported by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD) PDF-2. The implantation treatment is realized in high-voltage pulsed discharges at low pressures. The crystal structure of the implanted solid surfaces is analyzed by the x-ray diffraction technique which permits to identify the possible newly formed compounds and to identify any change in the surface structure of the treated samples. A decrease in the intensity of the plane (110), a reduction of the cell unity in values of 2-theta and a diminishing of the crystallite dimensions in comparison with non-implanted samples are observed.

  12. A Hybrid Constant and Oscillatory Field Ion Mobility Analyzer Using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Aneesh; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Ewing, Robert G.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-02-01

    Here we explore the combination of constant and oscillatory fields applied in a single device to affect the continuous separation and filtering of ions based on their mobilities. The device explored allows confining and manipulating ions utilizing a combination of radio frequency (rf), direct current (DC) fields, and traveling waves (TW) in a structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM) module. We have investigated theoretically and experimentally a concept for continuous filtering of ions based on their mobilities where ions are mobility separated and selected by passage through two regions, both of which incorporated combined TW and constant fields providing opposing forces on the ions. The SLIM module was composed of two surfaces with mirror-image arrays of electrodes and had two regions where the different TW and opposing DC fields could be applied. The filtering capabilities are determined by the applied DC gradient and the TW parameters, such as speed, amplitude, and the TW sequence (i.e., the duty cycle of the traveling wave). The effects of different parameters on the sensitivity and the ion mobility (IM) resolution of the device have been investigated. By appropriately choosing the DC gradient and TW parameters for the two sections, it is possible to transmit ions of a selected mobility while filtering out others of both higher and lower mobility. The novel device described here provides a basis for the targeted analysis of compounds based upon the continuous selection of ions according to their mobility and without the need for high electric fields or pulsed injection.

  13. Measurement of acetates in air using differential ion mobility spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Andrzej; Maciejewska, Monika; Zajiczek, Żaneta; Maziejuk, Mirosław

    2017-11-01

    Volatile organic compounds are one of the most important group of air pollutants. Potential health and environmental problems resulting from their emission prompted the requirement for monitoring these species. It motivates development of new measurement techniques which are fast, cost effective, reliable and field deployable. One of novel approaches is ion mobility spectrometry. It dwells on ion separation in electric field, based on differences in ion mobility. Many variants of this method are developed. In this wok, differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) was considered in respect of acetate measurements in air. It was demonstrated that DMS offers linear response to methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl acetate in concentration range from 0.3 ppm to 7 ppm. Positive ions spectrum has to be utilised for this purpose. We showed that fragments of DMS spectrum which secure linearity are compound-specific. The obtained results are promising from the application point of view.

  14. The mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomaa, M.

    1982-01-01

    This article reviews recent experimental and theoretical work on the mobility of negative ions in the superfluid A and B phases of liquid 3 He. In the normal Fermi liquid at temperatures below approximately 50 mK and also in the superfluid close to the superfluid transition temperature, Tsub(c), the mobility of a negative ion may simply be considered as limited by the elastic scattering of 3 He quasiparticles. This explains the constancy of the ion mobility in the normal phase. However, underlying the rapid increase of the measured mobility in the superfluid phases there is a subtle quantum-mechanical scattering effect. Detailed solutions of the 3 He quasiparticle-negative ion scattering process in the pair-correlated state provide a simple physical picture of an energy-dependent forward-peaking phenomenon. This yields quantitative theoretical results for the ion mobility in the quasi-isotropic B phase and for the ion mobility tensor in the anisotropic A phase which agree with the experimental data. (author)

  15. Determination of ion mobilities of radionuclides in a free electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanov, M.; Doberenz, W.; Marinov, A.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new variant of a technique for determining ion mobilities by means of horizontal zone electrophoresis in free solutions is developed. Setup circuit is presented. Some details of experiment and results of measuring limiting mobilities of 131 I - and 160 Tb 3+ are given. On these examples the reproducibility was checked. (author)

  16. Simple area determination of strongly overlapping ion mobility peaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borovcová, L.; Hermannová, M.; Pauk, V.; Šimek, M.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Lemr, Karel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 981, AUG 15 (2017), s. 71-79 ISSN 0003-2670 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LO1305 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ion mobility-mass spectrometry * Fitting of mobility peaks * Analysis of isomers Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 4.950, year: 2016

  17. Experimental studies on ion mobility in xenon-trimethylamine mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, A. M. F.; Encarnação, P. M. C. C.; Escada, J.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Neves, P. N. B.; Conde, C. A. N.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Santos, F. P.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present experimental results for ion reduced mobilities (K0) in gaseous trimethylamine, TMA—(CH3)3N, and xenon-TMA mixtures for reduced electric fields E/N between 7.5 and 60 Td and in the pressure range from 0.5 to 10 Torr, at room temperature. Both in the mixtures and in pure TMA only one peak was observed in the time of arrival spectra, which is believed to be due to two TMA ions with similar mass, (CH3)3N+ (59 u) and (CH3)2CH2N+ (58 u), whose mobility is indistinguishable in our experimental system. The possibility of ion cluster formation is also discussed. In pure TMA, for the E/N range investigated, an average value of 0.56 cm2V-1s-1 was obtained for the reduced mobility of TMA ions. For the studied mixtures, it was observed that even a very small amount of gaseous TMA (~0.2%) in xenon leads to the production of the above referred TMA ions or clusters. The reduced mobility value of this ion or ions in Xe-TMA mixtures is higher than the value in pure TMA: around 0.8 cm2V-1s-1 for TMA concentrations from 0.2% to about 10%, decreasing for higher TMA percentages, eventually converging to the reduced mobility value in pure TMA.

  18. Ion-neutral potential models in atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry IM(tof)MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Wes E; English, William A; Hill, Herbert H

    2006-02-09

    The ion mobilities and their respective masses of several classes of amines (primary, secondary, and tertiary) were measured by electrospray ionization atmospheric pressure ion mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometry IM(tof)MS. The experimental data obtained were comparatively analyzed by the one-temperature kinetic theory of Chapman-Enskog. Several theoretical models were used to estimate the collision cross-sections; they include the rigid-sphere, polarization-limit, 12-6-4, and 12-4 potential models. These models were investigated to represent the interaction potentials contained within the collision integral that occurs between the polyatomic ions and the neutral drift gas molecules. The effectiveness of these collision cross-section models on predicting the mobility of these amine ions was explored. Moreover, the effects of drift gas selectivity on the reduced-mass term and in the collision cross-section term was examined. Use of a series of drift gases, namely, helium, neon, argon, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide, made it possible to distinguish between mass effects and polarizability effects. It was found that the modified 12-4 potential that compensates for the center of charge not being at the same location as the centers of mass showed improved agreement over the other collision cross-section models with respect to experimental data.

  19. Energy landscapes for mobile ions in ion conducting solids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    molecular dynamics (MD) simulations yields quantitative predictions of the ion transport characteristics. As ... Solid electrolytes; bond valence analysis; ion transport in glasses. 1. .... clusters are considered to contribute only to a.c. conduc-.

  20. An alkali ion source based on graphite intercalation compounds for ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Hosseini, Zahra S

    2008-01-01

    A variety of alkali cation emitters were developed as the ion source for ion mobility spectrometry. The cation emitters were constructed based on alkali ion graphite intercalation compounds (GICs). The compounds were prepared by fusing alkali salts with ground graphite. In order to produce alkali ions, the compounds were loaded on a filament and heated to red. Reactant ions of the form alk + ions were observed for the alkali salts NaCl, KCl.LiCl, CsCl and SrCl. In addition to Na + ions, K + ions were observed at the beginning of thermionic emission from Na-GIC. This is due to the low ionization potential of potassium that exists in trace amounts in sodium salts. In addition to the potassium ion, Na + was observed in the case of LiCl salt. The Na + and K + peaks originating from impurities totally disappeared after about 40 min. However, the thermionic emission of the main ion of the corresponding salt lasted for several days. No negative ions were observed upon reversing the drift field. Selected organic compounds (methyl isobutyl ketone, dimethyl sulfoxide, acetone and tetrahydrofuran) were also ionized via alkali cation attachment reaction. Distinct ion mobility patterns were observed for different substances using one type of alkali reactant ion. However, the ion mobility pattern for a given substance changed when a different alkali reactant ion was used. Ammonia and amines were not ionized when this source was used

  1. Diffusion and mobility of positive ions in sulphur hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urquijo, J. de; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Martinez, H.

    1988-01-01

    It is presented some recent results on the measurements of longitudinal difusion and mobility of positive ions in SF 6 . The experimental technique employed could determine the most abundant positive ion under electric discharge conditions. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  2. Traveling-wave ion mobility mass spectrometry of protein complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salbo, Rune; Bush, Matthew F; Naver, Helle

    2012-01-01

    The collision cross-section (Ω) of a protein or protein complex ion can be measured using traveling-wave (T-wave) ion mobility (IM) mass spectrometry (MS) via calibration with compounds of known Ω. The T-wave Ω-values depend strongly on instrument parameters and calibrant selection. Optimization ...

  3. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.I.; Kokko, J.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Paalanen, M.A.; Richardson, R.C.; Schoepe, W.; Takano, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The mobility of negative ions is shown to increase rapidly below T/sub c/ in both superfluid 3 He phases. The ratio μ/μ/sub N/ of superfluid to normal mobility is larger in the B phase than in the A phase. A critical velocity consistent in magnitude with the Landau limit for pair breaking has also been observed. In the normal fluid we find a temperature independent mobility between 40 mK and T/sub c/ for all pressures between 0 and 28 bar. The increase of μ/sub N/ with increasing pressure is in agreement with the bubble model for the negative ion

  4. Programmable ion mobility spectrometer: Time resolution improvement and ion counter comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, R.G.; Wilding, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric ion mobility spectrometers operating on the aspirated electrode principle require switching of a bias voltage to select ions of different mobility. The ion spectrum can be obtained by sweeping across a set of bias voltages. If rapid temporal changes in atmospheric ion spectra are to be measured, however, such as for a balloon-carried instrument, the sweep time across the ion spectrum must be kept short. As bias voltage steps can generate saturation in the mobility spectrometer's electrometer amplifier, the electrometer recovery time limits the ion mobility spectrum sweep rate. Here, active compensation of the charge injected at a bias voltage step is used to reduce the saturation time. Further, the optimal setting of the charge compensation circuitry provides a determination of the system capacitance, a necessary calibration parameter for absolute measurements. Using laboratory air, hourly variations in ion concentrations and air conductivity found using the voltage switching system were similar to those obtained with a traditional ion counter operating at a single mobility: ion growth, however, could only be detected using the ion spectrometer

  5. Tandem ion mobility spectrometry coupled to laser excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Anne-Laure; Choi, Chang Min; Clavier, Christian; Barbaire, Marc; Maurelli, Jacques; Dagany, Xavier; MacAleese, Luke; Dugourd, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.dugourd@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Chirot, Fabien [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2015-09-15

    This manuscript describes a new experimental setup that allows to perform tandem ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements and which is coupled to a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It consists of two 79 cm long drift tubes connected by a dual ion funnel assembly. The setup was built to permit laser irradiation of the ions in the transfer region between the two drift tubes. This geometry allows selecting ions according to their ion mobility in the first drift tube, to irradiate selected ions, and examine the ion mobility of the product ions in the second drift tube. Activation by collision is possible in the same region (between the two tubes) and between the second tube and the time-of-flight. IMS-IMS experiments on Ubiquitin are reported. We selected a given isomer of charge state +7 and explored its structural rearrangement following collisional activation between the two drift tubes. An example of IMS-laser-IMS experiment is reported on eosin Y, where laser irradiation was used to produce radical ions by electron photodetachment starting from doubly deprotonated species. This allowed measuring the collision cross section of the radical photo-product, which cannot be directly produced with an electrospray source.

  6. Titanium Nitride and Nitrogen Ion Implanted Coated Dental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Berzins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials have been investigated since the mid-1980s and considered in various applications in dentistry such as implants, abutments, orthodontic wires, endodontic files, periodontal/oral hygiene instruments, and casting alloys for fixed restorations. Multiple methodologies have been employed to create the coatings, but detailed structural analysis of the coatings is generally lacking in the dental literature. Depending on application, the purpose of the coating is to provide increased surface hardness, abrasion/wear resistance, esthetics, and corrosion resistance, lower friction, as well as greater beneficial interaction with adjacent biological and material substrates. While many studies have reported on the achievement of these properties, a consensus is not always clear. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of the coatings in a clinical setting. Overall, titanium nitride and/or nitrogen ion implanted coated dental materials potentially offer advantages over uncoated counterparts, but more investigation is needed to document the structure of the coatings and their clinical effectiveness.

  7. Replenishment and mobilization of intracellular nitrogen pools decouples wine yeast nitrogen uptake from growth

    OpenAIRE

    SANCHO FORNER, MARTA; Alicia Gutiérrez; BELTRAN CASELLAS, GEMMA; José Manuel Guillamon; Jonas Warringer

    2016-01-01

    Wine yeast capacity to take up nitrogen from the environment and catabolize it to support population growth, fermentation, and aroma production is critical to wine production. Under nitrogen restriction, yeast nitrogen uptake is believed to be intimately coupled to reproduction with nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) suggested mediating this link. We provide a time- and strain-resolved view of nitrogen uptake, population growth, and NCR activity in wine yeasts. Nitrogen uptake was found to ...

  8. The Influence of Drift Gas Composition on the Separation Mechanism in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Insight from Electrodynamic Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jody C; McLean, John A

    2003-06-01

    The influence of three different drift gases (helium, nitrogen, and argon) on the separation mechanism in traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry is explored through ion trajectory simulations which include considerations for ion diffusion based on kinetic theory and the electrodynamic traveling wave potential. The model developed for this work is an accurate depiction of a second-generation commercial traveling wave instrument. Three ion systems (cocaine, MDMA, and amphetamine) whose reduced mobility values have previously been measured in different drift gases are represented in the simulation model. The simulation results presented here provide a fundamental understanding of the separation mechanism in traveling wave, which is characterized by three regions of ion motion: (1) ions surfing on a single wave, (2) ions exhibiting intermittent roll-over onto subsequent waves, and (3) ions experiencing a steady state roll-over which repeats every few wave cycles. These regions of ion motion are accessed through changes in the gas pressure, wave amplitude, and wave velocity. Resolving power values extracted from simulated arrival times suggest that momentum transfer in helium gas is generally insufficient to access regions (2) and (3) where ion mobility separations occur. Ion mobility separations by traveling wave are predicted to be effectual for both nitrogen and argon, with slightly lower resolving power values observed for argon as a result of band-broadening due to collisional scattering. For the simulation conditions studied here, the resolving power in traveling wave plateaus between regions (2) and (3), with further increases in wave velocity contributing only minor improvements in separations.

  9. Method and device for ion mobility separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-07-11

    Methods and devices for ion separations or manipulations in gas phase are disclosed. The device includes a single non-planar surface. Arrays of electrodes are coupled to the surface. A combination of RF and DC voltages are applied to the arrays of electrodes to create confining and driving fields that move ions through the device. The DC voltages are static DC voltages or time-dependent DC potentials or waveforms.

  10. Investigation of drift gas selectivity in high resolution ion mobility spectrometry with mass spectrometry detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Laura M; Hill, Herbert H; Beegle, Luther W; Kanik, Isik

    2002-04-01

    Recent studies in electrospray ionization (ESI)/ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) have focussed on employing different drift gases to alter separation efficiency for some molecules. This study investigates four structurally similar classes of molecules (cocaine and metabolites, amphetamines, benzodiazepines, and small peptides) to determine the effect of structure on relative mobility changes in four drift gases (helium, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide). Collision cross sections were plotted against drift gas polarizability and a linear relationship was found for the nineteen compounds evaluated in the study. Based on the reduced mobility database, all nineteen compounds could be separated in one of the four drift gases, however, the drift gas that provided optimal separation was specific for the two compounds.

  11. Ion mobility spectrometer / mass spectrometer (IMS-MS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka Deborah Elaine; Austin, Daniel E.

    2005-07-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400). Combining Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) with Mass Spectrometry (MS) is described. The IMS-MS combination overcomes several limitations present in simple IMS systems. Ion mobility alone is insufficient to identify an unknown chemical agent. Collision cross section, upon which mobility is based, is not sufficiently unique or predictable a priori to be able to make a confident peak assignment unless the compounds present are already identified. Molecular mass, on the other hand, is much more readily interpreted and related to compounds. For a given compound, the molecular mass can be determined using a pocket calculator (or in one's head) while a reasonable value of the cross-section might require hours of computation time. Thus a mass spectrum provides chemical specificity and identity not accessible in the mobility spectrum alone. In addition, several advanced mass spectrometric methods, such as tandem MS, have been extensively developed for the purpose of molecular identification. With an appropriate mass spectrometer connected to an ion mobility spectrometer, these advanced identification methods become available, providing greater characterization capability.

  12. Ion Mobility Spectrometer / Mass Spectrometer (IMS-MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunka, Deborah E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Austin, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-10-01

    The use of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS)in the Detection of Contraband Sandia researchers use ion mobility spectrometers for trace chemical detection and analysis in a variety of projects and applications. Products developed in recent years based on IMS-technology include explosives detection personnel portals, the Material Area Access (MAA) checkpoint of the future, an explosives detection vehicle portal, hand-held detection systems such as the Hound and Hound II (all 6400), micro-IMS sensors (1700), ordnance detection (2500), and Fourier Transform IMS technology (8700). The emphasis to date has been on explosives detection, but the detection of chemical agents has also been pursued (8100 and 6400).

  13. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Ne-N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, A.F.V.; Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Santos, F.P.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.

    2016-01-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors, such as the ALICE TPC or in the NEXT experiment. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Ne-N 2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two peaks for different gas ratios of Ne-N 2 , low reduced electric fields, E / N , 10–20 Td (2.4–4.8 kV·cm −1 ·bar −1 ), low pressures 6–8 Torr (8–10.6 mbar) and at room temperature.

  14. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Patra, R. N.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-06-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CO2 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of only one peak for all gas ratios of Xe-CO2, low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV·cm-1·bar-1), low pressures 6-8 Torr (8-10.6 mbar), at room temperature.

  15. Squeezing of Ion Populations and Peaks in Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations and Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations using Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Webb, Ian K.; Baker, Erin M.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-11-02

    In this work, we report an approach for spatial and temporal gas phase ion population manipulation, and demonstrate its application for the collapse of the ion distributions in ion mobility (IM) separations into tighter packets providing higher sensitivity measurements in conjunction with mass spectrometry (MS). We do this for ions moving from a conventionally traveling wave (TW)-driven region to a region where the TW is intermittently halted or ‘stuttered’. This approach causes the ion packets spanning a number of TW-created traveling traps (TT) to be redistributed into fewer TT, resulting in spatial compression. The degree of spatial compression is controllable and determined by the ratio of stationary time of the TW in the second region to its moving time. This compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach has been implemented using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) in conjunction with MS. CRIMP with the SLIM-MS platform is shown to provide increased peak intensities, reduced peak widths, and improved S/N ratios with MS detection. CRIMP also provides a foundation for extremely long path length and multi-pass IM separations in SLIM providing greatly enhanced IM resolution by reducing the detrimental effects of diffusional peak broadening due to increasing peak widths.

  16. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-09-01

    Data on ion mobility is important to improve the performance of large volume gaseous detectors. In the present work, the method, experimental setup and results for the ion mobility measurements in Xe-CH4 mixtures are presented. The results for this mixture show the presence of two distinct groups of ions. The nature of the ions depend on the mixture ratio since they are originated by both Xe and CH4. The results here presented were obtained for low reduced electric fields, E/N, 10-25 Td (2.4-6.1 kV ṡ cm-1 ṡ bar-1), at low pressure (8 Torr) (10.6 mbar), and at room temperature.

  17. Complex fluids with mobile charge-regulating macro-ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovich, Tomer; Andelman, David; Podgornik, Rudi

    2017-10-01

    We generalize the concept of charge regulation of ionic solutions, and apply it to complex fluids with mobile macro-ions having internal non-electrostatic degrees of freedom. The suggested framework provides a convenient tool for investigating systems where mobile macro-ions can self-regulate their charge (e.g., proteins). We show that even within a simplified charge-regulation model, the charge dissociation equilibrium results in different and notable properties. Consequences of the charge regulation include a positional dependence of the effective charge of the macro-ions, a non-monotonic dependence of the effective Debye screening length on the concentration of the monovalent salt, a modification of the electric double-layer structure, and buffering by the macro-ions of the background electrolyte.

  18. Corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry at reduced pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Rouholahnejad, Fereshteh

    2004-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) normally operate at ambient pressure. In this work an IMS cell has been designed and constructed to allow the pressure to be reduced inside the IMS cell. In this cell, corona discharge was employed as the ionization source. Reducing pressure affected both the discharge and the performance of the IMS. The discharge current was observed to increase with reducing pressure while the ignition potential decreased. The ion current received at the collector plate was also increased about 50 times when the pressure was reduced from ambient pressure to 15 Torr. The higher ion current can lead to an extended dynamic range. IMS spectra were recorded at various pressures and the results show that the drift times shift perfectly linear with pressure. This suggests that unlike temperature, pressure correction for ion mobility spectra is as simple as multiplying the drift times by a factor of 760/P

  19. The dressed mobile atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Amour, B; Guillot, L

    2005-01-01

    We consider free atoms and ions in $\\R^3$ interacting with the quantized electromagnetic field. Because of the translation invariance we consider the reduced hamiltonian associated with the total momentum. After introducing an ultraviolet cutoff we prove that the reduced hamiltonian for atoms has a ground state if the coupling constant and the total momentum are sufficiently small. In the case of ions an extra infrared regularization is needed. We also consider the case of the hydrogen atom in a constant magnetic field. Finally we determine the absolutely continuous spectrum of the reduced hamiltonian. \\end{abstract}

  20. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.I.; Kokko, J.; Lounasmaa, O.V.; Paalanen, M.A.; Richardson, R.C.; Schoepe, W.; Takano, Y.

    1976-01-01

    We have found that the mobility of negative ions increases rapidly below T/sub c/ in both superfluid 3 He phases. The ratio μ/μ/sub N/ of superfluid to normal mobility is larger in the B phase than in the A phase. A critical velocity consistent in magnitude with the Landau limit for pair breaking has also been observed. In the normal fluid we find a temperature-independent mobility between 30 mK and T/sub c/ for all pressures between 0 and 28 bars

  1. Determination of gas phase protein ion densities via ion mobility analysis with charge reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisser, Anne; Premnath, Vinay; Ghosh, Abhimanyu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Attoui, Michel; Hogan, Christopher J

    2011-12-28

    We use a charge reduction electrospray (ESI) source and subsequent ion mobility analysis with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA, with detection via both a Faraday cage electrometer and a condensation particle counter) to infer the densities of single and multiprotein ions of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin produced from non-denaturing (20 mM aqueous ammonium acetate) and denaturing (1 : 49.5 : 49.5, formic acid : methanol : water) ESI. Charge reduction is achieved through use of a Po-210 radioactive source, which generates roughly equal concentrations of positive and negative ions. Ions produced by the source collide with and reduce the charge on ESI generated drops, preventing Coulombic fissions, and unlike typical protein ESI, leading to gas-phase protein ions with +1 to +3 excess charges. Therefore, charge reduction serves to effectively mitigate any role that Coulombic stretching may play on the structure of the gas phase ions. Density inference is made via determination of the mobility diameter, and correspondingly the spherical equivalent protein volume. Through this approach it is found that for both non-denaturing and denaturing ESI-generated ions, gas-phase protein ions are relatively compact, with average densities of 0.97 g cm(-3) and 0.86 g cm(-3), respectively. Ions from non-denaturing ESI are found to be slightly more compact than predicted from the protein crystal structures, suggesting that low charge state protein ions in the gas phase are slightly denser than their solution conformations. While a slight difference is detected between the ions produced with non-denaturing and denaturing ESI, the denatured ions are found to be much more dense than those examined previously by drift tube mobility analysis, in which charge reduction was not employed. This indicates that Coulombic stretching is typically what leads to non-compact ions in the gas-phase, and suggests that for gas phase

  2. Heavy metal ion adsorption behavior in nitrogen-doped magnetic carbon nanoparticles: Isotherms and kinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Keun-Young; Hong, Jin-Yong; Jang, Jyongsik

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → The monodisperse and multigram-scale N-MCNPs are fabricated by carbonization of polypyrrole as a carbon precursor. → The synthesized N-MCNPs provide an enhanced adsorption uptake for various heavy metal ions. → The N-MCNPs can be applied to the Langmuir model and pseudo-second-order kinetics. → The iron-impregnated N-MCNPs are reused up to 5 times with no loss of removal efficiency. - Abstract: To clarify the heavy metal adsorption mechanism of nitrogen-doped magnetic carbon nanoparticles (N-MCNPs), adsorption capacity was investigated from the adsorption isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics points of view. The obtained results showed that the equilibrium adsorption behavior of Cr 3+ ion onto the N-MCNPs can be applied to the Langmuir model and pseudo-second-order kinetics. It indicated that the fabricated N-MCNPs had the homogenous surface for adsorption and all adsorption sites had equal adsorption energies. Furthermore, the adsorption onto N-MCNPs taken place through a chemical process involving the valence forces. According to the thermodynamics, the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic in nature which means that the adsorption capacity increases with increasing temperature due to the enhanced mobility of adsorbate molecules. The effects of the solution pH and the species of heavy metal ion on the adsorption uptake were also studied. The synthesized N-MCNPs exhibited an enhanced adsorption capacity for the heavy metal ions due to the high surface area and large amount of nitrogen contents.

  3. Characterization of Nitride Layers Formed by Nitrogen Ion Implantation into Surface Region of Iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudjatmoko; Subki, M. Iyos R.

    2000-01-01

    Ion implantation is a convenient means of modifying the physical and chemical properties of the near-surface region of materials. The nitrogen implantation into pure iron has been performed at room temperature with ion dose of 1.310 17 to 1.310 18 ions/cm 2 and ion energy of 20 to 100 keV. The optimum dose of nitrogen ions implanted into pure iron was around 2.2310 17 ions/cm 2 in order to get the maximum wear resistant. SEM micrographs and EDX show that the nitride layers were found on the surface of substrate. The nitrogen concentration profile was measured using EDX in combination with spot technique, and it can be shown that the depth profile of nitrogen implanted into substrate was nearly Gaussian. (author)

  4. Interfacing an aspiration ion mobility spectrometer to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamov, Alexey; Viidanoja, Jyrki; Kaerpaenoja, Esko; Paakkanen, Heikki; Ketola, Raimo A.; Kostiainen, Risto; Sysoev, Alexey; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the combination of an aspiration-type ion mobility spectrometer with a mass spectrometer. The interface between the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer and the mass spectrometer was designed to allow for quick mounting of the aspiration ion mobility spectrometer onto a Sciex API-300 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The developed instrumentation is used for gathering fundamental information on aspiration ion mobility spectrometry. Performance of the instrument is demonstrated using 2,6-di-tert-butyl pyridine and dimethyl methylphosphonate

  5. Mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3He-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baym, G.; Pethick, C.J.; Salomaa, M.

    1979-01-01

    We calculate the mobility of negative ions in superfluid 3 He-B. We first derive the general formula for the mobility, and show that to a good approximation the scattering of quasiparticles from an ion may be treated as elastic, both in the superfluid for temperatures not too far below the transition temperature and also in the normal state. The scattering cross section in the superfluid is then calculated in terms of normal state properties; as we show, it is vital to include the effects of superfluid correlations on intermediate states in the scattering process. We find that for quasiparticles near the gap edge, the quasiparticle: ion scattering amplitude has a resonant behavior, and that as a result of interference among many partial waves, the differential scattering cross section is strongly peaked in the forward direction and reduced at larger angles, in much the same way as in diffraction. The transport cross section for such a quasiparticle is strongly reduced compared to that for a normal state quasiparticle, and the mobility is consequently strongly enhanced. Detailed calculations of the mobility which contain essentially no free parameters, agree well with the experimental data

  6. Improved generation of single nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond by ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naydenov, Boris; Beck, Johannes; Steiner, Matthias; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrishnan; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg [3. Institute of Physics, University of Stuttgart (Germany); Richter, Vladimir; Kalish, Rafi [Solid State Institute, Technion City, Haifa (Israel); Achard, Jocelyn [Laboratoire d' Ingenieurie des Materiaux et des Hautes Pressions, CNRS, Villetaneuse (France)

    2010-07-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have recently attracted the attention of many research groups due to their possible application as quantum bits (qubits), ultra low magnetic field sensors and single photon sources. These color centers can be produced by nitrogen ion implantation, although the yield is usually below 5 % at low ion energies. Here we report an increase of the NV production efficiency by subsequently implanting carbon ions in the area of implanted nitrogen ions. This method improves the production yield by more than 50 %. We also show that very low nitrogen concentration (below 0.1 ppb) in diamond can be determined by converting the intrinsic nitrogen atoms to single NV centers and detecting the latter using a confocal microscope.

  7. Raman scattering studies of mobile ions in superionic conductor hollandites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Y.; Suemoto, T.; Ishigame, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Raman spectra of the superionic conductors K/sub 1.6/Mg/sub 0.8/Ti/sub 7.2/O 16 , Cs/sub 1.2/Mg/sub 0.6/Ti/sub 7.4/O 16 , and (KTl)/sub 1.6/Mg/sub 0.8/Ti/sub 7.2/O 16 are measured in the frequency range from 5 to 1000 cm -1 . In the range from 100 to 1000 cm -1 Raman spectra hardly show alkali ion dependence. On the contrary, in the frequency range from 5 to 100 cm -1 , an additional Raman band is observed. This Raman band shows alkali ion dependence. By using the Frenkel-Kontorova model for the hollandite crystal with the given configuration of the mobile ions, it is found that the dependence of vibrational frequency of mobile ions with kinds of alkali ion is well explained and that the concept of 'super unit cell' that is introduced by Beyeler is very useful to explain the Raman bands which are observed below 100 cm -1 in hollandite crystals. (author)

  8. Ion mobility analyzer - quadrupole mass spectrometer system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuna, C; Leuca, M; Lupsa, N; Mirel, V; Cuna, Stela; Cosma, V; Tusa, Florina; Bocos-Bintintan, V

    2009-01-01

    Because of their extremely high sensitivity for chemicals with elevated electronegativity or high proton affinity the ion mobility analysers are ideal for the ultra-trace detection of toxic or explosive chemicals, most of these situated often at concentration levels of sub-ppb (parts-per-billion). Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) can be used to identify illicit drugs or environmental pollutants. Since resolution of an IMS is relatively low, to achieve an accurate identification of target analyte it is recommended to couple the IMS with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) or a time of flight mass spectrometer, acquiring in this way confirmatory information. This coupling is made through a specific interface. In this paper, an experimental model of such a tandem instrument, IMS-QMS is described. Accomplishment of this general purpose will be done, overcoming a series of specific issues. This implies the solving, using innovative solutions, of a series of complex issues: ensuring the stability of the ions beam generated by ion source; transfer with a good efficiency of the ionic current from IMS analyser to QMS; and realization of a special electronic circuitry which will be able to detect both positive and negative ions.

  9. Ion mobility analyzer - quadrupole mass spectrometer system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuna, C; Leuca, M; Lupsa, N; Mirel, V; Cuna, Stela; Cosma, V; Tusa, Florina [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Bocos-Bintintan, V, E-mail: cornel.cuna@itim-cj.r [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, 3 Fantanele, 400294 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    Because of their extremely high sensitivity for chemicals with elevated electronegativity or high proton affinity the ion mobility analysers are ideal for the ultra-trace detection of toxic or explosive chemicals, most of these situated often at concentration levels of sub-ppb (parts-per-billion). Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) can be used to identify illicit drugs or environmental pollutants. Since resolution of an IMS is relatively low, to achieve an accurate identification of target analyte it is recommended to couple the IMS with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) or a time of flight mass spectrometer, acquiring in this way confirmatory information. This coupling is made through a specific interface. In this paper, an experimental model of such a tandem instrument, IMS-QMS is described. Accomplishment of this general purpose will be done, overcoming a series of specific issues. This implies the solving, using innovative solutions, of a series of complex issues: ensuring the stability of the ions beam generated by ion source; transfer with a good efficiency of the ionic current from IMS analyser to QMS; and realization of a special electronic circuitry which will be able to detect both positive and negative ions.

  10. Performance evaluation of oxygen adsorbents using negative corona discharge–ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadkish, Kamal; Jafari, Mohammad T., E-mail: jafari@cc.iut.ac.ir; Ghaziaskar, Hassan S.

    2017-02-08

    Trace amounts of oxygen was determined using negative corona discharge as an ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry. A point-in-cylinder geometry with novel design was used to establish the corona discharge without interferences of negative ions such as NO{sub X}{sup −}. The desirable background spectrum shows only electrons peak, providing the instrument capable of trace analysis of oxygen in gaseous samples. The limit of detection and linear dynamic range with high coefficient of determination (r{sup 2} = 0.9997), were obtained for oxygen as 8.5 and 28–14204 ppm, respectively. The relative standard deviations of the method for intraday and interday were obtained 4 and 11%, respectively. The satisfactory results revealed the ability of the negative corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for investigating the performance of synthesized oxygen adsorbents in nitrogen streams. Two oxygen scavengers of MnO and Cu powder were prepared and the optimum temperature of the reactor containing MnO and Cu powder were obtained as 180 and 230 °C, respectively. Due to higher lifetime of copper powder, it was selected as the oxygen scavenger and some parameters such as: the type of adsorbent support, the size of adsorbent particles, and the amount of copper were studied for preparation of more efficient oxygen adsorbent. - Highlights: • Analysis of oxygen using negative corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry was investigated for the first time. • Novel designed point-in-cylinder geometry was used to establish the corona discharge without interferences of negative ions. • The method was utilized to evaluate the performance of some synthesized oxygen scavengers.

  11. Micro faraday-element array detector for ion mobility spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, Christopher A [Albuquerque, NM; Rodacy, Phillip J [Albuquerque, NM; Denton, M Bonner [Tucson, AZ; Sperline, Roger [Tucson, AZ

    2004-10-26

    An ion mobility spectrometer includes a drift tube having a collecting surface covering a collecting area at one end of the tube. The surface comprises a plurality of closely spaced conductive elements on a non-conductive substrate, each conductive element being electrically insulated from each other element. A plurality of capacitive transimpedance amplifiers (CTIA) adjacent the collecting surface are electrically connected to the plurality of elements, so charge from an ion striking an element is transferred to the capacitor of the connected CTIA. A controller counts the charge on the capacitors over a period of time.

  12. Generation of Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond with Ion Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Jin-Ming; Chen Xiang-Dong; Gong Zhao-Jun; Sun Fang-Wen; Han Zheng-Fu; Guo Guang-Can; Fan Le-Le; Zou Chong-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen-vacancy defect color centers are created in a high purity single crystal diamond by nitrogen-ion implantation. Both optical spectrum and optically detected magnetic resonance are measured for these artificial quantum emitters. Moreover, with a suitable mask, a lattice composed of nitrogen-vacancy centers is fabricated. Rabi oscillation driven by micro-waves is carried out to show the quality of the ion implantation and potential in quantum manipulation. Along with compatible standard lithography, such an implantation technique shows high potential in future to make structures with nitrogen-vacancy centers for diamond photonics and integrated photonic quantum chip

  13. On mobility of ions in thin films in liquid substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, Yu.A.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of energy dissipation by emission of ripplons is solved for an ion moving in the media with two interfaces (films on solid and liquid substrates), taking into account the Van der Waals interaction. It is shown that in contrast to the earlier considered case of solid substrate where the action of the Van der Waals forces causes only renormalization of the free fall acceleration, in the vase of liquid substrate the influence of these forces is much more complicated. In addition to renormalization of the amplitude of the emitted surface wave and change of the velocity threshold after which the wave mechanism is effective, in sufficiently thin film, where modes are ''intersected'' the analytical expressions for mobility are also significantly modified. In real experimental environments consideration of all the factors mentioned leads as a rule to higher ion mobility

  14. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-CF4 mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, A. F. V.; Kaja, M. A.; Escada, J.; Santos, M. A. G.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon with carbon tetrafluoride (Xe-CF4) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm‑1ṡbar‑1), at room temperature. The time-of-arrival spectra revealed one or two peaks depending on the gas relative abundances, which were attributed to CF3+ and to Xe2+ ions. However, for Xe concentrations above 60%, only one peak remains (Xe2+). The reduced mobilities obtained from the peak centroid of the time-of-arrival spectra are presented for Xe concentrations in the 5%-95% range.

  15. Ion mobility and transport barriers in the tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, H.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Valanju, P.M.

    1993-06-01

    The character of charged particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system with a constant radial electric field is investigated both analytically and numerically. Ion radial mobility caused by the combined effects of the radial electric field and charge exchange is found. A simple moment argument in the banana regime matches the simulation results well. Relation of present work and high confinement (H-mode) experiment is also discussed

  16. Hypothesis of linear relaxation and ion mobility in neutral gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naudy, Michel

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to propose a theory of ion mobility in neutral gases, based on the hypothesis of linear relaxation, in order to obtain simple formula and a good agreement with experiment. The author first presents some generalities on ion mobility such as history and values of interest, and some notions about the way experimental results are obtained, and then theories proposed from 1903 to 1976. He reports two tests. The first one, based on the Boltzmann equation, is based on a method of moments, and requires the use of a computer, but does not give results in good agreement with the experiment. Thus, for the second test, the author used a kinetic equation similar to one used for the study of neutral gas viscosity. This kinetic equation is used for the study of ion mobility in neutral gases, and the author shows that, with a Sutherland potential, a simple formula can be obtained, the results of which can be obtained with a pocket calculator. Moreover, these results are in agreement with experimental values over a portion of the experimental range. In order to reach an agreement over the whole experimental range, a possibility has been to use, in some cases, a more realistic interaction potential. However, a computer was then necessary [fr

  17. A mobile light source for carbon/nitrogen cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trower, W.P.; Melekhin, V.N.; Shvedunov, V.I.; Sobenin, N.P.

    1995-01-01

    The pulsed light source for carbon/nitrogen cameras developed to image concealed narcotics/explosives is described. This race-track microtron will produce 40 mA pulses of 70 MeV electrons, have minimal size and weight, and maximal ruggedness and reliability, so that it can be transported on a truck. (orig.)

  18. A mobile light source for carbon/nitrogen cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, W. P.; Karev, A. I.; Melekhin, V. N.; Shvedunov, V. I.; Sobenin, N. P.

    1995-05-01

    The pulsed light source for carbon/nitrogen cameras developed to image concealed narcotics/explosives is described. This race-track microtron will produce 40 mA pulses of 70 MeV electrons, have minimal size and weight, and maximal ruggedness and reliability, so that it can be transported on a truck.

  19. The ion mobility spectrometer for high explosive vapor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.J.; Stimac, R.M.; Wernlund, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    The Phemto-Chem /SUP R/ Model 100 Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) operates in air and measures a number of explosive vapors at levels as low as partsper-trillion in seconds. The theory and operation of this instrument is discussed. The IMS inhales the vapor sample in a current of air and generates characteristic ions which are separated by time-of -ion drift in the atmospheric pressure gas. Quantitative results, using a dilution tunnel and standard signal generator with TNT, nitroglycerine, ethylene glycol dinitrate, cyclohexanone, methylamine, octafluoronaphthalene and hexafluorobenzene, are given. Rapid sample treatment with sample concentrations, microprocessor signal readout and chemical identification, offer a realistic opportunity of rapid explosive vapor detection at levels down to 10 -14 parts by volume in air

  20. Experimental Ion Mobility measurements in Ne-CO$_2$ and CO$_2$-N$_2$ mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Encarnação, P.M.C.C.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P.N.B.; Santos, F.P.; Trindade, A.M.F.; Borges, F.I.G.M.; Conde, C.A.N.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the experimental results for the mobility, K0, of ions in neon-carbon dioxide (Ne-CO2) and carbon dioxide-nitrogen (CO2-N2) gaseous mixtures for total pressures ranging from 8–12 Torr, reduced electric fields in the 10–25 Td range, at room temperature. Regarding the Ne-CO2 mixture only one peak was observed for CO2 concentrations above 25%, which has been identified as an ion originated in CO2, while below 25% of CO2 a second-small peak appears at the left side of the main peak, which has been attributed to impurities. The mobility values for the main peak range between 3.51 ± 0.05 and 1.07 ± 0.01 cm2V−1s−1 in the 10%-99% interval of CO2, and from 4.61 ± 0.19 to 3.00 ± 0.09 cm2V−1s−1 for the second peak observed (10%–25% of CO2). For the CO2-N2, the time-of-arrival spectra displayed only one peak for CO2 concentrations above 10%, which was attributed to ions originated in CO2, namely CO2+(CO2), with a second peak appearing for CO2 concentrations below 10%. This secon...

  1. Differential Fragmentation of Mobility-Selected Glycans via Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Kelsey A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2017-06-01

    The alternative dissociation pathways initiated by ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) compared with collision-induced dissociation (CID) may provide useful diagnostic fragments for biomolecule identification, including glycans. However, underivatized glycans do not commonly demonstrate strong UV absorbance, resulting in low fragmentation yields for UVPD spectra. In contrast to UVPD experiments that leverage covalent modification of glycans, we detail the capacity of metal adduction to yield comparatively rich UVPD fragmentation patterns and enhance separation factors for an isomeric glycan set in a drift tube ion mobility system. Ion mobility and UVPD-MS spectra for two N-acetyl glycan isomers were examined, each adducted with sodium or cobalt cations, with the latter providing fragment yield gains of an order of magnitude versus sodium adducts. Furthermore, our glycan analysis incorporated front-end ion mobility separation such that the structural glycan isomers could still be identified even as a mixture and not simply composite spectra of isomeric standards. Cobalt adduction proved influential in the glycan separation by yielding an isomer resolution of 0.78 when analyzed simultaneously versus no discernable separation obtained with the sodium adducts. It is the combined enhancement of both isomeric drift time separation and isomer distinction with improved UVPD fragment ion yields that further bolster multivalent metal adduction for advancing glycan IM-MS experiments. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Nitrogen ion implantation: Barriers to industrial acceptance and prospects for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation has been used to improve the wear and fatigue resistance of metals in industrial applications since the process was developed at the UK Harwell Laboratory in the 1970s. However, implantation service companies like Ion Surface Technology have found so far that the market for nitrogen implantation is limited. Both market and technical barriers exist to more widespread acceptance in industry. Market factors include cost, industrial conservatism, and production priorities in manufacturing. Technical factors include the size of available implanters, the line-of-sight limitation of ion implantation, sputtering, and other process limitations such as shallow penetration depth. Several recent technical developments that should greatly increase market acceptance are described: 1. large-scale nitrogen implanters, 2. the non-line-of-sight plasma source ion implantation process, and 3. ion assisted coating techniques. (orig.)

  3. Ion mobility spectrometric analysis of vaporous chemical warfare agents by the instrument with corona discharge ionization ammonia dopant ambient temperature operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Takafumi; Kishi, Shintaro; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Tachikawa, Masumi; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Nakagawa, Takao; Kitagawa, Nobuyoshi; Tokita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Soichiro; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-03-20

    The ion mobility behavior of nineteen chemical warfare agents (7 nerve gases, 5 blister agents, 2 lachrymators, 2 blood agents, 3 choking agents) and related compounds including simulants (8 agents) and organic solvents (39) was comparably investigated by the ion mobility spectrometry instrument utilizing weak electric field linear drift tube with corona discharge ionization, ammonia doping, purified inner air drift flow circulation operated at ambient temperature and pressure. Three alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates, tabun, and four organophosphorus simulants gave the intense characteristic positive monomer-derived ion peaks and small dimer-derived ion peaks, and the later ion peaks were increased with the vapor concentrations. VX, RVX and tabun gave both characteristic positive monomer-derived ions and degradation product ions. Nitrogen mustards gave the intense characteristic positive ion peaks, and in addition distinctive negative ion peak appeared from HN3. Mustard gas, lewisite 1, o-chlorobenzylidenemalononitrile and 2-mercaptoethanol gave the characteristic negative ion peaks. Methylphosphonyl difluoride, 2-chloroacetophenone and 1,4-thioxane gave the characteristic ion peaks both in the positive and negative ion mode. 2-Chloroethylethylsulfide and allylisothiocyanate gave weak ion peaks. The marker ion peaks derived from two blood agents and three choking agents were very close to the reactant ion peak in negative ion mode and the respective reduced ion mobility was fluctuated. The reduced ion mobility of the CWA monomer-derived peaks were positively correlated with molecular masses among structurally similar agents such as G-type nerve gases and organophosphorus simulants; V-type nerve gases and nitrogen mustards. The slope values of the calibration plots of the peak heights of the characteristic marker ions versus the vapor concentrations are related to the detection sensitivity, and within chemical warfare agents examined the slope values for sarin, soman

  4. Ion mobility spectrometry for food quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautz, W; Zimmermann, D; Hartmann, M; Baumbach, J I; Nolte, J; Jung, J

    2006-11-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is known to be a fast and sensitive technique for the detection of trace substances, and it is increasingly in demand not only for protection against explosives and chemical warfare agents, but also for new applications in medical diagnosis or process control. Generally, a gas phase sample is ionized by help of ultraviolet light, ss-radiation or partial discharges. The ions move in a weak electrical field towards a detector. During their drift they collide with a drift gas flowing in the opposite direction and, therefore, are slowed down depending on their size, shape and charge. As a result, different ions reach the detector at different drift times, which are characteristic for the ions considered. The number of ions reaching the detector are a measure of the concentration of the analyte. The method enables the identification and quantification of analytes with high sensitivity (ng l(-1) range). The selectivity can even be increased - as necessary for the analyses of complex mixtures - using pre-separation techniques such as gas chromatography or multi-capillary columns. No pre-concentration of the sample is necessary. Those characteristics of the method are preserved even in air with up to a 100% relative humidity rate. The suitability of the method for application in the field of food quality and safety - including storage, process and quality control as well as the characterization of food stuffs - was investigated in recent years for a number of representative examples, which are summarized in the following, including new studies as well: (1) the detection of metabolites from bacteria for the identification and control of their growth; (2) process control in food production - beer fermentation being an example; (3) the detection of the metabolites of mould for process control during cheese production, for quality control of raw materials or for the control of storage conditions; (4) the quality control of packaging materials during

  5. The microstructure and surface hardness of Ti6Al4V alloy implanted with nitrogen ions at an elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcak, Petr, E-mail: petr.vlcak@fs.cvut.cz [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Cerny, Frantisek [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Drahokoupil, Jan [Department of Metals, Institute of Physics, AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Sepitka, Josef [Department of Mechanics, Biomechanics and Mechatronics, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic); Tolde, Zdenek [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, Technicka 4, 16607 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-25

    Highlights: • The Ti6Al4V samples were implanted with 90 keV nitrogen ions. • The samples were annealed at 500 °C during the ion implantation process. • An elevated temperature increases the mobility of the atoms and the quantity of TiN. • The hardness showed a significant increase compared to room temperature implantation. - Abstract: The effect of an elevated temperature during nitrogen ion implantation on the microstructure and on the surface hardness of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy was examined. The implantation process was carried out at fluences of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17}, 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 6 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} and at ion energy 90 keV. The implanted samples were annealed at 500 °C during the implantation process. X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to obtain a phase characterization and a phase quantification in the implanted sample surface. The surface hardness was investigated by nanoindentation testing, and the nitrogen depth distribution was measured by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Elevated temperature led to increased formation of a TiN compound. It was found that a mixture of TiN and an α-Ti(+N) solid solution had a predominant amount of TiN for samples with fluence of 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} or higher. Elevated temperature during ion implantation caused an increase in surface hardening more towards the depth of the substrate in comparison with room temperature implantation. The hardness showed a remarkably significant increase at a fluence of 1 ⋅ 10{sup 17} and 2.7 ⋅ 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} compared to samples implanted at the same fluences and at room temperature. There is a discussion of such mechanisms that explain the observed hardening more towards the depth of the substrate, and the increase in hardness.

  6. The effect of ion irradiation on inert gas bubble mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1991-09-01

    The effect of Al ion irradiation on the mobility of Xe gas bubbles in Al thin films was investigated. Transmission electron microscopy was used to determine bubble diffusivities in films irradiated and/or annealed at 673K, 723K and 773K. Irradiation increased bubble diffusivity by a factor of 2--9 over that due to thermal annealing alone. The Arrhenius behavior and dose rate dependence of bubble diffusivity are consistent with a radiation enhanced diffusion phenomenon affecting a volume diffusion mechanism of bubble transport. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. In situ EELS and TEM observation of Al implanted with nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojou, K.; Furuno, S.; Kushita, K.N.; Otsu, H.; Izui, K.

    1995-01-01

    Formation processes of Aluminum nitride (AIN) in Aluminum (AI) implanted with nitrogen were examined by in situ EELS and TEM observations during nitrogen ion implantation in an electron microscope at room temperature and 400 deg C. AIN phase was identified both by EDP and EELS after nitrogen ion implantation to 6 x 10 20 (N + )/m 2 . The observed peak (20.8 eV) in EELS spectra was identified as plasmon loss peak of AIN formed in AI. The binding energy of N ls in AI was found to shift by about 4 eV to the lower side with increasing nitrogen-ion fluence. Unreacted AI was also found to remain in the AIN films after high fluence implantation both at room temperature and 400 deg C. (authors). 11 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Nitrogen diffusion in near-surface range of ion doped molybdenum

    CERN Document Server

    Zamalin, E Y

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of change in nitrogen near-the-surface concentration in the Mo ion-alloyed monocrystalline foil is studied through the Auger-electron spectroscopy and the secondary ion mass spectrometry. The implantation dose constituted 5 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 ion/cm sup 2 and the implantation energy equaled 50 and 100 keV. The samples diffusion annealing was performed at the temperature of 800-900 deg C. The evaluation of the nitrogen diffusion coefficient indicates the values by 3-5 orders lesser than the diffusion coefficient in the nitrogen solid-state solution in the molybdenum. At the same time the molybdenum self-diffusion coefficient value is by 3-5 orders lesser as compared to the obtained value. The supposition is made, the the surplus nitrogen relative to the solubility limit is deposited on the radiation defects and in the process of the diffusion annealing it nitrates together with them

  9. Hydrogenlike nitrogen ions collision with helium into excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Guangyan; Yang Feng; Li Dawan; Xu Qian; Liu Huiping; Zhao Mengchun

    1991-01-01

    The emission spectra have been measured in collisions between N 6+ and He using the LHT-30 VUV Monochromator. The wavelength range is 10 nm-80 nm, the energy of N 6+ ions is 90 keV, the current of ion beam in the collision region is about 10 μA. Recently, the authors have investigated the electron capture processes and incident ions excitation in the velocity of N 6+ ions about 0.5 atomic unit. The emission spectrum of N V, N VI and N VII liens is given in collisions of N 6+ with He at 90 keV of ions energy

  10. Long-range effect in nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budzynski, P., E-mail: p.budzynski@pollub.pl

    2015-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on AISI 316L stainless steel was investigated. The microstructure and composition of an N implanted layer were studied by RBS, GIXRD, SEM, and EDX measurements. Friction and wear tests were also performed. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated stopped ion maximum range does not exceed 0.03 μm. After nitrogen implantation with a fluence of 5 × 10{sup 17} ion/cm{sup 2}, additional phases of expanded austenite were detected. At a 5-fold larger depth than the maximum ion range, improvement in the coefficient of friction and wear was detected. We have shown, for the first time, the long-range effect in tribological investigations. The long-range effect is caused by movement of not only defects along the depth of the sample, as assumed so far, but also nitrogen atoms.

  11. Long-range effect in nitrogen ion-implanted AISI 316L stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzynski, P.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen ion implantation on AISI 316L stainless steel was investigated. The microstructure and composition of an N implanted layer were studied by RBS, GIXRD, SEM, and EDX measurements. Friction and wear tests were also performed. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated stopped ion maximum range does not exceed 0.03 μm. After nitrogen implantation with a fluence of 5 × 1017 ion/cm2, additional phases of expanded austenite were detected. At a 5-fold larger depth than the maximum ion range, improvement in the coefficient of friction and wear was detected. We have shown, for the first time, the long-range effect in tribological investigations. The long-range effect is caused by movement of not only defects along the depth of the sample, as assumed so far, but also nitrogen atoms.

  12. Measurement of negative ion mobility in O2 at high pressures using a point plate gap as an ion detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, Y; Kimura, T; Suzuki, S; Itoh, H

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental results for negative ion mobility in O 2 at 0.5-2.0 atm. The ion mobility is observed using a high-pressure ion drift tube with a positive corona gap (Geiger counter), which is constructed from a point plate gap and acts as a negative ion detector. The variation of waveforms in the burst pulse is observed by varying the voltage applied to the ion detector to find the optimum voltage that must be applied across the ion detector in O 2 . This is investigated carefully to ensure the precise determination of mobility. The distortion of the electric field near the mesh electrode, which operates as the cathode of the ion detector and as the anode of the ion drift gap, is then examined to determine the optimum applied voltage to suppress its effect on the measurement of mobility. The mobility is subsequently measured at a reduced electric field intensity of 2.83 × 10 -3 to 2.83. The observed mobility of 2.31 ± 0.03 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in O 2 is concluded to be that of O 2 - . This value is also obtained in experiments over a wide range of gas pressures (0.5-2.0 atm) and drift lengths (1.00-9.00 cm). The mobilities of O 3 - and O - are also obtained experimentally. (paper)

  13. The ion–aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-05-21

    May 21, 2011 ... On these days mobility spectra showed two modes, ... together with the formation of multiple charged ions are proposed to result in the light and heavy large ion modes. Growth of ..... day and minimum during the night hours.

  14. Modification of polyethyleneterephtalate by implantation of nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svorcik, V.; Endrst, R.; Rybka, V.; Hnatowicz, V.; Cerny, F.

    1994-01-01

    The implantation of 90 keV N + ions into polyethyleneterephtalate (PET) to fluences of 1 x 10 14 --1 x 10 17 cm -2 was studied. The changes in electrical sheet conductivity and polarity of ion-exposed PET were observed and the structural changes were examined using IR spectroscopy. One degradation process is a chain fission according to the Norrish II reaction. The sheet conductivity due to conjugated double bonds was increased by ten orders of magnitude as a result of ion implantation. The surface polarity of the PET samples increases slightly with increasing ion fluence

  15. Mobilities of ions trapped on vortex lines in dilute 3He--4He solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.; Dahm, A.J.

    1976-01-01

    A model calculation of the mobility of a positive ion in the presence of 3 He atoms condensed on a vortex core is presented. Reasonable qualitative and quantitative agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, and reasons for differences are discussed. A reason for the larger mobility of the negative ion in comparison to the smaller positive ion is suggested. The contribution of vortex waves to the scattering of ions is addressed

  16. The role of ion optics modeling in the design and development of ion mobility spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Matthew T.

    2005-05-01

    Detection of trace gases by ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS) has become common in recent years. In fact, IMS devices are the most commonly deployed military devices for the detection of classical chemical warfare agents (CWA). IMS devices are protecting the homeland by aiding first responders in the identification of toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) and providing explosive and narcotic screening systems. Spurred by the asymmetric threat posed by new threat agents and the ever expanding list of toxic chemicals, research in the development, improvement, and optimization of IMS systems has increased. Much of the research is focused on increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of IMS systems. Ion optics is a large area of study in the field of mass spectrometry, but has been mostly overlooked in the design and development of IMS systems. Ion optics provides insight into particle trajectories, duty cycle, and efficiency of these systems. This paper will outline the role that ion optics can have in the development of IMS systems and introduce the trade space for traditional IMS as well as differential mobility spectroscopy.

