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Sample records for mitochondrial citrate transport

  1. Nutritional and Hormonal Regulation of Citrate and Carnitine/Acylcarnitine Transporters: Two Mitochondrial Carriers Involved in Fatty Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. Giudetti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The transport of solutes across the inner mitochondrial membrane is catalyzed by a family of nuclear-encoded membrane-embedded proteins called mitochondrial carriers (MCs. The citrate carrier (CiC and the carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT are two members of the MCs family involved in fatty acid metabolism. By conveying acetyl-coenzyme A, in the form of citrate, from the mitochondria to the cytosol, CiC contributes to fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis; CACT allows fatty acid oxidation, transporting cytosolic fatty acids, in the form of acylcarnitines, into the mitochondrial matrix. Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are inversely regulated so that when fatty acid synthesis is activated, the catabolism of fatty acids is turned-off. Malonyl-CoA, produced by acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a key enzyme of cytosolic fatty acid synthesis, represents a regulator of both metabolic pathways. CiC and CACT activity and expression are regulated by different nutritional and hormonal conditions. Defects in the corresponding genes have been directly linked to various human diseases. This review will assess the current understanding of CiC and CACT regulation; underlining their roles in physio-pathological conditions. Emphasis will be placed on the molecular basis of the regulation of CiC and CACT associated with fatty acid metabolism.

  2. Properties of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, J L; Zafra, M F; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1982-09-01

    Adenine nucleotides were tested as effectors of peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase from Agave americana leaves in the presence of different concentrations of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate substrates. ATP inhibited both enzyme activities but with a different inhibition profile. 1.0-7.5 mM ADP did not inhibit the peroxisomal citrate synthase in the presence of high substrate concentrations, while the mitochondrial enzyme was strongly inhibited by 1.0 mM ADP in the same conditions. Likewise, a different pattern was obtained with AMP on both peroxisomal and mitochondrial activities. The rate of citrate formation as function of acetyl-CoA and oxalacetate concentration was also studied in both fractions. Maximal velocity was highest in the peroxisomal fraction, whether acetyl-CoA or oxalacetate were the variable substrates. These differences indicate that peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthases seem to be two different isoenzymes.

  3. Characterization of Al-responsive citrate excretion and citrate-transporting MATEs in Eucalyptus camaldulensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaki, Yoshiharu; Kihara-Doi, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Yuriko; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Kawazu, Tetsu; Kobayashi, Yasufumi; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shigeru

    2013-04-01

    Many plant species excrete organic acids into the rhizosphere in response to aluminum stress to protect sensitive cells from aluminum rhizotoxicity. When the roots of Eucalyptus camaldulensis, a major source of pulp production, were incubated in aluminum-toxic medium, citrate released into the solution increased as a function of time. Citrate excretion was inducible by aluminum, but not by copper or sodium chloride stresses. This indicated that citrate is the major responsive organic acid released from the roots of this plant species to protect the root tips from aluminum damage. Four genes highly homologs to known citrate-transporting multidrugs and toxic compounds exclusion proteins, named EcMATE1-4, were isolated using polymerase chain reaction-based cloning techniques. Their predicted proteins included 12 membrane spanning domains, a common structural feature of citrate-transporting MATE proteins, and consisted of 502-579 amino acids with >60 % homology to orthologous genes in other plant species. One of the homologs, designated EcMATE1, was expressed in the roots more abundantly than in the shoots and in response to both Al and low pH stresses. Ectopic expression of EcMATE1 and 3 in tobacco hairy roots enhanced Al-responsive citrate excretion. Pharmacological characterization indicated that Al-responsive citrate excretion involved a protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation process. These results indicate that citrate excretion through citrate-transporting multidrugs and toxic compounds exclusion proteins is one of the important aluminum-tolerance mechanisms in Eucalyptus camaldulensis.

  4. Functional characterization and Me2+ ion specificity of a Ca2+-citrate transporter from Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blancato, Victor S.; Magni, Christian; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2006-01-01

    Secondary transporters of the bacterial CitMHS family transport citrate in complex with a metal ion. Different members of the family are specific for the metal ion in the complex and have been shown to transport Mg2+-citrate, Ca2+-citrate or Fe3+-citrate. The Fe3+-citrate transporter of Streptococcu

  5. Mitochondrial DNA damage associated with lipid peroxidation of the mitochondrial membrane induced by Fe2+-citrate

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Iron imbalance/accumulation has been implicated in oxidative injury associated with many degenerative diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis, beta-thalassemia, and Friedreich's ataxia. Mitochondria are particularly sensitive to iron-induced oxidative stress - high loads of iron cause extensive lipid peroxidation and membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria. Here we detected and characterized mitochondrial DNA damage in isolated rat liver mitochondria exposed to a Fe2+-citrate c...

  6. Citrate-release-mediated aluminum resistance is coupled to the inducible expression of mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Paraserianthes falcataria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Hiroki; Kojima, Katsumi

    2006-05-01

    Aluminum (Al) resistance in some leguminous plants is achieved by enhanced citrate release from roots. Enhancement requires several hours for complete activation and is postulated to involve Al-responsive genes or components. We examined the mechanism of Al-induced citrate release by studying the relationship between citrate release and expression of the mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) gene in three leguminous trees. Root elongation in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit was arrested within 24 h by 30 microM Al, whereas root elongation in Paraserianthes falcataria (L.) Neilson and Acacia mangium Willd. was inhibited mangium maintained enhanced release and accumulation of citrate for at least 28 days in response to Al treatment. Aluminum increased the accumulation of mCS transcripts in P. falcataria roots, but not in L. leucocephala roots, and thus up-regulation decreased following removal of Al. Lanthanum did not alter the expression level of mCS. Aluminum increased mCS activity concomitantly with enhanced mCS gene expression in P. falcataria, whereas it did not affect mCS activity in L. leucocephala. Aluminum content in root apices of P. falcataria was increased by cycloheximide, supporting the idea that de novo synthesis of proteins is a prerequisite for Al resistance. Our findings suggest that Al-inducible expression of mCS coupled with enhanced citrate release mediates Al resistance in P. falcataria.

  7. Mitochondrial ABC transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, R; Kispal, G

    2001-01-01

    In contrast to bacteria, mitochondria contain only a few ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters in their inner membrane. The known mitochondrial ABC proteins fall into two major classes that, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are represented by the half-transporter Atm1p and the two closely homologous proteins Mdl1p and Mdl2p. In humans two Atm1p orthologues (ABC7 and MTABC3) and two proteins homologous to Mdll/2p have been localized to mitochondria. The Atm1p-like proteins perform an important function in mitochondrial iron homeostasis and in the maturation of Fe/S proteins in the cytosol. Mutations in ABC7 are causative of hereditary X-linked sideroblastic anemia and cerebellar ataxia (XLSA/A). MTABC3 may be a candidate gene for the lethal neonatal syndrome. The function of the mitochondrial Mdl1/2p-like proteins is not clear at present with the notable exception of murine ABC-me that may transport intermediates of heme biosynthesis from the matrix to the cytosol in erythroid tissues.

  8. Identification and characterization of the mitochondrial targeting sequence and mechanism in human citrate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Liao, Ching-Chun; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Lin, Chin-Chih; Yeh, Chin-Wei; Teng, Chiao-Fang; Chang, Wen-Tsan

    2009-08-01

    Citrate synthase (CS), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, plays a decisive role in regulating energy generation of mitochondrial respiration. Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytoplasm as preproteins with an amino (N)-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) that directs mitochondria-specific sorting of the preprotein. However, the MTS and targeting mechanism of the human CS protein are not fully characterized. The human CS gene is a single nuclear gene which transcribes into two mRNA variants, isoform a (CSa) and b (CSb), by alternative splicing of exon 2. CSa encodes 466 amino acids, including a putative N-terminal MTS, while CSb expresses 400 residues with a shorter N terminus, lacking the MTS. Our results indicated that CSa is localized in the mitochondria and the N-terminal 27 amino acids, including a well-conserved RXY downward arrow (S/A) motif (the RHAS sequence), can efficiently target the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the mitochondria. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis analysis of the conserved basic amino acids and serine/threonine residues revealed that the R9 residue is essential but all serine/threonine residues are dispensable in the mitochondrial targeting function. Moreover, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing of the preprotein import receptors, including TOM20, TOM22, and TOM70, showed that all three preprotein import receptors are required for transporting CSa into the mitochondria. In conclusion, we have experimentally identified the mitochondrial targeting sequence of human CSa and elucidated its targeting mechanism. These results provide an important basis for the study of mitochondrial dysfunction due to aberrant CSa trafficking.

  9. Peroxisomal and mitochondrial citrate synthase in CAM plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, M F; Segovia, J L; Alejandre, M J; García-Peregrín, E

    1981-12-01

    Citrate synthase wa studied for the first time in peroxisomes and mitochondria of crassulacean acid metabolism plants. Cellular organelles were isolated from Agave americana leaves by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and characterized by the use of catalase and cytochrome oxidase as marker enzymes, respectively. 48,000 X g centrifugation caused the breakdown of the cellular organelles. The presence of a glyoxylate cycle enzyme (citrate synthase) and a glycollate pathway enzyme (catalase) in the same organelles, besides the absence of another glyoxalate cycle enzyme (malate synthase) is reported for the first time, suggesting that peroxisomal and glyoxysomal proteins are synthesized at the same time and housed in he same organelle.

  10. Overexpression of Citrus junos mitochondrial citrate synthase gene in Nicotiana benthamiana confers aluminum tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Luo, Keming; Li, Zhengguo; Yang, Yingwu; Hu, Nan; Wu, Yu

    2009-07-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the major factors that limit plant growth in acid soils. Al-induced release of organic acids into rhizosphere from the root apex has been identified as a major Al-tolerance mechanism in many plant species. In this study, Al tolerance of Yuzu (Citrus Junos Sieb. ex Tanaka) was tested on the basis of root elongation and the results demonstrated that Yuzu was Al tolerant compared with other plant species. Exposure to Al triggered the exudation of citrate from the Yuzu root. Thus, the mechanism of Al tolerance in Yuzu involved an Al-inducible increase in citrate release. Aluminum also elicited an increase of citrate content and increased the expression level of mitochondrial citrate synthase (CjCS) gene and enzyme activity in Yuzu. The CjCS gene was cloned from Yuzu and overexpressed in Nicotiana benthamiana using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated methods. Increased expression level of the CjCS gene and enhanced enzyme activity were observed in transgenic plants compared with the wild-type plants. Root growth experiments showed that transgenic plants have enhanced levels of Al tolerance. The transgenic Nicotiana plants showed increased levels of citrate in roots compared to wild-type plants. The exudation of citrate from roots of the transgenic plants significantly increased when exposed to Al. The results with transgenic plants suggest that overexpression of mitochondrial CS can be a useful tool to achieve Al tolerance.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA damage associated with lipid peroxidation of the mitochondrial membrane induced by Fe2+-citrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa M. Almeida

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron imbalance/accumulation has been implicated in oxidative injury associated with many degenerative diseases such as hereditary hemochromatosis, beta-thalassemia, and Friedreich's ataxia. Mitochondria are particularly sensitive to iron-induced oxidative stress - high loads of iron cause extensive lipid peroxidation and membrane permeabilization in isolated mitochondria. Here we detected and characterized mitochondrial DNA damage in isolated rat liver mitochondria exposed to a Fe2+-citrate complex, a small molecular weight complex. Intense DNA fragmentation was induced after the incubation of mitochondria with the iron complex. The detection of 3' phosphoglycolate ends at the mtDNA strand breaks by a 32P-postlabeling assay, suggested the involvement of hydroxyl radical in the DNA fragmentation induced by Fe2+-citrate. Increased levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine also suggested that Fe2+-citrate-induced oxidative stress causes mitochondrial DNA damage. In conclusion, our results show that iron-mediated lipid peroxidation was associated with intense mtDNA damage derived from the direct attack of reactive oxygen species.Desequilíbrio/acúmulo de ferro tem sido implicado em injúria oxidativa associada a diversas doenças degenerativas tais como, hemocromatose hereditária, beta-talassemia e ataxia de Friedreich. As mitocôndrias são particularmente sensíveis a estresse oxidativo induzido por ferro - um carregamento alto de ferro em mitocôndrias isoladas pode causar uma extensiva peroxidação lipídica e a permeabilização de membrana. Nesse estudo, nós detectamos e caracterizamos danos do DNA mitocondrial em mitocôndrias isoladas de fígado de rato, expostas ao complexo Fe2+-citrato, um dos complexos de baixo peso molecular. A intensa fragmentação do DNA foi induzida após a incubação das mitocôndrias com o complexo de ferro. A detecção de finais 3' de fosfoglicolato nas quebras de fitas de DNA mitocondrial pelo ensaio 32

  12. Transport of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles in unsaturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumahor, Samuel; Hron, Pavel; Metreveli, George; Schaumann, Gabriele; Vogel, Hans-Jörg

    2015-04-01

    Chemical factors and physical constraints lead to coupled effects during particle transport in unsaturated porous media. Unlike for saturated transport, studies on unsaturated transport as typical for soil are currently scarce. We investigated the mobility of citrate-coated Ag NPs in unsaturated sand (grain diameter: 0.1-0.3 mm). For three flux rates and a given pore-water ionic strength (1 mM KNO3), the citrate-coated Ag NPs were less mobile at pH = 5 compared to pH = 9. The classic Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory suggests unfavorable deposition conditions at both, the air-water interface and solid-water interface. Breakthrough curves measured under quasi-steady state unsaturated flow showed retardation of the citrate-coated Ag NPs compared to inert solute (KBr). After flushing with nanoparticle-free 1 mM KNO3 solution (pH-adjusted), retention was much lower in deeper depths compared to the surface where the particles entered the flow field. The results show a non-linear dependence of nanoparticle (NP) mobility on flux rate and water content. Especially the observed retardation similar to equilibrium sorption is in contrast to observations under saturated flow conditions. A convection-dispersion and reaction model that combines a reversible equilibrium process and a non-equilibrium interaction process reproduced the measured breakthrough curves reasonably well. From comparison between saturated and unsaturated experiments we conclude that the air-water interface is responsible for the reversible equilibrium process while the water-solid interface accounts for irreversible soption.

  13. Phenotypes of gene disruptants in relation to a putative mitochondrial malate-citrate shuttle protein in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Ueda, Yuka; Hattori, Takasumi

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial citrate transport protein (CTP) functions as a malate-citrate shuttle catalyzing the exchange of citrate plus a proton for malate between mitochondria and cytosol across the inner mitochondrial membrane in higher eukaryotic organisms. In this study, for functional analysis, we cloned the gene encoding putative CTP (ctpA) of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. The gene ctpA encodes a polypeptide consisting 296 amino acids conserved active residues required for citrate transport function. Only in early-log phase, the ctpA disruptant DCTPA-1 showed growth delay, and the amount of citric acid produced by strain DCTPA-1 was smaller than that by parental strain WU-2223L. These results indicate that the CTPA affects growth and thereby citric acid metabolism of A. niger changes, especially in early-log phase, but not citric acid-producing period. This is the first report showing that disruption of ctpA causes changes of phenotypes in relation to citric acid production in A. niger.

  14. NUCLEOTIDE-SEQUENCE AND FUNCTIONAL-PROPERTIES OF A SODIUM-DEPENDENT CITRATE TRANSPORT-SYSTEM FROM KLEBSIELLA-PNEUMONIAE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERREST, ME; SIEWE, RM; ABEE, T; SCHWARZ, E; OESTERHELT, D; KONINGS, WN

    1992-01-01

    The gene of the sodium-dependent citrate transport system from Klebsiella pneumoniae (citS) is located on plasmid pES3 (Schwarz, E., and Oesterhelt, D. (1985) EMBO J. 4, 1599-1603) and encodes a 446-amino acid protein. Transport of citrate via this citrate transport protein (CitS) is dependent on th

  15. Transport of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles in unsaturated sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumahor, Samuel K., E-mail: samuel.kumahor@ufz.de [Department of Soil Physics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany); Hron, Pavel, E-mail: pavel.hron@iwr.uni-heidelberg.de [Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 368, Raum 422, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Metreveli, George, E-mail: metreveli@uni-landau.de [Universität Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Fortstr. 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Schaumann, Gabriele E., E-mail: schaumann@uni-landau.de [Universität Koblenz-Landau, Institute for Environmental Sciences, Group of Environmental and Soil Chemistry, Fortstr. 7, D-76829 Landau (Germany); Vogel, Hans-Jörg, E-mail: hans-joerg.vogel@ufz.de [Department of Soil Physics, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZ, Theodor-Lieser-Strasse 4, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany); Institute of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 3, 06120 Halle-Saale (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Chemical factors and physical constraints lead to coupled effects during particle transport in unsaturated porous media. Studies on unsaturated transport as typical for soils are currently scarce. In unsaturated porous media, particle mobility is determined by the existence of an air–water interface in addition to a solid–water interface. To this end, we measured breakthrough curves and retention profiles of citrate-coated Ag nanoparticles in unsaturated sand at two pH values (5 and 9) and three different flow rates corresponding to different water contents with 1 mM KNO{sub 3} as background electrolyte. The classical DLVO theory suggests unfavorable deposition conditions at the air–water and solid–water interfaces. The breakthrough curves indicate modification in curve shapes and retardation of nanoparticles compared to inert solute. Retention profiles show sensitivity to flow rate and pH and this ranged from almost no retention for the highest flow rate at pH = 9 to almost complete retention for the lowest flow rate at pH = 5. Modeling of the breakthrough curves, thus, required coupling two parallel processes: a kinetically controlled attachment process far from equilibrium, responsible for the shape modification, and an equilibrium sorption, responsible for particle retardation. The non-equilibrium process and equilibrium sorption are suggested to relate to the solid–water and air–water interfaces, respectively. This is supported by the DLVO model extended for hydrophobic interactions which suggests reversible attachment, characterized by a secondary minimum (depth 3–5 kT) and a repulsive barrier at the air–water interface. In contrast, the solid–water interface is characterized by a significant repulsive barrier and the absence of a secondary minimum suggesting kinetically controlled and non-equilibrium interaction. This study provides new insights into particle transport in unsaturated porous media and offers a model concept representing the

  16. Regulation and expression of the metal citrate transporter CitM of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge - Warner, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    The main topic of this thesis is the regulation of transcription of the citM gene of Bacillus subtilis, encoding the major metal citrate transporter. CitM belongs to a small family of secondary transport proteins, the MeCit family, that is comprised of 12 members. CitM mediates the transport of meta

  17. Arg-425 of the citrate transporter CitP is responsible for high affinity binding of di- and tricarboxylatese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandell, M; Lolkema, JS

    2000-01-01

    The citrate transporter of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (CitP) catalyzes exchange of divalent anionic citrate from the medium for monovalent anionic lactate, which is an end product of citrate degradation. The exchange generates a membrane potential and thus metabolic energy for the cell. The mechanism

  18. Arg-425 of the Citrate Transporter CitP Is Responsible for High Affinity Binding of Di- and Tricarboxylates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandell, Michael; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2000-01-01

    The citrate transporter of Leuconostoc mesenteroides (CitP) catalyzes exchange of divalent anionic citrate from the medium for monovalent anionic lactate, which is an end product of citrate degradation. The exchange generates a membrane potential and thus metabolic energy for the cell. The mechanism

  19. Aquaporin-8-facilitated mitochondrial ammonia transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Leandro R; Fanelli, Elena; Altamura, Nicola; Svelto, Maria; Marinelli, Raúl A; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2010-03-05

    Aquaporin-8 (AQP8) is a membrane channel permeable to water and ammonia. As AQP8 is expressed in the inner mitochondrial membrane of several mammalian tissues, we studied the effect of the AQP8 expression on the mitochondrial transport of ammonia. Recombinant rat AQP8 was expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The presence of AQP8 in the inner membrane of yeast mitochondria was demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and immunoblotting analysis. The ammonia transport was determined in isolated mitochondria by stopped flow light scattering using formamide as ammonia analog. We found that the presence of AQP8 increased by threefold mitochondrial formamide transport. AQP8-facilitated mitochondrial formamide transport in rat native tissue was confirmed in liver (a mitochondrial AQP8-expressing tissue) vs. brain (a mitochondrial AQP8 non-expressing tissue). Comparative studies indicated that the AQP8-mediated mitochondrial movement of formamide was markedly higher than that of water. Together, our data suggest that ammonia diffusional transport is a major function for mitochondrial AQP8. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Plasma Membrane Na+-Coupled Citrate Transporter (SLC13A5 and Neonatal Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangzom D. Bhutia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available SLC13A5 is a Na+-coupled transporter for citrate that is expressed in the plasma membrane of specific cell types in the liver, testis, and brain. It is an electrogenic transporter with a Na+:citrate3− stoichiometry of 4:1. In humans, the Michaelis constant for SLC13A5 to transport citrate is ~600 μM, which is physiologically relevant given that the normal concentration of citrate in plasma is in the range of 150–200 μM. Li+ stimulates the transport function of human SLC13A5 at concentrations that are in the therapeutic range in patients on lithium therapy. Human SLC13A5 differs from rodent Slc13a5 in two important aspects: the affinity of the human transporter for citrate is ~30-fold less than that of the rodent transporter, thus making human SLC13A5 a low-affinity/high-capacity transporter and the rodent Slc13a5 a high-affinity/low-capacity transporter. In the liver, SLC13A5 is expressed exclusively in the sinusoidal membrane of the hepatocytes, where it plays a role in the uptake of circulating citrate from the sinusoidal blood for metabolic use. In the testis, the transporter is expressed only in spermatozoa, which is also only in the mid piece where mitochondria are located; the likely function of the transporter in spermatozoa is to mediate the uptake of citrate present at high levels in the seminal fluid for subsequent metabolism in the sperm mitochondria to generate biological energy, thereby supporting sperm motility. In the brain, the transporter is expressed mostly in neurons. As astrocytes secrete citrate into extracellular medium, the potential function of SLC13A5 in neurons is to mediate the uptake of circulating citrate and astrocyte-released citrate for subsequent metabolism. Slc13a5-knockout mice have been generated; these mice do not have any overt phenotype but are resistant to experimentally induced metabolic syndrome. Recently however, loss-of-function mutations in human SLC13A5 have been found to cause severe epilepsy

  1. Inhibition of flower formation by antisense repression of mitochondrial citrate synthase in transgenic potato plants leads to a specific disintegration of the ovary tissues of flowers.

    OpenAIRE

    Landschütze, V; Willmitzer, L.; Müller-Röber, B

    1995-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle constitutes a major component of the mitochondrial metabolism of eucaryotes, including higher plants. To analyze the importance of this pathway, we down-regulated mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS; EC 4.1.3.7), the first enzyme of the TCA cycle, in transgenic potato plants using an antisense RNA approach. Several transformants were identified with reduced citrate synthase activity (down to approximately 6% of wild-type activity). These plants were indistin...

  2. Transport of citrate across renal brush border membrane: effects of dietary acid and alkali loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, A.D.; Dousa, T.P.; Smith, L.H.

    1985-10-01

    Dietary acid or alkali loading was given to rats by providing 150 mM NH4Cl or 150 mM NaHCO3 in place of drinking water for 6 days; control animals received 150 mM NaCl. After 6 days, the citrate clearance was 0.04 +/- 0.01 ml/min (mean +/- SE) in the acid-loaded group, 0.9 +/- 0.1 ml/min in the control group, and 2.5 +/- 0.2 ml/min in the alkali-loaded group. At the end of the experiment, the rats were killed, and the Na gradient-dependent citrate uptake was measured in brush border membrane (BBM) vesicles prepared from each group. At 0.3 min, the ( UC)citrate uptake was 198 +/- 8 pmol/mg protein (mean +/- SE) in the acid-loaded group, 94 +/- 16 pmol/mg protein in the control group, and 94 +/- 13 pmol/mg protein in the alkali-loaded group. The rate of Na -independent (NaCl in medium replaced by KCl) ( UC)-citrate uptake by BBM vesicles was the same for acid-loaded, control, and alkali-loaded animals. Thus, the increased capacity of the proximal tubular BBM to transport citrate from the tubular lumen into the cell interior may be an important factor that contributes to decreased urinary citrate in the presence of metabolic acidosis induced by chronic dietary acid loading.

  3. News and views on mitochondrial water transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gena, Patrizia; Fanelli, Elena; Brenner, Catherine; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    The osmotic movement of water into and out of the mitochondrial matrix underlies the extraordinary plasticity that characterizes mitochondria, a feature of pivotal importance to cell bioenergetics and signaling, and of critical relevance to life-and-death cell decision. However, the biophysics and identity of mitochondrial water transport had remained mostly unexplored, until recent works suggesting high water permeability and the presence of multiple facilitated pathways of water diffusion in liver mitochondria. Here, we attempt to summarize our current view of the mechanisms of mitochondrial water transport and possible relevance of the channel-mediated pathways created by mitochondrial permeability transition, aquaporins and protein/lipid specializations. Assessing the molecular bases and dynamics of mitochondrial water permeability will help to answer the much-debated question over the role of mitochondria.

  4. Dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Francis Niescier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The polarized structure and long neurites of neurons pose a unique challenge for proper mitochondrial distribution. It is widely accepted that mitochondria move from the cell body to axon ends and vice versa; however, we have found that mitochondria originating from the axon ends moving in the retrograde direction never reach to the cell body, and only a limited number of mitochondria moving in the anterograde direction from the cell body arrive at the axon ends of mouse hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we have derived a mathematical formula using the Fokker-Planck equation to characterize features of mitochondrial transport, and the equation could determine altered mitochondrial transport in axons overexpressing parkin. Our analysis will provide new insights into the dynamics of mitochondrial transport in axons of normal and unhealthy neurons.

  5. Structure and elevator mechanism of the Na(+)-citrate transporter CitS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2016-01-01

    The recently determined crystal structure of the bacterial Na(+)-citrate symporter CitS provides unexpected structural and mechanistic insights. The protein has a fold that has not been seen in other proteins, but the oligomeric state, domain organization and proposed transport mechanism strongly re

  6. CcpA-independent regulation of expression of the Mg2+-citrate transporter gene citM by arginine metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, JB; Magni, C; Lolkema, JS; Warner, Jessica B.

    2003-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the Mg2+ -citrate transporter, CitM, the main citrate uptake system of Bacillus subtilis, was studied during growth in rich medium. Citrate in the growth medium was required for induction under all growth conditions. In Luria-Bertani medium containing citrate, citM expr

  7. CcpA-independent regulation of expression of the Mg2+-citrate transporter gene citM by arginine metabolism in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warner, JB; Magni, C; Lolkema, JS; Warner, Jessica B.

    2003-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the Mg2+ -citrate transporter, CitM, the main citrate uptake system of Bacillus subtilis, was studied during growth in rich medium. Citrate in the growth medium was required for induction under all growth conditions. In Luria-Bertani medium containing citrate, citM expr

  8. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne Bjerre; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and chan.......4). Training induced changes in whole body oxidative capacity is matched by changes in muscle CS activity in a nearly 1:1 relationship. Absolute values of CS across different studies cannot be compared unless a standardized analytical method is used by all laboratories......Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity...... and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate...

  9. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne B; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and chan.......4). Training induced changes in whole body oxidative capacity is matched by changes in muscle CS activity in a nearly 1:1 relationship. Absolute values of CS across different studies cannot be compared unless a standardized analytical method is used by all laboratories.......Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity...... and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate...

  10. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne B; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and chan......Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity...... and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate......, synthase, human, skeletal, muscle, training, not electrical stimulation, not in-vitro, not rats. Studies that reported changes in CS activity and V.O2max were included. Different training types and subject populations were analyzed independently to assess correlation between relative changes in V.O2max...

  11. Enhancing the aluminium tolerance of barley by expressing the citrate transporter genes SbMATE and FRD3

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Gaofeng; Pereira, Jorge F.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Zhou, Meixue; Magalhaes, Jurandir V.; Ryan, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Malate and citrate efflux from root apices is a mechanism of Al3+ tolerance in many plant species. Citrate efflux is facilitated by members of the MATE (multidrug and toxic compound exudation) family localized to the plasma membrane of root cells. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is among the most Al3+-sensitive cereal species but the small genotypic variation in tolerance that is present is correlated with citrate efflux via a MATE transporter named HvAACT1. This study used a biotechnological approa...

  12. Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Interaction Between Mitochondrial Malate Dehydrogenase and Citrate Synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu-chen; WANG Juan; SU Pei-ying; MA Chun-mei; ZHU Shu-hua

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) and citrate synthase (CS) are sequential enzymes in Krebs cycle. mMDH, CS and the complex between mMDH and CS (mMDH+CS) were treated with nitric oxide solution. The roles of notric oxide (NO) on the secondary structures and the interactions between mMDH and CS were studied using circular diehroism (CD) and Fourier transform surface plasmon resonance (FT-SPR), respectivley. The effects of NO on the activities of mMDH, CS and mMDH+CS were also studied. And the regulations by NO on mMDH and CS were simulated by PyMOL software. The results of SPR conifrmed that strong interaction between mMDH and CS existed and NO could signiifcantly regulate the interaction between the two enzymes. NO reduced the mass percents ofα-helix and increased that of random in mMDH, CS and mMDH+CS. NO increased the activities of CS and mMDH+CS, and inhibited the activity of mMDH. Graphic simulation indicated that covalent bond was formed between NO and Asn242 in active site of CS. However, there was no direct bond between NO and mMDH. The increase in activity of mMDH+CS complex depended mostly on the interaction between NO and CS. All the results suggested that the regulations by NO on the activity and interaction between mMDH and CS were accord with the changes in mMDH, CS and mMDH+CS caused by NO.

  13. Brassica oleracea MATE encodes a citrate transporter and enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinxin; Li, Ren; Shi, Jin; Wang, Jinfang; Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Haijun; Xing, Yanxia; Qi, Yan; Zhang, Na; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    The secretion of organic acid anions from roots is an important mechanism for plant aluminum (Al) tolerance. Here we report cloning and characterizing BoMATE (KF031944), a multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family gene from cabbage (Brassica oleracea). The expression of BoMATE was more abundant in roots than in shoots, and it was highly induced by Al treatment. The (14)C-citrate efflux experiments in oocytes demonstrated that BoMATE is a citrate transporter. Electrophysiological analysis and SIET analysis of Xenopus oocytes expressing BoMATE indicated BoMATE is activated by Al. Transient expression of BoMATE in onion epidermal cells demonstrated that it localized to the plasma membrane. Compared with the wild-type Arabidopsis, the transgenic lines constitutively overexpressing BoMATE enhanced Al tolerance and increased citrate secretion. In addition, Arabidopsis transgenic lines had a lower K(+) efflux and higher H(+) efflux, in the presence of Al, than control wild type in the distal elongation zone (DEZ). This is the first direct evidence that MATE protein is involved in the K(+) and H(+) flux in response to Al treatment. Taken together, our results show that BoMATE is an Al-induced citrate transporter and enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

  14. Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Plant Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    for metabolic pathways, which allow a wide range of adjustments of metabolic processes in response to environmental variations. Many of the metabolic pathways in plants involve the processing of redox compounds and the use of adenylates. They converge at the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) where...... therefore give a great flexibility in the type and origin of the substrate, the electron transport route(s) used, and the energy yield. At the same time special reactions, such as ascorbate biosynthesis, can take place. In this way, the mitochondrial ETC can mediate major adjustments in cellular metabolism...

  15. Discovery and characterization of novel inhibitors of the sodium-coupled citrate transporter (NaCT or SLC13A5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Kim; Brown, Janice; Jones, Jessica C; Cabral, Shawn; Futatsugi, Kentaro; Gorgoglione, Matthew; Lanba, Adhiraj; Vera, Nicholas B; Zhu, Yimin; Yan, Qingyun; Zhou, Yingjiang; Vernochet, Cecile; Riccardi, Keith; Wolford, Angela; Pirman, David; Niosi, Mark; Aspnes, Gary; Herr, Michael; Genung, Nathan E; Magee, Thomas V; Uccello, Daniel P; Loria, Paula; Di, Li; Gosset, James R; Hepworth, David; Rolph, Timothy; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Erion, Derek M

    2015-12-01

    Citrate is a key regulatory metabolic intermediate as it facilitates the integration of the glycolysis and lipid synthesis pathways. Inhibition of hepatic extracellular citrate uptake, by blocking the sodium-coupled citrate transporter (NaCT or SLC13A5), has been suggested as a potential therapeutic approach to treat metabolic disorders. NaCT transports citrate from the blood into the cell coupled to the transport of sodium ions. The studies herein report the identification and characterization of a novel small dicarboxylate molecule (compound 2) capable of selectively and potently inhibiting citrate transport through NaCT, both in vitro and in vivo. Binding and transport experiments indicate that 2 specifically binds NaCT in a competitive and stereosensitive manner, and is recognized as a substrate for transport by NaCT. The favorable pharmacokinetic properties of 2 permitted in vivo experiments to evaluate the effect of inhibiting hepatic citrate uptake on metabolic endpoints.

  16. Enhancing the aluminium tolerance of barley by expressing the citrate transporter genes SbMATE and FRD3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gaofeng; Pereira, Jorge F; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Zhou, Meixue; Magalhaes, Jurandir V; Ryan, Peter R

    2014-06-01

    Malate and citrate efflux from root apices is a mechanism of Al(3+) tolerance in many plant species. Citrate efflux is facilitated by members of the MATE (multidrug and toxic compound exudation) family localized to the plasma membrane of root cells. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is among the most Al(3+)-sensitive cereal species but the small genotypic variation in tolerance that is present is correlated with citrate efflux via a MATE transporter named HvAACT1. This study used a biotechnological approach to increase the Al(3+) tolerance of barley by transforming it with two MATE genes that encode citrate transporters: SbMATE is the major Al(3+)-tolerance gene from sorghum whereas FRD3 is involved with Fe nutrition in Arabidopsis. Independent transgenic and null T3 lines were generated for both transgenes. Lines expressing SbMATE showed Al(3+)-activated citrate efflux from root apices and greater tolerance to Al(3+) toxicity than nulls in hydroponic and short-term soil trials. Transgenic lines expressing FRD3 exhibited similar phenotypes except citrate release from roots occurred constitutively. The Al(3+) tolerance of these lines was compared with previously generated transgenic barley lines overexpressing the endogenous HvAACT1 gene and the TaALMT1 gene from wheat. Barley lines expressing TaALMT1 showed significantly greater Al(3+) tolerance than all lines expressing MATE genes. This study highlights the relative efficacy of different organic anion transport proteins for increasing the Al(3+) tolerance of an important crop species.

  17. TRANSPORT OF CITRATE CATALYZED BY THE SODIUM-DEPENDENT CITRATE CARRIER OF KLEBSIELLA-PNEUMONIAE IS OBLIGATORILY COUPLED TO THE TRANSPORT OF 2 SODIUM-IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOLKEMA, JS; ENEQUIST, H; VANDERREST, ME

    1994-01-01

    Aerobically grown Escherichia coli GM48 harboring plasmid pKScitS that codes for the sodium-dependent citrate carrier from Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) allows initial-rate measurements of citrate uptake in whole cells. The cation stoichiometry and selectivity of CitS was studied using this experimen

  18. Transport of citrate catalyzed by the sodium-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae is obligatorily coupled to the transport of two sodium ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.; Enequist, Hans; Rest, Michel E. van der

    1994-01-01

    Aerobically grown Escherichia coli GM48 harboring plasmid pKScitS that codes for the sodium-dependent citrate carrier from Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) allows initial-rate measurements of citrate uptake in whole cells. The cation stoichiometry and selectivity of CitS was studied using this experimen

  19. Deficiency of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in muscle does not cause insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ho Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that muscle insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes is due to a selective decrease in the components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and results from accumulation of toxic products of incomplete fat oxidation. The purpose of the present study was to test this hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were made severely iron deficient, by means of an iron-deficient diet. Iron deficiency results in decreases of the iron containing mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins without affecting the enzymes of the fatty acid oxidation pathway. Insulin resistance was induced by feeding iron-deficient and control rats a high fat diet. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance was evaluated by measuring glucose transport activity in soleus muscle strips. Mitochondrial proteins were measured by Western blot. Iron deficiency resulted in a decrease in expression of iron containing proteins of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in muscle. Citrate synthase, a non-iron containing citrate cycle enzyme, and long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD, used as a marker for the fatty acid oxidation pathway, were unaffected by the iron deficiency. Oleate oxidation by muscle homogenates was increased by high fat feeding and decreased by iron deficiency despite high fat feeding. The high fat diet caused severe insulin resistance of muscle glucose transport. Iron deficiency completely protected against the high fat diet-induced muscle insulin resistance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of the study argue against the hypothesis that a deficiency of the electron transport chain (ETC, and imbalance between the ETC and β-oxidation pathways, causes muscle insulin resistance.

  20. Membrane topology of the Na+/citrate transporter CitS of Klebsiella pneumoniae by insertion mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Marleen van; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2000-01-01

    The sodium ion dependent citrate transporter of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) is a member of the bacterial 2-hydroxycarboxylate transporter family. Membrane topology models of the protein. largely based on reporter molecule fusions to C-terninally truncated CitS molecules, indicate that the protein t

  1. Loop VIII/IX of the Na+-citrate transporter CitS of Klebsiella pneumoniae folds into an amphipathic surface helix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobczak, [No Value; Lolkema, JS; Sobczak, Iwona

    2005-01-01

    The sodium ion-dependent citrate transporter CitS of Klebsiella pneumoniae is a member of, the 2-hydroxycarboxylate transporter (2HCT) family whose members transport divalent citrate in symport with two sodium ions. Profiles of the hydrophobic moment suggested the presence of an amphipathic helical

  2. Mitochondrial Electron Transport and Plant Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan G; Møller, Ian Max

    2011-01-01

    redox compounds from carbon degradation are used for powering ATP synthesis. The standard ETC contains three sites of energy conservation in complexes I, III, and IV, which are in common with most other eukaryotes. However, the complexity of the plant metabolic system is mirrored in the ETC. In addition...... conservation in the ETC. The alternative oxidase provides a non-energy-conserving alternative to electron transport through complexes III and IV. There also appears to be a special coupling between specific NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and specific members of the alternative oxidase family. These additional enzymes...... therefore give a great flexibility in the type and origin of the substrate, the electron transport route(s) used, and the energy yield. At the same time special reactions, such as ascorbate biosynthesis, can take place. In this way, the mitochondrial ETC can mediate major adjustments in cellular metabolism...

  3. Mitochondrial lipid transport and biosynthesis: A complex balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about how mitochondrial lipids reach inner membrane–localized metabolic enzymes for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. Aaltonen et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201602007) and Miyata et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601082) now report roles for two mitochondrial complexes, Ups2–Mdm35 and mitochondrial contact site and cristae organizing system, in the biosynthesis and transport of mitochondrial lipids. PMID:27354376

  4. Title A de novo synthesis citrate transporter VuMATE confers aluminum resistance in rice bean (vigna umbellata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-activated organic acid anion efflux from roots is an important Al resistance mechanism in plants. We have conducted the homologous cloning and isolation of VuMATE (Vigna umbellata multidrug and toxic compound extrusion), a gene encoding a de novo citrate transporter from rice bean. Al treatment u...