  17. Successive ionization of positive ions of carbon and nitrogen by electron bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donets, E.D.; Ilyushchenko, V.I.

    Experimental studies of deep ionization of heavy ions are described. The applications of such studies in atomic physics, plasma physics and space physics are discussed. Investigations using intersecting ion-electron beams, shifted beams and ion trap sources are described, and data are presented for multi-charged ions of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen. A detailed description of the development of the IEL (electron beam ionizer) source, and the KRION (cryogenic version) source is given, and further data for the multiple ionization of carbon and nitrogen are given for charge states up to C 6+ and N 7+ . The advantages and disadvantages of the KRION source are discussed, and preliminary studies of a new torroidal ion trap source (HIRAC) are presented. (11 figs, 57 refs) (U.S.)

  18. Effect of nitrogen ion implantation on the structural and optical properties of indium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Riti; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M., E-mail: amsiddiqui@jmi.ac.in [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Kumar, Pravin [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India); Khan, Sameen Ahmed [Department of Mathematics and Sciences, College of Arts and Applied Sciences (CAAS) Dhofar University, Salalah, Sultanate of Oman (Oman)

    2016-06-10

    : We report here synthesis and subsequent nitrogen ion implantation of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films. The films were implanted with 25 keV N{sup +} beam for different ion doses between 3E15 to 1E16 ions/cm{sup 2}. The resulting changes in structural and optical properties were investigated using XRD, SEM-EDAX and UV-Vis Spectrometry. XRD studies reveal decrease in crystallite size from 20.06 to 12.42 nm with increase in ion dose. SEM micrographs show an increase in the grain size from 0.8 to 1.35 µm with increase in ion dose because of the agglomeration of the grains. Also, from EDAX data on pristine and N-implanted thin films the presence of indium and oxygen without any traces of impurity elements could be seen. However, at lower ion doses such as 3E15 and 5E15 ions/cm{sup 2}, no evidence of the presence of nitrogen ion was seen. However, for the ion dose of 1E16 ions/cm{sup 2}, evidence of presence of nitrogen can be seen in the EDAX data. Band gap calculations reveal a decrease in band gap from 3.54 to 3.38 eV with increasing ion dose. However, the band gap was found to again show an increase to 3.58 eV at the highest ion dose owing to quantum confinement effect.

  19. Measurement of negative ion mobilities in O2 and O3 mixtures at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, H.; Norimoto, K.; Hayashi, T.

    1998-01-01

    Mobility measurements of negative molecular oxygen ions in pure oxygen and in an oxygen-ozone mixture are reported. A cascaded gap consisting of an ion drift gap and an ion detection gap was used in the experiment. The ion detection gap was formed by a positive point and a grounded plane electrode was operated at atmospheric pressure. The zero field mobility of negative molecular oxygen ions was determined to be 2.07+-0.02 cm 2 /V.s. A somewhat higher value of oxygen mobility was found at higher electric field/pressure ratios; this is presumed to be due to negative ozone ions. When changing the electric field/pressure ratio the mobility of negative oxygen ions in oxygen-ozone mixtures becomes smaller than that in pure oxygen; this is probably due to the cumulative effect of other particles produced by silent discharges. (J.U.)

  20. Evaluation of Data for Collisions of Electrons with Nitrogen Molecule and Nitrogen Molecular Ion. Summary Report of an IAEA Consultants Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Mason, Nigel J.

    2014-02-01

    A Consultants' Meeting (CM) on Evaluation of Data for Collisions of Electrons with Nitrogen Molecules and Nitrogen Molecular Ions was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 5th to 6th December 2013. The meeting was organized in collaboration between the European eMOL project led by Prof N. J. Mason of the Open University, UK, and the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the IAEA. Seven experts from six countries participated in the meeting to evaluate currently available electron scattering data for nitrogen and nitrogen molecular ions and to develop general guidelines for data evaluation as a structured small group activity

  1. Structural modification of tantalum crystal induced by nitrogen ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran ... check the roughness variations prior to and also after the implantation phase. ... tional changes of modified surfaces as a function of ion dose.

  2. A Simple Analytical Model for Predicting the Detectable Ion Current in Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using Corona Discharge Ionization Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ansgar Thomas; Kobelt, Tim; Spehlbrink, Hauke; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    Corona discharge ionization sources are often used in ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) when a non-radioactive ion source with high ion currents is required. Typically, the corona discharge is followed by a reaction region where analyte ions are formed from the reactant ions. In this work, we present a simple yet sufficiently accurate model for predicting the ion current available at the end of this reaction region when operating at reduced pressure as in High Kinetic Energy Ion Mobility Spectrometers (HiKE-IMS) or most IMS-MS instruments. It yields excellent qualitative agreement with measurement results and is even able to calculate the ion current within an error of 15%. Additional interesting findings of this model are the ion current at the end of the reaction region being independent from the ion current generated by the corona discharge and the ion current in High Kinetic Energy Ion Mobility Spectrometers (HiKE-IMS) growing quadratically when scaling down the length of the reaction region. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Examination of Organic Vapor Adsorption onto Alkali Metal and Halide Atomic Ions by using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiβer, Anne; Hogan, Christopher J

    2017-11-03

    We utilize ion mobility mass spectrometry with an atmospheric pressure differential mobility analyzer coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (DMA-MS) to examine the formation of ion-vapor molecule complexes with seed ions of K + , Rb + , Cs + , Br - , and I - exposed to n-butanol and n-nonane vapor under subsaturated conditions. Ion-vapor molecule complex formation is indicated by a shift in the apparent mobility of each ion. Measurement results are compared to predicted mobility shifts based upon the Kelvin-Thomson equation, which is commonly used in predicting rates of ion-induced nucleation. We find that n-butanol at saturation ratios as low as 0.03 readily binds to all seed ions, leading to mobility shifts in excess of 35 %. Conversely, the binding of n-nonane is not detectable for any ion for saturation ratios in the 0-0.27 range. An inverse correlation between the ionic radius of the initial seed and the extent of n-butanol uptake is observed, such that at elevated n-butanol concentrations, the smallest ion (K + ) has the smallest apparent mobility and the largest (I - ) has the largest apparent mobility. Though the differences in behavior of the two vapor molecules types examined and the observed effect of ionic seed radius are not accounted for by the Kelvin-Thomson equation, its predictions are in good agreement with measured mobility shifts for Rb + , Cs + , and Br - in the presence of n-butanol (typically within 10 % of measurements). © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  4. Microstructural and corrosivity changes induced by nitrogen ion implantation on chromium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokouhy, A.; Larijani, M.M.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Hosseini G, S.H. Haji; Yari, M.; Sari, A.H.; Shahraki, M. Gholipur

    2006-01-01

    The chromium thin films were prepared using ion beam deposition on stainless steel 304. The chromium films were implanted by nitrogen ions after deposition at doses in the range of 4.5 x 10 17 to 2.7 x 10 18 N + /cm 2 and energy of 30 keV. The formation of nitride phases and corrosion behavior after nitrogen implantation were characterized by XRD and corrosion test, respectively. The results show that corrosion resistance rise, reach to a maximum at dose of 1.8 x 10 18 , and then fall down at higher doses. In addition, the effect of corrosion tests was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  5. Thermoluminescent relative efficiencies of TLD-100 for nitrogen ions respect of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concha S, K.; Avila, O.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Rodriguez V, M.; Buenfil, A.E.; Ruiz T, C.; Brandan, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to measure the thermoluminescent relative efficiency of those TLD-100 dosemeters irradiated with nitrogen ions with respect to the gamma radiation of 60 Co, in function of the linear energy transfer (LET). Two energy of such nitrogen ions were selected that has the same value from LET when impacting in the dosemeters but with E 1 energy (4.8 MeV) and E 2 (9.95 MeV) smaller and greater respectively that the energy of the Bragg peak. (Author)

  6. Nitrogen Ion TRacing Observatory (NITRO) concept: a possible mission for next ESA's M-class call

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Dandouras, Iannis; Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    Nitrogen is a key element for life as an inevitable part of the amino acid and protein, and its oxidation state (NH3 or N2 or NOX) in the ancient atmosphere is one of the key factors that determine the difficulty in forming amino acid without biological processes. Considering the fact that nitrogen molecule with triple chemical binding is much more difficult to be desolved/ionized than oxygen molecule with double chemical binding, and that dependence of the ion outflow from the ionosphere on the geomagnetic activity is more drastic for cold nitrogen ion than cold oxygen ions, it is important to understand the dynamic of N+ and N2+ at different solar conditions as compared to oxygen dynamics or proton dynamics. However, nearly no such observation exists at low energy less than keV, except very little observations for thermal nitrogen. One reason for lack of such measurement is difficulty in separating hot N+ from hot O+ even with the modern instruments, causing past instruments on board magnetospheric missions not targeting such separation but rather targeting higher temporal and spatial resolutions. However, with recent improvement of mass-separating ion analyser, it is now most likely possible to separate O+ and N+ by masking H+ and He++ and by limiting the angular coverage to minimize the contamination. In this sense, the nitrogen study in the magnetosphere requires a dedicated space mission. At moment there are two options: (1) pioneering single spacecraft mission with minimum instrumentation to detect hot nitrogen ions of missing energy range from 50 eV to 10 keV in the past missions; and (2) multi-spacecraft mission to make a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of nitrogen ions in the magnetosphere. Here we present necessary spacecraft and instrumentation for the second option because that will be fitted into the M-class mission (450 MEUR) that European Space Agency most likely announces soon this year. The mission consists of three spacecraft, two mid

  7. In-vitro evaluation of corrosion resistance of nitrogen ion implanted titanium simulated body fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbaiyan, M.; Sundararajian, T.; Rajeswari, S.; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Nair, K.G.M.; Thampi, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium and its alloy Ti6Al4V enjoy widespread use in various biomedical applications because of favourable local tissue response, higher corrosion resistance and fatigue strength than the stainless steels and cobalt-chromium alloy previously used. The study reported in this paper aims to optimize the conditions of nitrogen ion implantation on commercially pure titanium and to correlate the implantation parameters to the corrosion resistance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyse surface concentration and the implantation processes. An improvement in the electrochemical behaviour of the passive film was shown to occur with nitrogen ion implantation on titanium, in simulated body fluids. (UK)

  8. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization of fluorinated phenols in atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Bergloff, J. F.; Rodriguez, J. E.; Munro, W.; Karpas, Z.

    1999-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-mass spectrometry (MS) for fluorinated phenols (C6H5-xFxOH Where x = 0-5) in nitrogen with Cl- as the reagent ion yielded product ions of M Cl- through ion associations or (M-H)- through proton abstractions. Proton abstraction was controllable by potentials on the orifice and first lens, suggesting that some proton abstraction occurs through collision induced dissociation (CID) in the interface region. This was proven using CID of adduct ions (M Cl-) with Q2 studies where adduct ions were dissociated to Cl- or proton abstracted to (M-H)-. The extent of proton abstraction depended upon ion energy and structure in order of calculated acidities: pentafluorophenol > tetrafluorophenol > trifluorophenol > difluorophenol. Little or no proton abstraction occurred for fluorophenol, phenol, or benzyl alcohol analogs. Ion mobility spectrometry was used to determine if proton abstraction reactions passed through an adduct intermediate with thermalized ions and mobility spectra for all chemicals were obtained from 25 to 200 degrees C. Proton abstraction from M Cl- was not observed at any temperature for phenol, monofluorophenol, or difluorophenol. Mobility spectra for trifluorophenol revealed the kinetic transformations to (M-H)- either from M Cl- or from M2 Cl- directly. Proton abstraction was the predominant reaction for tetra- and penta-fluorophenols. Consequently, the evidence suggests that proton abstraction occurs from an adduct ion where the reaction barrier is reduced with increasing acidity of the O-H bond in C6H5-xFxOH.

  9. The affinity of the uranyl ion for nitrogen donor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, N.V.; De Sousa, A.S.; Hancock, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Established ligand design principles are used to predict the solution chemistry of UO 2 2+ with nitrogen donor ligands which do not contain carboxylate donors. pK a 's of the nitrogen donors are lowered by addition of hydroxylalkyl groups causing UO 2 2+ to have a greater affinity for these ligands than for hydroxide. Potentiometric studies using the ligands N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)1,2-diaminoethane, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane; 1,4,8,11-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine with UO 2 2+ showed that UO 2 2+ has a considerable aqueous solution chemistry with these ligands. (orig.)

  10. Luminescence of natural IIa diamond implanted with nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varichenko, V.S.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Stelmakh, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of defect environment in the irradiated diamond lattice are presented. The N + implantation with energies from 60 keV up to 60 MeV was used both as method of introducing nitrogen containing defects into the diamond and as a good tool to create different environment of these defects. Photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, and annealing measurements show that the action of defect environment is revealed through the effective pressure affecting the thermal stability of defects and their inhomogeneous distortion

  11. Shallow nitrogen ion implantation: Evolution of chemical state and defect structure in titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manojkumar, P.A., E-mail: manoj@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Chirayath, V.A.; Balamurugan, A.K.; Krishna, Nanda Gopala; Ilango, S.; Kamruddin, M.; Amarendra, G.; Tyagi, A.K. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [National Institute of Advanced Studies, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Low energy nitrogen ion implantation in titanium was studied. • Chemical and defect states were analyzed using SIMS, XPS and PAS. • SIMS and depth resolved XPS data showed good agreement. • Depth resolved defect and chemical states information were revealed. • Formation of 3 layers of defect states proposed to fit PAS results. - Abstract: Evolution of chemical states and defect structure in titanium during low energy nitrogen ion implantation by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) process is studied. The underlying process of chemical state evolution is investigated using secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The implantation induced defect structure evolution as a function of dose is elucidated using variable energy positron annihilation Doppler broadening spectroscopy (PAS) and the results were corroborated with chemical state. Formation of 3 layers of defect state was modeled to fit PAS results.

  12. Sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.

    1994-01-01

    Electronic sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions has been studied at two low-temperature setups. The yield of the sputtered particles has been determined in the energy regime 4-10 keV for H+, H-2+ and H-3+ ions. The yield for oxygen is more than a factor of two larger than...... that for nitrogen. The energy distributions of the sputtered N2 and O2 molecules were measured for hydrogen ions in this energy regime as well. The yields from both solids turn out to depend on the sum of the stopping power of all atoms in the ion. The yield increases as a quadratic function of the stopping power...

  13. Improved cell viability and hydroxyapatite growth on nitrogen ion-implanted surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafique, Muhammad Ahsan; Murtaza, G.; Saadat, Shahzad; Uddin, Muhammad K. H.; Ahmad, Riaz

    2017-08-01

    Stainless steel 306 is implanted with various doses of nitrogen ions using a 2 MV pelletron accelerator for the improvement of its surface biomedical properties. Raman spectroscopy reveals incubation of hydroxyapatite (HA) on all the samples and it is found that the growth of incubated HA is greater in higher ion dose samples. SEM profiles depict uniform growth and greater spread of HA with higher ion implantation. Human oral fibroblast response is also found consistent with Raman spectroscopy and SEM results; the cell viability is found maximum in samples treated with the highest (more than 300%) dose. XRD profiles signified greater peak intensity of HA with ion implantation; a contact angle study revealed hydrophilic behavior of all the samples but the treated samples were found to be lesser hydrophilic compared to the control samples. Nitrogen implantation yields greater bioactivity, improved surface affinity for HA incubation and improved hardness of the surface.

  14. A compact high resolution electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, T; Kirk, A T; Ahrens, A; Raddatz, C-R; Thoben, C; Zimmermann, S

    2016-04-01

    Electrospray is a commonly used ionization method for the analysis of liquids. An electrospray is a dispersed nebular of charged droplets produced under the influence of a strong electrical field. Subsequently, ions are produced in a complex process initiated by evaporation of neutral solvent molecules from these droplets. We coupled an electrospray ionization source to our previously described high resolution ion mobility spectrometer with 75 mm drift tube length and a drift voltage of 5 kV. When using a tritium source for chemical gas phase ionization, a resolving power of R=100 was reported for this setup. We replaced the tritium source and the field switching shutter by an electrospray needle, a desolvation region with variable length and a three-grid shutter for injecting ions into the drift region. Preliminary measurements with tetraalkylammonium halides show that the current configuration with the electrospray ionization source maintains the resolving power of R=100. In this work, we present the characterization of our setup. One major advantage of our setup is that the desolvation region can be heated separately from the drift region so that the temperature in the drift region stays at room temperature even up to desolvation region temperatures of 100 °C. We perform parametric studies for the investigation of the influence of temperature on solvent evaporation with different ratios of water and methanol in the solvent for different analyte substances. Furthermore, the setup is operated in negative mode and spectra of bentazon with different solvents are presented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manard, Manuel J.; Weeks, Stephan; Kyle, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and

  16. Changes of the electronic structure of the atoms of nitrogen in nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes under the influence of pulsed ion radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korusenko, P.M., E-mail: korusenko@obisp.oscsbras.ru [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Bolotov, V.V.; Nesov, S.N.; Povoroznyuk, S.N. [Omsk Scientific Centre, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Karl Marx Avenue, 15, Omsk 644024 (Russian Federation); Khailov, I.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Ave. 2a, Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    With the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) there have been investigated the changes of the chemical state of nitrogen atoms in the structure of nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}-MWCNTs) resulting from the impact of pulsed ion beam at various parameters of the beam (energy density, number of pulses). It has been established that irradiation with the pulsed ion beam leads to a reduction of the total amount of nitrogen in CN{sub x} nanotubes. It has been shown that a single pulse irradiation of ion beam at the energy densities of 0.5, 1, 1.5 J/cm{sup 2} leads to restructuring of the nitrogen from pyridinic and pyrrolic configuration to graphitic state. Complete removal of nitrogen (pyridinic, pyrrolic, graphitic) embedded in the structure of the walls of CN{sub x} nanotubes occurs at ten pulses and 1.5 J/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Unexpected mobility of OH+ and OD+ molecular ions in cooled helium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, R; Yamazoe, J; Tanuma, H; Ohtsuki, K

    2012-01-01

    Mobilities of OH + and OD + ions in cooled helium gas have been measured at gas temperature of 4.3 K. Measured mobilities of both ions as a function of an effective temperature T eff show a minimum around 80 K, and they are approaching to the polarization limits at very low T eff . These findings will be related to the extremely strong anisotropy of the interaction potential between the molecular ion and helium atom.

  18. Formation and decay of the intermediate quasistationary ion N-2 during charge exchange between fast H- ions and nitrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskii, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    The detachment of the electron from the H - ion during a collision with the nitrogen molecule at 1--6 keV occurs as a result of charge transfer to an unstable intermediate state of the molecular ion N - 2 and the subsequent decay of the ion. The formation process is described in the impulse approximation, and the motion of nuclei in the ion is treated quasiclassically. Expressions are obtained for the spectrum of emitted electrons and for the energy-loss spectrum of heavy particles. These expressions relate the spectra to the cross sections for the vibrational excitation of N 2 by electron impact. A convenient expression for the amplitude for the formation of the intermediate state is obtained in the ''boomerang'' model, and it is shown that one of the parameters, considered to be adjustable in traditional theory, can be calculated

  19. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The affinity of the uranyl ion for nitrogen donor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, N.V. (Atomic Energy Corp. of South Africa Ltd., Pretoria (South Africa). Dept. of Process Technology); De Sousa, A.S.; Hancock, R.D. (Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Centre for Molecular Design)

    1992-01-01

    Established ligand design principles are used to predict the solution chemistry of UO[sub 2][sup 2+] with nitrogen donor ligands which do not contain carboxylate donors. pK[sub a]'s of the nitrogen donors are lowered by addition of hydroxylalkyl groups causing UO[sub 2][sup 2+] to have a greater affinity for these ligands than for hydroxide. Potentiometric studies using the ligands N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N',N''-pentakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,7-triazaheptane; N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxypropyl)1,2-diaminoethane, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane; 1,4,8,11-tetrakis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)glycine with UO[sub 2][sup 2+] showed that UO[sub 2][sup 2+] has a considerable aqueous solution chemistry with these ligands. (orig.).

  1. Preliminary report into the effects of nitrogen ion bombardment treatment on mustard seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.; Al-Hashmi, S.A.R.; Ahmed, N.A.G.; Pollard, M.

    1988-01-01

    Mustard seeds have been subjected to nitrogen ion bombardment. A range of conditions was found within which there was an enhancement in the growth of seedlings from the ion bombardment treated seeds relative to those grown from control seeds. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine seeds after treatment. It appeared that there had been an etching of the seed coating by the ion bombardment. This view was supported by experiments which showed that the rate of capillary water uptake by the treated seeds had been enhanced. (author)

  2. Diet and mobility in Early Medieval Bavaria: a study of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakenbeck, Susanne; McManus, Ellen; Geisler, Hans; Grupe, Gisela; O'Connell, Tamsin

    2010-10-01

    This study investigates patterns of mobility in Early Medieval Bavaria through a combined study of diet and associated burial practice. Carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios were analyzed in human bone samples from the Late Roman cemetery of Klettham and from the Early Medieval cemeteries of Altenerding and Straubing-Bajuwarenstrasse. For dietary comparison, samples of faunal bone from one Late Roman and three Early Medieval settlement sites were also analyzed. The results indicate that the average diet was in keeping with a landlocked environment and fairly limited availability of freshwater or marine resources. The diet appears not to have changed significantly from the Late Roman to the Early Medieval period. However, in the population of Altenerding, there were significant differences in the diet of men and women, supporting a hypothesis of greater mobility among women. Furthermore, the isotopic evidence from dietary outliers is supported by "foreign" grave goods and practices, such as artificial skull modification. These results reveal the potential of carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis for questions regarding migration and mobility. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Towards metals analysis using corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2016-02-25

    For the first time, the capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) in the determination of metal complex was evaluated. The extreme simplicity of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) coupled to the high sensitivity of CD-IMS measurement could make this combination really useful for simple, rapid, and sensitive determination of metals in different samples. In this regard, mercury, as a model metal, was complexed with diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDTC), and then extracted into the carbon tetrachloride using DLLME. Some parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of the extraction solvent, the type and volume of the disperser solvent, the concentration of the chelating agent, salt addition and, pH were exhaustively investigated. Under the optimized condition, the enrichment factor was obtained to be 142. The linear range of 0.035-10.0 μg mL(-1) with r(2) = 0.997 and the detection limit of 0.010 μg mL(-1) were obtained. The relative standard deviation values were calculated to be lower than 4% and 8% for intra-day and inter-day, respectively. Finally, the developed method was successfully applied for the extraction and determination of mercury in various real samples. The satisfactory results revealed the capability of the proposed method in trace analysis without tedious derivatization or hydride generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Use of an ion mobility spectrometer for detecting uranium compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Derek R; Steeb, Jennifer L; Smith, Nicholas A

    2018-07-01

    The safeguards community currently lacks a method to rapidly determine the chemical form of radioactive and non-radioactive compounds in real time during inspection activities. Chemical speciation identification can provide important information on both the types of materials that are collected during environmental sampling and can inform inspectors as to where to focus efforts during inspections or complementary access visits. Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is an established field technique for the detection of explosives, narcotics, and other organic compounds. More recently, electrospray ionization (ESI) has been used to introduce inorganic compounds to IMS instruments for analysis. These techniques have shown the ability to supply chemical information on the compounds analyzed. Although these laboratory based instruments use a liquid-based injection system, there is evidence in the literature of unaltered and intact pharmaceutical tablets being volatilized and ionized in open atmosphere using heat and a Ni-63 source. This work determined that a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) IMS could be used for the identification of solid uranium compounds directly after sampling using a COTS sample swipe. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ionization of water clusters by fast Highly Charged Ions: Stability, fragmentation, energetics and charge mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, S; Maisonny, R; Capron, M; Bernigaud, V; Cassimi, A; Gervais, B; Grandin, J-P; Huber, B A; Manil, B; Rousseau, P; Tarisien, M; Adoui, L; Lopez-Tarifa, P; AlcamI, M; MartIn, F; Politis, M-F; Penhoat, M A Herve du; Vuilleumier, R; Gaigeot, M-P; Tavernelli, I

    2009-01-01

    We study dissociative ionization of water clusters by impact of fast Ni ions. Cold Target Recoil Ion Momentum Spectroscopy (COLTRIMS) is used to obtain information about stability, energetics and charge mobility of the ionized clusters. An unusual stability of the (H 2 O) 4 H ''+ ion is observed, which could be the signature of the so called ''Eigen'' structure in gas phase water clusters. High charge mobility, responsible for the formation of protonated water clusters that dominate the mass spectrum, is evidenced. These results are supported by CPMD and TDDFT simulations, which also reveal the mechanisms of such mobility.

  6. Amorphous carbon nitrogenated films prepared by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Elidiane C.; Durrant, Steven F.; Rangel, Rita C.C.; Kayama, Milton E.; Landers, Richard; Cruz, Nilson C. da

    2006-01-01

    In this work, an investigation was conducted on amorphous hydrogenated-nitrogenated carbon films prepared by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. Glow discharge was excited by radiofrequency power (13.56 MHz, 40 W) whereas the substrate-holder was biased with 25 kV negative pulses. The films were deposited from benzene, nitrogen and argon mixtures. The proportion of nitrogen in the chamber feed (R N ) was varied against that of argon, while keeping the total pressure constant (1.3 Pa). From infrared reflectance-absorbance spectroscopy it was observed that the molecular structure of the benzene is not preserved in the film. Nitrogen was incorporated from the plasma while oxygen arose as a contaminant. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that N/C and O/C atomic ratios change slightly with R N . Water wettability decreased as the proportion of N in the gas phase increased while surface roughness underwent just small changes. Nanoindentation measurements showed that film deposition by means of ion bombardment was beneficial to the mechanical properties of the film-substrate interface. The intensity of the modifications correlates well with the degree of ion bombardment

  7. Transition from the constant ion mobility regime to the ion-atom charge-exchange regime for bounded collisional plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poggie, Jonathan; Sternberg, Natalia

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and analytical study of a planar, collisional, direct-current, plasma-wall problem is presented. The fluid model for the problem is first validated by comparing numerical solutions with experimental data for low-pressure (∼0.1 Pa) electrode sheaths with wall potentials on the order of -100 V. For electric potential, ion number density, and ion velocity, good agreement was found between theory and experiment from within the sheath out to the bulk plasma. The frictional drag resulting from ion-neutral collisions is described by a model incorporating both linear and quadratic velocity terms. In order to study the transition from the constant ion mobility regime (linear friction) to the ion-atom charge-exchange collision regime (quadratic friction), the theoretical model was examined numerically for a range of ion temperatures and ion-neutral collision rates. It was found that the solution profiles in the quasineutral plasma depend on the ion temperature. For low ion temperatures they are governed mainly by the ion-atom charge-exchange regime, whereas for high temperatures they are governed by the constant ion mobility regime. Quasineutral plasma models corresponding to these two limiting cases were solved analytically. In particular, an analytical plasma solution is given for the ion-atom charge exchange regime that includes the effects of ion inertia. In contrast to the quasineutral plasma, the sheath is always governed for low to moderate collision rates by the ion-atom charge-exchange regime, independent of the ion temperature. Varying the collision rate, it was shown that when the wall potential is sufficiently high, the sheath cannot be considered collisionless, even if the collision rate is quite small

  8. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  9. Enhanced wear resistance of production tools and steel samples by implantation of nitrogen and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikkelsen, N.J.; Straede, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years ion implantation has become a feasible technique for obtaining improved wear resistance of production tools. However, basic knowledge of how and in which cases ion implantation is working at its best is still needed. The present paper discusses structural and tribological investigations of carbon and nitrogen implanted steels. The nitrogen data were obtained mainly from field tests and the investigation of carbon implantations took place mainly in the laboratory. A study was made of how the tribological behaviour of implanted steels changes with different implantation parameters. The tribological laboratory investigations were carried out using pin-on-disc equipment under controlled test conditions, and deal with high dose carbon implantation (approximately (1-2)x10 18 ions cm -2 ). The wear resistance of steels was enhanced dramatically, by up to several orders of magnitude. The field test results cover a broad range of ion implanted production tools, which showed a marked improvement in wear resistance. Nitrogen implanted tools are also compared with carbon and titanium implanted tools. (orig.)

  10. Compression Ratio Ion Mobility Programming (CRIMP) Accumulation and Compression of Billions of Ions for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Using Traveling Waves in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Venkata BS; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Webb, Ian K.; Attah, Isaac K.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Prost, Spencer A.; Zheng, Xueyun; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-05-25

    We report on the implementation of a traveling wave (TW) based compression ratio ion mobility programming (CRIMP) approach within Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) that enables both greatly enlarged trapped ion charge capacities and also their subsequent efficient compression for use in ion mobility (IM) separations. Ion accumulation is conducted in a long serpentine path TW SLIM region after which CRIMP allows the large ion populations to be ‘squeezed’. The compression process occurs at an interface between two SLIM regions, one operating conventionally and the second having an intermittently pausing or ‘stuttering’ TW, allowing the contents of multiple bins of ions from the first region to be merged into a single bin in the second region. In this initial work stationary voltages in the second region were used to block ions from exiting the first (trapping) region, and the resumption of TWs in the second region allows ions to exit, and the population to also be compressed if CRIMP is applied. In our initial evaluation we show that the number of charges trapped for a 40 s accumulation period was ~5×109, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the previously reported charge capacity using an ion funnel trap. We also show that over 1×109 ions can be accumulated with high efficiency in the present device, and that the extent of subsequent compression is only limited by the space charge capacity of the trapping region. Lower compression ratios allow increased IM peak heights without significant loss of signal, while excessively large compression ratios can lead to ion losses and other artifacts. Importantly, we show that extended ion accumulation in conjunction with CRIMP and multiple passes provides the basis for a highly desirable combination of ultra-high sensitivity and ultra-high resolution IM separations using SLIM.

  11. The ion–aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-02-18

    aerosol interactions from the ion mobility and aerosol particle size distribution measurements on January 17 and February 18, 2005 at Maitri, Antarctica – A case study. Devendraa Siingh Vimlesh Pant A K Kamra. Volume 120 Issue 4 August ...

  12. Production of excited nitrogen atoms and ions by electron impact on nitrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rall, D.L.A.; Anderson, L.W.; Lin, C.C.; Sharpton, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Emission lines of the N atoms and N ions are produced by electron-beam dissociative excitation of N 2 molecules. The ns→3 /sub p/ (n=5 to 9), np→3s (n=3 to 7), nd→3 /sub p/ (n=4 to 8), nf→3d (n=4,5) transitions of N and the 3 /sub p/ →3s, 3d→3p, 4s→3p, 4p→3d, 4f→3d transitions of N + have been observed and optical emission cross sections at various incident electron energies have been measured. The energy dependence of the cross sections of the N emission lines is similar to that of the N + lines at high incident electron energies, but the low-energy behaviors are quite different. These features are explained by the mechanisms involved in the production of the excited N atoms and N + ions. Absolute optical emission cross sections for the N and N + lines are presented

  13. Evaluation of hand-held ion-mobility explosives vapor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrows, T.A.; Thoma, P.J.

    1979-12-01

    Two types of ion-mobility detectors were evaluated in both laboratory and field tests. Laboratory test results show that these detectors are highly sensitive to dynamite and pistol powder and have good false-alarm agent rejection. Field tests of these two detectors revealed that they would detect dynamite and Ball-C-Propellent in free air. However, neither of the ion-mobility detectors would detect these explosives if the explosives were concealed

  14. Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile ions in copper selenides studied by EXAFS spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asylgushina, G.N.; Bikkulova, N.N.; Titova, S.G.; Kochubey, D.I.

    2005-01-01

    Interaction between crystal lattice and mobile Cu ions has been studied in Cu 2- x Se in superionic and in normal state using EXAFS-spectroscopy. It has been found that the transition from normal to superionic state and change of mobile Cu ion concentration practically do not have an influence on local state of Cu atoms, but change of both these parameters is accompanied by a change of Se-sublattice state

  15. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  16. Electronic sputtering by swift highly charged ions of nitrogen on amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caron, M.; Haranger, F.; Rothard, H.; Ban d'Etat, B.; Boduch, P.; Clouvas, A.; Potiriadis, C.; Neugebauer, R.; Jalowy, T.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic sputtering with heavy ions as a function of both electronic energy loss dE/dx and projectile charge state q was studied at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL. Amorphous carbon (untreated, and sputter-cleaned and subsequently exposed to nitrogen) was irradiated with swift highly charged ions (Z=6-73, q=6-54, energy 6-13 MeV/u) in an ultrahigh vacuum scattering chamber. The fluence dependence of ion-induced electron yields allows to deduce a desorption cross-section σ which varies approximately as σ∼(dE/dx) 1.65 or σ∼q 3.3 for sputter-cleaned amorphous carbon exposed to nitrogen. This q dependence is close to the cubic charge dependence observed for the emission of H + secondary ions which are believed to be emitted from the very surface. However, the power law σ∼(dE/dx) 1.65 , related to the electronic energy loss gives the best empirical description. The dependence on dE/dx is close to a quadratic one thus rather pointing towards a thermal evaporation-like effect

  17. Electrophoresis examination of strand breaks in plasmid DNA induced by low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yong; Tan Zheng; Du Yanhua; Qiu Guanying

    2003-01-01

    To study the effect on plasmid DNA of heavy ion in the energy range of keV where nuclear stopping interaction becomes more important or even predominant, thin film of plasmid pGEM-3Zf(-) DNA was prepared on aluminum surface and irradiated in vacuum ( -3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with energy of 30 keV (LET=285 keV/μm) at various fluence ranging from 2 x 10 10 to 8.2 x 10 13 ions/cm 2 . DNA strand breaks were analyzed by neutral electrophoresis followed by quantification with image analysis software. Low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation induced single-, double- and multiple double-strand breaks (DSB) and multiple DSB as the dominating form of DNA damages. Moreover, the linear fluence-response relationship at a low fluence range suggests that DSBs are induced predominantly by single ion track. However, strand break production is limited to a short range in the irradiated samples

  18. Studies on biological effects of nitrogen ion implantation in different genotype rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jiahua; Xia Yingwu; Shu Qingyao

    1994-01-01

    The biological effects of nitrogen ion implantation on different genotype rice (Oryza sativa L) were studied. The results showed that there were obvious differences in physiological damages for the M 1 generation, mutation frequencies and mutagenic efficiencies of chlorophyll, heading date and plant height for M 2 generation of different genotypes. Treated by nitrogen ions, the varieties with high mutation frequency and mutagenic efficiency of chlorophyll in the M 2 generation were not necessarily high in those of heading date and plant height. Moreover, the radiation sensitivity of Fu8530 and Fuxian No.6 which were bred by using early maturing and semidwarf mutants as maternal plant was low. The early maturing and high stature mutation were not induced with these two varieties

  19. Determination of ion mobilities of radionuclides in a free electrolyte. Methods and experimental organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milanov, M.; Doberenz, W.; Marinov, A.; Khalkin, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new variant of technique for determining ion mobilities by means of horizontal zone electrophoresis in free solutions is developed. Setup circuit is presented. Some details of experiment and results of measuring limiting mobilities of 131 I - and 160 Tb 3+ are given. On these examples the method reproducibility was checked

  20. Recent experiments towards production and diagnostics of nitrogen ion beam for medium-mass ion beam ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuya, K [Tokyo Inst. of Tech., Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Energy Sciences; Yasuike, K; Miyamoto, S [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering; and others

    1997-12-31

    Three research teams are collaborating in the title topics. The first group presented proposals and preliminary results on (1) re-operation of cryogenic diode for nitrogen beam, (2) laser plasma production to supply ion source, (3) application of CCD camera element to advanced particle detector, (4) application of cryogenic technique to advanced material production method, and (5) reform of UV laser for future diode cleaning or plasma production. The joint 2nd and 3rd groups present (6) most recent results of time- and space-dependent particle beam diagnostics by an advanced arrayed pin-hole camera. (orig.). 5 figs., 6 refs.

  1. Comprehensive Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 3. Relating Solution-Phase to Gas-Phase Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondalaji, Samaneh Ghassabi; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2018-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to study peptide ion conformer establishment during the electrospray process. An explicit water model is used for nanodroplets containing a model peptide and hydronium ions. Simulations are conducted at 300 K for two different peptide ion charge configurations and for droplets containing varying numbers of hydronium ions. For all conditions, modeling has been performed until production of the gas-phase ions and the resultant conformers have been compared to proposed gas-phase structures. The latter species were obtained from previous studies in which in silico candidate structures were filtered according to ion mobility and hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) reactivity matches. Results from the present study present three key findings namely (1) the evidence from ion production modeling supports previous structure refinement studies based on mobility and HDX reactivity matching, (2) the modeling of the electrospray process is significantly improved by utilizing initial droplets existing below but close to the calculated Rayleigh limit, and (3) peptide ions in the nanodroplets sample significantly different conformers than those in the bulk solution due to altered physicochemical properties of the solvent. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  2. Ion mobilities in Xe/Ne and other rare-gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscitelli, D; Pitchford, L C [Centre de Physique des Plasmas et Applications de Toulouse (CPAT), UMR 5002 CNRS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Phelps, A V [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Urquijo, J de [Centro de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Post Office Box 48-3, 62251, 80309-0440 Cuernavaca, Moreno (Mexico); Basurto, E [Departmento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, 02200 Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2003-10-01

    The ion mobility or drift velocity data important for modeling glow discharges in rare gas mixtures are not generally available, nor are the ion-neutral scattering cross sections needed to calculate these data. In this paper we propose a set of cross sections for Xe{sup +} and Ne{sup +} collisions with Xe and Ne atoms. Ion mobilities at 300 K calculated using this cross section set in a Monte Carlo simulation are reported for reduced field strengths, E/N, up to 1500x10{sup -21} V m{sup 2}, in pure gases and in Xe/Ne mixtures containing 5% and 20% Xe/Ne, which are mixtures of interest for plasma display panels (PDPs). The calculated Xe{sup +} mobilities depend strongly on the mixture composition, but the Ne{sup +} mobility varies only slightly with increasing Xe in the mixture over the range studied here. The mobilities in pure gases compare well with available experimental values, and mobilities in gas mixtures at low E/N compare well with our recent measurements which will be published separately. Results from these calculations of ion mobilities are used to evaluate the predictions of Blanc's law and of the mixture rule proposed by Mason and Hahn [Phys. Rev. A 5, 438 (1972)] for determining the ion mobilities in mixtures from a knowledge of the mobilities in each of the pure gases. The mixture rule of Mason and Hahn is accurate to better than 10% at high field strengths over a wide range of conditions of interest for modeling PDPs. We conclude that a good estimate of ion mobilities at high E/N in Xe/Ne and other binary rare gas mixtures can be obtained using this mixture rule combined with known values of mobilities in parent gases and with the Langevin form for mobility of rare gas ions ion in other gases. This conclusion is supported by results in Ar/Ne mixtures which are also presented here.

  3. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-01-01

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: (1) The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. (2) The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs departments (9%). (3) IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. (4) Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. (5) Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall operation

  4. Investigation of ion mobilities in different buffer gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peska, N.

    1981-01-01

    An existing drift apparatus has been adapted to mobility measurements. Mobilities of C + /He, CH + /He, CH 2 + /He and CH 3 + /Ar, hitherto unknown or known with low accuracy only, have been determined over the E/N range of about 20 - 200 Td. (G.Q.)

  5. Relaxation effects in ionic mobility and cluster formation: negative ions in SF6 at high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez, A M; De Urquijo, J; Hinojosa, G; Hernandez-Avila, J L; Basurto, E

    2010-01-01

    The relaxation effects of the ionic mobility and the formation of negative-ion clusters in SF 6 are studied in this work. For this purpose, we have measured the mobility of negative ions in SF 6 over the pressure range 100-800 Torr at a fixed value of density-normalized electric field, E/N, of 20 Td (1 Townsend = 10 -17 V cm 2 ). The data obtained show a clear dependence of the negative-ion drift velocity on drift distance. It is observed that the drift velocity (mobility) reaches a steady-state value only for drift distances above 2 cm, over the studied pressure range. In addition to this, we have observed that the ionic mobility depends strongly on the gas pressure. An explanation of this dependence of the ionic mobility on gas pressure is given in terms of a negative-ion clustering formation process. It was found that the assumption of a linear dependence of the cluster ion mass on pressure provides a satisfactory explanation for the observed mobilities.

  6. Aluminum surface modification by a non-mass-analyzed nitrogen ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Shigeo; Iwaki, Masaya

    Non-mass-analyzed nitrogen ion implantation into polycrystal and single crystal aluminum sheets has been carried out at an accelerating voltage of 90 kV and a dose of 1 × 10 18 N ions/cm 2 using a Zymet implanter model Z-100. The pressure during implantation rose to 10 -3 Pa due to the influence of N gas feeding into the ion source. The characteristics of the surface layers were investigated by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron diffraction (TED), and microscopy (TEM). The AES depth profiling shows a rectangular-like distribution of N atoms and little migration of O atoms near the surface. The high dose N-implantation forms c-axis oriented aluminum nitride (AIN) crystallines, and especially irradiation of Al single crystals with N ions leads to the formation of a hcp AlN single crystal. It is concluded that the high dose N-implantation in Al can result in the formation of AlN at room temperature without any thermal annealing. Furthermore, non-mass-analyzed N-implantation at a pressure of 10 -3 Pa of the nitrogen atmosphere causes the formation of pure AlN single crystals in the Al surface layer and consequently it can be practically used for AlN production.

  7. Mobility and diffusion of atomic helium and neon ions in their parent gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skullerud, H.R.; Larsen, P.-H.

    1990-01-01

    The mobility and the diffusion tensor have been calculated for He + ions in He and Ne + ions in Ne, at temperatures of 77-78 and 294 K, and at field-to-density values E/n 0 up to 2000 Td. For He + ions in He, ab initio potentials were used, with a careful extrapolation to large distances. A slight adjustment of the mean potential resulted in agreement between calculated mobilities and the best experimental values to better than 0.5%. For Ne + ions in Ne, a potential model with three adjustable parameters was constructed, and an overall agreement between measured and calculated mobilities to better than 1% was obtained. The model potentials probably give a good estimate of the gerade-ungerade splitting at internuclear distances from 7.5 to 10 au, but are not expected to be accurate at shorter distances. (author)

  8. Positive ion mobilities in normal liquid 3He at ultralow temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, P.W.

    1978-11-01

    The mobility has been measured of positive ions in liquid 3 he in the range 2.5 mK 3 sub(m)/sup(V) 5 sub(m)/sup(V). The effects of 500 p.p.m. 4 He in the 3 He were investigated. It was found that, at low temperatures, several stable ion species could be produced for 3 He pressures of 23 bar and above and, between 25 mK and 60 mK, time dependent conversion from one species of ion to another was observed at all pressures. The creation mechanism, mobility and stability of multiple positive ions were studied. Possible explanations of the phenomena are discussed. The measured drift field dependence of mobility is used to test the quasiparticle scattering model assumed for the liquid. (U.K.)

  9. Mobility and molecular ions of dimethyl methyl phosphonate, methyl salicylate and acetone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, D. M.

    1983-06-01

    The mobilities of positive and negative reactant ions are reported for (H2O)nH(+); (H2O)2O2 and (H2O)2CO3(-) ion clusters. The formation of positive DMMP monomer and dimer is reported, and equilbria molecular reactions are reported. Acetone is reported as forming a dimer at 81 ppb with a reduced mobility (K sub o) of 1.82, Methyl salicylate is shown to form a protonated and hydrated positive monomer. Mixtures of DMMP and methyl salicylate with acetone showed a substantial change in DMMP ion clustering and little or no change in the methyl salicylate mobility spectra. Negative ions were not observed for DMMP, methyl salicylate, acetone and the mixtures under the conditions reported.

  10. Theory of longitudinal plasma waves with allowance for ion mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kichigin, G.N.

    2003-01-01

    One studies propagation of stationary longitudinal plasma wave of high amplitude in collisionless cold plasma with regard to motion of electrons and ions in a wave. One derived dependences of amplitudes of electric field, potential, frequency and length of wave on the speed of wave propagation and on the parameter equal to the ration of ion mass to electron mass. Account of motion of ions in the wave with maximum possible amplitude resulted in nonmonotone dependence of frequency on wave speed [ru

  11. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon for Red Phosphorous Based Anode Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaoyang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serving as conductive matrix and stress buffer, the carbon matrix plays a pivotal role in enabling red phosphorus to be a promising anode material for high capacity lithium ion batteries and sodium ion batteries. In this paper, nitrogen-doping is proved to effective enhance the interface interaction between carbon and red phosphorus. In detail, the adsorption energy between phosphorus atoms and oxygen-containing functional groups on the carbon is significantly reduced by nitrogen doping, as verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption mechanisms are further revealed on the basis of DFT (the first density functional theory calculations. The RPNC (red phosphorus/nitrogen-doped carbon composite material shows higher cycling stability and higher capacity than that of RPC (red phosphorus/carbon composite anode. After 100 cycles, the RPNC still keeps discharge capacity of 1453 mAh g−1 at the current density of 300 mA g−1 (the discharge capacity of RPC after 100 cycles is 1348 mAh g−1. Even at 1200 mA g−1, the RPNC composite still delivers a capacity of 1178 mAh g−1. This work provides insight information about the interface interactions between composite materials, as well as new technology develops high performance phosphorus based anode materials.

  12. Ion Mobility Separations of Isomers based upon Long Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Combined with Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Ibrahim, Yehia M. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Baker, Erin S. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Aly, Noor A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Hamid, Ahmed M. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Zhang, Xing [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Zheng, Xueyun [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Garimella, Sandilya V. B. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Webb, Ian K. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Prost, Spencer A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Sandoval, Jeremy A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Norheim, Randolph V. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Anderson, Gordon A. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Tolmachev, Aleksey V. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division and Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland, WA 99352 USA

    2016-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based multi-omic measurements, including proteomics, metabolomics, lipidomics, and glycomics, are increasingly transforming our ability to characterize and understand biological systems, but, presently have limitations due to the chemical diversity and range of abundances of biomolecules in complex samples. Advances addressing these challenges increasingly are based upon the ability to quickly separate, react and otherwise manipulate sample components for analysis by MS. Here we report on a new approach using Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) to enable long serpentine path ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations followed by MS analyses. This approach provides previously unachieved mobility biomolecule isomer separations for biomolecular species, in conjunction with more effective ion utilization, and producing a basis for the improved characterization of very small samples.

  13. High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry for mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E; Moritz, Robert L

    2012-10-01

    High-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve the detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, the authors review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics.

  14. High Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Kristian E.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY High field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is an atmospheric pressure ion mobility technique that separates gas-phase ions by their behavior in strong and weak electric fields. FAIMS is easily interfaced with electrospray ionization and has been implemented as an additional separation mode between liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) in proteomic studies. FAIMS separation is orthogonal to both LC and MS and is used as a means of on-line fractionation to improve detection of peptides in complex samples. FAIMS improves dynamic range and concomitantly the detection limits of ions by filtering out chemical noise. FAIMS can also be used to remove interfering ion species and to select peptide charge states optimal for identification by tandem MS. Here, we review recent developments in LC-FAIMS-MS and its application to MS-based proteomics. PMID:23194268

  15. A series of inorganic solid nitrogen sources for the synthesis of metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the dependence of production yield on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fupin; Guan, Jian; Wei, Tao; Wang, Song; Jiao, Mingzhi; Yang, Shangfeng

    2013-04-01

    A series of nitrogen-containing inorganic solid compounds with variable oxidation states of nitrogen and counter ions have been successfully applied as new inorganic solid nitrogen sources toward the synthesis of Sc-based metal nitride clusterfullerenes (Sc-NCFs), including ammonium salts [(NH4)xH(3-x)PO4 (x = 0-2), (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)2CO3, NH4X (X = F, Cl), NH4SCN], thiocyanate (KSCN), nitrates (Cu(NO3)2, NaNO3), and nitrite (NaNO2). Among them, ammonium phosphates ((NH4)xH(3-x)PO4, x = 1-3) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) are revealed to behave as better nitrogen sources than others, and the highest yield of Sc-NCFs is achieved when NH4SCN was used as a nitrogen source. The optimum molar ratio of Sc2O3:(NH4)3PO4·3H2O:C and Sc2O3:NH4SCN:C has been determined to be 1:2:15 and 1:3:15, respectively. The thermal decomposition products of these 12 inorganic compounds have been discussed in order to understand their different performances toward the synthesis of Sc-NCFs, and accordingly the dependence of the production yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion is interpreted. The yield of Sc3N@C80 (I(h) + D(5h)) per gram Sc2O3 by using the N2-based group of nitrogen sources (thiocyanate, nitrates, and nitrite) is overall much lower than those by using gaseous N2 and NH4SCN, indicating the strong dependence of the yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen, which is attributed to the "in-situ" redox reaction taking place for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources during discharging. For NH3-based group of nitrogen sources (ammonium salts) which exhibits a (-3) oxidation states of nitrogen, their performance as nitrogen sources is found to be sensitively dependent on the anion, and this is understood by considering their difference on the thermal stability and/or decomposition rate. Contrarily, for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources, the formation of Sc-NCFs is independent to both the oxidation state of nitrogen (+3 or +5) and the

  16. Using a portable ion mobility spectrometer to screen dietary supplements for sibutramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Jamie D; Gryniewicz-Ruzicka, Connie M; Kauffman, John F; Westenberger, Benjamin J; Buhse, Lucinda F

    2011-02-20

    In response to recent incidents of undeclared sibutramine, an appetite suppressant found in dietary supplements, we developed a method to detect sibutramine using hand-held ion mobility spectrometers with an analysis time of 15 s. Ion mobility spectrometry is a high-throughput and sensitive technique that has been used for illicit drug, explosive, volatile organic compound and chemical warfare detection. We evaluated a hand-held ion mobility spectrometer as a tool for the analysis of supplement extracts containing sibutramine. The overall instrumental limit of detection of five portable ion mobility spectrometers was 2 ng of sibutramine HCl. When sample extractions containing 30 ng/μl or greater of sibutramine were analyzed, saturation of the ionization chamber of the spectrometer occurred and the instrument required more than three cleaning cycles to remove the drug. Hence, supplement samples suspected of containing sibutramine should be prepared at concentrations of 2-20 ng/μl. To obtain this target concentration range for products containing unknown amounts of sibutramine, we provided a simple sample preparation procedure, allowing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration or other agencies to screen products using the portable ion mobility spectrometer. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisilazane treated by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, R Y; Mota, R P; Batocki, R G S; Santos, D C R; Nicoleti, T; Kostov, K G; Kayama, M E; Algatti, M A [Laboratorio de Plasma, Faculdade de Engenharia, UNESP, Av. Dr Ariberto Pereira da Cunha-333, 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Cruz, N C [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Unidade Diferenciada, UNESP, Av. Tres de Marco-511, 18085-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Ruggiero, L, E-mail: honda@feg.unesp.b [Faculdade de Ciencias, UNESP, Av. Luis E. Carrijo Coube 14-1, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the effect of nitrogen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) on chemical structure, refraction index and surface hardness of plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisilazane (PPHMDSN) thin films. Firstly, polymeric films were deposited at 13.56 MHz radiofrequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) and then, were treated by nitrogen PIII from 15 to 60 min. Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to analyse the molecular structure of the samples, and it revealed that vibrations modes at 3350 cm{sup -1}, 2960 cm{sup -1}, 1650 cm{sup -1}, 1250 cm{sup -1} and 1050 cm{sup -1} were altered by nitrogen PIII. Visible-ultraviolet (vis-UV) spectroscopy was used to evaluate film refractive index and the results showed a slight increase from 1.6 to 1.8 following the implantation time. Nanoindentation revealed a surface hardness rise from 0.5 to 2.3 GPa as PIII treatment time increased. These results indicate nitrogen PIII is very promising in improving optical and mechanical properties of PPHMDSN films.

  18. Towards a Measurement of the n=2 Lamb Shift in Hydrogen-like Nitrogen Using an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, K.; Crosby, D. N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Smith, C. J.; Silver, J. D.; Myers, E. G.; Kinugawa, T.; Ohtani, S.

    2003-01-01

    Using a 14 C 16 O 2 laser the 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 (fine structure - Lamb shift) transition has been induced in 14 N 6+ ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap. Prospects for a measurement of the Lamb shift in hydrogen-like nitrogen are discussed.

  19. Gas-phase reaction rate constants for atmospheric pressure ionization in ion-mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandiver, V.J.

    1987-01-01

    Ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS) is an instrumental technique in which gaseous ions are formed from neutral molecules by proton and charge transfer from reactant ions through collisional ionization. An abbreviated rate theory has been proposed for atmospheric pressure ionization (API) in IMS, but supporting experimental measurements have not been reported. The objectives of this thesis were (1) assessment of existing API rate theory using positive and negative product ions in IMS, (2) measurement of API equilibria and kinetics for binary mixtures, and (3) investigating of cross-ionizations with multiple-product ions in API reactions. Although IMS measurements and predictions from rate theory were comparable, shapes and slopes of response curves for both proton transfer and electron capture were not described exactly by existing theory. In particular, terms that are needed for calculation of absolute rate constants were unsuitable in the existing theory. These included recombination coefficients,initial number of reactant ions, and opposing ion densities

  20. Combined corona discharge and UV photoionization source for ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud

    2012-08-15

    An ion mobility spectrometer is described which is equipped with two non-radioactive ion sources, namely an atmospheric pressure photoionization and a corona discharge ionization source. The two sources cannot only run individually but are additionally capable of operating simultaneously. For photoionization, a UV lamp was mounted parallel to the axis of the ion mobility cell. The corona discharge electrode was mounted perpendicular to the UV radiation. The total ion current from the photoionization source was verified as a function of lamp current, sample flow rate, and drift field. Simultaneous operation of the two ionization sources was investigated by recording ion mobility spectra of selected samples. The design allows one to observe peaks from either the corona discharge or photoionization individually or simultaneously. This makes it possible to accurately compare peaks in the ion mobility spectra from each individual source. Finally, the instrument's capability for discriminating two peaks appearing in approximately identical drift times using each individual ionization source is demonstrated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Determination of Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene by means of an ion mobility spectrometer device using photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, J. W.; Bensch, H.; Berger, D.; Nolting, M.; Baumbach, J. I.

    1995-01-01

    The continuous monitoring of changes on the quality of ambient air is a field of advantage of ion mobility spectrometry. Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene are substances of special interest because of their toxicity. We present an optimized drift tube for ion mobility spectrometers, which uses photo-ionization tubes to produce the ions to be analyzed. The actual version of this drift tube has a length of 45 mm, an electric field strength established within the drift tube of about 180 V/cm and a shutter-opening-time of 400 mus. With the hydrogen tube used for ionisation a mean flux of 10(exp 12) photons/sq cm s was established for the experiments described. We discuss the results of investigations on Benzene, Toluene, and Xylene in normal used gasoline SUPER. The detection limits obtained with the ion mobility spectrometer developed in co-operation are in the range of 10 ppbv in this case. Normally, charge transfer from Benzene ions to Toluene takes place. Nevertheless the simultaneous determination in mixtures is possible by a data evaluation procedure developed for this case. The interferences found between Xylene and others are rather weak. The ion mobility spectra of different concentrations of gasoline SUPER are attached as an example for the resolution and the detection limit of the instrument developed. Resolution and sensitivity of the system are well demonstrated. A hand-held portable device produced just now is to be tested for special environmental analytical problems in some industrial and scientific laboratories in Germany.

  2. Model Titan atmospheric hydrocarbon analysis by Ion Mobility Spectrometry in dry helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojiro, D.R.; Stimac, R.M.; Wernlund, R.F.; Cohen, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is one analytical technique being investigated for the in situ analysis of the atmosphere of Titan. Any hydrocarbon ions that may form react immediately, in microseconds, with the high concentration of water vapor normally present in conventional IMS. By reducing the water concentration to the parts-per-billion range, the lifetime of the hydrocarbon ions may be increased to the milliseconds required for measurement. At low water level concentrations, other species may become the reactant ion. This study focuses on IMS analysis of expected Titan atmospheric hydrocarbons under very dry, low water concentration conditions

  3. Mechanical response of nitrogen ion implanted NiTi shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucharski, S.; Levintant-Zayonts, N.; Luckner, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The effect of ion implantation process on shape memory alloy was investigated. • In the implantation process both surface layer and bulk material are modified. • The microstructure is modified and superelastic effect is destroyed in surface layer. • The parameters of superelastic phenomena are changed in bulk material. - Abstract: In the paper a change of material (mechanical) parameters of NiTi shape memory alloy subjected to ion implantation treatment is investigated. The spherical indentation tests in micro- and nano-scale and tension test have been performed to study an evolution of local superelastic effect in different volumes of nonimplanted and nitrogen ion implanted NiTi alloy. The differential scanning calorimetry has been applied to measure the change of characteristic temperatures due to ion implantation treatment. The structure of implanted material has been investigated using electron microscopy technique. It has been found that the ion implantation process changes the properties not only in a thin surface layer but also in bulk material. In the layer the pseudoelastic effect is destroyed, and in the substrate is preserved, however its parameters are changed. The characteristic phase transformation temperatures in substrate are also modified

  4. Effects of irradiation with low-energy nitrogen ion injection on root tip cells of broad bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yaqin; Li Jinzhe; Huang Qunce

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the cytogenetic effects of low-energy nitrogen ion irradiation, broad bean seed embryo was irradiated by different doses of nitrogen ions. Micronucleus rate, mitotic index and chromosome aberration in root-tip cells were analyzed. The results showed that the injection of ions inhibited mitosis of root tip cells, interfered the normal process of mitosis, caused aberrations of chromosome structure, behavior and number. The frequency of micronucleus and chromosomal aberrations increased with the increasing radiation dosage, while mitotic index decreased. (authors)

  5. Structural changes and tribological behaviors of nitrogen ion-implanted tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.J.; Wang, T.M.; Wang, X.J.

    1996-01-01

    Single-crystal tantalum sheets were implanted by 110 keV nitrogen ions to a dose of 5 x 10 17 ions/cm 2 at a temperature less than 100 C. The structural changes and the concentration depth profiles of the implanted layers were characterized by glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GXRD), selected area diffraction (SAD) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), respectively. The microhardness, the friction coefficient and the wear rate of the specimens against hardened GCr15 steel balls were also determined before and after the implantation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) were used to analyze the wear tracks. The results showed that there exist deviations between the characterization results of AES and GXRD or SAD. The AES measurement suggests the formation of the tantalum nitrides with a maximum N/Ta ratio of 1/2, while the GXRD and SAD reveal the formation of bcc Ta(N), fcc TaN and a trace amount of hcp Ta 2 N. This can be explained by considering the inhomogeneous distribution of nitrogen atoms in micro-regions: the enrichment of nitrogen atoms in local micro-regions leads to the formation of fcc TaN; however, the unfavorable structural compatibility between bcc Ta and hcp Ta 2 N hinders the formation of hcp Ta 2 N in the regions where the N/Ta ratio reaches 1/2. The detected trace amount of the hcp Ta 2 N phase in the implanted layers can be considered as an after effect of nitrogen loss from the originally formed nitrides. The results also showed that the tribological properties of the Ta surfaces were improved due to the implantation. It is believed that the implantation-induced Ta(N), fcc TaN, and hcp Ta 2 N phases are responsible for this improvement. (orig.)

  6. [Photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS) for the isomeric volatile organic compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hu; Niu, Wen-qi; Wang, Hong-mei; Huang, Chao-qun; Jiang, Hai-he; Chu, Yan-nan

    2012-01-01

    The construction and performance study is reported for a newly developed ultraviolet photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (UV-IMS). In the present paper, an UV-IMS technique was firstly developed to detect eleven isomeric volatile organic compounds including the differences in the structure of carbon chain, the style of function group and the position of function group. Their reduced mobility values were determined and increased in this order: linears alcohols homemade UV-IMS was around ppb-ppm.

  7. Studies on mobility in electric and magnetic fields of tritium ions occluded in titanium and zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzak, R [Wyzsza Szkola Pedagogiczna, Opole (Poland); Rozenfeld, B [Wroclaw Univ. (Poland)

    1976-01-01

    Migration of tritium ions in zirconium and titanium in electric field has been investigated. The effect of simultaneous action of crossed electric and magnetic fields on ions migration has also been studied. The averaged values taken from the large number of measurements allow us to suggest the relation between the rate of electromobility and electric field intensity oriented in the direction of migration. In case of migration caused by simultaneously applied both field, the mobility varied monotonously with the increase of magnetic induction; a linear dependence, however, was observed between the mobility of tritium and the current density in a sample.

  8. Measurements of ion mobility in argon and neon based gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00507268

    2017-01-01

    As gaseous detectors are operated at high rates of primary ionisation, ions created in the detector have a considerable impact on the performance of the detector. The upgraded ALICE Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will operate during LHC Run$\\,3$ with a substantial space charge density of positive ions in the drift volume. In order to properly simulate such space charges, knowledge of the ion mobility $K$ is necessary. To this end, a small gaseous detector was constructed and the ion mobility of various gas mixtures was measured. To validate the corresponding signal analysis, simulations were performed. Results are shown for several argon and neon based mixtures with different $\\textrm{CO}_2$ fractions. A decrease of $K$ was measured for increasing water content.

  9. Mobility and lifetime of sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions in liquid xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Walters, A J

    2003-01-01

    Positively charged sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Tl ions are transported through liquid xenon using electric fields in the range of 4-10 kV cm sup - sup 1 and for drift distances up to 50 mm. From these measurements we deduce upper limits on the attenuation length for Tl ions in liquid xenon, resulting in a lifetime >5.5 s. In addition to these results, the field independent mobility of Tl bearing species in liquid xenon was measured to be 1.33+-0.04x10 sup - sup 4 cm sup 2 V sup - sup 1 s sup - sup 1. This result, when coupled with those for other species by previous workers, suggests that positive ion mobility in liquid xenon is proportional to the hard-core radius. Applications to Ba ion collection in a double beta decay experiment are also discussed.

  10. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization Sources Used in The Detection of Explosives by Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltman, Melanie J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Explosives detection is a necessary and wide spread field of research. From large shipping containers to airline luggage, numerous items are tested for explosives every day. In the area of trace explosives detection, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is the technique employed most often because it is a quick, simple, and accurate way to test many items in a short amount of time. Detection by IMS is based on the difference in drift times of product ions through the drift region of an IMS instrument. The product ions are created when the explosive compounds, introduced to the instrument, are chemically ionized through interactions with the reactant ions. The identity of the reactant ions determines the outcomes of the ionization process. This research investigated the reactant ions created by various ionization sources and looked into ways to manipulate the chemistry occurring in the sources.

  11. A flexible statistical model for alignment of label-free proteomics data--incorporating ion mobility and product ion information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Ashlee M; Thompson, J Will; Soderblom, Erik J; Geromanos, Scott J; Henao, Ricardo; Kraus, Virginia B; Moseley, M Arthur; Lucas, Joseph E

    2013-12-16

    The goal of many proteomics experiments is to determine the abundance of proteins in biological samples, and the variation thereof in various physiological conditions. High-throughput quantitative proteomics, specifically label-free LC-MS/MS, allows rapid measurement of thousands of proteins, enabling large-scale studies of various biological systems. Prior to analyzing these information-rich datasets, raw data must undergo several computational processing steps. We present a method to address one of the essential steps in proteomics data processing--the matching of peptide measurements across samples. We describe a novel method for label-free proteomics data alignment with the ability to incorporate previously unused aspects of the data, particularly ion mobility drift times and product ion information. We compare the results of our alignment method to PEPPeR and OpenMS, and compare alignment accuracy achieved by different versions of our method utilizing various data characteristics. Our method results in increased match recall rates and similar or improved mismatch rates compared to PEPPeR and OpenMS feature-based alignment. We also show that the inclusion of drift time and product ion information results in higher recall rates and more confident matches, without increases in error rates. Based on the results presented here, we argue that the incorporation of ion mobility drift time and product ion information are worthy pursuits. Alignment methods should be flexible enough to utilize all available data, particularly with recent advancements in experimental separation methods.

  12. Characterization of a Distributed Plasma Ionization Source (DPIS) for Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltman, Melanie J.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert; Blanchard, William C.; Ewing, Robert G.

    2008-01-01

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions depending on the polarity of the applied potential. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H2O)nH+ with (H2O)2H+ as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO3-, NO3-, NO2-, O3- and O2- of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and environmental pollutants were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for several months and although deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions. The results indicated that the DPIS may have a longer operating life than a conventional corona discharge.

  13. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Wang, Xiao-teng; Gan, Cai-ling; Fang, Yan-qiong; Zhang, Meng

    2012-09-01

    To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N+ with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N+ beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 1016 to 15 × 1016 ions cm-2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 1016 ion cm-2, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 1016 ions cm-2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  14. Effect for hydrogen, nitrogen, phosphorous, and argon ions irradiation on ZnO NWs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishaq, A.; Usman, M.; Dee, C. F.; Khurram, A. A.; Yan, L.; Zhou, X. T.; Nadeem, A.; Naseem, S.; Rafique, H. M.; Majlis, B. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) are exposed to energetic proton (H + ), nitrogen (N + ), phosphorus (P + ), and argon (Ar + ) ions to understand the radiation hardness and structural changes induced by these irradiations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is utilized to see the irradiation effects in NWs. Multiple doses and energies of radiation at different temperatures are used for different set of samples. The study reveals that wurtzite (crystalline)-structured ZnO NWs experience amorphization, degradation, and morphological changes after the irradiation. At room temperature, deterioration of the crystalline structure is observed under high fluence of H + , N + , and P + ions. While for ZnO NWs, bombarded by Ar + and P + ions, nano-holes are produced. The ZnO NWs surfaces also show corrugated morphology full of nano-humps when irradiated by Ar + ions at 400 °C. The corrugated surface could serve as tight-holding interface when interconnecting it with other NWs/nanotubes. These nano-humps may have the function of increasing the surface for surface-oriented sensing applications in the future.

  15. Effect for hydrogen, nitrogen, phosphorous, and argon ions irradiation on ZnO NWs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishaq, A., E-mail: ishaq_ah@yahoo.com; Usman, M. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Experimental Physics Labs (Pakistan); Dee, C. F. [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN) (Malaysia); Khurram, A. A. [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Experimental Physics Labs (Pakistan); Yan, L., E-mail: yanlong@sinap.ac.cn; Zhou, X. T. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics (China); Nadeem, A.; Naseem, S. [University of the Punjab, Centre of Excellence in Solid State Physics (Pakistan); Rafique, H. M. [University of the Punjab, Department of Physics (Pakistan); Majlis, B. Y. [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN) (Malaysia)

    2013-04-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) are exposed to energetic proton (H{sup +}), nitrogen (N{sup +}), phosphorus (P{sup +}), and argon (Ar{sup +}) ions to understand the radiation hardness and structural changes induced by these irradiations. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is utilized to see the irradiation effects in NWs. Multiple doses and energies of radiation at different temperatures are used for different set of samples. The study reveals that wurtzite (crystalline)-structured ZnO NWs experience amorphization, degradation, and morphological changes after the irradiation. At room temperature, deterioration of the crystalline structure is observed under high fluence of H{sup +}, N{sup +}, and P{sup +} ions. While for ZnO NWs, bombarded by Ar{sup +} and P{sup +} ions, nano-holes are produced. The ZnO NWs surfaces also show corrugated morphology full of nano-humps when irradiated by Ar{sup +} ions at 400 Degree-Sign C. The corrugated surface could serve as tight-holding interface when interconnecting it with other NWs/nanotubes. These nano-humps may have the function of increasing the surface for surface-oriented sensing applications in the future.

  16. Temperature dependent mobility measurements of alkali earth ions in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putlitz, Gisbert Zu; Baumann, I.; Foerste, M.; Jungmann, K.; Riediger, O.; Tabbert, B.; Wiebe, J.; Zühlke, C.

    1998-05-01

    Mobility measurements of impurity ions in superfluid helium are reported. Alkali earth ions were produced with a laser sputtering technique and were drawn inside the liquid by an electric field. The experiments were carried out in the temperature region from 1.27 up to 1.66 K. The temperature dependence of the mobility of Be^+-ions (measured here for the first time) differs from that of the other alkali earth ions Mg^+, Ca^+, Sr^+ and Ba^+, but behaves similar to that of He^+ (M. Foerste, H. Günther, O. Riediger, J. Wiebe, G. zu Putlitz, Z. Phys. B) 104, 317 (1997). Theories of Atkins (A. Atkins, Phys. Rev.) 116, 1339 (1959) and Cole (M.W. Cole, R.A. Bachmann Phys. Rev. B) 15, 1388 (1977) predict a different defect structure for He^+ and the alkali earth ions: the helium ion is assumed to form a snowball like structure whereas for the alkali earth ions a bubble structure is assumed. If the temperature dependence is a characteristic feature for the different structures, then it seems likely that the Be^+ ion builds a snowball like structure.

  17. Characterization of applied fields for ion mobility in traveling wave based structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Prabhakaran Nair Syamala Amma, Aneesh; Garimella, Venkata BS; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2018-03-21

    Ion mobility (IM) is rapidly gaining attention for the analysis of biomolecules due to the ability to distinguish the shapes of ions. However, conventional constant electric field drift tube IM has limited resolving power, constrained by practical limitations on the path length and maximum applied voltage. The implementation of traveling waves (TW) in IM removes the latter limitation, allowing higher resolution to be achieved using extended path lengths. These can be readily obtainable in structures for lossless ion manipulations (SLIM), which are fabricated from electric fields that are generated by appropriate potentials applied to arrays of electrodes patterned on two parallel surfaces. In this work we have investigated the relationship between the various SLIM variables, such as electrode dimensions, inter-surface gap, and the TW applied voltages, that directly impact the fields experienced by ions. Ion simulation and theoretical calculations have been utilized to understand the dependence of SLIM geometry and effective electric field. The variables explored impact both ion confinement and the observed IM resolution in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) modules.

  18. A Novel Microwave-Induced Plasma Ionization Source for Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jianxiong; Zhao, Zhongjun; Liang, Gaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2017-03-01

    This work demonstrates the application of a novel microwave induced plasma ionization (MIPI) source to ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The MIPI source, called Surfatron, is composed of a copper cavity and a hollow quartz discharge tube. The ion mobility spectrum of synthetics air has a main peak with reduced mobility of 2.14 cm2V-1s-1 for positive ion mode and 2.29 cm2V-1s-1 for negative ion mode. The relative standard deviations (RSD) are 0.7% and 1.2% for positive and negative ion mode, respectively. The total ion current measured was more than 3.5 nA, which is much higher than that of the conventional 63Ni source. This indicates that a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be acquired from the MIPI source. The SNR was 110 in the analysis of 500 pptv methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), resulting in the limit of detection (SNR = 3) of 14 pptv. The linear range covers close to 2.5 orders of magnitude in the detection of triethylamine with a concentration range from 500 pptv to 80 ppbv. Finally, this new MIPI-IMS was used to detect some volatile organic compounds, which demonstrated that the MIPI-IMS has great potential in monitoring pollutants in air.

  19. Etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.; Acero, M.C. Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J.; El-Hassani, A.

    1996-01-01

    In this work the etch-stop behavior of buried layers formed by substoichiometric nitrogen ion implantation into silicon is studied as a function of the processing parameters, the implantation dose and temperature, and the presence of capping layers during implantation. Etching characteristics have been probed using tetramethylammonium hydroxide or KOH solutions for different times up to 6 h. Results show that, after annealing, the minimum dose required for the formation of an efficient etch-stop layer is about 4 x 10 17 cm -2 , for an implantation energy of 75 keV. This is defined as a layer with an efficient etch selectivity in relation to Si of s ≥ 100. For larger implantation doses efficient etch selectivities larger than 100 are obtained. However, for these doses a considerable density of pits is observed in the etch-stop layer. These are related to the presence of nitrogen poor Si regions in the buried layer after annealing, due to a partial separation of silicon and silicon nitride phases during the annealing process. The influence of this separation of phases as well as nitrogen gettering in the buried layer on the etch-stop behavior is discussed as a function of the processing parameters

  20. Significantly enhanced visible light response in single TiO2 nanowire by nitrogen ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pengcheng; Song, Xianyin; Si, Shuyao; Ke, Zunjian; Cheng, Li; Li, Wenqing; Xiao, Xiangheng; Jiang, Changzhong

    2018-05-01

    The metal-oxide semiconductor TiO2 shows enormous potential in the field of photoelectric detection; however, UV-light absorption only restricts its widespread application. It is considered that nitrogen doping can improve the visible light absorption of TiO2, but the effect of traditional chemical doping is far from being used for visible light detection. Herein, we dramatically broadened the absorption spectrum of the TiO2 nanowire (NW) by nitrogen ion implantation and apply the N-doped single TiO2 NW to visible light detection for the first time. Moreover, this novel strategy effectively modifies the surface states and thus regulates the height of Schottky barriers at the metal/semiconductor interface, which is crucial to realizing high responsivity and a fast response rate. Under the illumination of a laser with a wavelength of 457 nm, our fabricated photodetector exhibits favorable responsivity (8 A W-1) and a short response time (0.5 s). These results indicate that ion implantation is a promising method in exploring the visible light detection of TiO2.

  1. Sliding wear characteristics of carburized steels and thermally refined steels implanted with nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Keiichi; Koda, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Eiichi.

    1995-01-01

    In order to concretely examine the application of surface reforming by ion implantation, nitrogen ion implantation was applied to the thermally refined steels S45C and SCM440 and the carburized steel SCM415, which are high versatile steels for mechanical structures, and their friction and wear characteristics were examined. The results are summarized as follows. In the surface-reformed material, in which nitrogen was implanted for the purpose of improving the seizure durability of the carburized steel, the load-frictional coefficient curve in lubricated sliding friction was similar to that of the material without implantation, but it was recognized that the load at which seizure occurred reached 2000 kgf or more, and as the amount of implantation was more, the material withstood higher load. In the lubricated sliding friction using a pin-ring type wear testing machine of the thermally refined steels and those to which implantation was applied, it was recognized that the specific wear amount was less in the implanted steels than in those without implantation. The results of the analysis of the implanted surface layers and the friction surfaces are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Ion mobilities in diatomic gases: measurement versus prediction with non-specular scattering models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Carlos; Hogan, Christopher J

    2013-05-16

    Ion/electrical mobility measurements of nanoparticles and polyatomic ions are typically linked to particle/ion physical properties through either application of the Stokes-Millikan relationship or comparison to mobilities predicted from polyatomic models, which assume that gas molecules scatter specularly and elastically from rigid structural models. However, there is a discrepancy between these approaches; when specular, elastic scattering models (i.e., elastic-hard-sphere scattering, EHSS) are applied to polyatomic models of nanometer-scale ions with finite-sized impinging gas molecules, predictions are in substantial disagreement with the Stokes-Millikan equation. To rectify this discrepancy, we developed and tested a new approach for mobility calculations using polyatomic models in which non-specular (diffuse) and inelastic gas-molecule scattering is considered. Two distinct semiempirical models of gas-molecule scattering from particle surfaces were considered. In the first, which has been traditionally invoked in the study of aerosol nanoparticles, 91% of collisions are diffuse and thermally accommodating, and 9% are specular and elastic. In the second, all collisions are considered to be diffuse and accommodating, but the average speed of the gas molecules reemitted from a particle surface is 8% lower than the mean thermal speed at the particle temperature. Both scattering models attempt to mimic exchange between translational, vibrational, and rotational modes of energy during collision, as would be expected during collision between a nonmonoatomic gas molecule and a nonfrozen particle surface. The mobility calculation procedure was applied considering both hard-sphere potentials between gas molecules and the atoms within a particle and the long-range ion-induced dipole (polarization) potential. Predictions were compared to previous measurements in air near room temperature of multiply charged poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) ions, which range in morphology from

  3. Thermoluminescent relative efficiencies of TLD-100 for nitrogen ions respect of gamma radiation; Eficiencias termoluminiscentes relativas de TLD-100 para iones de nitrogeno respecto de radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha S, K. [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Avila, O. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Gamboa de Buen, I. [ICN-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rodriguez V, M.; Buenfil, A.E.; Ruiz T, C.; Brandan, M.E. [IFUNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to measure the thermoluminescent relative efficiency of those TLD-100 dosemeters irradiated with nitrogen ions with respect to the gamma radiation of {sup 60} Co, in function of the linear energy transfer (LET). Two energy of such nitrogen ions were selected that has the same value from LET when impacting in the dosemeters but with E{sub 1} energy (4.8 MeV) and E{sub 2} (9.95 MeV) smaller and greater respectively that the energy of the Bragg peak. (Author)

  4. Toward a Rational Design of Highly Folded Peptide Cation Conformations. 3D Gas-Phase Ion Structures and Ion Mobility Characterization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pepin, R.; Laszlo, K. J.; Marek, Aleš; Peng, B.; Bush, M. F.; Lavanant, H.; Afonso, C.; Tureček, F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 10 (2016), s. 1647-1660 ISSN 1044-0305 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : peptide ions * ion mobility * collisional cross sections * density functional theory calculations * ion structures * polar effects Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.786, year: 2016

  5. Nitrogen Ion Form and Spatio-temporal Variation in Root Distribution Mediate Nitrogen Effects on Lifespan of Ectomycorrhizal Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, L.; McCormack, M. L.; Chen, W.; Guo, D.; Wang, H.; Li, S.; Gao, W.; Yang, H.

    2017-12-01

    Background and Aims Absorptive roots active in soil resource uptake are often intimately associated with mycorrhizal fungi, yet it remains unclear how nitrogen (N) loading affects lifespan of absorptive roots associating with ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi. Methods Through a three-year minirhizotron experiment, we investigated the responses of ECM lifespan to different rates of N addition and examined the roles of N ion form, rooting depth, seasonal root cohort, and ECM morphotype in mediating the N effects on ECM lifespan in a slash pine (Pinus elliottii) forest in subtropical China. Results High rates of NH4Cl significantly decreased foliar P concentrations and increased foliar N: P ratios, and mean ECM lifespan was negatively correlated to foliar P concentration. N additions generally increased the lifespan of most ectomycorrhizas, but the specific differences were context dependent. N rates and forms exerted significant positive effects on ECM lifespan with stronger effects occurring at high N rates and under ammonium N addition. N additions extended lifespan of ectomycorrhizas in shallower soil and born in spring and autumn, but shortened lifespan of ectomycorrhizas in deeper soil and born in summer and winter. N additions reduced lifespan of dichotomous ectomycorrhizas, but increased lifespan of coralloid ectomycorrhizas. Conclusions The increased ECM lifespan in response to N additions may primarily be driven by the persistent and aggravated P limitation to plants. Our findings highlight the importance of environmental contexts in controlling ECM lifespan and the need to consider potential differences among mycorrhizal morphotypes when studying N—lifespan relationships of absorptive roots in the context of N deposition.

  6. Effects of drift gas on collision cross sections of a protein standard in linear drift tube and traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurneczko, Ewa; Kalapothakis, Jason; Campuzano, Iain D G; Morris, Michael; Barran, Perdita E

    2012-10-16

    There has been a significant increase in the use of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) to investigate conformations of proteins and protein complexes following electrospray ionization. Investigations which employ traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry (TW IM-MS) instrumentation rely on the use of calibrants to convert the arrival times of ions to collision cross sections (CCS) providing "hard numbers" of use to structural biology. It is common to use nitrogen as the buffer gas in TW IM-MS instruments and to calibrate by extrapolating from CCS measured in helium via drift tube (DT) IM-MS. In this work, both DT and TW IM-MS instruments are used to investigate the effects of different drift gases (helium, neon, nitrogen, and argon) on the transport of multiply charged ions of the protein myoglobin, frequently used as a standard in TW IM-MS studies. Irrespective of the drift gas used, recorded mass spectra are found to be highly similar. In contrast, the recorded arrival time distributions and the derived CCS differ greatly. At low charge states (7 ≤ z ≤ 11) where the protein is compact, the CCS scale with the polarizability of the gas; this is also the case for higher charge states (12 ≤ z ≤ 22) where the protein is more unfolded for the heavy gases (neon, argon, and nitrogen) but not the case for helium. This is here interpreted as a different conformational landscape being sampled by the lighter gas and potentially attributable to increased field heating by helium. Under nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI) conditions, where myoglobin is sprayed from an aqueous solution buffered to pH 6.8 with 20 mM ammonium acetate, in the DT IM-MS instrument, each buffer gas can yield a different arrival time distribution (ATD) for any given charge state.

  7. Ion mobility spectrometry-hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry of anions: part 1. Peptides to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, Gregory C; Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Valentine, Stephen J

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) has been used to study the conformations of negatively-charged peptide and protein ions. Results are presented for ion conformers of angiotensin 1, a synthetic peptide (SP), bovine insulin, ubiquitin, and equine cytochrome c. In general, the SP ion conformers demonstrate a greater level of HDX efficiency as a greater proportion of the sites undergo HDX. Additionally, these ions exhibit the fastest rates of exchange. Comparatively, the angiotensin 1 ions exhibit a lower rate of exchange and HDX level presumably because of decreased accessibility of exchange sites by charge sites. The latter are likely confined to the peptide termini. Insulin ions show dramatically reduced HDX levels and exchange rates, which can be attributed to decreased conformational flexibility resulting from the disulfide bonds. For the larger ubiquitin and protein ions, increased HDX is observed for larger ions of higher charge state. For ubiquitin, a conformational transition from compact to more elongated species (from lower to higher charge states) is reflected by an increase in HDX levels. These results can be explained by a combination of interior site protection by compact conformers as well as decreased access by charge sites. The elongated cytochrome c ions provide the largest HDX levels where higher values correlate with charge state. These results are consistent with increased exchange site accessibility by additional charge sites. The data from these enhanced IMS-HDX experiments are described in terms of charge site location, conformer rigidity, and interior site protection.

  8. Electron-capture process and ion mobility spectra in plasma chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasek, F.W.; Spangler, G.E.

    1981-01-01

    The basic principles of plasma chromatography are introduced and ion mobility relationships presented. The relationships of plasma chromatography to electron-capture detector mechanisms are discussed, including electron energy considerations and electron-capture reactions. A number of experimental studies by plasma chromatography are described. (C.F.)

  9. Ligand induced structural isomerism in phosphine coordinated gold clusters revealed by ion mobility mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligare, Marshall R.; Baker, Erin M.; Laskin, Julia; Johnson, Grant E.

    2017-01-01

    Structural isomerism in ligated gold clusters is revealed using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry. Phosphine ligated Au8 clusters are shown to adopt more “extended” type structures with increasing exchange of methyldiphenylphosphine (MePPh2) for triphenylphosphine (PPh3). These ligand-dependant structure-property relationships are critical to applications of clusters in catalysis.

  10. Direct classification of olive oils by using two types of ion mobility spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrido-Delgado, Rocio [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Mercader-Trejo, Flora [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Metrologia de Materiales, Centro Nacional de Metrologia, km. 4.5 Carretera a Los Cues, El Marques, Queretaro (Mexico); Sielemann, Stefanie; Bruyn, Wolfgang de [G.A.S. Gesellschaft fuer analytische Sensorsysteme mbH, BioMedizinZentrumDortmund, Otto-Hahn-Str. 15, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Arce, Lourdes [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); Valcarcel, Miguel, E-mail: qa1meobj@uco.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Cordoba, Annex C3 Building, Campus of Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2011-06-24

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: > We explore the use of Ion Mobility Spectrometers for classification of olive oils. > Three types of olive oils were analyzed with both devices coupled to headspace system. > The ion mobility data were processed using chemometric to obtain global information. > The classification rate was better using tritium source and separation step prior IMS. - Abstract: In this work, we explored the use of an Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) device with an ultraviolet (UV) source, and of a Gas Chromatographic (GC) column coupled to an IM Spectrometer with a tritium source, for the discrimination of three grades of olive oil, namely: extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), olive oil (OO) and pomace olive oil (POO). The three types of oil were analyzed with both equipment combinations as coupled to a headspace system and the obtained ion mobility data were consecutively processed with various chemometric tools. The classification rate for an independent validation set was 86.1% (confidence interval at 95% [83.4%, 88.5%]) with an UV-IMS and 100% (confidence interval at 95% [87%, 100%]) using a GC-IMS system. The classification rate was improved by using a more suitable ionization source and a pre-separation step prior to the IM analysis.

  11. Application of an ion mobility spectrometer based on virtual instrument technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Shihong; Wei Yongbo; Jiang Dazhen

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of virtual instrument technology on an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). By designing the data acquisition and processing system of IMS on LabVIEW platform, the ability of signal processing and real time measurement in practice has been improved. (authors)

  12. The simulation of pulsed heater for a sampling system for the ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkin, Evgeniy

    2011-01-01

    The development of the sampling device with pulsed heating of the intermediate carrier for ion mobility spectrometer is described in this article. Numerical simulation of a pulse heater structure of is presented. The design of the sampling device using a pulsed heating of the intermediate carrier is developed. Experimental results of approval of the sampling device are presented.

  13. Direct classification of olive oils by using two types of ion mobility spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido-Delgado, Rocio; Mercader-Trejo, Flora; Sielemann, Stefanie; Bruyn, Wolfgang de; Arce, Lourdes; Valcarcel, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → We explore the use of Ion Mobility Spectrometers for classification of olive oils. → Three types of olive oils were analyzed with both devices coupled to headspace system. → The ion mobility data were processed using chemometric to obtain global information. → The classification rate was better using tritium source and separation step prior IMS. - Abstract: In this work, we explored the use of an Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) device with an ultraviolet (UV) source, and of a Gas Chromatographic (GC) column coupled to an IM Spectrometer with a tritium source, for the discrimination of three grades of olive oil, namely: extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), olive oil (OO) and pomace olive oil (POO). The three types of oil were analyzed with both equipment combinations as coupled to a headspace system and the obtained ion mobility data were consecutively processed with various chemometric tools. The classification rate for an independent validation set was 86.1% (confidence interval at 95% [83.4%, 88.5%]) with an UV-IMS and 100% (confidence interval at 95% [87%, 100%]) using a GC-IMS system. The classification rate was improved by using a more suitable ionization source and a pre-separation step prior to the IM analysis.

  14. Chemometrics for ion mobility spectrometry data: recent advances and future prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanska, E.; Davies, Antony N.; Buydens, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, advances in the field of ion mobility spectrometry have been hindered by the variation in measured signals between instruments developed by different research laboratories or manufacturers. This has triggered the development and application of chemometric techniques able to reveal and

  15. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Gang; Wang Xiaoteng; Gan Cailing; Fang Yanqiong; Zhang Meng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We analyzed biological effects of N + implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed. ► N + implantation greatly decreased seedling survival rate. ► At doses beyond 15 × 10 16 ion cm −2 , biological repair took place. ► CAT was essential for H 2 O 2 removal. POD mainly functioned as seed was severely hurt. ► HAsA–GSH cycle mainly contributed to the regeneration of HAsA. - Abstract: To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N + with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N + beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 × 10 16 to 15 × 10 16 ions cm −2 severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 × 10 16 ion cm −2 , biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 × 10 16 ions cm −2 may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA–GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  16. The analysis of ion nitriding and nitrogen ion implantation on tribological properties of steels 33H3MF and 36H3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zandecki, R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface properties of two kinds of steel 33H3MF and 36H3M have been investigated. Three different methods of steel surface treatment have been used: ion nitriding, nitrogen ion implantation and mixing method being the sum of the first and second ones. The microstructure, microhardness distribution, fatigue strength, friction coefficient and other tribological properties have been measured and compared. 60 refs, 74 figs, 19 tabs

  17. Drift tube measurements of mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of ions in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelf, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    The zero-field mobilities of Br - and NH 4+ in O 2 were determined as a function of gas temperature in a high pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The mobilities and longitudinal diffusion coefficients of the ion-gas combinations Br - in Ne and Kr, Li + in Xe, and Tl/ + in Kr and Xe were determined as a function of E/N, where E is the electric field strength and N is the gas number density in a low pressure drift tube mass spectrometer. The measured longitudinal diffusion coefficients were used for a test and comparison of the generalized Einstein relations of Viehland-Mason and Waldman-Mason theories. The measured mobilities of Br - in Kr and Tl/ + in Kr were used in an iterative-inversion scheme from which the ion-neutral interaction potentials were determined

  18. Strong coupling between a single nitrogen-vacancy spin and the rotational mode of diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Chassagneux, Y.; Hétet, G.

    2017-12-01

    A scheme for strong coupling between a single atomic spin and the rotational mode of levitating nanoparticles is proposed. The idea is based on spin readout of nitrogen-vacancy centers embedded in aspherical nanodiamonds levitating in an ion trap. We show that the asymmetry of the diamond induces a rotational confinement in the ion trap. Using a weak homogeneous magnetic field and a strong microwave driving we then demonstrate that the spin of the nitrogen-vacancy center can be strongly coupled to the rotational mode of the diamond.

  19. Generation of Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions driven by ultraintense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jinping; Chu, Wei; Liu, Zhaoxiang; Xu, Bo; Chen, Jinming; Cheng, Ya

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric lasing has aroused much interest in the past few years. The ‘air–laser’ opens promising potential for remote chemical sensing of trace gases with high sensitivity and specificity. At present, several approaches have been successfully implemented for generating highly coherent laser beams in atmospheric condition, including both amplified-spontaneous emission, and narrow-bandwidth stimulated emission in the forward direction in the presence of self-generated or externally injected seed pulses. Here, we report on generation of multiple-wavelength Raman lasers from nitrogen molecular ions ({{{N}}}2+), driven by intense mid-infrared laser fields. Intuitively, the approach appears problematic for the small nonlinear susceptibility of {{{N}}}2+ ions, whereas the efficiency of Raman laser can be significantly promoted in near-resonant condition. More surprisingly, a Raman laser consisting of a supercontinuum spanning from ∼310 to ∼392 nm has been observed resulting from a series near-resonant nonlinear processes including four-wave mixing, stimulated Raman scattering and cross phase modulation. To date, extreme nonlinear optics in molecular ions remains largely unexplored, which provides an alternative means for air–laser-based remote sensing applications.

  20. Examining the role of SGD on the nitrogen budget of the fourth largest estuary in the USA, Mobile Bay, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, N. T.; Montiel, D.; Lu, Y.; Adyasari, D.

    2017-12-01

    The present study aims to help understand further the importance of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) to Mobile Bay, Alabama with respect to associated nitrogen (N-) fluxes. Based on a three-year long study we found that on a large scale, when comparing Mobile River discharge to SGD, during the dry season, the SGD flux is only 2.5% of Mobile River discharge, whereas, during the wet season, this contribution is less than 1%. However, when examining the nitrogen budget of MB, we found that during the dry season, SGD delivers about half of the fluxes to the Bay. Furthermore, we found that the distribution of these SGD-derived inputs along the MB shoreline is very heterogeneous. Shallow geophysical electrical resistivity imaging and multiple sediment cores recovered in the examined areas reveal a rich organic sediment layer (up to 80 cm thick at some locations) which is perhaps responsible for the observed enhanced N-fluxes. Ongoing microbial, DOM and stable isotope sediment examination aim to explain the geochemical processes responsible for the disproportionally large SGD-delivered nitrogen fluxes in the identified impacted coastal areas.

  1. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Ammonia was produced by 13 companies at 23 plants in 16 states during 2009. Sixty percent of all U.S. ammonia production capacity was centered in Louisiana. Oklahoma and Texas because of those states' large reserves of natural gas, the dominant domestic feedstock. In 2009, U.S. producers operated at about 83 percent of their rated capacity (excluding plants that were idle for the entire year). Five companies — Koch Nitrogen Co.; Terra Industries Inc.; CF Industries Inc.; PCS Nitrogen Inc. and Agrium Inc., in descending order — accounted for 80 percent of the total U.S. ammonia production capacity. U.S. production was estimated to be 7.7 Mt (8.5 million st) of nitrogen (N) content in 2009 compared with 7.85 Mt (8.65 million st) of N content in 2008. Apparent consumption was estimated to have decreased to 12.1 Mt (13.3 million st) of N, a 10-percent decrease from 2008. The United States was the world's fourth-ranked ammonia producer and consumer following China, India and Russia. Urea, ammonium nitrate, ammonium phosphates, nitric acid and ammonium sulfate were the major derivatives of ammonia in the United States, in descending order of importance.

  2. Characteristics of ion spectrum in a low energy nitrogen operated plasma focus: application to the metallic substrates thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, H.; Lepone, A.; Marquez, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This work presents the nitrogen ion spectrum characteristics in a Plasma Focus device, determined using a Thomson spectrometer and a Faraday cup, operated in the secondary electron collective mode. It is also discussed the thermal treatment and the re coating induce by ions incident on a metallic surface (AISI 304 steel) placed in front of the coaxial gun, when the device is operated with a Ti implant at the end of the central electrode

  3. Towards a Measurement of the n=2 Lamb Shift in Hydrogen-like Nitrogen Using an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosaka, K.; Crosby, D. N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Smith, C. J.; Silver, J. D. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Myers, E. G. [Florida State University (United States); Kinugawa, T.; Ohtani, S. [University of Electro-Communications, Cold Trapped Ions Project, JST (Japan)

    2003-03-15

    Using a {sup 14}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} laser the 2s{sub 1/2}-2p{sub 3/2} (fine structure - Lamb shift) transition has been induced in {sup 14}N{sup 6+} ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap. Prospects for a measurement of the Lamb shift in hydrogen-like nitrogen are discussed.

  4. Explosives vapour identification in ion mobility spectrometry using a tunable laser ionization source: a comparison with conventional 63Ni ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, A.; Deas, R.M.; Kosmidis, C.; Ledingham, K.W.D.; Marshall, A.; Singhal, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    Laser multiphoton ionization (MPI) is used to produce ions from explosive vapours at atmospheric pressure in air for analysis by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). In the positive ion mode of detection, NO + ions, generated directly by multiphoton dissociation/ionization of the explosive compounds, show strong variation with laser wavelength. This provides a means of identifying the presence of nitro-containing compounds. Moreover, electrons formed in the MPI of gaseous components in the air carrier stream, primarily O 2 , are transferred via neutral molecular oxygen (O 2 ) to trace explosive vapour, forming negative ions which give rise to characteristic and identifiable ion mobility spectra. Further, negative ion mobility spectra of several explosive vapours are presented using conventional 63 Ni ionization and are compared qualitatively with the laser ionization approach. (author)

  5. Measuring the radial density distribution of light emission around the track of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-01-01

    For analysing the emission and stopping of ionization electrons (σ-electrons) emitted by fast ions passing through a gas, the radial density distribution of the light emission of the (0,0) transition of two optical bands in nitrogen have been measured. The systems selected for the epxeriments are the 2nd positive system (2.PS) at 337.1 nm primarily excited by low-energy electrons of about 20 eV, and the first negative system (1.NS) at 391.4 nm excited by faster electrons and simultaneous ionization. The equipment developed for the experiments records the light emission with a telescope-type optical arrangement including interference filters, allowing high local resolution and dynamics of the measured range. The measurements have been carried out at pressures between 0.133 and 13.3 mbar, using photons of energies ranging from 270 keV to 2.8 MeV, helium 3 beams of 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u, and neon beams of 270 keV/u. Abel's inversion applied to the distance functions allows calculation of the spatial light emission density which is normalized for a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The profiles of the two bands indicate that the σ-electron spectrum gets harder in outward direction. Next to the beam the impact density decreases faster with increasing ion energy than the stopping power (increasing interaction range of the σ-electrons). With photon beams, about half of the whole light emission in the 1. NS, and of the ionization, is induced by primary interactions of the ion beam. This proportion decreases at constant energy per nucleon with increasing atomic number of the ions as compared with the σ-electrons. The primary σ-emission gets harder with higher atomic numbers. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Deprotonation effect of tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile buffer gas dopant in ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Maestre, Roberto; Meza-Morelos, Dairo; Wu, Ching

    2016-06-15

    When dopants are introduced into the buffer gas of an ion mobility spectrometer, spectra are simplified due to charge competition. We used electrospray ionization to inject tetrahydrofuran-2-carbonitrile (F, 2-furonitrile or 2-furancarbonitrile) as a buffer gas dopant into an ion mobility spectrometer coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Density functional theory was used for theoretical calculations of dopant-ion interaction energies and proton affinities, using the hybrid functional X3LYP/6-311++(d,p) with the Gaussian 09 program that accounts for the basis set superposition error; analytes structures and theoretical calculations with Gaussian were used to explain the behavior of the analytes upon interaction with F. When F was used as a dopant at concentrations below 1.5 mmol m(-3) in the buffer gas, ions were not observed for α-amino acids due to charge competition with the dopant; this deprotonation capability arises from the production of a dimer with a high formation energy that stabilized the positive charge and created steric hindrance that deterred the equilibrium with analyte ions. F could not completely strip other compounds of their charge because they either showed steric hindrance at the charge site that deterred the approach of the dopant (2,4-lutidine, and DTBP), formed intramolecular bonds that stabilized the positive charge (atenolol), had high proton affinity (2,4-lutidine, DTBP, valinol and atenolol), or were inherently ionic (tetraalkylammonium ions). This selective deprotonation suggests the use of F to simplify spectra of complex mixtures in ion mobility and mass spectrometry in metabolomics, proteomics and other studies that generate complex spectra with thousands of peaks. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Application of ion mobility-mass spectrometry to microRNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Kosuke; Hirose, Kenji; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Bamba, Takeshi; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-03-01

    Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry is widely used for studying sequence determination and modification analysis of small RNAs. However, the efficiency of liquid chromatography-based separation of intact small RNA species is insufficient, since the physiochemical properties among small RNAs are very similar. In this study, we focused on ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS), which is a gas-phase separation technique coupled with mass spectrometry; we have evaluated the utility of IM-MS for microRNA (miRNA) analysis. A multiply charged deprotonated ion derived from an 18-24-nt-long miRNA was formed by electrospray ionization, and then the time, called the "drift time", taken by each ion to migrate through a buffer gas was measured. Each multivalent ion was temporally separated on the basis of the charge state and structural formation; 3 types of unique mass-mobility correlation patterns (i.e., chainlike-form, hairpin-form, and dimer-form) were present on the two-dimensional mobility-mass spectrum. Moreover, we found that the ion size (sequence length) and the secondary structures of the small RNAs strongly contributed to the IM-MS-based separation, although solvent conditions such as pH had no effect. Therefore, sequence isomers could also be discerned by the selection of each specific charged ion, i.e., the 6(-) charged ion reflected a majority among chainlike-, hairpin-, and other structures. We concluded that the IM-MS provides additional capability for separation; thus, this analytical method will be a powerful tool for comprehensive small RNA analysis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Analysis of buried etch-stop layers in silicon by nitrogen-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, M.C.; Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J.; Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Garrido, B.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of the etch-stop properties of layers obtained by substoichiometric nitrogen-ion implantation and annealing in silicon has been performed as a function of the implantation conditions. The analysis of the etching efficiency has been tested in TMAH-IPA systems. The results obtained show the need to implant at doses higher than 2 x 10 17 cm -2 to obtain etch-stop layers stable under high-temperature annealing. So, for implantation doses of 5 x 10 17 cm -2 , layers stand unetched for times longer than 2 h. The preliminary structural analysis of the samples suggests the presence of an amorphous silicon nitride layer for higher implantation doses. (author)

  9. Analysis of buried etch-stop layers in silicon by nitrogen-ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acero, M.C.; Esteve, J.; Montserrat, J. (Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (CNM-CSIC), Bellaterra (Spain)); Perez-Rodriguez, A.; Garrido, B.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.; Morante, J.R. (Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Electronica)

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of the etch-stop properties of layers obtained by substoichiometric nitrogen-ion implantation and annealing in silicon has been performed as a function of the implantation conditions. The analysis of the etching efficiency has been tested in TMAH-IPA systems. The results obtained show the need to implant at doses higher than 2 x 10[sup 17] cm[sup -2] to obtain etch-stop layers stable under high-temperature annealing. So, for implantation doses of 5 x 10[sup 17] cm[sup -2], layers stand unetched for times longer than 2 h. The preliminary structural analysis of the samples suggests the presence of an amorphous silicon nitride layer for higher implantation doses. (author).

  10. Influence of the coupling between an atmospheric pressure ion mobility spectrometer and the low pressure ion inlet of a mass spectrometer on the mobility measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunzer Frank

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion mobility spectrometers (IMS are versatile gas analyzers. Due to their small size and robustness, combined with a very high sensitivity, they are often used in gas sensing applications such as environmental monitoring. In order to improve the selectivity, they are typically combined with a mass spectrometer (MS. Since IMS works at atmospheric pressure, and MS works at vacuum, a special interface reducing the pressure over normally two stages has to be used. In this paper the influence of this coupling of different pressure areas on the IMS signal will be analyzed with help of finite elements method simulations.

  11. Atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen in Spanish forests of Quercus ilex measured with ion-exchange resins and conventional collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héctor García-Gomez; Sheila Izquieta-Rojano; Laura Aguillaume; Ignacio González-Fernández; Fernando Valiño; David Elustondo; Jesús M. Santamaría; Anna Àvila; Mark E. Fenn; Rocío Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen deposition is one of the main threats for biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Measurement techniques like ion-exchange resin collectors (IECs), which are less expensive and time-consuming than conventional methods, are gaining relevance in the study of atmospheric deposition and are recommended to expand monitoring networks. In the present work...

  12. Distribution of species and Ga–N bonds in silicon co-implanted with gallium and nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surodin, S. I.; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Kryukov, R. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I.

    2016-01-01

    The concentration profiles of species in silicon subjected to gallium and nitrogen co-implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with the layer-by-layer ion etching of the implanted layer. It is shown that practically entire implanted gallium undergoes out-diffusion, but the preliminary implantation of nitrogen for the synthesis of a barrier SiN_x layer makes it possible to avoid the essential loss of gallium. In this case, about 14 % of implanted gallium bond to nitrogen. The obtained data are discussed from the viewpoint of the possibility of ion synthesis of GaN inclusions in silicon matrix.

  13. Distribution of species and Ga–N bonds in silicon co-implanted with gallium and nitrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surodin, S. I., E-mail: surodin.bsn@mail.ru; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Kryukov, R. N.; Belov, A. I.; Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Tetelbaum, D. I., E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Lobachevsky University, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The concentration profiles of species in silicon subjected to gallium and nitrogen co-implantation and subsequent annealing have been investigated by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with the layer-by-layer ion etching of the implanted layer. It is shown that practically entire implanted gallium undergoes out-diffusion, but the preliminary implantation of nitrogen for the synthesis of a barrier SiN{sub x} layer makes it possible to avoid the essential loss of gallium. In this case, about 14 % of implanted gallium bond to nitrogen. The obtained data are discussed from the viewpoint of the possibility of ion synthesis of GaN inclusions in silicon matrix.

  14. Measurement of mobility profile in ion-implanted silicon layers using electroreflection spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiev, G.B.; Kapaev, V.V.; Mokerov, V.G.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility is shown of the application of the low field linearized electroreflection spectroscopy for the measurement of profiles of carriers mobilities μ(x) simultaneously with the concentration profiles N(x) in thin ion-implanted silicon layers. The μ(χ) value is determined from the calibration curve of the dependence of the phenomenological broadening parameter γ on the mobility for uniformly doped samples. The results are presented for the measurements of the profiles μ(x) for boron- and arsenic-implanted silicon

  15. Separation of different ion structures in atmospheric pressure photoionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (APPI-IMS-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakia, Jaakko; Adamov, Alexey; Jussila, Matti; Pedersen, Christian S; Sysoev, Alexey A; Kotiaho, Tapio

    2010-09-01

    This study demonstrates how positive ion atmospheric pressure photoionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (APPI-IMS-MS) can be used to produce different ionic forms of an analyte and how these can be separated. When hexane:toluene (9:1) is used as a solvent, 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine (2,6-DtBPyr) and 2,6-di-tert-4-methylpyridine (2,6-DtB-4-MPyr) efficiently produce radical cations [M](+*) and protonated [M + H](+) molecules, whereas, when the sample solvent is hexane, protonated molecules are mainly formed. Interestingly, radical cations drift slower in the drift tube than the protonated molecules. It was observed that an oxygen adduct ion, [M + O(2)](+*), which was clearly seen in the mass spectra for hexane:toluene (9:1) solutions, shares the same mobility with radical cations, [M](+*). Therefore, the observed mobility order is most likely explained by oxygen adduct formation, i.e., the radical cation forming a heavier adduct. For pyridine and 2-tert-butylpyridine, only protonated molecules could be efficiently formed in the conditions used. For 1- and 2-naphthol it was observed that in hexane the protonated molecule typically had a higher intensity than the radical cation, whereas in hexane:toluene (9:1) the radical cation [M](+*) typically had a higher intensity than the protonated molecule [M + H](+). Interestingly, the latter drifts slower than the radical cation [M](+*), which is the opposite of the drift pattern seen for 2,6-DtBPyr and 2,6-DtB-4-MPyr. 2010 American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ion beam deposition of DLC and nitrogen doped DLC thin films for enhanced haemocompatibility on PTFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tang, Y.; Li, Y.S.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) and N-doped DLC (DLC:N) thin films have been synthesized on polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) and silicon wafers using ion beam deposition. Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the structural and morphological properties of the coated surface. The results show that the ion beam deposited DLC thin films exhibit high hardness and Young's modulus, low coefficient of friction and high adhesion to the substrate. Low concentration of nitrogen doping in DLC improves the mechanical properties and reduces the surface roughness. DLC coating decreases the surface energy and improves the wettability of PTFE. The platelet adhesion results show that the haemocompatibility of DLC coated PTFE, especially DLC:N coated PTFE, has been significantly enhanced as compared with uncoated PTFE. SEM observations show that the platelet reaction on the DLC and DLC:N coated PTFE was minimized as the platelets were much less aggregated and activated.

  17. Investigation of the lithium ion mobility in cyclic model compounds and their ion conduction properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thielen, Joerg

    2011-07-27

    In view of both, energy density and energy drain, rechargeable lithium ion batteries outperform other present accumulator systems. However, despite great efforts over the last decades, the ideal electrolyte in terms of key characteristics such as capacity, cycle life, and most important reliable safety, has not yet been identified. Steps ahead in lithium ion battery technology require a fundamental understanding of lithium ion transport, salt association, and ion solvation within the electrolyte. Indeed, well defined model compounds allow for systematic studies of molecular ion transport. Thus, in the present work, based on the concept of immobilizing ion solvents, three main series with a cyclotriphosphazene (CTP), hexaphenylbenzene (HBP), and tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (TMS) scaffold were prepared. Lithium ion solvents, among others ethylene carbonate (EC), which has proven to fulfill together with propylene carbonate safety and market concerns in commercial lithium ion batteries, were attached to the different cores via alkyl spacers of variable length. All model compounds were fully characterized, pure and thermally stable up to at least 235 C, covering the requested broad range of glass transition temperatures from -78.1 C up to +6.2 C. While the CTP models tend to rearrange at elevated temperatures over time, which questions the general stability of alkoxide related (poly)phosphazenes, both, the HPB and CTP based models show no evidence of core stacking. In particular the CTP derivatives represent good solvents for various lithium salts, exhibiting no significant differences in the ionic conductivity {sigma}{sub dc} and thus indicating comparable salt dissociation and rather independent motion of cations and ions. In general, temperature-dependent bulk ionic conductivities investigated via impedance spectroscopy follow a William-Landel-Ferry (WLF) type behavior. Modifications of the alkyl spacer length were shown to influence ionic conductivities only in

  18. The hypertrehalosemic neuropeptides of cicadas are structural isomers-evidence by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Simone; Marco, Heather; Gäde, Gerd

    2017-11-01

    It has been known for more than 20 years that the neurosecretory glands of the cicadas, the corpora cardiaca, synthesize two isobaric peptides with hypertrehalosemic activity. Both decapeptides have exactly the same amino acid sequence (pGlu-Val-Asn-Phe-Ser-Pro-Ser-Trp-Gly-Asn-NH 2 ) and mass but differ in their retention time in reversed-phase liquid chromatography. A synthetic peptide with the same sequence elutes together with the second more hydrophobic peptide peak of the natural cicada extract. It is not clear what modification is causing the described observations. Therefore, in the current study, ion mobility separation in conjunction with high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to investigate this phenomenon as it was sensitive to changes in conformation. It detected different drift times in buffer gas for both the intact peptides and some of their fragment ions. Based on the ion mobility and fragment ion intensity of the corresponding ions, it is concluded that the region Pro 6 -Ser 7 -Trp 8 contains a structural feature differing from the L-amino acids present in the known peptide. Whether the conformer is the result of racemization or other biochemical processes needs to be further investigated.

  19. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Peng; Ji, Zhiwei; Deng, Shuping; Li, Chi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Prediction of peptide drift time in ion mobility mass spectrometry from sequence-based features

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Bing

    2013-05-09

    Background: Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IMMS), an analytical technique which combines the features of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and mass spectrometry (MS), can rapidly separates ions on a millisecond time-scale. IMMS becomes a powerful tool to analyzing complex mixtures, especially for the analysis of peptides in proteomics. The high-throughput nature of this technique provides a challenge for the identification of peptides in complex biological samples. As an important parameter, peptide drift time can be used for enhancing downstream data analysis in IMMS-based proteomics.Results: In this paper, a model is presented based on least square support vectors regression (LS-SVR) method to predict peptide ion drift time in IMMS from the sequence-based features of peptide. Four descriptors were extracted from peptide sequence to represent peptide ions by a 34-component vector. The parameters of LS-SVR were selected by a grid searching strategy, and a 10-fold cross-validation approach was employed for the model training and testing. Our proposed method was tested on three datasets with different charge states. The high prediction performance achieve demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the prediction model.Conclusions: Our proposed LS-SVR model can predict peptide drift time from sequence information in relative high prediction accuracy by a test on a dataset of 595 peptides. This work can enhance the confidence of protein identification by combining with current protein searching techniques. 2013 Wang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  1. Design and implementation of embedded ion mobility spectrometry instrument based on SOPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Genwei; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Liu; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Yanwei; Yang, Jie

    2015-02-01

    On the hardware platform with single CYCLONE IV FPGA Chip based on SOPC technology, the control functions of IP cores of a Ion Mobility Spectrometry instrument was tested, including 32 bit Nios II soft-core processor, high-voltage module, ion gate switch, gas flow, temperature and pressure sensors, signal acquisition and communication protocol. Embedded operating system μCLinux was successfully transplanted to the hardware platform, used to schedule all the tasks, such as system initialization, parameter setting, signal processing, recognition algorithm and results display. The system was validated using the IMS diagram of Acetone reagent, and the instrument was proved to have a strong signal resolution.