  5. Apaf-1-deficient fog mouse cell apoptosis involves hypopolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane,ATP depletion and citrate accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iyoko Katoh; Shingo Sato; Nahoko Fukunishi; Hiroki Yoshida; Takasuke Imai; Shun-ichi Kurata

    2008-01-01

    To explore how the intrinsic apoptosis pathway is controlled in the spontaneous fog (forebrain overgrowth) mutant mice with an Apaf1 splicing deficiency,we examined spleen and bone marrow cells from Apaf1+/+(+/+) and Apaf1fog/fog (fog/fog) mice for initiator caspase-9 activation by cellular stresses.When the mitochondrial inner membrane potential (△Ψm) was disrupted by staurosporine,+/+ cells but not fog/fog cells activated caspase-9 to cause apoptosis,indicating the lack of apoptosomc (apoptosis protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1)/cytochrome c/(d)ATP/procaspase-9) function in fog/fog cells.However,when a marginal (~20%) decrease in △Ψm was caused by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM),peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine (0.1 mM) and UV-C irradiation (20 J/m2),both +/+ and fog/fog cells triggeredprocaspase-9 auto-processing and its downstream cascade activation.Supporting our previous results,procaspase-9 pre-existing in the mitochondria induced its auto-processing before the cytosolic caspase activation regardless of the geuotypes.Cellular ATP concentration significantly decreased under the hypoactive AΨm condition.Furthermore,we detected accumulation of citrate,a kosmotrope known to facilitate procaspase-9 dimerization,probably due to a feedback control of the Krebs cycle by the electron transfer system.Thus,mitochondrial in situ caspase-9 activation may be caused by the major metabolic reactions in response to physiological stresses,which may represent a mode of Apaf-1-independent apoptosis hypothesized from recent genetic studies.

  6. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore opening and mitochondrial energetic status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore (PTP) opening as well as the effects of mitochondrial energetic status on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening were studied. The results showed that the calcium-induced calcium release from mitochondria (mCICR) induced PTP opening. Inhibitors for electron transport of respiratory chain inhibited mCICR and PTP opening. Partial recovery of electron transport in respiratory chain resulted in partial recovery of mCICR and PTP opening. mCICR and PTP opening were also inhibited by CCCP which eliminated transmembrane proton gradient. The results indicated that mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening are largely dependent on electron transport and energy coupling.

  7. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore opening and mitochondrial energetic status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄行许; 翟大勇; 黄有国; 杨福愉

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and permeability transition pore (PTP) opening as well as the effects of mitochondrial energetic status on mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening were studied. The results showed that the calcium-induced calcium release from mitochondria (mClCR) induced PTP opening. Inhibitors for electron transport of respiratory chain inhibited mClCR and PTP opening. Partial recovery of electron transport in respiratory chain resulted in partial recovery of mClCR and PTP opening. mClCR and PTP opening were also inhibited by CCCP which eliminated transmembrane proton gradient. The results indicated that mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and PTP opening are largely dependent on electron transport and energy coupling.

  8. Disruption of mitochondrial DNA replication in Drosophila increases mitochondrial fast axonal transport in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan M Baqri

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase (pol gamma cause several progressive human diseases including Parkinson's disease, Alper's syndrome, and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. At the cellular level, disruption of pol gamma leads to depletion of mtDNA, disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and increases susceptibility to oxidative stress. Although recent studies have intensified focus on the role of mtDNA in neuronal diseases, the changes that take place in mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial axonal transport when mtDNA replication is disrupted are unknown. Using high-speed confocal microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical approaches, we report that mutations in pol gamma deplete mtDNA levels and lead to an increase in mitochondrial density in Drosophila proximal nerves and muscles, without a noticeable increase in mitochondrial fragmentation. Furthermore, there is a rise in flux of bidirectional mitochondrial axonal transport, albeit with slower kinesin-based anterograde transport. In contrast, flux of synaptic vesicle precursors was modestly decreased in pol gamma-alpha mutants. Our data indicate that disruption of mtDNA replication does not hinder mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial axonal transport, and raises the question of whether high levels of circulating mtDNA-deficient mitochondria are beneficial or deleterious in mtDNA diseases.

  9. Implication of citrate, malate and histidine in the accumulation and transport of nickel in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amari, Taoufik; Lutts, Stanley; Taamali, Manel; Lucchini, Giorgio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio; Abdelly, Chedly; Ghnaya, Tahar

    2016-04-01

    Citrate, malate and histidine have been involved in many processes including metal tolerance and accumulation in plants. These molecules have been frequently reported to be the potential nickel chelators, which most likely facilitate metal transport through xylem. In this context, we assess here, the relationship between organics acids and histidine content and nickel accumulation in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum and Brassica juncea grown in hydroponic media added with 25, 50 and 100 µM NiCl2. Results showed that M. crystallinum is relatively more tolerant to Ni toxicity than B. juncea. For both species, xylem transport rate of Ni increased with increasing Ni supply. A positive correlation was established between nickel and citrate concentrations in the xylem sap. In the shoot of B. juncea, citric and malic acids concentrations were significantly higher than in the shoot of M. crystallinum. Also, the shoots and roots of B. juncea accumulated much more histidine. In contrast, a higher root citrate concentration was observed in M. crystallinum. These findings suggest a specific involvement of malic and citric acid in Ni translocation and accumulation in M. crystallinum and B. juncea. The high citrate and histidine accumulation especially at 100µM NiCl2, in the roots of M. crystallinum might be among the important factors associated with the tolerance of this halophyte to toxic Ni levels.

  10. Automated measurement of fast mitochondrial transport in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kyle E; Liu, Xin-An; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However, a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing, and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundreds of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility.

  11. Automated Measurement of Fast Mitochondrial Transport in Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle eMiller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing recognition that fast mitochondrial transport in neurons is disrupted in multiple neurological diseases and psychiatric disorders. However a major constraint in identifying novel therapeutics based on mitochondrial transport is that the large-scale analysis of fast transport is time consuming. Here we describe methodologies for the automated analysis of fast mitochondrial transport from data acquired using a robotic microscope. We focused on addressing questions of measurement precision, speed, reliably, workflow ease, statistical processing and presentation. We used optical flow and particle tracking algorithms, implemented in ImageJ, to measure mitochondrial movement in primary cultured cortical and hippocampal neurons. With it, we are able to generate complete descriptions of movement profiles in an automated fashion of hundred of thousands of mitochondria with a processing time of approximately one hour. We describe the calibration of the parameters of the tracking algorithms and demonstrate that they are capable of measuring the fast transport of a single mitochondrion. We then show that the methods are capable of reliably measuring the inhibition of fast mitochondria transport induced by the disruption of microtubules with the drug nocodazole in both hippocampal and cortical neurons. This work lays the foundation for future large-scale screens designed to identify compounds that modulate mitochondrial motility.

  12. Isolating the segment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain responsible for mitochondrial damage during cardiac ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qun; Yin, Guotian; Stewart, Sarah; Hu, Ying [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lesnefsky, Edward J., E-mail: edward.lesnefsky@va.gov [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Medical Service, Louis Stokes Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2010-07-09

    Ischemia damages the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), mediated in part by damage generated by the mitochondria themselves. Mitochondrial damage resulting from ischemia, in turn, leads to cardiac injury during reperfusion. The goal of the present study was to localize the segment of the ETC that produces the ischemic mitochondrial damage. We tested if blockade of the proximal ETC at complex I differed from blockade distal in the chain at cytochrome oxidase. Isolated rabbit hearts were perfused for 15 min followed by 30 min stop-flow ischemia at 37 {sup o}C. Amobarbital (2.5 mM) or azide (5 mM) was used to block proximal (complex I) or distal (cytochrome oxidase) sites in the ETC. Time control hearts were buffer-perfused for 45 min. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) were isolated. Ischemia decreased cytochrome c content in SSM but not in IFM compared to time control. Blockade of electron transport at complex I preserved the cytochrome c content in SSM. In contrast, blockade of electron transport at cytochrome oxidase with azide did not retain cytochrome c in SSM during ischemia. Since blockade of electron transport at complex III also prevented cytochrome c loss during ischemia, the specific site that elicits mitochondrial damage during ischemia is likely located in the segment between complex III and cytochrome oxidase.

  13. Divalent cation chelators citrate and EDTA unmask an intrinsic uncoupling pathway in isolated mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Chinopoulos, Christos; Starkova, Natalia N; Konrad, Csaba; Kiss, Gergely; Stepanova, Anna; Popov, Vasily N

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a suppression of ROS production and uncoupling of mitochondria by exogenous citrate in Mg(2+) free medium. Exogenous citrate suppressed H2O2 emission and depolarized mitochondria. The depolarization was paralleled by the stimulation of respiration of mitochondria. The uncoupling action of citrate was independent of the presence of sodium, potassium, or chlorine ions, and it was not mediated by the changes in permeability of the inner mitochondrial membrane to solutes. The citrate transporter was not involved in the citrate effect. Inhibitory analysis data indicated that several well described mitochondria carriers and channels (ATPase, IMAC, ADP/ATP translocase, mPTP, mKATP) were not involved in citrate's effect. Exogenous MgCl2 strongly inhibited citrate-induced depolarization. The uncoupling effect of citrate was demonstrated in rat brain, mouse brain, mouse liver, and human melanoma cells mitochondria. We interpreted the data as an evidence to the existence of a hitherto undescribed putative inner mitochondrial membrane channel that is regulated by extramitochondrial Mg(2+) or other divalent cations.

  14. [Molecular genetic studies of mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency (HHH syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, S; Miyamoto, T; Kanazawa, N

    2001-11-01

    Mitochondrial ornithine transporter deficiency has been called HHH syndrome, because this disorder is characterized by three biochemical abnormalities; hyperornithinemia, hyperammonemia, and homocitrullinuria, and presents with various neurological symptoms; mental retardation, spastic paraparesis with pyramidal signs, cerebellar ataxia and episodic disturbance of consciousness or coma due to hyperammonemia. We identified four mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter gene (ORNT1) of Japanese patients with HHH syndrome. These include a nonsense mutation (R179X), associated with exon skipping, missense mutations (G27E, P126R), and an insertion of AAC between codons 228 and 229, leading to an insertion of amino acid Asn. Especially, R179X was detected 4 of 7 Japanese patients (8 of 14 alleles), implying that this is a common mutation in Japanese population.

  15. Transmembrane segment (TMS) VIII of the Na+/citrate transporter CitS requires downstream TMS IX for insertion in the Escherichia coli membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geest, M; Lolkema, JS

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the sodium ion-dependent citrate transporter CitS of IL pneumoniae contains 12 hydrophobic stretches that could form membrane-spanning segments. A previous analysis of the membrane topology in Escherichia coli using the PhoA gene fusion technique indicated that only nine o

  16. Membrane topology of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae - Evidence for a new structural class of secondary transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanGeest, M; Lolkema, JS

    1996-01-01

    The predicted secondary structure model of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) presents the la-transmembrane helix motif observed for many secondary transporters, Biochemical evidence presented in this paper is not consistent with this model. N-terminal and C-ter

  17. Membrane Topology of the Sodium Ion-dependent Citrate Carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Evidence for a New Structural Class of Secondary Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Marleen van; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1996-01-01

    The predicted secondary structure model of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) presents the 12-transmembrane helix motif observed for many secondary transporters. Biochemical evidence presented in this paper is not consistent with this model. N-terminal and C-ter

  18. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne Bjerre; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate.......4). Training induced changes in whole body oxidative capacity is matched by changes in muscle CS activity in a nearly 1:1 relationship. Absolute values of CS across different studies cannot be compared unless a standardized analytical method is used by all laboratories...... and CS activity. 70 publications with 97 intervention groups were included. There was a positive (r = 0.45) correlation (P values of CS and V.O2max did not correlate (r =- 0.07, n = 148, P = 0...

  19. Mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 regulates mitochondrial transport and dendritic arborization in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumitsu, Kansai; Hatsukano, Tetsu; Yoshimura, Azumi; Heuser, John; Fujishima, Kazuto; Kengaku, Mineko

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria dynamically change their shape by repeated fission and fusion in response to physiological and pathological conditions. Recent studies have uncovered significant roles of mitochondrial fission and fusion in neuronal functions, such as neurotransmission and spine formation. However, the contribution of mitochondrial fission to the development of dendrites remains controversial. We analyzed the function of the mitochondrial fission GTPase Drp1 in dendritic arborization in cerebellar Purkinje cells. Overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Drp1 in postmitotic Purkinje cells enlarged and clustered mitochondria, which failed to exit from the soma into the dendrites. The emerging dendrites lacking mitochondrial transport remained short and unstable in culture and in vivo. The dominant-negative Drp1 affected neither the basal respiratory function of mitochondria nor the survival of Purkinje cells. Enhanced ATP supply by creatine treatment, but not reduced ROS production by antioxidant treatment, restored the hypomorphic dendrites caused by inhibition of Drp1 function. Collectively, our results suggest that Drp1 is required for dendritic distribution of mitochondria and thereby regulates energy supply in growing dendritic branches in developing Purkinje cells.

  20. Cyclophilin D Deficiency Rescues Axonal Mitochondrial Transport in Alzheimer’s Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lan Guo; Heng Du; Shiqiang Yan; Xiaoping Wu; Guy M. McKhann; John Xi Chen; Shirley ShiDu Yan

    2013-01-01

    Normal axonal mitochondrial transport and function is essential for the maintenance of synaptic function. Abnormal mitochondrial motility and mitochondrial dysfunction within axons are critical for amyloid β (Aβ)-induced synaptic stress and the loss of synapses relevant to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms controlling axonal mitochondrial function and transport alterations in AD remain elusive. Here, we report an unexplored role of cyclophilin D (CypD)-depe...

  1. Mitochondrial ROS Produced via Reverse Electron Transport Extend Animal Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel; Gubina, Nina; Lõhmus, Madis; Nelson, Glyn; Logan, Angela; Cooper, Helen M; Navas, Plácido; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Murphy, Michael P; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-04-12

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has long been considered a cause of aging. However, recent studies have implicated ROS as essential secondary messengers. Here we show that the site of ROS production significantly contributes to their apparent dual nature. We report that ROS increase with age as mitochondrial function deteriorates. However, we also demonstrate that increasing ROS production specifically through respiratory complex I reverse electron transport extends Drosophila lifespan. Reverse electron transport rescued pathogenesis induced by severe oxidative stress, highlighting the importance of the site of ROS production in signaling. Furthermore, preventing ubiquinone reduction, through knockdown of PINK1, shortens lifespan and accelerates aging; phenotypes that are rescued by increasing reverse electron transport. These results illustrate that the source of a ROS signal is vital in determining its effects on cellular physiology and establish that manipulation of ubiquinone redox state is a valid strategy to delay aging.

  2. 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate target glycolysis, suppress survivin, and induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells and inhibit gastric orthotopic transplantation tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-An; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Guo, Xing-Yu; Xian, Shu-Lin; Lu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Glycolysis is the primary method utilized by cancer cells to produce the energy (adenosine triphosphate, ATP) required for cell proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of glycolysis may inhibit tumor growth. We previously found that both 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit glycolysis in vitro; however, the underlying inhibitory mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we used a human gastric cancer cell line (SGC-7901) and an orthotopic transplantation tumor model in nude mice to explore the specific mechanisms of 3-BrPA and SCT. We found that both 3-BrPA and SCT effectively suppressed cancer cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle, induced apoptosis, and decreased the production of lactate and ATP. 3-BrPA significantly reduced the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase activity, while SCT selectively inhibited phosphofructokinase-1 activity. Furthermore, 3-BrPA and SCT upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins (Bax, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3) and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (Bcl-2 and survivin). Finally, our animal model of gastric cancer indicated that intraperitoneal injection of 3-BrPA and SCT suppressed orthotopic transplantation tumor growth and induced tumor apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that 3-BrPA and SCT selectively suppress glycolytic enzymes, decrease ATP production, induce mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, downregulate survivin, and inhibit tumor growth. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection is an effective form of administration of 3-BrPA and SCT.

  3. Overexpression of Mitochondrial Phosphate Transporter 3 Severely Hampers Plant Development through Regulating Mitochondrial Function in Arabidopsis.

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    Fengjuan Jia

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are abundant and important organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells, which maintain metabolic communication with the cytosol through mitochondrial carriers. The mitochondrial membrane localized phosphate transporter (MPT plays vital roles in diverse development and signaling processes, especially the ATP biosynthesis. Among the three MPT genes in Arabidopsis genome, AtMPT3 was proven to be a major member, and its overexpression gave rise to multiple developmental defects including curly leaves with deep color, dwarfed stature, and reduced fertility. Transcript profiles revealed that genes involved in plant metabolism, cellular redox homeostasis, alternative respiration pathway, and leaf and flower development were obviously altered in AtMPT3 overexpression (OEMPT3 plants. Moreover, OEMPT3 plants also accumulated higher ATP content, faster respiration rate and more reactive oxygen species (ROS than wild type plants. Overall, our studies showed that AtMPT3 was indispensable for Arabidopsis normal growth and development, and provided new sights to investigate its possible regulation mechanisms.

  4. Live imaging of mitochondrial dynamics in CNS dopaminergic neurons in vivo demonstrates early reversal of mitochondrial transport following MPP(+) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, April A; Bai, Qing; Van Laar, Victor S; Zhou, Yangzhong; Ilin, Vladimir; David, Christopher N; Agim, Zeynep S; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Cannon, Jason R; Watkins, Simon C; Croix, Claudette M St; Burton, Edward A; Berman, Sarah B

    2016-11-01

    Extensive convergent evidence collectively suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Recently, changes in the dynamic properties of mitochondria have been increasingly implicated as a key proximate mechanism underlying neurodegeneration. However, studies have been limited by the lack of a model in which mitochondria can be imaged directly and dynamically in dopaminergic neurons of the intact vertebrate CNS. We generated transgenic zebrafish in which mitochondria of dopaminergic neurons are labeled with a fluorescent reporter, and optimized methods allowing direct intravital imaging of CNS dopaminergic axons and measurement of mitochondrial transport in vivo. The proportion of mitochondria undergoing axonal transport in dopaminergic neurons decreased overall during development between 2days post-fertilization (dpf) and 5dpf, at which point the major period of growth and synaptogenesis of the relevant axonal projections is complete. Exposure to 0.5-1.0mM MPP(+) between 4 and 5dpf did not compromise zebrafish viability or cause detectable changes in the number or morphology of dopaminergic neurons, motor function or monoaminergic neurochemistry. However, 0.5mM MPP(+) caused a 300% increase in retrograde mitochondrial transport and a 30% decrease in anterograde transport. In contrast, exposure to higher concentrations of MPP(+) caused an overall reduction in mitochondrial transport. This is the first time mitochondrial transport has been observed directly in CNS dopaminergic neurons of a living vertebrate and quantified in a PD model in vivo. Our findings are compatible with a model in which damage at presynaptic dopaminergic terminals causes an early compensatory increase in retrograde transport of compromised mitochondria for degradation in the cell body. These data are important because manipulation of early pathogenic mechanisms might be a valid therapeutic approach to PD. The novel transgenic lines and

  5. In vivo Imaging of Mitochondrial Transport in Single-Axon Regeneration of Zebrafish Mauthner Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Chen, Min; Hu, Bingbing; Huang, Rongchen; Hu, Bing

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial transport is essential for neuronal function, but the evidence of connections between mitochondrial transport and axon regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of living vertebrates remains limited. Here, we developed a novel model to explore mitochondrial transport in a single Mauthner axon (M axon) of zebrafish with non-invasive in vivo imaging. To confirm the feasibility of using this model, we treated labeled zebrafish with nocodazole and demonstrated that it could disrupt mitochondrial transport. We also used two-photon laser axotomy to precisely axotomize M axons and simultaneously recorded their regeneration and the process of mitochondrial transport in living zebrafish larvae. The findings showed that the injured axons with stronger regenerative capability maintain greater mitochondrial motility. Furthermore, to stimulate axon regeneration, treatment with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) could also augment mitochondrial motility. Taken together, our results provide new evidence that mitochondrial motility is positively correlated with axon regeneration in the living vertebrate CNS. This promising model will be useful for further studies on the interaction between axon regeneration and mitochondrial dynamics, using various genetic and pharmacological techniques. PMID:28174522

  6. Facilitation of axon regeneration by enhancing mitochondrial transport and rescuing energy deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Panpan; Lin, Mei-Yao; Chen, Yanmin

    2016-01-01

    Although neuronal regeneration is a highly energy-demanding process, axonal mitochondrial transport progressively declines with maturation. Mature neurons typically fail to regenerate after injury, thus raising a fundamental question as to whether mitochondrial transport is necessary to meet enhanced metabolic requirements during regeneration. Here, we reveal that reduced mitochondrial motility and energy deficits in injured axons are intrinsic mechanisms controlling regrowth in mature neurons. Axotomy induces acute mitochondrial depolarization and ATP depletion in injured axons. Thus, mature neuron-associated increases in mitochondria-anchoring protein syntaphilin (SNPH) and decreases in mitochondrial transport cause local energy deficits. Strikingly, enhancing mitochondrial transport via genetic manipulation facilitates regenerative capacity by replenishing healthy mitochondria in injured axons, thereby rescuing energy deficits. An in vivo sciatic nerve crush study further shows that enhanced mitochondrial transport in snph knockout mice accelerates axon regeneration. Understanding deficits in mitochondrial trafficking and energy supply in injured axons of mature neurons benefits development of new strategies to stimulate axon regeneration. PMID:27268498

  7. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology as early pathological changes in human models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Chong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, characterized by specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons, is caused by mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (SMN1 gene and subsequent decreased levels of functional SMN. How the deficiency of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein, leads to spinal motor neuron-specific degeneration in individuals affected by SMA remains unknown. In this study, we examined the role of SMN in mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human motor neurons by generating SMA type 1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and differentiating these cells into spinal motor neurons. The initial specification of spinal motor neurons was not affected, but these SMA spinal motor neurons specifically degenerated following long-term culture. Moreover, at an early stage in SMA spinal motor neurons, but not in SMA forebrain neurons, the number of mitochondria, mitochondrial area and mitochondrial transport were significantly reduced in axons. Knocking down of SMN expression led to similar mitochondrial defects in spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, confirming that SMN deficiency results in impaired mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, the application of N-acetylcysteine (NAC mitigated the impairment in mitochondrial transport and morphology and rescued motor neuron degeneration in SMA long-term cultures. Furthermore, NAC ameliorated the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in SMA spinal motor neurons, suggesting that NAC might rescue apoptosis and motor neuron degeneration by improving mitochondrial health. Overall, our data demonstrate that SMN deficiency results in abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology and a subsequent reduction in mitochondrial health, which are implicated in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in SMA.

  8. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology as early pathological changes in human models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chong-Chong; Denton, Kyle R; Wang, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), characterized by specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons, is caused by mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (SMN1) gene and subsequent decreased levels of functional SMN. How the deficiency of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein, leads to spinal motor neuron-specific degeneration in individuals affected by SMA remains unknown. In this study, we examined the role of SMN in mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human motor neurons by generating SMA type 1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and differentiating these cells into spinal motor neurons. The initial specification of spinal motor neurons was not affected, but these SMA spinal motor neurons specifically degenerated following long-term culture. Moreover, at an early stage in SMA spinal motor neurons, but not in SMA forebrain neurons, the number of mitochondria, mitochondrial area and mitochondrial transport were significantly reduced in axons. Knocking down of SMN expression led to similar mitochondrial defects in spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, confirming that SMN deficiency results in impaired mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, the application of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) mitigated the impairment in mitochondrial transport and morphology and rescued motor neuron degeneration in SMA long-term cultures. Furthermore, NAC ameliorated the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in SMA spinal motor neurons, suggesting that NAC might rescue apoptosis and motor neuron degeneration by improving mitochondrial health. Overall, our data demonstrate that SMN deficiency results in abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology and a subsequent reduction in mitochondrial health, which are implicated in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in SMA.

  9. Electrophysiological characterization of human and mouse sodium-dependent citrate transporters (NaCT/SLC13A5) reveal species differences with respect to substrate sensitivity and cation dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Ruud; Peeva, Polina M; Rong, James X; Sher, Emanuele

    2015-11-01

    The citric acid cycle intermediate citrate plays a crucial role in metabolic processes such as fatty acid synthesis, glucose metabolism, and β-oxidation. Citrate is imported from the circulation across the plasma membrane into liver cells mainly by the sodium-dependent citrate transporter (NaCT; SLC13A5). Deletion of NaCT from mice led to metabolic changes similar to caloric restriction; therefore, NaCT has been proposed as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we expressed mouse and human NaCT into Xenopus oocytes and examined some basic functional properties of those transporters. Interestingly, striking differences were found between mouse and human NaCT with respect to their sensitivities to citric acid cycle intermediates as substrates for these transporters. Mouse NaCT had at least 20- to 800-fold higher affinity for these intermediates than human NaCT. Mouse NaCT is fully active at physiologic plasma levels of citrate, but its human counterpart is not. Replacement of extracellular sodium by other monovalent cations revealed that human NaCT was markedly less dependent on extracellular sodium than mouse NaCT. The low sensitivity of human NaCT for citrate raises questions about the translatability of this target from the mouse to the human situation and raises doubts about the validity of this transporter as a therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic diseases in humans.

  10. The Role of Lithium Carbonate and Lithium Citrate in Regulating Urinary Citrate Level and Preventing Nephrolithiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Aggarwal, Piyush; Li, Xiaoming; Oakman, Crystale; Wang, Zhiping; Rodriguez, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Urinary Citrate is an inhibitor of Calcium oxalate stone formation. It is reabsorbed in the proximal kidney through sodium dicarboxylate co-transporters (NaDC-1, NaDC-3) present in the renal tubular epithelium. Lithium (Li) is a known potent inhibitor of these transporters. We investigated the effect of lithium carbonate (LiC) and lithium citrate (LiCit) in regulating urinary citrate levels and preventing nephrolithiasis (NL) in the rat model. Experimental approach: We...

  11. Pyruvate fuels mitochondrial respiration and proliferation of breast cancer cells: effect of monocarboxylate transporter inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diers, Anne R; Broniowska, Katarzyna A; Chang, Ching-Fang; Hogg, Neil

    2012-06-15

    Recent studies have highlighted the fact that cancer cells have an altered metabolic phenotype, and this metabolic reprogramming is required to drive the biosynthesis pathways necessary for rapid replication and proliferation. Specifically, the importance of citric acid cycle-generated intermediates in the regulation of cancer cell proliferation has been recently appreciated. One function of MCTs (monocarboxylate transporters) is to transport the citric acid cycle substrate pyruvate across the plasma membrane and into mitochondria, and inhibition of MCTs has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy to target metabolic pathways in cancer. In the present paper, we examined the effect of different metabolic substrates (glucose and pyruvate) on mitochondrial function and proliferation in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that cancer cells proliferate more rapidly in the presence of exogenous pyruvate when compared with lactate. Pyruvate supplementation fuelled mitochondrial oxygen consumption and the reserve respiratory capacity, and this increase in mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. In addition, inhibition of cellular pyruvate uptake using the MCT inhibitor α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid impaired mitochondrial respiration and decreased cell growth. These data demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial metabolism in proliferative responses and highlight a novel mechanism of action for MCT inhibitors through suppression of pyruvate-fuelled mitochondrial respiration.

  12. Electron transport chain inhibitors induce microglia activation through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Junli; Jiang, Zhongxin; Chen, Xuehong; Liu, Mengyang; Li, Jing; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be mediators of excessive microglial activation, yet the resources and mechanism are not fully understood. Here we stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells and primary microglial cells with different inhibitors of electron transport chain (ETC), rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), antimycin A, and NaN3 to induce mitochondrial ROS production and we observed the role of mitochondrial ROS in microglial activation. Our results showed that ETC inhibitors resulted in significant changes in cell viability, microglial morphology, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in both primary cultural microglia and BV-2 cell lines. Moreover, ETC inhibitors, especially rotenone and antimycin A stimulated secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by microglia with marked activation of mitogen-activated proteinkinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which could be blocked by specific inhibitors of MAPK and NF-κB and mitochondrial antioxidants, Mito-TEMPO. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain in microglia led to production of mitochondrial ROS and therefore may activate MAPK/NF-кB dependent inflammatory cytokines release in microglia, which indicated that mitochondrial-derived ROS were contributed to microglial activation.

  13. Sites of inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport in macrophage-injured neoplastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, D L; Lehninger, A L

    1982-11-01

    Previous work has shown that injury of neoplastic cells by cytotoxic macrophages (CM) in cell culture is accompanied by inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. We have investigated the nature of this inhibition by studying mitochondrial respiration in CM-injured leukemia L1210 cells permeabilized with digitonin. CM-induced injury affects the mitochondrial respiratory chain proper. Complex I (NADH-coenzyme Q reductase) and complex II (succinate-coenzyme Q reductase) are markedly inhibited. In addition a minor inhibition of cytochrome oxidase was found. Electron transport from alpha-glycerophosphate through the respiratory chain to oxygen is unaffected and permeabilized CM-injured L1210 cells oxidizing this substrate exhibit acceptor control. However, glycerophosphate shuttle activity was found not to occur within CM-injured or uninjured L1210 cells in culture hence, alpha-glycerophosphate is apparently unavailable for mitochondrial oxidation in the intact cell. It is concluded that the failure of respiration of intact neoplastic cells injured by CM is caused by the nearly complete inhibition of complexes I and II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The time courses of CM-induced electron transport inhibition and arrest of L1210 cell division are examined and the possible relationship between these phenomena is discussed.

  14. Molecular characterization of the citrate transporter gene TaMATE1 and expression analysis of upstream genes involved in organic acid transport under Al stress in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Oliveira, Ana Luísa; Martins-Lopes, Paula; Tolrá, Roser; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Tarquis, Marta; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; Benito, César

    2014-11-01

    In bread wheat, besides malate, the importance of citrate efflux for Al tolerance has also been reported. For better understanding the Al tolerance mechanism in bread wheat, here, we performed both a molecular characterization of the citrate transporter gene TaMATE1 and an investigation on the upstream variations in citrate and malate transporter genes. TaMATE1 belong to multidrug transporter protein family, which are located on the long arm of homoeologous group 4 chromosomes (TaMATE1-4A, TaMATE1-4B TaMATE1-4D). TaMATE1 homoeologues transcript expression study exhibited the preponderance of homoeologue TaMATE1-4B followed by TaMATE1-4D whereas homoeologue TaMATE1-4A seemed to be silenced. TaMATE1, particularly homoeologue TaMATE1-4B and TaALMT1 transcripts were much more expressed in the root apices than in shoots of Al tolerant genotype Barbela 7/72/92 under both control and Al stress conditions. In addition, in both tissues of Barbela 7/72/92, higher basal levels of these gene transcripts were observed than in Anahuac (Al sensitive). Noticeably, the presence of a transposon in the upstream of TaMATE1-4B in Barbela 7/72/92 seems to be responsible for its higher transcript expression where it may confer citrate efflux. Thus, promoter variations (transposon in TaMATE1-4B upstream and type VI promoter in TaALMT1) associated with higher basal transcript expression of TaMATE1-4B and TaALMT1 clearly show how different mechanisms for Al tolerance operate simultaneously in a single genotype. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Barbela 7/72/92 has favorable alleles for these organic acids transporter genes which could be utilized through genomic assisted selection to develop improved cultivars for acidic soils.

  15. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

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    Jing-Fang Wang

    Full Text Available Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113. Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and

  16. Insights into the mutation-induced HHH syndrome from modeling human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 is reported in coupling with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder. For in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the disease, it is crucially important to acquire the 3D structure of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1. Since no such structure is available in the current protein structure database, we have developed it via computational approaches based on the recent NMR structure of human mitochondrial uncoupling protein (Berardi MJ, Chou JJ, et al. Nature 2011, 476:109-113). Subsequently, we docked the ligand L-ornithine into the computational structure to search for the favorable binding mode. It was observed that the binding interaction for the most favorable binding mode is featured by six remarkable hydrogen bonds between the receptor and ligand, and that the most favorable binding mode shared the same ligand-binding site with most of the homologous mitochondrial carriers from different organisms, implying that the ligand-binding sites are quite conservative in the mitochondrial carriers family although their sequences similarity is very low with 20% or so. Moreover, according to our structural analysis, the relationship between the disease-causing mutations of human mitochondrial ornithine transporter-1 and the HHH syndrome can be classified into the following three categories: (i) the mutation occurs in the pseudo-repeat regions so as to change the region of the protein closer to the mitochondrial matrix; (ii) the mutation is directly affecting the substrate binding pocket so as to reduce the substrate binding affinity; (iii) the mutation is located in the structural region closer to the intermembrane space that can significantly break the salt bridge networks of the protein. These findings may provide useful insights for in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanism of the HHH syndrome and developing effective

  17. Mitochondrial swelling impairs the transport of organelles in cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasik, Allen; Safiulina, Dzhamilja; Choubey, Vinay; Kuum, Malle; Zharkovsky, Alexander; Veksler, Vladimir

    2007-11-09

    Organelle transport in neuronal processes is central to the organization, developmental fate, and functions of neurons. Organelles must be transported through the slender, highly branched neuronal processes, making the axonal transport vulnerable to any perturbation. However, some intracellular structures like mitochondria are able to considerably modify their volume. We therefore hypothesized that swollen mitochondria could impair the traffic of other organelles in neurite shafts. To test this hypothesis, we have investigated the effects of mitochondrial swellers on the organelle traffic. Our data demonstrate that treatment of neurons with potassium ionophore valinomycin led to the fast time-dependent inhibition of organelle movement in cerebellar granule neurons. Similar inhibition was observed in neurons treated with the inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, sodium azide and antimycin, which also induced swelling. No decrease in the motility of organelles was observed in cultures treated with inhibitors of ATP production or transport, oligomycin or bongkrekic acid, suggesting that inhibition of the ATP-generating activity itself without swelling does not affect the motility of organelles. The effect of swellers on the traffic was more important in thin processes, thus indicating the role of steric hindrance of swollen mitochondria. We propose that the size and morphology of the transported cargo is also relevant for seamless axonal transport and speculate that mitochondrial swelling could be one of the reasons for impaired organelle transport in neuronal processes.

  18. Measurement of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mediated by three transport proteins: VDAC1, the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, and the Ca2+ uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Palty, Raz; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2014-02-01

    Ca(2+) is a ubiquitous cellular signal, with changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration not only stimulating a number of intercellular events but also triggering cell death pathways, including apoptosis. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release play pivotal roles in cellular physiology by regulating intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, energy metabolism and cell death. Ca(2+) transport across the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes is mediated by several proteins, including channels, antiporters, and a uniporter. In this article, we present the background to several methods now established for assaying mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport activity across both mitochondrial membranes. The first of these is Ca(2+) transport mediated by the outer mitochondrial protein, the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1, also known as porin 1), both as a purified protein reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer (PLB) or into liposomes and as a mitochondrial membrane-embedded protein. The second method involves isolated mitochondria for assaying the activity of an inner mitochondrial membrane transport protein, the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) that transports Ca(2+) and is powered by the steep mitochondrial membrane potential. In the event of Ca(2+) overload, this leads to opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) and cell death. The third method describes how Na(+)-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) efflux mediated by mitochondrial NCLX, a member of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily, can be assayed in digitonin-permeabilized HEK-293 cells. The Ca(2+)-transport assays can be performed under various conditions and in combination with inhibitors, allowing detailed characterization of the transport activity of interest.

  19. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T.C.; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax. PMID:27283492

  20. IFPA meeting 2015 workshop report I: placental mitochondrial function, transport systems and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco-Miotto, T; Blundell, C; Buckberry, S; Chamley, L; Chong, S; Cottrell, E; Dawson, P; Hanna, C; Holland, O; Lewis, R M; Moritz, K; Myatt, L; Perkins, A V; Powell, T; Saffery, R; Sferruzzi-Perri, A; Sibley, C; Simmons, D; O'Tierney-Ginn, P F

    2016-12-01

    Workshops are an important part of the IFPA annual meeting as they allow for discussion of specialized topics. At IFPA meeting 2015 there were twelve themed workshops, three of which are summarized in this report. These workshops covered areas of placental regulation and nutrient handling: 1) placental epigenetics; 2) placental mitochondrial function; 3) placental transport systems.

  1. Post-translational modification by acetylation regulates the mitochondrial carnitine/acylcarnitine transport protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, Nicola; Tonazzi, Annamaria; Console, Lara; Indiveri, Cesare

    2017-02-01

    The carnitine/acylcarnitine transporter (CACT; SLC25A20) mediates an antiport reaction allowing entry of acyl moieties in the form of acylcarnitines into the mitochondrial matrix and exit of free carnitine. The transport function of CACT is crucial for the β-oxidation pathway. In this work, it has been found that CACT is partially acetylated in rat liver mitochondria as demonstrated by anti-acetyl-lys antibody immunostaining. Acetylation was reversed by the deacetylase Sirtuin 3 in the presence of NAD(+). After treatment of the mitochondrial extract with the deacetylase, the CACT activity, assayed in proteoliposomes, increased. The half-saturation constant of the CACT was not influenced, while the V max was increased by deacetylation. Sirtuin 3 was not able to deacetylate the CACT when incubation was performed in intact mitoplasts, indicating that the acetylation sites are located in the mitochondrial matrix. Prediction on the localization of acetylated residues by bioinformatics correlates well with the experimental data. Recombinant CACT treated with acetyl-CoA was partially acetylated by non-enzymatic mechanism with a corresponding decrease of transport activity. The experimental data indicate that acetylation of CACT inhibits its transport activity, and thus may contribute to the regulation of the mitochondrial β-oxidation pathway.

  2. Relationship between mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction, development, and life extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane L Rea

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies have shown that disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC function in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can result in life extension. Counter to these findings, many mutations that disrupt ETC function in humans are known to be pathologically life-shortening. In this study, we have undertaken the first formal investigation of the role of partial mitochondrial ETC inhibition and its contribution to the life-extension phenotype of C. elegans. We have developed a novel RNA interference (RNAi dilution strategy to incrementally reduce the expression level of five genes encoding mitochondrial proteins in C. elegans: atp-3, nuo-2, isp-1, cco-1, and frataxin (frh-1. We observed that each RNAi treatment led to marked alterations in multiple ETC components. Using this dilution technique, we observed a consistent, three-phase lifespan response to increasingly greater inhibition by RNAi: at low levels of inhibition, there was no response, then as inhibition increased, lifespan responded by monotonically lengthening. Finally, at the highest levels of RNAi inhibition, lifespan began to shorten. Indirect measurements of whole-animal oxidative stress showed no correlation with life extension. Instead, larval development, fertility, and adult size all became coordinately affected at the same point at which lifespan began to increase. We show that a specific signal, initiated during the L3/L4 larval stage of development, is sufficient for initiating mitochondrial dysfunction-dependent life extension in C. elegans. This stage of development is characterized by the last somatic cell divisions normally undertaken by C. elegans and also by massive mitochondrial DNA expansion. The coordinate effects of mitochondrial dysfunction on several cell cycle-dependent phenotypes, coupled with recent findings directly linking cell cycle progression with mitochondrial activity in C. elegans, lead us to propose that cell cycle checkpoint control

  3. Plasma membrane electron transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the presence of mitochondrial respiratory subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herst, Patries M; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W; Bircham, Peter W; Berridge, Michael V

    2008-09-01

    Most investigations into plasma membrane electron transport (PMET) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the inducible ferric reductase responsible for iron uptake under iron/copper-limiting conditions. In this paper, we describe a PMET system, distinct from ferric reductase, which reduces the cell-impermeable water-soluble tetrazolium dye, 2-(4-iodophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulphophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium monosodium salt (WST-1), under normal iron/copper conditions. WST-1/1-methoxy-phenazine methosulphate reduction was unaffected by anoxia and relatively insensitive to diphenyleneiodonium. Dye reduction was increased when intracellular NADH levels were high, which, in S. cerevisiae, required deletion of numerous genes associated with NADH recycling. Genome-wide screening of all viable nuclear gene-deletion mutants of S. cerevisiae revealed that, although mitochondrial electron transport per se was not required, the presence of several nuclear and mitochondrially encoded subunits of respiratory complexes III and IV was mandatory for PMET. This suggests some form of interaction between components of mitochondrial and plasma membrane electron transport. In support of this, mitochondrial tubular networks in S. cerevisiae were shown to be located in close proximity to the plasma membrane using confocal microscopy.

  4. Evidence for several cysteine transport mechanisms in the mitochondrial membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Pong; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is essential for many mitochondrial processes in plants, including translation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and cyanide detoxification. Its biosynthesis is carried out by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL) which can be found in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria. Mutants lacking one compartment-specific OAS-TL isoform show viable phenotypes, leading to the hypothesis that the organellar membranes are permeable to substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. In this report, we show that exogenouslly supplied [(35)S]cysteine accumulates in the mitochondrial fraction and is taken up into isolated mitochondria for in organello protein synthesis. Analysis of cysteine uptake by isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts indicates that cysteine is transported by multiple facilitated mechanisms that operate in a concentration gradient-dependent manner. In addition, cysteine uptake is dependent mainly on the ΔpH across the inner membrane. The rates of mitochondrial cysteine transport can be mildly altered by specific metabolites in the cyanide detoxification-linked sulfide oxidation, but not by most substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the transport of cysteine plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular cysteine biosynthesis as well as modulating the availability of sulfur for mitochondrial metabolism.

  5. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology are common pathological denominators in SOD1 and TDP43 ALS mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrané, Jordi; Cortez, Czrina; Gan, Wen-Biao; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2014-03-15

    Neuronal mitochondrial morphology abnormalities occur in models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) associated with SOD1 and TDP43 mutations. These abnormalities have been linked to mitochondrial axonal transport defects, but the temporal and spatial relationship between mitochondrial morphology and transport alterations in these two distinct genetic forms of ALS has not been investigated in vivo. To address this question, we crossed SOD1 (wild-type SOD1(WT) and mutant SOD1(G93A)) or TDP43 (mutant TDP43(A315T)) transgenic mice with mice expressing the fluorescent protein Dendra targeted to mitochondria in neurons (mitoDendra). At different time points during the disease course, we studied mitochondrial transport in the intact sciatic nerve of living mice and analyzed axonal mitochondrial morphology at multiple sites, spanning from the spinal cord to the motor terminals. Defects of retrograde mitochondrial transport were detected at 45 days of age, before the onset of symptoms, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) mice, but not in SOD1(WT). At later disease stages, also anterograde mitochondrial transport was affected in both mutant mouse lines. In SOD1(G93A) mice, mitochondrial morphological abnormalities were apparent at 15 days of age, thus preceding transport abnormalities. Conversely, in TDP43(A315T) mice, morphological abnormalities appeared after the onset of transport defects. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that neuronal mitochondrial transport and morphology abnormalities occur in vivo and that they are common denominators of different genetic forms of the ALS. At the same time, differences in the temporal and spatial manifestation of mitochondrial abnormalities between the two mouse models of familial ALS imply that different molecular mechanisms may be involved.

  6. Impaired mitochondrial biogenesis, defective axonal transport of mitochondria, abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and synaptic degeneration in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Marcus J; Manczak, Maria; Mao, Peizhong; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) in synapses and synaptic mitochondria causes synaptic mitochondrial failure and synaptic degeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this study was to better understand the effects of Aβ in mitochondrial activity and synaptic alterations in neurons from a mouse model of AD. Using primary neurons from a well-characterized Aβ precursor protein transgenic (AβPP) mouse model (Tg2576 mouse line), for the first time, we studied mitochondrial activity, including axonal transport of mitochondria, mitochondrial dynamics, morphology and function. Further, we also studied the nature of Aβ-induced synaptic alterations, and cell death in primary neurons from Tg2576 mice, and we sought to determine whether the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 could mitigate the effects of oligomeric Aβ. We found significantly decreased anterograde mitochondrial movement, increased mitochondrial fission and decreased fusion, abnormal mitochondrial and synaptic proteins and defective mitochondrial function in primary neurons from AβPP mice compared with wild-type (WT) neurons. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a large number of small mitochondria and structurally damaged mitochondria, with broken cristae in AβPP primary neurons. We also found an increased accumulation of oligomeric Aβ and increased apoptotic neuronal death in the primary neurons from the AβPP mice relative to the WT neurons. Our results revealed an accumulation of intraneuronal oligomeric Aβ, leading to mitochondrial and synaptic deficiencies, and ultimately causing neurodegeneration in AβPP cultures. However, we found that the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31 restored mitochondrial transport and synaptic viability, and decreased the percentage of defective mitochondria, indicating that SS31 protects mitochondria and synapses from Aβ toxicity.

  7. Gem1 and ERMES Do Not Directly Affect Phosphatidylserine Transport from ER to Mitochondria or Mitochondrial Inheritance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Tammy T; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Choi, Jae-Yeon

    2012-01-01

    In yeast, a protein complex termed the ER-Mitochondria Encounter Structure (ERMES) tethers mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum. ERMES proteins are implicated in a variety of cellular functions including phospholipid synthesis, mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial attachment to actin......, polarized mitochondrial movement into daughter cells during division, and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The mitochondrial-anchored Gem1 GTPase has been proposed to regulate ERMES functions. Here, we show that ERMES and Gem1 have no direct role in the transport of phosphatidylserine (PS) from...... the ER to mitochondria during the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), as PS to PE conversion is not affected in ERMES or gem1 mutants. In addition, we report that mitochondrial inheritance defects in ERMES mutants are a secondary consequence of mitochondrial morphology defects, arguing against...

  8. Hydrogen sulfide-mediated stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport involves inhibition of the mitochondrial phosphodiesterase 2A, elevation of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Módis, Katalin; Panopoulos, Panagiotis; Coletta, Ciro; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Szabo, Csaba

    2013-11-01

    Although hydrogen sulfide (H₂S) is generally known as a mitochondrial poison, recent studies show that lower concentrations of H₂S play a physiological role in the stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport and cellular bioenergetics. This effect involves electron donation at Complex II. Other lines of recent studies demonstrated that one of the biological actions of H₂S involves inhibition of cAMP and cGMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Given the emerging functional role of the mitochondrial isoform of cAMP PDE (PDE2A) in the regulation of mitochondrial function the current study investigated whether cAMP-dependent mechanisms participate in the stimulatory effect of NaHS on mitochondrial function. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, partial digestion studies localized PDE2A into the mitochondrial matrix. NaHS exerted a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on recombinant PDE2A enzyme in vitro. Moreover, NaHS induced an elevation of cAMP levels when added to isolated mitochondria and stimulated the mitochondrial electron transport. The latter effect was inhibited by Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The current findings suggest that the direct electron donating effect of NaHS is amplified by an intramitochondrial cAMP system, which may involve the inhibition of PDE2A and subsequent, cAMP-mediated stimulation of PKA.

  9. A Trypanosomatid Iron Transporter that Regulates Mitochondrial Function Is Required for Leishmania amazonensis Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidyottam Mittra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron, an essential co-factor of respiratory chain proteins, is critical for mitochondrial function and maintenance of its redox balance. We previously reported a role for iron uptake in differentiation of Leishmania amazonensis into virulent amastigotes, by a mechanism that involves reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is independent of the classical pH and temperature cues. Iron import into mitochondria was proposed to be essential for this process, but evidence supporting this hypothesis was lacking because the Leishmania mitochondrial iron transporter was unknown. Here we describe MIT1, a homolog of the mitochondrial iron importer genes mrs3 (yeast and mitoferrin-1 (human that is highly conserved among trypanosomatids. MIT1 expression was essential for the survival of Trypanosoma brucei procyclic but not bloodstream forms, which lack functional respiratory complexes. L. amazonensis LMIT1 null mutants could not be generated, suggesting that this mitochondrial iron importer is essential for promastigote viability. Promastigotes lacking one LMIT1 allele (LMIT1/Δlmit1 showed growth defects and were more susceptible to ROS toxicity, consistent with the role of iron as the essential co-factor of trypanosomatid mitochondrial superoxide dismutases. LMIT1/Δlmit1 metacyclic promastigotes were unable to replicate as intracellular amastigotes after infecting macrophages or cause cutaneous lesions in mice. When induced to differentiate axenically into amastigotes, LMIT1/Δlmit1 showed strong defects in iron content and function of mitochondria, were unable to upregulate the ROS-regulatory enzyme FeSOD, and showed mitochondrial changes suggestive of redox imbalance. Our results demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial iron uptake in trypanosomatid parasites, and highlight the role of LMIT1 in the iron-regulated process that orchestrates differentiation of L. amazonensis into infective amastigotes.

  10. Glutamate transport decreases mitochondrial pH and modulates oxidative metabolism in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarias, Guillaume; Perreten, Hélène; Lengacher, Sylvain; Poburko, Damon; Demaurex, Nicolas; Magistretti, Pierre J; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2011-03-09

    During synaptic activity, the clearance of neuronally released glutamate leads to an intracellular sodium concentration increase in astrocytes that is associated with significant metabolic cost. The proximity of mitochondria at glutamate uptake sites in astrocytes raises the question of the ability of mitochondria to respond to these energy demands. We used dynamic fluorescence imaging to investigate the impact of glutamatergic transmission on mitochondria in intact astrocytes. Neuronal release of glutamate induced an intracellular acidification in astrocytes, via glutamate transporters, that spread over the mitochondrial matrix. The glutamate-induced mitochondrial matrix acidification exceeded cytosolic acidification and abrogated cytosol-to-mitochondrial matrix pH gradient. By decoupling glutamate uptake from cellular acidification, we found that glutamate induced a pH-mediated decrease in mitochondrial metabolism that surpasses the Ca(2+)-mediated stimulatory effects. These findings suggest a model in which excitatory neurotransmission dynamically regulates astrocyte energy metabolism by limiting the contribution of mitochondria to the metabolic response, thereby increasing the local oxygen availability and preventing excessive mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

  11. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Geraldo; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Malosetti, Marcos; Viana, Joao Herbert Moreira; Menezes, Cicero Bezerra; Silva, Lidianne Assis; Guimaraes, Claudia Teixeira; Coelho, Antonio Marcos; Kochian, Leon V.; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Magalhaes, Jurandir Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world’s arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha–1 grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha–1 independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries. PMID:26681519

  12. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Carvalho Jr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world’s arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha–1 grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha–1 independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries.

  13. Back to Acid Soil Fields: The Citrate Transporter SbMATE Is a Major Asset for Sustainable Grain Yield for Sorghum Cultivated on Acid Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Geraldo; Schaffert, Robert Eugene; Malosetti, Marcos; Viana, Joao Herbert Moreira; Menezes, Cicero Bezerra; Silva, Lidianne Assis; Guimaraes, Claudia Teixeira; Coelho, Antonio Marcos; Kochian, Leon V; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Magalhaes, Jurandir Vieira

    2015-12-17

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity damages plant roots and limits crop production on acid soils, which comprise up to 50% of the world's arable lands. A major Al tolerance locus on chromosome 3, AltSB, controls aluminum tolerance in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] via SbMATE, an Al-activated plasma membrane transporter that mediates Al exclusion from sensitive regions in the root apex. As is the case with other known Al tolerance genes, SbMATE was cloned based on studies conducted under controlled environmental conditions, in nutrient solution. Therefore, its impact on grain yield on acid soils remains undetermined. To determine the real world impact of SbMATE, multi-trait quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping in hydroponics, and, in the field, revealed a large-effect QTL colocalized with the Al tolerance locus AltSB, where SbMATE lies, conferring a 0.6 ton ha(-1) grain yield increase on acid soils. A second QTL for Al tolerance in hydroponics, where the positive allele was also donated by the Al tolerant parent, SC283, was found on chromosome 9, indicating the presence of distinct Al tolerance genes in the sorghum genome, or genes acting in the SbMATE pathway leading to Al-activated citrate release. There was no yield penalty for AltSB, consistent with the highly localized Al regulated SbMATE expression in the root tip, and Al-dependent transport activity. A female effect of 0.5 ton ha(-1) independently demonstrated the effectiveness of AltSB in hybrids. Al tolerance conferred by AltSB is thus an indispensable asset for sorghum production and food security on acid soils, many of which are located in developing countries.

  14. Amiloride and diltiazem inhibition of microsomal and mitochondrial Na+ and Ca2+ transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordahl, L A; LaBelle, E F; Rex, K A

    1984-01-01

    Amiloride, a K+-sparing diuretic, and diltiazem, a Ca2+ channel antagonist, have both been reported to inhibit Na+ transport-associated processes in different subcellular membrane systems. In this report, similar inhibitory effects of both agents are demonstrated on Na+-induced Ca2+ release from rabbit heart mitochondria and on Na+ uptake in a kidney medulla microsomal preparation. Both amiloride and diltiazem produce 50% inhibition of Na+ uptake in kidney microsomes at the same concentrations. Heart mitochondrial Na+-induced Ca2+ release was 50% inhibited by 6 microM diltiazem and 200 microM amiloride. No effects of either agent on mitochondrial respiratory activity were observed. The results suggest a specific effect of both drugs on a Na+-binding site associated with an antiport exchange process. These data also extend previous observations suggesting the use of these agents as tools to define further ion transport mechanisms in biological membranes.

  15. Bacillus cereus iron uptake protein fishes out an unstable ferric citrate trimer

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Sia, Allyson K.; Allred, Benjamin E.; Nichiporuk, Rita; Zhou, Zhongrui; Andersen, Ulla N.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2012-01-01

    Citrate is a common biomolecule that chelates Fe(III). Many bacteria and plants use ferric citrate to fulfill their nutritional requirement for iron. Only the Escherichia coli ferric citrate outer-membrane transport protein FecA has been characterized; little is known about other ferric citrate-binding proteins. Here we report a unique siderophore-binding protein from the Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Bacillus cereus that binds multinuclear ferric citrate complexes. We have demonstrated ...

  16. Mitochondrial H2O2 generated from electron transport chain complex 1 stimulates muscle differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seonmin Lee; Eunyoung Tak; Jisun Lee; MA Rashid; Michael P Murphy; Joohun Ha; Sung Soo Kim

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species(mROS)have been considered detrimental to cells. However, their physiological roles as signaling mediators have not been thoroughly explored. Here, we investigated whether mROS generated from mitochondrial electron transport chain(mETC)complex I stimulated muscle differentiation. Our results showed that the quantity of mROS was increased and that manganese superoxide dismutase(MnSOD)was induced via NF-KB activation during muscle differentiation. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants(MitoQ and MitoTEMPOL)and mitochondria-targeted catalase decreased mROS quantity and suppressed muscle differentiation without affecting the amount of ATP Mitochondrial alterations, including the induction of mitochondrial transcription factor A and an increase in the number and size of mitochondria, and functional activations were observed during muscle differentiation. In particular, increased expression levels of mETC complex I subunits and a higher activity of complex I than other complexes were observed. Rotenone, an inhibitor of mETC complex I, decreased the mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ ratio and mROS levels during muscle differentiation. The inhibition of complex I using small interfering RNAs and rotenone reduced mROS levels, suppressed muscle differentiation, and depleted ATP levels with a concomitant increase in glycolysis. From these results, we conclude that complex I-derived O2, produced through reverse electron transport due to enhanced metabolism and a high activity of complex I, was dismutated into H2O2 by MnSOD induced via NF-KB activation and that the dismutated mH202 stimulated muscle differentiation as a signaling messenger.

  17. Mitochondrial Dynamics in Mitochondrial Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M. Suárez-Rivero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are very versatile organelles in continuous fusion and fission processes in response to various cellular signals. Mitochondrial dynamics, including mitochondrial fission/fusion, movements and turnover, are essential for the mitochondrial network quality control. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics can cause neuropathies such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in which mitochondrial fusion and transport are impaired, or dominant optic atrophy which is caused by a reduced mitochondrial fusion. On the other hand, mitochondrial dysfunction in primary mitochondrial diseases promotes reactive oxygen species production that impairs its own function and dynamics, causing a continuous vicious cycle that aggravates the pathological phenotype. Mitochondrial dynamics provides a new way to understand the pathophysiology of mitochondrial disorders and other diseases related to mitochondria dysfunction such as diabetes, heart failure, or Hungtinton’s disease. The knowledge about mitochondrial dynamics also offers new therapeutics targets in mitochondrial diseases.

  18. Citrat og nyresten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osther, P J

    1993-01-01

    Citrate is an important naturally occurring inhibitor of calcium stone formation in urine. Urinary citrate excretion was examined in 43 consecutive patients with recurrent idiopathic calcium nephrolithiasis and in 50 normal controls by a specific enzymatic technique. Hypocitraturia (<1.6 mmol/24h...

  19. Ca2+-Citrate Uptake and Metabolism in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mortera, Pablo; Pudlik, Agata; Magni, Christian; Alarcon, Sergio; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2013-01-01

    The putative citrate metabolic pathway in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334 consists of the transporter CitH, a proton symporter of the citrate-divalent metal ion family of transporters CitMHS, citrate lyase, and the membrane-bound oxaloacetate decarboxylase complex OAD-ABDH. Resting cells of Lactobacill

  20. Tumor cell death induced by the inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport: The effect of 3-hydroxybakuchiol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaña, Fabián [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Faini, Francesca [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Lapier, Michel; Pavani, Mario [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kemmerling, Ulrike [Anatomy and Developmental Biology Program, ICBM, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Morello, Antonio; Maya, Juan Diego; Jara, José [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile); Parra, Eduardo [Laboratory of Experimental Biomedicine, University of Tarapaca, Campus Esmeralda, Iquique (Chile); Ferreira, Jorge, E-mail: jferreir@med.uchile.cl [Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology Program, University of Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    Changes in mitochondrial ATP synthesis can affect the function of tumor cells due to the dependence of the first step of glycolysis on mitochondrial ATP. The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system is responsible for the synthesis of approximately 90% of the ATP in normal cells and up to 50% in most glycolytic cancers; therefore, inhibition of the electron transport chain (ETC) emerges as an attractive therapeutic target. We studied the effect of a lipophilic isoprenylated catechol, 3-hydroxybakuchiol (3-OHbk), a putative ETC inhibitor isolated from Psoralea glandulosa. 3-OHbk exerted cytotoxic and anti-proliferative effects on the TA3/Ha mouse mammary adenocarcinoma cell line and induced a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the activation of caspase-3, the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transport pore (MPTP) and nuclear DNA fragmentation. Additionally, 3-OHbk inhibited oxygen consumption, an effect that was completely reversed by succinate (an electron donor for Complex II) and duroquinol (electron donor for Complex III), suggesting that 3-OHbk disrupted the electron flow at the level of Complex I. The inhibition of OXPHOS did not increase the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but caused a large decrease in the intracellular ATP level. ETC inhibitors have been shown to induce cell death through necrosis and apoptosis by increasing ROS generation. Nevertheless, we demonstrated that 3-OHbk inhibited the ETC and induced apoptosis through an interaction with Complex I. By delivering electrons directly to Complex III with duroquinol, cell death was almost completely abrogated. These results suggest that 3-OHbk has antitumor activity resulting from interactions with the ETC, a system that is already deficient in cancer cells. - Highlights: • We studied the anticancer activity of a natural compound, 3-OHbk, on TA3/Ha cells. • 3-OHbk inhibited mitochondrial electron flow by interacting with Complex I. • Complex I inhibition did

  1. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  2. Evaluation of functioning of mitochondrial electron transport chain with NADH and FAD autofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Danylovych

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We prove the feasibility of evaluation of mitochondrial electron transport chain function in isolated mitochondria of smooth muscle cells of rats from uterus using fluorescence of NADH and FAD coenzymes. We found the inversely directed changes in FAD and NADH fluorescence intensity under normal functioning of mitochondrial electron transport chain. The targeted effect of inhibitors of complex I, III and IV changed fluorescence of adenine nucleotides. Rotenone (5 μM induced rapid increase in NADH fluorescence due to inhibition of complex I, without changing in dynamics of FAD fluorescence increase. Antimycin A, a complex III inhibitor, in concentration of 1 μg/ml caused sharp increase in NADH fluorescence and moderate increase in FAD fluorescence in comparison to control. NaN3 (5 mM, a complex IV inhibitor, and CCCP (10 μM, a protonophore, caused decrease in NADH and FAD fluorescence. Moreover, all the inhibitors caused mitochondria swelling. NO donors, e.g. 0.1 mM sodium nitroprusside and sodium nitrite similarly to the effects of sodium azide. Energy-dependent Ca2+ accumulation in mitochondrial matrix (in presence of oxidation substrates and Mg-ATP2- complex is associated with pronounced drop in NADH and FAD fluorescence followed by increased fluorescence of adenine nucleotides, which may be primarily due to Ca2+-dependent activation of dehydrogenases of citric acid cycle. Therefore, the fluorescent signal of FAD and NADH indicates changes in oxidation state of these nucleotides in isolated mitochondria, which may be used to assay the potential of effectors of electron transport chain.

  3. Trisilver(I citrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Fischer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Trisilver(I citrate, 3Ag+·C6H5O73−, was obtained by evaporation of a saturated aqueous solution of the raw material that had been obtained from sodium dihydrogen citrate and silver nitrate. It features one formula unit in the asymmetric unit. There is an intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond between the OH group and one of the terminal carboxylate groups. Different citrate groups are linked via the three Ag+ ions, yielding a three-dimensional network with rather irregular [AgO4] polyhedra.

  4. Green tea polyphenols require the mitochondrial iron transporter, mitoferrin, for lifespan extension in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Terry E; Pham, Hoang M; Nguyen, Benjamin V; Tahmasian, Yerazik; Ramsden, Shannon; Coskun, Volkan; Schriner, Samuel E; Jafari, Mahtab

    2016-12-01

    Green tea has been found to increase the lifespan of various experimental animal models including the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. High in polyphenolic content, green tea has been shown to reduce oxidative stress in part by its ability to bind free iron, a micronutrient that is both essential for and toxic to all living organisms. Due to green tea's iron-binding properties, we questioned whether green tea acts to increase the lifespan of the fruit fly by modulating iron regulators, specifically, mitoferrin, a mitochondrial iron transporter, and transferrin, found in the hemolymph of flies. Publicly available hypomorph mutants for these iron regulators were utilized to investigate the effect of green tea on lifespan and fertility. We identified that green tea could not increase the lifespan of mitoferrin mutants but did rescue the reduced male fertility phenotype. The effect of green tea on transferrin mutant lifespan and fertility were comparable to w(1118) flies, as observed in our previous studies, in which green tea increased male fly lifespan and reduced male fertility. Expression levels in both w(1118) flies and mutant flies, supplemented with green tea, showed an upregulation of mitoferrin but not transferrin. Total body and mitochondrial iron levels were significantly reduced by green tea supplementation in w(1118) and mitoferrin mutants but not transferrin mutant flies. Our results demonstrate that green tea may act to increase the lifespan of Drosophila in part by the regulation of mitoferrin and reduction of mitochondrial iron. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Evolution of interacting proteins in the mitochondrial electron transport system in a marine copepod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Christopher S; Burton, Ronald S

    2004-03-01

    The extensive interaction between mitochondrial-encoded and nuclear-encoded subunits of electron transport system (ETS) enzymes in mitochondria is expected to lead to intergenomic coadaptation. Whether this coadaptation results from adaptation to the environment or from fixation of deleterious mtDNA mutations followed by compensatory nuclear gene evolution is unknown. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus shows extreme divergence in mtDNA sequence and provides an excellent model system for study of intergenomic coadaptation. Here, we examine genes encoding subunits of complex III of the ETS, including the mtDNA-encoded cytochrome b (CYTB), the nuclear-encoded rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP), and cytochrome c(1) (CYC1). We compare levels of polymorphism within populations and divergence between populations in these genes to begin to untangle the selective forces that have shaped evolution in these genes. CYTB displays dramatic divergence between populations, but sequence analysis shows no evidence for positive selection driving this divergence. CYC1 and RISP have lower levels of sequence divergence between populations than CYTB, but, again, sequence analysis gives no evidence for positive selection acting on them. However, an examination of variation at cytochrome c (CYC), a nuclear-encoded protein that transfers electrons between complex III and complex IV provides evidence for selective divergence. Hence, it appears that rapid evolution in mitochondrial-encoded subunits is not always associated with rapid divergence in interacting subunits (CYC1 and RISP), but can be in some cases (CYC). Finally, a comparison of nuclear-encoded and mitochondrial-encoded genes from T. californicus suggests that substitution rates in the mitochondrial-encoded genes are dramatically increased relative to nuclear genes.

  6. Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Heavy Metal-Induced Neurotoxicity: Effects of Cadmium, Mercury, and Copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Belyaeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To clarify the role of mitochondrial electron transport chain (mtETC in heavy-metal-induced neurotoxicity, we studied action of Cd2+, Hg2+, and Cu2+ on cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species formation, respiratory function, and mitochondrial membrane potential of rat cell line PC12. As found, the metals produced, although in a different way, dose- and time-dependent changes of all these parameters. Importantly, Cd2+ beginning from 10 [mu]M and already at short incubation time (3 h significantly inhibited the FCCP-uncoupled cell respiration; besides, practically the complete inhibition of the respiration was reached after 3 h incubation with 50 [mu]M Hg2+ or 500 [mu]M Cd2+, whereas even after 48 h exposure with 500 [mu]M Cu2+, only a 50% inhibition of the respiration occurred. Against the Cd2+-induced cell injury, not only different antioxidants and mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitors were protective but also such mtETC effectors as FCCP and stigmatellin (complex III inhibitor. However, all mtETC effectors used did not protect against the Hg2+- or Cu2+-induced cell damage. Notably, stigmatellin was shown to be one of the strongest protectors against the Cd2+-induced cell damage, producing a 15–20% increase in the cell viability. The mechanisms of the mtETC involvement in the heavy-metal-induced mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and cell death are discussed.

  7. Citrate Metabolism by Pediococcus halophilus

    OpenAIRE

    Kanbe, Chiyuki; Uchida, Kinji

    1987-01-01

    Several strains of non-citrate-metabolizing Pediococcus halophilus have previously been isolated from soy sauce mash or moromi. The factors controlling the metabolism of citrate in soy pediococci were studied. All the soy pediococcal strains tested which failed to decompose citrate did not possess citrate lyase [citrate (pro-3S)-lyase; EC 4.1.3.6] activity. In P. halophilus, citrate lyase was an inducible enzyme, and the optimum pH for activity was 7.0. The metabolism of citrate in P. halophi...

  8. Mitochondrial ascorbic acid transport is mediated by a low-affinity form of the sodium-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Montesino, Carola; Roa, Francisco J; Peña, Eduardo; González, Mauricio; Sotomayor, Kirsty; Inostroza, Eveling; Muñoz, Carolina A; González, Iván; Maldonado, Mafalda; Soliz, Carlos; Reyes, Alejandro M; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I

    2014-05-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of the redox metabolism of mitochondria under normal and pathological conditions, our knowledge regarding the transport of vitamin C across mitochondrial membranes remains far from complete. We report here that human HEK-293 cells express a mitochondrial low-affinity ascorbic acid transporter that molecularly corresponds to SVCT2, a member of the sodium-coupled ascorbic acid transporter family 2. The transporter SVCT1 is absent from HEK-293 cells. Confocal colocalization experiments with anti-SVCT2 and anti-organelle protein markers revealed that most of the SVCT2 immunoreactivity was associated with mitochondria, with minor colocalization at the endoplasmic reticulum and very low immunoreactivity at the plasma membrane. Immunoblotting of proteins extracted from highly purified mitochondrial fractions confirmed that SVCT2 protein was associated with mitochondria, and transport analysis revealed a sigmoidal ascorbic acid concentration curve with an apparent ascorbic acid transport Km of 0.6mM. Use of SVCT2 siRNA for silencing SVCT2 expression produced a major decrease in mitochondrial SVCT2 immunoreactivity, and immunoblotting revealed decreased SVCT2 protein expression by approximately 75%. Most importantly, the decreased protein expression was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the mitochondrial ascorbic acid transport rate. Further studies using HEK-293 cells overexpressing SVCT2 at the plasma membrane revealed that the altered kinetic properties of mitochondrial SVCT2 are due to the ionic intracellular microenvironment (low in sodium and high in potassium), with potassium acting as a concentration-dependent inhibitor of SVCT2. We discarded the participation of two glucose transporters previously described as mitochondrial dehydroascorbic acid transporters; GLUT1 is absent from mitochondria and GLUT10 is not expressed in HEK-293 cells. Overall, our data indicate that intracellular SVCT2 is localized in mitochondria, is

  9. Evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport from rate measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1976-12-10

    The mitochondrial H+/site ratio (i.e. the number of protons ejected per pair of electrons traversing each of the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain) has been evaluated employing a new experimental approach. In this method the rates of oxygen uptake and H+ ejection were measured simultaneously during the initial period of respiration evoked by addition of succinate to aerobic, rotenone-inhibited, de-energized mitochondria. Either K+, in the presence of valinomycin, or Ca2+, was used as mobile cation to dissipate the membrane potential and allow quantitative H+ ejection into the medium. The H+/site ratio observed with this method in the absence of precautions to inhibit the uptake of phosphate was close to 2.0, in agreement with values obtained using the oxygen pulse technique (Mitchell, P. and Moyle, J. (1967) Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). However, when phosphate movements were eliminated either by inhibition of the phosphate-hydroxide antiporter with N-ethylamaleimide or by depleting the mitochondria of their endogenous phosphate content, H+/site ratios close to 4.0 were consistently observed. This ratio was independent of the concentration of succinate, of mitochondrial protein, of pH between 6 and 8, and of ionic composition of the medium, provided that sufficient K+ (plus valinomycin) or Ca2+ were present. Specific inhibitors of the hydrolysis of endogenous ATP or transport of other ions (adenine nucleotides, tricarboxylates, HCO3-, etc.) were shown not to affect the observed H+/site ratio. Furthermore, the replacement of succinate by alpha-glycerol phosphate, a substrate which is oxidized on the outer surface of the inner membrane and thus does not need to enter the matrix, gave the same H+/site ratios as did succinate. It is concluded that the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport, when phosphate movements are eliminated, may be close to 4.0.

  10. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), a novel mitochondrial cholesterol transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Walter L

    2007-06-01

    Cholesterol is a vital component of cellular membranes, and is the substrate for biosynthesis of steroids, oxysterols and bile acids. The mechanisms directing the intracellular trafficking of this nearly insoluble molecule have received increased attention through the discovery of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and similar proteins containing StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domains. StAR can transfer cholesterol between synthetic liposomes in vitro, an activity which appears to correspond to the trans-cytoplasmic transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. However, trans-cytoplasmic cholesterol transport in vivo appears to involve the recently-described protein StarD4, which is expressed in most cells. Steroidogenic cells must also move large amounts of cholesterol from the outer mitochondrial membrane to the first steroidogenic enzyme, which lies on the matrix side of the inner membrane; this action requires StAR. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, a rare and severe disorder of human steroidogenesis, results from mutations in StAR, providing a StAR knockout of nature that has provided key insights into its activity. Cell biology experiments show that StAR moves large amounts of cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane, but acts exclusively on the outer membrane. Biophysical data show that only the carboxyl-terminal alpha-helix of StAR interacts with the outer membrane. Spectroscopic data and molecular dynamics simulations show that StAR's interactions with protonated phospholipid head groups on the outer mitochondrial membrane induce a conformational change (molten globule transition) needed for StAR's activity. StAR appears to act in concert with the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, but the precise itinerary of a cholesterol molecule entering the mitochondrion remains unclear.

  11. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  12. A conserved mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter exports glutathione polysulfide for cytosolic metal cofactor assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Theresia A; Thornton, Jeremy D; Kruse, Inga; Schwarzländer, Markus; Meyer, Andreas J; van Veen, Hendrik W; Balk, Janneke

    2014-08-22

    An ATP-binding cassette transporter located in the inner mitochondrial membrane is involved in iron-sulfur cluster and molybdenum cofactor assembly in the cytosol, but the transported substrate is unknown. ATM3 (ABCB25) from Arabidopsis thaliana and its functional orthologue Atm1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were expressed in Lactococcus lactis and studied in inside-out membrane vesicles and in purified form. Both proteins selectively transported glutathione disulfide (GSSG) but not reduced glutathione in agreement with a 3-fold stimulation of ATPase activity by GSSG. By contrast, Fe(2+) alone or in combination with glutathione did not stimulate ATPase activity. Arabidopsis atm3 mutants were hypersensitive to an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis and accumulated GSSG in the mitochondria. The growth phenotype of atm3-1 was strongly enhanced by depletion of the mitochondrion-localized, GSH-dependent persulfide oxygenase ETHE1, suggesting that the physiological substrate of ATM3 contains persulfide in addition to glutathione. Consistent with this idea, a transportomics approach using mass spectrometry showed that glutathione trisulfide (GS-S-SG) was transported by Atm1. We propose that mitochondria export glutathione polysulfide, containing glutathione and persulfide, for iron-sulfur cluster assembly in the cytosol.

  13. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human mitochondrial variants influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Whether mitochondrial respiratory capacity per mitochondrion (intrinsic activity) in human skeletal muscle is affected by differences in mitochondrial variants is not known. We recruited 54 males...... and determined their mitochondrial haplogroup, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation capacity (OXPHOS), mitochondrial content (citrate synthase (CS)) and VO2max. Intrinsic mitochondrial function is calculated as mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity divided by mitochondrial content (CS). Haplogroup H showed a 30......% higher intrinsic mitochondrial function compared with the other haplo group U. There was no relationship between haplogroups and VO2max. In skeletal muscle from men with mitochondrial haplogroup H, an increased intrinsic mitochondrial function is present....

  14. Final report on the safety assessment of acetyl triethyl citrate, acetyl tributyl citrate, acetyl trihexyl citrate, and acetyl trioctyl citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wilbur

    2002-01-01

    Acetyl Triethyl Citrate, Acetyl Tributyl Citrate, Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate, and Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate all function as plasticizers in cosmetics. Additionally, the Trihexyl and Trioctyl forms are described as skin-conditioning agents-emollients, although there are currently no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl Citrate or Acetyl Trioctyl Citrate. Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate are used in nail products at concentrations up to 7%. Recognizing that there are no reported uses of Acetyl Trihexyl or Trioctyl Citrate, if they were to be used in the future, their concentration of use is expected to be no higher than that reported for Acetyl Triethyl and Tributyl Citrate. These ingredients were sufficiently similar in structure that safety test data on one were considered applicable to all. Approximately 99% of orally administered Acetyl Tributyl Citrate is excreted-intermediate metabolites include acetyl citrate, monobutyl citrate, acetyl monobutyl citrate, dibutyl citrate, and acetyl dibutyl citrate. In acute, short-term, subchronic, and chronic feeding studies, these ingredients were relatively nontoxic. Differences from controls were either not statistically significant or not related to any organ toxicity. Ocular exposures produced moderate reactions that cleared by 48 hours after instillation. Dermal application was not toxic in rabbits. In a guinea pig maximization test, Acetyl Triethyl Citrate was a sensitizer whereas Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was not. Limited clinical testing of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate and Acetyl Tributyl Citrate was negative for both skin irritation and sensitization. These clinical data were considered more relevant than the guinea pig maximization data, suggesting to the Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel that none of these ingredients would be a sensitizer. Physiologic effects noted with intravenous delivery of Acetyl Triethyl Citrate or Acetyl Tributyl Citrate include dose-related decreases in blood pressure and

  15. Biphasic modulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsin-Ling; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Yeh, Steve T; Zweier, Jay L; Chen, Yeong-Renn

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) is the major source of reactive oxygen species during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Ischemic defect and reperfusion-induced injury to ETC are critical in the disease pathogenesis of postischemic heart. The properties of ETC were investigated in an isolated heart model of global I/R. Rat hearts were subjected to ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 1 h. Studies of mitochondrial function indicated a biphasic modulation of electron transfer activity (ETA) and ETC protein expression during I/R. Analysis of ETAs in the isolated mitochondria indicated that complexes I, II, III, and IV activities were diminished after 30 min of ischemia but increased upon restoration of flow. Immunoblotting analysis and ultrastructural analysis with transmission electron microscopy further revealed marked downregulation of ETC in the ischemic heart and then upregulation of ETC upon reperfusion. No significant difference in the mRNA expression level of ETC was detected between ischemic and postischemic hearts. However, reperfusion-induced ETC biosynthesis in myocardium can be inhibited by cycloheximide, indicating the involvement of translational control. Immunoblotting analysis of tissue homogenates revealed a similar profile in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α expression, suggesting its essential role as an upstream regulator in controlling ETC biosynthesis during I/R. Significant impairment caused by ischemic and postischemic injury was observed in the complexes I- III. Analysis of NADH ferricyanide reductase activity indicated that injury of flavoprotein subcomplex accounts for 50% decline of intact complex I activity from ischemic heart. Taken together, our findings provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism of I/R-induced mitochondrial dysfunction.