  2. Biological effects of low energy nitrogen ion implantation on Jatropha curcas L. seed germination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Gang, E-mail: xg335300@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Research and Development of Fine Chemicals, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Institute of Entomology, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wang Xiaoteng [Department of Agricultural Resources and Environment, College of Agricultural, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Gan Cailing; Fang Yanqiong; Zhang Meng [College of Life Sciences, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyzed biological effects of N{sup +} implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sup +} implantation greatly decreased seedling survival rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At doses beyond 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CAT was essential for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} removal. POD mainly functioned as seed was severely hurt. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HAsA-GSH cycle mainly contributed to the regeneration of HAsA. - Abstract: To explore the biological effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on dry Jatropha curcas seed, a beam of N{sup +} with energy of 25 keV was applied to treat the dry seed at six different doses. N{sup +} beam implantation greatly decreased germination rate and seedling survival rate. The doses within the range of 12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} severely damaged the seeds: total antioxidant capacity (TAC), germination rate, seedling survival rate, reduced ascorbate acid (HAsA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, and most of the tested antioxidases activity (i.e. catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) reached their lowest levels. At a dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ion cm{sup -2}, biological repair took place: moderate increases were found in TAC, germination rate, seedling survival rate, HAsA and GSH contents, and some antioxidant enzyme activities (i.e. CAT, APX, SOD and GPX). The dose of 18 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup -2} may be the optimum dose for use in dry J. curcas seed mutation breeding. CAT, HAsA and GSH contributed to the increase of TAC, but CAT was the most important. POD performed its important role as seed was severely damaged. The main role of the HAsA-GSH cycle appeared to be for regeneration of HAsA.

  3. A compact high resolution ion mobility spectrometer for fast trace gas analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Allers, Maria; Cochems, Philipp; Langejuergen, Jens; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2013-09-21

    Drift tube ion mobility spectrometers (IMS) are widely used for fast trace gas detection in air, but portable compact systems are typically very limited in their resolving power. Decreasing the initial ion packet width improves the resolution, but is generally associated with a reduced signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) due to the lower number of ions injected into the drift region. In this paper, we present a refined theory of IMS operation which employs a combined approach for the analysis of the ion drift and the subsequent amplification to predict both the resolution and the SNR of the measured ion current peak. This theoretical analysis shows that the SNR is not a function of the initial ion packet width, meaning that compact drift tube IMS with both very high resolution and extremely low limits of detection can be designed. Based on these implications, an optimized combination of a compact drift tube with a length of just 10 cm and a transimpedance amplifier has been constructed with a resolution of 183 measured for the positive reactant ion peak (RIP(+)), which is sufficient to e.g. separate the RIP(+) from the protonated acetone monomer, even though their drift times only differ by a factor of 1.007. Furthermore, the limits of detection (LODs) for acetone are 180 pptv within 1 s of averaging time and 580 pptv within only 100 ms.

  4. Application Of Electronic Nose And Ion Mobility Spectrometer To Quality Control Of Spice Mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banach, U.; Tiebe, C.; Huebert, Th.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the application of electronic nose (e-nose) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) to quality control and to find out product adulteration of spice mixtures. Therefore the gaseous head space phase of four different spice mixtures (spices for sausages and saveloy) was differed from original composition and product adulteration. In this set of experiments metal-oxide type e-nose (KAMINA-type) has been used, and characteristic patterns of data corresponding to various complex odors of the four different spice mixtures were generated. Simultaneously an ion mobility spectrometer was coupled also to an emission chamber for the detection of gaseous components of spice mixtures. The two main methods that have been used show a clear discrimination between the original spice mixtures and product adulteration could be distinguished from original spice mixtures.

  5. Mixed mobile ion effect on a.c. conductivity of boroarsenate glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article we report the study of mixed mobile ion effect (MMIE) in boroarsenate glasses. DSC and a.c. electrical conductivity studies have been carried out for MgO–(25−)Li2O–50B2O3–25As2O3 glasses. It is observed that strength of MMIE in a.c. conductivity is less pronounced with increase in temperature and ...

  6. The first nitrogen index app for mobile devices: using portable technology for smart agricultural management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen fertilizer from organic and inorganic sources is used across the world’s agroecosystems. It contributes to higher yields and higher economic returns to farmers, and is essential for food security. However, when more is applied than necessary, significant amounts of nitrogen can exit the sy...

  7. Experimental ion mobility measurements in Xe-C2H6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigoto, J. M. C.; Cortez, A. F. V.; Veenhof, R.; Neves, P. N. B.; Santos, F. P.; Borges, F. I. G. M.; Conde, C. A. N.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we present the results of the ion mobility measurements made in gaseous mixtures of xenon (Xe) with ethane (C2H6) for pressures ranging from 6 to 10 Torr (8-10.6 mbar) and for low reduced electric fields in the 10 Td to 25 Td range (2.4-6.1 kVṡcm-1ṡ bar-1), at room temperature. The time of arrival spectra revealed two peaks throughout the entire range studied which were attributed to ion species with 3-carbons (C3H5+, C3H6+ C3H8+ and C3H9+) and with 4-carbons (C4H7+, C4H9+ and C4H10+). Besides these, and for Xe concentrations above 70%, a bump starts to appear at the right side of the main peak for reduced electric fields higher than 20 Td, which was attributed to the resonant charge transfer of C2H6+ to C2H6 that affects the mobility of its ion products (C3H8+ and C3H9+). The time of arrival spectra for Xe concentrations of 20%, 50%, 70% and 90% are presented, together with the reduced mobilities as a function of the Xe concentration calculated from the peaks observed for the low reduced electric fields and pressures studied.

  8. Gas-Phase Enrichment of Multiply Charged Peptide Ions by Differential Ion Mobility Extend the Comprehensiveness of SUMO Proteome Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfammatter, Sibylle; Bonneil, Eric; McManus, Francis P.; Thibault, Pierre

    2018-04-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a member of the family of ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs) and is involved in important cellular processes, including DNA damage response, meiosis and cellular trafficking. The large-scale identification of SUMO peptides in a site-specific manner is challenging not only because of the low abundance and dynamic nature of this modification, but also due to the branched structure of the corresponding peptides that further complicate their identification using conventional search engines. Here, we exploited the unusual structure of SUMO peptides to facilitate their separation by high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) and increase the coverage of SUMO proteome analysis. Upon trypsin digestion, branched peptides contain a SUMO remnant side chain and predominantly form triply protonated ions that facilitate their gas-phase separation using FAIMS. We evaluated the mobility characteristics of synthetic SUMO peptides and further demonstrated the application of FAIMS to profile the changes in protein SUMOylation of HEK293 cells following heat shock, a condition known to affect this modification. FAIMS typically provided a 10-fold improvement of detection limit of SUMO peptides, and enabled a 36% increase in SUMO proteome coverage compared to the same LC-MS/MS analyses performed without FAIMS. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Ignition method of corona discharge with modulation of the field in ion source of ion mobility spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gromov, Evgeniy

    2011-01-01

    The new method for the ignition of the corona discharge has been developed, which improves the stability of the ion mobility spectrometer and the resolution of the instrument. The system of forming a corona discharge without additional electrodes, which are used in a number of known structures for the pre-ionization, has been developed. This simplifies the design of the proposed source and an electronic control circuit. IMS technology is widely used in different civil and military fields for vapor-phase detection of explosive, narcotics, chemical warfare agents, biology molecules and so on. There are set of methods whose are used for the ionization of molecules under analysis. They are the following: radioactive ionization, ultraviolet photoionization, laser ionization, electric field ionization, corona spray ionization, electro spray ionization, roentgen ionization, and surface ionization. All these methods has their own advantages and disadvantages. A comparing of ion mobility spectra of non-polar hydrocarbons for photoionization, corona discharge ionization and 63 Ni ionization, had carried in. In our work we have investigated four types of IMS spectrometers whose use different sources for molecules under analysis ionization. They use radioactive ionization, ultraviolet photoionization, laser ionization, and roentgen ionization. The traditional explosives had investigated in experiments. In electricity, a corona discharge is an electrical discharge brought on by the ionization of a fluid surrounding a conductor, which occurs when the potential gradient (the strength of the electric field) exceeds a certain value, but conditions are insufficient to cause complete electrical breakdown or arcing.

  10. Supercritical fluid chromatographic resolution of water soluble isomeric carboxyl/amine terminated peptides facilitated via mobile phase water and ion pair formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M A; Riley, F; Ashraf-Khorassani, M; Taylor, L T

    2012-04-13

    Both analytical scale and preparative scale packed column supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) have found widespread applicability for chiral separations of multiple polar pharmaceutical candidates. However, SFC is rapidly becoming an achiral technique. More specifically, ion pair SFC is finding greater utility for separation of ionic analytes such as amine salts and organic sulfonates. The key to this success is, in part, the incorporation of additives such as trifluoroacetic acid and ammonium acetate into the mobile phase in association with a wide variety of both bonded silica stationary phases and high purity bare silica. Ion pairing SFC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection and mass spectrometric detection is presented here for the separation of water soluble, uncapped, isomeric peptide pairs that differ in amino acid arrangement. The separation is best achieved on either diol-bonded silica or bare silica with 1-5% (w/w) water as a significant ingredient in the mobile phase. Nitrogenous stationary phases such as 2-ethylpyridine, which had been very successful for the separation of capped peptides failed to yield the desired separation regardless of the mobile phase composition. A HILIC type retention mechanism is postulated for the separation of both isomeric uncapped peptide pairs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malau, Viktor, E-mail: malau@ugm.ac.id; Ilman, Mochammad Noer, E-mail: noer-ilman@yahoo.com; Iswanto, Priyo Tri, E-mail: priyatri@yahoo.com; Jatisukamto, Gaguk, E-mail: gagukjtsk@yahoo.co.id [Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Gadjah Mada University Jl. Grafika 2, Yogyakarta, 55281 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    Nitrogen ion implantation time on tungsten thin film deposited on surface of AISI 410 steel has been performed. Tungsten thin film produced by dc magnetron sputtering method was deposited on AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel substrates, and then the nitrogen ions were implanted on tungsten thin film. The objective of this research is to investigate the effects of implantation deposition time on surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of nitrogen implanted on tungsten film. Magnetron sputtering process was performed by using plasma gas of argon (Ar) to bombardier tungsten target (W) in a vacuum chamber with a pressure of 7.6 x 10{sup −2} torr, a voltage of 300 V, a sputter current of 80 mA for sputtered time of 10 minutes. Nitrogen implantation on tungsten film was done with an initial pressure of 3x10{sup −6} mbar, a fluence of 2 x 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}, an energy of 100 keV and implantation deposition times of 0, 20, 30 and 40 minutes. The surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate of the films were evaluated by surfcorder test, Vickers microhardness test, wear test and potentiostat (galvanostat) test respectively. The results show that the nitrogen ions implanted deposition time on tungsten film can modify the surface roughness, microhardness, specific wear and corrosion rate. The minimum surface roughness, specific wear and corrosion rate can be obtained for implantation time of 20 minutes and the maximum microhardness of the film is 329 VHN (Vickers Hardness Number) for implantation time of 30 minutes. The specific wear and corrosion rate of the film depend directly on the surface roughness.

  12. Development of a short pulsed corona discharge ionization source for ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Yuan; Aliaga-Rossel, R.; Choi, Peter; Gilles, Jean-Paul

    2005-01-01

    The development of a pulsed corona discharge ionization source and its use in ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is presented. In a point-plane electrode geometry, an electrical pulse up to 12 kV, 150 ns rise time and 500 ns pulse width was used to generate a corona discharge in air. A single positive high voltage pulse was able to generate about 1.6x10 10 ions at energy consumption of 22 μJ. Since the temporal distribution of ions is in a pulsed form, the possibility of removal the ion gate has been investigated. By purposely arranging the interface between discharge field and drift field, nearly 10 7 positive ions were drawn into the drift region with absence of the ion gate after every single discharge. The positive spectrum of acetone dimer (working at room temperature) was obtained with a resolving power of 20 by using this configuration. The advantages of this new scheme are the low power consumption compared with the dc method as well as the simplicity of the IMS cell structure

  13. Adsorption of fluids in slitlike pores containing a small amount of mobile ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borówko, M; Bucior, K; Sokołowski, S; Staszewski, T

    2005-11-01

    We apply density functional theory to investigate changes in the phase behavior of a fluid caused by the presence of mobile ions inside the pore. The approach has been based on the fundamental measure density functional theory and on the theory of nonuniform electrolytes developed recently by O. Pizio, A. Patrykiejew, S. Sokołowski [J. Chem. Phys. 121 (2005) 11,957]. We have evaluated capillary condensation phase diagrams for pores of different widths and for different concentrations of confined ions. The calculations have demonstrated that the presence of ions leads to lowering the critical temperature and to an increase of the value of the chemical potential at the capillary condensation point.

  14. Nitrogen-modified carbon nanostructures derived from metal-organic frameworks as high performance anodes for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Cai; Zhao, Chongchong; Xin, Fengxia; Cao, Can; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report preparation of nitrogen-modified nanostructure carbons through carbonization of Cu-based metal organic nanofibers at 700 °C under argon gas atmosphere. After removal of copper through chemical treatment with acids, pure N-modified nanostructure carbon with a nitrogen content of 8.62 wt% is obtained. When use as anodes for lithium-ion battery, the nanostructure carbon electrode has a discharge capacity of 853.1 mAh g −1 measured at a current of 500 mA g −1 after 800 cycles.

  15. The origin of the enhanced performance of nitrogen-doped MoS_2 in lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qiuhong; Weijun, Xia; Wu, Zhenjun; Huo, Jia; Liu, Dongdong; Wang, Shuangyin; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    MoS_2 with a similar layered structure to graphene has been widely applied in various areas including lithium ion batteries. However, low conductivity, capacity fading and poor rate performance are still the main challenges for MoS_2 anode materials. In this work, for the first time, we prepared nitrogen-doped MoS_2 (N-MoS_2) nanosheets through a simple two-step method involving the preparation of MoS_2 with defects by the hydrothermal method, followed by sintering in a NH_3 atmosphere. Our electrochemical characterizations and density functional theory calculations demonstrated that nitrogen doping could enhance the electron conductivity and showed higher specific capacity than pristine MoS_2 as anode materials of lithium ion batteries, which can be attributed to the faster transportation of electrons and ions because of nitrogen doping. This work helps us understand the origin of the enhanced performance of N-doped MoS_2 in lithium ion batteries. (paper)

  16. Hall effect mobility for SiC MOSFETs with increasing dose of nitrogen implantation into channel region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Munetaka; Iwamatsu, Toshiaki; Amishiro, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kita, Koji; Yamakawa, Satoshi

    2018-04-01

    The Hall effect mobility (μHall) of the Si-face 4H-SiC metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with a nitrogen (N)-implanted channel region was investigated by increasing the N dose. The μHall in the channel region was systematically examined regarding channel structures, that is, the surface and buried channels. It was experimentally demonstrated that increasing the N dose results in an improvement in μHall in the channel region due to the formation of the buried channel. However, further increase in N dose was found to decrease the μHall in the channel region, owing to the decrease in the electron mobility in the N-implanted bulk region.

  17. Analysis of antibiotics from liquid sample using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Li; Jian, Jia; Xiaoguang, Gao; Xiuli, He [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Li Jianping, E-mail: jpli@mail.ie.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Transducer Technology, Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reduced mobilities of 18 antibiotics are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establishing antibiotic mass-mobility correlation using (12,4) potential model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multi-component characteristics of antibiotics can be revealed using ESI-IMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most mixtures of antibiotics can be analyzed using ESI-IMS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The detection limit of amoxicillin is 70 pg. - Abstract: The recent findings of antibiotic residues in aquatic environment at trace level have gained much concern for the detrimental effect on ecological and human health due to bacterial resistance. Here, the feasibility of using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) for analysis antibiotics in liquid sample is demonstrated. Reduced mobilities and collision cross sections of 18 antibiotics are experimentally measured and compared with theoretical values according to mass-mobility correlation. Gentamicin is used as an example to investigate the capability of ESI-IMS for multi-component analysis of antibiotics. Mixtures of antibiotics at different concentrations are analyzed. The estimated detection limit for amoxicillin is 0.7 mg L{sup -1} (70 pg) and the linear range of response maintains over two orders. This method will be a potential technique for the analysis of antibiotics in aquatic environment.

  18. Analysis of antibiotics from liquid sample using electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shu; Jia Jian; Gao Xiaoguang; He Xiuli; Li Jianping

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The reduced mobilities of 18 antibiotics are determined. ► Establishing antibiotic mass-mobility correlation using (12,4) potential model. ► Multi-component characteristics of antibiotics can be revealed using ESI-IMS. ► Most mixtures of antibiotics can be analyzed using ESI-IMS. ► The detection limit of amoxicillin is 70 pg. - Abstract: The recent findings of antibiotic residues in aquatic environment at trace level have gained much concern for the detrimental effect on ecological and human health due to bacterial resistance. Here, the feasibility of using electrospray ionization ion mobility spectrometry (ESI-IMS) for analysis antibiotics in liquid sample is demonstrated. Reduced mobilities and collision cross sections of 18 antibiotics are experimentally measured and compared with theoretical values according to mass-mobility correlation. Gentamicin is used as an example to investigate the capability of ESI-IMS for multi-component analysis of antibiotics. Mixtures of antibiotics at different concentrations are analyzed. The estimated detection limit for amoxicillin is 0.7 mg L −1 (70 pg) and the linear range of response maintains over two orders. This method will be a potential technique for the analysis of antibiotics in aquatic environment.

  19. Study of the effects of E × B fields as mechanism to carbon-nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation on stainless steel samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillaca, E. J. D. M.; Ueda, M.; Oliveira, R. M.; Pichon, L.

    2014-08-01

    Effects of E × B fields as mechanism to carbon-nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) have been investigated. This magnetic configuration when used in PIII allows obtaining high nitrogen plasma density close to the ion implantation region. Consequently, high ions dose on the target is possible to be achieved compared with standard PIII. In this scenario, nitrogen and carbon ions were implanted simultaneously on stainless steel, as measured by GDOES and detected by X-ray diffraction. Carbon-tape disposed on the sample-holder was sputtered by intense bombardment of nitrogen ions, being the source of carbon atoms in this experiment. The implantation of both N and C caused changes on sample morphology and improvement of the tribological properties of the stainless steel.

  20. Mobility of Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions in gases at high pressures; Mobilite des ions Rb{sup +} et Cs{sup +} dans les gaz a haute pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacconnet, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    A theoretical study and mobility measurements have been made of Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions moving in gases at high pressures (10{sup -2} to 25 kg/cm{sup 2}). The theoretical study has been effected using the results of P. Langevin who considers the ions and molecules as elastic spheres and takes into account the electrical polarization forces. The practical work has been carried out using the Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions emitted by a thermal source; for the measurement of their velocity the method using an ionic beam cut by four grids was employed. Since the source does not work in atmospheres containing oxygen (even in the combined state) the tests only involved pure gases: nitrogen, argon, helium at pressures of from 10{sup -2} to 12 kg/cm{sup 2}. The overall results show that the Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ionic mobilities are very similar and that for fairly-short times spent by the ions in the gas, the measurement results are in agreement with theory. An increase in these times favours a degradation of the ions, which always leads to a decrease in the mobility. This effect is most marked in helium. The gases argon and nitrogen behave identically towards Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions. (author) [French] Une etude theorique et des mesures de mobilite ont ete effectuees pour des ions Rb{sup +} et Cs{sup +} se deplacant dans des gaz a haute pression (10{sup -2} a 25 kg/cm{sup 2}). L'etude theorique a ete effectuee en utilisant les resultats de P. Langevin qui assimile les ions et les molecules a des spheres elastiques et tient compte des forces de polarisation electrique. L'etude pratique a ete realisee en utilisant des ions Rb{sup +} et Cs{sup +} emis par une source thermique et pour la mesure de leur vitesse, la methode de coupure du faisceau ionique au moyen de quatre grilles a ete adoptee. La source ne fonctionnant pas dans des atmospheres contenant de l'oxygene (meme a l'etat combine) les essais ont seulement porte sur des gaz purs: azote

  1. Mobility of Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions in gases at high pressures; Mobilite des ions Rb{sup +} et Cs{sup +} dans les gaz a haute pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacconnet, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    A theoretical study and mobility measurements have been made of Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions moving in gases at high pressures (10{sup -2} to 25 kg/cm{sup 2}). The theoretical study has been effected using the results of P. Langevin who considers the ions and molecules as elastic spheres and takes into account the electrical polarization forces. The practical work has been carried out using the Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions emitted by a thermal source; for the measurement of their velocity the method using an ionic beam cut by four grids was employed. Since the source does not work in atmospheres containing oxygen (even in the combined state) the tests only involved pure gases: nitrogen, argon, helium at pressures of from 10{sup -2} to 12 kg/cm{sup 2}. The overall results show that the Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ionic mobilities are very similar and that for fairly-short times spent by the ions in the gas, the measurement results are in agreement with theory. An increase in these times favours a degradation of the ions, which always leads to a decrease in the mobility. This effect is most marked in helium. The gases argon and nitrogen behave identically towards Rb{sup +} and Cs{sup +} ions. (author) [French] Une etude theorique et des mesures de mobilite ont ete effectuees pour des ions Rb{sup +} et Cs{sup +} se deplacant dans des gaz a haute pression (10{sup -2} a 25 kg/cm{sup 2}). L'etude theorique a ete effectuee en utilisant les resultats de P. Langevin qui assimile les ions et les molecules a des spheres elastiques et tient compte des forces de polarisation electrique. L'etude pratique a ete realisee en utilisant des ions Rb{sup +} et Cs{sup +} emis par une source thermique et pour la mesure de leur vitesse, la methode de coupure du faisceau ionique au moyen de quatre grilles a ete adoptee. La source ne fonctionnant pas dans des atmospheres contenant de l'oxygene (meme a l'etat combine) les essais ont seulement porte sur des gaz purs: azote, argon, helium et pour

  2. Application of nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation to titanium nasal implants with nanonetwork surface structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Ying-Sui; Yang, Wei-En [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Lan [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Zhu, Hongqin [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Lan, Ming-Ying [Division of Rhinology, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Lee, Sheng-Wei [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Huang, Her-Hsiung, E-mail: hhhuang@ym.edu.tw [Department of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Institute of Oral Biology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China); Department of Stomatology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2016-07-15

    In nasal reconstruction, the response of cells to titanium (Ti) implants is mainly determined by surface features of the implant. In a pilot study, the authors applied electrochemical anodization to Ti surfaces in an alkaline solution to create a network of nanoscale surface structures. This nanonetwork was intended to enhance the responses of primary human nasal epithelial cell (HNEpC) to the Ti surface. In this study, the authors then treated the anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surface using nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (NPIII) in order to further improve the HNEpC response to the Ti surface. Subsequently, surface characterization was performed to elucidate morphology, roughness, wettability, and chemistry of specimens. Cytotoxicity, blood, and HNEpC responses were also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that NPIII treatment led to the formation of a noncytotoxic TiN-containing thin film (thickness <100 nm) on the electrochemically anodized Ti surface with a nanonetwork-structure. NPIII treatment was shown to improve blood clotting and the adhesion of platelets to the anodized Ti surface as well as the adhesion and proliferation of hNEpC. This research spreads our understanding of the fact that a TiN-containing thin film, produced using NPIII treatment, could be used to improve blood and HNEpC responses to anodized, nanonetwork-structured Ti surfaces in nasal implant applications.

  3. Potential for chlorate interference in ion chromatographic determination of total nitrogen in natural waters following alkaline persulfate digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, J A; Edwards, J; Soracco, R J; Armstrong, R W

    1999-10-01

    Determination of total nitrogen in aqueous samples after thermal potassium peroxydisulfate (persulfate) digestion is a commonly used alternative to the tedious Kjeldahl procedure. When ion chromatography is used to quantify the nitrate formed during digestion, there is a potential for interference from a chlorate peak if the digested sample initially contained chloride in concentrations close to or greater than the concentration of nitrogen. It was determined that this interference can be avoided either by using chromatographic conditions which cleanly resolve the nitrate and chlorate peaks (e.g., the Dionex AG9-HG column) or by using digestion reagent concentrations chosen to maintain a high pH throughout the digestion. The second alternative is not a viable option for investigators using a single digestion for both total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) analysis.

  4. High density nitrogen-vacancy sensing surface created via He{sup +} ion implantation of {sup 12}C diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinsasser, Ed E., E-mail: edklein@uw.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2500 (United States); Stanfield, Matthew M.; Banks, Jannel K. Q. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Zhu, Zhouyang; Li, Wen-Di [HKU-Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation (HKU-SIRI), Shenzhen 518000 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Acosta, Victor M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Watanabe, Hideyuki [Correlated Electronics Group, Electronics and Photonics Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Itoh, Kohei M. [School of Fundamental Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Fu, Kai-Mei C., E-mail: kaimeifu@uw.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-2500 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)

    2016-05-16

    We present a promising method for creating high-density ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers with narrow spin-resonances for high-sensitivity magnetic imaging. Practically, narrow spin-resonance linewidths substantially reduce the optical and RF power requirements for ensemble-based sensing. The method combines isotope purified diamond growth, in situ nitrogen doping, and helium ion implantation to realize a 100 nm-thick sensing surface. The obtained 10{sup 17 }cm{sup −3} nitrogen-vacancy density is only a factor of 10 less than the highest densities reported to date, with an observed 200 kHz spin resonance linewidth over 10 times narrower.

  5. Characterization of silicon oxynitride films prepared by the simultaneous implantation of oxygen and nitrogen ions into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hezel, R.; Streb, W.

    1985-01-01

    Silicon oxynitride films about 5 nm in thickness were prepared by simultaneously implanting 5 keV oxygen and nitrogen ions into silicon at room temperature up to saturation. These films with concentrations ranging from pure silicon oxide to silicon nitride were characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and depth-concentration profiling. The different behaviour of the silicon oxynitride films compared with those of silicon oxide and silicon nitride with regard to thermal stability and hardness against electron and argon ion irradiation is pointed out. (Auth.)

  6. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on nitrogen-doped graphene as anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Dan; Shi Dongqi [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong (Australia); Liu Zongwen [University of Sydney, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (Australia); Liu Huakun; Guo Zaiping, E-mail: zguo@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong (Australia)

    2013-05-15

    Anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in situ grown on nitrogen-doped, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been successfully synthesized as an anode material for the lithium ion battery. The nanosized TiO{sub 2} particles were homogeneously distributed on the reduced graphene oxide to inhibit the restacking of the neighbouring graphene sheets. The obtained TiO{sub 2}/N-rGO composite exhibits improved cycling performance and rate capability, indicating the important role of reduced graphene oxide, which not only facilitates the formation of uniformly distributed TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals, but also increases the electrical conductivity of the composite material. The introduction of nitrogen on the reduced graphene oxide has been proved to increase the conductivity of the reduced graphene oxide and leads to more defects. A disordered structure is thus formed to accommodate more lithium ions, thereby further improving the electrochemical performance.

  7. Isomer Information from Ion Mobility Separation of High-Mannose Glycan Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, David J; Seabright, Gemma E; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Crispin, Max; Struwe, Weston B

    2018-05-01

    Extracted arrival time distributions of negative ion CID-derived fragments produced prior to traveling-wave ion mobility separation were evaluated for their ability to provide structural information on N-linked glycans. Fragmentation of high-mannose glycans released from several glycoproteins, including those from viral sources, provided over 50 fragments, many of which gave unique collisional cross-sections and provided additional information used to assign structural isomers. For example, cross-ring fragments arising from cleavage of the reducing terminal GlcNAc residue on Man 8 GlcNAc 2 isomers have unique collision cross-sections enabling isomers to be differentiated in mixtures. Specific fragment collision cross-sections enabled identification of glycans, the antennae of which terminated in the antigenic α-galactose residue, and ions defining the composition of the 6-antenna of several of the glycans were also found to have different cross-sections from isomeric ions produced in the same spectra. Potential mechanisms for the formation of the various ions are discussed and the estimated collisional cross-sections are tabulated. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Diffusion pathway of mobile ions and crystal structure of ionic and mixed conductors. A brief review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2009-01-01

    A brief review on the field of Solid State Ionics, including the diffusion pathway of mobile ions, crystal structure and materials, is presented. In the fluorite-structured ionic conductors such as ceria solid solution Ce 0.93 Y 0.07 O 1.96 , bismuth oxide solid solution δ-Bi 1.4 Yb 0.6 O 3 and copper iodide CuI, a similar curved diffusion pathway along the directions is observed. In the ionic and mixed conductors with the cubic ABO 3 perovskite-type structure such as lanthanum gallate and lanthanum cobaltite solid solutions, the mobile ions diffuse along a curved line keeping the interatomic distance between the B cation and O 2- anion to some degree. The structure and diffusion path of double-perovskite-type La 0.64 Ti 0.92 Nb 0.08 O 2.99 , K 2 NiF 4 -type (Pr 0.9 La 0.1 ) 2 (Ni 0.74 Cu 0.21 Ga 0.05 )O 4+δ , and apatite-type La 9.69 (Si 5.70 Mg 0.30 )O 26.24 are described. The diffusion paths of Li + ions in La 0.62 Li 0.16 TiO 3 and Li 0.6 FePO 4 are two- and one-dimensional, respectively. (author)

  9. Noncontact measurement of electrostatic fields: Verification of modeled potentials within ion mobility spectrometer drift tube designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jill R.; Tremblay, Paul L.

    2007-01-01

    The heart of an ion mobility spectrometer is the drift region where ion separation occurs. While the electrostatic potentials within a drift tube design can be modeled, no method for independently validating the electrostatic field has previously been reported. Two basic drift tube designs were modeled using SIMION 7.0 to reveal the expected electrostatic fields: (1) A traditional alternating set of electrodes and insulators and (2) a truly linear drift tube. One version of the alternating electrode/insulator drift tube and two versions of linear drift tubes were then fabricated. The stacked alternating electrodes/insulators were connected through a resistor network to generate the electrostatic gradient in the drift tube. The two linear drift tube designs consisted of two types of resistive drift tubes with one tube consisting of a resistive coating within an insulating tube and the other tube composed of resistive ferrites. The electrostatic fields within each type of drift tube were then evaluated by a noncontact method using a Kelvin-Zisman type electrostatic voltmeter and probe (results for alternative measurement methods provided in supplementary material). The experimental results were then compared with the electrostatic fields predicted by SIMION. Both the modeling and experimental measurements reveal that the electrostatic fields within a stacked ion mobility spectrometer drift tube are only pseudo-linear, while the electrostatic fields within a resistive drift tube approach perfect linearity

  10. Ion mobility based on column leaching of South African gold tailings dam with chemometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukrowska, Ewa M; Govender, Koovila; Viljoen, Morris

    2004-07-01

    New column leaching experiments were designed and used as an alternative rapid screening approach to element mobility assessment. In these experiments, field-moist material was treated with an extracting solution to assess the effects of acidification on element mobility in mine tailings. The main advantage of this version of column leaching experiments with partitioned segments is that they give quick information on current element mobility in conditions closely simulating field conditions to compare with common unrepresentative air-dried, sieved samples used for column leaching experiments. Layers from the tailings dump material were sampled and packed into columns. The design of columns allows extracting leachates from each layer. The extracting solutions used were natural (pH 6.8) and acidified (pH 4.2) rainwater. Metals and anions were determined in the leachates. The concentrations of metals (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Al, Cr, Ni, Co, Zn, and Cu) in sample leachates were determined using ICP OES. The most important anions (NO3-, Cl-, and SO4(2)-) were determined using the closed system izotacophoresis ITP analyser. The chemical analytical data from tailings leaching and physico-chemical data from field measurements (including pH, conductivity, redox potential, temperature) were used for chemometric evaluation of element mobility. Principal factor analysis (PFA) was used to evaluate ions mobility from different layers of tailings dump arising from varied pH and redox conditions. It was found that the results from the partitioned column leaching illustrate much better complex processes of metals mobility from tailings dump than the total column. The chemometric data analysis (PFA) proofed the differences in the various layers leachability that are arising from physico-chemical processes due to chemical composition of tailings dump deposit. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Radio-frequency plasma nitriding and nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation of Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.Y.; Chu, P.K.; Tang, B.Y.; Zeng, X.C.; Wang, X.F.; Chen, Y.B.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrogen ion implantation improves the wear resistance of Ti-6Al-4V alloys by forming a hard TiN superficial passivation layer. However, the thickness of the layer formed by traditional ion implantation is typically 100-200 nm and may not be adequate for many industrial applications. We propose to use radio-frequency (RF) plasma nitriding and nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) to increase the layer thickness. By using a newly designed inductively coupled RF plasma source and applying a series of negative high voltage pulses to the Ti-6Al-4V samples. RF plasma nitriding and nitrogen PIII can be achieved. Our process yields a substantially thicker modified layer exhibiting more superior wear resistance characteristics, as demonstrated by data from micro-hardness testing, pin-on-disc wear testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The performance of our newly developed inductively coupled RF plasma source which is responsible for the success of the experiments is also described. (orig.)

  12. Effects of low-pressure nitrogen plasma treatment on the surface properties and electrochemical performance of the polyethylene separator used lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Li, Hsiao-Ling; Li, Chi-Heng; Liu, Yu-Shuan; Sung, Yu-Ching; Huang, Chun

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the surface transition of the polyethylene (PE) separator used in lithium-ion batteries treated by low-pressure nitrogen plasma discharge. The nitrogen-plasma-treated PE separator was characterized by contact angle measurement, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical performance of the lithium ion batteries fabricated with the nitrogen-plasma-treated separator was also evaluated. Results showed that polar functionalization groups were induced on the PE surface by the nitrogen plasma discharge, causing the surface to become hydrophilic. The increases in surface wettability and surface free energy result in electrolyte retention improvement. Moreover, the nitrogen plasma-treated PE separator leads to superior performance in lithium-ion battery assembly.

  13. Effect of ion irradiation-produced defects on the mobility of dislocations in 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briceno, M.; Fenske, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Dadfarnia, M.; Sofronis, P. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Robertson, I.M., E-mail: ian.robertson@tcd.ie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The impact of heavy-ion produced defects on the mobility of dislocations, dislocation sources and newly generated dislocations in 304 stainless steel are discovered by performing irradiation and deformation experiments in real time in the transmission electron microscope. Dislocations mobile prior to the irradiation are effectively locked in position by the irradiation, but the irradiation has no discernible impact on the ability of a source to generate dislocations. The motion and mobility of a dislocation is altered by the irradiation. It becomes irregular and jerky and the mobility increases slowly with time as the radiation-produced defects are annihilated locally. Channels created by dislocations ejected from grain boundary dislocation sources were found to have a natural width, as the emission sites within the boundary were spaced close together. Finally, the distribution of dislocations, basically, an inverse dislocation pile-up, within a cleared channel suggests a new mechanism for generating high local levels of stress at grain boundaries. The impact of these observations on the mechanical properties of irradiated materials is discussed briefly.

  14. Effect of ion irradiation-produced defects on the mobility of dislocations in 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briceno, M.; Fenske, J.; Dadfarnia, M.; Sofronis, P.; Robertson, I.M.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of heavy-ion produced defects on the mobility of dislocations, dislocation sources and newly generated dislocations in 304 stainless steel are discovered by performing irradiation and deformation experiments in real time in the transmission electron microscope. Dislocations mobile prior to the irradiation are effectively locked in position by the irradiation, but the irradiation has no discernible impact on the ability of a source to generate dislocations. The motion and mobility of a dislocation is altered by the irradiation. It becomes irregular and jerky and the mobility increases slowly with time as the radiation-produced defects are annihilated locally. Channels created by dislocations ejected from grain boundary dislocation sources were found to have a natural width, as the emission sites within the boundary were spaced close together. Finally, the distribution of dislocations, basically, an inverse dislocation pile-up, within a cleared channel suggests a new mechanism for generating high local levels of stress at grain boundaries. The impact of these observations on the mechanical properties of irradiated materials is discussed briefly.

  15. Ion mobility spectrometry focusing on speciation analysis of metals/metalloids bound to carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessôa, Gustavo de Souza; Pilau, Eduardo Jorge; Gozzo, Fábio Cesar; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (TWIMS-MS) was applied to speciation analysis of metalloproteins. The influence of pH on complexation conditions between some metals and bovine carbonic anhydrase was evaluated from pH 6 to 9, as well as the time involved in their complexation (0-24 h). Employing TWIMS-MS, two conformational states of bovine carbonic anhydrase were observed with charge states of +12 and +11; these configurations being evaluated in terms of the folded state of the apo form and this protein (at charge state +11) being linked to barium, lead, copper, and zinc in their divalent forms. Metalloprotein speciation analysis was carried out for copper (Cu(+) and Cu(2+)), lead (Pb(2+) and Pb(4+)), and selenium (Se(4+) and Se(6+)) species complexed with bovine carbonic anhydrase. Mobilities of all complexed species were compared, also considering the apo form of this protein.

  16. Applicability of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of quarantine pests in wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, K. J.; Sanghera, J.; Myers, S. W.; Ervin, A. M.; Carey, C.; Gleason, G.; Mosser, L.; Levy, L.; Hennessey, M. K.; Bulluck, R.

    2016-05-01

    Visual inspection is the most commonly used method for detecting quarantine pests in agricultural cargo items at ports. For example, solid wood packing material (SWPM) at ports may be a pathway for wood pests and is a frequent item of inspection at ports. The inspection process includes examination of the external surface of the item and often destructive sampling to detect internal pest targets. There are few tools available to inspectors to increase the efficiency of inspection and reduce the labor involved. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has promise as an aid for inspection. Because pests emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as hormone like substances, Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) was investigated for possible utility for detecting pests during inspection. SWPM is a major pest pathway in trade, and fumigation of many kinds of wood, including SWPM, with methyl bromide (MeBr) following a published schedule1 is regularly conducted for phytosanitary reasons prior to shipment to the United States. However, the question remains as to how long the methyl bromide remains in the wood samples after fumigation such that it could act as an interferent to the detection of pest related VOC emissions. This work investigates the capability of ion mobility spectrometry to detect the presence of residual methyl bromide in fumigated maple and poplar wood samples at different times post fumigation up to 118 days after fumigation. Data show that MeBr can be detected in the less dense poplar wood up to 118 days after fumigation while MeBr can be detected in the denser maple wood 55 days after fumigation.

  17. Application of Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) in forensic chemistry and toxicology with focus on biological matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Werner; Keller, Thomas; Regenscheit, Priska

    1995-01-01

    The IMS (Ion Mobility Spectroscopy) instrument 'Ionscan' takes advantage of the fact that trace quantities of illicit drugs are adsorbed on dust particles on clothes, in cars and on other items of evidence. The dust particles are collected on a membrane filter by a special attachment on a vacuum cleaner. The sample is then directly inserted into the spectrometer and can be analyzed immediately. We show casework applications of a forensic chemistry and toxicology laboratory. One new application of IMS in forensic chemistry is the detection of psilocybin in dried mushrooms without any further sample preparation.

  18. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of tramadol in biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Sheibani; Najmeh Haghpazir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a simple and rapid ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) method has been described for the determination of tramadol. The operating instrumental parameters that could influence IMS were investigated and optimized (temperature; injection: 220 and IMS cell: 190°C, flow rate; carrier: 300 and drift: 600 mL/minute, voltage; corona: 2300 and drift: 7000 V, pulse width: 100 μs). Under optimum conditions, the calibration curves were linear within two orders of magnitude with R2 ≥ 0.998 for ...

  19. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  20. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I FC by the mobile plate tuner. The I FC is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I FC and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I FC when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  1. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M; Williams, J S; Svensson, B G; Conway, M [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than {approx} 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO{sub 2}/Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  2. Formation of oxides and segregation of mobile atoms during SIMS profiling of Si with oxygen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petravic, M.; Williams, J.S.; Svensson, B.G.; Conway, M. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    An oxygen beam is commonly used in secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis to enhance the ionization probability for positive secondary ions. It has been observed, however, that this technique produces in some cases a great degradation of depth resolution. The most pronounced effects have been found for impurities in silicon under oxygen bombardment at angles of incidence smaller than {approx} 30 deg from the surface normal. A new approach is described which involved broadening of SIMS profiles for some mobile atoms, such as Cu, Ni and Au, implanted into silicon. The anomalously large broadening is explained in terms of segregation at a SiO{sub 2}/Si interface formed during bombardment with oxygen at impact angles less than 30 deg. 2 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  3. Systems Maturity Assessment of the Lithium Ion Battery for Extravehicular Mobility Unit Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Samuel P.

    2011-01-01

    The Long Life (Lithium Ion) Battery (LLB/LIB) is designed to replace the current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Silver/Zinc (Ag/Zn) Increased Capacity Battery (ICB), which is used to provide power to the Primary Life Support Subsystem (PLSS) during Extravehicular Activities (EVAs). The LLB (a battery based on commercial lithium ion cell technology) is designed to have the same electrical and mechanical interfaces as the current ICB. The EMU LIB Charger is designed to charge, discharge, and condition the LLB either in a charger-strapped configuration or in an EMU-mounted configuration. This paper will retroactively apply the principles of Systems Maturity Assessment to the LLB project through use of the Integration Readiness Level and Earned Readiness Management. The viability of this methodology will be considered for application to new and existing technology development projects.

  4. Electron mobility and saturation of ion yield in 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poffenberger, P.R.; Astbury, A.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Keeler, R.K.; Li, Y.; Robertson, L.P.; Rosvick, M.; Schenk, P.; Oram, C.; Sobie, R.

    1993-01-01

    The electron drift mobility μ and zero field free ion yield G fi 0 have been measured for liquid 2,2,4,4-tetramethylpentane using a waveform analysis. The saturation of the ion yield for highly ionizing radiation has also been investigated and parameterized using the Birks' equation. The results obtained are μ=26.3±0.8 cm 2 /V s, G fi 0 =0.743±0.029 electrons/100 eV, and a Birks' factor ranging from kB=0.222±0.014 cm/MeV at 604 V/cm to kB=0.141±0.021 cm/MeV at 3625 V/cm. (orig.)

  5. Studies on the determination of trace amounts of nitrogen along with alkali and alkaline earth elements in uranium based samples by ion-chromatography (IC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Poonam; Rastogi, R.K.; Ramakumar, K.L.

    2006-12-01

    Present report describes an ion chromatography (IC) method with suppressed conductivity detection for the determination of traces of nitrogen along with alkali and alkaline earth elements in uranium based nuclear fuels. Method was developed to determine nitrogen as NH 4 + along with alkali and alkaline earth cations by IC using a cation exchange column. (author)

  6. Fire effects on the mobilization and uptake of nitrogen by cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittany G. Johnson; Dale W. Johnson; Jeanne C. Chambers; Robert R. Blank

    2011-01-01

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.), an invasive annual grass, is displacing native species and causing increased fire frequency in the Great Basin of the southwestern United States. Growth and nitrogen uptake patterns by cheatgrass were examined in a greenhouse study using soils from sites with the same soil type but different fire histories: 1) an area that burned in...

  7. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  8. Formation of aluminium nitride and segregation of Cu impurity atoms in aluminium implanted by high dose nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chenglu; Hemment, P.L.F.; Li Jinhua; Zou Shichang

    1994-01-01

    Aluminium films with a thickness of 7000 A (containing 0.85% copper) were deposited on silicon substrates. 400 keV N 2 + or 350 keV N + ions were implanted into the aluminium films or at the interface between the aluminium and silicon, respectively. Automatic spreading resistance (ASR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and channelling were used to characterize the formation of aluminium nitride and the depth distribution of the Cu impurity in the aluminium films after ion implantation and post-annealing. The formation of a stoichiometric AlN layer with high resistance was evident from ASR, RBS analysis and FTIR measurements by the presence of the absorption band at 650 cm -1 . When the implanted nitrogen is near the interface between the aluminium and silicon, a multilayer structure can be obtained, which consists of aluminium, aluminium nitride and the silicon substrate. Cu, which is a background impurity in the deposited aluminium films, segregated into the synthesised aluminium nitride during high dose nitrogen ion implantation. This is due to irradiation-induced segregation during ion implantation. (orig.)

  9. Method for selective detection of explosives in mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at parts-per-quadrillion level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2015-09-01

    A method for selective detection of volatile and non-volatile explosives in a mass spectrometer or ion mobility spectrometer at a parts-per-quadrillion level without preconcentration is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of ionizing a carrier gas with an ionization source to form reactant ions or reactant adduct ions comprising nitrate ions (NO.sub.3.sup.-); selectively reacting the reactant ions or reactant adduct ions with at least one volatile or non-volatile explosive analyte at a carrier gas pressure of at least about 100 Ton in a reaction region disposed between the ionization source and an ion detector, the reaction region having a length which provides a residence time (tr) for reactant ions therein of at least about 0.10 seconds, wherein the selective reaction yields product ions comprising reactant ions or reactant adduct ions that are selectively bound to the at least one explosive analyte when present therein; and detecting product ions with the ion detector to determine presence or absence of the at least one explosive analyte.

  10. Layer-by-layer composition and structure of silicon subjected to combined gallium and nitrogen ion implantation for the ion synthesis of gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, D. S.; Mikhaylov, A. N.; Belov, A. I.; Vasiliev, V. K.; Guseinov, D. V.; Okulich, E. V. [Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation); Shemukhin, A. A. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Surodin, S. I.; Nikolitchev, D. E.; Nezhdanov, A. V.; Pirogov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.; Tetelbaum, D. I., E-mail: tetelbaum@phys.unn.ru [Nizhny Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The composition and structure of silicon surface layers subjected to combined gallium and nitrogen ion implantation with subsequent annealing have been studied by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, electron spin resonance, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. A slight redistribution of the implanted atoms before annealing and their substantial migration towards the surface during annealing depending on the sequence of implantations are observed. It is found that about 2% of atoms of the implanted layer are replaced with gallium bonded to nitrogen; however, it is impossible to detect the gallium-nitride phase. At the same time, gallium-enriched inclusions containing ∼25 at % of gallium are detected as candidates for the further synthesis of gallium-nitride inclusions.

  11. Classification of ion mobility spectra by functional groups using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S.; Nazarov, E.; Wang, Y. F.; Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neural networks were trained using whole ion mobility spectra from a standardized database of 3137 spectra for 204 chemicals at various concentrations. Performance of the network was measured by the success of classification into ten chemical classes. Eleven stages for evaluation of spectra and of spectral pre-processing were employed and minimums established for response thresholds and spectral purity. After optimization of the database, network, and pre-processing routines, the fraction of successful classifications by functional group was 0.91 throughout a range of concentrations. Network classification relied on a combination of features, including drift times, number of peaks, relative intensities, and other factors apparently including peak shape. The network was opportunistic, exploiting different features within different chemical classes. Application of neural networks in a two-tier design where chemicals were first identified by class and then individually eliminated all but one false positive out of 161 test spectra. These findings establish that ion mobility spectra, even with low resolution instrumentation, contain sufficient detail to permit the development of automated identification systems.

  12. Bioleaching of valuable metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries using Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horeh, N. Bahaloo; Mousavi, S. M.; Shojaosadati, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a bio-hydrometallurgical route based on fungal activity of Aspergillus niger was evaluated for the detoxification and recovery of Cu, Li, Mn, Al, Co and Ni metals from spent lithium-ion phone mobile batteries under various conditions (one-step, two-step and spent medium bioleaching). The maximum recovery efficiency of 100% for Cu, 95% for Li, 70% for Mn, 65% for Al, 45% for Co, and 38% for Ni was obtained at a pulp density of 1% in spent medium bioleaching. The HPLC results indicated that citric acid in comparison with other detected organic acids (gluconic, oxalic and malic acid) had an important role in the effectiveness of bioleaching using A. niger. The results of FTIR, XRD and FE-SEM analysis of battery powder before and after bioleaching process confirmed that the fungal activities were quite effective. In addition, bioleaching achieved higher removal efficiency for heavy metals than the chemical leaching. This research demonstrated the great potential of bio-hydrometallurgical route to recover heavy metals from spent lithium-ion mobile phone batteries.

  13. Relationship of Ambient Atmosphere and Biological Aerosol Responses from a Fielded Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Ion Mobility Spectrometry Bioanalytical Detector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, A

    2003-01-01

    .... A pyrolysis-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry stand-alone bioaerosol system was interfaced to an aerosol concentrator to collect ambient background aerosols and produce bioanalytical...

  14. Comparison of the performance of three ion mobility spectrometers for measurement of biogenic amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpas, Zeev; Guamán, Ana V.; Pardo, Antonio; Marco, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The response to different amounts of TMA (in μg) that were placed in a headspace vial as a function of time for the VG-Test (top) and the GDA (bottom). Note that the ratio [TMA/(TMA + TEP)] (top) and [TMA/(TMA + RIP)] (bottom) and the clearance time increase with the amount of TMA deposited in the vial. Highlights: ► First comparison of performance of IMS devices. ► Gas-phase ion chemistry affected by operational parameters. ► Limits of detection quite similar despite differences in devices. ► LODs determined in controlled continuous flow and in headspace vapor. ► Exponential dilution of headspace studies. - Abstract: The performance of three different types of ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) devices: GDA2 with a radioactive ion source (Airsense, Germany), UV-IMS with a photo-ionization source (G.A.S. Germany) and VG-Test with a corona discharge source (3QBD, Israel) was studied. The gas-phase ion chemistry in the IMS devices affected the species formed and their measured reduced mobility values. The sensitivity and limit of detection for trimethylamine (TMA), putrescine and cadaverine were compared by continuous monitoring of a stream of air with a given concentration of the analyte and by measurement of headspace vapors of TMA in a sealed vial. Preprocessing of the mobility spectra and the effectiveness of multivariate curve resolution techniques (MCR-LASSO) improved the accuracy of the measurements by correcting baseline effects and adjusting for variations in drift time as well as enhancing the signal to noise ratio and deconvolution of the complex data matrix to their pure components. The limit of detection for measurement of the biogenic amines by the three IMS devices was between 0.1 and 1.2 ppm (for TMA with the VG-Test and GDA, respectively) and between 0.2 and 0.7 ppm for putrescine and cadaverine with all three devices. Considering the uncertainty in the LOD determination there is almost no statistically significant

  15. Depleted ion exchange resins encapsulation with mobile unit: equipment and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.; Faisantieu, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1981, STMI has been operating mobile units in EDF's PWR nuclear power plants, for spent resins encapsulation with polymer thermosetting matrices. Three mobile units are now in operation: COMET 1 and COMET 2, supplied by STMI, using polymerized styrene with proper additives as encapsulating material, and PRECED 1, on PEC-Engineering design, based on a DOW Chemical solidification process. On march 1986, more than 30 operations have been performed on EDF's PWR plants. More than 5000 liners containing encapsulated depleted ion exchange resins have been produced, while processing about 500 m 3 (i.e. 17.000 ft 3 ) of resins. During this period, those mobile units have shown their reliability and their efficiency. The produced processed waste, which have been accepted by ANDRA at the La Manche Storage Site (SSM) must meet the Fundamental Safety Rules (RFS) edicted by the Central Bureau for Nuclear Facilities Safety (SCSIN) of the French Department of Industry. The operations are carried out with excellent safety and radioprotection safety conditions, and following a very detailed Q.A. program [fr

  16. Structural transitions, ion mobility, and conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavun, V. Ya.; Uvarov, N. F.; Slobodyuk, A. B.; Ulihin, A. S.; Kovaleva, E. V.; Zemnukhova, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    Structural transitions, ion mobility, and conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4) (I) have been investigated by the methods of 1H, 19F, 31P NMR (including 1H, 19F, 31P MAS NMR), DSC, X-ray diffraction, and impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the fundamental changes in 1H, 19F, 31P NMR spectra (above 390 K) were associated with the formation of a crystalline disorder phase I with high ionic mobility in the proton and fluoride sublattices, as a result of a phase transition in the 400-420 K range. In the same temperature range, the transition of PO2(OH)2- anions from the "rigid lattice" to fast reorientations takes place. Above 430 K, there occurs a transition from the crystalline disordered phase to the amorphous one. The types of ion mobility in CsSbF3(H2PO4) and its amorphous phase have been established and temperature ranges of their realization have been determined (150-450 K). According to the NMR data, the diffusion in the proton sublattice of the disordered crystalline and amorphous phases is preserved even at room temperature. The ionic conductivity in CsSbF3(H2PO4) reaches the values of 2.6 × 10-4 S/cm in the temperature range 410-425 K and decreases down to 2.0 × 10-5 S/cm upon transition to the amorphous phase (435-445 K).

  17. Lithium-Ion Mobility in Quaternary Boro-Germano-Phosphate Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Sklepić, Kristina; Mošner, Petr; Koudelka, Ladislav; Kalenda, Petr

    2016-04-28

    Effect of the structural changes, electrical conductivity, and dielectric properties on the addition of a third glass-former, GeO2, to the borophosphate glasses, 40Li2O-10B2O3-(50 - x)P2O5-xGeO2, x = 0-25 mol %, has been studied. Introduction of GeO2 causes the structural modifications in the glass network, which results in a continuous increase in electrical conductivity. Glasses with low GeO2 content, up to 10 mol %, show a rapid increase in dc conductivity as a result of the interlinkage of slightly depolymerized phosphate chains and negatively charged [GeO4](-) units, which enhances the migration of Li(+) ions. The Li(+) ions compensate these delocalized charges connecting both phosphate and germanium units, which results in reduction of both bond effectiveness and binding energy of Li(+) ions and therefore enables their hop to the next charge-compensating site. For higher GeO2 content, the dc conductivity increases slightly, tending to approach a maximum in Li(+) ion mobility caused by the incorporation of GeO2 units into phosphate network combined with conversion of GeO4 to GeO6 units. The strong cross-linkage of germanium and phosphate units creates heteroatomic P-O-Ge bonds responsible for more effectively trapped Li(+) ions. A close correspondence between dielectric and conductivity parameters at high frequencies indicates that the increase in conductivity indeed is controlled by the modification of structure as a function of GeO2 addition.

  18. Ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry studies of ion processes in air at atmospheric pressure and their application to thermal desorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabo, Martin; Malásková, Michaela; Matejčík, Štefan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the negative reactant ion formation in a negative corona discharge (CD) using the corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (CD-IMS-oaTOF) technique. The reactant ions were formed in the CD operating in the reverse gas flow mode at an elevated temperature of 363.5 K in synthetic and ambient air. Under these conditions mainly O 2 − and their clusters were formed. We have also studied the influence of CCl 4 admixture to air (dopant gas) on the composition of the reactant ions, which resulted in the formation of Cl − and its clusters with a reduced ion mobility of 3.05 cm 2  V −1  s −1 as a major reactant ion peak. Additional IMS peaks with reduced ion mobilities of 2.49, 2.25 and 2.03 cm 2  V −1  s −1 were detected, and Cl −  · (NO 2 ) and Cl −  · (NO) n (n = 2, 3) anions were identified. The negative reactant ions were used to detect 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) using the thermal desorption (TD) technique using a CD-IMS instrument. Using TD sampling and a negative CD ion source doped by CCl 4 we have achieved a limit of detection of 350 pg for direct surface analysis of TNT. (paper)

  19. Mobilization of interactions between functional diversity of plant and soil organisms on nitrogen availability and use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drut, Baptiste; Cassagne, Nathalie; Cannavacciuolo, Mario; Brauman, Alain; Le Floch, Gaëtan; Cobo, Jose; Fustec, Joëlle

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: legumes, earthworms, microorganisms, nitrogen, interactions Both aboveground and belowground biodiversity and their interactions can play an important role in crop productivity. Plant functional diversity, such as legume based intercrops have been shown to improve yields through plant complementarity for nitrogen use (Corre-Hellou et al., 2006). Moreover, plant species or plant genotype may influence the structure of soil microorganism communities through the composition of rhizodeposits in the rhizosphere (Dennis et al., 2010). Belowground diversity can also positively influence plant performance especially related to functional dissimilarity between soil organisms (Eisenhauer, 2012). Earthworms through their burrowing activity influence soil microbial decomposers and nutrient availability and have thus been reported to increase plant growth (Brown, 1995; Brown et al., 2004). We hypothesize that i) plant functional (genetic and/or specific) diversity associated to functional earthworms diversity are key drivers of interactions balance to improve crop performances and ii) the improvement of plant performances can be related to change in the structure of soil microorganism communities due to the diversity of rhizodeposits and the burrowing activity of earthworms. In a first mesocosm experiment, we investigated the effect of a gradient of plant diversity - one cultivar of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), 3 different wheat cultivars, and 3 different cultivars intercropped with clover (Trifolium hybridum L.) - and the presence of one (endogeic) or two (endogeic and anecic) categories of earthworms on biomass and nitrogen accumulation of wheat. In a second mesocosm experiment, we investigated the influence of three species with different rhizodeposition - wheat, rapeseed (Brassica napus L. ) and faba bean (Vicia faba L.) in pure stand or intercropped - and the presence of endogeic earthworms on microbial activity and nitrogen availability. In the first experiment

  20. Miniature GC-Minicell Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) for In Situ Measurements in Astrobiology Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Holland, Paul M.; Takeuchi, Norishige

    2006-01-01

    Astrobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ analysis of volatile chemical species and minerals present in the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and asteroids. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The use of land rovers and balloon aero-rovers place additional emphasis on miniaturization of the analytical instrumentation. In addition, smaller instruments, using tiny amounts of consumables, allow the use of more instrumentation and/or ionger mission life for stationary landers/laboratories. The miniCometary Ice and Dust Experiment (miniCIDEX), which combined Gas Chromatography (GC) with helium Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS), was capable of providing the wide range of analytical information required for Astrobiology missions. The IMS used here was based on the PCP model 111 IMS. A similar system, the Titan Ice and Dust Experiment (TIDE), was proposed as part of the Titan Orbiter Aerorover Mission (TOAM). Newer GC systems employing Micro Electro- Mechanical System (MEMS) based technology have greatly reduced both the size and resource requirements for space GCs. These smaller GCs, as well as the continuing miniaturization of Astrobiology analytical instruments in general, has highlighted the need for smaller, dry helium IMS systems. We describe here the development of a miniature, MEMS GC-IMS system (MEMS GC developed by Thorleaf Research Inc.), employing the MiniCell Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS), from Ion Applications Inc., developed through NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development (ASTID) Program and NASA s Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program.