  16. Knocking down mitochondrial iron transporter (MIT) reprograms primary and secondary metabolism in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Bashir, Khurram; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Lehmann, Martin; Casiraghi, Fabio Marco; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Seki, Motoaki; Geigenberger, Peter; Zocchi, Graziano; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, and its reduced bioavailability strongly impairs mitochondrial functionality. In this work, the metabolic adjustment in the rice (Oryza sativa) mitochondrial Fe transporter knockdown mutant (mit-2) was analysed. Biochemical characterization of purified mitochondria from rice roots showed alteration in the respiratory chain of mit-2 compared with wild-type (WT) plants. In particular, proteins belonging to the type II alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases accumulated strongly in mit-2 plants, indicating that alternative pathways were activated to keep the respiratory chain working. Additionally, large-scale changes in the transcriptome and metabolome were observed in mit-2 rice plants. In particular, a strong alteration (up-/down-regulation) in the expression of genes encoding enzymes of both primary and secondary metabolism was found in mutant plants. This was reflected by changes in the metabolic profiles in both roots and shoots of mit-2 plants. Significant alterations in the levels of amino acids belonging to the aspartic acid-related pathways (aspartic acid, lysine, and threonine in roots, and aspartic acid and ornithine in shoots) were found that are strictly connected to the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, some metabolites (e.g. pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, ornithine, and oligosaccharides of the raffinose family) accumulated only in the shoot of mit-2 plants, indicating possible hypoxic responses. These findings suggest that the induction of local Fe deficiency in the mitochondrial compartment of mit-2 plants differentially affects the transcript as well as the metabolic profiles in root and shoot tissues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. AmcA - a putative mitochondrial ornithine transporter supporting fungal siderophore biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas eSchafferer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient required for a wide range of cellular processes. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus employs low-molecular mass iron-specific chelators, termed siderophores, for uptake, storage and intracellular iron distribution, which play a crucial role in the pathogenicity of this fungus. Siderophore biosynthesis depends on coordination with the supply of its precursor ornithine, produced mitochondrially from glutamate or cytosolically via hydrolysis of arginine. In this study, we demonstrate a role of the putative mitochondrial transporter AmcA (AFUA_8G02760 in siderophore biosynthesis of A. fumigatus.Consistent with a role in cellular ornithine handling, AmcA-deficiency resulted in decreased cellular ornithine and arginine contents as well as decreased siderophore production on medium containing glutamine as the sole nitrogen source. In support, arginine and ornithine as nitrogen sources did not impact siderophore biosynthesis due to cytosolic ornithine availability. As revealed by Northern blot analysis, transcript levels of siderophore biosynthetic genes were unresponsive to the cellular ornithine level. In contrast to siderophore production, AmcA deficiency did only mildly decrease the cellular polyamine content, demonstrating cellular prioritization of ornithine use. Nevertheless, AmcA-deficiency increased the susceptibility of A. fumigatus to the polyamine biosynthesis inhibitor eflornithine, most likely due to the decreased ornithine pool. AmcA-deficiency decreased the growth rate particularly on ornithine as the sole nitrogen source during iron starvation and sufficiency, indicating an additional role in the metabolism and fitness of A. fumigatus, possibly in mitochondrial ornithine import. In the Galleria mellonella infection model, AmcA-deficiency did not affect virulence of A. fumigatus, most likely due to the residual siderophore production and arginine availability in this host niche.

  18. Bacillus cereus iron uptake protein fishes out an unstable ferric citrate trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Tatsuya; Sia, Allyson K; Allred, Benjamin E; Nichiporuk, Rita; Zhou, Zhongrui; Andersen, Ulla N; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-10-16

    Citrate is a common biomolecule that chelates Fe(III). Many bacteria and plants use ferric citrate to fulfill their nutritional requirement for iron. Only the Escherichia coli ferric citrate outer-membrane transport protein FecA has been characterized; little is known about other ferric citrate-binding proteins. Here we report a unique siderophore-binding protein from the gram-positive pathogenic bacterium Bacillus cereus that binds multinuclear ferric citrate complexes. We have demonstrated that B. cereus ATCC 14579 takes up (55)Fe radiolabeled ferric citrate and that a protein, BC_3466 [renamed FctC (ferric citrate-binding protein C)], binds ferric citrate. The dissociation constant (K(d)) of FctC at pH 7.4 with ferric citrate (molar ratio 1:50) is 2.6 nM. This is the tightest binding observed of any B. cereus siderophore-binding protein. Nano electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (nano ESI-MS) analysis of FctC and ferric citrate complexes or citrate alone show that FctC binds diferric di-citrate, and triferric tricitrate, but does not bind ferric di-citrate, ferric monocitrate, or citrate alone. Significantly, the protein selectively binds triferric tricitrate even though this species is naturally present at very low equilibrium concentrations.

  19. Evolutionary origin of the mitochondrial cholesterol transport machinery reveals a universal mechanism of steroid hormone biosynthesis in animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinjiang Fan

    Full Text Available Steroidogenesis begins with the transport of cholesterol from intracellular stores into mitochondria via a series of protein-protein interactions involving cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins located at both the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. In adrenal glands and gonads, this process is accelerated by hormones, leading to the production of high levels of steroids that control tissue development and function. A hormone-induced multiprotein complex, the transduceosome, was recently identified, and is composed of cytosolic and outer mitochondrial membrane proteins that control the rate of cholesterol entry into the outer mitochondrial membrane. More recent studies unveiled the steroidogenic metabolon, a bioactive, multimeric protein complex that spans the outer-inner mitochondrial membranes and is responsible for hormone-induced import, segregation, targeting, and metabolism of cholesterol by cytochrome P450 family 11 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP11A1 in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The availability of genome information allowed us to systematically explore the evolutionary origin of the proteins involved in the mitochondrial cholesterol transport machinery (transduceosome, steroidogenic metabolon, and signaling proteins, trace the original archetype, and predict their biological functions by molecular phylogenetic and functional divergence analyses, protein homology modeling and molecular docking. Although most members of these complexes have a history of gene duplication and functional divergence during evolution, phylogenomic analysis revealed that all vertebrates have the same functional complex members, suggesting a common mechanism in the first step of steroidogenesis. An archetype of the complex was found in invertebrates. The data presented herein suggest that the cholesterol transport machinery is responsible for steroidogenesis among all vertebrates and is evolutionarily conserved throughout the entire animal kingdom.

  20. Interactive Effects of Dietary Lipid and Phenotypic Feed Efficiency on the Expression of Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genes Involved in the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain in Rainbow Trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan C. Eya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A 2 × 3 factorial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary lipid level on the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in all-female rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Three practical diets with a fixed crude protein content of 40%, formulated to contain 10% (40/10, 20% (40/20 and 30% (40/30 dietary lipid, were fed to apparent satiety to triplicate groups of either low-feed efficient (F120; 217.66 ± 2.24 g initial average mass or high-feed efficient (F136; 205.47 ± 1.27 g full-sib families of fish, twice per day, for 90 days. At the end of the experiment, the results showed that there is an interactive effect of the dietary lipid levels and the phenotypic feed efficiency (growth rate and feed efficiency on the expression of the mitochondrial genes nd1 (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, cytb (Cytochrome b, cox1 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1, cox2 (Cytochrome c oxidase subunits 2 and atp6 (ATP synthase subunit 6 and nuclear genes ucp2α (uncoupling proteins 2 alpha, ucp2β (uncoupling proteins 2 beta, pparα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, pparβ (peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor beta and ppargc1α (proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha in fish liver, intestine and muscle, except on ppargc1α in the muscle which was affected by the diet and the family separately. Also, the results revealed that the expression of mitochondrial genes is associated with that of nuclear genes involved in electron transport chain in fish liver, intestine and muscle. Furthermore, this work showed that the expression of mitochondrial genes parallels with the expression of genes encoding uncoupling proteins (UCP in the liver and the intestine of rainbow trout. This study for the first time presents the molecular basis of the effects of dietary lipid level on mitochondrial and nuclear genes involved in mitochondrial electron transport chain in fish.

  1. Selenium and zinc protect brain mitochondrial antioxidants and electron transport chain enzymes following postnatal protein malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Adenuga, Gbenga A; Sandhir, Rajat

    2016-05-01

    Selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) are trace elements required for optimal brain functions. Thus, the role of Se and Zn against protein malnutrition induced oxidative stress on mitochondrial antioxidants and electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes from rats' brain were investigated. Normal protein (NP) and low protein (LP) rats were fed with diets containing 16% and 5% casein respectively for a period of 10weeks. Then the rats were supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15mgL(-1) and 227mgL(-1) in drinking water for 3weeks after which the rats were sacrificed. The results obtained from the study showed significant (pmalnutrition induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Oxygen transport and mitochondrial function in porcine septic shock, cardiogenic shock, and hypoxaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueira, T; Djafarzadeh, S; Brandt, S; Gorrasi, J; Borotto, E; Porta, F; Takala, J; Bracht, H; Shaw, S; Lepper, P M; Jakob, S M

    2012-08-01

    The relevance of tissue oxygenation in the pathogenesis of organ dysfunction during sepsis is controversial. We compared oxygen transport, lactate metabolism, and mitochondrial function in pigs with septic shock, cardiogenic shock, or hypoxic hypoxia. Thirty-two anaesthetized, ventilated pigs were randomized to faecal peritonitis (P), cardiac tamponade (CT), hypoxic hypoxia (HH) or controls. Systemic and regional blood flows, lactate, mitochondrial respiration, and tissue hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) were measured for 24 h. Mortality was 50% in each intervention group. While systemic oxygen consumption (VO(2) ) was maintained in all groups, hepatic VO(2) tended to decrease in CT [0.84 (0.5-1.3) vs. 0.42 (0.06-0.8)/ml/min/kg; P = 0.06]. In P, fractional hepatic, celiac trunk, and portal vein blood flows, and especially renal blood flow [by 46 (14-91)%; P = 0.001] decreased. In CT, renal blood flow [by 50.4 (23-81)%; P = 0.004] and in HH, superior mesenteric blood flow decreased [by 38.9 (16-100)%, P = 0.009]. Hepatic lactate influx increased > 100% in P and HH, and > 200% in CT (all P < 0.02). Hepatic lactate uptake remained unchanged in P and HH and converted to release in CT. Mitochondrial respiration remained normal. Muscle adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations decreased in P (5.9 ± 1.4 μmol/g wt vs. 2.8 ± 2.7 μmol/g wt, P = 0.04). HIF-1α expression was not detectable in any group. We conclude that despite shock and renal hypoperfusion, tissue hypoxia is not a major pathophysiological issue in early and established faecal peritonitis. The reasons for reduced skeletal muscle tissue ATP levels in the presence of well-preserved in-vitro muscle mitochondrial respiration should be further investigated. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  3. Altered expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins and improved myocardial energetic state during late ischemic preconditioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Cabrera (Jesús); E.A. Ziemba (Elizabeth); L.H. Colbert (Lisa); L.B. Anderson (Lorraine); W.J. Sluiter (Wim); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); T.A. Butterick (Tammy); J. Sikora (Joseph); H.B. Ward (Herbert B.); R.F. Kelly (Rosemary); E.O. McFalls (Edward)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAltered expression of mitochondrial electron transport proteins has been shown in early preconditioned myocardial tissue. We wished to determine whether these alterations persist in the Second Window of Protection (SWOP) and if so, whether a favorable energetic state is facilitated durin

  4. Protective role of mitochondrial K-ATP channel and mitochondrial membrane transport pore in rat kidney ischemic postconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-liang; ZHAO Yan-li; LIU Xiao-ming; CHEN Jing; ZHANG Dong

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggested that mechanical intervention during early reperfusion, or ischemia postconditioning (Ipo), could protect kidneys against renal ischemia reperfusion injury (RIRI). However, the mechanisms responsible for this protection remain unclear. This study therefore investigated the protection afforded by Ipo in rat kidneys in vivo, and the roles of mitochondrial KATP channels (mitOKATP) and mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTPs), by inhibiting mitOKATP with 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD), and by directly detecting open MPTPs using calcein-AM and CoCl2.Methods Thirty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham-operation (S), ischemia-reperfusion (I/R),Ipo, ischemia reperfusion with 5-HD (I/R+5-HD), or Ipo with 5-HD (Ipo +5-HD) groups. Rats in each group were sacrificed after 6 hours of reperfusion by heart exsanguination or cervical dislocation under anesthesia. RIRI was assessed by determination of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and by examination of histologic sections. The roles of mitoKATP and MPTP were investigated by analyzing fluorescence intensities of mitochondria, mitochondrial membrane potential,intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium, using appropriate fluorescent markers. The relationship between apoptosis and RIRI was assessed by determining the apoptotic index (Al) of kidney tubular epithelial cells.Results The RIRI model was shown to be successful. Significantly higher levels of creatinine and BUN, and abnormal pathology of histologic sections, were observed in group I/R, compared with group S. 5-HD eliminated the renoprotective effects of Ipo. Mitochondrial and mitochondrial membrane potential fluorescence intensities increased, and intracellular calcium, ROS fluorescence intensities and AI decreased in group Ipo, compared with group I/R. However, mitochondrial and mitochondrial membrane potential fluorescence intensities decreased, and intracellular

  5. Targeting the mitochondrial electron transport chain in autism, a systematic review and synthesis of a novel therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Berk, Michael; Farrashbandi, Hassan; Alavi Shoushtari, Ali; Villagonzalo, Kristi-Ann

    2013-09-01

    Autism is a complex developmental disorder with an unknown etiology and without any curative treatment. The mitochondrial electron transfer chains play a major role in the production of ATP, and the generation and management of reactive oxidative stress (ROS). This paper is a systematic review of the role of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in autism, and a consequent hypothesis for treating autism is synthesized. An electronic search with pre-specified inclusion criteria was conducted in order to retrieve all the published articles about the mitochondrial electron transport chain in autism. The two databases of PUBMED and Google Scholar were searched. From one hundred twenty five retrieved titles, 12 (three case control study and 9 case reports) articles met inclusion criteria. All of the included studies indicated dysfunction of electron transport chain in autism. The mitochondrial electron transfer chain seems impaired in some children with autism and ROS production is additionally enhanced. It is hypothesized that interventions involving alternative electron shuttling may improve autism through lowering the production of ROS. In addition, it is expected that this alternative electron shuttling to cytochrome c might enhance the production of ATP which is impaired in the disorder.

  6. Aroma compounds generation in citrate metabolism of Enterococcus faecium: Genetic characterization of type I citrate gene cluster.

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    Martino, Gabriela P; Quintana, Ingrid M; Espariz, Martín; Blancato, Victor S; Magni, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Enterococcus is one of the most controversial genera belonging to Lactic Acid Bacteria. Research involving this microorganism reflects its dual behavior as regards its safety. Although it has also been associated to nosocomial infections, natural occurrence of Enterococcus faecium in food contributes to the final quality of cheese. This bacterium is capable of fermenting citrate, which is metabolized to pyruvate and finally derives in the production of the aroma compounds diacetyl, acetoin and 2,3 butanediol. Citrate metabolism was studied in E. faecium but no data about genes related to these pathways have been described. A bioinformatic approach allowed us to differentiate cit(-) (no citrate metabolism genes) from cit(+) strains in E. faecium. Furthermore, we could classify them according to genes encoding for the transcriptional regulator, the oxaloacetate decarboxylase and the citrate transporter. Thus we defined type I organization having CitI regulator (DeoR family), CitM cytoplasmic soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase (Malic Enzyme family) and CitP citrate transporter (2-hydroxy-carboxylate transporter family) and type II organization with CitO regulator (GntR family), OAD membrane oxaloacetate decarboxylase complex (Na(+)-transport decarboxylase enzyme family) and CitH citrate transporter (CitMHS family). We isolated and identified 17 E. faecium strains from regional cheeses. PCR analyses allowed us to classify them as cit(-) or cit(+). Within the latter classification we could differentiate type I but no type II organization. Remarkably, we came upon E. faecium GM75 strain which carries the insertion sequence IS256, involved in adaptative and evolution processes of bacteria related to Staphylococcus and Enterococcus genera. In this work we describe the differential behavior in citrate transport, metabolism and aroma generation of three strains and we present results that link citrate metabolism and genetic organizations in E. faecium for the first time.

  7. Changes of proton transportation across the inner mitochondrial membrane and H+-ATPase in endotoxic shock rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Song-min 陆松敏; SONG Shuang-ming 宋双明; LIU Jian-cang 刘建仓; YANG He-ming 杨鹤鸣; LI Ping 李萍; WANG Zheng-guo 王正国

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of proton transportation across the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) and H+-ATPase of hepatocytes in endotoxic shock rats.Methods: Endotoxin from E.Coil of 5.0 mg/kg or saline of 1 ml/kg was injected into the femoral vein.The rats were sacrificed pre-injection and 1, 3, 5, 8 hours after injection, and plasma and liver tissue samples were collected respectively.The liver tissue samples were used for preparation of mitochondria and submitochondrial particles (SMPs).The proton-translocation of SMPs and H+-ATPase, phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, membrane fluidities of different level of mitochondria membrane and plasma MDA content were assayed.Results: (1) Five hours after E.Coli.O111B4 injection, the maximum fluorescence quenching ACMA after adding ATP, nicotinamide adenin dinucleoacid hydrogen (NADH), and the succinate were significantly decreased (P<0.05).The time of maximum fluorescent quenching and the half time of fluorescent quenching were significantly prolonged (P<0.01), especially when NADH was used as a substrate.(2) The mitochondrial H+-ATPase activity was significantly increased at early stage of endotoxic shock (P<0.05), and significantly decreased at late stage of endotoxic shock (P<0.01).(3) The mitochondrial membrane bound PLA2 activity, plasmal and mitochondrial MDA content were significantly increased and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of mitochondria decreased markedly in endotoxic shock rats (P<0.05).(4) The mitochondrial membrane fluidity of different lipid regions was decreased, especially in the head of phospholipid.Conclusions: Proton transportation across IMM and mitochondrial H+-ATPase activity are significantly decreased in endotoxic shock.

  8. Variation in molybdenum content across broadly distributed populations of Arabidopsis thaliana is controlled by a mitochondrial molybdenum transporter (MOT1.

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    Ivan Baxter

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo is an essential micronutrient for plants, serving as a cofactor for enzymes involved in nitrate assimilation, sulfite detoxification, abscisic acid biosynthesis, and purine degradation. Here we show that natural variation in shoot Mo content across 92 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions is controlled by variation in a mitochondrially localized transporter (Molybdenum Transporter 1 - MOT1 that belongs to the sulfate transporter superfamily. A deletion in the MOT1 promoter is strongly associated with low shoot Mo, occurring in seven of the accessions with the lowest shoot content of Mo. Consistent with the low Mo phenotype, MOT1 expression in low Mo accessions is reduced. Reciprocal grafting experiments demonstrate that the roots of Ler-0 are responsible for the low Mo accumulation in shoot, and GUS localization demonstrates that MOT1 is expressed strongly in the roots. MOT1 contains an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence and expression of MOT1 tagged with GFP in protoplasts and transgenic plants, establishing the mitochondrial localization of this protein. Furthermore, expression of MOT1 specifically enhances Mo accumulation in yeast by 5-fold, consistent with MOT1 functioning as a molybdate transporter. This work provides the first molecular insight into the processes that regulate Mo accumulation in plants and shows that novel loci can be detected by association mapping.

  9. The Protective Effect of Icariin on Mitochondrial Transport and Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons from 3× Tg-AD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijing; Han, Shuangxue; Huang, Xiuxian; Ni, Jiazuan; He, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-27

    Icariin, a pharmacologically active component isolated from the Chinese herb Epimedium, has been shown to improve spatial learning and memory abilities in Alzheimer's disease (AD) rats through inhibition of Aβ production and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. However, the potential mechanism of icariin-induced protective effects against mitochondrial dysfunctions in AD still remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of icariin on the modulation of mitochondrial transport and distribution in primary hippocampal cultures from triple-transgenic (3× Tg) AD mice. The results showed that icariin enhanced mitochondrial motility and increased mitochondrial index and mitochondrial length and size in the diseased neurons. Additionally, the expression of the key mitochondrial enzyme, pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDHE1α), and the post synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), was preserved in AD neurons after icariin treatment, accompanied by a downregulation of Aβ and phosphorylated tau expression in the corresponding areas. Further study showed that icariin treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and an increase in fusion protein Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). These data indicate that icariin can promote mitochondrial transport, protect mitochondria against fragmentation and preserve the expression of mitochondrial and synaptic functional proteins in AD neurons. Thus, icariin may be a potential therapeutic complement for AD and other mitochondrial malfunction-related neuronal degenerative diseases.

  10. The Protective Effect of Icariin on Mitochondrial Transport and Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons from 3× Tg-AD Mice

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    Yijing Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Icariin, a pharmacologically active component isolated from the Chinese herb Epimedium, has been shown to improve spatial learning and memory abilities in Alzheimer’s disease (AD rats through inhibition of Aβ production and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. However, the potential mechanism of icariin-induced protective effects against mitochondrial dysfunctions in AD still remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effect of icariin on the modulation of mitochondrial transport and distribution in primary hippocampal cultures from triple-transgenic (3× Tg AD mice. The results showed that icariin enhanced mitochondrial motility and increased mitochondrial index and mitochondrial length and size in the diseased neurons. Additionally, the expression of the key mitochondrial enzyme, pyruvate dehydrogenase-E1α (PDHE1α, and the post synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95, was preserved in AD neurons after icariin treatment, accompanied by a downregulation of Aβ and phosphorylated tau expression in the corresponding areas. Further study showed that icariin treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 and an increase in fusion protein Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2. These data indicate that icariin can promote mitochondrial transport, protect mitochondria against fragmentation and preserve the expression of mitochondrial and synaptic functional proteins in AD neurons. Thus, icariin may be a potential therapeutic complement for AD and other mitochondrial malfunction-related neuronal degenerative diseases.

  11. A mild impairment of mitochondrial electron transport has sex-specific effects on lifespan and aging in mice.

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    Bryan G Hughes

    Full Text Available Impairments of various aspects of mitochondrial function have been associated with increased lifespan in various model organisms ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mice. For example, disruption of the function of the 'Rieske' iron-sulfur protein (RISP of complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain can result in increased lifespan in the nematode worm C. elegans. However, the mechanisms by which impaired mitochondrial function affects aging remain under investigation, including whether or not they require decreased electron transport. We have generated knock-in mice with a loss-of-function Risp mutation that is homozygous lethal. However, heterozygotes (Risp(+/P224S were viable and had decreased levels of RISP protein and complex III enzymatic activity. This decrease was sufficient to impair mitochondrial respiration and to decrease overall metabolic rate in males, but not females. These defects did not appear to exert an overtly deleterious effect on the health of the mutants, since young Risp(+/P224S mice are outwardly normal, with unaffected performance and fertility. Furthermore, biomarkers of oxidative stress were unaffected in both young and aged animals. Despite this, the average lifespan of male Risp(+/P224S mice was shortened and aged Risp(+/P224S males showed signs of more rapidly deteriorating health. In spite of these differences, analysis of Gompertz mortality parameters showed that Risp heterozygosity decreased the rate of increase of mortality with age and increased the intrinsic vulnerability to death in both sexes. However, the intrinsic vulnerability was increased more dramatically in males, which resulted in their shortened lifespan. For females, the slower acceleration of age-dependent mortality results in significantly increased survival of Risp(+/P224S mice in the second half of lifespan. These results demonstrate that even relatively small perturbations of the mitochondrial electron transport chain can

  12. Expression of the Bcl-2 family genes and complexes involved in the mitochondrial transport in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmarinah, Asmarinah; Paradowska-Dogan, Agnieszka; Kodariah, Ria; Tanuhardja, Budiana; Waliszewski, Przemyslaw; Mochtar, Chaidir Arif; Weidner, Wolfgang; Hinsch, Elvira

    2014-10-01

    Alteration of molecular pathways triggering apoptosis gives raise to various pathological tissue processes, such as tumorigenesis. The mitochondrial pathway is regulated by both the genes of the Bcl-2 family and the genes encoding mitochondrial transport molecules. Those proteins allow a release of cyctochrome c through the outer mitochondrial membrane. This release activates the caspase cascade resulting in death of cells. There are at least two main transport systems associated with the family of Bcl-2 proteins that are involved in transport of molecules through the outer mitochondrial membrane, i.e., the voltage dependent anion channels (VDACs) and translocases of the outer mitochondrial membrane proteins (TOMs). We investigated the expression of genes of the Bcl-2 family, i.e., pro-apoptotic Bak and Bid, and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2; VDAC gene, i.e., VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3; and TOMM genes, i.e., TOMM20, TOMM22 and TOMM40. This study was performed at the mRNA and the protein level. Fourteen paraffin embedded prostate cancer tissues and five normal prostate tissues were analyzed by the quantitative PCR array and immunohistochemistry. We found a significant increase in both mRNA expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene and VDAC1 gene in prostate cancer tissue in comparison with their normal counterparts. Translation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and VDAC1 genes in prostate cancer tissue was slightly increased. We observed no significant differences in the mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic Bak and Bid genes, VDAC2 or VDAC3 genes or the three TOMM genes in these tissues. The pro-apoptotic Bax protein was downtranslated significantly in secretory cells of prostate cancer as compared to normal prostate. We suggest that this protein is a good candidate as biomarker for prostate cancer.

  13. Impaired mitochondrial energy production and ABC transporter function-A crucial interconnection in dementing proteopathies of the brain.

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    Pahnke, Jens; Fröhlich, Christina; Krohn, Markus; Schumacher, Toni; Paarmann, Kristin

    2013-10-01

    Ageing is the main risk factor for the development of dementing neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) and it is accompanied by the accumulation of variations in mitochondrial DNA. The resulting tissue-specific alterations in ATP production and availability cause deteriorations of cerebral clearance mechanisms that are important for the removal of toxic peptides and its aggregates. ABC transporters were shown to be the most important exporter superfamily for toxic peptides, e.g. β-amyloid and α-synuclein. Their activity is highly dependent on the availability of ATP and forms a directed energy-exporter network, linking decreased mitochondrial function with highly impaired ABC transporter activity and disease progression. In this paper, we describe a network based on interactions between ageing, energy metabolism, regeneration, accumulation of toxic peptides and the development of proteopathies of the brain with a focus on Alzheimer's disease (AD). Additionally, we provide new experimental evidence for interactions within this network in regenerative processes in AD.

  14. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

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    J. Brian Morgan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula. Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM. Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase. Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF in tumor cells.

  15. Composition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in acanthamoeba castellanii: structural and evolutionary insights.

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    Gawryluk, Ryan M R; Chisholm, Kenneth A; Pinto, Devanand M; Gray, Michael W

    2012-11-01

    The mitochondrion, derived in evolution from an α-proteobacterial progenitor, plays a key metabolic role in eukaryotes. Mitochondria house the electron transport chain (ETC) that couples oxidation of organic substrates and electron transfer to proton pumping and synthesis of ATP. The ETC comprises several multiprotein enzyme complexes, all of which have counterparts in bacteria. However, mitochondrial ETC assemblies from animals, plants and fungi are generally more complex than their bacterial counterparts, with a number of 'supernumerary' subunits appearing early in eukaryotic evolution. Little is known, however, about the ETC of unicellular eukaryotes (protists), which are key to understanding the evolution of mitochondria and the ETC. We present an analysis of the ETC proteome from Acanthamoeba castellanii, an ecologically, medically and evolutionarily important member of Amoebozoa (sister to Opisthokonta). Data obtained from tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analyses of purified mitochondria as well as ETC complexes isolated via blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis are combined with the results of bioinformatic queries of sequence databases. Our bioinformatic analyses have identified most of the ETC subunits found in other eukaryotes, confirming and extending previous observations. The assignment of proteins as ETC subunits by MS/MS provides important insights into the primary structures of ETC proteins and makes possible, through the use of sensitive profile-based similarity searches, the identification of novel constituents of the ETC along with the annotation of highly divergent but phylogenetically conserved ETC subunits.

  16. Dynamic changes in the mitochondrial electron transport chain underpinning cold acclimation of leaf respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Anna F; Badger, Murray R; Day, David A; Barthet, Michelle M; Smith, Penelope M C; Millar, A Harvey; Whelan, Jim; Atkin, Owen K

    2008-08-01

    We examined the effect of short- and long-term changes in temperature on gene expression, protein abundance, and the activity of the alternative oxidase and cytochrome oxidase pathways (AOP and COP, respectively) in Arabidopsis thaliana. The AOP was more sensitive to short-term changes in temperature than the COP, with partitioning to the AOP decreasing significantly below a threshold temperature of 20 degrees C. AOP activity was increased in leaves, which had been shifted to the cold for several days, but this response was transient, with AOP activity subsiding (and COP activity increasing) following the development of leaves in the cold. The transient increase in AOP activity in 10-d cold-shifted leaves was not associated with an increase in alternative oxidase (AOX) protein or AOX1a transcript abundance. By contrast, the amount of uncoupling protein was significantly increased in cold-developed leaves. In conjunction with this, transcript levels of the uncoupling protein-encoding gene UCP1 and the external NAD(P)H dehydrogenase-encoding gene NDB2 exhibited sustained increases following growth in the cold. The data suggest a role for each of these alternative non-phosphorylating bypasses of mitochondrial electron transport at different points in time following exposure to cold, with increased AOP activity being important only in the early stages of cold treatment.

  17. Cannabinoid receptor 1 signalling dampens activity and mitochondrial transport in networks of enteric neurones.

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    Boesmans, W; Ameloot, K; van den Abbeel, V; Tack, J; Vanden Berghe, P

    2009-09-01

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors are expressed in the enteric nervous system (ENS) and CB(1) receptor activity slows down motility and delays gastric emptying. This receptor system has become an important target for GI-related drug development such as in obesity treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate how CB(1) ligands and antagonists affect ongoing activity in enteric neurone networks, modulate synaptic vesicle cycling and influence mitochondrial transport in nerve processes. Primary cultures of guinea-pig myenteric neurones were loaded with different fluorescent markers: Fluo-4 to measure network activity, FM1-43 to image synaptic vesicles and Mitotracker green to label mitochondria. Synaptic vesicle cluster density was assessed by immunohistochemistry and expression of CB(1) receptors was confirmed by RT-PCR. Spontaneous network activity, displayed by both excitatory and inhibitory neurones, was significantly increased by CB(1) receptor antagonists (AM-251 and SR141716), abolished by CB(1) activation (methanandamide, mAEA) and reduced by two different inhibitors (arachidonylamide serotonin, AA-5HT and URB597) of fatty acid amide hydrolase. Antagonists reduced the number of synaptic vesicles that were recycled during an electrical stimulus. CB(1) agonists (mAEA and WIN55,212) reduced and antagonists enhanced the fraction of transported mitochondria in enteric nerve fibres. We found immunohistochemical evidence for an enhancement of synaptophysin-positive release sites with SR141716, while WIN55,212 caused a reduction. The opposite effects of agonists and antagonists suggest that enteric nerve signalling is under the permanent control of CB(1) receptor activity. Using inhibitors of the endocannabinoid degrading enzyme, we were able to show there is endogenous production of a CB ligand in the ENS.

  18. Alverine citrate induced acute hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mehmet Arhan; Seyfettin K(o)klü; Aydln S K(o)ksal; (O)mer F Yolcu; Senem Koruk; Irfan Koruk; Ertugrul Kayacetin

    2004-01-01

    Alverine citrate is a commonly used smooth muscle relaxant agent. A MEDLINE search on January 2004 revealed only 1 report implicating the hepatotoxicity of this agent. A 34-year-old woman was investigated because of the finding of elevated liver function tests on biochemical screening. Other etiologies of hepatitis were appropriately ruled out and elevated enzymes were ascribed to alverine citrate treatment.Although alverine citrate hepatotoxicity was related to an immune mechanism in the first case, several features such as absence of predictable dose-dependent toxicity of alverine citrate in a previous study and absence of hypersensitivity manifestations in our patient are suggestive of a metabolic type of idiosyncratic toxicity.

  19. The homeobox protein CEH-23 mediates prolonged longevity in response to impaired mitochondrial electron transport chain in C. elegans.

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    Ludivine Walter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings indicate that perturbations of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC can cause extended longevity in evolutionarily diverse organisms. To uncover the molecular basis of how altered METC increases lifespan in C. elegans, we performed an RNAi screen and revealed that three predicted transcription factors are specifically required for the extended longevity of mitochondrial mutants. In particular, we demonstrated that the nuclear homeobox protein CEH-23 uniquely mediates the longevity but not the slow development, reduced brood size, or resistance to oxidative stress associated with mitochondrial mutations. Furthermore, we showed that ceh-23 expression levels are responsive to altered METC, and enforced overexpression of ceh-23 is sufficient to extend lifespan in wild-type background. Our data point to mitochondria-to-nucleus communications to be key for longevity determination and highlight CEH-23 as a novel longevity factor capable of responding to mitochondrial perturbations. These findings provide a new paradigm for how mitochondria impact aging and age-dependent diseases.

  20. The effect of the Ti (IV-citrate complex on staphylococcus aureus growth and biofilm formation

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    Gritsenko Viktor A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the Ti (IV-citrate complex on growth dynamics and biofilm formation of S. aureus. Speciation analysis was performed in order to estimate the structure of the Ti complex existing in citrate solutions at near-physiological pH. It is estimated that the fully deprotonated tris(citratetitanate ion [Ti(C6H4O73]8- predominates in solution at pH 6.46-7.44, and that this is most probably the biologically active form of Ti(IV-citrate. In in vitro experiments, increasing concentrations of citric acid solutions (0.05, 0.005, 0.0005 M, served as positive controls, while the effects of respective concentrations of Ti(IV-citrate were examined. The obtained results indicate that citrate decreased S. aureus 48 growth at all studied concentrations, whereas S. aureus 44 growth was decreased only by high concentrations of citrate (0.05M. Incubation of S. aureus culture with Ti(IV-citrate significantly potentiated citrate-induced effects. Ti(IV-citrate significantly altered specific bacterial growth rate in a similar manner. The most significant growth reduction was observed at the initial period of bacterial growth. At the same time, the opposite effect was detected in investigations of the effect of citrate and Ti(IV-citrate on S. aureus biofilm formation. Citric acid suppressed S. aureus biofilm formation, whereas Ti(IV-citrate displayed a significant stimulatory effect. Our findings suggest that Ti(IV-citrate possesses a more pronounced biological effect than citrate. The proposed mechanism of this action is activation of complex transport into the cell and induction of oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanism of Ti(IV-citrate biological action on bacterial cultures remains unknown.

  1. Ca2+ transport in isolated mitochondrial vesicles from Leishmania braziliensis promastigotes.

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    Benaim, G; Bermudez, R; Urbina, J A

    1990-02-01

    Leishmania braziliensis maintained very low (50 +/- 20 nM) intracellular concentrations of calcium ions under normal conditions, as shown by the fluorimetric indicator QUIN2. Digitonin-permeabilized cells liberated large amounts of calcium ions in the presence of the ionophore A23187, indicating the presence of a large intracellular reservoir for this ion. Given the extraordinary extension of the single giant mitochondrion of Kinetoplastida and the known capacity of mitochondria from other sources to accumulate calcium, we tested the capacity of this organelle to accumulate calcium ions in Leishmania. Coupled mitochondrial vesicles, five-fold enriched in succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase, were obtained from promastigotes by gentle grinding (45 s) with glass beads in hypertonic buffer solution, followed by differential centrifugation. These vesicles had a respiratory control ratio of 1.82 +/- 0.15, and two phosphorylation sites (sites II and III) using succinate as electron donor, and were capable of calcium uptake in the presence of several respiratory substrates; this uptake was enhanced in the presence of ADP and Pi and was blocked by classical electron transport inhibitors. Uncouplers such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone (FCCP) and the calcium ionophore A23187 released previously accumulated calcium ions, suggesting that the driving force for the calcium uptake by the vesicles is the respiratory generated electrochemical potential gradient of protons. A study of the affinity of this system for calcium showed that even at 90 microM free calcium, succinate-induced calcium uptake is not saturated while approaching a level of 200 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1, indicating a low-affinity, large-capacity system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Citrate uptake into Pectobacterium atrosepticum is critical for bacterial virulence.

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    Urbany, Claude; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2008-05-01

    To analyze whether metabolite import into Pectobacterium atrosepticum cells affects bacterial virulence, we investigated the function of a carrier which exhibits significant structural homology to characterized carboxylic-acid transport proteins. The corresponding gene, ECA3984, previously annotated as coding for a Na(+)/sulphate carrier, in fact encodes a highly specific citrate transporter (Cit1) which is energized by the proton-motive force. Expression of the cit1 gene is stimulated by the presence of citrate in the growth medium and is substantial during growth of P. atrosepticum on potato tuber tissue. Infection of tuber tissue with P. atrosepticum leads to reduced citrate levels. P. atrosepticum insertion mutants, lacking the functional Cit1 protein, did not grow in medium containing citrate as the sole carbon source, showed a substantially reduced ability to macerate potato tuber tissue, and did not provoke reduced citrate levels in the plant tissue upon infection. We propose that citrate uptake into P. atrosepticum is critical for full bacterial virulence.

  3. Artificial citrate operon and Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene enhanced mineral phosphate solubilizing ability of Enterobacter hormaechei DHRSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Kavita; Kumar, Chanchal; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2014-10-01

    Mineral phosphate solubilization by bacteria is mediated through secretion of organic acids, among which citrate is one of the most effective. To overproduce citrate in bacterial systems, an artificial citrate operon comprising of genes encoding NADH-insensitive citrate synthase of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium sodium-dependent citrate transporter was constructed. In order to improve its mineral phosphate solubilizing (MPS) ability, the citrate operon was incorporated into E. hormaechei DHRSS. The artificial citrate operon transformant secreted 7.2 mM citric acid whereas in the native strain, it was undetectable. The transformant released 0.82 mM phosphate in flask studies in buffered medium containing rock phosphate as sole P source. In fermenter studies, similar phenotype was observed under aerobic conditions. However, under microaerobic conditions, no citrate was detected and P release was not observed. Therefore, an artificial citrate gene cluster containing Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (vgb) gene under its native promoter, along with artificial citrate operon under constitutive tac promoter, was constructed and transformed into E. hormaechei DHRSS. This transformant secreted 9 mM citric acid under microaerobic conditions and released 1.0 mM P. Thus, incorporation of citrate operon along with vgb gene improves MPS ability of E. hormaechei DHRSS under buffered, microaerobic conditions mimicking rhizospheric environment.

  4. Citrate uptake into tonoplast vesicles from acid lime (Citrus aurantifolia) juice cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brune, A; Gonzalez, P; Goren, R; Zehavi, U; Echeverria, E

    1998-12-01

    Citrate transport into the vacuoles of acid lime juice cells was investigated using isolated tonoplast vesicles. ATP stimulated citrate uptake in the presence or in the absence of a Delta mu H+. Energization of the vesicles only by an artificial K+ gradient (establishing an inside-positive Delta psi) also resulted in citrate uptake as was the case of a Delta pH dominated Delta mu H+. Addition of inhibitors to endomembrane ATPases showed no direct correlation between the inhibition to the tonoplast bound H+/ATPase and citrate uptake. The data indicated that, although some citrate uptake can be accounted for by Delta psi and by a direct primary active transport mechanism involving ATP, under in vivo conditions of vacuolar pH of 2.0, citrate uptake is driven by Delta pH.

  5. Impulse conduction increases mitochondrial transport in adult mammalian peripheral nerves in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Sajic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Matching energy supply and demand is critical in the bioenergetic homeostasis of all cells. This is a special problem in neurons where high levels of energy expenditure may occur at sites remote from the cell body, given the remarkable length of axons and enormous variability of impulse activity over time. Positioning mitochondria at areas with high energy requirements is an essential solution to this problem, but it is not known how this is related to impulse conduction in vivo. Therefore, to study mitochondrial trafficking along resting and electrically active adult axons in vivo, confocal imaging of saphenous nerves in anaesthetised mice was combined with electrical and pharmacological stimulation of myelinated and unmyelinated axons, respectively. We show that low frequency activity induced by electrical stimulation significantly increases anterograde and retrograde mitochondrial traffic in comparison with silent axons. Higher frequency conduction within a physiological range (50 Hz dramatically further increased anterograde, but not retrograde, mitochondrial traffic, by rapidly increasing the number of mobile mitochondria and gradually increasing their velocity. Similarly, topical application of capsaicin to skin innervated by the saphenous nerve increased mitochondrial traffic in both myelinated and unmyelinated axons. In addition, stationary mitochondria in axons conducting at higher frequency become shorter, thus supplying additional mitochondria to the trafficking population, presumably through enhanced fission. Mitochondria recruited to the mobile population do not accumulate near Nodes of Ranvier, but continue to travel anterogradely. This pattern of mitochondrial redistribution suggests that the peripheral terminals of sensory axons represent sites of particularly high metabolic demand during physiological high frequency conduction. As the majority of mitochondrial biogenesis occurs at the cell body, increased anterograde

  6. Citric/citrate buffer: an effective antiglycolytic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pino, Isabel García; Constanso, Ignacio; Mourín, Luis Vázquez; Safont, Carmela Barbuzano; Vázquez, Pastora Rodríguez

    2013-10-01

    In order to minimize the influence of glycolysis on diabetes mellitus (DM) diagnostic tests, we have compared the behavior of citric/citrate, fluoride additives and gel-serum with plasma-heparin under careful preanalytical conditions. Subsequently, we compared the effectiveness of both fluoride and citric additives at different pre-centrifugation times. Finally, the influence of citric/citrate collection tube on diagnostic tests results was evaluated. The first study of 80 voluntary patients assessed the glucose bias of citric/citrate, fluoride additive tubes and gel-serum tubes versus plasma-heparin tubes at several medical decision cut-offs (MDC). The second study performed with 72 volunteers evaluated additives, simulating transport times to the laboratory and centrifugation delay periods. Final evaluation compares the proportion of positive tests in total tests carried out in two different periods. When citric/citrate (n=79) and fluoride tubes (n=60) were compared with plasma-heparin under controlled preanalytical conditions, both met the bias specification for plasma glucose (±1.8%) at seven MDC. On the contrary, serum samples (n=15) did not meet it at five MDC. In the second study, differences in glucose values at distinct pre-centrifugation times were not statistically significant for citric/citrate tubes, but significant for fluoride tubes and also for comparison of fluoride and citric/citrate tubes. Hemolysis in fluoride tubes was higher. Citric/citrate tube implementation in our laboratory caused an increase in positive diagnostic tests that were only statistically significant for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) screening. Citric/citrate additive tube is equivalent to plasma-heparin avoiding glycolysis completely and immediately under careful preanalytical conditions even with a 3-h delay in plasma separation. According to used MDC we have not statistically significantly increased the diagnoses of DM cases.

  7. Antiproliferative Effects of Zinc-Citrate Compound on Hormone Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Hoo Hong; Yong Sun Choi; Hyuk Jin Cho; Ji Youl Lee; Joon Chul Kim; Tae Kon Hwang; Sae Woong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the antiproliferative effects of zinc-citrate compound on hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC).Methods:HRPC cell line (DU145) and normal prostate cell line (RWPE-1) were treated with zinc,citrate and zinc-citrate compound at different time intervals and concentrations to investigate the effect of zinc-citrate compound.Mitochondrial (m)-aconitase activity was determined using aconitase assay.DNA laddering analysis was performed to investigate apoptosis of DU145 cells.Molecular mechanism of apoptosis was investigated by Western blot analys s of P53,P21waf1,Bcl-2,Bcl-xL and Bax,and also caspase-3 activity analysis.Results:Treatment with zinc-citrate compound resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in cell number of DU145 cells in comparison with RWPE-1.M-aconitase activity was significantly decreased.DNA laddering analysis indicated apoptosis of DU145 cells.Zinc-citrate compound increased the expression of P21waf1 and P53,and reduced the express on of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL proteins but induced the expression of Bax protein.Zinc-citrate compound induced apoptosis of DU145 cells by activation of the caspase-3 pathway.Conclusion:Zinc-citrate compound can induce apoptotic cell death in DU145,by caspase-3 activation through up-regulation of apoptotic proteins and down-regulation of antiapoptotic proteins.

  8. Inactivation of brain mitochondrial Lon protease by peroxynitrite precedes electron transport chain dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanyer, Lee; Jørgensen, Wenche; Hori, Osamu;

    2008-01-01

    more sensitive than basal Lon protease activity. Furthermore, supplementation of mitochondrial matrix extracts with reduced glutathione, following ONOO(-) exposure, resulted in partial restoration of basal and ATP-stimulated activity, thus suggesting possible redox regulation of this enzyme complex....... Taken together these findings suggest that Lon protease may be particularly vulnerable to inactivation in conditions associated with GSH depletion and elevated oxidative stress....

  9. TGFβ1 downregulates neurite outgrowth, expression of Ca2+ transporters, and mitochondrial dynamics of in vitro cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskova, Katarina; Pavlovicova, Michaela; Cagalinec, Michal; Lacinova, Lubica; Jurkovicova, Dana

    2014-03-26

    Acute injury to central nervous system (CNS) triggers neurodegenerative processes that can result in serious damage or complete loss of function. After injury, production of transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) increases and initiates creation of a fibrotic scar that prevents normal growth, plasticity, and recovery of damaged neurons. Administration of TGFβ1 antagonists can prevent its pathological effects. To define consequences of increased TGFβ1 release on calcium signaling, neuronal plasticity, excitability, and mitochondrial dynamics in CNS neurons we directly exposed a rat primary culture of cerebellar granule neurons to TGFβ1. We focused on changes in expression of intracellular calcium transporters, especially inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) type 1, mitochondrial dynamics, and membrane excitability. TGFβ1 significantly decreased the gene and protein expression of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 and the gene expression of additional intracellular Ca transporters such as IP3R2, ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1), RyR2, and SERCA2. Altered calcium signaling suppressed neurite outgrowth and significantly decreased the length of the mitochondria and the frequency of mitochondrial fusion. The resting membrane potential of cerebellar granule neurons was hyperpolarized and slow after depolarization of single action potential was suppressed. LY364947, a blocker of TGFβ1 receptor I, prevented these effects, and IP3 receptor blocker 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2APB) mimicked them. After CNS injury TGFβ1 downregulates intracellular Ca levels and alters Ca signaling within injured neurons. We suggest that in our model TGFβ1 may trigger both neurodegenerative and neuroprotective events through IP3-induced Ca signaling.

  10. Mitochondrial Medicine: Pharmacological targeting of mitochondria in disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Armstrong, J S

    2007-01-01

    .... This review discusses mitochondrial drug targeting strategies and a variety of novel mitochondrial drug targets including the electron transport chain, mitochondrial permeability transition, Bcl...

  11. Safety Assessment of Citric Acid, Inorganic Citrate Salts, and Alkyl Citrate Esters as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart A; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-05-26

    The CIR Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of citric acid, 12 inorganic citrate salts, and 20 alkyl citrate esters as used in cosmetics, concluding that these ingredients are safe in the present practices of use and concentration. Citric acid is reported to function as a pH adjuster, chelating agent, or fragrance ingredient. Some of the salts are also reported to function as chelating agents, and a number of the citrates are reported to function as skin-conditioning agents but other functions are also reported. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data, but because citric acid, calcium citrate, ferric citrate, manganese citrate, potassium citrate, sodium citrate, diammonium citrate, isopropyl citrate, stearyl citrate, and triethyl citrate are generally recognized as safe direct food additives, dermal exposure was the focus for these ingredients in this cosmetic ingredient safety assessment.

  12. IL-6 induces lipolysis and mitochondrial dysfunction, but does not affect insulin-mediated glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chenbo; Chen, Xiaohui; Gao, Chunlin; Jiao, Liuhong; Wang, Jianguo; Xu, Guangfeng; Fu, Hailong; Guo, Xirong; Zhao, Yaping

    2011-08-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has emerged as an important cytokine involved in the regulation of metabolism. However, the role of IL-6 in the etiology of obesity and insulin resistance is not fully understood. Mitochondria are key organelles of energy metabolism, and there is growing evidence that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated insulin resistance. In this study, we determined the direct effect of IL-6 on lipolysis in adipocytes, and the effects of IL-6 on mitochondrial function were investigated. We found that cells treated with IL-6 displayed fewer lipids and an elevated glycerol release rate. Further, IL-6 treatment led to decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased cellular ATP production, and increased intracellular ROS levels. The mitochondria in IL-6-treated cells became swollen and hollow with reduced or missing cristae. However, insulin-stimulated glucose transport was unaltered. PGC-1α, NRF1, and mtTFA mRNA levels were markedly increased, and the mitochondrial contents were also increased. Our results demonstrate that IL-6 can exert a direct lipolytic effect and induce mitochondrial dysfunction. However, IL-6 did not affect insulin sensitivity in adipocytes in vitro. We deduce that in these cells, enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis might play a compensatory role in glucose transport.

  13. Mitochondrial electron transport chain dysfunction during development does not extend lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rera, Michael; Monnier, Véronique; Tricoire, Hervé

    2010-02-01

    Since the initial identification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as the major factor in aging, many studies have provided evidence for the central role of mitochondria in longevity. A few years ago, an unexpected finding showed that the inactivation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) in Caenorhabditis elegans, during the developmental stages only, extended lifespan. Activation of this mitochondrial pathway affecting aging (MIT) is associated with several phenotypic features: increased longevity, increased time of development, decreased fertility/fecundity and reduced adult size. Here, we investigated this pathway in another model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. To assess the role of mitochondrial activity in the Drosophila aging process, we partially inactivated the MRC using RNA interference (RNAi) during larval stages. Developmental perturbation of the respiratory process prolonged development, increased lethality during developmental stage, reduced both fecundity and fertility and slightly reduced individual weight. However, in contrast to the nematode, this genetic intervention either shortened or had no effect on lifespan, depending on the level of gene inactivation. Thus, the effects of MRC disruption during development on aging differ between species. We discuss the possible origins of such differences.

  14. The human and mouse SLC25A29 mitochondrial transporters rescue the deficient ornithine metabolism in fibroblasts of patients with the hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, José A; Rioseco-Camacho, Natalia

    2009-07-01

    The hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is a disorder of the urea cycle (UCD) and ornithine degradation pathway caused by mutations in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter (ORNT1). Unlike other UCDs, HHH syndrome is characterized by a less severe and variable phenotype that we believe may, in part, be due to genes with redundant function to ORNT1, such as the previously characterized ORNT2 gene. We reasoned that SLC25A29, a member of the same subfamily of mitochondrial carrier proteins as ORNT1 and ORNT2, might also have overlapping function with ORNT1. Here, we report that both the human and mouse SLC25A29, previously identified as mitochondrial carnitine/acyl-carnitine transporter-like, when overexpressed transiently also rescues the impaired ornithine transport in cultured HHH fibroblasts. Moreover, we observed that, in the mouse, the Slc25a29 message is more significantly expressed in the CNS and cultured astrocytes when compared with the liver and kidney. These results suggest a potential physiologic role for the SLC25A29 transporter in the oxidation of fatty acids, ornithine degradation pathway, and possibly the urea cycle. Our results show that SLC25A29 is the third human mitochondrial ornithine transporter, designated as ORNT3, which may contribute to the milder and variable phenotype seen in patients with HHH syndrome.

  15. Enhancement of Aminoacylase Activity by Sodium Citrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于范利; 曹志方; 李森; 周海梦

    2001-01-01

    Kidney and other tissues of animals and humans have a high concentration of citrate which is an important intermediate substance in the citrate cycle. Citrate may play an important physiological role in metabolism. In this paper, we studied the interaction of the sodium salt of citrate with aminoacylase which is an important enzyme in metabolism and found sodium citrate can enhance the activity of aminoacylase. The maximum enzyme activity induced by sodium citrate increased approximately 3 folds over the enzyme activity without sodium citrate. The initial reaction rates (Ⅴ) for different concentrations of sodium citrate were obtained, showing that sodium citrate is a non-competitive activator. The result of the ANS binding fluorescence measurements for aminoacylase indicated that increasing sodium citrate concentrations markedly increased the ANS binding fluorescence with a blue shift of the emission spectra peak. This suggests the formation of more hydrophobic regions. Aggregates formed quickly when aminoacylase was incubated with sodium citrate (0.3 mol/L) and guanidinium chloride (0- 3. 5 mol/L). Aminoacylase lost enzyme activity in the guanidinium chloride more quickly in the presence of sodium citrate than in the absence of sodium citrate. The intrinsic fluorescence emission intensity decreased more quickly and the red shift of the emission spectra peak was larger than that without sodium citrate.

  16. The Effect of Mitochondrial Supplements on Mitochondrial Activity in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhey, Leanna M.; Nur Kilinc, Ekim; Yin, Li; Slattery, John C.; Tippett, Marie L.; Rose, Shannon; Bennuri, Sirish C.; Kahler, Stephen G.; Damle, Shirish; Legido, Agustin; Goldenthal, Michael J.; Frye, Richard E.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment for mitochondrial dysfunction is typically guided by expert opinion with a paucity of empirical evidence of the effect of treatment on mitochondrial activity. We examined citrate synthase and Complex I and IV activities using a validated buccal swab method in 127 children with autism spectrum disorder with and without mitochondrial disease, a portion of which were on common mitochondrial supplements. Mixed-model linear regression determined whether specific supplements altered the absolute mitochondrial activity as well as the relationship between the activities of mitochondrial components. Complex I activity was increased by fatty acid and folate supplementation, but folate only effected those with mitochondrial disease. Citrate synthase activity was increased by antioxidant supplementation but only for the mitochondrial disease subgroup. The relationship between Complex I and IV was modulated by folate while the relationship between Complex I and Citrate Synthase was modulated by both folate and B12. This study provides empirical support for common mitochondrial treatments and demonstrates that the relationship between activities of mitochondrial components might be a marker to follow in addition to absolute activities. Measurements of mitochondrial activity that can be practically repeated over time may be very useful to monitor the biochemical effects of treatments. PMID:28208802

  17. Aspergillus fumigatus mitochondrial electron transport chain mediates oxidative stress homeostasis, hypoxia responses, and fungal pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahl, Nora; Dinamarco, Taisa Magnani; Willger, Sven D.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We previously observed that hypoxia is an important component of host microenvironments during pulmonary fungal infections. However, mechanisms of fungal growth in these in vivo hypoxic conditions are poorly understood. Here, we report that mitochondrial respiration is active in hypoxia (1% oxygen) and critical for fungal pathogenesis. We generated Aspergillus fumigatus alternative oxidase (aoxA) and cytochrome C (cycA) null mutants and assessed their ability to tolerate hypoxia, macrophage killing, and virulence. In contrast to ΔaoxA, ΔcycA was found to be significantly impaired in conidia germination, growth in normoxia and hypoxia, and displayed attenuated virulence. Intriguingly, loss of cycA results in increased levels of AoxA activity, which results in increased resistance to oxidative stress, macrophage killing, and long-term persistence in murine lungs. Thus, our results demonstrate a previously unidentified role for fungal mitochondrial respiration in the pathogenesis of aspergillosis, and lay the foundation for future research into its role in hypoxia signaling and adaptation. PMID:22443190

  18. Elevated mRNA-levels of distinct mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual hypoglossal motor neurons of endstage SOD1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eMühling

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances in Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial dysfunction have emerged as major pathogenic features in familial and sporadic forms of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, a fatal degenerative motor neuron disease. However, the distinct molecular ALS-pathology remains unclear. Recently, an activity-dependent Ca2+ homeostasis deficit, selectively in highly vulnerable cholinergic motor neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (hMNs from a common ALS mouse model, endstage superoxide dismutase SOD1G93A transgenic mice, was described. This functional deficit was defined by a reduced hMN mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake capacity and elevated Ca2+ extrusion across the plasma membrane. To address the underlying molecular mechanisms, here we quantified mRNA-levels of respective potential mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca2+ transporters in individual, choline-acetyltransferase (ChAT positive hMNs from wildtype (WT and endstage SOD1G93A mice, by combining UV laser microdissection with RT-qPCR techniques, and specific data normalization. As ChAT cDNA levels as well as cDNA and genomic DNA levels of the mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase ND1 were not different between hMNs from WT and endstage SOD1G93A mice, these genes were used to normalize hMN-specific mRNA-levels of plasma membrane and mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters, respectively. We detected about 2-fold higher levels of the mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters MCU/MICU1, Letm1 and UCP2 in remaining hMNs from endstage SOD1G93A mice. These higher expression-levels of mitochondrial Ca2+ transporters in individual hMNs were not associated with a respective increase in number of mitochondrial genomes, as evident from hMN specific ND1 DNA quantification. Normalized mRNA-levels for the plasma membrane Na2+/Ca2+exchanger NCX1 was also about 2-fold higher in hMNs from SOD1G93A mice. Thus, pharmacological stimulation of Ca2+ transporters in highly vulnerable hMNs might offer a novel neuroprotective strategy for ALS.

  19. 21 CFR 184.1751 - Sodium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium citrate. 184.1751 Section 184.1751 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1751 Sodium citrate. (a) Sodium citrate (C6H5Na3O7·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 68... may be prepared in an anhydrous state or may contain two moles of water per mole of sodium citrate....

  20. Supercomplex assembly determines electron flux in the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuente-Brun, Esther; Moreno-Loshuertos, Raquel; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Latorre-Pellicer, Ana; Colás, Carmen; Balsa, Eduardo; Perales-Clemente, Ester; Quirós, Pedro M; Calvo, Enrique; Rodríguez-Hernández, M A; Navas, Plácido; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Ángel; López-Otín, Carlos; Pérez-Martos, Acisclo; Fernández-Silva, Patricio; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Enríquez, José Antonio

    2013-06-28

    The textbook description of mitochondrial respiratory complexes (RCs) views them as free-moving entities linked by the mobile carriers coenzyme Q (CoQ) and cytochrome c (cyt c). This model (known as the fluid model) is challenged by the proposal that all RCs except complex II can associate in supercomplexes (SCs). The proposed SCs are the respirasome (complexes I, III, and IV), complexes I and III, and complexes III and IV. The role of SCs is unclear, and their existence is debated. By genetic modulation of interactions between complexes I and III and III and IV, we show that these associations define dedicated CoQ and cyt c pools and that SC assembly is dynamic and organizes electron flux to optimize the use of available substrates.

  1. 21 CFR 582.6625 - Potassium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium citrate. 582.6625 Section 582.6625 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Potassium citrate. (a) Product. Potassium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1625 - Potassium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium citrate. 582.1625 Section 582.1625 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1625 Potassium citrate. (a) Product. Potassium citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1298 Ferric citrate. (a) Ferric citrate (iron (III) citrate, C6H5FeO7, CAS Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  4. 21 CFR 582.6751 - Sodium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium citrate. 582.6751 Section 582.6751 Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Sequestrants 2 § 582.6751 Sodium citrate. (a) Product. Sodium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  5. 21 CFR 582.1751 - Sodium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium citrate. 582.1751 Section 582.1751 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1751 Sodium citrate. (a) Product. Sodium citrate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 582.5449 Section 582.5449 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. Mitochondrial fusion, fission, and mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joel N; Leuthner, Tess C; Luz, Anthony L

    2017-08-05

    Mitochondrial dynamics are regulated by two sets of opposed processes: mitochondrial fusion and fission, and mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation (including mitophagy), as well as processes such as intracellular transport. These processes maintain mitochondrial homeostasis, regulate mitochondrial form, volume and function, and are increasingly understood to be critical components of the cellular stress response. Mitochondrial dynamics vary based on developmental stage and age, cell type, environmental factors, and genetic background. Indeed, many mitochondrial homeostasis genes are human disease genes. Emerging evidence indicates that deficiencies in these genes often sensitize to environmental exposures, yet can also be protective under certain circumstances. Inhibition of mitochondrial dynamics also affects elimination of irreparable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and transmission of mtDNA mutations. We briefly review the basic biology of mitodynamic processes with a focus on mitochondrial fusion and fission, discuss what is known and unknown regarding how these processes respond to chemical and other stressors, and review the literature on interactions between mitochondrial toxicity and genetic variation in mitochondrial fusion and fission genes. Finally, we suggest areas for future research, including elucidating the full range of mitodynamic responses from low to high-level exposures, and from acute to chronic exposures; detailed examination of the physiological consequences of mitodynamic alterations in different cell types; mechanism-based testing of mitotoxicant interactions with interindividual variability in mitodynamics processes; and incorporating other environmental variables that affect mitochondria, such as diet and exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in mitochondrial function and mitochondria associated protein expression in response to 2-weeks of high intensity interval training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace eVincent

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: High-intensity short-duration interval training (HIT stimulates functional and metabolic adaptation in skeletal muscle, but the influence of HIT on mitochondrial function remains poorly studied in humans. Mitochondrial metabolism, as well as mitochondrial-associated protein expression were tested in untrained participants performing HIT over a two-week period. Methods: Eight males performed a single-leg cycling protocol (12 x 1 min intervals at 120% peak power output, 90 s recovery, 4 days/week. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis were taken pre- and post-HIT. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibres, citrate synthase (CS activity and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α and respiratory complex components were measured. Results: HIT training improved peak power and time to fatigue. Increases in absolute oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS capacities and CS activity were observed, but not in the ratio of CCO to the electron transport system (CCO/ETS, the respiratory control ratios (RCR-1 and RCR-2 or mitochondrial-associated protein expression. Specific increases in OXPHOS flux were not apparent after normalization to CS, indicating that gross changes mainly resulted from increased mitochondrial mass. Conclusion: Over only 2 weeks HIT significantly increased mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle independently of detectable changes in mitochondrial-associated and mitogenic protein expression.

  10. Delphinidin-3-glucoside protects against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelial cells via the sodium-dependent glucose transporter SGLT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jin

    Full Text Available Delphinidin-3-glucoside (Dp is a member of a family of bioactive compounds known as anthocyanins that occur naturally in pigmented plants and are known to ameliorate oxidative stress. Previous studies have showed that Dp decreased oxidative stress in vascular endothelial cells, however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In the present study, we showed that pretreatment with Dp significantly suppressed oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL-induced cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Also, Dp pretreatment attenuated oxLDL-induced mitochondrial dysfunction via decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS and superoxide anion generation, thereby repressing mitochondrial membrane potential and closing mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data showed that Dp was transported into endothelial cells in a temperature, concentration, and time-dependent manner via the sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT1. Suppression of SGLT1 by its substrate glucose, its inhibitor phlorizin or SGLT1 siRNA blocked Dp transportation. Repression of SGLT1 significantly inhibited Dp function of ameliorating mitochondrial dysfunction induced by pro-apoptotic factors (Apoptosis-inducing factor, Cytochrome c, Caspase-3 and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Taken together, our data indicate that Dp protects VECs via the SGLT1-ROS-mitochodria pathway. This new insight may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the vascular protection afforded by Dp, and anthocyanins in general, in the context of prevention of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

  11. Partial mitochondrial complex I inhibition induces oxidative damage and perturbs glutamate transport in primary retinal cultures. Relevance to Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Simone; Wood, John P M; Derham, Barry; Sala, Gessica; Tremolizzo, Lucio; Ferrarese, Carlo; Osborne, Neville N

    2006-11-01

    Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited form of visual loss, due to selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. Despite the established aetiological association between LHON and mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I of the electron transport chain, the pathophysiology of this disorder remains obscure. Primary rat retinal cultures were exposed to increasing concentrations of rotenone to titrate complex I inhibition. Neural cells were more sensitive than Müller glial cells to rotenone toxicity. Rotenone induced an increase in mitochondrial-derived free radicals and lipid peroxidation. Sodium-dependent glutamate uptake, which is mostly mediated by the glutamate transporter GLAST expressed by Müller glial cells, was reduced dose-dependently by rotenone with no changes in GLAST expression. Our findings suggest that complex I-derived free radicals and disruption of glutamate transport might represent key elements for explaining the selective retinal ganglion cell death in LHON.

  12. Evaluation of the electron transport chain inhibition and uncoupling of mitochondrial bioelectrocatalysis with antibiotics and nitro-based compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arechederra, Marguerite N.; Fischer, Caitlin N.; Wetzel, David J. [Department of Chemistry, Saint Louis University, 3501 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, MO (United States); Minteer, Shelley D., E-mail: minteers@slu.ed [Department of Chemistry, Saint Louis University, 3501 Laclede Ave., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-12-30

    Mitochondrial bioelectrocatalysis can be useful for sensing applications due to the unique metabolic pathways than can be selectively inhibited and uncoupled in mitochondria. This paper details the comparison of different inhibitors and nitro-containing explosive uncouplers in a mitochondria-catalyzed biofuel cell for self-powered explosive sensing. Previous research has reported inhibition of pyruvate oxidation at a mitochondria-modified electrode followed by nitroaromatic uncoupling of current and power. We have previously used oligomycin as the antibiotic and nitrobenzene as the uncoupler of the membrane in the mitochondria-catalyzed biofuel cell, but no comprehensive comparison of various mitochondria inhibitors or explosives has been performed. Results are discussed here for inhibitors targeting complex I, complex III, ATP synthases, adenine nucleotide transport and monocarboxylic acid transport. Reactivation with nitrobenzene was possible in the presence of these inhibitors: oligomycin, 3,3'-diindolylmethane, atractyloside, rotenone, {alpha}-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid and antimycin A. All eleven explosives studied, including: 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), caused uncoupling of the mitochondria function and could be detected by the biosensor.

  13. Cannabinoid-Induced Changes in the Activity of Electron Transport Chain Complexes of Brain Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Namrata; Hroudová, Jana; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in the activity of individual mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes (I, II/III, IV) and citrate synthase induced by pharmacologically different cannabinoids. In vitro effects of selected cannabinoids on mitochondrial enzymes were measured in crude mitochondrial fraction isolated from pig brain. Both cannabinoid receptor agonists, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, anandamide, and R-(+)-WIN55,212-2, and antagonist/inverse agonists of cannabinoid receptors, AM251, and cannabidiol were examined in pig brain mitochondria. Different effects of these cannabinoids on mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and citrate synthase were found. Citrate synthase activity was decreased only by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and AM251. Significant increase in the complex I activity was induced by anandamide. At micromolar concentration, all the tested cannabinoids inhibited the activity of electron transport chain complexes II/III and IV. Stimulatory effect of anandamide on activity of complex I may participate on distinct physiological effects of endocannabinoids compared to phytocannabinoids or synthetic cannabinoids. Common inhibitory effect of cannabinoids on activity of complex II/III and IV confirmed a non-receptor-mediated mechanism of cannabinoid action on individual components of system of oxidative phosphorylation.

  14. CEP-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans p53 homolog, mediates opposing longevity outcomes in mitochondrial electron transport chain mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiswarya Baruah

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans CEP-1 and its mammalian homolog p53 are critical for responding to diverse stress signals. In this study, we found that cep-1 inactivation suppressed the prolonged lifespan of electron transport chain (ETC mutants, such as isp-1 and nuo-6, but rescued the shortened lifespan of other ETC mutants, such as mev-1 and gas-1. We compared the CEP-1-regulated transcriptional profiles of the long-lived isp-1 and the short-lived mev-1 mutants and, to our surprise, found that CEP-1 regulated largely similar sets of target genes in the two mutants despite exerting opposing effects on their longevity. Further analyses identified a small subset of CEP-1-regulated genes that displayed distinct expression changes between the isp-1 and mev-1 mutants. Interestingly, this small group of differentially regulated genes are enriched for the "aging" Gene Ontology term, consistent with the hypothesis that they might be particularly important for mediating the distinct longevity effects of CEP-1 in isp-1 and mev-1 mutants. We further focused on one of these differentially regulated genes, ftn-1, which encodes ferritin in C. elegans, and demonstrated that it specifically contributed to the extended lifespan of isp-1 mutant worms but did not affect the mev-1 mutant lifespan. We propose that CEP-1 responds to different mitochondrial ETC stress by mounting distinct compensatory responses accordingly to modulate animal physiology and longevity. Our findings provide insights into how mammalian p53 might respond to distinct mitochondrial stressors to influence cellular and organismal responses.

  15. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex II in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Wei, Alicia Y.; Sherman, Teresa A.; Foster, Thomas H.; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play critical roles in meeting cellular energy demand, in cell death, and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stress signaling. Most Caenorhabditis elegans loss-of-function (lf) mutants in nuclear-encoded components of the respiratory chain are non-viable, emphasizing the importance of respiratory function. Chromophore-Assisted Light Inactivation (CALI) using genetically-encoded photosensitizers provides an opportunity to determine how individual respiratory chain components contribute to physiology following acute lf. As proof-of-concept, we expressed the ‘singlet oxygen generator’ miniSOG as a fusion with the SDHC subunit of respiratory complex II, encoded by mev-1 in C. elegans, using Mos1-mediated Single Copy Insertion. The resulting mev-1::miniSOG transgene complemented mev-1 mutant phenotypes in kn1 missense and tm1081(lf) deletion mutants. Complex II activity was inactivated by blue light in mitochondria from strains expressing active miniSOG fusions, but not those from inactive fusions. Moreover, light-inducible phenotypes in vivo demonstrated that complex II activity is important under conditions of high energy demand, and that specific cell types are uniquely susceptible to loss of complex II. In conclusion, miniSOG-mediated CALI is a novel genetic platform for acute inactivation of respiratory chain components. Spatio-temporally controlled ROS generation will expand our understanding of how the respiratory chain and mitochondrial ROS influence whole organism physiology. PMID:27440050

  16. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kgb.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits-NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. © 2013.

  17. Alterations in mitochondrial electron transport system activity in response to warm acclimation, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDougald, Michelle [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Health Sciences Centre, Prince Philip Drive, St. John’s, NL, A1B 3V6 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC, V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sequential inhibition and activation allows assessment of multiple segments of the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation have global effects on the electron transport system. • Warm acclimation and hypoxia-reoxygenation sensitize the electron transport system to copper. • Thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation and copper act additively to impair mitochondrial function. - Abstract: Fish expend significant amounts of energy to handle the numerous potentially stressful biotic and abiotic factors that they commonly encounter in aquatic environments. This universal requirement for energy singularizes mitochondria, the primary cellular energy transformers, as fundamental drivers of responses to environmental change. Our study probed the interacting effects of thermal stress, hypoxia-reoxygenation (HRO) and copper (Cu) exposure in rainbow trout to test the prediction that they act jointly to impair mitochondrial function. Rainbow trout were acclimated to 11 (controls) or 20 °C for 2 months. Liver mitochondria were then isolated and their responses in vitro to Cu (0–20 μM) without and with HRO were assessed. Sequential inhibition and activation of mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) enzyme complexes permitted the measurement of respiratory activities supported by complex I–IV (CI–IV) in one run. The results showed that warm acclimation reduced fish and liver weights but increased mitochondrial protein indicating impairment of energy metabolism, increased synthesis of defense proteins and/or reduced liver water content. Whereas acute rise (11 → 20 °C) in temperature increased mitochondrial oxidation rates supported by CI–IV, warm acclimation reduced the maximal (state 3) and increased the basal (state 4) respiration leading to global uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). HRO profoundly inhibited both maximal and basal respiration rates supported by CI–IV, reduced RCR for all except

  18. The involvement of mitochondrial phosphate transporter in accelerating bud dormancy release during chilling treatment of tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Zhu, Wei; Dai, Silan; Gai, Shupeng; Zheng, Guosheng; Zheng, Chengchao

    2008-09-01

    A cDNA clone was isolated from tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) subtractive cDNA library of burst buds and characterized with regard to its sequence, expression in response to chilling treatment during the release of bud dormancy, and its function in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. The clone, designated as PsMPT, contains 1,615 nucleotides with an open reading frame of 1,119 nucleotides, and the deduced amino acid sequence shows high homology with mitochondrial phosphate transporters (MPTs) from various organisms. The mRNA accumulation of PsMPT in tree peony was strongly induced by chilling treatment during the release of bud dormancy. When the treated plants were transferred to normal growth conditions, the level of PsMPT transcripts induced by sufficient chilling could be maintained high, whereas that induced by insufficient chilling decreased sharply. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants that overexpress PsMPT showed rapid growth and earlier flowering than wild-type plants. ATP contents in the transgenic plants were much higher than that in wild-type plants through various developmental stages. Together, these results suggest that the product of PsMPT is a MPT and might play an important role during the release of bud dormancy in tree peony.

  19. An epidemiologic study of mitochondrial membrane transporter protein gene polymorphism and risk factors for neural tube defects in Shanxi, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhizhen Liu; Jun Xie; Tiane Luo; Tao Zhang; Xia Zhao; Hong Zhao; Peizhen Li

    2012-01-01

    The present study involved a questionnaire survey of 156 mothers that gave birth to children with neural tube defects or had a history of pregnancy resulting in children with neural tube defects (case group) and 156 control mothers with concurrent healthy children (control group) as well as detection of mitochondrial membrane transporter protein gene [uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2)] polymorphism. The maternal UCP2 3' untranslated region (UTR) D/D genotype and D allele frequency were significantly higher in the case group compared with the control group (odds ratio (OR) 3.233; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.103-9.476; P = 0.040; OR: 3.484; 95% CI: for neural tube defects 2.109-5.753; P < 0.001). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis of risk factors for neural tube defects showed that a maternal UCP2 3' UTR D/D genotype was negatively interacted with the mothers'consumption of frequent fresh fruit and vegetables (S = 0.007), positively interacted with the mothers'frequency of germinated potato consumption (S = 2.15) and positively interacted with the mothers' body mass index (S = 3.50). These findings suggest that maternal UCP2 3' UTR gene polymorphism, pregnancy time, consumption of germinated potatoes and body mass index are associated with an increased risk for neural tube defects in children from mothers living in Shanxi province, China. Moreover, there is an apparent gene-environment interaction involved in the development of neural tube defects in offspring.

  20. [F-18]Fluorodihydrorotenone: Synthesis and evaluation of a mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complex I probe for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanBrocklin, H.F.; Enas, J.D.; Hanrahan, S.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) consists of five enzyme complexes (I-V) which participate in the transfer of electrons to oxygen and phosphorylation of ADP (oxidative phosphorylation). ETC dysfunction has been linked to several genetic neurological diseases as well as implicated in Parkinson`s (complex I) and Huntington`s (complex I) disease and normal aging processes. Dihydrorotenone (DHR) is a specific high affinity inhibitor of complex I. In order to develop a PET tracer for complex I, we have labeled DHR with fluorine-18. The tosylate precursor was produced in three steps from commercially available rotenone. Fluorine-18 was introduced by nucleophilic displacement of the tosylate using tetrabutyl-ammonium fluoride. Subsequent oxidation with MnO{sub 2} and HPLC purification gave the desired [{sup 18}F]fluoro-DHR. Initial biodistribution studies were carried out in {approximately}200 g male Sprague-Dawley rats. The tracer was taken up rapidly in the heart, an organ highly enriched with mitochondria, (5.5-6% injected dose (ID)/g at 30 minutes) and in the brain ({approximately}1.5% ID/g at 1 hour).

  1. Quercetin protects against aluminium induced oxidative stress and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via activation of the PGC-1α signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Verma, Deepika; Priyanka, Kumari; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of PGC-1α and its downstream targets, i.e. NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats, which were pre-treated with quercetin 6h before aluminium (10mg/kg b.wt./day, intragastrically) for 12 weeks. We found a decrease in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and citrate synthase activity in the hippocampus (HC) and corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain treated with quercetin. Besides this an increase in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits - ND1, ND2, ND3, Cyt b, COX1, COX3 and ATPase6 along with increased expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A and COX5B of electron transport chain (ETC). In quercetin treated group an increase in the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both the regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was up regulated in quercetin treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant decrease in the mitochondrial cross-section area, mitochondrial perimeter length and increase in mitochondrial number in case of quercetin treated rats as compared to aluminium treated ones. Therefore it seems quercetin increases mitochondrial biogenesis and makes it an almost ideal flavanoid to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in many neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1625 - Potassium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium citrate. 184.1625 Section 184.1625 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1625 Potassium citrate. (a) Potassium citrate (C6H5K3O7·H2O,...

  3. Re-evaluation of the H+/site ratio of mitochondrial electron transport with the oxygen pulse technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, M D; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1976-09-25

    The number of protons ejected per pair of electrons passing each energy-conserving site in the electron transport chain (the H+/site ratio) has been investigated in rat liver mitochondria by means of the oxygen pulse technique introduced by Mitchell and Moyle (1967) (Biochem. J. 105, 1147-1162). The usual H+/site values of 2.0 observed by this method were found to be substantially underestimated as a result of the influx of phosphate into the mitochondria. This was shown by three different kinds of experiments. 1. Addition of N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibitors of mitochondrial phosphate transport, increased the H+/site ratio from 2.0 to 3.0. The dependence of this effect on the concentration of either inhibitor was identical with that for inhibition of phosphate transport. Added phosphate diminished the H+/site ratio to values below 2.0 in the absence of N-ethylmaleimide. N-Ethylmaleimide protected the elevated H+/site ratio of 3.0 against the deleterious effect of added phosphate, but did not prevent a lowering effect of weak acid anions such as 3-hydroxybutyrate. 2. Prior washing of mitochondria to remove the endogenous phosphate that leaks out during the anaerobic preincubation led to H+/site ratios near 3.0, which were not increased by N-ethylmaleimide. Addition of low concentrations of phosphate to such phosphate-depleted mitochondria decreased the H+/site ratio to 2.0; addition of N-ethylmaleimide returned the ratio to 3.0. 3. Lowering the temperature to 5 degrees, which slows down phosphate transport, led to H+/site values of 3.0 even in the absence of N-ethylmaleimide. The H+/site ratio of 3.0 observed in the absence of phosphate movements was not dependent on any narrowly limited set of experimental conditions. It occurred with either Ca2+ or K+ (in the presence of valinomycin) as mobile permeant cation. It was independent of the concentration of succinate, oxygen, mitochondria, or rotenone, additions of Ca2+, Li+, or Na+ and was independent of

  4. Bypasses of the antimycin a block of mitochondrial electron transport in relation to ubisemiquinone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1984-10-26

    Two different bypasses around the antimycin block of electron transport from succinate to cytochrome c via the ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase of intact rat liver mitochondria were analyzed, one promoted by N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) and the other by 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCIP). Both bypasses are inhibited by myxothiazol, which blocks electron flow from ubiquinol to the Rieske iron-sulfur center, and by 2-hydroxy-3-undecyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, which inhibits electron flow from the iron-sulfur center to cytochrome c1. In the bypass promoted by TMPD its oxidized form (Wurster's blue) acts as an electron acceptor from some reduced component prior to the antimycin block, which by exclusion of other possibilities is ubisemiquinone. In the DCIP bypass its reduced form acts as an electron donor, by reducing ubisemiquinone to ubiquinol; reduced DCIP is regenerated again at the expense of either succinate or ascorbate. The observations described are consistent with and support current models of the Q cycle. Bypasses promoted by artificial electron carriers provide an independent approach to analysis of electron flow through ubiquinol-cytochrome c oxidoreductase.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1307c - Ferrous citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferrous citrate. 184.1307c Section 184.1307c Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307c Ferrous citrate. (a) Ferrous citrate (iron (II) citrate... the reaction of sodium citrate with ferrous sulfate or by direct action of citric acid on iron filings...