  1. Tribological changes on SS304 stainless steel induced by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation with and without auxiliary heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, C.B.; Ueda, M.; Lepienski, C.M.; Reuther, H.

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve quite thick treated layers with reasonable thickness uniformity in SS304 steel, the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process was run in high-temperature, up to 350 deg. C, to induce high thermal diffusion but avoid the white layer formation. In these experiments, we heated the sample-holder with a shielded resistive wire properly wound around it and subjected the SS samples to nitrogen glow discharge PIII with relatively low voltages (10 kV) in different temperatures. We also treated the SS samples by the traditional PIII method, slowly increasing the high voltage pulse intensities, until 14 kV at the end of processing, reaching temperatures of up to 350 deg. C. These modes of treatments were compared with respect to nitrogen implantation profiles, X-ray diffraction, tribology and mechanical properties. X-ray diffraction results indicated a much higher efficiency of auxiliary heated PIII mode compared to the ordinary PIII. Very prominent γ N peaks were observed for the first mode, indicating large concentration of nitrogen in thick layers, confirmed by the nitrogen profiles measured by GDOS and AES. Improved mechanical and tribological properties were obtained for SS304 samples treated by the PIII with auxiliary heating, more than for ordinary PIII. Hardness was enhanced by up to 2.77 times, as seen by nanoindentation tests.

  2. Green synthesis of nitrogen-doped carbon dots from lotus root for Hg(II) ions detection and cell imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Dan; Shang, Shaoming, E-mail: smshang@jiangnan.edu.cn; Yu, Qin; Shen, Jie

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots were synthesized by a facile, green, and fast microwave method, using lotus root as carbon source. These nitrogen-doped carbon dots can be used for Hg{sup 2+} detection and cell imaging. - Highlights: • A green, fast strategy for synthesizing carbon dots was established. • A simple, sensitive, selective and wide linear range sensing of Hg{sup 2+} was developed. • The sensor system was demonstrated to detect Hg{sup 2+} in environmental water sample. • The carbon dots could serve for multicolor fluorescence bioimaging. - Abstract: Herein, a facile, green, and fast method was developed in the synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (CDs) with nitrogen content of 5.23%, using one-pot microwave treatment of lotus root (LR), without using any other surface passivation agents. The results show that these LR-CDs (with an average diameter of 9.41 nm) possess many outstanding features and have a high quantum yield of 19.0%. We further demonstrated applications of LR-CDs as probes for heavy metal ion detection. The LR-CDs exhibit captivating sensitivity and selectivity toward Hg{sup 2+} with a linear range from 0.1 to 60.0 μM and a detection limit of 18.7 nM. Eventually, the LR-CDs were applied for multicolor cell imaging, demonstrating their potential toward diverse applications.

  3. Effect of nitrogen ion dose on the corrosion resistance, the microstructure and the phase structure of the biomaterials austenitic stainless steel 316L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lely Susita RM; Bambang Siswanto; Ihwanul Aziz; Anjar Anggraini H

    2016-01-01

    The succeed of the use of biomaterials for orthopedic implant device is determined by its mechanical properties, chemical stability and biocompatibility in tissues and body fluids. The corrosion resistance is one of the main property of biomaterials to determine for successful orthopedic implant in body tissues. Surface modification is carried out to improve biomaterial surface properties of austenitic stainless steel 316L with nitrogen ion implantation technique and ion nitriding. Nitrogen ion implantation performed on 60 keV ion energy and ion dose variations 2 x 10"1"6 ions/cm"2- 2 x 10"1"7 ions/cm"2. The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel 316L in Hanks solution is measured by using a potentiostat, and corrosion resistance optimum of a sample is obtained at an ion dose of 5 x 10"1"6 ions/cm"2 and increase by a factor of 2.1 if compared to the sample without the nitrogen ion implantation. Further the sample of austenitic stainless steel 316L with the optimum corrosion resistance is processed by ion nitriding technique at a nitriding temperature of 350 °C and nitriding time of 4 hours. Based on corrosion test of the sample produced by ion nitriding is obtained an increasing the corrosion resistance by a factor of 2.96 when compared to the sample before nitrogen ion implantation. The improvement of corrosion resistance of the sample is caused by the formation of iron nitride ξ-Fe2N and γ- Fe4N which has excellent corrosion resistance properties. (author)

  4. The predictive power of SIMION/SDS simulation software for modeling ion mobility spectrometry instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hanh; McJunkin, Timothy R.; Miller, Carla J.; Scott, Jill R.; Almirall, José R.

    2008-09-01

    The combined use of SIMION 7.0 and the statistical diffusion simulation (SDS) user program in conjunction with SolidWorks® with COSMSOSFloWorks® fluid dynamics software to model a complete, commercial ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was demonstrated for the first time and compared to experimental results for tests using compounds of immediate interest in the security industry (e.g., 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, 2,7-dinitrofluorene, and cocaine). The effort of this research was to evaluate the predictive power of SIMION/SDS for application to IMS instruments. The simulation was evaluated against experimental results in three studies: (1) a drift:carrier gas flow rates study assesses the ability of SIMION/SDS to correctly predict the ion drift times; (2) a drift gas composition study evaluates the accuracy in predicting the resolution; (3) a gate width study compares the simulated peak shape and peak intensity with the experimental values. SIMION/SDS successfully predicted the correct drift time, intensity, and resolution trends for the operating parameters studied. Despite the need for estimations and assumptions in the construction of the simulated instrument, SIMION/SDS was able to predict the resolution between two ion species in air within 3% accuracy. The preliminary success of IMS simulations using SIMION/SDS software holds great promise for the design of future instruments with enhanced performance.

  5. Arrival time distributions of product ions reveal isomeric ratio of deprotonated molecules in ion mobility-mass spectrometry of hyaluronan-derived oligosaccharides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hermanová, M.; Iordache, A.-M.; Slováková, K.; Havlíček, Vladimír; Pelantová, Helena; Lemr, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 6 (2015), s. 854-863 ISSN 1076-5174 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP206/12/1150 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : tyramine-based hyaluronan derivatives * isomer discrimination * ion mobility Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.541, year: 2015

  6. Nitrogen effects on mobility and plant uptake of heavy metals in sewage sludge applied to soil columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, P.M.; Mortvedt, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    Cation movement in soil under leaching conditions has been associated with N fertilization. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine whether the mobility of some heavy metals applied in the inorganic form or in sewage sludge is enhanced in the presence of various sources of N. Columns of heavy metal-amended soil in plastic well casings were cropped with tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and leached three times with deionized H/sub 2/O. Heavy metal concentrations above check values were not detected in leachates from any column. Mobility of the heavy metals from the inorganic sources was slightly greater than that from the sewage sludge. Nitrogen fertilization did not affect the downward movement of Zn, Cd, Cr, Pb, or Ni in soil but enhanced uptake of these metals by fescue because of increased growth. These results suggest that heavy metal contamination of ground water is not likely in heavy textured soils when sewage sludge applications are accompanied by N fertilization, at least for short periods of time. 11 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  7. Spectroscopy of beryllium-like nitrogen ions by laser-induced recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhlenberg, G.

    1996-04-01

    The following topics were dealt with: Rydberg spectroscopy of beryllium-like nitrogen (N 3+ ) by laser-induced recombination, transition enrgies, Rydberg level shift, configuration interaction, laser intensity effect, laser band width

  8. Tribological effects of yttrium and nitrogen ion implantation on a precipitation hardening stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, F.; Arizaga, A.; Garcia, A.; Onate, J.I.

    1994-01-01

    Yttrium, nitrogen and combined yttrium and nitrogen implantations have been carried out on an ASTM A286 precipitation hardening iron base alloy to evaluate the benefits in their tribological behaviour. Microindentation tests have shown a significant 20%-60% increment in hardness on the nitrogen implanted material, with a limited improvement in elastic recovery of the indentation. An abrasive test on the same material has also produced a 50% reduction in scratch depth. Y + and Y + +N + implantations also hardened the material but to a lesser extent. Reciprocating ball on disk friction and wear testing at 400 C resulted in very severe damage in all cases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses combined with Ar sputtering have disclosed that nitrogen is mainly in a nitrided form, yttrium remains oxidized at the surface, below which there is an apparent increase in the metallic bond. ((orig.))

  9. Comparison of Ambient and Atmospheric Pressure Ion Sources for Cystic Fibrosis Exhaled Breath Condensate Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xiaoling; Pérez, José J.; Jones, Christina M.; Monge, María Eugenia; McCarty, Nael A.; Stecenko, Arlene A.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2017-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The vast majority of the mortality is due to progressive lung disease. Targeted and untargeted CF breath metabolomics investigations via exhaled breath condensate (EBC) analyses have the potential to expose metabolic alterations associated with CF pathology and aid in assessing the effectiveness of CF therapies. Here, transmission-mode direct analysis in real time traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS) was tested as a high-throughput alternative to conventional direct infusion (DI) electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods, and a critical comparison of the three ionization methods was conducted. EBC was chosen as the noninvasive surrogate for airway sampling over expectorated sputum as EBC can be collected in all CF subjects regardless of age and lung disease severity. When using pooled EBC collected from a healthy control, ESI detected the most metabolites, APCI a log order less, and TM-DART the least. TM-DART-TWIMS-TOF MS was used to profile metabolites in EBC samples from five healthy controls and four CF patients, finding that a panel of three discriminant EBC metabolites, some of which had been previously detected by other methods, differentiated these two classes with excellent cross-validated accuracy.

  10. Binding SnO2 nanocrystals in nitrogen-doped graphene sheets as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaosi; Wan, Li-Jun; Guo, Yu-Guo

    2013-04-18

    Hybrid anode materials for Li-ion batteries are fabricated by binding SnO2 nanocrystals (NCs) in nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) sheets by means of an in situ hydrazine monohydrate vapor reduction method. The SnO2NCs in the obtained SnO2NC@N-RGO hybrid material exhibit exceptionally high specific capacity and high rate capability. Bonds formed between graphene and SnO2 nanocrystals limit the aggregation of in situ formed Sn nanoparticles, leading to a stable hybrid anode material with long cycle life. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Measuring the effects of Coulomb repulsion via signal decay in an atmospheric pressure laser ionization ion mobility spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlenborg, Marvin; Schuster, Ann-Kathrin; Grotemeyer, Juergen; Gunzer, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Using lasers in ion mobility spectrometry offers a lot of advantages compared to standard ionization sources. Especially, the ion yield can be drastically increased. It can, however, reach levels where the Coulomb repulsion leads to unwanted side effects. Here, we investigate how the Coulomb repulsion can be detected apart from the typical signal broadening by measuring effects created already in the reaction region and comparing them with corresponding finite element method simulations.

  12. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Anions: Part 2. Assessing Charge Site Location and Isotope Scrambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Donohoe, Gregory C.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2016-03-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with gas-phase hydrogen deuterium exchange (HDX)-mass spectrometry (MS) and molecular dynamic simulations (MDS) has been used for structural investigation of anions produced by electrospraying a sample containing a synthetic peptide having the sequence KKDDDDDIIKIIK. In these experiments the potential of the analytical method for locating charge sites on ions as well as for utilizing collision-induced dissociation (CID) to reveal the degree of deuterium uptake within specific amino acid residues has been assessed. For diffuse (i.e., more elongated) [M - 2H]2- ions, decreased deuterium content along with MDS data suggest that the D4 and D6 residues are charge sites, whereas for the more diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions, the data suggest that the D4, D7, and the C-terminus are deprotonated. Fragmentation of mobility-selected, diffuse [M - 2H]2- ions to determine deuterium uptake at individual amino acid residues reveals a degree of deuterium retention at incorporation sites. Although the diffuse [M - 3H]3- ions may show more HD scrambling, it is not possible to clearly distinguish HD scrambling from the expected deuterium uptake based on a hydrogen accessibility model. The capability of the IMS-HDX-MS/MS approach to provide relevant details about ion structure is discussed. Additionally, the ability to extend the approach for locating protonation sites on positively-charged ions is presented.

  13. Test of Blanc's law for negative ion mobility in mixtures of SF6 with N2, O2 and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa, G; Urquijo, J de

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the mobility of negative ion species drifting in mixtures of SF 6 with N 2 , O 2 and air. The pulsed Townsend experiment was used for this purpose. The conditions of the experiment, high pressures and low values of the reduced electric field, E/N, ensured that the majority species drifting in the gap was SF 6 - , to which the present mobilities are ascribed. The extrapolated, zero field mobilities for several mixture compositions were used to test them successfully with Blanc's law. Moreover, the measured zero field SF 6 - mobilities in air could also be explained in terms of the measured mobilities for this ionic species in N 2 and O 2

  14. Salinity and Salicylic Acid Interactions in Affecting Nitrogen Assimilation, Enzyme Activity, Ions Content and Translocation Rate of Maize Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khodary, S.E.A.; Moussa, H.R.

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out to establish the relationship between nitrogen metabolism, enzyme activity, ions concentration as well as the translocation rate (TR) of carbohydrates and salicylic acid (SA) in salt-stressed maize (Zea mays L). Salicylic acid plus salinity treatment highly significantly increased: nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), protein content, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) and nitrate reductase (NR) and inhibited nucleases (DNase and RNase) activities compared with Na CI-treated plants. In addition, the ionic levels of potassium (K), phosphorus (P), nitrate (NO 3 ) and the translocation rate of the labelled photo assimilates have also been stimulated while sodium (Na) ions content was decreased. It is concluded that, salinazid maize plants might show an enhancement in their growth pattern upon salicylic acid application

  15. Characterization of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and refractory metals in binary and ternary silicon-based films using ion beam methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatri-Bouamrane, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ion beam methods (non Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reactions) have been carried out in order to characterize silicon-based films. The cross sections for the reactions 12 C(α,α), 14 N(α,α), 16 O(α,α), 28 Si(α,α) and 14 N(α,p) have been measured within 2 and 7 MeV. CVD beta SiC films could be analyzed and the interface between silicon carbide and the (100) silicon substrate was studied. The epitaxial growth of the beta SiC film could be modelled by comparing the results obtained with ion beam analysis, infrared spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Moreover, the stoichiometry of low pressure CVD Me-Si-N (Me=Re, W, Ti, Ta) ternary systems was studied. The evolution of the nitrogen content in W-Si-N systems allowed to study their stability with respect to the annealing conditions. (N.T.)

  16. Uncovering biologically significant lipid isomers with liquid chromatography, ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, Jennifer E.; Zhang, Xing; Weitz, Karl K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; Polyak, Steve; Metz, Thomas O.; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Smith, Richard D.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Baker, Erin Shammel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biological molecules are generated, metabolized and eliminated in living systems is important for interpreting processes such as immune response and disease pathology. While genomic and proteomic studies have provided vast amounts of information over the last several decades, interest in lipidomics has also grown due to improved analytical technologies revealing altered lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetes, cancer, and lipid storage disease. Liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for characterizing the lipidome by providing detailed information on the spatial and temporal composition of lipids. However, interpreting lipids’ biological roles is challenging due to the existence of numerous structural and stereoisomers (i.e. distinct acyl chain and double-bond positions), which are unresolvable using present LC-MS approaches. Here we show that combining structurally-based ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with LC-MS measurements distinguishes lipid isomers and allows insight into biological and disease processes.

  17. An intelligent detection method for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Yu, Jianwen; Ruan, Zhiming; Chen, Chilai; Chen, Ran; Wang, Han; Liu, Youjiang; Wang, Xiaozhi; Li, Shan

    2018-04-01

    In conventional high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry signal acquisition, multi-cycle detection is time consuming and limits somewhat the technique's scope for rapid field detection. In this study, a novel intelligent detection approach has been developed in which a threshold was set on the relative error of α parameters, which can eliminate unnecessary time spent on detection. In this method, two full-spectrum scans were made in advance to obtain the estimated compensation voltage at different dispersion voltages, resulting in a narrowing down of the whole scan area to just the peak area(s) of interest. This intelligent detection method can reduce the detection time to 5-10% of that of the original full-spectrum scan in a single cycle.

  18. Quantitative analysis of volatile organic compounds using ion mobility spectra and cascade correlation neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Peter DEB.; Zheng, Peng

    1995-01-01

    Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique for trace organic analysis in the gas phase. Quantitative measurements are difficult, because IMS has a limited linear range. Factors that may affect the instrument response are pressure, temperature, and humidity. Nonlinear calibration methods, such as neural networks, may be ideally suited for IMS. Neural networks have the capability of modeling complex systems. Many neural networks suffer from long training times and overfitting. Cascade correlation neural networks train at very fast rates. They also build their own topology, that is a number of layers and number of units in each layer. By controlling the decay parameter in training neural networks, reproducible and general models may be obtained.

  19. Hardware/Software Codesign in a Compact Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Subsurface Contaminant Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gribb MollyM

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A field-programmable-gate-array-(FPGA- based data acquisition and control system was designed in a hardware/software codesign environment using an embedded Xilinx Microblaze soft-core processor for use with a subsurface ion mobility spectrometer (IMS system, designed for detection of gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOCs. An FPGA is used to accelerate the digital signal processing algorithms and provide accurate timing and control. An embedded soft-core processor is used to ease development by implementing nontime critical portions of the design in software. The design was successfully implemented using a low-cost, off-the-shelf Xilinx Spartan-III FPGA and supporting digital and analog electronics.

  20. Recent Applications of Ion Mobility Spectrometry in Diagnosis of Vaginal Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeev Karpas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaginal infections (vaginosis globally affect more than 15% of the female population of reproductive age. However, diagnosis of vaginosis and differentiating between the three common types: bacterial vaginosis (BV, vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC, and trichomoniasis are challenging. Elevated levels of the biogenic amines, trimethylamine (TMA, putrescine, and cadaverine have been found in vaginal discharge fluid of women with vaginosis. Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS is particularly suitable for measurement of amines even in complex biological matrices due to their high proton affinity and has been shown to be suitable for the diagnosis of vaginal infections. Recent developments that have increased the accuracy of the technique for diagnosis of BV and simplified sample introduction are described here.

  1. Miniature GC: Minicell ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for astrobiology planetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Holland, Paul M.; Stimac, Robert M.; Kaye, William J.; Takeuchi, Norishige

    2006-01-01

    Astrobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ analysis of volatile chemical species and minerals present in the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and asteroids. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The use of land rovers and balloon aero-rovers place additional emphasis on miniaturization of the analytical instrumentation. In addition, smaller instruments, using tiny amounts of consumables, allow the use of more instrumentation and/or longer mission life for stationary landers/laboratories. We describe here the development of a miniature GC - Minicell Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IMS) under development through NASA's Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development (ASTID) Program and NASA's Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program.

  2. Coupling laser desorption with gas chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry for improved olive oil characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Sascha; Seifert, Luzia; Ahlmann, Norman; Hariharan, Chandrasekhara; Franzke, Joachim; Vautz, Wolfgang

    2018-07-30

    The investigation of volatile compounds in the headspace of liquid samples can often be used for detailed and non-destructive characterisation of the sample. This has great potential for process control or the characterisation of food samples, such as olive oil. We investigated, for the first time, the plume of substances released from olive oil droplets by laser desorption in a feasibility study and applied ion mobility spectrometry coupled to rapid GC pre-separation to enhance selectivity. Our investigation demonstrated that significantly more substances can be detected and quantified via laser desorption than in the usual headspace, enabling a rapid (5-10 min), sensitive (low ng/g range) and comprehensive analysis of the sample, with the potential for quality control and fraud identification. Therefore, laser desorption provides a useful sampling tool for characterising liquids in many applications, requiring only a few µL of sample. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The importance of ammonium mobility in nitrogen-impacted unfertilized grasslands: A critical reassessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, Ishaq Ahmad; Riaz, Muhammad; Cresser, Malcolm S.

    2009-01-01

    The physico-chemical absorption characteristics of ammonium-N for 10 soils from 5 profiles in York, UK, show its high potential mobility in N deposition-impacted, unfertilized, permanent grassland soils. Substantial proportions of ammonium-N inputs were retained in the solution phase, indicating that ammonium translocation plays an important role in the N cycling in, and losses from, such soils. This conclusion was further supported by measuring the ammonium-N leaching from intact plant/soil microcosms. The ammonium-N absorption characteristics apparently varied with soil pH, depth and soil texture. It was concluded for the most acid soils especially that ammonium-N leached from litter horizons could be seriously limiting the capacity of underlying soils to retain ammonium. Contrary to common opinion, more attention therefore needs to be paid to ammonium leaching and its potential role in biogeochemical N cycling in semi-natural soil systems subject to atmospheric pollution. - Ammonium mobility is more important than previously thought in N-impacted, unfertilized grasslands

  4. A high energy and power sodium-ion hybrid capacitor based on nitrogen-doped hollow carbon nanowires anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Ye, Chao; Chen, Xinzhi; Wang, Suqing; Wang, Haihui

    2018-04-01

    The sodium ion hybrid capacitor (SHC) has been attracting much attention. However, the SHC's power density is significantly confined to a low level due to the sluggish ion diffusion in the anode. Herein, we propose to use an electrode with a high double layer capacitance as the anode in the SHC instead of insertion anodes. To this aim, nitrogen doped hollow carbon nanowires (N-HCNWs) with a high specific surface area are prepared, and the high capacitive contribution during the sodium ion storage process is confirmed by a series of electrochemical measurements. A new SHC consisting of a N-HCNW anode and a commercial active carbon (AC) cathode is fabricated for the first time. Due to the hybrid charge storage mechanism combining ion insertion and capacitive process, the as-fabricated SHC strikes a balance between the energy density and power density, a energy density of 108 Wh kg-1 and a power density of 9 kW kg-1 can be achieved, which overwhelms the electrochemical performances of most reported AC-based SHCs.

  5. Influence of nitrogen ion implantation on hydrogen permeation in an extra mild steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brass, A.M.; Chene, J.; Pivin, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the first results on the effect of nitrogen implantation on hydrogen permeation in steels. Nitrogen can modify superficially the steel's chemistry and/or microstructure depending on the fluence and thereby affect the processes of hydrogen diffusion and trapping. The implantations were performed on low carbon steel specimens with different nominal doses (1% to 10% and 33% nitrogen in a superficial layer of approximately 100 to 120 nm). The corresponding microstructures were characterized and permeation tests were conducted at room temperature in a double electrolytic cell. The nitrogen implanted layers on iron affects the electrochemical behaviour of the surface and the permeation in the material. This effect depends on the nitrogen concentration in the layer and on the corresponding microstructure. A continuous Fe 2 N layer acts as an efficient barrier to hydrogen entry and permeation when the layer is located on the entry face of the permeation membrane. This effect is stronger when the implanted layer is on the downstream face of the membrane. The low permeability values are mainly attributed to a lower hydrogen solubility in the implanted layer, whereas hydrogen trapping on defects and nitride precipitates delay hydrogen penetration. (author)

  6. Mobilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to social networks, personal identities, and our relationship to the built environment. The omnipresence of mobilities within everyday life, high politics, technology, and tourism (to mention but a few) all point to a key insight harnessed by the ‘mobilities turn’. Namely that mobilities is much more than......The world is on the move. This is a widespread understanding by many inhabitants of contemporary society across the Globe. But what does it actually mean? During over one decade the ‘mobilities turn’ within the social sciences have provided a new set of insights into the repercussions of mobilities...... and environmental degradation. The spaces and territories marked by mobilities as well as the sites marked by the bypassing of such are explored. Moreover, the architectural and technological dimensions to infrastructures and sites of mobilities will be included as well as the issues of power, social exclusion...

  7. Highly nitrogen-doped carbon capsules: scalable preparation and high-performance applications in fuel cells and lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chuangang; Xiao, Ying; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Nan; Zhang, Zhipan; Cao, Minhua; Qu, Liangti

    2013-04-07

    Highly nitrogen-doped carbon capsules (hN-CCs) have been successfully prepared by using inexpensive melamine and glyoxal as precursors via solvothermal reaction and carbonization. With a great promise for large scale production, the hN-CCs, having large surface area and high-level nitrogen content (N/C atomic ration of ca. 13%), possess superior crossover resistance, selective activity and catalytic stability towards oxygen reduction reaction for fuel cells in alkaline medium. As a new anode material in lithium-ion battery, hN-CCs also exhibit excellent cycle performance and high rate capacity with a reversible capacity of as high as 1046 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 50 mA g(-1) after 50 cycles. These features make the hN-CCs developed in this study promising as suitable substitutes for the expensive noble metal catalysts in the next generation alkaline fuel cells, and as advanced electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries.

  8. Damage accumulation in nitrogen implanted 6H-SiC: Dependence on the direction of ion incidence and on the ion fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolnai, Z.; Ster, A.; Khanh, N. Q.; Battistig, G.; Lohner, T.; Gyulai, J.; Kotai, E.; Posselt, M.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of crystallographic orientation and ion fluence on the shape of damage distributions induced by 500 keV N + implantation at room temperature into 6H-SiC is investigated. The irradiation was performed at different tilt angles between 0 degree sign and 4 degree sign with respect to the crystallographic axis in order to consider the whole range of beam alignment from channeling to random conditions. The applied implantation fluence range was 2.5x10 14 -3x10 15 cm -2 . A special analytical method, 3.55 MeV 4 He + ion backscattering analysis in combination with channeling technique (BS/C), was employed to measure the disorder accumulation simultaneously in the Si and C sublattices of SiC with good depth resolution. For correct energy to depth conversion in the BS/C spectra, the average electronic energy loss per analyzing He ion for the axial channeling direction was determined. It was found that the tilt angle of nitrogen implantation has strong influence on the shape of the induced disorder profiles. Significantly lower disorder was found for channeling than for random irradiation. Computer simulation of the measured BS/C spectra showed the presence of a simple defect structure in weakly damaged samples and suggested the formation of a complex disorder state for higher disorder levels. Full-cascade atomistic computer simulation of the ion implantation process was performed to explain the differences in disorder accumulation on the Si and C sublattices. The damage buildup mechanism was interpreted with the direct-impact, defect-stimulated amorphization model in order to understand damage formation and to describe the composition of structural disorder versus the ion fluence and the implantation tilt angle

  9. Detection of methamphetamine in the presence of nicotine using in situ chemical derivatization and ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Mariela L; Harrington, Peter B

    2004-02-15

    The detection of methamphetamine in the presence of nicotine has been successfully accomplished using in situ chemical derivatization with propyl chloroformate as the derivatization reagent and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The rapid detection of methamphetamine is important for forensic scientists in order to establish a chain of evidence and link criminals to the crime scene. Nicotine is pervasive in clandestine drug laboratories from cigarette smoke residue. It has been demonstrated that nicotine obscures the methamphetamine peaks in ion mobility spectrometers due to their similar charge affinities and ion mobilities, which makes their detection a challenging task. As a consequence, false positive or negative responses may arise. In situ chemical derivatization poses as a sensitive, accurate, and reproducible alternative to remove the nicotine background when detecting nanogram amounts of methamphetamine. The derivatization agent was coated onto the sample disk, and the derivatization product corresponding to propyl methamphetamine carbamate was detected. In the present study, in situ chemical derivatization was demonstrated to be a feasible method to detect methamphetamine hydrochloride as the carbamate derivative, which was baseline-resolved from the nicotine peak. Alternating least squares (ALS) was used to model the datasets. A mixture containing both compounds revealed reduced mobilities of 1.61 cm(2)/V.s and 1.54 cm(2)/V.s for methamphetamine and nicotine, respectively. The reduced mobility of propyl methamphetamine carbamate was found at 1.35 cm(2)/V.s.

  10. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry reveals conformational flexibility in the deubiquitinating enzyme USP5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Oldham, Neil J

    2015-08-01

    Many proteins exhibit conformation flexibility as part of their biological function, whether through the presence of a series of well-defined states or by the existence of intrinsic disorder. Ion mobility spectrometry, in combination with MS (IM-MS), offers a rapid and sensitive means of probing ensembles of protein structures through measurement of gas-phase collisional cross sections. We have applied IM-MS analysis to the multidomain deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin specific protease 5 (USP5), which is believed to exhibit significant conformational flexibility. Native ESI-MS measurement of the 94-kDa USP5 revealed two distinct charge-state distributions: [M + 17H](+) to [M + 21H](+) and [M + 24H](+) to [M + 29H](+). The collisional cross sections of these ions revealed clear groupings of 52 ± 4 nm(2) for the lower charges and 66 ± 6 nm(2) for the higher charges. Molecular dynamics simulation of a compact form of USP5, based on a crystal structure, produced structures of 53-54 nm(2) following 2 ns in the gas phase, while simulation of an extended form (based on small-angle X-ray scattering data) led to structures of 64 nm(2). These data demonstrate that IM-MS is a valuable tool in studying proteins with different discrete conformational states. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. New Lithium-ion Polymer Battery for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Suit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, J. A.; Darcy, E. C.

    2004-01-01

    The Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) suit currently has a silver-zinc battery that is 20.5 V and 45 Ah capacity. The EMU's portable life support system (PLSS) will draw power from the battery during the entire period of an EVA. Due to the disadvantages of using the silver-zinc battery in terms of cost and performance, a new high energy density battery is being developed for future use, The new battery (Lithium-ion battery or LIB) will consist of Li-ion polymer cells that will provide power to the EMU suit. The battery design consists of five 8 Ah cells in parallel to form a single module of 40 Ah and five such modules will be placed in series to give a 20.5 V, 40 Ah battery. Charging will be accomplished on the Shuttle or Station using the new LIB charger or the existing ALPS (Air Lock Power Supply) charger. The LIB delivers a maximum of 3.8 A on the average, for seven continuous hours, at voltages ranging from 20.5 V to 16.0 V and it should be capable of supporting transient pulses during start up and once every hour to support PLSS fan and pump operation. Figure 1 shows the placement of the battery in the backpack area of the EMU suit. The battery and cells will undergo testing under different conditions to understand its performance and safety characteristics.

  12. Separation and characterization of metallosupramolecular libraries by ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Chan, Yi-Tsu; Casiano-Maldonado, Madalis; Yu, Jing; Carri, Gustavo A; Newkome, George R; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2011-09-01

    The self-assembly of Zn(II) ions and bis(terpyridine) (tpy) ligands carrying 120° or 180° angles between their metal binding sites was utilized to prepare metallosupramolecular libraries with the connectivity. These combinatorial libraries were separated and characterized by ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS(2)). The 180°-angle building blocks generate exclusively linear complexes, which were used as standards to determine the architectures of the assemblies resulting from the 120°-angle ligands. The latter ligand geometry promotes the formation of macrocyclic hexamers, but other n-mers with smaller (n = 5) or larger ring sizes (n = 7-9) were identified as minor products, indicating that the angles in the bis(terpyridine) ligand and within the coordinative tpy-Zn(II)-tpy bonds are not as rigid, as previously believed. Macrocyclic and linear isomers were detected in penta- and heptameric assemblies; in the larger octa- and nonameric assemblies, ring-opened conformers with compact and folded geometries were observed in addition to linear extended and cyclic architectures. IM MS(2) experiments provided strong evidence that the macrocycles present in the libraries were already formed in solution, during the self-assembly process, not by dissociation of larger complexes in the gas phase. The IM MS/MS(2) methods provide a means to analyze, based on size and shape (architecture), supramolecular libraries that are not amenable to liquid chromatography, LC-MS, NMR, and/or X-ray techniques.

  13. Meqalac Results - Multichannel Rf Acceleration of Nitrogen-Ions to 1 Mev

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wojke, R. G. C.; Bannenberg, J. G.; Vijftigschild, A. J. M.; Giskes, F. G.; Ficke, H. G.; Klein, H.; Thomae, R. W.; Schempp, A.; Weis, T.; van Amersfoort, P. W.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    In the MEQALAC (Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Linear Accelerator) multiple N+ ion beams are accelerated in 32 rf gaps, which are part of a modified interdigital-H-resonator operating at 25 MHz. The transverse focusing of the intense ion beams is achieved by means of sets of miniaturized

  14. Probing the coordination environment of Ti(3+) ions coordinated to nitrogen-containing Lewis bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, E; Maurelli, S; Chiesa, M; Van Doorslaer, S

    2015-08-28

    Multi-frequency continuous-wave and pulsed EPR techniques are employed to investigate the coordination of nitrogen-containing ligands to Ti(3+)-chloro complexes. Frozen solutions of TiCl3 and TiCl3(Py)3 dissolved in nitrogen-containing solvents have been investigated together with the TiCl3(Py)3 solid-state complex. For these different systems, the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole data of Ti(3+)-bound (14)N nuclei are reported and discussed in the light of DFT computations, allowing for a detailed description of the microscopic structure of these systems.

  15. General Synthesis of Transition-Metal Oxide Hollow Nanospheres/Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Hybrids by Metal-Ammine Complex Chemistry for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiayuan; Wu, Xiaofeng; Gong, Yan; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Wenhui; Mo, Shengpeng; Peng, Shengpan; Tan, Qiangqiang; Chen, Yunfa

    2018-02-09

    We present a general and facile synthesis strategy, on the basis of metal-ammine complex chemistry, for synthesizing hollow transition-metal oxides (Co 3 O 4 , NiO, CuO-Cu 2 O, and ZnO)/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids, potentially applied in high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The oxygen-containing functional groups of graphene oxide play a prerequisite role in the formation of hollow transition-metal oxides on graphene nanosheets, and a significant hollowing process occurs only when forming metal (Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , or Zn 2+ )-ammine complex ions. Moreover, the hollowing process is well correlated with the complexing capacity between metal ions and NH 3 molecules. The significant hollowing process occurs for strong metal-ammine complex ions including Co 2+ , Ni 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Zn 2+ ions, and no hollow structures formed for weak and/or noncomplex Mn 2+ and Fe 3+ ions. Simultaneously, this novel strategy can also achieve the direct doping of nitrogen atoms into the graphene framework. The electrochemical performance of two typical hollow Co 3 O 4 or NiO/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids was evaluated by their use as anodic materials. It was demonstrated that these unique nanostructured hybrids, in contrast with the bare counterparts, solid transition-metal oxides/nitrogen-doped graphene hybrids, perform with significantly improved specific capacity, superior rate capability, and excellent capacity retention. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Needle-Age Related Variability in Nitrogen, Mobile Carbohydrates, and δ13C within Pinus koraiensis Tree Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Cai-Feng; Han, Shi-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Mei; Wang, Cun-Guo; Dai, Guan-Hua; Xiao, Wen-Fa; Li, Mai-He

    2012-01-01

    For both ecologists and physiologists, foliar physioecology as a function of spatially and temporally variable environmental factors such as sunlight exposure within a tree crown is important for understanding whole tree physiology and for predicting ecosystem carbon balance and productivity. Hence, we studied concentrations of nitrogen (N), non-structural carbohydrates (NSC = soluble sugars + starch), and δ13C in different-aged needles within Pinus koraiensis tree crowns, to understand the needle age- and crown position-related physiology, in order to test the hypothesis that concentrations of N, NSC, and δ13C are needle-age and crown position dependent (more light, more photosynthesis affecting N, NSC, and δ13C), and to develop an accurate sampling strategy. The present study indicated that the 1-yr-old needles had significantly higher concentration levels of mobile carbohydrates (both on a mass and an area basis) and Narea (on an area basis), as well as NSC-N ratios, but significantly lower levels of Nmass (on a mass basis) concentration and specific leaf area (SLA), compared to the current-year needles. Azimuthal (south-facing vs. north-facing crown side) effects were found to be significant on starch [both on a mass (STmass) and an area basis (STarea)], δ13C values, and Narea, with higher levels in needles on the S-facing crown side than the N-facing crown side. Needle Nmass concentrations significantly decreased but needle STmass, STarea, and δ13C values significantly increased with increasing vertical crown levels. Our results suggest that the sun-exposed crown position related to photosynthetic activity and water availability affects starch accumulation and carbon isotope discrimination. Needle age associated with physiological activity plays an important role in determining carbon and nitrogen physiology. The present study indicates that across-scale sampling needs to carefully select tissue samples with equal age from a comparable crown position

  17. A comparative investigation on the effects of nitrogen-doping into graphene on enhancing the electrochemical performance of SnO2/graphene for sodium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiuqiang; Su, Dawei; Zhang, Jinqiang; Chen, Shuangqiang; Mondal, Anjon Kumar; Wang, Guoxiu

    2015-02-21

    SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids have been synthesized by an in situ hydrothermal method, during which the formation of SnO2 nanocrystals and nitrogen doping of graphene occur simultaneously. The as-prepared SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids exhibit enhanced electrochemical performance for sodium-ion batteries compared to SnO2/graphene nanocomposites. A systematic comparison between SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids and the SnO2/graphene counterpart as anode materials for sodium-ion batteries has been conducted. The comparison is in a reasonable framework, where SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids and the SnO2/graphene counterpart have the same SnO2 ratio, similar SnO2 crystallinity and particle size, close surface area and pore size. The results clearly manifest that the improved electron transfer efficiency of SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene due to nitrogen-doping plays a more important role than the increased electro-active sites within graphene network in enhancing the electro-activity of SnO2/nitrogen-doped graphene nanohybrids compared to the SnO2/graphene counterpart. In contrast to the previous reports which often ascribe the enhanced electro-activity of nitrogen-doped graphene based composites to two nitrogen-doping effects (improving the electron transfer efficiency and increasing electro-active sites within graphene networks) in one single declaration, this work is expected to provide more specific information for understanding the effects of nitrogen-doping into graphene on improving the electrochemical performance of graphene based composites.

  18. Practical application of in silico fragmentation based residue screening with ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anton; Butcher, Patrick; Maden, Kathry; Walker, Stephan; Widmer, Mirjam

    2017-07-15

    A screening concept for residues in complex matrices based on liquid chromatography coupled to ion mobility high-resolution mass spectrometry LC/IMS-HRMS is presented. The comprehensive four-dimensional data (chromatographic retention time, drift time, mass-to-charge and ion abundance) obtained in data-independent acquisition (DIA) mode was used for data mining. An in silico fragmenter utilizing a molecular structure database was used for suspect screening, instead of targeted screening with reference substances. The utilized data-independent acquisition mode relies on the MS E concept; where two constantly alternating HRMS scans (low and high fragmentation energy) are acquired. Peak deconvolution and drift time alignment of ions from the low (precursor ion) and high (product ion) energy scan result in relatively clean product ion spectra. A bond dissociation in silico fragmenter (MassFragment) supplied with mol files of compounds of interest was used to explain the observed product ions of each extracted candidate component (chromatographic peak). Two complex matrices (fish and bovine liver extract) were fortified with 98 veterinary drugs. Out of 98 screened compounds 94 could be detected with the in silico based screening approach. The high correlation among drift time and m/z value of equally charged ions was utilized for an orthogonal filtration (ranking). Such an orthogonal ion mobility based filter removes multiply charged ions (e.g. peptides and proteins from the matrix) as well as noise and artefacts. Most significantly, this filtration dramatically reduces false positive findings but hardly increases false negative findings. The proposed screening approach may offer new possibilities for applications where reference compounds are hardly or not at all commercially available. Such areas may be the analysis of metabolites of drugs, pyrrolizidine alkaloids, marine toxins, derivatives of sildenafil or novel designer drugs (new psychoactive substances

  19. Comparison of ion balance and nitrogen metabolism in old and young leaves of alkali-stressed rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Wu, Zhihai; Han, Jiayu; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Chunwu

    2012-01-01

    Alkali stress is an important agricultural contaminant and has complex effects on plant metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the alkali stress has different effects on the growth, ion balance, and nitrogen metabolism in old and young leaves of rice plants, and to compare functions of both organs in alkali tolerance. The results showed that alkali stress only produced a small effect on the growth of young leaves, whereas strongly damaged old leaves. Rice protected young leaves from ion harm via the large accumulation of Na(+) and Cl(-) in old leaves. The up-regulation of OsHKT1;1, OsAKT1, OsHAK1, OsHAK7, OsHAK10 and OsHAK16 may contribute to the larger accumulation of Na(+) in old leaves under alkali stress. Alkali stress mightily reduced the NO(3)(-) contents in both organs. As old leaf cells have larger vacuole, under alkali stress these scarce NO(3)(-) was principally stored in old leaves. Accordingly, the expression of OsNRT1;1 and OsNRT1;2 in old leaves was up-regulated by alkali stress, revealing that the two genes might contribute to the accumulation of NO(3)(-) in old leaves. NO(3)(-) deficiency in young leaves under alkali stress might induce the reduction in OsNR1 expression and the subsequent lacking of NH(4)(+), which might be main reason for the larger down-regulation of OsFd-GOGAT and OsGS2 in young leaves. Our results strongly indicated that, during adaptation of rice to alkali stress, young and old leaves have distinct mechanisms of ion balance and nitrogen metabolism regulation. We propose that the comparative studies of young and old tissues may be important for abiotic stress tolerance research.

  20. Angular correlation of the N+ ions produced in the dissociative double ionization of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezell, R.L.; Edwards, A.K.; Wood, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The double ionization of N 2 by He + projectiles was studied by measuring the angular correlation between the two N + ions emitted in the dissociation of N 2+ 2 molecular ions. If there were no recoil velocity imposed on the N 2+ 2 ion in the initial ionizing collision, and thermal effects were neglected, the pair of N + ions would have equal and opposite velocity vectors in the laboratory frame of reference. Measuring the coincidence yield of pairs of N + ions as a function of the angle between their velocity vectors permits an estimate to be made of the component of momentum transferred to the N 2+ 2 parent ions in the beam direction. The results presented in this report show the recoil velocity to be considerably less than the mean thermal velocity of N 2 molecules at room temperature. We also report mesurements of the relative cross section for N + production from N 2+ 2 as a function of the orientation of the N 2 target molecules relative to the projectile beam axis

  1. Nitrogen ion induced nitridation of Si(111) surface: Energy and fluence dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Praveen [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India); ISOM, Universidad Politecnia de Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Kumar, Mahesh [Physics and Energy Harvesting Group, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Nötzel, R. [ISOM, Universidad Politecnia de Madrid, 28040 (Spain); Shivaprasad, S.M., E-mail: smsprasad@jncasr.ac.in [Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore 560064 (India)

    2014-06-01

    We present the surface modification of Si(111) into silicon nitride by exposure to energetic N{sub 2}{sup +} ions. In-situ UHV experiments have been performed to optimize the energy and fluence of the N{sub 2}{sup +} ions to form silicon nitride at room temperature (RT) and characterized in-situ by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We have used N{sub 2}{sup +} ion beams in the energy range of 0.2–5.0 keV of different fluence to induce surface reactions, which lead to the formation of Si{sub x}N{sub y} on the Si(111) surface. The XPS core level spectra of Si(2p) and N(1s) have been deconvoluted into different oxidation states to extract qualitative information, while survey scans have been used for quantifying of the silicon nitride formation, valence band spectra show that as the N{sub 2}{sup +} ion fluence increases, there is an increase in the band gap. The secondary electron emission spectra region of photoemission is used to evaluate the change in the work function during the nitridation process. The results show that surface nitridation initially increases rapidly with ion fluence and then saturates. - Highlights: • A systematic study for the formation of silicon nitride on Si(111). • Investigation of optimal energy and fluence for energetic N{sub 2}{sup +} ions. • Silicon nitride formation at room temperature on Si(111)

  2. Aerosol Vacuum-Assisted Plasma Ionization (Aero-VaPI) Coupled to Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Sandra L.; Ng, Nga L.; Zambrzycki, Stephen C.; Li, Anyin; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2018-02-01

    In this communication, we report on the real-time analysis of organic aerosol particles by Vacuum-assisted Plasma Ionization-Mass Spectrometry (Aero-VaPI-MS) using a home-built VaPI ion source coupled to a Synapt G2-S HDMS ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) system. Standards of organic molecules of interest in prebiotic chemistry were used to generate aerosols. Monocaprin and decanoic acid aerosol particles were successfully detected in both the positive and negative ion modes, respectively. A complex aerosol mixture of different sizes of polymers of L-malic acid was also examined through ion mobility (IM) separations, resulting in the detection of polymers of up to eight monomeric units. This noncommercial plasma ion source is proposed as a low cost alternative to other plasma ionization platforms used for aerosol analysis, and a higher-performance alternative to more traditional aerosol mass spectrometers. VaPI provides robust online ionization of organics in aerosols without extensive ion activation, with the coupling to IM-MS providing higher peak capacity and excellent mass accuracy. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Study of plasma characteristics in the cathode regime of a nitrogen glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulis, Alvaro

    1987-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the cathode region, cathodic sheath and negative glow, of a nitrogen glow discharge. The author first presents general data regarding glow discharges, a description of the experimental installation, and measurements of discharge balancing. In the next part, he precisely describes spectroscopic methods, and the implementation of diagnoses from an experimental point of view as well as in terms of space resolution. Results are then presented and interpreted. Measurements concern space distributions of excited species, the determination of axial and radial concentrations of nitrogen ions, axial variations of rotational temperatures of the different species and variations of nitrogen ion vibrational temperature. The laser optogalvanic effect on the nitrogen molecular ion is resolved in time, and compared with the result of a theoretical model based on the mobility difference between the different nitrogen ions. Finally, the author compares experimental results on ion profiles along the discharge axis with results obtained with theoretical models [fr

  4. The mobility of Li+ and K+ ions in helium and argon at 294 and 80 K and derived interaction potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassidy, R.A.; Elford, M.T.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of mobility data is a valuable technique for deriving ion-atom interaction potentials or testing at initio potentials particularly at relatively large internuclear separations. In order to obtain the most complete information on the long range part of the potential it is necessary to have mobility data at sufficiently low gas temperatures and small values of E/N that the mobility is determined only by the dipole polarization force. Although this condition can be reasonably well met at room temperature for gases of high polarizability, this is not the case for ions in helium and in particular for the most well studied case, that of Li + in helium. The prime purpose of the present measurements was to obtain low temperature data for Li + in helium in order to determine more accurately the attractive long range tail of the potential. The measurements were also extended to argon to demonstrate the effect of the polarizability on the derivation of potentials. The mobility measurements were made using a drift tube-mass spectrometer system employing the Bradbury-Nielsen time of flight technique. Measurements were performed at 294 K and 80 K. The 'three temperature' theory of Lin, Viehland and Mason was used to fit interaction potentials to the present data. Detailed comparisons are made here only for the case of Li + ions in helium. The new data for 80 K provide additional information on the potential at internuclear separations which cover the range to 5 A. (Authors)

  5. Influence of nitrogen ion implantation on wear studied by a new laboratory wear test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilagyi, E.; Paszti, F.; Vertessy, Z. (Central Research Inst. for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary))

    1991-05-01

    A new laboratory wear test is developed in which the wear trace is measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The advantage of the new test is that the wear rate is directly determinable. The new test setup has been used to study the effects of nitrogen implantation on the wear processes on 115CrV3 steel. The wear rate decreases by a factor of 2 at 4x10{sup 17} N{sup +}/cm{sup 2} implanted dose. (orig.).

  6. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder: detecting multidimensional liquid chromatography, ion mobility and mass spectrometry features in complex datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Kevin L; Slysz, Gordon W; Baker, Erin S; LaMarche, Brian L; Monroe, Matthew E; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Payne, Samuel H; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2013-11-01

    The addition of ion mobility spectrometry to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry experiments requires new, or updated, software tools to facilitate data processing. We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension. LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder is available as a command-line tool for download at http://omics.pnl.gov/software/LC-IMS-MS_Feature_Finder.php. The Microsoft.NET Framework 4.0 is required to run the software. All other dependencies are included with the software package. Usage of this software is limited to non-profit research to use (see README). rds@pnnl.gov. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Resolution and Assignment of Differential Ion Mobility Spectra of Sarcosine and Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthias, Francis; Maatoug, Belkis; Glish, Gary L.; Moussa, Fathi; Maitre, Philippe

    2018-02-01

    Due to their central role in biochemical processes, fast separation and identification of amino acids (AA) is of importance in many areas of the biomedical field including the diagnosis and monitoring of inborn errors of metabolism and biomarker discovery. Due to the large number of AA together with their isomers and isobars, common methods of AA analysis are tedious and time-consuming because they include a chromatographic separation step requiring pre- or post-column derivatization. Here, we propose a rapid method of separation and identification of sarcosine, a biomarker candidate of prostate cancer, from isomers using differential ion mobility spectrometry (DIMS) interfaced with a tandem mass spectrometer (MS/MS) instrument. Baseline separation of protonated sarcosine from α- and β-alanine isomers can be easily achieved. Identification of DIMS peak is performed using an isomer-specific activation mode where DIMS- and mass-selected ions are irradiated at selected wavenumbers allowing for the specific fragmentation via an infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) process. Two orthogonal methods to MS/MS are thus added, where the MS/MS(IRMPD) is nothing but an isomer-specific multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method. The identification relies on the comparison of DIMS-MS/MS(IRMPD) chromatograms recorded at different wavenumbers. Based on the comparison of IR spectra of the three isomers, it is shown that specific depletion of the two protonated α- and β-alanine can be achieved, thus allowing for clear identification of the sarcosine peak. It is also demonstrated that DIMS-MS/MS(IRMPD) spectra in the carboxylic C=O stretching region allow for the resolution of overlapping DIMS peaks. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Electrospray Ionization Mechanisms for Large Polyethylene Glycol Chains Studied Through Tandem Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larriba, Carlos; de la Mora, Juan Fernandez; Clemmer, David E.

    2014-08-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) is used to investigate the abundance pattern, n z (m) of Poly-(ethyleneglycol) (PEG) electrosprayed from water/methanol as a function of mass and charge state. We examine n z (m) patterns from a diversity of solution cations, primarily dimethylammonium and triethylammonium. The ability of PEG chains to initially attach to various cations in the spraying chamber, and to retain them (or not) on entering the MS, provide valuable clues on the ionization mechanism. Single chains form in highly charged and extended shapes in most buffers. But the high initial charge they hold under atmospheric pressure is lost on transit to the vacuum system for large cations. In contrast, aggregates of two or more chains carry in all buffers at most the Rayleigh charge of a water drop of the same volume. This shows either that they form via Dole's charge residue mechanism, or that highly charged and extended aggregates are ripped apart by Coulombic repulsion. IMS-IMS experiments in He confirm these findings, and provide new mechanistic insights on the stability of aggregates. When collisionally activated, initially globular dimers are stable. However, slightly nonglobular dimers projecting out a linear appendix are segregated into two monomeric chains. The breakup of a charged dimer is therefore a multi-step process, similar to the Fenn-Consta polymer extrusion mechanism. The highest activation barrier is associated to the first step, where a short chain segment carrying a single charge escapes (ion-evaporates) from a charged drop, leading then to gradual field extrusion of the whole chain out of the drop.

  9. Accession of non-nitrogenous ions dissolved in rainwater to soils in Victoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutton, J T; Leslie, T I

    1958-01-01

    Analyses of rainwater samples from 24 stations in Victoria have shown that with increasing distance from the coast there is a sharp decrease in the influence of the ocean on the nature of the dissolved ions. About 150 miles inland the ionic ratio of sodium to potassium falls below 10, that of sodium to chloride exceeds unity, and calcium becomes the dominant cation. This is considered to reflect the influence of terrestrial material such as the dry surface of soils. As soils also contain sodium and chloride ions, the common assumption that all the chloride in the rain is derived from the ocean is unjustified, hence calculations of the net accession of salts are unwarranted. In southern Australia, sulphate ions are present in much smaller amounts than in other countries and this may contribute to the observed deficiencies of sulphur in plant nutrition. Details are given of the method of collecting the rainwater and of its analysis.

  10. Detection of nitro-based and peroxide-based explosives by fast polarity-switchable ion mobility spectrometer with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-05-29

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H](-) and [HMTD+H](+) could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP.

  11. Rotational Coherence Encoded in an “Air-Laser” Spectrum of Nitrogen Molecular Ions in an Intense Laser Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haisu Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate lasing action in aligned nitrogen molecular ions (N_{2}^{+} produced in an intense laser field. We find that, besides the population inversion between the B^{2}Σ_{u}^{+}-X^{2}Σ_{g}^{+} states, which is responsible for the observed simulated amplification of a seed pulse, a rotational wave packet in the ground vibrational state (v=0 of the excited electronic B^{2}Σ_{u}^{+} state has been created in N_{2}^{+}. The rotational coherence can faithfully encode its characteristics into the amplified seed pulses, enabling reconstruction of rotational wave packets of molecules in a single-shot detection manner from the frequency-resolved laser spectrum. Our results suggest that the air laser can potentially provide a promising tool for remote characterization of coherent molecular rotational wave packets.

  12. Effect of nitrogen on the electrochemical performance of core–shell structured Si/C nanocomposites as anode materials for Li-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Hua-Chao; Huang, Mian; Fan, Li-Zhen; Qu, Xuanhui

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► N-containing core–shell structured Si/C nanocomposites are prepared via two steps. ► The N-containing Si/C nanocomposites exhibit high capacity and excellent cycling stability. ► The appropriate nitrogen has a beneficial effect on the electrochemical performance. -- Abstract: Core–shell structured Si/C nanocomposites with different nitrogen contents are prepared by in situ polymerization of aniline in the suspension of silicon nanoparticles followed by carbonization of Si/polyaniline (PANI) nanocomposites at different temperatures. The nitrogen contents of Si/C nanocomposites decrease gradually with increasing carbonization temperatures. The effect of nitrogen contents on the electrochemical performance of Si/C nanocomposites as anode materials for lithium ion batteries is investigated. It is found that the Si/C nanocomposites with 4.75 wt.% nitrogen exhibit the high specific capacity of 795 mAh g −1 after 50 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g −1 and excellent cycling stability. The appropriate nitrogen in Si/C nanocomposites plays a beneficial role in the improvement of electrochemical performance. The nitrogen in Si/C nanocomposites increases the reversible capacity, which may be due to the formation of vacancies and dangling bonds around the nitrogen sites

  13. A Revival of Waste: Atmospheric Pressure Nitrogen Plasma Jet Enhanced Jumbo Silicon/Silicon Carbide Composite in Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Shang-I; Liu, Wei-Ren; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a jumbo silicon/silicon carbide (Si/SiC) composite (JSC), a novel anode material source, was extracted from solar power industry cutting waste and used as a material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), instead of manufacturing the nanolized-Si. Unlike previous methods used for preventing volume expansion and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), the approach proposed here simply entails applying surface modification to JSC-based electrodes by using nitrogen-atmospheric pressure plasma jet (N-APPJ) treatment process. Surface organic bonds were rearranged and N-doped compounds were formed on the electrodes through applying different plasma treatment durations, and the qualitative examinations of before/after plasma treatment were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The surface modification resulted in the enhancement of electrochemical performance with stable capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency. In addition, depth profile and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were executed to determine the existence of Li-N matrix and how the nitrogen compounds change the surface conditions of the electrodes. The N-APPJ-induced rapid surface modification is a major breakthrough for processing recycled waste that can serve as anode materials for next-generation high-performance LIBs.