  6. The K+/site and H+/site stoichiometry of mitochondrial electron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1978-09-25

    Electrode measurements of the average number of H+ ejected and K+ taken up (in the presence of valinomycin) per pair of electrons passing the energy-conserving sites of the respiratory chain of rat liver and rat heart mitochondria have given identical values of the H+/site and 5+/site ratios very close to 4 in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide, an inhibitor of interfering respiration-coupled uptake of H+ + H2PO4-. The K+/site uptake ratio of 4 not only shows that inward movement of K+ provides quantitative charge-compensation for the 4 H+ ejected, but also confirms that 4 charges are separated per pair of electrons per site. When N-ethylmaleimide is omitted, the H+/site ejection ratio is depressed, because of the interfering secondary uptake of H/+ with H2PO4- on the phosphate carrier, but the K+/site uptake ratio remains at 4.0. Addition of phosphate or acetate, which can carry H+ into respiring mitochondria, further depresses the H+/site ratio, but does not affect the K+/site ratio, which remains at 4.0. These and other considerations thus confirm our earlier stoichiometric measurements that the average H+/site ratio is 4.0 and also show that the K+/site uptake ratio can be used as a measure of the intrinsic H+/site ratio, regardless of the presence of phosphate in the medium and without the necessity of adding N-ethylmaleimide or other inhibitors of H+ + H2PO4- transport.

  7. Resistance mechanisms to mitochondrial electron transport inhibitors in a field-collected strain of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pottelberge, S; Van Leeuwen, T; Nauen, R; Tirry, L

    2009-02-01

    A Belgian field strain (MR-VP) of Tetranychus urticae (Koch) (Acari: Tetranychidae) exhibits different levels of resistance to four frequently used METI (mitochondrial electron transport inhibitor)-acaricides, i.e. tebufenpyrad, fenpyroximate, pyridaben and fenazaquin. Resistance factors for these compounds were 184, 1547, 5971 and 35, respectively. A 23.5-fold increase in 7-ethoxy-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin O-deethylation activity suggested that metabolic resistance through elevated levels of cytochrome P450 dependent monooxygenase-activity is a possible resistance mechanism.However, synergism studies with different metabolic inhibitors revealed some contrasting resistance mechanisms between the METI-acaricides. Tebufenpyrad resistance could only be synergized after pre-treatment with the monooxygenase inhibitor piperonyl butoxide (PBO), whereas pyridaben resistance was strongly synergized both by PBO and the esterase inhibitor S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF). Resistance levels to fenpyroximate could neither be suppressed by PBO nor by DEF. Although METI-acaricides are structurally related, these findings probably reflect a different role of esterases and mono-oxygenases in metabolic detoxification between these compounds. The overall lack of synergism by diethylmaleate (DEM) suggests that glutathione-S-transferases are not an important factor in resistance to METIs.Reciprocal crosses between susceptible females and resistant males showed no maternal effect, and resistance to METI-acaricides was inherited generally as a dominant trait. Backcrosses with F1 females revealed striking differences in the mode of inheritance. Although resistance to fenpyroximate and pyridaben was under monogenic control, resistance to tebufenpyrad was under control of more than one gene.

  8. On the location of the H+-extruding steps in site 2 of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A; Galiazzo, F; Lehninger, A L

    1980-11-25

    The location of the H+-translocating reactions within energy-conserving Site 2 of the mitochondrial electron transport chain was evaluated from two sets of data. In the first, the H+/2e- ejection ratios and Ca2+/2e- uptake ratios were compared for electron flow from succinate dehydrogenase, whose active site is on the matrix side of the inner membrane and from glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase, whose active site is on the cytosolic side. In intact rat liver mitochondria both substrates yielded H+/2e- ejection ratios close to 4.0 and Ca2+/2e- uptake ratios close to 1.0 during antimycin-sensitive reduction of ferricyanide. With rat liver mitoplasts and ferricytochrome c as electron acceptor, both substrates again gave the same stoichiometric ratios. The second approach involved determination of the sidedness of H+ formation during electron flow from succinate to ferricyanide via bypass of the antimycin block of the cytochrome b.c1 complex provided by N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD), under conditions in which the TMPD-TMPD+ couple does not act as a membrane-penetrating protonophore. Electron flow in this system was inhibited by 2-then-oyltrifluoroacetone, indicating that TMPD probably accepts electrons from ubiquinol. The 2 H+ formed in this system were not delivered into the matrix but appeared directly in the medium in the absence of a protonophore. To accommodate the available evidence on Site 2 substrates, it is concluded that the substrate hydrogens are first transferred to ubiquinone, 2 H+ per 2e then appear in the medium by protolytic dehydrogenation of a species of ubiquinol or ubiquinol-protein having the appropriate sidedness (designated Site 2A), and the other 2 H+ are translocated from the matrix to the medium on passage of 2e- through the cytochrome b x c1 complex (designated Site 2B).

  9. Ranitidine bismuth citrate: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and the development of gastroduodenal disease has increased greatly in recent years. To avoid complications of H pylori infection, such as the development of recurrent duodenal and gastric ulcers, effective therapies are required for eradication of the infection. This article reviews ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC, a novel complex of ranitidine, bismuth and citrate, which was developed specifically for the purpose of eradicating H pylori. Dual therapy with RBC in combination with clarithromycin for 14 days yields eradication rates of 76%. Triple therapy bid for one week with a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin and either amoxicillin or a nitroimidazole (tinidazole or metronidazole is advocated as the treatment of choice for H pylori eradication. Analogous regimens with RBC in place of proton pump inhibitors show effective eradication rates in comparative studies and with pooled data. RBC, used alone or in combination with other antibiotics, appears to be a safe and effective drug for the treatment of H pylori infection. Bismuth levels do not appear to rise to toxic levels.

  10. Induction of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is associated with mTOR regulation in hepatocytes of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagland, Hanne R.; Nilsson, Linn I.H. [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Burri, Lena [Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Nikolaisen, Julie [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway); Berge, Rolf K. [Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Department of Heart Disease, Haukeland University Hospital (Norway); Tronstad, Karl J., E-mail: karl.tronstad@biomed.uib.no [Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen (Norway)

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated mechanisms of mitochondrial regulation in rat hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) was employed to activate mitochondrial oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It was confirmed that PPAR target genes were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism involved activation mTOR. -- Abstract: The hypolipidemic effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) activators has been explained by increasing mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, as observed in livers of rats treated with the pan-PPAR activator tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA). PPAR-activation does, however, not fully explain the metabolic adaptations observed in hepatocytes after treatment with TTA. We therefore characterized the mitochondrial effects, and linked this to signalling by the metabolic sensor, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In hepatocytes isolated from TTA-treated rats, the changes in cellular content and morphology were consistent with hypertrophy. This was associated with induction of multiple mitochondrial biomarkers, including mitochondrial DNA, citrate synthase and mRNAs of mitochondrial proteins. Transcription analysis further confirmed activation of PPAR{alpha}-associated genes, in addition to genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Analysis of mitochondrial respiration revealed that the capacity of both electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation were increased. These effects coincided with activation of the stress related factor, ERK1/2, and mTOR. The protein level and phosphorylation of the downstream mTOR actors eIF4G and 4E-BP1 were induced. In summary, TTA increases mitochondrial respiration by inducing hypertrophy and mitochondrial biogenesis in rat hepatocytes, via adaptive regulation of PPARs as well as mTOR.

  11. Aluminium induced oxidative stress results in decreased mitochondrial biogenesis via modulation of PGC-1α expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Kandimalla, Ramesh J.L. [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India); Bal, Amanjit [Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh (India); Gill, Kiran Dip, E-mail: kdgill2002@yahoo.co.in [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh 160012 (India)

    2013-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the effects of aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) and its downstream targets i.e. Nuclear respiratory factor-1(NRF-1), Nuclear respiratory factor-2(NRF-2) and Mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10 mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats for 12 weeks. After 12 weeks of exposure, we found an increase in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and decrease in citrate synthase activity in the Hippocampus (HC) and Corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain. On the other hand, there was a decrease in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits–NADH dehydrogenase (ND) subunits i.e. ND1, ND2, ND3, Cytochrome b (Cytb), Cytochrome oxidase (COX) subunits i.e. COX1, COX3, ATP synthase (ATPase) subunit 6 along with reduced expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A, COX5B of Electron transport chain (ETC). Besides, a decrease in mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was down-regulated in aluminium treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α in aluminium treated rats. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant increase in the mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae, chromatin condensation and decreases in mitochondrial number in case of aluminium treated rats as compared to control. So, PGC-1α seems to be a potent target for aluminium neurotoxicity, which makes it an almost ideal target to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in neurodegenerative diseases. - Highlights: • Aluminium decreases the mRNA levels of mitochondrial and nuclear encoded

  12. Orbital pseudotumor imaged with Ga-67 citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaikishen, P.; Bateman, J.L.; Shreeve, W.W. (Veterans Administration Medical Center, Northport, NY (USA))

    1989-11-01

    An orbital pseudotumor causing proptosis, diplopia, and gaze palsy was imaged with Ga-67 citrate and showed persistent intense activity for five days. This may be the first case of gallium uptake into an orbital pseudotumor to be reported in the literature. This case report demonstrates the use of Ga-67 citrate imaging in the early diagnostic workup of this disorder.

  13. Mitochondrial and performance adaptations to exercise training in mice lacking skeletal muscle LKB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Colby B; Madsen, Steven R; Hallowell, David M; Goring, Darren M J; Moore, Timothy M; Hardman, Shalene E; Heninger, Megan R; Atwood, Daniel R; Thomson, David M

    2013-10-15

    LKB1 and its downstream targets of the AMP-activated protein kinase family are important regulators of many aspects of skeletal muscle cell function, including control of mitochondrial content and capillarity. LKB1 deficiency in skeletal and cardiac muscle (mLKB1-KO) greatly impairs exercise capacity. However, cardiac dysfunction in that genetic model prevents a clear assessment of the role of skeletal muscle LKB1 in the observed effects. Our purposes here were to determine whether skeletal muscle-specific knockout of LKB1 (skmLKB1-KO) decreases exercise capacity and mitochondrial protein content, impairs accretion of mitochondrial proteins after exercise training, and attenuates improvement in running performance after exercise training. We found that treadmill and voluntary wheel running capacity was reduced in skmLKB1-KO vs. control (CON) mice. Citrate synthase activity, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase content were lower in KO vs. CON muscles. Three weeks of treadmill training resulted in significantly increased treadmill running performance in both CON and skmLKB1-KO mice. Citrate synthase activity increased significantly with training in both genotypes, but protein content and activity for components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain increased only in CON mice. Capillarity and VEGF protein was lower in skmLKB1-KO vs. CON muscles, but VEGF increased with training only in skmLKB1-KO. Three hours after an acute bout of muscle contractions, PGC-1α, cytochrome c, and VEGF gene expression all increased in CON but not skmLKB1-KO muscles. Our findings indicate that skeletal muscle LKB1 is required for accretion of some mitochondrial proteins but not for early exercise capacity improvements with exercise training.

  14. The HO-1/CO system regulates mitochondrial-capillary density relationships in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorella, Shelly R. H.; Potter, Jennifer V. F.; Cherry, Anne D.; Peacher, Dionne F.; Welty-Wolf, Karen E.; Moon, Richard E.; Suliman, Hagir B.

    2015-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)/carbon monoxide (CO) system induces mitochondrial biogenesis, but its biological impact in human skeletal muscle is uncertain. The enzyme system generates CO, which stimulates mitochondrial proliferation in normal muscle. Here we examined whether CO breathing can be used to produce a coordinated metabolic and vascular response in human skeletal muscle. In 19 healthy subjects, we performed vastus lateralis muscle biopsies and tested one-legged maximal O2 uptake (V̇o2max) before and after breathing air or CO (200 ppm) for 1 h daily for 5 days. In response to CO, there was robust HO-1 induction along with increased mRNA levels for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), cytochrome c, cytochrome oxidase subunit IV (COX IV), and mitochondrial-encoded COX I and NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NDI). CO breathing did not increase V̇o2max (1.96 ± 0.51 pre-CO, 1.87 ± 0.50 post-CO l/min; P = not significant) but did increase muscle citrate synthase, mitochondrial density (139.0 ± 34.9 pre-CO, 219.0 ± 36.2 post-CO; no. of mitochondrial profiles/field), myoglobin content and glucose transporter (GLUT4) protein level and led to GLUT4 localization to the myocyte membrane, all consistent with expansion of the tissue O2 transport system. These responses were attended by increased cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31)-positive muscle capillaries (1.78 ± 0.16 pre-CO, 2.37 ± 0.59 post-CO; capillaries/muscle fiber), implying the enrichment of microvascular O2 reserve. The findings support that induction of the HO-1/CO system by CO not only improves muscle mitochondrial density, but regulates myoglobin content, GLUT4 localization, and capillarity in accordance with current concepts of skeletal muscle plasticity. PMID:26186946

  15. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  16. Iron deficiency induces changes in riboflavin secretion and the mitochondrial electron transport chain in hairy roots of Hyoscyamus albus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Ataru; Mori, Yuko; Kitamura, Yoshie

    2010-07-15

    Hyoscyamus albus hairy roots secrete riboflavin under Fe-deficient conditions. To determine whether this secretion was linked to an enhancement of respiration, both riboflavin secretion and the reduction of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC), as a measure of respiration activity, were determined in hairy roots cultured under Fe-deficient and Fe-replete conditions, with or without aeration. Appreciable TTC-reducing activity was detected at the root tips, at the bases of lateral roots and in internal tissues, notably the vascular system. TTC-reducing activity increased under Fe deficiency and this increase occurred in concert with riboflavin secretion and was more apparent under aeration. Riboflavin secretion was not apparent under Fe-replete conditions. In order to examine which elements of the mitochondrial electron transport chain might be involved, the effects of the respiratory inhibitors, barbiturate, dicoumarol, malonic acid, antimycin, KCN and salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM) were investigated. Under Fe-deficient conditions, malonic acid affected neither root growth, TTC-reducing activity nor riboflavin secretion, whereas barbiturate and SHAM inhibited only root growth and TTC-reducing activity, respectively, and the other compounds variously inhibited growth and TTC-reducing activity. Riboflavin secretion was decreased, in concert with TTC-reducing activity, by dicoumarol, antimycin and KCN, but not by SHAM. In Fe-replete roots, all inhibitors which reduced riboflavin secretion in Fe-deficient roots showed somewhat different effects: notably, antimycin and KCN did not significantly inhibit TTC-reducing activity and the inhibition by dicoumarol was much weaker in Fe-replete roots. Combined treatment with KCN and SHAM also revealed that Fe-deficient and Fe-replete roots reduced TTC in different ways. A decrease in the Fe content of mitochondria in Fe-deficient roots was confirmed. Overall, the results suggest that, under conditions of Fe deficiency in H

  17. Impact of repeated stress on traumatic brain injury-induced mitochondrial electron transport chain expression and behavioral responses in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang eXing

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of the military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts have suffered from both mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The mechanisms are unknown. We used a rat model of repeated stress and mTBI to examine brain activity and behavioral function. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: Naïve; 3 days repeated tail-shock stress; lateral fluid percussion mTBI; and repeated stress followed by mTBI (S-mTBI. Open field activity, sensorimotor responses, and acoustic startle responses were measured after mTBI. The protein expression of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC complex subunits (CI-V and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHE1α1 were determined in 4 brain regions at day 7 post mTBI. Compared to Naïves, repeated stress decreased horizontal activity; repeated stress and mTBI both decreased vertical activity; and the mTBI and S-mTBI groups were impaired in sensorimotor and acoustic startle responses. Repeated stress significantly increased CI, CII, and CIII protein levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, but decreased PDHE1α1 protein in the PFC and cerebellum, and decreased CIV protein in the hippocampus. The mTBI treatment decreased CV protein levels in the ipsilateral hippocampus. The S-mTBI treatment resulted in increased CII, CIII, CIV, and CV protein levels in the PFC, increased CI level in the cerebellum, and increased CIII and CV levels in the cerebral cortex, but decreased CI, CII, CIV, and PDHE1α1 protein levels in the hippocampus. Thus, repeated stress or mTBI alone differentially altered ETC expression in heterogeneous brain regions. Repeated stress followed by mTBI had synergistic effects on brain ETC expression, and resulted in more severe behavioral deficits. These results suggest that repeated stress could have contributed to the high incidence of long-term neurologic and neuropsychiatric morbidity in military personnel with or without

  18. The Resistance of Electron Transport Chain Fe-S Clusters to Oxidative Damage during the Reaction of Peroxynitrite with Mitochondrial Complex II and Rat Heart Pericardium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Linda L.; Martinez-Bosch, Sandra; Manzano, Elisenda Lopez; Winnica, Daniel E.; Epperly, Michael W.; Peterson, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The effects of peroxynitrite and nitric oxide on the iron-sulfur clusters in complex II (succinate dehydrogenase) isolated from bovine heart have been studied primarily by EPR spectroscopy and no measurable damage to the constitutive 2Fe-2S, 3Fe-4S, or 4Fe-4S clusters was observed. The enzyme can be repeatedly oxidized with a slight excess of peroxynitrite and then quantitatively re-reduced with succinate. When added in large excess, peroxynitrite reacted with at least one tyrosine in each subunit of complex II to form 3-nitrotyrosines, but activity was barely compromised. Examination of rat-heart pericardium subjected to conditions leading to peroxynitrite production showed a small inhibition of complex II (16%) and a greater inhibition of aconitase (77%). In addition, experiments performed with excesses of sodium citrate and sodium succinate on rat-heart pericardium indicated that the “g ~2.01” EPR signal observed immediately following the beginning of conditions modeling oxidative/nitrosative stress, could be a consequence of both reversible oxidation of the constitutive 3Fe-4S cluster in complex II and degradation of the 4Fe-4S cluster in aconitase. However, the net signal envelope, which becomes apparent in less than one minute following the start of oxidative/nitrosative conditions, is dominated by the component arising from complex II. Taking into account the findings of a previous study concerning complexes I and III [L.L. Pearce, A.J. Kanai, M.W. Epperly, J. Peterson (2005) Nitric Oxide 13, 254-63] it is now apparent that, with the exception of the cofactor in aconitase, mammalian (mitochondrial) iron-sulfur clusters are surprisingly resistant to degradation stemming from oxidative/nitrosative stress. PMID:19118636

  19. Oxidative stress in duckweed (Lemna minor L.) induced by glyphosate: Is the mitochondrial electron transport chain a target of this herbicide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Marcelo Pedrosa; Juneau, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the physiological responses of Lemna minor plants exposed to glyphosate. The deleterious effects of this herbicide on photosynthesis, respiration, and pigment concentrations were related to glyphosate-induced oxidative stress through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. By using photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport chain (ETC) inhibitors we located the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in plants exposed to 500 mg glyphosate l(-1). Inhibition of mitochondrial ETC Complex I by rotenone reduced H2O2 concentrations in glyphosate-treated plants. Complex III activity was very sensitive to glyphosate which appears to act much like antimycin A (an inhibitor of mitochondrial ETC Complex III) by shunting electrons from semiquinone to oxygen, with resulting ROS formation. Confocal evaluations for ROS localization showed that ROS are initially produced outside of the chloroplasts upon initial glyphosate exposure. Our results indicate that in addition to interfering with the shikimate pathway, glyphosate can induce oxidative stress in plants through H2O2 formation by targeting the mitochondrial ETC, which would explain its observed effects on non-target organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Developmental and hormone-induced changes of mitochondrial electron transport chain enzyme activities during the last instar larval development of maize stem borer, Chilo partellus (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    VenkatRao, V; Chaitanya, R K; Naresh Kumar, D; Bramhaiah, M; Dutta-Gupta, A

    2016-12-01

    The energy demand for structural remodelling in holometabolous insects is met by cellular mitochondria. Developmental and hormone-induced changes in the mitochondrial respiratory activity during insect metamorphosis are not well documented. The present study investigates activities of enzymes of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) namely, NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase or complex I, Succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase or complex II, Ubiquinol:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase or complex III, cytochrome c oxidase or complex IV and F1F0ATPase (ATPase), during Chilo partellus development. Further, the effect of juvenile hormone (JH) analog, methoprene, and brain and corpora-allata-corpora-cardiaca (CC-CA) homogenates that represent neurohormones, on the ETC enzyme activities was monitored. The enzymatic activities increased from penultimate to last larval stage and thereafter declined during pupal development with an exception of ATPase which showed high enzyme activity during last larval and pupal stages compared to the penultimate stage. JH analog, methoprene differentially modulated ETC enzyme activities. It stimulated complex I and IV enzyme activities, but did not alter the activities of complex II, III and ATPase. On the other hand, brain homogenate declined the ATPase activity while the injected CC-CA homogenate stimulated complex I and IV enzyme activities. Cumulatively, the present study is the first to show that mitochondrial ETC enzyme system is under hormone control, particularly of JH and neurohormones during insect development.

  1. ATP citrate lyase inhibitors as novel cancer therapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Xu-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Hai; Liu, Jiang-Hua; Cao, Ren-Xian; Zhong, Jing; Yi, Guang-Hui; Quan, Zhi-Hua; Pizzorno, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    ATP citrate lyase (ACL or ACLY) is an extra-mitochondrial enzyme widely distributed in various human and animal tissues. ACL links glucose and lipid metabolism by catalyzing the formation of acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate from citrate produced by glycolysis in the presence of ATP and CoA. ACL is aberrantly expressed in many immortalized cells and tumors, such as breast, liver, colon, lung and prostate cancers, and is correlated reversely with tumor stage and differentiation, serving as a negative prognostic marker. ACL is an upstream enzyme of the long chain fatty acid synthesis, providing acetyl-CoA as an essential component of the fatty acid synthesis. Therefore, ACL is a key enzyme of cellular lipogenesis and potent target for cancer therapy. As a hypolipidemic strategy of metabolic syndrome and cancer treatment, many small chemicals targeting ACL have been designed and developed. This review article provides an update for the research and development of ACL inhibitors with a focus on their patent status, offering a new insight into their potential application.

  2. Anaphylaxis related to fentanyl citrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Singh Tomar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylaxis is a fulminant, unexpected, immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reaction that can be triggered by multiple agents. Common causative agents include neuromuscular blocking drugs, latex, antibiotics, colloids, hypnotics, and opioids. Fentanyl citrate, however, is an extremely unusual cause of anaphylaxis. Pulmonary edema, although uncommon in anaphylaxis, can be a prominent feature, as was in one of the patient. An adverse drug reaction is a noxious or unintended reaction to a drug that is administered in standard doses by the proper route for the purpose of prophylaxis, diagnosis, or treatment. Reactions are classified into two major subtypes: type A, which are dose dependent and predictable; and type B, which are not dose dependent and unpredictable. Unpredictable reactions include immune (allergic or no immune drug hypersensitivity reactions and are related to genetic susceptibilities or undefined mechanisms (formally called idiosyncratic and intolerance reactions. A drug allergy is always associated with an immune mechanism for which evidence of drug-specific antibodies or activated T lymphocytes can be shown. In the last few years, many novel drugs have entered clinical practice (i.e., biologic agents generating novel patterns of drug hypersensitivity reactions. As old drugs continue to be used, new clinical and biologic techniques enable improvement in the diagnosis of these reactions.

  3. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate elicits Ca(2+) signals and workloads that regulate neuronal fate both in physiological and pathological circumstances. Oxidative phosphorylation is required in order to respond to the metabolic challenge caused by glutamate. In response to physiological glutamate signals, cytosolic Ca(2+) activates respiration by stimulation of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle through Ca(2+)-binding to the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12), and by stimulation of adenine nucleotide uptake through Ca(2+) binding to the mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier (SCaMC-3/Slc25a23). In addition, after Ca(2+) entry into the matrix through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), it activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases. In response to pathological glutamate stimulation during excitotoxicity, Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed Ca(2+) deregulation (DCD) lead to neuronal death. Glutamate-induced respiratory stimulation is rapidly inactivated through a mechanism involving Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, consumption of cytosolic NAD(+), a decrease in matrix ATP and restricted substrate supply. Glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-activation of SCaMC-3 imports adenine nucleotides into mitochondria, counteracting the depletion of matrix ATP and the impaired respiration, while Aralar-dependent lactate metabolism prevents substrate exhaustion. A second mechanism induced by excitotoxic glutamate is permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, which critically depends on ROS production and matrix Ca(2+) entry through the MCU. By increasing matrix content of adenine nucleotides, SCaMC-3 activity protects against glutamate-induced PTP opening and lowers matrix free Ca(2+), resulting in protracted appearance of DCD and protection against excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, while the lack of lactate protection during in vivo excitotoxicity explains increased vulnerability to kainite-induced toxicity in Aralar

  4. FAT/CD36 is located on the outer mitochondrial membrane, upstream of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, and regulates palmitate oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brennan K; Jain, Swati S; Rimbaud, Stéphanie; Dam, Aaron; Quadrilatero, Joe; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Bonen, Arend; Holloway, Graham P

    2011-07-01

    FAT/CD36 (fatty acid translocase/Cluster of Differentiation 36), a plasma membrane fatty-acid transport protein, has been found on mitochondrial membranes; however, it remains unclear where FAT/CD36 resides on this organelle or its functional role within mitochondria. In the present study, we demonstrate, using several different approaches, that in skeletal muscle FAT/CD36 resides on the OMM (outer mitochondrial membrane). To determine the functional role of mitochondrial FAT/CD36 in this tissue, we determined oxygen consumption rates in permeabilized muscle fibres in WT (wild-type) and FAT/CD36-KO (knockout) mice using a variety of substrates. Despite comparable muscle mitochondrial content, as assessed by unaltered mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA), citrate synthase, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, cytochrome c oxidase complex IV and respiratory capacities [maximal OXPHOS (oxidative phosphorylation) respiration] in WT and KO mice, palmitate-supported respiration was 34% lower in KO animals. In contrast, palmitoyl-CoA-supported respiration was unchanged. These results indicate that FAT/CD36 is key for palmitate-supported respiration. Therefore we propose a working model of mitochondrial fatty-acid transport, in which FAT/CD36 is positioned on the OMM, upstream of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase, thereby contributing to the regulation of mitochondrial fatty-acid transport. We further support this model by providing evidence that FAT/CD36 is not located in mitochondrial contact sites, and therefore does not directly interact with carnitine palmitoyltransferase-I as original proposed.

  5. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone Resists Denervation-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy by Activating PGC-1α and Integrating Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Ting Kuo

    Full Text Available Denervation-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy results from the loss of electric stimulation and leads to protein degradation, which is critically regulated by the well-confirmed transcriptional co-activator peroxisome proliferator co-activator 1 alpha (PGC-1α. No adequate treatments of muscle wasting are available. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, a naturally occurring antioxidant component with multiple functions including mitochondrial modulation, demonstrates the ability to protect against muscle dysfunction. However, it remains unclear whether PQQ enhances PGC-1α activation and resists skeletal muscle atrophy in mice subjected to a denervation operation. This work investigates the expression of PGC-1α and mitochondrial function in the skeletal muscle of denervated mice administered PQQ. The C57BL6/J mouse was subjected to a hindlimb sciatic axotomy. A PQQ-containing ALZET® osmotic pump (equivalent to 4.5 mg/day/kg b.w. was implanted subcutaneously into the right lower abdomen of the mouse. In the time course study, the mouse was sacrificed and the gastrocnemius muscle was prepared for further myopathological staining, energy metabolism analysis, western blotting, and real-time quantitative PCR studies. We observed that PQQ administration abolished the denervation-induced decrease in muscle mass and reduced mitochondrial activities, as evidenced by the reduced fiber size and the decreased expression of cytochrome c oxidase and NADH-tetrazolium reductase. Bioenergetic analysis demonstrated that PQQ reprogrammed the denervation-induced increase in the mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (OCR and led to an increase in the extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, a measurement of the glycolytic metabolism. The protein levels of PGC-1α and the electron transport chain (ETC complexes were also increased by treatment with PQQ. Furthermore, PQQ administration highly enhanced the expression of oxidative fibers and maintained the type II glycolytic

  6. A putative mitochondrial iron transporter MrsA in Aspergillus fumigatus plays important roles in azole-, oxidative stress responses and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanbiao eLong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient and enzyme co-factor required for a wide range of cellular processes, especially for the function of mitochondria. For the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, the ability to obtain iron is required for growth and virulence during the infection process. However, knowledge of how mitochondria are involved in iron regulation is still limited. Here, we show that a mitochondrial iron transporter, MrsA, a homolog of yeast Mrs4p, is critical for adaptation to iron-limited or iron-excess conditions in A. fumigatus. Deletion of mrsA leads to disruption of iron homeostasis with a decreased sreA expression, resulted in activated reductive iron assimilation (RIA and siderophore-mediated iron acquisition (SIA. Furthermore, deletion of mrsA induces hypersusceptibility to azole and oxidative stresses. An assay for cellular ROS content in ΔmrsA combined with rescue from the mrsA-defective phenotype by the antioxidant reagent L-ascorbic acid indicates that the increased sensitivity of ΔmrsA to the azole itraconazole and to oxidative stress is mainly the result of abnormal ROS accumulation. Moreover, site-directed mutation experiments verified that three conserved histidine residues related to iron transport in MrsA are required for responses to oxidative and azole stresses. Importantly, ΔmrsA causes significant attenuation of virulence in an immunocompromised murine model of aspergillosis. Collectively, our results show that the putative mitochondrial iron transporter MrsA plays important roles in azole- and oxidative-stress responses and virulence by regulating the balance of cellular iron in A. fumigatus.

  7. A Putative Mitochondrial Iron Transporter MrsA in Aspergillus fumigatus Plays Important Roles in Azole-, Oxidative Stress Responses and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Nanbiao; Xu, Xiaoling; Qian, Hui; Zhang, Shizhu; Lu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient and enzyme co-factor required for a wide range of cellular processes, especially for the function of mitochondria. For the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, the ability to obtain iron is required for growth and virulence during the infection process. However, knowledge of how mitochondria are involved in iron regulation is still limited. Here, we show that a mitochondrial iron transporter, MrsA, a homolog of yeast Mrs4p, is critical for adaptation to iron-limited or iron-excess conditions in A. fumigatus. Deletion of mrsA leads to disruption of iron homeostasis with a decreased sreA expression, resulted in activated reductive iron assimilation (RIA) and siderophore-mediated iron acquisition (SIA). Furthermore, deletion of mrsA induces hypersusceptibility to azole and oxidative stresses. An assay for cellular ROS content in ΔmrsA combined with rescue from the mrsA-defective phenotype by the antioxidant reagent L-ascorbic acid indicates that the increased sensitivity of ΔmrsA to the azole itraconazole and to oxidative stress is mainly the result of abnormal ROS accumulation. Moreover, site-directed mutation experiments verified that three conserved histidine residues related to iron transport in MrsA are required for responses to oxidative and azole stresses. Importantly, ΔmrsA causes significant attenuation of virulence in an immunocompromised murine model of aspergillosis. Collectively, our results show that the putative mitochondrial iron transporter MrsA plays important roles in azole- and oxidative-stress responses and virulence by regulating the balance of cellular iron in A. fumigatus.

  8. Rerouting Citrate Metabolism in Lactococcus lactis to Citrate-Driven Transamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pudlik, Agata M.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    Oxaloacetate is an intermediate of the citrate fermentation pathway that accumulates in the cytoplasm of Lactococcus lactis ILCitM(pFL3) at a high concentration due to the inactivation of oxaloacetate decarboxylase. An excess of toxic oxaloacetate is excreted into the medium in exchange for citrate

  9. Computational modeling analysis of mitochondrial superoxide production under varying substrate conditions and upon inhibition of different segments of the electron transport chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markevich, Nikolai I; Hoek, Jan B

    2015-01-01

    A computational mechanistic model of superoxide (O2•-) formation in the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) was developed to facilitate the quantitative analysis of factors controlling mitochondrial O2•- production and assist in the interpretation of experimental studies. The model takes into account all individual electron transfer reactions in Complexes I and III. The model accounts for multiple, often seemingly contradictory observations on the effects of ΔΨ and ΔpH, and for the effects of multiple substrate and inhibitor conditions, including differential effects of Complex III inhibitors antimycin A, myxothiazol and stigmatellin. Simulation results confirm that, in addition to O2•- formation in Complex III and at the flavin site of Complex I, the quinone binding site of Complex I is an additional superoxide generating site that accounts for experimental observations on O2•- production during reverse electron transfer. However, our simulation results predict that, when cytochrome c oxidase is inhibited during oxidation of succinate, ROS production at this site is eliminated and almost all superoxide in Complex I is generated by reduced FMN, even when the redox pressure for reverse electron transfer from succinate is strong. In addition, the model indicates that conflicting literature data on the kinetics of electron transfer in Complex III involving the iron-sulfur protein-cytochrome bL complex can be resolved in favor of a dissociation of the protein only after electron transfer to cytochrome bH. The model predictions can be helpful in understanding factors driving mitochondrial superoxide formation in intact cells and tissues.

  10. Suppression of NDA-type alternative mitochondrial NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in arabidopsis thaliana modifies growth and metabolism, but not high light stimulation of mitochondrial electron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallström, Sabá V; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L; Escobar, Matthew A; Geisler, Daniela A; Aidemark, Mari; Lager, Ida; Fernie, Alisdair R; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2014-05-01

    The plant respiratory chain contains several pathways which bypass the energy-conserving electron transport complexes I, III and IV. These energy bypasses, including type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase (AOX), may have a role in redox stabilization and regulation, but current evidence is inconclusive. Using RNA interference, we generated Arabidopsis thaliana plants simultaneously suppressing the type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes NDA1 and NDA2. Leaf mitochondria contained substantially reduced levels of both proteins. In sterile culture in the light, the transgenic lines displayed a slow growth phenotype, which was more severe when the complex I inhibitor rotenone was present. Slower growth was also observed in soil. In rosette leaves, a higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)⁺ ratio and elevated levels of lactate relative to sugars and citric acid cycle metabolites were observed. However, photosynthetic performance was unaffected and microarray analyses indicated few transcriptional changes. A high light treatment increased AOX1a mRNA levels, in vivo AOX and cytochrome oxidase activities, and levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and hexoses in all genotypes. However, NDA-suppressing plants deviated from the wild type merely by having higher levels of several amino acids. These results suggest that NDA suppression restricts citric acid cycle reactions, inducing a shift towards increased levels of fermentation products, but do not support a direct association between photosynthesis and NDA proteins.

  11. Platinum states in citrate sols by EXAFS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Shiang; Khan, Maksudur R; Lin, Shawn D

    2005-07-01

    Platinum sols have been prepared by citrate reduction in the temperature range of 343-363 K. The Pt state in the solution was examined by EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy). It did not show any PtPt bonding, a characteristic for reduced Pt sols. EXAFS model fitting further proved the presence of PtO with 4 oxygen neighbors, which suggests a tetraplanar coordination configuration. The possibility of neighboring Pt sharing oxygen ligand or the formation of PtO(x) is rejected by EXAFS model fitting. Citrate was found to be the most likely ligand to orient its oxygen end toward a charged Pt center. Thus we have revealed that the citrate treatment at this temperature range was clearly insufficient to reduce H2PtCl(6(aq)). Neither an extended period of reaction time nor an excess citrate reduced the Pt precursor. It is therefore highly recommended that the citrate sols should be carefully prepared and used.

  12. The Arabidopsis thaliana RNA Editing FactorSLO2, which Affects the Mitochondrial ElectronTransport Chain, Participates in Multiple Stressand Hormone Resoonses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we reported that the novel mitochondrial RNA editing factor SLO2 is essential for mitochondrialelectron transport, and vital for plant growth through regulation of carbon and energy metabolism. Here, we show thatmutation in SL02 causes hypersensitivity to ABA and insensitivity to ethylene, suggesting a link with stress responses.Indeed, slo2 mutants are hypersensitive to salt and osmotic stress during the germination stage, while adult plantsshow increased drought and salt tolerance. Moreover, slo2 mutants are more susceptible to Botrytis cinerea infection.An increased expression of nuclear-encoded stress-responsive genes, as well as mitochondrial-encoded NAD genes ofcomplex I and genes of the alternative respiratory pathway, was observed in slo2 mutants, further enhanced by ABAtreatment. In addition, H202 accumulation and altered amino acid levels were recorded in slo2 mutants. We conclude thatSLO2 is required for plant sensitivity to ABA, ethylene, biotic, and abiotic stress. Although two stress-related RNA editingfactors were reported very recently, this study demonstrates a unique role of SLO2, and further supports a link betweenmitochondrial RNA editing events and stress response.

  13. H2O2 generated from mitochondrial electron transport chain in thoracic perivascular adipose tissue is crucial for modulation of vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rafael M; Filgueira, Fernando P; Tostes, Rita C; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Akamine, Eliana H; Lobato, Nubia S

    2016-09-01

    The perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) releases a variety of factors that affect vascular function. PVAT in the thoracic aorta shares characteristics with the brown adipose tissue, including a large amount of mitochondria. PVAT-derived factors influence both endothelial and smooth muscle function via several signaling mechanisms including the release/generation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. Considering the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on vascular function and that mitochondria are an important source of ROS, we hypothesized that mitochondria-derived ROS in the PVAT modulates vascular reactivity. Vascular reactivity to norephinephrine (NE) was evaluated in thoracic aortic rings, with or without endothelium and/or PVAT, from male Wistar rats. Mitochondrial uncoupling, as well as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) removal, increased the contraction in vessels surrounded by PVAT. PVAT stimulated with NE exhibited increased protein expression, determined by Western blot analysis, of manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and decreased protein expression of catalase. Ultimately, NE increased superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation in PVAT via increases in intracellular calcium. These results clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC) in PVAT contributes to modulation of aortic muscle contraction by generating higher amounts of O2(-) that is, in turn, dismutated to hydrogen peroxide, which then acts as a pivotal signaling molecule regulating vascular smooth muscle contraction.

  14. Concentration-dependent Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) effects on ROS production, energy status, and human sperm function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Maria Inês; Amaral, Sandra; Tavares, Renata Santos; Paiva, Carla; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2014-04-01

    Literature regarding the effects of sildenafil citrate on sperm function remains controversial. In the present study, we specifically wanted to determine if mitochondrial dysfunction, namely membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, and changes in energy content, are involved in in vitro sildenafil-induced alterations of human sperm function. Sperm samples of healthy men were incubated in the presence of 0.03, 0.3, and 3 μM sildenafil citrate in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-based medium for 2, 3, 12, and 24 hours. Sperm motility and viability were evaluated and mitochondrial function, i.e., mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide production were assessed using flow-cytometry. Additionally, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Results show a decrease in sperm motility correlated with the level of mitochondria-generated superoxide, without a visible effect on mitochondrial membrane potential or viability upon exposure to sildenafil. The effect on both motility and superoxide production was higher for the intermediate concentration of sildenafil (0.3 µM) indicating that the in vitro effects of sildenafil on human sperm do not vary linearly with drug concentration. Adenosine triphosphate levels also decreased following sildenafil exposure, but this decrease was only detected after a decrease in motility was already evident. These results suggest that along with the level of ATP and mitochondrial function other factors are involved in the early sildenafil-mediated decline in sperm motility. However, the further decrease in ATP levels and increase in mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species after 24 hours of exposure might further contribute towards declining sperm motility.

  15. Reduction of nuclear encoded enzymes of mitochondrial energy metabolism in cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Edith E., E-mail: ed.mueller@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Mayr, Johannes A., E-mail: h.mayr@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Zimmermann, Franz A., E-mail: f.zimmermann@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Feichtinger, Rene G., E-mail: r.feichtinger@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Stanger, Olaf, E-mail: o.stanger@rbht.nhs.uk [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Sperl, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.sperl@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria); Kofler, Barbara, E-mail: b.kofler@salk.at [Research Program for Receptor Biochemistry and Tumor Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Muellner Hauptstrasse 48, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examined OXPHOS and citrate synthase enzyme activities in HEK293 cells devoid of mtDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzymes partially encoded by mtDNA show reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also the entirely nuclear encoded complex II and citrate synthase exhibit reduced activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Loss of mtDNA induces a feedback mechanism that downregulates complex II and citrate synthase. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are generally associated with reduced activities of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) enzymes that contain subunits encoded by mtDNA. Conversely, entirely nuclear encoded mitochondrial enzymes in these syndromes, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme citrate synthase (CS) and OXPHOS complex II, usually exhibit normal or compensatory enhanced activities. Here we report that a human cell line devoid of mtDNA (HEK293 {rho}{sup 0} cells) has diminished activities of both complex II and CS. This finding indicates the existence of a feedback mechanism in {rho}{sup 0} cells that downregulates the expression of entirely nuclear encoded components of mitochondrial energy metabolism.

  16. Calorie restriction increases muscle mitochondrial biogenesis in healthy humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony E Civitarese

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction without malnutrition extends life span in a range of organisms including insects and mammals and lowers free radical production by the mitochondria. However, the mechanism responsible for this adaptation are poorly understood.The current study was undertaken to examine muscle mitochondrial bioenergetics in response to caloric restriction alone or in combination with exercise in 36 young (36.8 +/- 1.0 y, overweight (body mass index, 27.8 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2 individuals randomized into one of three groups for a 6-mo intervention: Control, 100% of energy requirements; CR, 25% caloric restriction; and CREX, caloric restriction with exercise (CREX, 12.5% CR + 12.5% increased energy expenditure (EE. In the controls, 24-h EE was unchanged, but in CR and CREX it was significantly reduced from baseline even after adjustment for the loss of metabolic mass (CR, -135 +/- 42 kcal/d, p = 0.002 and CREX, -117 +/- 52 kcal/d, p = 0.008. Participants in the CR and CREX groups had increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial function such as PPARGC1A, TFAM, eNOS, SIRT1, and PARL (all, p < 0.05. In parallel, mitochondrial DNA content increased by 35% +/- 5% in the CR group (p = 0.005 and 21% +/- 4% in the CREX group (p < 0.004, with no change in the control group (2% +/- 2%. However, the activity of key mitochondrial enzymes of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle (citrate synthase, beta-oxidation (beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and electron transport chain (cytochrome C oxidase II was unchanged. DNA damage was reduced from baseline in the CR (-0.56 +/- 0.11 arbitrary units, p = 0.003 and CREX (-0.45 +/- 0.12 arbitrary units, p = 0.011, but not in the controls. In primary cultures of human myotubes, a nitric oxide donor (mimicking eNOS signaling induced mitochondrial biogenesis but failed to induce SIRT1 protein expression, suggesting that additional factors may regulate SIRT1 content during CR.The observed increase in

  17. Nitrate Protects Cucumber Plants Against Fusarium oxysporum by Regulating Citrate Exudation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Sun, Yuming; Gu, Zechen; Wang, Ruirui; Sun, Guomei; Zhu, Chen; Guo, Shiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium wilt causes severe yield losses in cash crops. Nitrogen plays a critical role in the management of plant disease; however, the regulating mechanism is poorly understood. Using biochemical, physiological, bioinformatic and transcriptome approaches, we analyzed how nitrogen forms regulate the interactions between cucumber plants and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cucumerinum (FOC). Nitrate significantly suppressed Fusarium wilt compared with ammonium in both pot and hydroponic experiments. Fewer FOC colonized the roots and stems under nitrate compared with ammonium supply. Cucumber grown with nitrate accumulated less fusaric acid (FA) after FOC infection and exhibited increased tolerance to chemical FA by decreasing FA absorption and transportation in shoots. A lower citrate concentration was observed in nitrate-grown cucumbers, which was associated with lower MATE (multidrug and toxin compound extrusion) family gene and citrate synthase (CS) gene expression, as well as lower CS activity. Citrate enhanced FOC spore germination and infection, and increased disease incidence and the FOC population in ammonium-treated plants. Our study provides evidence that nitrate protects cucumber plants against F. oxysporum by decreasing root citrate exudation and FOC infection. Citrate exudation is essential for regulating disease development of Fusarium wilt in cucumber plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Artificial citrate operon confers mineral phosphate solubilization ability to diverse fluorescent pseudomonads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanta Adhikary

    Full Text Available Citric acid is a strong acid with good cation chelating ability and can be very efficient in solubilizing mineral phosphates. Only a few phosphate solubilizing bacteria and fungi are known to secrete citric acids. In this work, we incorporated artificial citrate operon containing NADH insensitive citrate synthase (gltA1 and citrate transporter (citC genes into the genome of six-plant growth promoting P. fluorescens strains viz., PfO-1, Pf5, CHAO1, P109, ATCC13525 and Fp315 using MiniTn7 transposon gene delivery system. Comprehensive biochemical characterization of the genomic integrants and their comparison with plasmid transformants of the same operon in M9 minimal medium reveals the highest amount of ∼7.6±0.41 mM citric and 29.95±2.8 mM gluconic acid secretion along with ∼43.2±3.24 mM intracellular citrate without affecting the growth of these P. fluorescens strains. All genomic integrants showed enhanced citric and gluconic acid secretion on Tris-Cl rock phosphate (TRP buffered medium, which was sufficient to release 200-1000 µM Pi in TRP medium. This study demonstrates that MPS ability could be achieved in natural fluorescent pseudomonads by incorporation of artificial citrate operon not only as plasmid but also by genomic integration.

  19. Artificial citrate operon confers mineral phosphate solubilization ability to diverse fluorescent pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Hemanta; Sanghavi, Paulomi B; Macwan, Silviya R; Archana, Gattupalli; Naresh Kumar, G

    2014-01-01

    Citric acid is a strong acid with good cation chelating ability and can be very efficient in solubilizing mineral phosphates. Only a few phosphate solubilizing bacteria and fungi are known to secrete citric acids. In this work, we incorporated artificial citrate operon containing NADH insensitive citrate synthase (gltA1) and citrate transporter (citC) genes into the genome of six-plant growth promoting P. fluorescens strains viz., PfO-1, Pf5, CHAO1, P109, ATCC13525 and Fp315 using MiniTn7 transposon gene delivery system. Comprehensive biochemical characterization of the genomic integrants and their comparison with plasmid transformants of the same operon in M9 minimal medium reveals the highest amount of ∼7.6±0.41 mM citric and 29.95±2.8 mM gluconic acid secretion along with ∼43.2±3.24 mM intracellular citrate without affecting the growth of these P. fluorescens strains. All genomic integrants showed enhanced citric and gluconic acid secretion on Tris-Cl rock phosphate (TRP) buffered medium, which was sufficient to release 200-1000 µM Pi in TRP medium. This study demonstrates that MPS ability could be achieved in natural fluorescent pseudomonads by incorporation of artificial citrate operon not only as plasmid but also by genomic integration.

  20. Galectin-3 silencing inhibits epirubicin-induced ATP binding cassette transporters and activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway via β-catenin/GSK-3β modulation in colorectal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kuo Lee

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising the treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves the upregulation of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and induction of galectin-3 signaling. Galectin-3 plays an anti-apoptotic role in many cancer cells and regulates various pathways to activate MDR. Thus, the inhibition of galectin-3 has the potential to enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug epirubicin. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanisms of silencing galectin-3 via RNA interference (RNAi on the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Galectin-3 knockdown increased the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells; suppressed the mRNA expression of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, c-myc, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR-associated protein (MRP 1, and MRP2; and downregulated the protein expression of P-gp, cyclin D1, galectin-3, β-catenin, c-Myc, and Bcl-2. Moreover, galectin-3 RNAi treatment significantly increased the mRNA level of GSK-3β, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9; remarkably increased the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio; and upregulated the GSK-3β and Bax protein expressions. Apoptosis was induced by galectin-3 RNAi and/or epirubicin as demonstrated by chromatin condensation, a higher sub-G1 phase proportion, and increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, indicating an intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Epirubicin-mediated resistance was effectively inhibited via galectin-3 RNAi treatment. However, these phenomena could be rescued after galectin-3 overexpression. We show for the first time that the silencing of galectin-3 sensitizes MDR cells to epirubicin by inhibiting ABC transporters and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis through modulation of the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon cancer cells.

  1. Mitochondrial phospholipids: role in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Edgard M; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are essential components of eukaryotic cells and are involved in a diverse set of cellular processes that include ATP production, cellular signalling, apoptosis and cell growth. These organelles are thought to have originated from a symbiotic relationship between prokaryotic cells in an effort to provide a bioenergetic jump and thus, the greater complexity observed in eukaryotes (Lane and Martin 2010). Mitochondrial processes are required not only for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis, but also allow cell to cell and tissue to tissue communication (Nunnari and Suomalainen 2012). Mitochondrial phospholipids are important components of this system. Phospholipids make up the characteristic outer and inner membranes that give mitochondria their shape. In addition, these membranes house sterols, sphingolipids and a wide variety of proteins. It is the phospholipids that also give rise to other characteristic mitochondrial structures such as cristae (formed from the invaginations of the inner mitochondrial membrane), the matrix (area within cristae) and the intermembrane space (IMS) which separates the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). Phospholipids are the building blocks that make up these structures. However, the phospholipid composition of the OMM and IMM is unique in each membrane. Mitochondria are able to synthesize some of the phospholipids it requires, but the majority of cellular lipid biosynthesis takes place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in conjunction with the Golgi apparatus (Fagone and Jackowski 2009). In this review, we will focus on the role that mitochondrial phospholipids play in specific cellular functions and discuss their biosynthesis, metabolism and transport as well as the differences between the OMM and IMM phospholipid composition. Finally, we will focus on the human diseases that result from disturbances to mitochondrial phospholipids and the current research being performed to help

  2. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on rabbit urinary bladder citrate synthase activity in the presence and absence of a grape suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Venugopal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The etiology of obstructive bladder dysfunction includes free radical damage to mitochondria. Feeding rabbits a standardized grape suspension protects the ability of the bladder to contract and empty in part by preventing mitochondrial damage, thus maintaining smooth muscle and mucosal metabolism. The objective of the current study is to determine the direct effect of this grape suspension on the response of mitochondria to the oxidative effects of hydrogen peroxide. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six male rabbits were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital and the bladders excised. Four full thickness strips were obtained for contractile studies and the balance separated into smooth muscle and mucosa compartments by blunt dissection. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the contractile response to field stimulation was quantitated. Each tissue was homogenized and the effects of increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of grape suspension on citrate synthase activity was determined. RESULTS: Citrate synthase activity was significantly higher in the mucosa than in the muscle. The grape suspension had no effect on control citrate synthase activity. However, the grape suspension provided significant protection of both smooth muscle and mucosal citrate synthase activity. CONCLUSIONS: These studies support the conclusion that the grape suspension provides direct protection of mitochondrial function.

  3. FERRIC CITRATE: AN IRON-BASED ORAL PHOSPHATE BINDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Christopher Bond

    2012-06-01

    Based on actual physician behavior in response to ferritin and TSAT increases and ferric citrate clinical trial results, and assuming equivalent pricing to other PBs, there would be cost savings with ferric citrate use through reduced ESA and iron use.

  4. Salicylic acid binding of mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase E2 affects mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport chain components and plays a role in basal defense against tobacco mosaic virus in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yangwenke; Tian, Miaoying; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xin; Wang, Yu; Xia, Xiaojian; Zhou, Jie; Zhou, Yanhong; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays a critical role in plant defense against pathogen invasion. SA-induced viral defense in plants is distinct from the pathways mediating bacterial and fungal defense and involves a specific pathway mediated by mitochondria; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. The SA-binding activity of the recombinant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (Slα-kGDH) E2 subunit of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was characterized. The biological role of this binding in plant defenses against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was further investigated via Slα-kGDH E2 silencing and transient overexpression in plants. Slα-kGDH E2 was found to bind SA in two independent assays. SA treatment, as well as Slα-kGDH E2 silencing, increased resistance to TMV. SA did not further enhance TMV defense in Slα-kGDH E2-silenced tomato plants but did reduce TMV susceptibility in Nicotiana benthamiana plants transiently overexpressing Slα-kGDH E2. Furthermore, Slα-kGDH E2-silencing-induced TMV resistance was fully blocked by bongkrekic acid application and alternative oxidase 1a silencing. These results indicated that binding by Slα-kGDH E2 of SA acts upstream of and affects the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which plays an important role in basal defense against TMV. The findings of this study help to elucidate the mechanisms of SA-induced viral defense.

  5. Physicochemical action of potassium-magnesium citrate in nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, C. Y.; Koenig, K.; Khan, R.; Haynes, S.; Padalino, P.

    1992-01-01

    Effect of potassium-magnesium citrate on urinary biochemistry and crystallization of stone-forming salts was compared with that of potassium citrate at same dose of potassium in five normal subjects and five patients with calcium nephrolithiasis. Compared to the placebo phase, urinary pH rose significantly from 6.06 +/- 0.27 to 6.48 +/- 0.36 (mean +/- SD, p less than 0.0167) during treatment with potassium citrate (50 mEq/day for 7 days) and to 6.68 +/- 0.31 during therapy with potassium-magnesium citrate (containing 49 mEq K, 24.5 mEq Mg, and 73.5 mEq citrate per day). Urinary pH was significantly higher during potassium-magnesium citrate than during potassium citrate therapy. Thus, the amount of undissociated uric acid declined from 118 +/- 61 mg/day during the placebo phase to 68 +/- 54 mg/day during potassium citrate treatment and, more prominently, to 41 +/- 46 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy. Urinary magnesium rose significantly from 102 +/- 25 to 146 +/- 37 mg/day during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy but not during potassium citrate therapy. Urinary citrate rose more prominently during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy (to 1027 +/- 478 mg/day from 638 +/- 252 mg/day) than during potassium citrate treatment (to 932 +/- 297 mg/day). Consequently, urinary saturation (activity product) of calcium oxalate declined significantly (from 1.49 x 10(-8) to 1.03 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium-magnesium citrate therapy and marginally (to 1.14 x 10(-8) M2) during potassium citrate therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  6. 14 N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, David; Singh, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values.

  7. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet Supercritical CO2 and Sodium Citrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L.; Schaef, T.; Wang, Z.; Miller, Q.; McGrail, P.

    2013-12-01

    Lin Qiu1*, Herbert T. Schaef2, Zhengrong Wang1, Quin R.S. Miller3, BP McGrail2 1. Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA 2. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA 3. University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA Geologic reservoirs for managing carbon emissions (mostly CO2) have expanded over the last 5 years to include unconventional formations including basalts and fractured shales. Recently, ~1000 metric tons of CO2 was injected into the Columbia River Basalt (CRB) in Eastern Washington as part of the Wallula Pilot Project, Big Sky Regional Carbon Partnership. Based on reservoir conditions, the injected CO2 is present as a supercritical fluid that dissolves into the formation water over time, and reacts with basalt components to form carbonate minerals. In this paper, we discuss mineral transformation reactions occurring when the forsterite (Mg2SiO4) is exposed to wet scCO2 in equilibrium with pure water and sodium citrate solutions. Forsterite was selected as it is an important olivine group mineral present in igneous and mafic rocks. Citrate was selected as it has been shown to enhance mineral dissolution and organic ligands are possible degradation products of the microbial communities present in the formational waters of the CRB. For the supercritical phase, transformation reactions were examined by in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction (HXRD) in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) in contact with water and sodium citrate solutions at conditions relevant to carbon sequestration. Experimental results show close-to-complete dissolution of forsterite in contact with scCO2 equilibrated with pure water for 90 hours (90 bar and 50°C). Under these conditions, thin films of water coated the mineral surface, providing a mechanism for silicate dissolution and transport of cations necessary for carbonate formation. The primary crystalline component initially detected with in situ HXRD was the hydrated magnesium carbonate, nesquehonite [Mg

  8. 21 CFR 520.1803 - Piperazine citrate capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Piperazine citrate capsules. 520.1803 Section 520... capsules. (a) Specifications. Piperazine citrate capsules contain piperazine citrate equivalent to 140 milligrams of piperazine base in each capsule. (b) Sponsor. See No. 021091 in § 510.600(c) of this chapter...

  9. Ventricular tachycardia after administration of sildenafil citrate: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmussen Jeppe G

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has not previously been reported that sildenafil citrate causes malignant arrhythmias in humans. Case presentation A 41-year-old man developed sustained ventricular tachycardia following sildenafil citrate administration. Conclusion It cannot be dismissed that this patient experienced ventricular tachycardia as an adverse effect of sildenafil citrate administration.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... citrate (iron (III) ammonium citrate) is prepared by the reaction of ferric hydroxide with citric acid, followed by treatment with ammonium hydroxide, evaporating, and drying. The resulting product occurs in two forms depending on the stoichiometry of the initial reactants. (1) Ferric ammonium citrate (iron...

  11. 21 CFR 573.580 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron-choline citrate complex. 573.580 Section 573.580 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Additive Listing § 573.580 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made...

  12. 21 CFR 172.370 - Iron-choline citrate complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron-choline citrate complex. 172.370 Section 172... CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.370 Iron-choline citrate complex. Iron-choline citrate complex made by reacting approximately equimolecular quantities of ferric hydroxide, choline,...

  13. 21 CFR 522.800 - Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. 522.800... § 522.800 Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection. (a) Specifications. Droperidol and fentanyl citrate injection is a sterile solution containing 20 milligrams of droperidol and 0.4 milligram of fentanyl...

  14. Mitochondrial Myopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which stimulates normal beating of the heart. Cardiac muscle damage also may occur. People with mitochondrial disorders may need to have regular examina- tions by a cardiologist. Other potential health issues Some people with mitochondrial disease experience ...

  15. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  16. Mitochondrial genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnery, Patrick Francis; Hudson, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In the last 10 years the field of mitochondrial genetics has widened, shifting the focus from rare sporadic, metabolic disease to the effects of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in a growing spectrum of human disease. The aim of this review is to guide the reader through some key concepts regarding mitochondria before introducing both classic and emerging mitochondrial disorders. Sources of data In this article, a review of the current mitochondrial genetics literature was con...

  17. Effects of TAT-conjugated platinum nanoparticles on lifespan of mitochondrial electron transport complex I-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans, nuo-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaue, Yuri; Kim, Juewon; Miyamoto, Yusei

    2010-09-20

    Platinum nanoparticle (Pt-np) species are superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics and also have an activity similar to that of mitochondrial electron transport complex I. To examine if this complex I-like activity functions in vivo, we studied the effects of Pt-nps on the lifespan of a mitochondrial complex I-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, nuo-1 (LB25) compared with wild-type N2. We synthesized a fusion protein of a cell-penetrating peptide, human immunodeficiency virus-1 TAT (48-60), C-terminally linked to a peptide with a high affinity to platinum (GRKKRRQRRRPPQ-DRTSTWR). Pt-nps were functionalized by conjugation with this fusion protein at a 1:1 ratio of TAT-PtBP to Pt atoms. Adult worms were treated with conjugated Pt-nps for 10 days. The mean lifespan of untreated N2 and LB25 was 19.6 ± 0.4 and 11.8 ± 0.3 days, respectively. Using 5 μM of conjugated Pt-nps, the lifespan of N2 and LB25 was maximally extended. This maximal lifespan extension of LB25 was 31.9 ± 2.6%, which was significantly greater than that of N2 (21.1 ± 1.7%, P < 0.05 by Student's t-test). Internalization of Pt into the whole body and mitochondria was similar between these two strains. Excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species was not observed in the cytosol or mitochondria of untreated LB25. Treatment for five days with 5 μM conjugated Pt-nps decreased cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in N2 and LB25 to a similar extent. The ratio of [NAD(+)]/[NADH] was very low in the whole body and mitochondria of control LB25. After five days of treatment with 5 μM conjugated Pt-nps, the ratio of [NAD(+)]/[NADH] was increased in N2 and LB25. However, the degree of the increase was much higher in LB25 than in N2. Pt-nps function as NADH oxidase and recover the [NAD(+)]/[NADH] ratio in LB25, leading to effective extension of the lifespan of LB25.

  18. Formation and Regulation of Mitochondrial Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Cigana Schenkel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane phospholipids are essential for the mitochondrial architecture, the activity of respiratory proteins, and the transport of proteins into the mitochondria. The accumulation of phospholipids within mitochondria depends on a coordinate synthesis, degradation, and trafficking of phospholipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria as well as intramitochondrial lipid trafficking. Several studies highlight the contribution of dietary fatty acids to the remodeling of phospholipids and mitochondrial membrane homeostasis. Understanding the role of phospholipids in the mitochondrial membrane and their metabolism will shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of mitochondrial function and in the mitochondrial-related diseases.

  19. Advances in research of malate and citrate transporter genes in plants%植物苹果酸和柠檬酸通道蛋白基因的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁锋; 罗义勇; 陈丽梅; 李昆志

    2011-01-01

    Aluminum is the major factor inhibiting plant growth and crop yield in acid soils.Recent researches show that Al is mainly detoxified by transporting small molecular anions of organic acids out of cells in the root with the organic acid channel protein in the plants.In this paper, two Al-resistant genes encoding aluminumactivated malate transporter and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion protein in plants are summarized from the aspects of gene cloning, protein homology comparison, gene expression regulation, function and application of gene as well as the predicted acting model of Al-tolerance genes.In addition, the prospect of these Al-resistant genes is also predicted.%铝毒是酸性土壤中抑制植物生长和减少作物产量的主要因素.近年来研究表明植物主要通过根部有机酸通道蛋白将小分子有机酸阴离子转运到细胞膜外来缓解铝毒.本文综述了植物中编码铝诱导的苹果酸转运蛋白和多药及毒性复合物的排出转运蛋白两种耐铝基因,并从基因克隆、蛋白质同源性比较、基因表达调控、基因的功能和应用以及预测耐铝基因作用模式等方面进行了阐述;同时对这些耐铝基因的应用前景进行了展望.

  20. Mitochondrial cholesterol: mechanisms of import and effects on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laura A; Kennedy, Barry E; Karten, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria require cholesterol for biogenesis and membrane maintenance, and for the synthesis of steroids, oxysterols and hepatic bile acids. Multiple pathways mediate the transport of cholesterol from different subcellular pools to mitochondria. In steroidogenic cells, the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) interacts with a mitochondrial protein complex to mediate cholesterol delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane for conversion to pregnenolone. In non-steroidogenic cells, several members of a protein family defined by the presence of a StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain play key roles in the delivery of cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes. Subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), form membrane contact sites with mitochondria and may contribute to the transport of ER cholesterol to mitochondria, either independently or in conjunction with lipid-transfer proteins. Model systems of mitochondria enriched with cholesterol in vitro and mitochondria isolated from cells with (patho)physiological mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation clearly demonstrate that mitochondrial cholesterol levels affect mitochondrial function. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in several diseases, including cancer, ischemia, steatohepatitis and neurodegenerative diseases, and influence disease pathology. Hence, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms maintaining mitochondrial cholesterol homeostasis may reveal additional targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we give a brief overview of mitochondrial cholesterol import in steroidogenic cells, and then focus on cholesterol trafficking pathways that deliver cholesterol to mitochondrial membranes in non-steroidogenic cells. We also briefly discuss the consequences of increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels on mitochondrial function and their potential role in disease pathology.

  1. Molecular basis for mitochondrial signaling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent advances in the study of structure, function, and regulation of metabolite, protein and ion translocating channels, and transporters in mitochondria. A wide array of cutting-edge methods are covered, ranging from electrophysiology and cell biology to bioinformatics, as well as structural, systems, and computational biology. At last, the molecular identity of two important channels in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been established. After years of work on the physiology and structure of VDAC channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane, there have been multiple discoveries on VDAC permeation and regulation by cytosolic proteins. Recent breakthroughs in structural studies of the mitochondrial cholesterol translocator reveal a set of novel unexpected features and provide essential clues for defining therapeutic strategies. Molecular Basis for Mitochondrial Signaling covers these and many more re...

  2. Mitochondrial dynamics and peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloh, Robert H

    2008-02-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is perhaps the archetypal disease of axonal degeneration, characteristically involving degeneration of the longest axons in the body. Evidence from both inherited and acquired forms of peripheral neuropathy strongly supports that the primary pathology is in the axons themselves and points to disruption of axonal transport as an important disease mechanism. Recent studies in human genetics have further identified abnormalities in mitochondrial dynamics--the fusion, fission, and movement of mitochondria--as a player in the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathy. This review provides an update on the mechanisms of mitochondrial trafficking in axons and the emerging relationship between the disruption of mitochondrial dynamics and axonal degeneration. Evidence suggests mitochondria are a "critical cargo" whose transport is necessary for proper axonal and synaptic function. Importantly, understanding the regulation of mitochondrial movement and the consequences of decreased axonal mitochondrial function may define new paths for therapeutic agents in peripheral neuropathy and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Posttranslational modifications and dysfunction of mitochondrial enzymes in human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Freya L; Pepe, Salvatore

    2016-08-01

    Deficiency of energy supply is a major complication contributing to the syndrome of heart failure (HF). Because the concurrent activity profile of mitochondrial bioenergetic enzymes has not been studied collectively in human HF, our aim was to examine the mitochondrial enzyme defects in left ventricular myocardium obtained from explanted end-stage failing hearts. Compared with nonfailing donor hearts, activity rates of complexes I and IV and the Krebs cycle enzymes isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and aconitase were lower in HF, as determined spectrophotometrically. However, activity rates of complexes II and III and citrate synthase did not differ significantly between the two groups. Protein expression, determined by Western blotting, did not differ between the groups, implying posttranslational perturbation. In the face of diminished total glutathione and coenzyme Q10 levels, oxidative modification was explored as an underlying cause of enzyme dysfunction. Of the three oxidative modifications measured, protein carbonylation was increased significantly by 31% in HF (P transport chain and Krebs cycle enzymes without altered expression of protein levels. Augmented oxidative modification of crucial enzyme subunit structures implicates dysfunction due to diminished capacity for management of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, thus contributing further to reduced bioenergetics in human HF.

  4. Competition between transferrin and the serum ligands citrate and phosphate for the binding of aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wesley R; Wang, Zhepeng; Hamada, Yahia Z

    2003-05-19

    A key issue regarding the speciation of Al(3+) in serum is how well the ligands citric acid and phosphate can compete with the iron transport protein serum transferrin for the aluminum. Previous studies have attempted to measure binding constants for each ligand separately, but experimental problems make it very difficult to obtain stability constants with the accuracy required to make a meaningful comparison between these ligands. In this study, effective binding constants for Al-citrate and Al-phosphate at pH 7.4 have been determined using difference UV spectroscopy to monitor the direct competition between these ligands and transferrin. The analysis of this competition equilibrium also includes the binding of citrate and phosphate as anions to apotransferrin. The effective binding constants are 10(11.59) for the 1:1 Al-citrate complexes and 10(14.90) for the 1:2 Al-citrate complexes. The effective binding constant for the 1:2 Al-phosphate complex is 10(12.02). No 1:1 Al-phosphate complex was detected. Speciation calculations based on these effective binding constants indicate that, at serum concentrations of citrate and phosphate, citrate will be the primary low-molecular-mass ligand for aluminum. Formal stability constants for the Al-citrate system have also been determined by potentiometric methods. This equilibrium system is quite complex, and information from both electrospray mass spectrometry and difference UV experiments has been used to select the best model for fitting the potentiometric data. The mass spectra contain peaks that have been assigned to complexes having aluminum:citrate stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 2:2, 2:3, and 3:3. The difference UV results were used to determine the stability constant for Al(H(-1)cta)-, which was then used in the least-squares fitting of the potentiometric data to determine stability constants for Al(Hcta)+, Al(cta), Al(cta)2(3-), Al(H(-1)cta)(cta)(4-), Al2(H(-1)cta)2(2-), and Al3(H(-1)cta)3(OH)(4-).

  5. TMFunction data: 322 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available R181C ... yes citrate translocation pathway TM 4; Mitochondrial citrate transport pro...ix ... first order rate constant; accessibility; transmembrane domain; substrate translocation pathway

  6. TMFunction data: 328 [TMFunction[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available A187C ... no citrate translocation pathway TM 4; Mitochondrial citrate transport prot... ... first order rate constant; accessibility; transmembrane domain; substrate translocation pathway

  7. Mitochondrial vasculopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Josef Finsterer; Sinda Zarrouk-Mahjoub

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders(MIDs)are usually multisystem disorders(mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome)either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course.Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system,the muscle,endocrine glands,or the myocardium.Recently,it has been shown that rarely alsothe arteries may be affected(mitochondrial arteriopathy).This review focuses on the type,diagnosis,and treat-ment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients.A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out.Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy.Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy,migraine-like headache,stroke-like episodes,or peripheral retinopathy.Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis,ectasia of arteries,aneurysm formation,dissection,or spontan-eous rupture of arteries.The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes.Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes.Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro-or macroangiopathy.Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications.

  8. Nickel electrodeposition from novel citrate bath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new type of electroplating bath suitable for nickel electrodeposition was developed. Trisodium citrate was used as a complexing agent and a buffer in the bath. The buffering capacity between trisodium citrate and boric acid were compared. The effects were investigated under different conditions of bath composition, current density, pH and temperature on the potentiodynamic cathodic polarization curves, cathodic current efficiency and throwing index, as well as the electrical conductivity of these baths. The optimum conditions for producing sound and satisfactory nickel deposits were: NiSO4·6H2O 350 g/L, NiC12·6H2O 45 g/L and Na3C6H5O7 30 g/L at pH=4 and 55 ℃. The surface morphology of the as-plated Ni deposit was examined by SEM. The results reveal that the nickel deposition obtained from the optimum conditions are composed of compact, non-porous fine grains covering the entire surface. X-ray analysis shows that nickel deposits obtained from the citrate bath have a fine crystal structure compared with deposits from the Watts bath.

  9. Chronically ischemic mouse skeletal muscle exhibits myopathy in association with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinos, Iraklis I; Swanson, Stanley A; Zhu, Zhen; Nella, Aikaterini A; Weiss, Dustin J; Gutti, Tanuja L; McComb, Rodney D; Baxter, B Timothy; Lynch, Thomas G; Casale, George P

    2008-07-01

    A myopathy characterized by mitochondrial pathology and oxidative stress is present in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Patients with PAD differ in disease severity, mode of presentation, and presence of comorbid conditions. In this study, we used a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia to isolate and directly investigate the effects of chronic inflow arterial occlusion on skeletal muscle microanatomy, mitochondrial function and expression, and oxidative stress. Hindlimb ischemia was induced by staged ligation/division of the common femoral and iliac arteries in C57BL/6 mice, and muscles were harvested 12 wk later. Muscle microanatomy was examined by bright-field microscopy, and mitochondrial content was determined as citrate synthase activity in muscle homogenates and ATP synthase expression by fluorescence microscopy. Electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I through IV were analyzed individually by respirometry. Oxidative stress was assessed as total protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) adducts and altered expression and activity of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Ischemic muscle exhibited histological features of myopathy and increased mitochondrial content compared with control muscle. Complex-dependent respiration was significantly reduced for ETC complexes I, III, and IV in ischemic muscle. Protein carbonyls, HNE adducts, and MnSOD expression were significantly increased in ischemic muscle. MnSOD activity was not significantly changed, suggesting MnSOD inactivation. Using a mouse model, we have demonstrated for the first time that inflow arterial occlusion alone, i.e., in the absence of other comorbid conditions, causes myopathy with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, recapitulating the muscle pathology of PAD patients.

  10. Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi's Concept (Szeged) till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    OpenAIRE

    Levente Szalárdy; Dénes Zádori; Péter Klivényi; József Toldi; László Vécsei

    2015-01-01

    Impaired function of certain mitochondrial respiratory complexes has long been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Furthermore, genetic alterations of mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes encoding proteins playing essential roles in maintaining proper mitochondrial function can lead to the development of severe systemic diseases associated with neurodegeneration and vacuolar myelinopathy. At present, all of these di...

  11. The Mitochondrial Metallochaperone SCO1 Is Required to Sustain Expression of the High-Affinity Copper Transporter CTR1 and Preserve Copper Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Hlynialuk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Human SCO1 fulfills essential roles in cytochrome c oxidase (COX assembly and the regulation of copper (Cu homeostasis, yet it remains unclear why pathogenic mutations in this gene cause such clinically heterogeneous forms of disease. Here, we establish a Sco1 mouse model of human disease and show that ablation of Sco1 expression in the liver is lethal owing to severe COX and Cu deficiencies. We further demonstrate that the Cu deficiency is explained by a functional connection between SCO1 and CTR1, the high-affinity transporter that imports Cu into the cell. CTR1 is rapidly degraded in the absence of SCO1 protein, and we show that its levels are restored in Sco1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts upon inhibition of the proteasome. These data suggest that mitochondrial signaling through SCO1 provides a post-translational mechanism to regulate CTR1-dependent Cu import into the cell, and they further underpin the importance of mitochondria in cellular Cu homeostasis.

  12. Cytokine and nitric oxide levels in patients with sepsis--temporal evolvement and relation to platelet mitochondrial respiratory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjövall, Fredrik; Morota, Saori; Frostner, Eleonor Åsander

    2014-01-01

    -γ), IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-17 and NO were analyzed in 38 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock at three time points during one week following admission to the ICU. Citrate synthase, mitochondrial DNA and cytochrome c were measured as markers of cellular mitochondrial content...

  13. Dietary citrate treatment of polycystic kidney disease in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, George A; Tanner, Judith A

    2003-01-01

    Progression of autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in the heterozygous male Han:SPRD rat is dramatically slowed by ingestion of potassium or sodium citrate. This study examined the efficacy of delayed therapy with sodium citrate, the effect of sodium citrate therapy on kidney cortex levels of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), and the response to calcium citrate ingestion. Rats were provided with citrate salts in their food, and renal clearance, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and survival determinations were made. Sodium citrate therapy was most effective when started at age 1 month, and delay of therapy until age 3 months produced no benefit. Kidney cortex TGF-beta levels were elevated in 3- and 8-month-old rats with ADPKD, but not in 6-week-old rats. Sodium citrate treatment, started at age 1 month, lowered TGF-beta levels to normal in 3-month-old rats, but this is probably not the primary mechanism of citrate's beneficial effect. Calcium citrate had only a modest effect in preserving glomerular filtration rate. Effective treatment of ADPKD in this rat model requires early administration of a readily absorbed alkalinizing citrate salt. Existing data on ADPKD patients on vegetarian diets or with kidney stones should be studied in light of these findings.

  14. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun-Xian Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s. Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS, inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP, and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs. Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria.

  15. Mitochondrial respiration is decreased in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Sahlin, Kent; Fernström, Maria

    2007-01-01

    -Acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HAD) and citrate synthase activity, uncoupling protein (UCP)3 content, oxidative stress measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), fiber type distribution, and respiration in isolated mitochondria. Respiration was normalized to citrate synthase activity (mitochondrial content) in isolated mitochondria...... no differences in respiration with palmitoyl-l-carnitine plus malate, citrate synthase activity, HAD activity, UCP3 content, or oxidative stress measured as HNE between the groups. In the whole group, state 3 respiration with pyruvate plus malate and respiration through ETC were negatively associated with A1C......, and the proportion of type 2X fibers correlated with markers of insulin resistance (P

  16. High-intensity sprint training inhibits mitochondrial respiration through aconitase inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Filip J; Schiffer, Tomas A; Ørtenblad, Niels; Zinner, Christoph; Morales-Alamo, David; Willis, Sarah J; Calbet, Jose A; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Boushel, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Intense exercise training is a powerful stimulus that activates mitochondrial biogenesis pathways and thus increases mitochondrial density and oxidative capacity. Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during exercise are considered vital in the adaptive response, but high ROS production is a serious threat to cellular homeostasis. Although biochemical markers of the transition from adaptive to maladaptive ROS stress are lacking, it is likely mediated by redox sensitive enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism. One potential enzyme mediating such redox sensitivity is the citric acid cycle enzyme aconitase. In this study, we examined biopsy specimens of vastus lateralis and triceps brachii in healthy volunteers, together with primary human myotubes. An intense exercise regimen inactivated aconitase by 55-72%, resulting in inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by 50-65%. In the vastus, the mitochondrial dysfunction was compensated for by a 15-72% increase in mitochondrial proteins, whereas H2O2 emission was unchanged. In parallel with the inactivation of aconitase, the intermediary metabolite citrate accumulated and played an integral part in cellular protection against oxidative stress. In contrast, the triceps failed to increase mitochondrial density, and citrate did not accumulate. Instead, mitochondrial H2O2 emission was decreased to 40% of the pretraining levels, together with a 6-fold increase in protein abundance of catalase. In this study, a novel mitochondrial stress response was highlighted where accumulation of citrate acted to preserve the redox status of the cell during periods of intense exercise.

  17. Miro, MCU, and calcium: bridging our understanding of mitochondrial movement in axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niescier, Robert F; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2013-09-10

    Neurons are extremely polarized structures with long axons and dendrites, which require proper distribution of mitochondria and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics for neuronal functions and survival. Indeed, recent studies show that various neurological disorders are linked to mitochondrial transport in neurons. Mitochondrial anterograde transport is believed to deliver metabolic energy to synaptic terminals where energy demands are high, while mitochondrial retrograde transport is required to repair or remove damaged mitochondria in axons. It has been suggested that Ca(2) (+) plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial transport by altering the configuration of mitochondrial protein, miro. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial transport in neurons still are not well characterized. In this review, we will discuss the roles of miro in mitochondrial transport and how the recently identified components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter add to our current model of mitochondrial mobility regulation.