  14. Nitrogen lattice location in MOVPE grown Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y films using ion beam channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nebiki, Takuya; Narusawa, Tadashi; Kumagai, Akiko; Doi, Hideyuki; Saito, Tadashi; Takagishi, Shigenori

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the nitrogen lattice location in MOVPE grown Ga 1-x In x N y As 1-y with x=0.07 and y=0.025 by means of ion beam channeling technique. In this system, the lattice constant of the Ga 1-x In x N y As 1-y film is equal to GaAs lattice. Therefore, we can grow apparently no strain, high quality and very thick GaInNAs film on GaAs substrate. The quality of the films as well as the lattice location of In and N were characterized by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis using 3.95 MeV He 2+ beam. The fraction of substitutional nitrogen in the film was measured using the 14 N(α,p) 17 O endothermic nuclear reaction. Our results indicate that more than 90% of In and N atoms are located the substitutional site, however, N atoms are slightly displaced by ∼0.2 A from the lattice site. We suggest that the GaInNAs film has a local strain or point defects around the N atoms. (author)

  15. Freeze-drying for sustainable synthesis of nitrogen doped porous carbon cryogel with enhanced supercapacitor and lithium ion storage performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Zheng; Yu, Chang; Fan, Xiaoming; Liu, Shaohong; Yang, Juan; Zhang, Mengdi; Wang, Gang; Xiao, Nan; Qiu, Jieshan

    2015-01-01

    A chitosan (CS) based nitrogen doped carbon cryogel with a high specific surface area (SSA) has been directly synthesized via a combined process of freeze-drying and high-temperature carbonization without adding any activation agents. The as-made carbon cryogel demonstrates an SSA up to 1025 m 2 g −1 and a high nitrogen content of 5.98 wt%, while its counterpart derived from CS powder only shows an SSA of 26 m 2 g −1 . Freeze-drying is a determining factor for the formation of carbon cryogel with a high SSA, where the CS powder with a size of ca. 200 μm is transformed into the sheet-shaped cryogel with a thickness of 5–8 μm. The as-made carbon cryogel keeps the sheet-shaped structure and the abundant pores are formed in situ and decorated inside the sheets during carbonization. The carbon cryogel shows significantly enhanced performance as supercapacitor and lithium ion battery electrodes in terms of capacity and rate capability due to its quasi two-dimensional (2D) structure with reduced thickness. The proposed method may provide a simple approach to configure 2D biomass-derived advanced carbon materials for energy storage devices. (paper)

  16. Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Metabolomics Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Hossein; Karanji, Ahmad K.; Majuta, Sandra; Maurer, Megan M.; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2018-02-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) in combination with gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) is evaluated as an analytical method for small-molecule standard and mixture characterization. Experiments show that compound ions exhibit unique HDX reactivities that can be used to distinguish different species. Additionally, it is shown that gas-phase HDX kinetics can be exploited to provide even further distinguishing capabilities by using different partial pressures of reagent gas. The relative HDX reactivity of a wide variety of molecules is discussed in light of the various molecular structures. Additionally, hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS) and HDX kinetics modeling of candidate ( in silico) ion structures is utilized to estimate the relative ion conformer populations giving rise to specific HDX behavior. These data interpretation methods are discussed with a focus on developing predictive tools for HDX behavior. Finally, an example is provided in which ion mobility information is supplemented with HDX reactivity data to aid identification efforts of compounds in a metabolite extract.

  17. Application of ion mobility spectrometry for the determination of tramadol in biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sheibani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple and rapid ion mobility spectrometry (IMS method has been described for the determination of tramadol. The operating instrumental parameters that could influence IMS were investigated and optimized (temperature; injection: 220 and IMS cell: 190°C, flow rate; carrier: 300 and drift: 600 mL/minute, voltage; corona: 2300 and drift: 7000 V, pulse width: 100 μs. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curves were linear within two orders of magnitude with R2 ≥ 0.998 for the determination of tramadol in human plasma, saliva, serum, and urine samples. The limits of detection and the limits of quantitation were between 0.1 and 0.3 and 0.3 and 1 ng/mL, respectively. The relative standard deviations were between 7.5 and 8.8%. The recovery results (90–103.9% indicate that the proposed method can be applied for tramadol analysis in different biological samples.

  18. Multi-Capillary Column-Ion Mobility Spectrometry of Volatile Metabolites Emitted by Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Halbfeld

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds (VOCs produced during microbial fermentations determine the flavor of fermented food and are of interest for the production of fragrances or food additives. However, the microbial synthesis of these compounds from simple carbon sources has not been well investigated so far. Here, we analyzed the headspace over glucose minimal salt medium cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry (MCC-IMS. The high sensitivity and fast data acquisition of the MCC-IMS enabled online analysis of the fermentation off-gas and 19 specific signals were determined. To four of these volatile compounds, we could assign the metabolites ethanol, 2-pentanone, isobutyric acid, and 2,3-hexanedione by MCC-IMS measurements of pure standards and cross validation with thermal desorption–gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements. Despite the huge biochemical knowledge of the biochemistry of the model organism S. cerevisiae, only the biosynthetic pathways for ethanol and isobutyric acid are fully understood, demonstrating the considerable lack of research of volatile metabolites. As monitoring of VOCs produced during microbial fermentations can give valuable insight into the metabolic state of the organism, fast and non-invasive MCC-IMS analyses provide valuable data for process control.

  19. Instrument response measurements of ion mobility spectrometers in situ: maintaining optimal system performance of fielded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Eric; Griffin, Todd M.; Popkie, Norm, Jr.; Eagan, Michael A.; McAtee, Robert F.; Vrazel, Danet; McKinly, Jim

    2005-05-01

    Ion Mobility Spectroscopy (IMS) is the most widespread detection technique in use by the military for the detection of chemical warfare agents, explosives, and other threat agents. Moreover, its role in homeland security and force protection has expanded due, in part, to its good sensitivity, low power, lightweight, and reasonable cost. With the increased use of IMS systems as continuous monitors, it becomes necessary to develop tools and methodologies to ensure optimal performance over a wide range of conditions and extended periods of time. Namely, instrument calibration is needed to ensure proper sensitivity and to correct for matrix or environmental effects. We have developed methodologies to deal with the semi-quantitative nature of IMS and allow us to generate response curves that allow a gauge of instrument performance and maintenance requirements. This instrumentation communicates to the IMS systems via a software interface that was developed in-house. The software measures system response, logs information to a database, and generates the response curves. This paper will discuss the instrumentation, software, data collected, and initial results from fielded systems.

  20. Structures of Metalloporphyrin-Oligomer Multianions: Cofacial versus Coplanar Motifs as Resolved by Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brendle, Katrina; Schwarz, Ulrike; Jäger, Patrick; Weis, Patrick; Kappes, Manfred

    2016-11-03

    We have combined ion mobility mass spectrometry with quantum chemical calculations to investigate the gas-phase structures of multiply negatively charged oligomers of meso-tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)metalloporphyrins comprising the divalent metal centers Zn II , Cu II , and Pd II . Sets of candidate structures were obtained by geometry optimizations based on calculations at both the semiempirical PM7 and density functional theory (DFT) levels. The corresponding theoretical cross sections were calculated with the projection approximation and also with the trajectory method. By comparing these collision cross sections with the respective experimental values we were able to assign oligomer structures up to the tetramer. In most cases the cross sections of the lowest energy isomers predicted by theory were found to agree with the measurements to within the experimental uncertainty (2%). Specifically, we find that for a given oligomer size the structures are independent of the metal center but depend strongly on the charge state. Oligomers in low charge states with a correspondingly larger number of sodium counterions tend to form stacked, cofacial structures reminiscent of H-aggregate motifs observed in solution. By contrast, in higher charge states, the stack opens to form coplanar structures.

  1. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Manis Kumar; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-01

    In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H(2)O(2) (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75°C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H(2)O(2) in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1-(1-X)(1/3)=k(c)t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model 'ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles' i.e. 1-3(1-X)(2/3)+2(1-X)=k(c)t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Native Mass Spectrometry, Ion mobility, and Collision-Induced Unfolding Categorize Malaria Antigen/Antibody Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Salinas, Nichole D.; Chen, Edwin; Tolia, Niraj H.; Gross, Michael L.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP) is a promising vaccine candidate for P. vivax malaria. Recently, we reported the epitopes on PvDBP region II (PvDBP-II) for three inhibitory monoclonal antibodies (2D10, 2H2, and 2C6). In this communication, we describe the combination of native mass spectrometry and ion mobility (IM) with collision induced unfolding (CIU) to study the conformation and stabilities of three malarial antigen-antibody complexes. These complexes, when collisionally activated, undergo conformational changes that depend on the location of the epitope. CIU patterns for PvDBP-II in complex with antibody 2D10 and 2H2 are highly similar, indicating comparable binding topology and stability. A different CIU fingerprint is observed for PvDBP-II/2C6, indicating that 2C6 binds to PvDBP-II on an epitope different from 2D10 and 2H2. This work supports the use of CIU as a means of classifying antigen-antibody complexes by their epitope maps in a high throughput screening workflow. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Monitoring Conformational Landscape of Ovine Prion Protein Monomer Using Ion Mobility Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Rest, Guillaume; Rezaei, Human; Halgand, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Prion protein is involved in deadly neurodegenerative diseases. Its pathogenicity is linked to its structural conversion (α-helix to β-strand transition). However, recent studies suggest that prion protein can follow a plurality of conversion pathways, which hints towards different conformers that might coexist in solution. To gain insights on the plasticity of the ovine prion protein (PrP) monomer, wild type (A136, R154, Q171), mutants and deletions of ARQ were studied by traveling wave ion mobility experiments coupled to mass spectrometry. In order to perform the analysis of a large body of data sets, we designed and evaluated the performance of a processing pipeline based on Driftscope peak detection and a homemade script for automated peak assignment, annotation, and quantification on specific multiply charged protein data. Using this approach, we showed that in the gas phase, PrPs are represented by at least three conformer families differing in both charge state distribution and collisional cross-section, in agreement with the work of Hilton et al. (2010). We also showed that this plasticity is borne both by the N- and C-terminal domains. Effect of protein concentration, pH and temperature were also assessed, showing that (1) pH does not affect conformer distributions, (2) protein concentration modifies the conformational landscape of one mutant (I208M) only, and (3) heating leads to other unfolded species and to a modification of the conformer intensity ratios.

  4. Off-line coupling of multidimensional immunoaffinity chromatography and ion mobility spectrometry: A promising partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel; Abad-Fuentes, Antonio; Abad-Somovilla, Antonio; Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A

    2015-12-24

    The extreme specificity of immunoaffinity chromatography (IAC) columns coupled to the high sensitivity of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) measurements makes this combination really useful for rapid, selective, and sensitive determination of a high variety of analytes in different samples. The capabilities of the IAC-IMS coupling have been highlighted under three different scenarios: (i) multiclass residue analysis using a single IAC column, (ii) multiclass residue analysis using stacked IAC columns, and (iii) isomer analysis. In the first case, the determination of three strobilurin fungicides - azoxystrobin, picoxystrobin, and pyraclostrobin - in water and strawberry juice was considered, obtaining limits of quantification (LOQs) from 11 to 63μgL(-1). Recoveries from 96 to 106% for water, and from 67 to 104% for strawberry juice were obtained. In the second case, anilinopyrimidine compounds, including two analytes with similar drift time, were selectively retained in different IAC columns and analyzed after independent elution in commercial wine samples by IMS. LOQ values of 16, 14 and 12μgL(-1) were obtained for pyrimethanil, mepanipyrim, and cyprodinil, respectively. The obtained recoveries for wine samples spiked with 25 and 100μgL(-1) were from 82 to 123%. Additionally, the stacked IAC columns concept was applied to the separation of Z and E isomers of azoxystrobin that were selectively retained in specific IAC columns and quantified by IMS. Recoveries between 91 and 94% were obtained for both isomers in water samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Compaction of polydimethylsiloxane due to nitrogen ion irradiation and its application for creating microlens arrays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagy, G. U. L.; Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Banyasz, I.; Szilasi, S. Z.; Havránek, Vladimír; Voseček, Václav; Huszank, R.; Rajta, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 636, AUG (2017), s. 634-638 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ion microbeam * microprobe * polydimethylsioloxane * microlens Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 1.879, year: 2016

  6. Effects of nitrogen seeding on core ion thermal transport in JET ILW L-mode plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanomi, N.; Mantica, P.; Citrin, J.; Giroud, C.; Lerche, E.; Sozzi, C.; Taylor, D.; Tsalas, M.; Van Eester, D.; JET Contributors,

    2018-01-01

    A set of experiments was carried out in JET ILW (Joint European Torus with ITER-Like Wall) L-mode plasmas in order to study the effects of light impurities on core ion thermal transport. N was puffed into some discharges and its profile was measured by active Charge Exchange diagnostics, while ICRH

  7. Microstructure and properties of nitrogen ion implantation/AlN/CrAlN/MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin duplex coatings on magnesium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Zhiwen [University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China); Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China); Chen, Qiang, E-mail: 2009chenqiang@163.com [Southwest Technique and Engineering Research Institute, Chongqing 400039 (China); Chen, Tian [Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chongqing 400714 (China); Gao, Xu; Yu, Xiaoguang; Song, Hua; Feng, Yongjun [University of Science and Technology Liaoning, Anshan 114051 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The novel nitrogen ion implantation/AlN/CrAlN/MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin duplex coatings are fabricated on the AM60 magnesium alloys. The microstructure, tribological and electrochemical properties of the duplex coatings are characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, nano-indenter, electrochemical corrosion and wear tester. These studies reveal that the MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin coating has a two-phase microstructure crystalline MoS{sub 2} particles embedded in the amorphous phenolic resin matrix. The single-layer MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin enhances the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys, but shows poor wear resistance due to the low substrate's load bearing capacity. The addition of nitrogen ion implantation/AlN/CrAlN interlayer in the MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin/substrate system greatly enhances the substrate's load bearing capacity. The AlN/CrAlN/MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin duplex coating with a high load bearing capacity demonstrates super wear resistance (i.e., long wear life and low friction coefficient). In addition, the nitrogen ion implantation/AlN interlayer greatly depresses the effect of galvanic corrosion because its potential is close to that of the magnesium alloys, but the nitrogen ion implantation/AlN/CrAlN interlayer is inefficient in reducing the galvanic corrosion due to the large potential difference between the CrN phase and the substrate. As a result, the nitrogen ion implantation/AlN/MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin duplex coating shows a better corrosion resistance compared to the nitrogen ion implantation/AlN/CrAlN/MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin. - Highlights: • Ion implantation/AlN/CrAlN/MoS{sub 2}-phenolic resin duplex coatings were presented. • Ion implantation/AlN/CrAlN interlayer greatly enhanced the load bearing capacity. • Ion implantation/AlN interlayer greatly depressed the effect of galvanic corrosion. • The

  8. Coupling Front-End Separations, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry For Enhanced Multidimensional Biological and Environmental Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Wojcik, Roza; Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin S.

    2017-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used analytical technique for rapid molecular separations in the gas phase. Though IMS alone is useful, its coupling with mass spectrometry (MS) and front-end separations is extremely beneficial for increasing measurement sensitivity, peak capacity of complex mixtures, and the scope of molecular information available from biological and environmental sample analyses. In fact, multiple disease screening and environmental evaluations have illustrated that the IMS-based multidimensional separations extract information that cannot be acquired with each technique individually. This review highlights three-dimensional separations using IMS-MS in conjunction with a range of front-end techniques, such as gas chromatography, supercritical fluid chromatography, liquid chromatography, solid-phase extractions, capillary electrophoresis, field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry, and microfluidic devices. The origination, current state, various applications, and future capabilities of these multidimensional approaches are described in detail to provide insight into their uses and benefits. PMID:28301728

  9. Coupling Front-End Separations, Ion Mobility Spectrometry, and Mass Spectrometry For Enhanced Multidimensional Biological and Environmental Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Wojcik, Roza; Zhang, Xing; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin M.

    2017-06-12

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a widely used analytical technique for rapid molecular separations in the gas phase. IMS alone is useful, but its coupling with mass spectrometry (MS) and front-end separations has been extremely beneficial for increasing measurement sensitivity, peak capacity of complex mixtures, and the scope of molecular information in biological and environmental sample analyses. Multiple studies in disease screening and environmental evaluations have even shown these IMS-based multidimensional separations extract information not possible with each technique individually. This review highlights 3-dimensional separations using IMS-MS in conjunction with a range of front-end techniques, such as gas chromatography (GC), supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), liquid chromatography (LC), solid phase extractions (SPE), capillary electrophoresis (CE), field asymmetric ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), and microfluidic devices. The origination, current state, various applications, and future capabilities for these multidimensional approaches are described to provide insight into the utility and potential of each technique.

  10. Separation of Opiate Isomers Using Electrospray Ionization and Paper Spray Coupled to High-Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manicke, Nicholas E.; Belford, Michael

    2015-05-01

    One limitation in the growing field of ambient or direct analysis methods is reduced selectivity caused by the elimination of chromatographic separations prior to mass spectrometric analysis. We explored the use of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), an ambient pressure ion mobility technique, to separate the closely related opiate isomers of morphine, hydromorphone, and norcodeine. These isomers cannot be distinguished by tandem mass spectrometry. Separation prior to MS analysis is, therefore, required to distinguish these compounds, which are important in clinical chemistry and toxicology. FAIMS was coupled to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, and ionization was performed using either a pneumatically assisted heated electrospray ionization source (H-ESI) or paper spray, a direct analysis method that has been applied to the direct analysis of dried blood spots and other complex samples. We found that FAIMS was capable of separating the three opiate structural isomers using both H-ESI and paper spray as the ionization source.

  11. Tribological studies of nitrogen ion implantation induced overlayer coatings of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, N.; Srivastava, S.K.; Pandian, R.; Bahuguna, Ashok; Dhara, S.; Nair, K.G.M.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Composite phase of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase is observed on the N + ion implanted surface of steel. ► Advanced properties of implanted surface shows low friction coefficient of ∼0.05. ► High wear resistance 4.3 × 10 −8 mm 3 /Nm of N + implanted surface is obtained. -- Abstract: Morphology and microstructure of N + ion implanted 316 LN steel are found to modify with irradiated substrate temperature. At low temperature of 100 °C, self-similar micro-ripples are formed but at high temperature of 200 and 300 °C, micro-pores and blisters are observed on the implanted surface. Chemically modified surface is found to consist of amorphous carbon and carbonitride phase. Such composite characteristic of implanted steel surface at irradiated substrate temperature of 300 °C shows improved tribological properties with low friction coefficient and high wear resistance

  12. Improvement of Vitamin K2 Production by Escherichia sp. with Nitrogen Ion Beam Implantation Induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Wang Li; Zheng Zhiming; Wang Peng; Zhao Genhai; Liu Hui; Gong Guohong; Wu Hefang; Liu Hongxia; Tan Mu; Li Zhemin

    2015-01-01

    Low-energy ion implantation as a novel mutagen has been increasingly applied in the microbial mutagenesis for its higher mutation frequency and wider mutation spectra. In this work, N + ion beam implantation was used to enhance Escherichia sp. in vitamin K 2 yield. Optimization of process parameters under submerged fermentation was carried out to improve the vitamin K 2 yield of mutant FM5-632. The results indicate that an excellent mutant FM5-632 with a yield of 123.2±1.6 μg/L, that is four times that of the original strain, was achieved by eight successive implantations under the conditions of 15 keV and 60×2.6×10 13 ions/cm 2 . A further optimization increased the yield of the mutant by 39.7%, i.e. 172.1±1.2 μg/L which occurred in the mutant cultivated in the optimal fermentation culture medium composed of (per liter): 15.31 g glycerol, 10 g peptone, 2.89 g yeast extract, 5 g K 2 HPO 4 , 1 g NaCl, 0.5 g MgSO 4 ·7H 2 O and 0.04 g cedar wood oil, incubated at 33 °C, pH 7.0 and 180 rpm for 120 h. (plasma technology)

  13. Improvement of Vitamin K2 Production by Escherichia sp. with Nitrogen Ion Beam Implantation Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Li; Zheng, Zhiming; Wang, Peng; Zhao, Genhai; Liu, Hui; Gong, Guohong; Wu, Hefang; Liu, Hongxia; Tan, Mu; Li, Zhemin

    2015-02-01

    Low-energy ion implantation as a novel mutagen has been increasingly applied in the microbial mutagenesis for its higher mutation frequency and wider mutation spectra. In this work, N+ ion beam implantation was used to enhance Escherichia sp. in vitamin K2 yield. Optimization of process parameters under submerged fermentation was carried out to improve the vitamin K2 yield of mutant FM5-632. The results indicate that an excellent mutant FM5-632 with a yield of 123.2±1.6 μg/L, that is four times that of the original strain, was achieved by eight successive implantations under the conditions of 15 keV and 60×2.6×1013 ions/cm2. A further optimization increased the yield of the mutant by 39.7%, i.e. 172.1±1.2 μg/L which occurred in the mutant cultivated in the optimal fermentation culture medium composed of (per liter): 15.31 g glycerol, 10 g peptone, 2.89 g yeast extract, 5 g K2HPO4, 1 g NaCl, 0.5 g MgSO4·7H2O and 0.04 g cedar wood oil, incubated at 33 °C, pH 7.0 and 180 rpm for 120 h.

  14. Fast vaporization solid phase microextraction and ion mobility spectrometry: A new approach for determination of creatinine in biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mostafa; Ebrahimzadeh, Homeira; Banitaba, Mohamma Hossein

    2015-11-01

    In this work a rapid and simple method for creatinine determination in urine and plasma samples based on aqueous derivatization of creatinine and complete vaporization of sample (as low as 10 µL), followed by ion mobility spectrometry analysis has been proposed. The effect of four important parameters (extraction temperature, total volume of solution, desorption temperature and extraction time) on ion mobility signal has been studied. Under the optimized conditions, the quantitative response of ion mobility spectrometry for creatinine was linear in the range of 0-500 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.6 mg L(-1) in urine and 0-250 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 2.6 mg L(-1) in plasma sample. The limit of quantitation of creatinine was 2.1 mg L(-1) and 8.7 mg L(-1) in urine and plasma samples, respectively. The relative standard deviation of the method was found to be 13%. The method was successfully applied to the analysis of creatinine in biological samples, showing recoveries from 92% to 104% in urine and 101-110% in plasma samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry: a potential screening system to differentiate virgin olive oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Delgado, Rocío; Arce, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    The potential of a headspace device coupled to multi-capillary column-ion mobility spectrometry has been studied as a screening system to differentiate virgin olive oils ("lampante," "virgin," and "extra virgin" olive oil). The last two types are virgin olive oil samples of very similar characteristics, which were very difficult to distinguish with the existing analytical method. The procedure involves the direct introduction of the virgin olive oil sample into a vial, headspace generation, and automatic injection of the volatiles into a gas chromatograph-ion mobility spectrometer. The data obtained after the analysis by duplicate of 98 samples of three different categories of virgin olive oils, were preprocessed and submitted to a detailed chemometric treatment to classify the virgin olive oil samples according to their sensory quality. The same virgin olive oil samples were also analyzed by an expert's panel to establish their category and use these data as reference values to check the potential of this new screening system. This comparison confirms the potential of the results presented here. The model was able to classify 97% of virgin olive oil samples in their corresponding group. Finally, the chemometric method was validated obtaining a percentage of prediction of 87%. These results provide promising perspectives for the use of ion mobility spectrometry to differentiate virgin olive oil samples according to their quality instead of using the classical analytical procedure.

  16. Ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) for on- and offline analysis of atmospheric gas and aerosol species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, Jordan E.; Groessl, Michael; Zhang, Xuan; Junninen, Heikki; Massoli, Paola; Lambe, Andrew T.; Kimmel, Joel R.; Cubison, Michael J.; Graf, Stephan; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Budisulistiorini, Sri H.; Zhang, Haofei; Surratt, Jason D.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis; Canagaratna, Manjula R.

    2016-07-01

    Measurement techniques that provide molecular-level information are needed to elucidate the multiphase processes that produce secondary organic aerosol (SOA) species in the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate the application of ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to the simultaneous characterization of the elemental composition and molecular structures of organic species in the gas and particulate phases. Molecular ions of gas-phase organic species are measured online with IMS-MS after ionization with a custom-built nitrate chemical ionization (CI) source. This CI-IMS-MS technique is used to obtain time-resolved measurements (5 min) of highly oxidized organic molecules during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) ambient field campaign in the forested SE US. The ambient IMS-MS signals are consistent with laboratory IMS-MS spectra obtained from single-component carboxylic acids and multicomponent mixtures of isoprene and monoterpene oxidation products. Mass-mobility correlations in the 2-D IMS-MS space provide a means of identifying ions with similar molecular structures within complex mass spectra and are used to separate and identify monoterpene oxidation products in the ambient data that are produced from different chemical pathways. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constituents of fine aerosol particles that are not resolvable with standard analytical separation methods, such as liquid chromatography (LC), are shown to be separable with IMS-MS coupled to an electrospray ionization (ESI) source. The capability to use ion mobility to differentiate between isomers is demonstrated for organosulfates derived from the reactive uptake of isomers of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) onto wet acidic sulfate aerosol. Controlled fragmentation of precursor ions by collisionally induced dissociation (CID) in the transfer region between the IMS and the MS is used to validate MS peak assignments, elucidate structures of oligomers, and confirm the

  17. Recovery of lithium and cobalt from waste lithium ion batteries of mobile phone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Manis Kumar, E-mail: mkjha@nmlindia.org; Kumari, Anjan; Jha, Amrita Kumari; Kumar, Vinay; Hait, Jhumki; Pandey, Banshi Dhar

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Recovery of valuable metals from scrap batteries of mobile phone. - Highlights: • Recovery of Co and Li from spent LIBs was performed by hydrometallurgical route. • Under the optimum condition, 99.1% of lithium and 70.0% of cobalt were leached. • The mechanism of the dissolution of lithium and cobalt was studied. • Activation energy for lithium and cobalt were found to be 32.4 kJ/mol and 59.81 kJ/mol, respectively. • After metal recovery, residue was washed before disposal to the environment. - Abstract: In view of the stringent environmental regulations, availability of limited natural resources and ever increasing need of alternative energy critical elements, an environmental eco-friendly leaching process is reported for the recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials of spent lithium-ion batteries of mobile phones. The experiments were carried out to optimize the process parameters for the recovery of lithium and cobalt by varying the concentration of leachant, pulp density, reductant volume and temperature. Leaching with 2 M sulfuric acid with the addition of 5% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (v/v) at a pulp density of 100 g/L and 75 °C resulted in the recovery of 99.1% lithium and 70.0% cobalt in 60 min. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in sulfuric acid solution acts as an effective reducing agent, which enhance the percentage leaching of metals. Leaching kinetics of lithium in sulfuric acid fitted well to the chemical controlled reaction model i.e. 1 − (1 − X){sup 1/3} = k{sub c}t. Leaching kinetics of cobalt fitted well to the model ‘ash diffusion control dense constant sizes spherical particles’ i.e. 1 − 3(1 − X){sup 2/3} + 2(1 − X) = k{sub c}t. Metals could subsequently be separated selectively from the leach liquor by solvent extraction process to produce their salts by crystallization process from the purified solution.

  18. Protective Sliding Carbon-Based Nanolayers Prepared by Argon or Nitrogen Ion-Beam Assisted Deposition on Ti6Al4V Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vlcak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and the surface properties of samples coated by carbon-based nanolayer were investigated in an effort to increase the surface hardness and reduce the coefficient of friction of the Ti6Al4V alloy. Protective carbon-based nanolayers were fabricated by argon or nitrogen ion-beam assisted deposition at ion energy of 700 eV on Ti6Al4V substrates. The Raman spectra indicated that nanolayers had a diamond-like carbon character with sp2 rich bonds. The TiC and TiN compounds formed in the surface area were detected by X-ray diffraction. Nanoscratch tests showed increased adhesion of a carbon-based nanolayer deposited with ion assistance in comparison with a carbon nanolayer deposited without ion assistance. The results showed that argon ion assistance leads to greater nanohardness than a sample coated by a carbon-based nanolayer with nitrogen ion assistance. A more than twofold increase in nanohardness and a more than fivefold decrease in the coefficient of friction were obtained for samples coated by a carbon-based nanolayer with ion assistance, in comparison with the reference sample.

  19. Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Separations Utilizing Traveling Waves in a 13 m Serpentine Path Length Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Liulin; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Hamid, Ahmed M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Webb, Ian K.; Zheng, Xueyun; Prost, Spencer A.; Sandoval, Jeremy A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-09-20

    We report the development and initial evaluation of a 13-m path length Structures for Lossless Manipulations (SLIM) module for achieving high resolution separations using traveling waves (TW) with ion mobility (IM) spectrometry. The TW SLIM module was fabricated using two mirror-image printed circuit boards with appropriately configured RF, DC and TW electrodes and positioned with a 2.75-mm inter-surface gap. Ions were effective confined between the surfaces by RF-generated pseudopotential fields and moved losslessly through a serpentine path including 44 “U” turns using TWs. The ion mobility resolution was characterized at different pressures, gaps between the SLIM surfaces, TW and RF parameters. After initial optimization the SLIM IM-MS module provided about 5-fold higher resolution separations than present commercially available drift tube or traveling wave IM-MS platforms. Peak capacity and peak generation rates achieved were 246 and 370 s-1, respectively, at a TW speed of 148 m/s. The high resolution achieved in the TW SLIM IM-MS enabled e.g., isomeric sugars (Lacto-N-fucopentaose I and Lacto-N-fucopentaose II) to be baseline resolved, and peptides from a albumin tryptic digest much better resolved than with existing commercial IM-MS platforms. The present work also provides a foundation for the development of much higher resolution SLIM devices based upon both considerably longer path lengths and multi-pass designs.

  20. Annealing of TiO2 Films Deposited on Si by Irradiating Nitrogen Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Katsuhiro; Yano, Yoshinori; Miyashita, Fumiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Thin TiO2 films were deposited on Si at a temperature of 600 deg. C by an ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) method. The TiO2 films were annealed for 30 min in Ar at temperatures below 700 deg. C. The as-deposited TiO2 films had high permittivities such 200 εo and consisted of crystallites that were not preferentially oriented to the c-axis but had an expanded c-axis. On the annealed TiO2 films, permittivities became lower with increasing annealing temperature, and crystallites were oriented preferentially to the (110) plane

  1. Study on breeding of daptomycin-producing strains by nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jian; Liu Ying; Fang Dongsheng; Jiang Hong; Zhang Yin; Gao Wuyan

    2008-01-01

    Streptomyces roseosporus C20, the bacteria used in production of daptomycin, were implanted with (15-200)x10 13 /cm 2 of 20keV N + ions. Survival rate of the bacteria at different absorbed doses was investigated, and mutagenic effects of the microbe were studied. After breeding under the selection pressure of resistance to streptomycin (the lethal concentration is 1.2μg/mL), several mutant strains with higher yields of daptomycin have been obtained. One of mutant strains, N3-36, can increase up to 126% compared to the original strain. It also shows that the mutant strains have high genetic stability. (authors)

  2. Breeding L(+)-lactic acid high productive mutant from xylose by nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingge; Li Wen; Liu Dan; Fan Yonghong; Wang Dongmei; Zheng Zhiming; Yu Zengliang

    2007-01-01

    In order to obtain higher L(+)-lactic acid yield strain fermentating from xylose, the original strain Rhizopus oryzae RLC41-6 was mutated by 10keV N + ion implantation. A mutant strain RQ4012 was obtained. After 72h shake-flask cultivation, the concentration of L(+)-lactic acid reached 74.37g/L, and the productivity was 1.03g/(L.h). Its lactic acid yield was 160% higher than that of the original one, and the mutant strain has high genetic stability. (authors)

  3. Towards an automatic lab-on-valve-ion mobility spectrometric system for detection of cocaine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocovi-Solberg, David J; Esteve-Turrillas, Francesc A; Armenta, Sergio; de la Guardia, Miguel; Miró, Manuel

    2017-08-25

    A lab-on-valve miniaturized system integrating on-line disposable micro-solid phase extraction has been interfaced with ion mobility spectrometry for the accurate and sensitive determination of cocaine and ecgonine methyl ester in oral fluids. The method is based on the automatic loading of 500μL of oral fluid along with the retention of target analytes and matrix clean-up by mixed-mode cationic/reversed-phase solid phase beads, followed by elution with 100μL of 2-propanol containing (3% v/v) ammonia, which are online injected into the IMS. The sorptive particles are automatically discarded after every individual assay inasmuch as the sorptive capacity of the sorbent material is proven to be dramatically deteriorated with reuse. The method provided a limit of detection of 0.3 and 0.14μgL -1 for cocaine and ecgonine methyl ester, respectively, with relative standard deviation values from 8 till 14% with a total analysis time per sample of 7.5min. Method trueness was evaluated by analyzing oral fluid samples spiked with cocaine at different concentration levels (1, 5 and 25μgL -1 ) affording relative recoveries within the range of 85±24%. Fifteen saliva samples were collected from volunteers and analysed following the proposed automatic procedure, showing a 40% cocaine occurrence with concentrations ranging from 1.3 to 97μgL -1 . Field saliva samples were also analysed by reference methods based on lateral flow immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The application of this procedure to the control of oral fluids of cocaine consumers represents a step forward towards the development of a point-of-care cocaine abuse sensing system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Exhaled breath analysis for lung cancer detection using ion mobility spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Handa

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for lung cancer detection including computed tomography (CT and bronchoscopy are expensive and invasive. Thus, there is still a need for an optimal lung cancer detection technique.The exhaled breath of 50 patients with lung cancer histologically proven by bronchoscopic biopsy samples (32 adenocarcinomas, 10 squamous cell carcinomas, 8 small cell carcinomas, were analyzed using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS and compared with 39 healthy volunteers. As a secondary assessment, we compared adenocarcinoma patients with and without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation.A decision tree algorithm could separate patients with lung cancer including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. One hundred-fifteen separated volatile organic compound (VOC peaks were analyzed. Peak-2 noted as n-Dodecane using the IMS database was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 70.0% and a specificity of 89.7%. Incorporating a decision tree algorithm starting with n-Dodecane, a sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 100% was achieved. Comparing VOC peaks between adenocarcinoma and healthy subjects, n-Dodecane was able to separate values with a sensitivity of 81.3% and a specificity of 89.7%. Fourteen patients positive for EGFR mutation displayed a significantly higher n-Dodecane than for the 14 patients negative for EGFR (p<0.01, with a sensitivity of 85.7% and a specificity of 78.6%.In this prospective study, VOC peak patterns using a decision tree algorithm were useful in the detection of lung cancer. Moreover, n-Dodecane analysis from adenocarcinoma patients might be useful to discriminate the EGFR mutation.

  5. Optimization of curved drift tubes for ultraviolet-ion mobility spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kai; Ou, Guangli; Zhang, Xiaoguo; Yu, Zhou; Yu, Quan; Qian, Xiang; Wang, Xiaohao

    2015-08-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a key trace detection technique for toxic pollutants and explosives in the atmosphere. Ultraviolet radiation photoionization source is widely used as an ionization source for IMS due to its advantages of high selectivity and non-radioactivity. However, UV-IMS bring problems that UV rays will be launched into the drift tube which will cause secondary ionization and lead to the photoelectric effect of the Faraday disk. So air is often used as working gas to reduce the effective distance of UV rays, but it will limit the application areas of UV-IMS. In this paper, we propose a new structure of curved drift tube, which can avoid abnormally incident UV rays. Furthermore, using curved drift tube may increase the length of drift tube and then improve the resolution of UV-IMS according to previous research. We studied the homogeneity of electric field in the curved drift tube, which determined the performance of UV-IMS. Numerical simulation of electric field in curved drift tube was conducted by SIMION in our study. In addition, modeling method and homogeneity standard for electric field were also presented. The influences of key parameters include radius of gyration, gap between electrode as well as inner diameter of curved drift tube, on the homogeneity of electric field were researched and some useful laws were summarized. Finally, an optimized curved drift tube is designed to achieve homogenous drift electric field. There is more than 98.75% of the region inside the curved drift tube where the fluctuation of the electric field strength along the radial direction is less than 0.2% of that along the axial direction.

  6. Peak detection method evaluation for ion mobility spectrometry by using machine learning approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Kopczynski, Dominik; D'Addario, Marianna; Baumbach, Jörg Ingo; Rahmann, Sven; Baumbach, Jan

    2013-04-16

    Ion mobility spectrometry with pre-separation by multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS) has become an established inexpensive, non-invasive bioanalytics technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with various metabolomics applications in medical research. To pave the way for this technology towards daily usage in medical practice, different steps still have to be taken. With respect to modern biomarker research, one of the most important tasks is the automatic classification of patient-specific data sets into different groups, healthy or not, for instance. Although sophisticated machine learning methods exist, an inevitable preprocessing step is reliable and robust peak detection without manual intervention. In this work we evaluate four state-of-the-art approaches for automated IMS-based peak detection: local maxima search, watershed transformation with IPHEx, region-merging with VisualNow, and peak model estimation (PME).We manually generated Metabolites 2013, 3 278 a gold standard with the aid of a domain expert (manual) and compare the performance of the four peak calling methods with respect to two distinct criteria. We first utilize established machine learning methods and systematically study their classification performance based on the four peak detectors' results. Second, we investigate the classification variance and robustness regarding perturbation and overfitting. Our main finding is that the power of the classification accuracy is almost equally good for all methods, the manually created gold standard as well as the four automatic peak finding methods. In addition, we note that all tools, manual and automatic, are similarly robust against perturbations. However, the classification performance is more robust against overfitting when using the PME as peak calling preprocessor. In summary, we conclude that all methods, though small differences exist, are largely reliable and enable a wide spectrum of real-world biomedical applications.

  7. Laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry with ion mobility separation reveals metabolites in the symbiotic interactions of soybean roots and rhizobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stopka, Sylwia A.; Agtuca, Beverly J.; Koppenaal, David W.; Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana; Stacey, Gary; Vertes, Akos; Anderton, Christopher R.

    2017-05-23

    Technologies enabling in situ metabolic profiling of living plant systems are invaluable for understanding physiological processes and could be used for rapid phenotypic screening (e.g., to produce plants with superior biological nitrogen fixing ability). The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria results in a specialized plant organ (i.e., root nodule), where the exchange of nutrients between host and endosymbiont occurs. Laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) is a method that can be performed under ambient conditions requiring minimal sample preparation. Here, we employed LAESI-MS to explore the well-characterized symbiosis between soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) and its compatible symbiont, Bradyrhizobium japonicum. The utilization of ion mobility separation (IMS) improved the molecular coverage, selectivity, and identification of the detected biomolecules. Specifically, incorporation of IMS resulted in an increase of 153 detected metabolites in the nodule samples. The data presented demonstrates the advantages of using LAESI-IMS-MS for the rapid analysis of intact root nodules, uninfected root segments, and free-living rhizobia. Untargeted pathway analysis revealed several metabolic processes within the nodule (e.g., zeatin, riboflavin, and purine synthesis). Compounds specific to the uninfected root and bacteria were also detected. Lastly, we performed depth-profiling of intact nodules to reveal the location of metabolites to the cortex and inside the infected region, and lateral profiling of sectioned nodules confirmed these molecular distributions. Our results established the feasibility of LAESI-IMS-MS for the analysis and spatial mapping of plant tissues, with its specific demonstration to improve our understanding of the soybean-rhizobial symbiosis.

  8. Effects of nitrogen ion irradiation on endoglucanase activity and gene mutation of Bacillus subtilis Bac01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Jie; Mao Peihong; Jin Xiang; Yu Long; Ying Hanjie

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis Bac01 was mutated by 15 keV N + ions of 1.5xl0 16 cm -2 . The mutant strain Bac11 with high yield of endoglucanase was isolated using carboxymethylcellulose sodium and congo red indicative plates. It exhibited higher endoglucanase activity (381.89IU) than the original strain Bac01 (93.33IU). Two 1,500 bp endoglucanase gene fragments were obtained with PCR amplification from B. subtilis Bac01 and mutant strain Bac11. BLAST comparison result indicated that 10 nucleotides mutated. Bioinformatics methods were used to analyze the two predicted amino acid sequences, and it was found that 5 amino acid residues changed, being all in the cellulose-binding domain of endoglucanase. (authors)

  9. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alinat, Elodie; Delaunay, Nathalie; Archer, Xavier; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Gareil, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • New insights into the nitrocellulose alkaline denitration mechanism. • Linear correlation for molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions and nitrogen content. • Capillary electrophoresis monitoring of nitrite and nitrate ions. • Applications to explosive and non-explosive nitrocellulose-containing samples. • Improved performances (including safety) over classical methods. - Abstract: A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1 h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1 M sodium hydroxide for 1 h at 60 °C)

  10. A new method for the determination of the nitrogen content of nitrocellulose based on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alinat, Elodie, E-mail: elodie.alinat@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech, Laboratory of Physicochemistry of Electrolytes, Colloids and Analytical Sciences (PECSA), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Central Laboratory of Police Prefecture (LCPP), 39 bis rue de Dantzig, 75015 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7195 PECSA, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Delaunay, Nathalie, E-mail: nathalie.delaunay@espci.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech, Laboratory of Physicochemistry of Electrolytes, Colloids and Analytical Sciences (PECSA), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7195 PECSA, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Archer, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.archer@interieur.gouv.fr [Central Laboratory of Police Prefecture (LCPP), 39 bis rue de Dantzig, 75015 Paris (France); Mallet, Jean-Maurice, E-mail: jean-maurice.mallet@es.fr [École Normale Supérieure-PSL Research University, Département de Chimie, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7203 LBM, F-75005 Paris (France); Gareil, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.gareil@chimie-paristech.fr [PSL Research University, Chimie ParisTech, Laboratory of Physicochemistry of Electrolytes, Colloids and Analytical Sciences (PECSA), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7195 PECSA, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, LBM, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • New insights into the nitrocellulose alkaline denitration mechanism. • Linear correlation for molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions and nitrogen content. • Capillary electrophoresis monitoring of nitrite and nitrate ions. • Applications to explosive and non-explosive nitrocellulose-containing samples. • Improved performances (including safety) over classical methods. - Abstract: A new method was proposed to determine the nitrogen content of nitrocelluloses (NCs). It is based on the finding of a linear relationship between the nitrogen content and the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions released after alkaline hydrolysis. Capillary electrophoresis was used to monitor the concentration of nitrite and nitrate ions. The influences of hydrolysis time and molar mass of NC on the molar ratio of nitrite-to-nitrate ions were investigated, and new insights into the understanding of the alkaline denitration mechanism of NCs, underlying this analytical strategy is provided. The method was then tested successfully with various explosive and non-explosive NC-containing samples such as various daily products and smokeless gunpowders. Inherently to its principle exploiting a concentration ratio, this method shows very good repeatability in the determination of nitrogen content in real samples with relative standard deviation (n = 3) inferior to 1.5%, and also provides very significant advantages with respect to sample extraction, analysis time (1 h for alkaline hydrolysis, 3 min for electrophoretic separation), which was about 5 times shorter than for the classical Devarda's method, currently used in industry, and safety conditions (no need for preliminary drying NC samples, mild hydrolysis conditions with 1 M sodium hydroxide for 1 h at 60 °C)

  11. Mobility of ions trapped on vortex lines in pure 4He and 3He--4He solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostermeier, R.M.; Glaberson, W.I.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the mobility of positive and negative ions trapped on vortex lines in pure 4 He and dilute 3 He-- 4 He solutions over the temperature range 1.6 greater than T greater than 0.3 K. In pure 4 He below about 0.7 K, several new effects not seen at higher temperatures are observed and are not easily explained with existing theories. Most notable are an enhanced broadening of the ion pulse and a rapid increase in the mobility with decreasing temperature. Measurements of the electric field dependence of the drift velocity in pure 4 He at low temperatures show a limiting velocity for sufficiently large fields. This behavior can be explained using a simple resonance theory. The inverse mobility data for solutions show sharp increases at certain critical temperatures, which are interpreted as being associated with the condensation of 3 He atoms onto the vortex cores. The dependence of the critical temperature on the bulk 3 He concentration is found to be in good agreement with a simple condensation theory. An extension of arguments used in this theory to lower temperatures leads to the picture of a 3 He-rich core growing with decreasing temperature, consistent with our lower temperature experimental data

  12. Selectivity improvement of positive photoionization ion mobility spectrometry for rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticides by switching dopant concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Jia; Wang, Bin; Wang, Shuang; Li, Haiyang; Chen, Jinyuan

    2018-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) opened a potential avenue for the rapid detection of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), though an improved selectivity of stand-alone IMS was still in high demand. In this study, a stand-alone positive photoionization ion mobility spectrometry (PP-IMS) apparatus was constructed for the rapid detection of OPPs with acetone as dopant. The photoionization of acetone molecules was induced by the ultraviolet irradiation to produce the reactant ions (Ac) 2 H + , which were employed to ionize the OPPs including fenthion, imidan, phosphamidon, dursban, dimethoate and isocarbophos via the proton transfer reaction. Due to the difference in proton affinity, the tested OPPs exhibited the different dopant-dependent manners. Based on this observation, the switching of dopant concentration was implemented to improve the selectivity of PP-IMS for OPPs detection. For instance, a mixture of fenthion, dursban and dimethoate was tested. By switching the concentration of doped acetone from 0.07 to 2.33 to 19.94mgL -1 , the ion peaks of fenthion and dursban were inhibited in succession, achieving the selective detection of dimethoate at last. In addition, another mixture of imidan and phosphamidon was initially detected by PP-IMS with a dose of 0.07mgL -1 acetone, indicating that their ion peaks were severely overlapped; when the concentration of doped acetone was switched to 19.94mgL -1 , the inhibition of imidan signals promised the accurate identification of phosphamidon in mixture. Finally, the PP-IMS in combination of switching dopant concentration was applied to detect the mixed fenthion, dursban and dimethoate in Chinese cabbage, demonstrating the applicability of proposed method to real samples. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Comparison of linear intrascan and interscan dynamic ranges of Orbitrap and ion-mobility time-of-flight mass spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Anton; Walker, Stephan

    2017-11-30

    The linear intrascan and interscan dynamic ranges of mass spectrometers are important in metabolome and residue analysis. A large linear dynamic range is mandatory if both low- and high-abundance ions have to be detected and quantitated in heavy matrix samples. These performance criteria, as provided by modern high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), were systematically investigated. The comparison included two generations of Orbitraps, and an ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) system In addition, different scan modes, as provided by the utilized instruments, were investigated. Calibration curves of different compounds covering a concentration range of five orders of magnitude were measured to evaluate the linear interscan dynamic range. The linear intrascan dynamic range and the resulting mass accuracy were evaluated by repeating these measurements in the presence of a very intense background. Modern HRMS instruments can show linear dynamic ranges of five orders of magnitude. Often, however, the linear dynamic range is limited by the detection capability (sensitivity and selectivity) and by the electrospray ionization. Orbitraps, as opposed to TOF instruments, show a reduced intrascan dynamic range. This is due to the limited C-trap and Orbitrap capacity. The tested TOF instrument shows poorer mass accuracies than the Orbitraps. In contrast, hyphenation with an ion-mobility device seems not to affect the linear dynamic range. The linear dynamic range of modern HRMS instrumentation has been significantly improved. This also refers to the virtual absence of systematic mass shifts at high ion abundances. The intrascan dynamic range of the current Orbitrap technology may still be a limitation when analyzing complex matrix extracts. On the other hand, the linear dynamic range is not only limited by the detector technology, but can also be shortened by peripheral devices, where the ionization and transfer of ions take place. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley

  14. Determining Double Bond Position in Lipids Using Online Ozonolysis Coupled to Liquid Chromatography and Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rachel A; May, Jody C; Stinson, Craig A; Xia, Yu; McLean, John A

    2018-02-06

    The increasing focus on lipid metabolism has revealed a need for analytical techniques capable of structurally characterizing lipids with a high degree of specificity. Lipids can exist as any one of a large number of double bond positional isomers, which are indistinguishable by single-stage mass spectrometry alone. Ozonolysis reactions coupled to mass spectrometry have previously been demonstrated as a means for localizing double bonds in unsaturated lipids. Here we describe an online, solution-phase reactor using ozone produced via a low-pressure mercury lamp, which generates aldehyde products diagnostic of cleavage at a particular double bond position. This flow-cell device is utilized in conjunction with structurally selective ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The lamp-mediated reaction was found to be effective for multiple lipid species in both positive and negative ionization modes, and the conversion efficiency from precursor to product ions was tunable across a wide range (20-95%) by varying the flow rate through the ozonolysis device. Ion mobility separation of the ozonolysis products generated additional structural information and revealed the presence of saturated species in a complex mixture. The method presented here is simple, robust, and readily coupled to existing instrument platforms with minimal modifications necessary. For these reasons, application to standard lipidomic workflows is possible and aids in more comprehensive structural characterization of a myriad of lipid species.

  15. Nitrogen doped graphene - Silver nanowire hybrids: An excellent anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Anju K.; Elizabeth, Indu; S, Gopukumar; Thomas, Sabu; M. S, Kala; Kalarikkal, Nandakumar

    2018-01-01

    We present an in-situ polyol assisted synthesis approach for the preparation of silver nanowires (AgNW) over the nitrogen doped graphene (NG) sheets and has been tested as a viable LIBs anode material for the first time. The use of NG serves as nucleation sites, thereby facilitating the growth of AgNWs. The specific material design of the as-prepared NG-AgNW hybrids involves some advantages, including a continuous AgNW-graphene conducting network. Since AgNWs are electrically conductive, it provides an electrical contact with NG sheets which can effectively help the charge transport process and limit the variations in volume during the lithiation/de-lithiation processes. Apart from this, the insertion of metallic Ag nanowires into a percolated NG network increases the interlayer distance of NG sheets and prevent its restacking. Moreover, the more porous nature of the hybrid structure accommodating the large volume changes of AgNWs. As an anode material for LIBs, the NG-AgNW hybrid displays a remarkable initial discharge capacity of 1215 mAh g-1 and attains a stable capacity of 724 mAh g-1 at a current density of 100 mA g-1 after 50 cycles. The electrode exhibits a stable reversible capacity of 714, 634, 550 and 464 mA h g-1 at 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 Ag-1 respectively. The reversible capacity (710 mAh g-1) at 0.1 Ag-1 is recovered after the cycling at various current densities confirming outstanding rate performance of the material. In addition, the coulombic efficiency, the NG-AgNW anode retains nearly 99% after the second cycle, further indicating its excellent reversibility. The hybrid material exhibits better cycling stability, greater rate capability, capacity retention and superior reversible capacity than that of bare AgNW and NG sheets. Our smart design will pave way for the development of efficient electrode materials for high capacity and long cycle life LIBs.

  16. Antimony Anchored with Nitrogen-Doping Porous Carbon as a High-Performance Anode Material for Na-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianjing; Hou, Hongshuai; Zhang, Chenyang; Ge, Peng; Huang, Zhaodong; Jing, Mingjun; Qiu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Xiaobo

    2017-08-09

    Antimony represents a class of unique functional materials in sodium-ion batteries with high theoretical capacity (660 mA h g -1 ). The utilization of carbonaceous materials as a buffer layer has been considered an effective approach to alleviate rapid capacity fading. Herein, the antimony/nitrogen-doping porous carbon (Sb/NPC) composite with polyaniline nanosheets as a carbon source has been successfully achieved. In addition, our strategy involves three processes, a tunable organic polyreaction, a thermal annealing process, and a cost-effective reduction reaction. The as-prepared Sb/NPC electrode demonstrates a great reversible capacity of 529.6 mA h g -1 and an outstanding cycling stability with 97.2% capacity retention after 100 cycles at 100 mA g -1 . Even at 1600 mA g -1 , a superior rate capacity of 357 mA h g -1 can be retained. Those remarkable electrochemical performances can be ascribed to the introduction of a hierarchical porous NPC material to which tiny Sb nanoparticles of about 30 nm were well-wrapped to buffer volume expansion and improve conductivity.

  17. Hyperthermal (1-100 eV) nitrogen ion scattering damage to D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A

    2007-10-14

    Highly charged heavy ion traversal of a biological medium can produce energetic secondary fragment ions. These fragment ions can in turn cause collisional and reactive scattering damage to DNA. Here we report hyperthermal (1-100 eV) scattering of one such fragment ion (N(+)) from biologically relevant sugar molecules D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose condensed on polycrystalline Pt substrate. The results indicate that N(+) ion scattering at kinetic energies down to 10 eV induces effective decomposition of both sugar molecules and leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. Use of isotope-labeled molecules (5-(13)C D-ribose and 1-D D-ribose) partly reveals some site specificity of the fragment origin. Several scattering reactions are also observed. Both ionic and neutral nitrogen atoms abstract carbon from the molecules to form CN(-) anion at energies down to approximately 5 eV. N(+) ions also abstract hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the molecules to form NH(-) and NH(2) (-) anions. A fraction of OO(-) fragments abstract hydrogen to form OH(-). The formation of H(3)O(+) ions also involves hydrogen abstraction as well as intramolecular proton transfer. These findings suggest a variety of severe damaging pathways to DNA molecules which occur on the picosecond time scale following heavy ion irradiation of a cell, and prior to the late diffusion-limited homogeneous chemical processes.

  18. Measurement of the radial density distribution of the light emissions near the trajectory of fast ions in nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibach, T.

    1983-11-01

    For the analysis of the emission and deceleration mechanisms of ionisation-electrons (delta-electrons) during the passage of fast ions through gases, the radial density distribution of the light emission has been measured, which is related with the (0,0)-transitions of two optical bands in nitrogen. These measurements have been made using a small aperture limited ion beam. The first band under study is the 2. positive system at 337.1 nm excited mainly by low energy electrons around 20 eV, and the second band is the 1. negative system at 391.4 nm excited by fast electrons with simultaneous ionisation. For these measurements an experimental setup has been developed with a telescope-like optical system and interference filters to detect the emitted light with a high spacial resolution (4x10 -4 of profile width) and a high dynamic range (10 6 ). The experiments have been performed using proton beams of different energies between 270 keV and 2.8 MeV, He-3 beams with 270 keV/u and 500 keV/u and a Ne beam with 270 keV/u with gas pressures in the range between 0.133 to 13.3 mbar. Based on the method of Abel inversion the spacial light emission density is deduced from the experimental distance functions and normalized to a gas density of 1 g/cm 3 . The results show that approximately half of the total light emission in the 1. negative system and the ionisation is caused by the primary interaction of the ion beam. For the same energy per nucleon this contribution decreases relative to the contribution of the delta-electrons with increasing atomic number. In addition the delta-radiation becomes harder with increasing atomic number. Good agreement is obtained by comparison with the results of other authors, which are based on probe techniques and Monte-Carlo-calculations. (orig./HP) [de

  19. The role of nitrogen in luminescent Si nanoprecipitate formation during annealing of Si ion-implanted SiO sub 2 layers

    CERN Document Server

    Kachurin, G A; Zhuravlev, K S; Ruault, M O

    2001-01-01

    SiO sub 2 layers were implanted with 25 keV Si sup + and 13 keV N sup + ions with the doses of (1-4) x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 2 and (0.2-2) x 10 sup 1 sup 6 cm sup - sup 2 , respectively. Then the samples were annealed at 900-1100 deg C to form luminescent silicon nanoprecipitates. The nitrogen effect on the process is controlled by photoluminescence spectra. It is found out that the photoluminescence intensity increases considerably at the appropriate ratio between silicon and nitrogen. It has been concluded that the interaction of nitrogen with excessive silicon results in increasing the number of precipitation centers. This raises the nanocrystals number and reduces their mean size

  20. The Effect of Nitrogen Ion Implantation on the Surface Properties of Ti6Al4V Alloy Coated by a Carbon Nanolayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vlcak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD method was chosen for preparing a carbon thin film with a mixing area on a substrate of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy. Nitrogen ions with energy 90 keV were used. These form a broad ion beam mixing area at the interface between the carbon film and the substrate. We investigated the chemical composition by the glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GD-OES method and the phases by the X-ray diffraction (XRD method. The measured concentration profiles indicate the mixing of the carbon film into the substrate, which may have an effect on increasing the adhesion of the deposited film. The nanohardness and the coefficient of friction were measured. We found that the modified samples had a markedly lower coefficient of friction even after damage to the carbon film, and they also had higher nanohardness than the unmodified samples. The increased nanohardness is attributed to the newly created phases that arose with ion implantation of nitrogen ions.

  1. One-pot synthesis of nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene supported MoS2 as high performance anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qiuhong; Wu, Zhenjun; Ma, Zhaoling; Dou, Shuo; Wu, Jianghong; Tao, Li; Wang, Xin; Ouyang, Canbing; Shen, Anli; Wang, Shuangyin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene supported MoS 2 nanosheets were successfully prepared and used as anode materials for Li-ion batteries. • The as-prepared anode materials show excellent stability in Li-ion batteries. • The materials show high reversible capacity for lithium ion batteries. - Abstract: Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene supported MoS 2 (MoS 2 /NS-G) nanosheets were prepared through a one-pot thermal annealing method. The as prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectra and electrochemical techniques. The MoS 2 /NS-G shows high reversible capacity about 1200 mAh/g at current density of 150 mA/g and excellent stability in Li-ion batteries. It was demonstrated the co-doping of graphene by N and S could significantly enhance the durability of MoS 2 as anode materials for Li-ion batteries

  2. Influence of temperature on properties of nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) of Ti6A14V alloy

    CERN Document Server

    Geng Man; Zhao Qing

    2001-01-01

    Specimens of Ti6Al4V alloy were implanted with nitrogen plasma source ion implantation (N-PSII) at temperatures between 100 degree C and 600 degree C to a ion dose of 4 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) was used to determine the nitrogen concentration depth profiles. Microhardness measurements and pin-on-disk wear test were performed to evaluate the improvements of the surface modification. Glancing angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) was employed to determine the phases presented in the surface modified layer. The thickness of implanted layer increased by about an order of magnitude when the temperature was elevated from 100 degree C to 600 degree C. Higher surface hardness and wear resistance was also obtained at higher temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed distinct microstructural changes and the presence of titanium nitrides in the implanted surface

  3. Nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation for surface treatment and wear protection of austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi1810

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blawert, C.; Mordike, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation is an effective surface treatment for stainless steels. The influence of treatment parameters (temperature, plasma density and pressure) on the sliding wear resistance are studied here. At moderate temperatures, nitrogen remains in solid solution without forming nitrides. This increases the surface hardness and the wear resistance without affecting the passivation of the steel. This may allow the use of such steels in applications where their poor wear resistance would normally prohibit their use. (orig.)

  4. Nitrogen implantation into silicon at 700-1100 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachurin, G.A.; Tyschenko, I.E.; Popov, V.P.; Tijs, S.A.; Plotnikov, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    Nitrogen ions 130-140 kW potential accelerated were implanted in silicon heated up to Ti=700-1100 deg C. Densities of ion current were 1-5 mcA/cm 2 , doses did not exceed 5x10 17 cm -2 . Initial stages of nitride formation in buried layers are investigated by means of Rutherford backscattering, layer-by-layer Augerspctroscopy and electron microscopy. It is determind, that Ti growth from 700 up to 900 deg C is accompanied by essential reduction of defectiveness of silicon near-the-surface layer at nitrogen retention within the limits of the calculation profile of ion ranges. At Ti=900 deg C nitrogen is rather mobile and at ∼5x10 16 cm -2 dose it is drown to α-Si 3 N 4 crystalling extraction in R p range. Beginning from Ti ≅1000 deg C nitrogen is not retained in the furied layer and diffuses to the surface. No essenstial losses of nitrogen due to evaporation or inside diffusion are observed. It is noted, that critical Ti, when nitrogen is accumulated in the buried layer, correspond to critical temperatures, when light ions introduce essential structure distortions. Conclusion is made, that irradition-introduced distortions of structure represent centres of initiation and growth of nitride phase. At 1150 deg C additional annaling during 3 hs nitrogen, occurring outside the stable extraction, is redistributed between th surface and furied layers, sintering in narrow concentration peaks

  5. Application of an online ion-chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Walker, John T.

    2016-06-01

    The dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur atmospheric deposition remains uncertain. The lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent make it difficult to develop accurate mass budgets and sufficient process level detail is not available to improve current air-surface exchange models. Over the past decade, significant advances have been made in the development of continuous air sampling measurement techniques, resulting with instruments of sufficient sensitivity and temporal resolution to directly quantify air-surface exchange of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. However, their applicability is generally restricted to only one or a few of the compounds within the deposition budget. Here, the performance of the Monitor for AeRosols and GAses in ambient air (MARGA 2S), a commercially available online ion-chromatography-based analyzer is characterized for the first time as applied for air-surface exchange measurements of HNO3, NH3, NH4+, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-. Analytical accuracy and precision are assessed under field conditions. Chemical concentrations gradient precision are determined at the same sampling site. Flux uncertainty measured by the aerodynamic gradient method is determined for a representative 3-week period in fall 2012 over a grass field. Analytical precision and chemical concentration gradient precision were found to compare favorably in comparison to previous studies. During the 3-week period, percentages of hourly chemical concentration gradients greater than the corresponding chemical concentration gradient detection limit were 86, 42, 82, 73, 74 and 69 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. As expected, percentages were lowest for aerosol species, owing to their relatively low deposition velocities and correspondingly smaller gradients relative to gas phase species. Relative hourly median flux uncertainties were 31, 121, 42, 43, 67 and 56 % for NH3, NH4+, HNO3, NO3-, SO2 and SO42-, respectively. Flux

  6. An introduction to the technique of combined ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry for the analysis of complex biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowall, Mark A.; Bateman, Robert H.; Bajic, Steve; Giles, Kevin; Langridge, Jim; McKenna, Therese; Pringle, Steven D.; Wildgoose, Jason L.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) offers several advantages compared with conventional High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as an 'inlet system' for mass spectrometry. UPLC provides improved chromatographic resolution, increased sensitivity and reduced analysis time. This is achieved through the use of sub 2μm particles (stationary phase) combined with high-pressure solvent delivery (up to 15,000 psi). When coupled with orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (oa-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), UPLC presents a means to achieve high sample throughput with reduced spectral overlap, increased sensitivity, and exact mass measurement capabilities with high mass spectral resolution (Ca 20,000 FWHM). Dispersive ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) implemented within a traveling-wave ion guide provides an orthogonal separation strategy for ions in the gas phase that can resolve isobaric ions formed by either Electrospray of MALDI ionization typically in Ca 20 mille seconds. All three techniques have the potential to be combined on-line (e.g. UPLC-IMS-MS/MS) in real time to maximize peak capacity and resolving power for the analysis of complex biological mixtures including; intact proteins, modified peptides and endogenous/exogenous metabolites

  7. Spatial and temporal small-scale variability of nitrogen mobilization in a forest ecosystem with high N deposition in NW-Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorz, Carsten; Eissner, Christel; Lethmate, Jürgen; Schneider, Birgit

    2010-02-01

    For conifer stands in NW-Germany with high DIN load (23-35 kg N ha(-1) a(-1)) and a long history of nitrogen export the risk of N mobilization were investigated. Ammonium is the most mobilized N species, pointing towards either conditions not favoring nitrification or, more likely - under the dominant aerobic conditions - a very high amount of ammonium in the forest floor. Independence of net nitrification and net ammonification from each other indicates the existence of two separate systems. The nitrifying system depends very much on biotic conditions - as a function of energy and moisture - and seems not to be directly related to N deposition. In contrast, for the ammonification system (Oe horizon) a correlation with the sum of ammonium deposition three months prior to sampling was found. However, the role of disturbance, i.e. nitrogen export, during the last centuries and the role of recovery of the N balance during the last 150 years is still not clear. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Utility of continuum diffusion models for analyzing mobile-ion immittance data: electrode polarization, bulk, and generation-recombination effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macdonald, J Ross, E-mail: macd@email.unc.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3255 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Consequences of the well-known Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) continuum equations of charge motion in liquids or solids for ordinary or anomalous diffusion are investigated for an electrochemical cell with completely blocking electrodes. Previous work is summarized and much of it is shown to be independent of earlier published results and incomplete, with little comparison made between ordinary and anomalous diffusion. Such comparison is provided here and also includes variation of the mobility ratio of the mobilities of positive and negative charges from equality to charge of only one sign mobile. New generation-recombination effects are demonstrated for a range of mobility ratios, with particular attention given to those present for the case of charge of only one sign mobile. No previous analyses of experimental data with PNP models using complex-least-squares fitting have been published. Here such a model is found to fit frequency response data well for a hydrogel and to lead to estimates of physically meaningful parameters such as the diffusion constant and ionic concentration. PNP analysis of a synthetic data set derived from experimental results for liquid electrolytes refutes claims made in the original publication dealing with it, but verifies and extends an interesting analysis equation proposed there. PNP fitting of data for solids, including ones showing colossal low-frequency-limiting dielectric constants, suggests that they may often be well described as arising from simple diffuse-charge double-layer effects, and that continuum microscopic models such as the PNP, in series with a conducting Debye response model, may be sufficient for fitting well an appreciable amount of data involving ion hopping and trapping behavior.

  9. Utility of continuum diffusion models for analyzing mobile-ion immittance data: electrode polarization, bulk, and generation-recombination effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, J Ross

    2010-01-01

    Consequences of the well-known Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) continuum equations of charge motion in liquids or solids for ordinary or anomalous diffusion are investigated for an electrochemical cell with completely blocking electrodes. Previous work is summarized and much of it is shown to be independent of earlier published results and incomplete, with little comparison made between ordinary and anomalous diffusion. Such comparison is provided here and also includes variation of the mobility ratio of the mobilities of positive and negative charges from equality to charge of only one sign mobile. New generation-recombination effects are demonstrated for a range of mobility ratios, with particular attention given to those present for the case of charge of only one sign mobile. No previous analyses of experimental data with PNP models using complex-least-squares fitting have been published. Here such a model is found to fit frequency response data well for a hydrogel and to lead to estimates of physically meaningful parameters such as the diffusion constant and ionic concentration. PNP analysis of a synthetic data set derived from experimental results for liquid electrolytes refutes claims made in the original publication dealing with it, but verifies and extends an interesting analysis equation proposed there. PNP fitting of data for solids, including ones showing colossal low-frequency-limiting dielectric constants, suggests that they may often be well described as arising from simple diffuse-charge double-layer effects, and that continuum microscopic models such as the PNP, in series with a conducting Debye response model, may be sufficient for fitting well an appreciable amount of data involving ion hopping and trapping behavior.

  10. Life-Cycle Cost and Environmental Assessment of Decentralized Nitrogen Recovery Using Ion Exchange from Source-Separated Urine through Spatial Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavvada, Olga; Tarpeh, William A; Horvath, Arpad; Nelson, Kara L

    2017-11-07

    Nitrogen standards for discharge of wastewater effluent into aquatic bodies are becoming more stringent, requiring some treatment plants to reduce effluent nitrogen concentrations. This study aimed to assess, from a life-cycle perspective, an innovative decentralized approach to nitrogen recovery: ion exchange of source-separated urine. We modeled an approach in which nitrogen from urine at individual buildings is sorbed onto resins, then transported by truck to regeneration and fertilizer production facilities. To provide insight into impacts from transportation, we enhanced the traditional economic and environmental assessment approach by combining spatial analysis, system-scale evaluation, and detailed last-mile logistics modeling using the city of San Francisco as an illustrative case study. The major contributor to energy intensity and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions was the production of sulfuric acid to regenerate resins, rather than transportation. Energy and GHG emissions were not significantly sensitive to the number of regeneration facilities. Cost, however, increased with decentralization as rental costs per unit area are higher for smaller areas. The metrics assessed (unit energy, GHG emissions, and cost) were not significantly influenced by facility location in this high-density urban area. We determined that this decentralized approach has lower cost, unit energy, and GHG emissions than centralized nitrogen management via nitrification-denitrification if fertilizer production offsets are taken into account.

  11. High rate capability of TiO{sub 2}/nitrogen-doped graphene nanocomposite as an anode material for lithium–ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Dandan; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Suqing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road, Guangzhou (China); Zhu, Xuefeng; Yang, Weishen [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian (China); Zhang, Shanqing [Centre for Clean Environment and Energy, Environmental Futures Centre and Griffith School of Environment, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, QLD 4222 (Australia); Wang, Haihui, E-mail: hhwang@scut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road, Guangzhou (China)

    2013-06-05

    Highlights: ► TiO{sub 2}/N-doped graphene composite was synthesized by a gas/liquid interfacial method. ► The nanocomposite was used to fabricate lithium-ion batteries. ► Its electrochemical performance was evaluated for the first time. ► The anode material exhibits a good cycling performance and rate capability. -- Abstract: TiO{sub 2}/nitrogen-doped graphene nanocomposite was synthesized by a facile gas/liquid interface reaction. The structure and morphology of the sample were analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results indicate that nitrogen atoms were successfully doped into graphene sheets. The TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (8–13 nm in size) were homogenously anchored on the nitrogen-doped graphene sheets through gas/liquid interface reaction. The as-prepared TiO{sub 2}/nitrogen-doped graphene nanocomposite shows a better electrochemical performance than the TiO{sub 2}/graphene nanocomposite and the bare TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. TiO{sub 2}/nitrogen-doped graphene nanocomposite exhibits excellent cycling stability and shows high capacity of 136 mAh g{sup −1} (at a current density of 1000 mA g{sup −1}) after 80 cycles. More importantly, a high reversible capacity of 109 mAh g{sup −1} can still be obtained even at a super high current density of 5000 mA g{sup −1}. The superior electrochemical performance is attributed to the good electronic conductivity introduced by the nitrogen-doped graphene sheets and the positive synergistic effect between nitrogen-doped graphene sheets and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles.

  12. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization studies of non-polar isomeric hydrocarbons using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different ionization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsdorf, H.; Nazarov, E. G.; Eiceman, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The ionization pathways were determined for sets of isomeric non-polar hydrocarbons (structural isomers, cis/trans isomers) using ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry with different techniques of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization to assess the influence of structural features on ion formation. Depending on the structural features, different ions were observed using mass spectrometry. Unsaturated hydrocarbons formed mostly [M - 1]+ and [(M - 1)2H]+ ions while mainly [M - 3]+ and [(M - 3)H2O]+ ions were found for saturated cis/trans isomers using photoionization and 63Ni ionization. These ionization methods and corona discharge ionization were used for ion mobility measurements of these compounds. Different ions were detected for compounds with different structural features. 63Ni ionization and photoionization provide comparable ions for every set of isomers. The product ions formed can be clearly attributed to the structures identified. However, differences in relative abundance of product ions were found. Although corona discharge ionization permits the most sensitive detection of non-polar hydrocarbons, the spectra detected are complex and differ from those obtained with 63Ni ionization and photoionization. c. 2002 American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

  13. Feasibility of corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry for direct analysis of samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Riahi, Farhad

    2014-05-23

    The capability of corona discharge ionization ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) for direct analysis of the samples extracted by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) was investigated and evaluated, for the first time. To that end, an appropriate new injection port was designed and constructed, resulting in possibility of direct injection of the known sample volume, without tedious sample preparation steps (e.g. derivatization, solvent evaporation, and re-solving in another solvent…). Malathion as a test compound was extracted from different matrices by a rapid and convenient DLLME method. The positive ion mobility spectra of the extracted malathion were obtained after direct injection of carbon tetrachloride or methanol solutions. The analyte responses were compared and the statistical results revealed the feasibility of direct analysis of the extracted samples in carbon tetrachloride, resulting in a convenient methodology. The coupled method of DLLME-CD-IMS was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, recovery, and enrichment factor. Finally, various real samples of apple, river and underground water were analyzed, all verifying the feasibility and success of the proposed method for the easy extraction of the analyte using DLLME separation before the direct analysis by CD-IMS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of ecstasy in oral fluid by ion mobility spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy after liquid-liquid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, Sergio; Garrigues, Salvador; de la Guardia, Miguel; Brassier, Judit; Alcalà, Manel; Blanco, Marcelo

    2015-03-06

    We developed and evaluated two different strategies for determining abuse drugs based on (i) the analysis of saliva by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) after thermal desorption and (ii) the joint use of IMS and infrared (IR) spectroscopy after liquid-liquid microextraction (LLME) to enable the sensitivity-enhanced detection and double confirmation of ecstasy (MDMA) abuse. Both strategies proved effective for the intended purpose. Analysing saliva by IMS after thermal desorption, which provides a limit of detection (LOD) of 160μgL(-1), requires adding 0.2M acetic acid to the sample and using the truncated negative second derivative of the ion mobility spectrum. The joint use of IMS and IR spectroscopy after LLME provides an LOD of 11μgL(-1) with the former technique and 800μgL(-1) with the latter, in addition to a limit of confirmation (LOC) of 1.5mgL(-1). Using IMS after thermal desorption simplifies the operational procedure, and using it jointly with IR spectroscopy after LLME allows double confirmation of MDMA abuse with two techniques based on different principles (viz., IMS drift times and IR spectra). Also, it affords on-site analyses, albeit at a lower throughput. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The anthocyanidin delphinidin mobilizes endogenous copper ions from human lymphocytes leading to oxidative degradation of cellular DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, Sarmad; Shamim, Uzma; Ullah, M.F.; Azmi, Asfar S.; Bhat, Showket H.; Hadi, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental evidence exists to suggest that pomegranate and its juice possess chemopreventive and anticancer properties. The anthocyanidin delphinidin is a major polyphenol present in pomegranates and has been shown to be responsible for these effects. Plant polyphenols are recognized as naturally occurring antioxidants but also catalyze oxidative DNA degradation of cellular DNA either alone or in the presence of transition metal ions such as copper. In this paper we show that similar to various other classes of polyphenols, delphinidin is also capable of causing oxidative degradation of cellular DNA. Lymphocytes were exposed to various concentrations of delphinidin (10, 20, 50 μM) for 1 h and the DNA breakage was assessed using single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis (Comet assay). Inhibition of DNA breakage by several scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated that it is caused by the formation of ROS. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine (a cell membrane permeable Cu(I) chelator) inhibited DNA degradation in intact lymphocytes in a dose dependent manner. Bathocuproine, which is unable to permeate through the cell membrane, did not cause such inhibition. We have further shown that delphinidin is able to degrade DNA in cell nuclei and that such DNA degradation is also inhibited by neocuproine suggesting that nuclear copper is mobilized in this reaction. These results indicate that the generation of ROS possibly occurs through mobilization of endogenous copper ions. The results are in support of our hypothesis that the prooxidant activity of plant polyphenols may be an important mechanism for their anticancer properties

  16. Atmospheric pressure ionization of chlorinated ethanes in ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.; Benson, Michael T.

    2015-05-16

    This study investigates the APCI mechanisms associated with chlorinated ethanes in an attempt to define conditions under which unique pseudo-molecular adducts, in addition to chloride ion, can be produced for analytical measurements using IMS and MS. The ionization chemistry of chlorinated compounds typically leads to the detection of only the halide ions. Using molecular modeling, which provides insights into the ion formation and relative binding energies, predictions for the formation of pseudo-molecular adducts are postulated. Predicted structures of the chloride ion with multiple hydrogens on the ethane backbone was supported by the observation of specific pseudo-molecular adducts in IMS and MS spectra. With the proper instrumental conditions, such as short reaction times and low temp.

  17. Determination of ion mobility collision cross sections for unresolved isomeric mixtures using tandem mass spectrometry and chemometric deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, Brett [Institute of Biomedical Studies, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Neumann, Elizabeth K. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States); Stow, Sarah M.; May, Jody C.; McLean, John A. [Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Center for Innovative Technology, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Solouki, Touradj, E-mail: Touradj_Solouki@baylor.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Ion mobility (IM) is an important analytical technique for determining ion collision cross section (CCS) values in the gas-phase and gaining insight into molecular structures and conformations. However, limited instrument resolving powers for IM may restrict adequate characterization of conformationally similar ions, such as structural isomers, and reduce the accuracy of IM-based CCS calculations. Recently, we introduced an automated technique for extracting “pure” IM and collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra of IM overlapping species using chemometric deconvolution of post-IM/CID mass spectrometry (MS) data [J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom., 2014, 25, 1810–1819]. Here we extend those capabilities to demonstrate how extracted IM profiles can be used to calculate accurate CCS values of peptide isomer ions which are not fully resolved by IM. We show that CCS values obtained from deconvoluted IM spectra match with CCS values measured from the individually analyzed corresponding peptides on uniform field IM instrumentation. We introduce an approach that utilizes experimentally determined IM arrival time (AT) “shift factors” to compensate for ion acceleration variations during post-IM/CID and significantly improve the accuracy of the calculated CCS values. Also, we discuss details of this IM deconvolution approach and compare empirical CCS values from traveling wave (TW)IM-MS and drift tube (DT)IM-MS with theoretically calculated CCS values using the projected superposition approximation (PSA). For example, experimentally measured deconvoluted TWIM-MS mean CCS values for doubly-protonated RYGGFM, RMFGYG, MFRYGG, and FRMYGG peptide isomers were 288.{sub 8} Å{sup 2}, 295.{sub 1} Å{sup 2}, 296.{sub 8} Å{sup 2}, and 300.{sub 1} Å{sup 2}; all four of these CCS values were within 1.5% of independently measured DTIM-MS values.

  18. Determination of ion mobility collision cross sections for unresolved isomeric mixtures using tandem mass spectrometry and chemometric deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, Brett; Neumann, Elizabeth K.; Stow, Sarah M.; May, Jody C.; McLean, John A.; Solouki, Touradj

    2016-01-01

    Ion mobility (IM) is an important analytical technique for determining ion collision cross section (CCS) values in the gas-phase and gaining insight into molecular structures and conformations. However, limited instrument resolving powers for IM may restrict adequate characterization of conformationally similar ions, such as structural isomers, and reduce the accuracy of IM-based CCS calculations. Recently, we introduced an automated technique for extracting “pure” IM and collision-induced dissociation (CID) mass spectra of IM overlapping species using chemometric deconvolution of post-IM/CID mass spectrometry (MS) data [J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom., 2014, 25, 1810–1819]. Here we extend those capabilities to demonstrate how extracted IM profiles can be used to calculate accurate CCS values of peptide isomer ions which are not fully resolved by IM. We show that CCS values obtained from deconvoluted IM spectra match with CCS values measured from the individually analyzed corresponding peptides on uniform field IM instrumentation. We introduce an approach that utilizes experimentally determined IM arrival time (AT) “shift factors” to compensate for ion acceleration variations during post-IM/CID and significantly improve the accuracy of the calculated CCS values. Also, we discuss details of this IM deconvolution approach and compare empirical CCS values from traveling wave (TW)IM-MS and drift tube (DT)IM-MS with theoretically calculated CCS values using the projected superposition approximation (PSA). For example, experimentally measured deconvoluted TWIM-MS mean CCS values for doubly-protonated RYGGFM, RMFGYG, MFRYGG, and FRMYGG peptide isomers were 288._8 Å"2, 295._1 Å"2, 296._8 Å"2, and 300._1 Å"2; all four of these CCS values were within 1.5% of independently measured DTIM-MS values.

  19. Performance enhancement of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry by applying differential-RF-driven operation mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yue; Tang, Fei; Zhai, Yadong; Wang, Xiaohao

    2017-09-01

    The traditional operation mode of high-field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry (FAIMS) uses a one-way radio frequency (RF) voltage input as the dispersion voltage. This requires a high voltage input and limits power consumption reduction and miniaturization of instruments. With higher dispersion voltages or larger compensation voltages, there also exist problems such as low signal intensity or the fact that the dispersion voltage is no longer much larger than the compensation voltage. In this paper, a differential-RF-driven operation mode of FAIMS is proposed. The two-way RF is used to generate the dispersion field, and a phase difference is added between the two RFs to generate a single step waveform field. Theoretical analysis, and experimental results from an ethanol sample, showed that the peak positions of the ion spectra changed linearly (R 2 = 0.9992) with the phase difference of the two RFs in the differential-RF-driven mode and that the peak intensity of the ion spectrum could be enhanced by more than eight times for ethanol ions. In this way, it is possible to convert the ion spectrum peaks outside the separation or compensation voltage range into a detectable range, by changing the phase difference. To produce the same separation electric field, the high-voltage direct current input voltage can be maximally reduced to half of that in the traditional operation mode. Without changing the drift region size or drift condition, the differential-RF-driven operation mode can reduce power consumption, increase signal-to-noise ratio, extend the application range of the dispersion voltage and compensation voltage, and improve FAIMS detection performance.

  20. Online Ozonolysis Combined with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Provides a New Platform for Lipid Isomer Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poad, Berwyck L.; Zheng, Xueyun; Mitchell, Todd A.; Smith, Richard D.; Baker, Erin M.; Blanksby, Stephen J.

    2017-12-21

    One of the most significant challenges in contemporary lipidomics lies in the separation and identification of lipid isomers that differ only in site(s) of unsaturation or geometric configuration of the carbon-carbon double bonds. While analytical separation techniques including ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and liquid chromatography (LC) can separate isomeric lipids under appropriate conditions, conventional tandem mass spectrometry cannot provide unequivocal identification. To address this challenge, we have implemented ozone-induced dissociation (OzID) in-line with LC, IMS and high resolution mass spectrometry. Modification of an IMS- capable quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer was undertaken to allow the introduction of ozone into the high-pressure trapping ion funnel region preceding the IMS cell. This enabled the novel LC-OzID-IMS-MS configuration where ozonolysis of ionized lipids occurred rapidly (10 ms) without prior mass-selection. LC-elution time alignment combined with accurate mass and arrival time extraction of ozonolysis products facilitated correlation of precursor and product ions without mass-selection (and associated reductions in duty cycle). Unsaturated lipids across 11 classes were examined using this workflow in both positive and negative ion modalities and in all cases the positions of carbon-carbon double bonds were unequivocally assigned based on predictable OzID transitions. Under these conditions geometric isomers exhibited different IMS arrival time distributions and distinct OzID product ion ratios providing a means for discrimination of cis/trans double bonds in complex lipids. The combination of OzID with multidimensional separations shows significant promise for facile profiling of unsaturation patterns within complex lipidomes.

  1. A novel method for observation by unaided eyes of nitrogen ion tracks and angular distribution in a plasma focus device using 50 Hz–HV electrochemically-etched polycarbonate detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Habibi, M.; Roshani, G.H.; Ramezani, V.

    2012-01-01

    A novel ion detection method has been developed and studied in this paper for the first time to detect and observe tracks of nitrogen ions and their angular distribution by unaided eyes in the Amirkabir 4 kJ plasma focus device (PFD). The method is based on electrochemical etching (ECE) of nitrogen ion tracks in 1 mm thick large area polycarbonate (PC) detectors. The ECE method employed a specially designed and constructed large area ECE chamber by applying a 50 Hz–high voltage (HV) generator under optimized ECE conditions. The nitrogen ion tracks and angular distribution were efficiently (constructed for this study) amplified to a point observable by the unaided eyes. The beam profile and angular distribution of nitrogen ion tracks in the central axes of the beam and two- and three-dimensional iso-ion track density distributions showing micro-beam spots were determined. The distribution of ion track density along the central axes versus angular position shows double humps around a dip at the 0° angular positions. The method introduced in this paper proved to be quite efficient for ion beam profile and characteristic studies in PFDs with potential for ion detection studies and other relevant dosimetry applications.

  2. Nitrogen mobility, ammonia volatilization, and estimated leaching loss from long-term manure incorporation in red soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) loss from fertilization in agricultural fields has an unavoidable negative impact on the environment, and a better understanding of the major pathways can assist in developing best management practices. The aim of this study was to evaluate the fate of N fertilizers applied to acidic re...

  3. External Second Gate, Fourier Transform Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Parametric Optimization for Detection of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E. Tarver

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS is recognized as one of the most sensitive and robust techniques for the detection of narcotics, explosives and chemical warfare agents. IMS is widely used in forensic, military and security applications. Increasing threat of terrorist attacks, the proliferation of narcotics, Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC treaty verification as well as humanitarian de-mining efforts have mandated that equal importance be placed on the time required to obtain results as well as the quality of the analytical data. [1] In this regard IMS is virtually unrivaled when both speed of response and sensitivity have to be considered. [2] The problem with conventional (signal averaging IMS systems is the fixed duty cycle of the entrance gate that restricts to less than 1%, the number of available ions contributing to the measured signal. Furthermore, the signal averaging process incorporates scan-to-scan variations that degrade the spectral resolution contributing to misidentifications and false positives. With external second gate, Fourier Transform ion mobility spectrometry (FT-IMS the entrance gate frequency is variable and can be altered in conjunction with other data acquisition parameters (scan time and sampling rate to increase the spectral resolution to reduce false alarms and improve the sensitivity for early warning and contamination avoidance. In addition, with FT-IMS the entrance gate operates with a 50% duty cycle and so affords a seven-fold increase in sensitivity. Recent data on high explosives are presented to demonstrate the parametric optimization in sensitivity and resolution of our system.

  4. Ion chromatography of transition metals: specific alteration of retention by complexation reactions in the mobile and on the stationary phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, S.

    1992-05-01

    Ion chromatography of mono- and bivalent cations was performed on a conventional cation exchanger. The pH influence of an ethylene-diamine/citrate eluent was significant for the retention of alkaline earth and transition metals, but negligible for alkali ions. This was dealt with from a mechanistic point of view. Mobile phase optimization allowed fast isocratic analysis of mono- and bivalent cations and the separation of the radionuclides Cs-137 and Sr-90. A newly synthesized stationary phase containing iminodiacetate (IDA) function was investigated for cation chromatography using ethylenediamine/citrate eluents, polyhydroxy acid and dipicolinic acid. The column's high selectivity for transition metal ions in comparison to alkali and alkaline earth metals may be governed by the choice of complexing ability and pH of the eluent. Applications verified by atomic absorption spectroscopy include alkaline earth metals in beverages and the determination of Co, Cd and Zn in solutions containing more than 10 14 -fold excess of Na and Mg, such as sea water

  5. Fragmentation of molecular ions in differential mobility spectrometry as a method for identification of chemical warfare agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziejuk, M; Puton, J; Szyposzyńska, M; Witkiewicz, Z

    2015-11-01

    The subject of the work is the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the detection of chemical warfare agents (CWA). Studies were performed for mustard gas, i.e., bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (HD), sarin, i.e., O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB) and methyl salicylate (MS) used as test compounds. Measurements were conducted with two ceramic DMS analyzers of different constructions allowing the generation of an electric field with an intensity of more than 120 Td. Detector signals were measured for positive and negative modes of operation in a temperature range from 0 to 80 °C. Fragmentations of ions containing analyte molecules were observed for all tested compounds. The effective temperatures of fragmentation estimated on the basis of dispersion plots were equal from about 148 °C for GB to 178 °C for MS. It was found that values of separation voltage (SV) and compensation voltage (CV) at which the fragmentation of sample ions is observed may be the parameters improving the certainty of detection for different analytes. The DMS analyzers enabling the observation of ion fragmentation can be successfully used for effective CWA detection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Ultrasmall Tin Nanodots Embedded in Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: Metal-Organic-Framework Derivation and Electrochemical Application as Highly Stable Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Ruoling; Sun, Weiwei; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sn-based metal-organic-framework (MOF) is prepared. • Ultrasmall tin nanodots (2–3 nm) are embedded in nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. • The Sn/C composite anode shows high capacity and ultralong cycle life. - Abstract: This work reports a facile metal-organic-framework based approach to synthesize Sn/C composite, in which ultrasmall Sn nanodots with typical size of 2–3 nm are uniformly embedded in the nitrogen-doped porous carbon matrix (denoted as Sn@NPC). The effect of thermal treatment and nitrogen doping are also explored. Owing to the delicate size control and confined volume change within carbon matrix, the Sn@NPC composite can exhibit reversible capacities of 575 mAh g −1 (Sn contribution: 1091 mAh g −1 ) after 500 cycles at 0.2 A g −1 and 507 mAh g −1 (Sn contribution: 1077 mAh g −1 ) after 1500 cycles at 1 A g −1 . The excellent long-life electrochemical stability of the Sn@NPC anode has been mainly attributed to the uniform distribution of ultrasmall Sn nanodots and the highly-conductive and flexible N-doped carbon matrix, which can effectively facilitate lithium ion/electron diffusion, buffer the large volume change and improve the structure stability of the electrode during repetitive cycling with lithium ions.

  7. Surface modification by nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation into new steel 460Li–21Cr in a capacitively coupled radio frequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, H.; Mändl, S.; Bora, B.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E.; Maze, J.R.; Walczak, M.; Manova, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Nitriding of a novel steel has been done in a RF plasma by PIII technique. • Improved hardness and wear behavior have been observed. • Hardness was improved by a factor 4 and the wear by 2 orders of magnitude. • Fast, anomalous diffusion, similar to nitrogen in expanded austenite is observed. - Abstract: A novel steel 460Li–21Cr belonging to a new generation of superferritic grade steel has been implanted with nitrogen in a low power 13.56 MHz radio frequency plasma by the plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technique in order to study its physical and chemical properties under different experimental conditions. We observed improved hardness and wear behavior of 460Li–21Cr steel with a layer thickness between 1.5 and 4.0 μm after 60 min implantation in the temperature range from 350 to 550 °C. The modified surface layer containing nitrogen does not show CrN in X-ray diffraction (XRD). Compared to untreated substrates, the hardness can be increased by a factor of 4, depending on the experimental conditions, and the wear behavior was also improved by two orders of magnitude. The results are very similar to those for austenitic stainless steel with a similar pronounced increase in wear resistance and plateau-like nitrogen depth profiles

  8. Cation mobility in H+/Na+ ion exchange products of acid tantalum and zirconium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnopol'skij, V.A.; Yaroslavtsev, A.B.

    2000-01-01

    Ionic conductivity of Na + /H + exchange products on acid zirconium phosphate with different substitution degree and on acid tantalum phosphate, where ion exchange occurs via formation of a continuous series of solid solutions, was studied by the method of conductometry. It was ascertained that ionic conductivity decreases monotonously with growth in substitution degree of H + for Na + in acid tantalum phosphate. Anomalous increase in ionic conductivity of ion exchange products on acid zirconium phosphate with a low substitution degree has been detected for the first time. Formation of a double electric layer with a high concentration of cationic defects on the interface surface is the reason for increase in ionic conductivity [ru

  9. High photocarrier mobility in ultrafast ion-irradiated In.sub.0.53./sub.Ga.sub.0.47./sub.As

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Delagnes, J.C.; Mounaix, P.; Němec, Hynek; Fekete, Ladislav; Kadlec, Filip; Kužel, Petr; Martin, M.; Mangeney, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 19 (2009), 195103/1-195103/6 ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP202/09/P099; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : InGaAs * photocarrier mobility * ultrafast photoconductivity terahertz * ion irradiation * terahertz * ion irradiation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.083, year: 2009

  10. Effect of electrolyte sorbed by nonion-exchange mechanism on the state and diffusive mobility of water and alkali metal ions in perfluorinated sulfocationic membranes from NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.I.; Sidorenkova, E.A.; Korochkova, S.A.; Novikov, N.A.; Sokol'skaya, I.B.; Timashev, S.F.

    1994-01-01

    On the basis of data of high-resolution NMR on 1 H nuclei of water, 23 Na and 133 Cs, of counterions Na + and Ca + the influence of nonionexchange sorved alkalis and metal chlorides on the state and diffusive mobility of the counterions was studied. It is shown that the type of co-ion can affect considerably the translational diffusion of metal ions

  11. Enhancement of evaporative light scattering detection in high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of neomycin based on highly volatile mobile phase, high-molecular-mass ion-pairing reagents and controlled peak shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megoulas, Nikolaos C; Koupparis, Michael A

    2004-11-19

    In the frame of the development of a novel HPLC-ELSD (evaporative light scattering detection) method for the determination of the aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin sulfate, the influence of mobile phase composition and peak broadening on ELSD response was evaluated. ELSD response was enhanced by: (a) increase of mobile phase volatility (solvents examined: water, acetonitrile, methanol and acetone), (b) increase of molecular mass of ion-pairing species [acidic reagents tested: formic, acetic, trifluoroacetic, trichloroacetic and heptafluorobutyric acid (HFBA)], and (c) decrease of peak width and asymmetry obtained by controlling the concentration of the ion-pairing acidic reagent (HFBA). Utilizing a Waters ODS-2 C18 Spherisorb column, evaporation temperature of 45 degrees C and nitrogen pressure of 3.5 bar, the optimized mobile phase was water-acetone (50:50), containing 11.6 mM HFBA, in an isocratic mode at a rate of 1.0 ml/min. Neomycin was eluted at 4.9 min, with asymmetry factor 1.3. Logarithmic calibration curve was obtained from 2 to 50 microg/ml (r > 0.9997). Limit of detection (LOD) was 0.6 microg/ml and R.S.D. = 1.7% (n = 3, 3.3 microg/ml). In raw materials, the simultaneous determination of sulfate (LOD = 3 microg/ml, R.S.D. = 1.7%, r> 0.9998) and of minor impurities was feasible. The developed method was also applied for the determination of neomycin in pharmaceutical formulations (powder, aerosol and cream) without any interference from excipients (recovery from spiked samples ranged from 99 to 102%) and a %R.S.D. of <2.1 (n = 3). The HPLC-ELSD method was also found applicable in the determination of neomycin in animal feeds (LOQ=0.2%) without any interference from the feed matrices.

  12. Improvements of anti-corrosion and mechanical properties of NiTi orthopedic materials by acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, Ray W.Y.; Ho, Joan P.Y.; Liu Xuanyong; Chung, C.Y.; Chu, Paul K.; Yeung, Kelvin W.K.; Lu, William W.; Cheung, Kenneth M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Nickel-titanium shape memory alloys (NiTi) are useful materials in orthopedics and orthodontics due to their unique super-elasticity and shape memory effects. However, the problem associated with the release of harmful Ni ions to human tissues and fluids has been raising safety concern. Hence, it is necessary to produce a surface barrier to impede the out-diffusion of Ni ions from the materials. We have conducted acetylene, nitrogen and oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) into NiTi alloys in an attempt to improve the surface properties. All the implanted and annealed samples surfaces exhibit outstanding corrosion and Ni out-diffusion resistance. Besides, the implanted layers are mechanically stronger than the substrate underneath. XPS analyses disclose that the layer formed by C 2 H 2 PIII is composed of mainly TiC x with increasing Ti to C concentration ratios towards the bulk. The nitrogen PIII layer is observed to be TiN, whereas the oxygen PIII layer is composed of oxides of Ti 4+ , Ti 3+ and Ti 2+

  13. Effect of surface modification by nitrogen ion implantation on the electrochemical and cellular behaviors of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki-Ghaleh, H; Khalil-Allafi, J; Sadeghpour-Motlagh, M; Shakeri, M S; Masoudfar, S; Farrokhi, A; Beygi Khosrowshahi, Y; Nadernezhad, A; Siadati, M H; Javidi, M; Shakiba, M; Aghaie, E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to enhance the biological behavior of NiTi shape memory alloy while preserving its super-elastic behavior in order to facilitate its compatibility for application in human body. The surfaces of NiTi samples were bombarded by three different nitrogen doses. Small-angle X-ray diffraction was employed for evaluating the generated phases on the bombarded surfaces. The electrochemical behaviors of the bare and surface-modified NiTi samples were studied in simulated body fluid (SBF) using electrochemical impedance and potentio-dynamic polarization tests. Ni ion release during a 2-month period of service in the SBF environment was evaluated using atomic absorption spectrometry. The cellular behavior of nitrogen-modified samples was studied using fibroblast cells. Furthermore, the effect of surface modification on super-elasticity was investigated by tensile test. The results showed the improvement of both corrosion and biological behaviors of the modified NiTi samples. However, no significant change in the super-elasticity was observed. Samples modified at 1.4E18 ion cm(-2) showed the highest corrosion resistance and the lowest Ni ion release.

  14. Characterization of gate oxynitrides by means of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Quantification of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, S.; Perego, M.; Fanciulli, M.

    2002-01-01

    We present a methodology for the quantitative estimation of nitrogen in ultrathin oxynitrides by means of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We consider an innovative approach to TOF-SIMS depth profiling, by elemental distribution of single species as sum of peaks containing such species. This approach is very efficient in overcoming matrix effect arising when quantifying elements were distributed in silicon and silicon oxide. We use XPS to calibrate TOF-SIMS and to obtain quantitative information on nitrogen distribution in oxynitride thin layers. In the method we propose we process TOF-SIMS and XPS data simultaneously to obtain a quantitative depth profile

  15. Integrated Chemical and Microorganism Monitoring of Air Using Gas Chromatography/Ion Mobility Spectometry: Toward an Expanded-Use Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this research program originated with the choice by NASA of an ion mobility spectrometer for air quality monitoring on-board the international spacestation. Though the gas chromatograph-ion mobility spectrometer analyzer known as VOA met or exceeded expectations, limitations in the basic understanding of response and the utilization of foundational principles into usable technology was considered unacceptable. In this research program, a comprehensive model for the origins of mobility spectra was proposed, tested and verified. The principles considered responsible for the appearance of mobility spectra have now been elucidated through this project. This understanding has been applied in automated identification of mobility spectra using neural networks and routine procedures for this now exist. Finally, the limitation on linear range has been shown to be a technical limitation and not a fundamental limitation so that a hardware component was crafted to extend the linear range of a mobility spectrometer by 10X. This project has led to one Ph.D. dissertation and one MS thesis. In addition, over ten public presentations at professional meetings and six journal publications have resulted from this program of research. The findings are so plentiful that total analysis of the findings may require four to six years or more. The findings confirm that the decision to use VOA was sound and that the chemical and physical principles of mobility spectrometry are both understandable and predictable.

  16. SETH 200: new mobile unit for spent ion-exchange resins embedding in polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Buzonniere, A.; Raibaud, J.; Augustin, X.

    1985-01-01

    The CEA embedding process for low- and medium-activity waste in thermosetting resins (polyester or epoxy) has been used industrially. Recent developments (elimination of chemical pretreatment thanks to a new epoxy formulation and technological breakthroughs in the operating techniques) have greatly increased the potential of the process and have allowed with Technicatome's industrial experience, the elaboration of a new mobile unit easily operated and very competitive, particularly in spent resin processing

  17. Effect of Mobile Phone Usage on Nickel Ions Release and pH of Saliva in Patients Undergoing Fixed Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjannawar, Lalita Girish; Girme, Tejashree Suresh; Agrawal, Jiwanasha Manish; Agrawal, Manish Suresh; Fulari, Sangamesh Gurunath; Shetti, Shraddha Subhash; Kagi, Vishwal Ajith

    2017-09-01

    Hand held mobile phones are presently the most popular means of communication worldwide and have transformed our lives in many aspects. The widespread use of such devices have resulted in growing concerns regarding harmful effects of radiations emitted by them. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of mobile phone usage on nickel ion release as well as pH of saliva in patients with fixed orthodontic appliances. To assess the level of nickel ions in saliva and pH of saliva in mobile phone users undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. A total of 42 healthy patients with fixed orthodontic appliance in mouth for a duration of six to nine months were selected for the study. They were divided into experimental group (n=21) consisting of mobile phone users and control group (n=21) of non mobile phone users. Saliva samples were collected from both the groups and nickel ion levels were measured using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy. The pH values were also assessed for both groups using pH meter. Unpaired t-test was used for the data analysis. Statistical analysis revealed that though the pH levels were reduced and the nickel ion levels were higher in the experimental group compared to the control group, the results were non significant. Mobile phone usage may affect the pH of saliva and result in increased release of nickel ions in saliva of patients with fixed orthodontic appliances in the oral cavity.

  18. Computational methods for metabolomic data analysis of ion mobility spectrometry data-reviewing the state of the art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Anne-Christin; Schneider, Till; Pauling, Josch

    2012-01-01

    that MCC/IMS coupled with sophisticated computational methods has the potential to successfully address a broad range of biomedical questions. While we can solve most of the data pre-processing steps satisfactorily, some computational challenges with statistical learning and model validation remain.......Ion mobility spectrometry combined with multi-capillary columns (MCC/IMS) is a well known technology for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We may utilize MCC/IMS for scanning human exhaled air, bacterial colonies or cell lines, for example. Thereby we gain information about the human...... of computational approaches for analyzing the huge amount of emerging data sets. Here, we will review the state of the art and highlight existing challenges. First, we address methods for raw data handling, data storage and visualization. Afterwards we will introduce de-noising, peak picking and other pre...

  19. Mercury-induced fragmentation of n-decane and n-undecane in positive mode ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzer, F

    2015-09-21

    Ion mobility spectrometry is a well-known technique for trace gas analysis. Using soft ionization techniques, fragmentation of analytes is normally not observed, with the consequence that analyte spectra of single substances are quite simple, i.e. showing in general only one peak. If the concentration is high enough, an extra cluster peak involving two analyte molecules can often be observed. When investigating n-alkanes, different results regarding the number of peaks in the spectra have been obtained in the past using this spectrometric technique. Here we present results obtained when analyzing n-alkanes (n-hexane to n-undecane) with a pulsed electron source, which show no fragmentation or clustering at all. However, when investigating a mixture of mercury and an n-alkane, a situation quite typical in the oil and gas industry, a strong fragmentation and cluster formation involving these fragments has been observed exclusively for n-decane and n-undecane.

  20. Specific Noncovalent Association of Chiral Large-Ring Hexaimines: Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry and PM7 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troć, Anna; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Danikiewicz, Witold; Kwit, Marcin

    2016-09-05

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry and PM7 semiempirical calculations are effective complementary methods to study gas phase formation of noncovalent complexes from vaselike macrocycles. The specific association of large-ring chiral hexaimines, derived from enantiomerically pure trans-1,2-diaminocyclohexane and various isophthaldehydes, is driven mostly by CH-π and π-π stacking interactions. The isotrianglimine macrocycles are prone to form two types of aggregates: tail-to-tail and head-to-head (capsule) dimers. The stability of the tail-to-tail dimers is affected by the size and electronic properties of the substituents at the C-5 position of the aromatic ring. Electron-withdrawing groups stabilize the aggregate, whereas bulky or electron-donating groups destabilize the complexes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Enhancement of biological mass spectrometry by using separations based on changes in ion mobility (FAIMS and DMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Randy W

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of complex biological samples for low-level analytes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) often requires additional selectivity. Differential mobility techniques (FAIMS and DMS) have been shown to enhance LC-MS/MS analyses by separating ions in the gas-phase on a millisecond timescale by use of a mechanism that is complementary to both liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this overview, a simplified description of the operation of these devices is given and an example presented that illustrates the utility of FAIMS (DMS) for solving a challenging analytical assay. Important recent advances in the field, including work with gas modifiers, are presented, along with an outlook for the technology.

  2. Distinguishing d- and l-aspartic and isoaspartic acids in amyloid β peptides with ultrahigh resolution ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Deng, Liulin; Baker, Erin S; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D

    2017-07-11

    While α-linked amino acids in the l-form are exclusively utilized in mammalian protein building, β-linked and d-form amino acids also have important biological roles. Unfortunately, the structural elucidation and separation of these different amino acid types in peptides has been analytically challenging to date due to the numerous isomers present, limiting our knowledge about their existence and biological roles. Here, we utilized an ultrahigh resolution ion mobility spectrometry platform coupled with mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) to separate amyloid β (Aβ) peptides containing l-aspartic acid, d-aspartic acid, l-isoaspartic acid, and d-isoaspartic acid residues which span α- and β-linked amino acids in both d- and l-forms. The results illustrate how IMS-MS could be used to better understand age-related diseases or protein folding disorders resulting from amino acid modifications.

  3. Role of competing ions in the mobilization of arsenic in groundwater of Bengal Basin: insight from surface complexation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ashis; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Neidhardt, Harald; Halder, Dipti; Kundu, Amit K; Chatterjee, Debashis; Berner, Zsolt; Bhattacharya, Prosun

    2014-05-15

    This study assesses the role of competing ions in the mobilization of arsenic (As) by surface complexation modeling of the temporal variability of As in groundwater. The potential use of two different surface complexation models (SCMs), developed for ferrihydrite and goethite, has been explored to account for the temporal variation of As(III) and As(V) concentration, monitored in shallow groundwater of Bengal Basin over a period of 20 months. The SCM for ferrihydrite appears as the better predictor of the observed variation in both As(III) and As(V) concentrations in the study sites. It is estimated that among the competing ions, PO4(3-) is the major competitor of As(III) and As(V) adsorption onto Fe oxyhydroxide, and the competition ability decreases in the order PO4(3-) ≫ Fe(II) > H4SiO4 = HCO3(-). It is further revealed that a small change in pH can also have a significant effect on the mobility of As(III) and As(V) in the aquifers. A decrease in pH increases the concentration of As(III), whereas it decreases the As(V) concentration and vice versa. The present study suggests that the reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxide alone cannot explain the observed high As concentration in groundwater of the Bengal Basin. This study supports the view that the reductive dissolution of Fe oxyhydroxide followed by competitive sorption reactions with the aquifer sediment is the processes responsible for As enrichment in groundwater. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid label-free profiling of oral cancer biomarker proteins using nano-UPLC-Q-TOF ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Ala F; Williams, Brad J; Yaworksy, Dustin C; Patel, Vyomesh; Rusling, James F

    2016-03-01

    It has become quite clear that single cancer biomarkers cannot in general provide high sensitivity and specificity for reliable clinical cancer diagnostics. This paper explores the feasibility of rapid detection of multiple biomarker proteins in model oral cancer samples using label-free protein relative quantitation. MS-based label-free quantitative proteomics offer a rapid alternative that bypasses the need for stable isotope containing compounds to chemically bind and label proteins. Total protein content in oral cancer cell culture conditioned media was precipitated, subjected to proteolytic digestion, and then analyzed using a nano-UPLC (where UPLC is ultra-performance liquid chromatography) coupled to a hybrid Q-Tof ion-mobility mass spectrometry (MS). Rapid, simultaneous identification and quantification of multiple possible cancer biomarker proteins was achieved. In a comparative study between cancer and noncancer samples, approximately 952 proteins were identified using a high-throughput 1D ion mobility assisted data independent acquisition (IM-DIA) approach. As we previously demonstrated that interleukin-8 (IL-8) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) were readily detected in oral cancer cell conditioned media(1), we targeted these biomarker proteins to validate our approach. Target biomarker protein IL-8 was found between 3.5 and 8.8 fmol, while VEGF-A was found at 1.45 fmol in the cancer cell media. Overall, our data suggest that the nano-UPLC-IM-DIA bioassay is a feasible approach to identify and quantify proteins in complex samples without the need for stable isotope labeling. These results have significant implications for rapid tumor diagnostics and prognostics by monitoring proteins such as IL-8 and VEGF-A implicated in cancer development and progression. The analysis in tissue or plasma is not possible at this time, but the subsequent work would be needed for validation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Nitrogen-Doped Holey Graphene as an Anode for Lithium-Ion Batteries with High Volumetric Energy Density and Long Cycle Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiantie; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W; Dai, Liming

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen-doped holey graphene (N-hG) as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries has delivered a maximum volumetric capacity of 384 mAh cm(-3) with an excellent long-term cycling life up to 6000 cycles, and as an electrochemical capacitor has delivered a maximum volumetric energy density of 171.2 Wh L(-1) and a volumetric capacitance of 201.6 F cm(-3) . © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The effect of alloyed nitrogen or dissolved nitrate ions on the anodic behaviour of austenitic stainless steel in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrabi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The anodic behaviour of high purity stainless steels, based on a 316L composition, has been studied at room temperature in HCl solutions from 1 to 6 M. For all acid concentrations, the presence of 0.22% nitrogen has little or no effect on the active dissolution kinetics at low over-potentials. The effect on the critical current density for passivation is also small for low HCl concentrations ( 4.5 M), no passivation occurs and again nitrogen has little effect. However, for HCl concentrations around 4 M nitrogen reversibly impedes active dissolution at a few hundred mA cm -2 . The effect does not appear to be an oxide passivation, but is more likely to be due to surface enrichment of nitrogen atoms. Implications for localized corrosion are discussed. An effect similar to that of nitrogen alloying is reproduced on a nitrogen free alloy by adding 2 M NaNO 3 to a 4M HCl solution. This effect is distinct from the passivation of salt-covered surfaces and may be preferable to the latter as an explanation of the increase in pitting potential by nitrate additions to NaCl solutions. Passivation under a salt film is retained to explain the passivation of growing pits above the inhibition potential. (authors)

  7. Characterization Of Commonly Encountered Explosives Using Highfield Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry Coupled With Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    symptoms depending on the relative concentration, even leading to death.32 2.4. Instrument Settings Both positive and negative ions can be formed...Detection Technology, pp. 619-633, 1992. 7. Osorio, Celia ; Gomez, Lewis M.; Hernandez, Samuel P.; Castro, Miguel E., Time-of- flight Mass Spectroscopy...vol. 15, pp. 1950-1952. 34. Federal Facilities Assessment Branch, Public Health Assessment, US Army Umatilla Depot Activity, Centers for Disease

  8. Physics in the fast lane: rotors, fast ions and mobile fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.L.; Saboungi, M.-L.

    1996-09-01

    Dynamic disorder in the high-temperature solid phases of the Zintl compounds CsPb and NaSn is characterized by. fast orientational motions of the polyanions and coupled motions of the cations Melting is characterized by slow translational motions of the centers of mass of the polyanions. The dynamic behavior of the ions is associated with dramatic increases in electrical conductivity characteristic of the behavior expected of a mixed conductor

  9. Optimization of a Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Method for High-Throughput Analysis of Nicotine and Related Compounds: Application to Electronic Cigarette Refill Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro, Jorge; Giri, Anupam; Wenzl, Thomas

    2016-06-21

    Fast market penetration of electronic cigarettes is leading to an exponentially growing number of electronic refill liquids with different nicotine contents and an endless list of flavors. Therefore, rapid and simple methods allowing a fast screening of these products are necessary to detect harmful substances which can negatively impact the health of consumers. In this regard, the present work explores the capabilities of differential ion mobility spectrometry coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for high-throughput analysis of nicotine and 11 related compounds in commercial refill liquids for electronic cigarettes. The influence of main factors affecting the ion mobility separation, such as modifier types and concentration, separation voltage, and temperature, was systematically investigated. Despite small molecular weight differences among the studied compounds, a good separation was achieved in the ion mobility cell under the optimized conditions, which involved the use of ethanol as a polar gas-phase chemical modifier. Indeed, differential ion mobility was able to resolve (resolution >4) nicotine from its structural isomer anabasine without the use of any chromatographic separation. The quantitative performance of the proposed method was then evaluated, showing satisfactory precision (RSD ≤ 16%) and recoveries ranging from 85 to 100% for nicotine, and from 84 to 126% for the rest of the target analytes. Several commercial electronic cigarette refill liquids were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the method. In some cases, significant differences were found between labeled and measured levels of nicotine. Anatabine, cotinine, myosmine, and nornicotine were also found in some of the analyzed samples.

  10. Magnetic resonance methods used to study the mobility of lithium ions and the formation of gamma radiolysis products in lithium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronin, I.S.; Nikiforov, A.S.; Vashman, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors present the results of research on the mobility of lithium ions and the formation of radiation induced paramagnetic centers in the gamma radiolysis of lithium ortho- and metasilicates; nuclear magnetic resonance of Li-7 and electroparamagnetic resonance were used in the studies

  11. Large-scale analysis of peptide sequence variants: the case for high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Andrew J; Smart, Jade; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-05-21

    Large scale analysis of proteins by mass spectrometry is becoming increasingly routine; however, the presence of peptide isomers remains a significant challenge for both identification and quantitation in proteomics. Classes of isomers include sequence inversions, structural isomers, and localization variants. In many cases, liquid chromatography is inadequate for separation of peptide isomers. The resulting tandem mass spectra are composite, containing fragments from multiple precursor ions. The benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) for proteomics have been demonstrated by a number of groups, but previously work has focused on extending proteome coverage generally. Here, we present a systematic study of the benefits of FAIMS for a key challenge in proteomics, that of peptide isomers. We have applied FAIMS to the analysis of a phosphopeptide library comprising the sequences GPSGXVpSXAQLX(K/R) and SXPFKXpSPLXFG(K/R), where X = ADEFGLSTVY. The library has defined limits enabling us to make valid conclusions regarding FAIMS performance. The library contains numerous sequence inversions and structural isomers. In addition, there are large numbers of theoretical localization variants, allowing false localization rates to be determined. The FAIMS approach is compared with reversed-phase liquid chromatography and strong cation exchange chromatography. The FAIMS approach identified 35% of the peptide library, whereas LC-MS/MS alone identified 8% and LC-MS/MS with strong cation exchange chromatography prefractionation identified 17.3% of the library.

  12. Online Measurement of Exhaled NO Concentration and Its Production Sites by Fast Non-equilibrium Dilution Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Zhenxin; Liu, Jiwei; Li, Haiyang

    2016-03-01

    Exhaled nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most promising breath markers for respiratory diseases. Its profile for exhalation and the respiratory NO production sites can provide useful information for medical disease diagnosis and therapeutic procedures. However, the high-level moisture in exhaled gas always leads to the poor selectivity and sensitivity for ion spectrometric techniques. Herein, a method based on fast non-equilibrium dilution ion mobility spectrometry (NED-IMS) was firstly proposed to directly monitor the exhaled NO profile on line. The moisture interference was eliminated by turbulently diluting the original moisture to 21% of the original with the drift gas and dilution gas. Weak enhancement was observed for humid NO response and its limit of detection at 100% relative humidity was down to 0.58 ppb. The NO concentrations at multiple exhalation flow rates were measured, while its respiratory production sites were determined by using two-compartment model (2CM) and Högman and Meriläinen algorithm (HMA). Last but not the least, the NO production sites were analyzed hourly to tentatively investigate the daily physiological process of NO. The results demonstrated the capacity of NED-IMS in the real-time analysis of exhaled NO and its production sites for clinical diagnosis and assessment.

  13. Self-doped carbon architectures with heteroatoms containing nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur as high-performance anodes for lithium- and sodium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Mingjie; Yu, Wenhua; Shi, Jing; Liu, Wei; Chen, Shougang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Huanlei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Self-doped carbon architectures with nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur are derived from Carrageen. •The obtained carbon materials exhibit excellent electrochemical property. •The strategy provides a one-step synthesis route to design advanced anodes for batteries. -- Abstract: Nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur tridoped porous carbons have been successfully synthesized from natural biomass algae-Carrageen by using a simultaneous carbonization and activation procedure. The doped carbons with sponge-like interconnected architecture, partially ordered graphitic structure, and abundant heteroatom doping perform outstanding features for electrochemical energy storage. When tested as lithium-ion battery anodes, a high reversible capacity of 839 mAh g −1 can be obtained at the current density of 0.1 A g −1 after 100 cycles, while a high capacity of 228 mAh g −1 can be maintained at 10 A g −1 . Tested against sodium, a high specific capacity of 227 can be delivered at 0.1 A g −1 after 100 cycles, while a high capacity of 109 mAh g −1 can be achieved at 10 A g −1 . These results turn out that the doped carbons would be potential anode materials for lithium- and sodium-ion batteries, which can be achieved by a one-step and large-scale synthesis route. Our observation indicates that heteroatom doping (especially sulfur) can significantly promote ion storage and reduce irreversible ion trapping to some extent. This work gives a general route for designing carbon nanostructures with heteroatom doping for efficient energy storage.

  14. Graphene/Pentacene Barristor with Ion-Gel Gate Dielectric: Flexible Ambipolar Transistor with High Mobility and On/Off Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Gwangtaek; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeon, Ji Hoon; Won, EunA; Son, Jong Wan; Lee, Duk Hyun; Kim, Cheol Kyeom; Jang, Jingon; Lee, Takhee; Park, Bae Ho

    2015-07-28

    High-quality channel layer is required for next-generation flexible electronic devices. Graphene is a good candidate due to its high carrier mobility and unique ambipolar transport characteristics but typically shows a low on/off ratio caused by gapless band structure. Popularly investigated organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, suffer from poor carrier mobility. Here, we propose a graphene/pentacene channel layer with high-k ion-gel gate dielectric. The graphene/pentacene device shows both high on/off ratio and carrier mobility as well as excellent mechanical flexibility. Most importantly, it reveals ambipolar behaviors and related negative differential resistance, which are controlled by external bias. Therefore, our graphene/pentacene barristor with ion-gel gate dielectric can offer various flexible device applications with high performances.

  15. Influence of cold work on the diffusion of ion-implanted nitrogen in D9 steel using nuclear reaction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arunkumar, J.; David, C.; Panigrahi, B.K.; Nair, K.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    D9 steels and their modified versions are envisaged for use as fuel cladding and wrapper materials in the Indian fast breeder reactor (FBR) programme. The role played by interstitially dissolved nitrogen in steel matrices for the stabilization of austenitic phase, increase of strength and corrosion resistance is well known. Various factors: the role of grain boundaries and the their orientation, stress mediation, grain fragmentation and production of short circuit paths as a result of compressive stress are known to affect the diffusion of nitrogen. Basically, cold working produces plethora of defects throughout the sample as compared to its solution annealed state. Our earlier studies on 1 x10"1"5 and 5x10"1"5 N"1"5 implanted Solution Annealed D9 (SAD9) showed significant vacancy-nitrogen complexes for higher fluence. Hence, thermal diffusion behaviour of nitrogen was studied in 5 x10"1"5 -N"1"5 implanted samples in solution annealed state. In the present study, to understand the influence of cold work, similar thermal diffusion behaviour of nitrogen has been studied in Cold Worked D9 steel (CWD9) using nuclear reaction analysis

  16. Synthesis of nitrogen-doped and amino acid-functionalized graphene quantum dots from glycine, and their application to the fluorometric determination of ferric ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Linbo; Li, Lin; Wang, Chao; Liu, Kangyu; Zhu, Ruohua; Qiang, Hong; Lin, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    We report on a single-step thermolysis strategy to prepare highly luminescent nitrogen-doped and amino acid-functionalized graphene quantum dots (NA-GQDs) by using glycine as both carbon and nitrogen source. The NA-GQDs display an excitation wavelength-dependent fluorescence with maximum excitation and emission wavelengths of 380 and 450 nm, respectively, and a quantum yield of ∼16 %. Fluorescence is quenched by Fe(III) and Hg(II), and the effect was used to develop a method for the determination of Fe(III). Quenching by Fe(III) is attributed to its higher thermodynamic affinity (compared to other transition-metal ions) for the ligands on the GQDs in which nitrogen atoms mainly act as the chelating atoms. A linear relationship was observed between fluorescence intensity and the concentration of Fe(III) over the 0.5 μM to 0.5 mM range. The detection limit is 0.1 μM. (author)

  17. Nitrogen-doped biomass-based ultra-thin carbon nanosheets with interconnected framework for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shasha; Chen, Yaxin; Shi, Liluo; Dong, Yue; Ma, Jing; Chen, Xiaohong; Song, Huaihe

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a low-cost and environmental friendly synthesis strategy is proposed to fabricate nitrogen-doped biomass-based ultra-thin carbon nanosheets (N-CNS) with interconnected framework by using soybean milk as the carbon precursor and sodium chloride as the template. The interconnected porous nanosheet structure is beneficial for lithium ion transportation, and the defects introduced by pyridine nitrogen doping are favorable for lithium storage. When used as the anodes for lithium-ion batteries, the N-CNS electrode shows a high initial reversible specific capacity of 1334 mAh g-1 at 50 mA g-1, excellent rate performance (1212, 555 and 336 mAh g-1 at 0.05, 0.5 and 2 A g-1, respectively) and good cycling stability (355 mAh g-1 at 1 A g-1 after 1000 cycles). Furthermore, this study demonstrates the prospects of biomass and soybean milk, as the potential anode for the application of electrochemical energy storage devices.

  18. Further improvement in ganoderic acid production in static liquid culture of Ganoderma lucidum by integrating nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan-Jun; Zhang, De-Huai; Han, Li-Liang; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To further improve the ganoderic acid (GA) production, a novel integrated strategy by combining nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition was developed. The effects of the integrated combination on the content of GA-T (one powerful anticancer compound), their intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and on the transcription levels of GA biosynthetic genes in G. lucidum fermentation were investigated. The maximum GA-T content with the integrated strategy were 1.87 mg/ 100 mg dry cell weight, which was 2.1-4.2 fold higher than that obtained with either calcium ion addition or nitrogen limitation alone, and it is also the highest record as ever reported in submerged fermentation of G. lucidum. The squalene content was increased by 3.9- and 2.2-fold in this case compared with either individual strategy alone. Moreover, the transcription levels of the GA biosynthetic genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and lanosterol synthase were also up-regulated by 3.3-7.5 and 1.3-2.3 fold, respectively.

  19. Determining the risk of cardiovascular disease using ion mobility of lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2010-05-11

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  20. Method of assessing a lipid-related health risk based on ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2010-12-14

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  1. The potential of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) for detection of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpas, Zeev; Guamán, Ana V; Calvo, Daniel; Pardo, Antonio; Marco, Santiago

    2012-05-15

    The off-flavor of "tainted wine" is attributed mainly to the presence of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (2,4,6-TCA) in the wine. In the present study the atmospheric pressure gas-phase ion chemistry, pertaining to ion mobility spectrometry, of 2,4,6-trichloroanisole was investigated. In positive ion mode the dominant species is a monomer ion with a lower intensity dimer species with reduced mobility values (K(0)) of 1.58 and 1.20 cm(2)V(-1) s(-1), respectively. In negative mode the ion with K(0) =1.64 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) is ascribed to a trichlorophenoxide species while the ions with K(0) =1.48 and 1.13 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1) are attributed to chloride attachment adducts of a TCA monomer and dimer, respectively. The limit of detection of the system for 2,4,6-TCA dissolved in dichloromethane deposited on a filter paper was 2.1 μg and 1.7 ppm in the gas phase. In ethanol and in wine the limit of detection is higher implying that pre-concentration and pre-separation are required before IMS can be used to monitor the level of TCA in wine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of CO2 absorption on ion and water mobility in an anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Roy, Asa L.; Greenbaum, Steve G.; Zawodzinski, Thomas A.

    2018-03-01

    We report the measured water uptake, density, ionic conductivity and water transport properties in Tokuyama A201 membrane in OH-, HCO3- and Cl- forms. The water uptake of the AEM varies with anion type in the order λ(OH-) > λ(HCO3-) > λ(Cl-) for samples equilibrated with the same water vapor activity (aw). The conductivity of the AEM is reduced by absorption of CO2. Pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) measurements were utilized to characterize the diffusivity of water and HCO3- ion. The anion diffusion coefficient and membrane conductivity are used to probe the applicability of the Nernst-Einstein equation in these AEMs.

  3. Application of an online ion chromatography-based instrument for gradient flux measurements of speciated nitrogen and sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    In North America, the dry component of total nitrogen and sulfur deposition remains uncertain due to a lack of measurements of sufficient chemical speciation and temporal extent to develop complete annual mass budgets or of sufficient process level detail to improve current air-s...

  4. Evaluation and application of static headspace-multicapillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry for complex sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denawaka, Chamila J; Fowlis, Ian A; Dean, John R

    2014-04-18

    An evaluation of static headspace-multicapillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS) has been undertaken to assess its applicability for the determination of 32 volatile compounds (VCs). The key experimental variables of sample incubation time and temperature have been evaluated alongside the MCC-GC variables of column polarity, syringe temperature, injection temperature, injection volume, column temperature and carrier gas flow rate coupled with the IMS variables of temperature and drift gas flow rate. This evaluation resulted in six sets of experimental variables being required to separate the 32 VCs. The optimum experimental variables for SHS-MCC-GC-IMS, the retention time and drift time operating parameters were determined; to normalise the operating parameters, the relative drift time and normalised reduced ion mobility for each VC were determined. In addition, a full theoretical explanation is provided on the formation of the monomer, dimer and trimer of a VC. The optimum operating condition for each VC calibration data was obtained alongside limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values. Typical detection limits ranged from 0.1ng bis(methylthio)methane, ethylbutanoate and (E)-2-nonenal to 472ng isovaleric acid with correlation coefficient (R(2)) data ranging from 0.9793 (for the dimer of octanal) through to 0.9990 (for isobutyric acid). Finally, the developed protocols were applied to the analysis of malodour in sock samples. Initial work involved spiking an inert matrix and sock samples with appropriate concentrations of eight VCs. The average recovery from the inert matrix was 101±18% (n=8), while recoveries from the sock samples were lower, that is, 54±30% (n=8) for sock type 1 and 78±24% (n=6) for sock type 2. Finally, SHS-MCC-GC-IMS was applied to sock malodour in a field trial based on 11 volunteers (mixed gender) over a 3-week period. By applying the SHS-MCC-GC-IMS database, four VCs were

  5. Note: Buffer gas temperature inhomogeneities and design of drift-tube ion mobility spectrometers: Warnings for real-world applications by non-specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Maestre, R.

    2017-09-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separates gas phase ions moving under an electric field according to their size-to-charge ratio. IMS is the method of choice to detect illegal drugs and explosives in customs and airports making accurate determination of reduced ion mobilities (K0) important for national security. An ion mobility spectrometer with electrospray ionization coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to study uncertainties in buffer gas temperatures during mobility experiments. Differences up to 16°C were found in the buffer gas temperatures in different regions of the drift tube and up to 42°C between the buffer gas and the drift tube temperatures. The drift tube temperature is used as an approximation to the buffer gas temperature for the calculation of K0 because the buffer gas temperature is hard to measure. This is leading to uncertainties in the determination of K0 values. Inaccurate determination of K0 values yields false positives that delay the cargo and passengers in customs and airports. Therefore, recommendations are issued for building mobility tubes to assure a homogeneous temperature of the buffer gas. Because the temperature and other instrumental parameters are difficult to measure in IMS, chemical standards should always be used when calculating K0. The difference of 42°C between the drift tube and buffer gas temperatures found in these experiments produces a 10.5% error in the calculation of K0. This large inaccuracy in K0 shows the importance of a correct temperature measurement in IMS.

  6. A four dimensional separation method based on continuous heart-cutting gas chromatography with ion mobility and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipok, Christian; Hippler, Jörg; Schmitz, Oliver J

    2018-02-09

    A two-dimensional GC (2D-GC) method was developed and coupled to an ion mobility-high resolution mass spectrometer, which enables the separation of complex samples in four dimensions (2D-GC, ion mobilility spectrometry and mass spectrometry). This approach works as a continuous multiheart-cutting GC-system (GC+GC), using a long modulation time of 20s, which allows the complete transfer of most of the first dimension peaks to the second dimension column without fractionation, in comparison to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC). Hence, each compound delivers only one peak in the second dimension, which simplifies the data handling even when ion mobility spectrometry as a third and mass spectrometry as a fourth dimension are introduced. The analysis of a plant extract from Calendula officinales shows the separation power of this four dimensional separation method. The introduction of ion mobility spectrometry provides an additional separation dimension and allows to determine collision cross sections (CCS) of the analytes as a further physicochemical constant supporting the identification. A CCS database with more than 800 standard substances including drug-like compounds and pesticides was used for CCS data base search in this work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term sub second-response monitoring of gaseous ammonia in ambient air by positive inhaling ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Weiguo; Chen, Chuang; Li, Mei; Peng, Liying; Li, Hang; Liu, Jiwei; Hou, Keyong; Li, Haiyang

    2017-12-01

    A real-time dynamic measurements of ammonia (NH 3 ) is crucial for understanding the atmospheric nucleation process. A novel method was developed for on line monitoring at the sub-second time scale for the gaseous ammonia in ambient air for months, based on a positive inhaling ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) with a 63 Ni ion source. The selective detection of NH 3 was achieved using a high resolution IMS with an optimization of the drift tube temperature above 150°C. This method improved the peak-to-peak resolution significantly, thus avoided the interferences of the adjacent peaks to the quantitative analysis of NH 3 . The time resolution of the IMS was less than 0.1s at a data averaging of 10 times. The limit of detection (LOD) achieved at sub-ppb level while a linear response of peak intensity versus concentration of NH 3 in the range of 10-60ppb and 60-400ppb were obtained. The relative standard deviations (RSD), the confidence level and the errors were 1.06%, 95% and ± 0.21ppb by measuring 100ppb NH 3 for 100 times. The effect of ambient humidity could be greatly reduced by using the drift temperature of over 150°C. At last, the application of measuring the NH 3 concentration evolutions of Dalian city was performed from June 19 to December 3 in 2015. The results illustrated a potential method of using IMS for a real-time measuring atmospheric NH 3 at an unprecedented accuracy and sensitivity with long-term stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PMR investigation of configuration and mobility of H5O2+ ions in certain tungsten heteropolyacid hexahydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuvaev, V.F.; Barash, A.B.

    1982-01-01

    PMR-method of wide bands has been used to investigate hexahydrates of tungsten typical heteropolyacids (HPA): H 3 PW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O, H 4 SiW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O, H 5 BW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O. The results are considered from the viewpoint of existing ideas on formation of H 5 O 2+ diaquohydrogen ions in the HPA structure. SoMe problems of stabilization of low-level hydrates of tungsten and molybdenum HPA are considered as well. The data of PMR low-temperature (80K) spectra have been used to identify the H 3 O + ions, H 2 O mole-- cules and small number of free protons in the investigated HPA. Taking this into account the H 5 O 2+ under the conditions of solid lattice is characterized as static distribution of proton between two molecules of the water of H 3 O + xH 2 O group. Dependence of the PMR spectra on temperature detects two transition regions, caused by mobility of the H 5 O 2+ elements. In the region of first transition (up to 250 K) the H 3 O + xH 2 O static configuration became dynamical, because of quick proton fluctuation along the 0...0 bond and librations of the H 2 O molequles. Then, higher than 250K, the H 5 O 2+ motion became more isotopic and then diffusion. Dynamical state of the H 5 O 2+ in H 3 PW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O and H 4 SiW 12 O 40 x6H 2 O hexahydrates in the wide temperature range is of limited nature, caused by specific of the H 5 O 2+ localizetion in the HPA structure

  9. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d{sup 6}4p (3d{sup 5}4s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6–9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels. - Highlights: • This paper describes the excitation mechanism of iron ion in Okamoto-cavity MIP in comparison with conventional ICP. • Boltzmann distribution is studied among iron ionic lines of

  10. Evaluation of false positive responses by mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry for the detection of trace explosives in complex samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.L., E-mail: clcrawf@sandia.gov; Hill, H.H.

    2013-09-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •First study to use (−)SESI-IM-TOFMS to analyze complex mixtures of personal care products. •The study demonstrated, by identifying mobility and mass interferents with explosive signatures, which, if used separately, neither IMS nor MS alone would prevent every false positive for explosives when detected in the presence of a complex sample matrix. •Ingredients in common household cleaning products were shown to either enhance or suppress the ionization of explosives in a SESI-IM-TOFMS analysis. •Mobility separation provided real-time separation of ion species that indicated overlapping isotope peak patterns -- Abstract: Secondary electrospray ionization-ion mobility-time of flight mass spectrometry (SESI-IM-TOFMS) was used to evaluate common household products and food ingredients for any mass or mobility responses that produced false positives for explosives. These products contained ingredients which shared the same mass and mobility drift time ranges as the analyte ions for common explosives. The results of this study showed that the vast array of compounds in these products can cause either mass or mobility false positive responses. This work also found that two ingredients caused either enhanced or reduced ionization of the target analytes. Another result showed that an IMS can provide real-time separation of ion species that impede accurate mass identifications due to overlapping isotope peak patterns. The final result of this study showed that, when mass and mobility values were used to identify an ion, no false responses were found for the target explosives. The wider implication of these results is that the possibility exists for even greater occurrences of false responses from complex mixtures found in common products. Neither IMS nor MS alone can provide 100% assurance from false responses. IMS, due to its low cost, ease of operation, rugged reliability, high sensitivity and tunable selectivity, will remain

  11. Metal-Organic Frameworks Derived Okra-like SnO2 Encapsulated in Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Lithium Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Chen, Sanmei; Yang, Juan; Bai, Tao; Ren, Yongpeng; Tian, Hangyu

    2017-04-26

    A facile process is developed to prepare SnO 2 -based composites through using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as precursors. The nitrogen-doped graphene wrapped okra-like SnO 2 composites (SnO 2 @N-RGO) are successfully synthesized for the first time by using Sn-based metal-organic frameworks (Sn-MOF) as precursors. When utilized as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, the SnO 2 @N-RGO composites possess a remarkably superior reversible capacity of 1041 mA h g -1 at a constant current of 200 mA g -1 after 180 charge-discharge processes and excellent rate capability. The excellent performance can be primarily ascribed to the unique structure of 1D okra-like SnO 2 in SnO 2 @N-RGO which are actually composed of a great number of SnO 2 primary crystallites and numerous well-defined internal voids, can effectively alleviate the huge volume change of SnO 2 , and facilitate the transport and storage of lithium ions. Besides, the structural stability acquires further improvement when the okra-like SnO 2 are wrapped by N-doped graphene. Similarly, this synthetic strategy can be employed to synthesize other high-capacity metal-oxide-based composites starting from various metal-organic frameworks, exhibiting promising application in novel electrode material field of lithium-ion batteries.

  12. First signal from a broadband cryogenic preamplifier cooled by circulating liquid nitrogen in a 7 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myoung Choul; Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Se Gyu; Choi, Sang Hwan; Choi, Yeon Suk; Lee, Kyung Jae; Kim, SeungYong; Kim, Hyun Sik; Stahl, Stefan

    2012-12-18

    Despite the outstanding performance of Fourier transform ion cyclotron/mass spectrometry (FTICR/MS), the complexity of the cellular proteome or natural compounds presents considerable challenges. Sensitivity is a key performance parameter of a FTICR mass spectrometer. By improving this parameter, the dynamic range of the instrument can be increased to improve the detection signal of low-abundance compounds or fragment ion peaks. In order to improve sensitivity, a cryogenic detection system was developed by the KBSI (Korean Basic Science Institute) in collaboration with Stahl-Electronics (Mettenheim, Germany). A simple, efficient liquid circulation cooling system was designed and a cryogenic preamplifier implemented inside a FTICR mass spectrometer. This cooling system circulates a cryoliquid from a Dewar to the "liquid circulation unit" through a CF flange to cool a copper block and a cryopreamplifier; the cooling medium is subsequently exhausted into the air. The cryopreamplifier can be operated over a very wide temperature range, from room temperature to low temperature environments (4.2 K). First, ion signals detected by the cryopreamplifier using a circulating liquid nitrogen cooling system were observed and showed a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) about 130% better than that obtained at room temperature.

  13. Responses of leaf nitrogen and mobile carbohydrates in different Quercus species/provenances to moderate climate changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M-H; Cherubini, P; Dobbertin, M; Arend, M; Xiao, W-F; Rigling, A

    2013-01-01

    Global warming and shortage of water have been evidenced in the recent past and are predicted for the future. Climate change will inevitably have considerable impact on plant physiology, growth, productivity and forest ecosystem functions. The present study determined the effects of simulated daytime air warming (+1 to 1.5 °C during the growing season), drought (-40% and -57% of mean precipitation of 728 mm during the 2007 and 2008 growing season, respectively) and their combination, on leaf nitrogen (N) and non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) of two Quercus species (Q. robur and Q. petraea) and provenances (two provenances for each species) grown in two soil types in Switzerland across two treatment years, to test the hypothesis that leaf N and NSC in the more water-sensitive species (Q. robur) and provenances (originating from water-rich locations) will more strongly respond to global warming and water deficit, compared to those in the more drought-tolerant species (Q. petraea) or provenances. No species- and provenance-specific responses in leaf N and NSC to the climate treatment were found, indicating that the results failed to support our hypothesis. The between-species variation of leaf N and NSC concentrations mainly reflected differences in biology of the two species, and the between-provenance variation of N and NSC concentrations apparently mirrored the climate of their origins. Hence, we conclude that (i) the two Quercus species studied are somewhat insensitive, due to their distribution covering a wide geographical and climate range, to moderate climate change within Switzerland, and (ii) a moderate global warming of B1 scenario (IPCC 2007) will not, or at least less, negatively affect the N and carbon physiology in Q. robur and Q. petraea. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. A novel mobile dual-wavelength laser altimetry system for improved site-specific Nitrogen fertilizer applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, J.; Magney, T. S.; Vierling, L. A.; Brown, T. T.; Huggins, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing fertilizer inputs while maintaining yield would increase farmer's profits and similarly lessen the adverse environmental effects of production agriculture. The development of technologies that allow precise, site-specific application of Nitrogen (N) fertilizer has thus been an important research goal over the past decades. Remote sensing of foliar crop properties and function with tractor-mountable optical sensors has thought to be useful to optimize N fertilizer applications. However, on-the-go sensing of foliar crop properties and function has proven difficult, particularly during early crop growth stages when fertilizer decisions are often made. This difficulty arises from the fact that the spectral signal measured by on-the-go sensors is dominated by soil reflectance during early crop growth stages. Here, we present the basic principles behind a novel, dual-wavelength, tractor mountable laser altimetry system that measures the laser return intensity of the reflected green and red laser light. The green (532 nm) and the red (660 nm) wavelength combination allows calculation of a modified Photochemical Reflectance Index (mPRI) that have shown to be sensitive to both crop function and foliar chemistry. The small field of view of the laser points (diameter: 4 mm) combined with its high sampling rate (1000 points sec-1) allows vegetation returns to be isolated from ground returns by using simple thresholds. First tests relating foliar N of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with laser derived mPRI are promising (r2 = 0.72). Further research is needed to test the relationship between laser derived spectral indices and crop function.

  15. Mobilization of Copper ions by Flavonoids in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes Leads to Oxidative DNA Breakage: A Structure Activity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Hussain; Rehmani, Nida; Farhan, Mohd; Ahmad, Aamir; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked dietary consumption of plant polyphenols with lower incidence of various cancers. In particular, flavonoids (present in onion, tomato and other plant sources) induce apoptosis and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. These can therefore be used as lead compounds for the synthesis of novel anticancer drugs with greater bioavailability. In the present study, we examined the chemical basis of cytotoxicity of flavonoids by studying the structure–activity relationship of myricetin (MN), fisetin (FN), quercetin (QN), kaempferol (KL) and galangin (GN). Using single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis (comet assay), we established the relative efficiency of cellular DNA breakage as MN > FN > QN > KL > GN. Also, we determined that the cellular DNA breakage was the result of mobilization of chromatin-bound copper ions and the generation of reactive oxygen species. The relative DNA binding affinity order was further confirmed using molecular docking and thermodynamic studies through the interaction of flavonoids with calf thymus DNA. Our results suggest that novel anti-cancer molecules should have ortho-dihydroxy groups in B-ring and hydroxyl groups at positions 3 and 5 in the A-ring system. Additional hydroxyl groups at other positions further enhance the cellular cytotoxicity of the flavonoids. PMID:26569217

  16. Determining the Effect of Catechins on SOD1 Conformation and Aggregation by Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Combined with Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Pi, Zifeng; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Song, Fengrui

    2018-02-01

    The aggregation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) plays an important role in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). For the disruption of ALS progression, discovering new drugs or compounds that can prevent SOD1 aggregation is important. In this study, ESI-MS was used to investigate the interaction of catechins and SOD1. The noncovalent complex of catechins that interact with SOD1 was found and retained in the gas phase under native ESI-MS condition. The conformation changes of SOD1 after binding with catechins were also explored via traveling wave ion mobility (IM) spectrometry. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) can stabilize SOD1 conformation against unfolding in three catechins. To further evaluate the efficacy of EGCG, we monitored the fluorescence changes of dimer E2,E2,-SOD1(apo-SOD1, E:empty) with and without ligands under denaturation conditions, and found that EGCG can inhibit apo-SOD1 aggregation. In addition, the circular dichroism spectra of the samples showed that EGCG can decrease the β-sheet content of SOD1, which can produce aggregates. These results indicated that orthogonal separation dimension in the gas-phase IM coupled with ESI-MS (ESI-IM-MS) can potentially provide insight into the interaction between SOD1 and small molecules. The advantage is that it dramatically decreases the analysis time. Meantime, optical spectroscopy techniques can be used to confirm ESI-IM-MS results. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Detection and quantification of natural contaminants of wine by gas chromatography-differential ion mobility spectrometry (GC-DMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, Malick; Gharbi, Nasser; Lenouvel, Audrey; Behr, Marc; Guignard, Cédric; Orlewski, Pierre; Evers, Danièle

    2013-02-06

    Rapid and direct, in situ headspace screening for odoriferous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) present in fresh grapes and in wines is a very promising method for quality control because the economic value of a wine is closely related to its aroma. Long used for the detection of VOCs in complex mixtures, miniature differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) seems therefore adequate for in situ trace detection of many kinds of VOCs of concern appearing in the headspace of selected foodstuffs. This work aims at a rapid detection, identification, and quantification of some natural and volatile contaminants of wine such as geosmin, 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB), 1-octen-3-ol, 1-octen-3-one, and pyrazines (2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine, IPMP, and 3-isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine, IBMP). In the present study, these compounds were spiked at a known concentration in wine and analyzed with a hyphenated trap-GC-DMS device. The detection of all target compounds at concentrations below the human olfactory threshold was demonstrated.

  18. Mobilization of Copper ions by Flavonoids in Human Peripheral Lymphocytes Leads to Oxidative DNA Breakage: A Structure Activity Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Arif

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have linked dietary consumption of plant polyphenols with lower incidence of various cancers. In particular, flavonoids (present in onion, tomato and other plant sources induce apoptosis and cytotoxicity in cancer cells. These can therefore be used as lead compounds for the synthesis of novel anticancer drugs with greater bioavailability. In the present study, we examined the chemical basis of cytotoxicity of flavonoids by studying the structure–activity relationship of myricetin (MN, fisetin (FN, quercetin (QN, kaempferol (KL and galangin (GN. Using single cell alkaline gel electrophoresis (comet assay, we established the relative efficiency of cellular DNA breakage as MN > FN > QN > KL > GN. Also, we determined that the cellular DNA breakage was the result of mobilization of chromatin-bound copper ions and the generation of reactive oxygen species. The relative DNA binding affinity order was further confirmed using molecular docking and thermodynamic studies through the interaction of flavonoids with calf thymus DNA. Our results suggest that novel anti-cancer molecules should have ortho-dihydroxy groups in B-ring and hydroxyl groups at positions 3 and 5 in the A-ring system. Additional hydroxyl groups at other positions further enhance the cellular cytotoxicity of the flavonoids.

  19. Ion mobility spectrometry as a simple and rapid method to measure the plasma propofol concentrations for intravenous anaesthesia monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zhou, Qinghua; Jiang, Dandan; Gong, Yulei; Li, Enyou; Li, Haiyang

    2016-11-01

    The plasma propofol concentration is important information for anaesthetists to monitor and adjust the anaesthesia depth for patients during a surgery operation. In this paper, a stand-alone ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) was constructed for the rapid measurement of the plasma propofol concentrations. Without any sample pre-treatment, the plasma samples were dropped on a piece of glass microfiber paper and then introduced into the IMS cell by the thermal desorption directly. Each individual measurement could be accomplished within 1 min. For the plasma propofol concentrations from 1 to 12 μg mL-1, the IMS response was linear with a correlation coefficient R2 of 0.998, while the limit of detection was evaluated to be 0.1 μg mL-1. These measurement results did meet the clinical application requirements. Furthermore, other clinically-often-used drugs, including remifentanil, flurbiprofen and atracurium, were found no significant interference with the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the plasma propofol. The plasma propofol concentrations measured by IMS were correlated well with those measured by the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results confirmed an excellent agreement between these two methods. Finally, this method was applied to monitor the plasma propofol concentrations for a patient undergoing surgery, demonstrating its capability of anaesthesia monitoring in real clinical environments.

  20. Detection of Potato Storage Disease via Gas Analysis: A Pilot Study Using Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Rutolo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot is a commonly occurring potato tuber disease that each year causes substantial losses to the food industry. Here, we explore the possibility of early detection of the disease via gas/vapor analysis, in a laboratory environment, using a recent technology known as FAIMS (Field Asymmetric Ion Mobility Spectrometry. In this work, tubers were inoculated with a bacterium causing the infection, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and stored within set environmental conditions in order to manage disease progression. They were compared with controls stored in the same conditions. Three different inoculation time courses were employed in order to obtain diseased potatoes showing clear signs of advanced infection (for standard detection and diseased potatoes with no apparent evidence of infection (for early detection. A total of 156 samples were processed by PCA (Principal Component Analysis and k-means clustering. Results show a clear discrimination between controls and diseased potatoes for all experiments with no difference among observations from standard and early detection. Further analysis was carried out by means of a statistical model based on LDA (Linear Discriminant Analysis that showed a high classification accuracy of 92.1% on the test set, obtained via a LOOCV (leave-one out cross-validation.

  1. Influence of nitrogen ion implantation on filtration of fluoride and cadmium using polysulfone/chitosan blend membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanichapichart, P., E-mail: pikul.v@psu.ac.th [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla 90110 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Bootluck, W. [Membrane Science and Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla 90110 (Thailand); Thopan, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, L.D. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Composite membranes between polysulfone and biopolymer chitosan were produced with variations of the chitosan content and temperature during the phase inversion process. The lower chitosan content led to lower water permeability and smaller membrane cut off. When the temperature of the phase inversion process was reduced from 25 °C to 5 °C, membrane pores were further decreased from somewhat greater than 10 kDa to a value smaller than 2 kDa. After being implanted with N-ions of 50 keV to a fluence of 1 × 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, the composite membranes showed an improvement in the rejection by about 15% for fluoride and 10% for cadmium. In addition, a slight increase in permeation flux was observed in the ion implanted membranes. Filtration tests using the N-ion implanted membranes showed that fluoride was rejected from 100 ppm NaF solution by 47% and the rejection was increased to 60% when 2.20 ppm underground water was filtered. In the case of cadmium, the rejection was increased from 80% to 90% as an effect of the N-ion implantation.

  2. Detection of chlorinated and brominated byproducts of drinking water disinfection using electrospray ionization-high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ells, B; Barnett, D A; Froese, K; Purves, R W; Hrudey, S; Guevremont, R

    1999-10-15

    The lower limit of detection for low molecular weight polar and ionic analytes using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is often severely compromised by an intense background that obscures ions of trace components in solution. Recently, a new technique, referred to as high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), has been shown to separate gas-phase ions at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. A FAIMS instrument is an ion filter that may be tuned, by control of electrical voltages, to continuously transmit selected ions from a complex mixture. This capability offers significant advantages when FAIMS is coupled with ESI, a source that generates a wide variety of ions, including solvent clusters and salt adducts. In this report, the tandem arrangement of ESI-FAIMS-MS is used for the analysis of haloacetic acids, a class of disinfection byproducts regulated by the US EPA. FAIMS is shown to effectively discriminate against background ions resulting from the electrospray of tap water solutions containing the haloacetic acids. Consequently, mass spectra are simplified, the selectivity of the method is improved, and the limits of detection are lowered compared with conventional ESI-MS. The detection limits of ESI-FAIMS-MS for six haloacetic acids ranged between 0.5 and 4 ng/mL in 9:1 methanol/tap water (5 and 40 ng/mL in the original tap water samples) with no preconcentration, derivatization, or chromatographic separation prior to analysis.

  3. Profiling the indole alkaloids in yohimbe bark with ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianghao; Baker, Andrew; Chen, Pei

    2011-09-30

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography/ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/IM-QTOF-MS) method was developed for profiling the indole alkaloids in yohimbe bark. Many indole alkaloids with the yohimbine or ajmalicine core structure, plus methylated, oxidized and reduced species, were characterized. Common fragments and mass differences are described. It was shown that the use of IMS could provide another molecular descriptor, i.e. molecular shape by rotationally averaged collision cross-section; this is of great value for identification of constituents when reference materials are usually not available. Using the combination of high resolution (~40000) accurate mass measurement with time-aligned parallel (TAP) fragmentation, MS(E) (where E represents collision energy), ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and UPLC chromatography, a total 55 indole alkaloids were characterized and a few new indole alkaloids are reported for the first time. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. PIXiE: an algorithm for automated ion mobility arrival time extraction and collision cross section calculation using global data association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Jian; Casey, Cameron P.; Zheng, Xueyun; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Wilkins, Christopher S.; Renslow, Ryan S.; Thomas, Dennis G.; Payne, Samuel H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Baker, Erin S.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-05-15

    Motivation: Drift tube ion mobility spectrometry (DTIMS) is increasingly implemented in high throughput omics workflows, and new informatics approaches are necessary for processing the associated data. To automatically extract arrival times for molecules measured by DTIMS coupled with mass spectrometry and compute their associated collisional cross sections (CCS) we created the PNNL Ion Mobility Cross Section Extractor (PIXiE). The primary application presented for this algorithm is the extraction of information necessary to create a reference library containing accu-rate masses, DTIMS arrival times and CCSs for use in high throughput omics analyses. Results: We demonstrate the utility of this approach by automatically extracting arrival times and calculating the associated CCSs for a set of endogenous metabolites and xenobiotics. The PIXiE-generated CCS values were identical to those calculated by hand and within error of those calcu-lated using commercially available instrument vendor software.

  5. Portable Solid Phase Micro-Extraction Coupled with Ion Mobility Spectrometry System for On-Site Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Simulants in Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples.

  6. Portable Solid Phase Micro-Extraction Coupled with Ion Mobility Spectrometry System for On-Site Analysis of Chemical Warfare Agents and Simulants in Water Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Han, Qiang; Cao, Shuya; Yang, Jie; Yang, Junchao; Ding, Mingyu

    2014-01-01

    On-site analysis is an efficient approach to facilitate analysis at the location of the system under investigation as it can result in more accurate, more precise and quickly available analytical data. In our work, a novel self-made thermal desorption based interface was fabricated to couple solid-phase microextraction with ion mobility spectrometry for on-site water analysis. The portable interface can be connected with the front-end of an ion mobility spectrometer directly without other modifications. The analytical performance was evaluated via the extraction of chemical warfare agents and simulants in water samples. Several parameters including ionic strength and extraction time have been investigated in detail. The application of the developed method afforded satisfactory recoveries ranging from 72.9% to 114.4% when applied to the analysis of real water samples. PMID:25384006

  7. Surfactant-Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of Cobalt Oxide/Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Framework for Enhanced Anodic Performance in Lithium Ion Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Xia; Liu, Ruili; Liu, Shaoqing; Xiao, Suo; Xu, Yi; Wang, Chi; Wu, Dongqing

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the composites of nitrogen-doped graphene framework and Co 3 O 4 nanoparticles with adjustable morphologies (NG/Co 3 O 4 ) were fabricated via a surfactant-assisted hydrothermal route for first time. Three different surfactants including triblock copolymer F127, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulfate are involved in the hybrid-assembly of graphene oxide, o-phthalonitrile and cobalt acetate in water/ethanol. Among the obtained samples, the one using F127 (NG/Co 3 O 4 -F127) manifests the most homogeneous distribution of Co 3 O 4 NPs with the size of ∼ 15 nm in the macropore-walls formed by NG. As the anode material in lithium ion battery (LIB), NG/Co 3 O 4 -F127 exhibits excellent electrochemical performance, which is superior to the other composites and most of the previously reported Co 3 O 4 based anode materials in LIBs.

  8. Nitrogen-doped carbon decorated Cu2NiSnS4 microflowers as superior anode materials for long-life lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Pei; Chen, Lihui; Ding, Yu; Du, Jun; Feng, Chuanqi; Fu, Zhengbin; Qin, Caiqin; Wang, Feng

    2018-05-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon (NC) decorated Cu2NiSnS4 (CNTS) microflower composites (NC@CNTS) were fabricated through a facile solvothermal and pyrrole polymerization with further annealing treatment. The NC@CNTS composites possessed a three-dimension (3D) microflower-like hierarchical structure. The unique microflower structure of NC@CNTS composites exhibited remarkable electrochemical performance as electrode materials for long life lithium ion batteries. The as-prepared composites had a stable and reversible capacity that reached 943 mA h g-1 after 160 cycles at a current rate of 0.1 A g-1. It showed satisfactory cycle stability and rate capability even at 2 A g-1, and specific capacity stabilized at 288 mA g-1 after 1000 cycles. The present facile and cost-effective strategy can be applied for the synthesis of other transition metal sulfide nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion applications.

  9. Distinguishing d - and l -aspartic and isoaspartic acids in amyloid β peptides with ultrahigh resolution ion mobility spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xueyun; Deng, Liulin; Baker, Erin M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) was utilized to separate Aβ peptide variants containing isomeric asparic and isoaspartic acid residues with either al- ord-form. The abundance of each variant is of great interest in Alzheimer's disease studies and also to evaluate how often these modifications are occurring in other environmental and biological samples.

  10. Investigating the role of ion-pair strategy in regulating nicotine release from patch: Mechanistic insights based on intermolecular interaction and mobility of pressure sensitive adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaoyun; Wan, Xiaocao; Liu, Chao; Fang, Liang

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare a drug-in-adhesive patch of nicotine (NIC) and use ion-pair strategy to regulate drug delivery rate. Moreover, the mechanism of how ion-pair strategy regulated drug release was elucidated at molecular level. Formulation factors including pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs), drug loading and counter ions (C 4 , C 6 , C 8 , C 10 , and C 12 ) were screened. In vitro release experiment and in vitro transdermal experiment were conducted to determine the rate-limiting step in drug delivery process. FT-IR and molecular modeling were used to characterize the interaction between drug and PSA. Thermal analysis and rheology study were conducted to investigate the mobility variation of PSA. The optimized patch prepared with NIC-C 8 had the transdermal profile fairly close to that of the commercial product (p > 0.05). The release rate constants (k) of NIC, NIC-C 4 and NIC-C 10 were 21.1, 14.4 and 32.4, respectively. Different release rates of NIC ion-pair complexes were attributed to the dual effect of ion-pair strategy on drug release. On one hand, ion-pair strategy enhanced the interaction between drug and PSA, which inhibited drug release. On the other hand, using ion-pair strategy improved the mobility of PSA, which facilitated drug release. Drug release behavior was determined by combined effect of two aspects above. These conclusions provided a new idea for us to regulate drug release behavior from patch. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of carbon on the microstructure, mechanical properties and metal ion release of Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloys containing nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Manami; Yamanaka, Kenta; Kuramoto, Koji; Ohmura, Kazuyo; Ashino, Tetsuya; Chiba, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of carbon addition on the microstructure and tensile properties of Ni-free biomedical Co-29Cr-6Mo (mass%) alloys containing 0.2 mass% nitrogen. The release of metal ions by the alloys was preliminarily evaluated in an aqueous solution of 0.6% sodium chloride (NaCl) and 1% lactic acid, after which samples with different carbon contents were subjected to hot rolling. All specimens were found to primarily consist of a γ-phase matrix due to nitrogen doping, with only the volume fraction of M23C6 increasing with carbon concentration. Owing to the very fine size of these carbide particles (less than 1 μm), which results from fragmentation during hot rolling, the increased formation of M23C6 increased the 0.2% proof stress, but reduced the elongation-to-failure. Carbon addition also increased the amount of Co and Cr released during static immersion; Co and Cr concentrations at the surfaces, which increased with increasing the bulk carbon concentrations, possibly enhanced the metal ion release. However, only a very small change in the Mo concentration was noticed in the solution. Therefore, it is not necessarily considered a suitable means of improving the strength of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo alloys, even though it has only to date been used in this alloy system. The results of this study revealed the limitations of the carbon strengthening and can aid in the design of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo-based alloys that exhibit the high durability needed for their practical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of cations containing C-N bonds in the reaction of benzene with atomic nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, Marco; Rosi, Marzio; Sgamellotti, Antonio; Ascenzi, Daniela; Bassi, Davide; Franceschi, Pietro; Tosi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    In the last few years, astronomical spectra have revealed the presence of aromatic and polyaromatic molecules in extraterrestrial environments, near carbon stars, in molecular clouds and meteorites. Moreover, the recent observation of benzene in interstellar space has noticeably increased the interest in the entire class of molecules and in their chemical behavior. In this work, we have investigated the reaction between the benzene molecule and the atomic nitrogen cation and, in particular, the mechanisms by which the reactants are converted into cationic products containing at least one C-N bond, according to the general scheme C 6 H 6 +N + →H m C n N + +C x H y . We have measured the energy dependence of the cross section in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Relevant stationary points of the potential energy surface have been studied by using the density functional theory hybrid functional B3LYP with the 6-31G* basis set. Thermochemical calculations, and the comparison with experimental results, allow us to distinguish between exoergic and endoergic processes and to obtain a detailed description of the reaction mechanisms. We show that aromatic hydrocarbons may be converted into organic-nitrogen compounds via the insertion of N + into the benzene ring and the formation of C-N bonds from C-C ring reactants

  13. Facile Synthesis of ZnO Nanoparticles on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanotubes as High-Performance Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haipeng Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ZnO/nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube (ZnO/NCNT composite, prepared though a simple one-step sol-gel synthetic technique, has been explored for the first time as an anode material. The as-prepared ZnO/NCNT nanocomposite preserves a good dispersity and homogeneity of the ZnO nanoparticles (~6 nm which deposited on the surface of NCNT. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM reveals the formation of ZnO nanoparticles with an average size of 6 nm homogeneously deposited on the surface of NCNT. ZnO/NCNT composite, when evaluated as an anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs, exhibits remarkably enhanced cycling ability and rate capability compared with the ZnO/CNT counterpart. A relatively large reversible capacity of 1013 mAh·g−1 is manifested at the second cycle and a capacity of 664 mAh·g−1 is retained after 100 cycles. Furthermore, the ZnO/NCNT system displays a reversible capacity of 308 mAh·g−1 even at a high current density of 1600 mA·g−1. These electrochemical performance enhancements are ascribed to the reinforced accumulative effects of the well-dispersed ZnO nanoparticles and doping nitrogen atoms, which can not only suppress the volumetric expansion of ZnO nanoparticles during the cycling performance but also provide a highly conductive NCNT network for ZnO anode.

  14. The mirostructure and surface hardness of Ti6Al4V alloy implanted with nitrogen ions at an elevated temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčák, P.; Černý, F.; Drahokoupil, Jan; Sepitka, J.; Tolde, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 620, Jan (2015), 48-54 ISSN 0925-8388 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hardening * microstructure * phase identification * phase quantification * ion implantation * titanium alloy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  15. Rapid analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples by dispersive solid-phase extraction based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and pulse glow discharge ion source ion mobility spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Nan; Gu, Kejia; Liu, Shaowen; Hou, Yanbing; Zhang, Jialei; Xu, Xiang; Li, Xuesheng; Pan, Canping

    2016-03-01

    An analytical method based on dispersive solid-phase extraction with a multiwalled carbon nanotubes sorbent coupled with positive pulse glow discharge ion mobility spectrometry was developed for analysis of 30 pesticide residues in drinking water samples. Reduced ion mobilities and the mass-mobility correlation of 30 pesticides were measured. The pesticides were divided into five groups to verify the separation capability of pulse glow discharge in mobility spectrometry. The extraction conditions such as desorption solvent, ionic strength, conditions of adsorption and desorption, the amounts of multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and solution pH were optimized. The enrichment factors of pesticides were 5.4- to 48.7-fold (theoretical enrichment factor was 50-fold). The detection limits of pesticides were 0.01∼0.77 μg/kg. The linear range was 0.005-0.2 mg/L for pesticide standard solutions, with determination coefficients from 0.9616 to 0.9999. The method was applied for the analysis of practical and spiked drinking water samples. All results were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. The proposed method was proven to be a commendably rapid screening qualitative and semiquantitative technique for the analysis of pesticide residues in drinking water samples on site. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Significantly enhanced electrochemical performance of lithium titanate anode for lithium ion battery by the hybrid of nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiyi, Li; Yuanyuan, Jiang; Xiaoyan, Zhou; Zaijun, Li; Zhiguo, Gu; Guangli, Wang; Junkang, Liu

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The study reported a facile synthesis of Li4Ti5O12/nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots (LTO/N,S-GQDs). The unique architecture and the introduction of N,S-GQDs create both ultrafast electron transfer and electrolyte transport. The as-prepared LTO/N,S-GQDs anode provides prominent advantage of specific capacity, high-rate performance and cycle stability. - Highlights: • We reported a new lithium titanate/nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots hybrid • The synthesis creates a crystalline interconnected porous framework composed of nanoscale LTO • The unique architecture achieves to maximize the rate performance and enhance the power density • Introduction of N,S-GQDs greatly enhances the electron transfer and the storage lithium capacity • The hybrid anode provides an excellent electrochemical performance for lithium-ion batteries - ABSTRACT: The paper reported a facile synthesis of lithium titanate/nitrogen and sulfur co-doped graphene quantum dots(LTO/N,S-GQDs). Tetrabutyl titanate was dissolved in tertbutanol and heated to refluxing state by microwave irradiation. Then, lithium acetate was added into the mixed solution to produce LTO precursor. The precursor was hybridized with N,S-GQDs in ethanol. Followed by drying and thermal annealing at 500 °C in Ar/H_2 to obtain LTO/N,S-GQDs. The synthesis creates fully crystalline interconnected porous framework composed of nanoscale LTO crystals. The unique architecture achieves to maximize the high-rate performance and enhance the power density. More importantly, the introduction of N,S-GQDs don't almost influence on the electrolyte transport, but greatly improve the electron transfer and the storage lithium capacity. The LTO/N,S-GQDs anode exhibits remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance for lithium ion battery. The specific discharge capacity is 254.2 mAh g"−"1 at 0.1C and 126.5 mAh g"−"1 at 10C. The capacity remains 96.9% at least after 2000 cycles

  17. Highly selective and sensitive phosphate anion sensors based on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors functionalized by ion imprinted polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiuling; Chen, Dunjun; Bin, Liu; Lu, Hai; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2016-06-09

    A novel ion-imprinted electrochemical sensor based on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) was developed to detect trace amounts of phosphate anion. This sensor combined the advantages of the ion sensitivity of AlGaN/GaN HEMTs and specific recognition of ion imprinted polymers. The current response showed that the fabricated sensor is highly sensitive and selective to phosphate anions. The current change exhibited approximate linear dependence for phosphate concentration from 0.02 mg L(-1) to 2 mg L(-1), the sensitivity and detection limit of the sensor is 3.191 μA/mg L(-1) and 1.97 μg L(-1), respectively. The results indicated that this AlGaN/GaN HEMT-based electrochemical sensor has the potential applications on phosphate anion detection.

  18. One-step synthesis of 3D sulfur/nitrogen dual-doped graphene supported nano silicon as anode for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruihong; Li, Junli; Qi, Kaiyu; Ge, Xin; Zhang, Qiwei; Zhang, Bangwen

    2018-03-01

    Silicon is one of the most promising candidates for next-generation anode of Lithium-ion batteries. However, poor electrical conductivity and large volume change during alloying/dealloying hinder its practical use. Here we reported a three-dimensional (3D) nitrogen and sulfur codoped graphene supported silicon nanoparticles composite (SN-G/Si) through one-step hydrothermal self-assembly. The obtained SN-G/Si was investigated in term of instrumental characterizations and electrochemical properties. The results show that SN-G/Si as a freestanding anode in LIBs delivers a reversible capacity of 2020 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles with coulombic efficiency of nearly 97%. The excellent electrochemical performance is associated with the unique structure and the synergistic effect of SN-G/Si, in which SN-G provides volume buffer for nano Si as the flexible loader, short paths/fast channels for electron/Li ion transport as porous skeleton, and low charge-transfer resistance.

  19. One-step argon/nitrogen binary plasma jet irradiation of Li4Ti5O12 for stable high-rate lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chun-Kai; Chuang, Shang-I.; Bao, Qi; Liao, Yen-Ting; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure Ar/N2 binary plasma jet irradiation has been introduced into the manufacturing process of lithium ions batteries as a facile, green and scalable post-fabrication treatment approach, which enhanced significantly the high-rate anode performance of lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12). Main emission lines in Ar/N2 plasma measured by optical emission spectroscopy reveal that the dominant excited high-energy species in Ar/N2 plasma are N2*, N2+, N∗ and Ar∗. Sufficient oxygen vacancies have been evidenced by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and Raman spectra. Nitrogen doping has been achieved simultaneously by the surface reaction between pristine Li4Ti5O12 particles and chemically reactive plasma species such as N∗ and N2+. The variety of Li4Ti5O12 particles on the surface of electrodes after different plasma processing time has been examined by grazing incident X-Ray diffraction. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) confirm that the Ar/N2 atmospheric plasma treatment facilitates Li+ ions diffusion and reduces the internal charge-transfer resistance. The as-prepared Li4Ti5O12 anodes exhibit a superior capacity (132 mAh g-1) and excellent stability with almost no capacity decay over 100 cycles under a high C rate (10C).

  20. Native mass spectrometry and ion mobility characterization of trastuzumab emtansine, a lysine-linked antibody drug conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, Julien; Champion, Thierry; Colas, Olivier; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Beck, Alain; Cianférani, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are biochemotherapeutics consisting of a cytotoxic chemical drug linked covalently to a monoclonal antibody. Two main classes of ADCs, namely cysteine and lysine conjugates, are currently available on the market or involved in clinical trials. The complex structure and heterogeneity of ADCs makes their biophysical characterization challenging. For cysteine conjugates, hydrophobic interaction chromatography is the gold standard technique for studying drug distribution, the naked antibody content, and the average drug to antibody ratio (DAR). For lysine ADC conjugates on the other hand, which are not amenable to hydrophobic interaction chromatography because of their higher heterogeneity, denaturing mass spectrometry (MS) and UV/Vis spectroscopy are the most powerful approaches. We report here the use of native MS and ion mobility (IM-MS) for the characterization of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1, Kadcyla(®)). This lysine conjugate is currently being considered for the treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer, and combines the anti-HER2 antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin(®)), with the cytotoxic microtubule-inhibiting maytansine derivative, DM1. We show that native MS combined with high-resolution measurements and/or charge reduction is beneficial in terms of the accurate values it provides of the average DAR and the drug load profiles. The use of spectral deconvolution is discussed in detail. We report furthermore the use of native IM-MS to directly determine DAR distribution profiles and average DAR values, as well as a molecular modeling investigation of positional isomers in T-DM1. © 2015 The Protein Society.