  18. Miro, MCU, and calcium: bridging our understanding of mitochondrial movement in axons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eNiescier

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are extremely polarized structures with long axons and dendrites, which require proper distribution of mitochondria and maintenance of mitochondrial dynamics for neuronal functions and survival. Indeed, recent studies show that various neurological disorders are linked to mitochondrial transport in neurons. Mitochondrial anterograde transport is believed to deliver metabolic energy to synaptic terminals where energy demands are high, while mitochondrial retrograde transport is required to repair or remove damaged mitochondria in axons. It has been suggested that Ca2+ plays a key role in regulating mitochondrial transport by altering the configuration of mitochondrial protein, miro. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate mitochondrial transport in neurons still are not well characterized. In this review, we will discuss the roles of miro in mitochondrial transport and how the recently identified components of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter add to our current model of mitochondrial mobility regulation.

  19. OXPHOS-Dependent Cells Identify Environmental Disruptors of Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with numerous chronic diseases including metabolic syndrome. Environmental chemicals can impair mitochondrial function through numerous mechanisms such as membrane disruption, complex inhibition and electron transport chain uncoupling. Curr...

  20. The role of VuMATE1 expression in aluminium-inducible citrate secretion in rice bean (Vigna umbellata) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei Ya; Chen, Wei Wei; Xu, Jia Meng; Fan, Wei; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2013-04-01

    Aluminium (Al)-activated citrate secretion plays an important role in Al resistance in a number of plant species, such as rice bean (Vigna umbellata). This study further characterized the regulation of VuMATE1, an aluminium-activated citrate transporter. Al stress induced VuMATE1 expression, followed by the secretion of citrate. Citrate secretion was specific to Al stress, whereas VuMATE1 expression was not, which could be explained by a combined regulation of VuMATE1 expression and Al-specific activation of VuMATE1 protein. Pre-treatment with a protein translation inhibitor suppressed VuMATE1 expression, indicating that de novo biosynthesis of proteins is required for gene expression. Furthermore, post-treatment with a protein translation inhibitor inhibited citrate secretion, indicating that post-transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1 is critical for citrate secretion. Protein kinase and phosphatase inhibitor studies showed that reversible phosphorylation was important not only for transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1 expression but also for post-translational regulation of VuMATE1 protein activity. These results suggest that citrate secretion is dependent on both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1. Additionally, VuMATE1 promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion lines revealed that VuMATE1 expression was restricted to the root apex and was entirely Al induced, indicating the presence of cis-acting elements regulating root tip-specific and Al-inducible gene expression, which will be an important resource for genetic improvement of plant Al resistance.

  1. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Keane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial proteins or proteins implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the central involvement of mitochondria in PD. This involvement is corroborated by reports that environmental toxins that inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been shown to be associated with PD. This paper aims to illustrate the considerable body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of PD patients and to highlight the important need for further research in this area.

  2. Citrate-coated silver nanoparticles interactions with effluent organic matter: influence of capping agent and solution conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Gutierrez, Leonardo

    2015-07-31

    Fate and transport studies of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) discharged from urban wastewaters containing effluent organic matter (EfOM) into natural waters represent a key knowledge gap. In this study, EfOM interfacial interactions with AgNPs and their aggregation kinetics were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS), respectively. Two well-characterized EfOM isolates, i.e., wastewater humic (WW humic) and wastewater colloids (WW colloids, a complex mixture of polysaccharides-proteins-lipids), and a River humic isolate of different characteristics were selected. Citrate-coated AgNPs were selected as representative capped-AgNPs. Citrate-coated AgNPs showed a considerable stability in Na+ solutions. However, Ca2+ ions induced aggregation by cation bridging between carboxyl groups on citrate. Although the presence of River humic increased the stability of citrate-coated AgNPs in Na+ solutions due to electrosteric effects, they aggregated in WW humic-containing solutions, indicating the importance of humics characteristics during interactions. Ca2+ ions increased citrate-coated AgNPs aggregation rates in both humic solutions, suggesting cation bridging between carboxyl groups on their structures as a dominant interacting mechanism. Aggregation of citrate-coated AgNPs in WW colloids solutions was significantly faster than those in both humic solutions. Control experiments in urea solution indicated hydrogen bonding as the main interacting mechanism. During AFM experiments, citrate-coated AgNPs showed higher adhesion to WW humic than to River humic, evidencing a consistency between TR-DLS and AFM results. Ca2+ ions increased citrate-coated AgNPs adhesion to both humic isolates. Interestingly, strong WW colloids interactions with citrate caused AFM probe contamination (nanoparticles adsorption) even at low Na+ concentrations, indicating the impact of hydrogen bonding on adhesion. These results suggest the importance

  3. Capsazepine抑制培养海马神经元网络线粒体转运%Capsazepine inhibits mitochondrial transport in cultured hippocampal neuronal networks of rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付敏; 潘丽洁; 孙朝晖; 左焕琮; 谢佐平

    2009-01-01

    capsazepine(CZP)是辣椒素的合成类似物,也是野香草型瞬时感受器电位通道1(TRPV1)的选择性抑制剂.TRPV1在体内有广泛的表达谱,使CZP有广泛的作用位点.除此之外,以往的研究结果表明CZP除了作用于TRPVI外还有更复杂的信号通路.本课题研究了CZP对体外培养的大鼠海马神经元网络内线粒体转运的作用并分析其可能机制.结果显示:20 μmol/L的CZP可有效抑制原代培养海马神经元网络中的线粒体转运.CZP急性作用不引起胞内钙离子浓度的升高,也不引起细胞的凋亡.胞外更换为无外钙记录液,或者将GSK3g抑制剂SB415286与CZP共孵育,均不影响CZP对线粒体转运的抑制作用.然而,将BAPTA-AM与CZP共孵育,抑制了CZP对线粒体转运的抑制作用.本研究结果表明,CZP直接通过胞内钙信号通路影响神经元的线粒体转运,与胞外钙流或转运蛋白的磷酸化无关.%Capsazepine is a ByntlIetic analogue of capsaicin and a selective inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channel (TRPV1).TRPV1 has wide expression profile,providing extensive targets for capsazepine.Evidence from previous studies showed that capsazepine acted more complex effects through other than TRPV1 signal pathway.In this study.we examined its effect and underlying mechanisms on mitochondrial transport of cultured hippecampal neurons in rats.The data showed that the number of the moving mitochondria in primarily cultured hippocampal neurons was remarkably decreased by 20 μmol/L capsazepine.Contradicted to previous study,the intracellular calcium concentration was not elevated.Capsazepine did not induce cell death in acute incubation.The inhibitory effect of capsasepine was not prevented by co-application of SB415286,the inhibitor of GSK313 or by replacing extracellular recording solution to calcium-free saline,but prevented by co-application of BAPTA-AM.These results indicated that capsazepine inhibited mitochondrial trans

  4. Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi’s Concept (Szeged till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levente Szalárdy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired function of certain mitochondrial respiratory complexes has long been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. Furthermore, genetic alterations of mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes encoding proteins playing essential roles in maintaining proper mitochondrial function can lead to the development of severe systemic diseases associated with neurodegeneration and vacuolar myelinopathy. At present, all of these diseases lack effective disease modifying therapy. Following a brief commemoration of Professor Albert Szent-Györgyi, a Nobel Prize laureate who pioneered in the field of cellular respiration, antioxidant processes, and the roles of free radicals in health and disease, the present paper overviews the current knowledge on the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in central nervous system diseases associated with neurodegeneration including Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease as well as mitochondrial encephalopathies. The review puts special focus on the involvement and the potential therapeutic relevance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α, a nuclear-encoded master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant responses in these disorders, the transcriptional activation of which may hold novel therapeutic value as a more system-based approach aiming to restore mitochondrial functions in neurodegenerative processes.

  5. Electron Transport Disturbances and Neurodegeneration: From Albert Szent-Györgyi's Concept (Szeged) till Novel Approaches to Boost Mitochondrial Bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalárdy, Levente; Zádori, Dénes; Klivényi, Péter; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2015-01-01

    Impaired function of certain mitochondrial respiratory complexes has long been linked to the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Furthermore, genetic alterations of mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes encoding proteins playing essential roles in maintaining proper mitochondrial function can lead to the development of severe systemic diseases associated with neurodegeneration and vacuolar myelinopathy. At present, all of these diseases lack effective disease modifying therapy. Following a brief commemoration of Professor Albert Szent-Györgyi, a Nobel Prize laureate who pioneered in the field of cellular respiration, antioxidant processes, and the roles of free radicals in health and disease, the present paper overviews the current knowledge on the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in central nervous system diseases associated with neurodegeneration including Parkinson's and Huntington's disease as well as mitochondrial encephalopathies. The review puts special focus on the involvement and the potential therapeutic relevance of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α), a nuclear-encoded master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and antioxidant responses in these disorders, the transcriptional activation of which may hold novel therapeutic value as a more system-based approach aiming to restore mitochondrial functions in neurodegenerative processes.

  6. Mitochondrial genome depletion dysregulates bile acid- and paracetamol-induced expression of the transporters Mdr1, Mrp1 and Mrp4 in liver cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, MJ; Gonzalez-Sanchez, E; Gonzalez-Loyola, A; Gonzalez-Buitrago, JM; Marin, JJG

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Mitochondria are involved in the toxicity of several compounds, retro-control of gene expression and apoptosis activation. The effect of mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) depletion on changes in ABC transporter protein expression in response to bile acids and paracetamol was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Hepa 1-6 mouse hepatoma cells with 70% decrease in 16S/18S rRNA ratio (Rho cells) were obtained by long-term treatment with ethidium bromide. KEY RESULTS Spontaneous apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were decreased in Rho cells. Following glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA) or paracetamol, Rho cells generated less ROS and were more resistant to cell death. Apoptosis induced by GCDCA and Fas was also reduced. The basal expression of Mdr1 was significantly enhanced, but this was not further stimulated by GCDCA or paracetamol, as observed in wild-type (WT) cells. Basal expression of Mrp1 and Mrp4 was similar in WT and Rho cells, whereas they were up-regulated only in WT cells after GCDCA or paracetamol, along with the transcription factors Shp and Nrf2, but not Fxr or Pxr. Increased expression of Nrf2 was accompanied by its enhanced nuclear translocation. Glycoursodeoxycholic acid failed to cause any of the effects observed for GCDCA or paracetamol. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The Nrf2-mediated pathway is partly independent of ROS production. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 is insufficient to up-regulate Mdr1, Mrp1 and Mrp4, which requires the participation of other regulatory element(s) whose activation in response to GCDCA and paracetamol is impaired in Rho cells and hence probably sensitive to ROS. PMID:21175587

  7. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a purported inhibitor of chaperone protein GRP78, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmy Thomas

    Full Text Available Verrucosidin (VCD belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78 expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD's anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose, but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin. However, VCD's strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed.

  8. Repositioning of Verrucosidin, a Purported Inhibitor of Chaperone Protein GRP78, as an Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain Complex I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Reyna; Pao, Peng-Wen; Hofman, Florence M.; Chen, Thomas C.; Louie, Stan G.; Pirrung, Michael C.; Schönthal, Axel H.

    2013-01-01

    Verrucosidin (VCD) belongs to a group of fungal metabolites that were identified in screening programs to detect molecules that preferentially kill cancer cells under glucose-deprived conditions. Its mode of action was proposed to involve inhibition of increased GRP78 (glucose regulated protein 78) expression during hypoglycemia. Because GRP78 plays an important role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors such as VCD might harbor cancer therapeutic potential. We therefore sought to characterize VCD’s anticancer activity in vitro. Triple-negative breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 were treated with VCD under different conditions known to trigger increased expression of GRP78, and a variety of cellular processes were analyzed. We show that VCD was highly cytotoxic only under hypoglycemic conditions, but not in the presence of normal glucose levels, and VCD blocked GRP78 expression only when glycolysis was impaired (due to hypoglycemia or the presence of the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose), but not when GRP78 was induced by other means (hypoxia, thapsigargin, tunicamycin). However, VCD’s strictly hypoglycemia-specific toxicity was not due to the inhibition of GRP78. Rather, VCD blocked mitochondrial energy production via inhibition of complex I of the electron transport chain. As a result, cellular ATP levels were quickly depleted under hypoglycemic conditions, and common cellular functions, including general protein synthesis, deteriorated and resulted in cell death. Altogether, our study identifies mitochondria as the primary target of VCD. The possibility that other purported GRP78 inhibitors (arctigenin, biguanides, deoxyverrucosidin, efrapeptin, JBIR, piericidin, prunustatin, pyrvinium, rottlerin, valinomycin, versipelostatin) might act in a similar GRP78-independent fashion will be discussed. PMID:23755268

  9. l-Lactate metabolism in HEP G2 cell mitochondria due to the l-lactate dehydrogenase determines the occurrence of the lactate/pyruvate shuttle and the appearance of oxaloacetate, malate and citrate outside mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, Roberto; Paventi, Gianluca; Porcile, Carola; Sarnataro, Daniela; Daniele, Aurora; Passarella, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    As part of an ongoing study of l-lactate metabolism both in normal and in cancer cells, we investigated whether and how l-lactate metabolism occurs in mitochondria of human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2) cells. We found that Hep G2 cell mitochondria (Hep G2-M) possess an l-lactate dehydrogenase (ml-LDH) restricted to the inner mitochondrial compartments as shown by immunological analysis, confocal microscopy and by assaying ml-LDH activity in solubilized mitochondria. Cytosolic and mitochondrial l-LDHs were found to differ from one another in their saturation kinetics. Having shown that l-lactate itself can enter Hep G2 cells, we found that Hep G2-M swell in ammonium l-lactate, but not in ammonium pyruvate solutions, in a manner inhibited by mersalyl, this showing the occurrence of a carrier-mediated l-lactate transport in these mitochondria. Occurrence of the l-lactate/pyruvate shuttle and the appearance outside mitochondria of oxaloacetate, malate and citrate arising from l-lactate uptake and metabolism together with the low oxygen consumption and membrane potential generation are in favor of an anaplerotic role for l-LAC in Hep G2-M.

  10. Alternate-Day High-Fat Diet Induces an Increase in Mitochondrial Enzyme Activities and Protein Content in Rat Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kawamura, Takuji; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2016-04-06

    Long-term high-fat diet increases muscle mitochondrial enzyme activity and endurance performance. However, excessive calorie intake causes intra-abdominal fat accumulation and metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an alternating day high-fat diet on muscle mitochondrial enzyme activities, protein content, and intra-abdominal fat mass in rats. Male Wistar rats were given a standard chow diet (CON), high-fat diet (HFD), or alternate-day high-fat diet (ALT) for 4 weeks. Rats in the ALT group were fed a high-fat diet and standard chow every other day for 4 weeks. After the dietary intervention, mitochondrial enzyme activities and protein content in skeletal muscle were measured. Although body weight did not differ among groups, the epididymal fat mass in the HFD group was higher than those of the CON and ALT groups. Citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase activities in the plantaris muscle of rats in HFD and ALT were significantly higher than that in CON rats, whereas there was no difference between HFD and ALT groups. No significant difference was observed in muscle glycogen concentration or glucose transporter-4 protein content among the three groups. These results suggest that an alternate-day high-fat diet induces increases in mitochondrial enzyme activities and protein content in rat skeletal muscle without intra-abdominal fat accumulation.

  11. Alternate-Day High-Fat Diet Induces an Increase in Mitochondrial Enzyme Activities and Protein Content in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kawamura, Takuji; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Long-term high-fat diet increases muscle mitochondrial enzyme activity and endurance performance. However, excessive calorie intake causes intra-abdominal fat accumulation and metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an alternating day high-fat diet on muscle mitochondrial enzyme activities, protein content, and intra-abdominal fat mass in rats. Male Wistar rats were given a standard chow diet (CON), high-fat diet (HFD), or alternate-day high-fat diet (ALT) for 4 weeks. Rats in the ALT group were fed a high-fat diet and standard chow every other day for 4 weeks. After the dietary intervention, mitochondrial enzyme activities and protein content in skeletal muscle were measured. Although body weight did not differ among groups, the epididymal fat mass in the HFD group was higher than those of the CON and ALT groups. Citrate synthase and beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase activities in the plantaris muscle of rats in HFD and ALT were significantly higher than that in CON rats, whereas there was no difference between HFD and ALT groups. No significant difference was observed in muscle glycogen concentration or glucose transporter-4 protein content among the three groups. These results suggest that an alternate-day high-fat diet induces increases in mitochondrial enzyme activities and protein content in rat skeletal muscle without intra-abdominal fat accumulation. PMID:27058555

  12. Anaerobic degradation of citrate under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, Victor M; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Waltz, Rebecca J; Field, James A

    2009-07-01

    Citrate is an important component of metal processing effluents such as chemical mechanical planarization wastewaters of the semiconductor industry. Citrate can serve as an electron donor for sulfate reduction applied to promote the removal of metals, and it can also potentially be used by methanogens that coexist in anaerobic biofilms. The objective of this study was to evaluate the degradation of citrate with sulfate-reducing and methanogenic biofilms. During batch bioassays, the citrate, acetate, methane and sulfide concentrations were monitored. The results indicate that independent of the biofilm or incubation conditions used, citrate was rapidly fermented with specific rates ranging from 566 to 720 mg chemical oxygen demand (COD) consumed per gram volatile suspended solids per day. Acetate was found to be the main fermentation product of citrate degradation, which was later degraded completely under either methanogenic or sulfate reducing conditions. However, if either sulfate reduction or methanogenesis was infeasible due to specific inhibitors (2-bromoethane sulfonate), absence of sulfate or lack of adequate microorganisms in the biofilm, acetate accumulated to levels accounting for 90-100% of the citrate-COD consumed. Based on carbon balances measured in phosphate buffered bioassays, acetate, CO(2) and hydrogen are the main products of citrate fermentation, with a molar ratio of 2:2:1 per mol of citrate, respectively. In bicarbonate buffered bioassays, acetogenesis of H(2) and CO(2) increased the yield of acetate. The results taken as a whole suggest that in anaerobic biofilm systems, citrate is metabolized via the formation of acetate as the main metabolic intermediate prior to methanogenesis or sulfate reduction. Sulfate reducing consortia must be enriched to utilize acetate as an electron donor in order to utilize the majority of the electron-equivalents in citrate.

  13. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus sepsis induces early renal mitochondrial DNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel R Bartz

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control, 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection.

  15. Mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeviani, M; Tiranti, V; Piantadosi, C

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration, the most efficient metabolic pathway devoted to energy production, is at the crosspoint of 2 quite different genetic systems, the nuclear genome and the mitochondrial genome (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA). The latter encodes a few essential components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and has unique molecular and genetic properties that account for some of the peculiar features of mitochondrial disorders. However, the perpetuation, propagation, and expression of mtDNA, the majority of the subunits of the respiratory complexes, as well as a number of genes involved in their assembly and turnover, are contained in the nuclear genome. Although mitochondrial disorders have been known for more than 30 years, a major breakthrough in their understanding has come much later, with the discovery of an impressive, ever-increasing number of mutations of mitochondrial DNA. Partial deletions or duplications of mtDNA, or maternally inherited point mutations, have been associated with well-defined clinical syndromes. However, phenotypes transmitted as mendelian traits have also been identified. These include clinical entities defined on the basis of specific biochemical defects, and also a few autosomal dominant or recessive syndromes associated with multiple deletions or tissue-specific depletion of mtDNA. Given the complexity of mitochondrial genetics and biochemistry, the clinical manifestations of mitochondrial disorders are extremely heterogenous. They range from lesions of single tissues or structures, such as the optic nerve in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or the cochlea in maternally inherited nonsyndromic deafness, to more widespread lesions including myopathies, encephalomyopathies, cardiopathies, or complex multisystem syndromes. The recent advances in genetic studies provide both diagnostic tools and new pathogenetic insights in this rapidly expanding area of human pathology.

  16. In vitro evidence that D-serine disturbs the citric acid cycle through inhibition of citrate synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Angela; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-11-17

    The present work investigated the in vitro effects of D-serine (D-Ser) on important parameters of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex of young rats. The parameters analyzed were CO(2) generation from glucose and acetate, glucose uptake and the activities of the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, of the citric acid cycle enzymes citrate synthase, aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase and of creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Our results show that D-Ser significantly reduced CO(2) production from acetate, but not from glucose, reflecting an impairment of the citric acid cycle function. Furthermore, D-Ser did not affect glucose uptake. We also observed that the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase from mitochondrial preparations and purified citrate synthase was significantly inhibited by D-Ser, whereas the other activities of the citric acid cycle as well as the activities of complexes I-III, II-III, II and IV of the respiratory chain, creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were not affected by this D-amino acid. We also found that L-serine did not affect citrate synthase activity from mitochondrial preparations and purified enzyme. The data indicate that D-Ser impairs the citric acid cycle activity via citrate synthase inhibition, therefore compromising energy metabolism production in cerebral cortex of young rats. Therefore, it is presumed that this mechanism may be involved at least in part in the neurological damage found in patients affected by disorders in which D-Ser metabolism is impaired, with altered cerebral concentrations of this D-amino acid.

  17. Citrate increases glass transition temperature of vitrified sucrose preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, E.P.W.; Lipelaar, P.J.; Hoekstra, F.A.; Vromans, H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium citrate on the properties of dried amorphous sucrose glasses. Addition of sodium citrate to a sucrose solution followed by freeze-drying or convective drying resulted in a glass transition temperature (T-g) that was higher than the well-s

  18. Diffuse abdominal gallium-67 citrate uptake in salmonella infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garty, I.; Koren, A.

    1987-11-01

    Two pediatric patients with salmonella infections (one with typhoid fever and the second with salmonella C2 gastroenteritis), had a diffuse abdominal uptake of Ga-67 citrate. The possible explanation for this finding is discussed. Salmonella infection should be included as a cause in the differential diagnosis of diffuse accumulation of Ga-67 citrate.

  19. 21 CFR 520.622d - Diethylcarbamazine citrate capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diethylcarbamazine citrate capsules. 520.622d Section 520.622d Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Diethylcarbamazine citrate capsules. (a) Specifications. Each capsule contains 12.5, 50, 200, or 400 milligrams (mg...

  20. Structural Basis for Norovirus Inhibition and Fucose Mimicry by Citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansman, Grant S.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; McLellan, Jason S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin; Shimoike, Takashi; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Bewley, Carole A.; Kwong, Peter D. (NIAID)

    2012-01-20

    Human noroviruses bind with their capsid-protruding domains to histo-blood-group antigens (HBGAs), an interaction thought to direct their entry into cells. Although human noroviruses are the major cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks, development of antivirals has been lacking, mainly because human noroviruses cannot be cultivated. Here we use X-ray crystallography and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) to analyze the interaction of citrate with genogroup II (GII) noroviruses. Crystals of citrate in complex with the protruding domain from norovirus GII.10 Vietnam026 diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} and showed a single citrate bound at the site of HBGA interaction. The citrate interaction was coordinated with a set of capsid interactions almost identical to that involved in recognizing the terminal HBGA fucose, the saccharide which forms the primary conserved interaction between HBGAs and GII noroviruses. Citrate and a water molecule formed a ring-like structure that mimicked the pyranoside ring of fucose. STD NMR showed the protruding domain to have weak affinity for citrate (460 {mu}M). This affinity, however, was similar to the affinities of the protruding domain for fucose (460 {mu}M) and H type 2 trisaccharide (390 {mu}M), an HBGA shown previously to be specifically recognized by human noroviruses. Importantly, competition STD NMR showed that citrate could compete with HBGA for norovirus binding. Together, the results suggest that citrate and other glycomimetics have the potential to block human noroviruses from binding to HBGAs.

  1. Structural basis for norovirus inhibition and fucose mimicry by citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Grant S; Shahzad-Ul-Hussan, Syed; McLellan, Jason S; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin; Shimoike, Takashi; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    Human noroviruses bind with their capsid-protruding domains to histo-blood-group antigens (HBGAs), an interaction thought to direct their entry into cells. Although human noroviruses are the major cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks, development of antivirals has been lacking, mainly because human noroviruses cannot be cultivated. Here we use X-ray crystallography and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) to analyze the interaction of citrate with genogroup II (GII) noroviruses. Crystals of citrate in complex with the protruding domain from norovirus GII.10 Vietnam026 diffracted to 1.4 Å and showed a single citrate bound at the site of HBGA interaction. The citrate interaction was coordinated with a set of capsid interactions almost identical to that involved in recognizing the terminal HBGA fucose, the saccharide which forms the primary conserved interaction between HBGAs and GII noroviruses. Citrate and a water molecule formed a ring-like structure that mimicked the pyranoside ring of fucose. STD NMR showed the protruding domain to have weak affinity for citrate (460 μM). This affinity, however, was similar to the affinities of the protruding domain for fucose (460 μM) and H type 2 trisaccharide (390 μM), an HBGA shown previously to be specifically recognized by human noroviruses. Importantly, competition STD NMR showed that citrate could compete with HBGA for norovirus binding. Together, the results suggest that citrate and other glycomimetics have the potential to block human noroviruses from binding to HBGAs.

  2. Pre-process desilication of wheat straw with citrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Duy Michael; Sorensen, Hanne R.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2017-01-01

    Effects of treatment time, citrate concentration, temperature, and pH on Si extraction from wheat straw prior to hydrothermal pretreatment were investigated for maximising Si removal and biomass recovery before biomass refining. With citrate, an almost linear negative correlation between Si conte...... the enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis, neither negatively nor positively....

  3. The distribution of plasmids determining citrate utilization in citrate-positive variants of Escherichia coli from humans, domestic animals, feral birds and environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, N; Sato, G

    1979-10-01

    Sixty-seven isolates of citrate-positive variants of Escherichia coli were isolated from human, domestic animal, feral bird and environmental sources. With the exception of citrate utilization, all isolates were identified as typical E. coli by their biochemical reactions. The transmission of the ability to utilize citrate on Simmons' citrate agar was demonstrated in 53 (79.1%) out of the 67 citrate-positive E. coli variants obtained from various sources. Drug resistance determinants and citrate utilizing character were co-transmitted into E. coli K-12 by conjugation among citrate-positive E. coli isolates carrying R plasmids except for that isolated from horses. The other characters (haemolysin or colicin production, raffinose or sucrose fermentation) were not transmitted together with the citrate utilizing character. These facts suggested that the structural gene responsible for citrate utilizing ability in citrate-positive variants of E. coli was located on a conjugative plasmid.

  4. Mitochondrial medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bandyopadhyay, S K; Dutt, Anita

    2010-01-01

    .... With the coming of age for mitochondrial medicine, it is now appropriate that physicians keep themselves well-acquainted with the recent developments in this expanding field of biomedical research.

  5. Mutations in TFAM, encoding mitochondrial transcription factor A, cause neonatal liver failure associated with mtDNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Ashlee R; Simon, Mariella T; Stover, Alexander; Eftekharian, Shaya; Khanlou, Negar; Wang, Hanlin L; Magaki, Shino; Lee, Hane; Partynski, Kate; Dorrani, Nagmeh; Chang, Richard; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A; Abdenur, Jose E

    2016-09-01

    In humans, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes are a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorders that arise as a consequence of defects in mtDNA replication or nucleotide synthesis. Clinical manifestations are variable and include myopathic, encephalomyopathic, neurogastrointestinal or hepatocerebral phenotypes. Through clinical exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense variant (c.533C>T; p.Pro178Leu) in mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) segregating in a consanguineous kindred of Colombian-Basque descent in which two siblings presented with IUGR, elevated transaminases, conjugated hyperbilirubinemia and hypoglycemia with progression to liver failure and death in early infancy. Results of the liver biopsy in the proband revealed cirrhosis, micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, cholestasis and mitochondrial pleomorphism. Electron microscopy of muscle revealed abnormal mitochondrial morphology and distribution while enzyme histochemistry was underwhelming. Electron transport chain testing in muscle showed increased citrate synthase activity suggesting mitochondrial proliferation, while respiratory chain activities were at the lower end of normal. mtDNA content was reduced in liver and muscle (11% and 21% of normal controls respectively). While Tfam mRNA expression was upregulated in primary fibroblasts, Tfam protein level was significantly reduced. Furthermore, functional investigations of the mitochondria revealed reduced basal respiration and spare respiratory capacity, decreased mtDNA copy number and markedly reduced nucleoids. TFAM is essential for transcription, replication and packaging of mtDNA into nucleoids. Tfam knockout mice display embryonic lethality secondary to severe mtDNA depletion. In this report, for the first time, we associate a homozygous variant in TFAM with a novel mtDNA depletion syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei, E-mail: wshlei@aliyun.com; Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-05

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca{sup 2+} transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury. - Highlights: • We study MCU with primary neuron culture. • MCU induces mitochondrial fission. • MCU reverses MIEF1 effect.

  7. Comparative proteomics analysis of lanthanum citrate complex-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In a previous study,the lanthanum citrate complex([LaCit2]3-) has been found to induce apoptosis in the human HeLa cervical cancer cell line.To clarify the mechanism,we carried out comparative proteomics analysis between treated and control cells.Differentially expressed proteins were separated electrophoretically and identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF tandem mass spectrometry.There were profound changes in 14 proteins related to mitochondrial function and oxidative stress,suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in [LaCit2]3--induced apoptosis.This was confirmed by a decrease in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential,and increases in cytochrome c release and reactive oxygen species generation in [LaCit2]3--treated cells.Western blotting analyses show that [LaCit2]3--induced apoptosis was accompanied by the activation of caspase-9 and the specific proteolytic cleavage of PARP,leading to an increase in the proapoptotic protein Bax and a decrease in the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2.These results suggest that [LaCit2]3-induced the apoptosis of HeLa cells through oxidative stress mediated pathway involving MT participation.

  8. 77 FR 74171 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... sodium citrate, otherwise known as citric acid sodium salt, and the monohydrate and monopotassium forms of potassium citrate.\\5\\ Sodium citrate also includes both trisodium citrate and monosodium citrate... acid and sodium citrate are classifiable under 2918.14.0000 and 2918.15.1000 of the Harmonized...

  9. Reduced insulin-mediated citrate synthase activity in cultured skeletal muscle cells from patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Mogensen, Martin; Petersen, Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    responded to high levels of insulin and/or palmitate. These results provide evidence for an intrinsic defect in CS activity, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of T2D. Moreover, the data suggest that insulin resistance at the CS level can be induced by exposure to high free fatty acid levels....... of these metabolic malfunctions, we studied mitochondrial respiration, uncoupled respiration and oxidative enzyme activities (citrate synthase (CS), 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase activity (HAD)) before and after acute exposure to insulin and/or palmitate in myotubes established from healthy lean and obese...

  10. Melatonin mitigates mitochondrial malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Josefa; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Escames, Germane; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J

    2005-01-01

    Melatonin, or N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is a compound derived from tryptophan that is found in all organisms from unicells to vertebrates. This indoleamine may act as a protective agent in disease conditions such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, aging, sepsis and other disorders including ischemia/reperfusion. In addition, melatonin has been proposed as a drug for the treatment of cancer. These disorders have in common a dysfunction of the apoptotic program. Thus, while defects which reduce apoptotic processes can exaggerate cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and ischemic conditions are made worse by enhanced apoptosis. The mechanism by which melatonin controls cell death is not entirely known. Recently, mitochondria, which are implicated in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, have been identified as a target for melatonin actions. It is known that melatonin scavenges oxygen and nitrogen-based reactants generated in mitochondria. This limits the loss of the intramitochondrial glutathione and lowers mitochondrial protein damage, improving electron transport chain (ETC) activity and reducing mtDNA damage. Melatonin also increases the activity of the complex I and complex IV of the ETC, thereby improving mitochondrial respiration and increasing ATP synthesis under normal and stressful conditions. These effects reflect the ability of melatonin to reduce the harmful reduction in the mitochondrial membrane potential that may trigger mitochondrial transition pore (MTP) opening and the apoptotic cascade. In addition, a reported direct action of melatonin in the control of currents through the MTP opens a new perspective in the understanding of the regulation of apoptotic cell death by the indoleamine.

  11. Enhanced dissolution of sildenafil citrate as dry foam tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdee, Somchai; Atipairin, Apichart; Sae Yoon, Attawadee; Srichana, Teerapol; Changsan, Narumon

    2017-01-30

    Dry foam formulation technology is alternative approach to enhance dissolution of the drug. Sildenafil citrate was suspended in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution and adding a mixture of maltodextrin and mannitol as diluent to form a paste. Sildenafil citrate paste was passed through a nozzle spray bottle to obtain smooth foam. The homogeneous foam was dried in a vacuum oven and sieved to obtain dry foam granules. The granules were mixed with croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate and compressed into tablet. All formulations were evaluated for their physicochemical properties and dissolution profiles. All the tested excipients were compatible with sildenafil citrate by both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and infrared (IR) analysis. There are no X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks representing crystals of sildenafil citrate observed form dry foam formulations. The hardness of tablets was about 5 kg, friability test foam tablet had higher dissolution rate in 0.1 N HCl in comparison with commercial sildenafil citrate tablet, sildenafil citrate prepared by direct compression and wet granulation method. Sildenafil citrate dry foam tablet with the high-level composition of surfactant, water and diluent showed enhanced dissolution rate than that of the lower-level composition of these excipients. This formulation was stable under accelerated conditions for at least 6 months.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Mariana G; Hoppel, Charles L

    2013-09-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex chronic clinical syndrome. Energy deficit is considered to be a key contributor to the development of both cardiac and skeletal myopathy. In HF, several components of cardiac and skeletal muscle bioenergetics are altered, such as oxygen availability, substrate oxidation, mitochondrial ATP production, and ATP transfer to the contractile apparatus via the creatine kinase shuttle. This review focuses on alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis and respirasome organization, substrate oxidation coupled with ATP synthesis in the context of their contribution to the chronic energy deficit, and mechanical dysfunction of the cardiac and skeletal muscle in HF. We conclude that HF is associated with decreased mitochondrial biogenesis and function in both heart and skeletal muscle, supporting the concept of a systemic mitochondrial cytopathy. The sites of mitochondrial defects are located within the electron transport and phosphorylation apparatus and differ with the etiology and progression of HF in the two mitochondrial populations (subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar) of cardiac and skeletal muscle. The roles of adrenergic stimulation, the renin-angiotensin system, and cytokines are evaluated as factors responsible for the systemic energy deficit. We propose a cyclic AMP-mediated mechanism by which increased adrenergic stimulation contributes to the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Role of Ga-67 citrate imaging in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aburano, T.; Yokoyama, K.; Hisada, K.; Kakuma, K.; Ichiyanagi, K.

    1988-11-01

    Two patients with pancreatitis in whom an area of predominant uptake of Ga-67 citrate was demonstrated involving the entire pancreas are presented. Ultrasound and x-ray CT did not reveal any morphologic abnormalities in the pancreas, whereas Ga-67 citrate imaging indicated the presence of active inflammatory change. Ga-67 citrate imaging may be useful in confirming the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis or acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis based on clinical and laboratory data, especially when ultrasound and/or x-ray CT cannot reveal any morphologic abnormalities in the pancreas.

  14. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Citrate Synthase Gene in Rice( Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shan-shan; MING Feng; LU Qun; GUO Bin; SHEN Da-leng

    2005-01-01

    The full-length OsCS encoding citrate synthase was isolated from rice (Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica). OsCS is 1477-bp long and encodes a 474 amino acid polypeptide. Its putative protein sequence is highly identical to Daucus carota, Nicotiana tabacum,Beta vulgaris subsp., Arabidopsis thaliana, and Citrus junos (>70%). The deduced amino-terminal sequence of OsCS showes characteristics of mitochondrial targeting signal. Southern blot analysis using ORF of the OsCS as the probe indicated that this gene exists in multiple copies in rice genome. The band with predicated size of 82 kD was detected by Western blot after being induced by 0.4 mmol/L IPTG.

  15. The effect of mitochondrial calcium uniporter on mitochondrial fission in hippocampus cells ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lantao; Li, Shuhong; Wang, Shilei; Yu, Ning; Liu, Jia

    2015-06-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free Ca(2+) into the mitochondrial matrix, maintaining Ca(2+) homeostasis, thus regulates the mitochondrial morphology. Previous studies have indicated that there was closely crosstalk between MCU and mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury. This study constructed a hypoxia reoxygenation model using primary hippocampus neurons to mimic the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury and aims to explore the exactly effect of MCU on the mitochondrial fission during the process of ischemia/reperfusion injury and so as the mechanisms. Our results found that the inhibitor of the MCU, Ru360, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, suppressed the expression of mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, MIEF1 and Fis1, and thus improved mitochondrial morphology significantly. Whereas spermine, the agonist of the MCU, had no significant impact compared to the I/R group. This study demonstrated that the MCU regulates the process of mitochondrial fission by controlling the Ca(2+) transport, directly upregulating mitochondrial fission proteins Drp1, Fis1 and indirectly reversing the MIEF1-induced mitochondrial fusion. It also provides new targets for brain protection during ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  16. Control of lipid oxidation at the mitochondrial level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlin, Kent

    2009-01-01

    , but the mechanisms regulating fuel preferences remain unclear. During intense exercise, oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) decreases, and the major control is likely to be at the mitochondrial level. Potential mitochondrial sites for control of lipid oxidation include transport of LCFAs into mitochondrial...

  17. Accessibility of cysteine residues in a cytoplasmic loop of CitS of Klebsiella pneumoniae is controlled by the catalytic state of the transporter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobczak, [No Value; Lolkema, JS; Sobczak, Iwona

    2003-01-01

    The citrate transporter CAS of Klebsiella pneumoniae is a secondary transporter that transports citrate in symport with two sodium ions and one proton. Treatment of CAS with the alkylating, agent N-ethylmaleimide resulted in a complete loss of transport activity. Treatment of mutant proteins in whic

  18. Accessibility of cysteine residues in a cytoplasmic loop of CitS of Klebsiella pneumoniae is controlled by the catalytic state of the transporter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobczak, [No Value; Lolkema, JS; Sobczak, Iwona

    2003-01-01

    The citrate transporter CAS of Klebsiella pneumoniae is a secondary transporter that transports citrate in symport with two sodium ions and one proton. Treatment of CAS with the alkylating, agent N-ethylmaleimide resulted in a complete loss of transport activity. Treatment of mutant proteins in whic

  19. The Antimalarial Activities of Methylene Blue and the 1,4-Naphthoquinone 3-[4-(Trifluoromethyl)Benzyl]-Menadione Are Not Due to Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Electron Transport Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhardt, Katharina; Ke, Hangjun; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Lanzer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Methylene blue and a series of recently developed 1,4-naphthoquinones, including 3-[4-(substituted)benzyl]-menadiones, are potent antimalarial agents in vitro and in vivo. The activity of these structurally diverse compounds against the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum might involve their peculiar redox properties. According to the current theory, redox-active methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione are “subversive substrates.” These agents are thought to shuttle electrons from reduced flavoproteins to acceptors such as hemoglobin-associated or free Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX. The reduction of Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX could subsequently prevent essential hemoglobin digestion and heme detoxification in the parasite. Alternatively, owing to their structures and redox properties, methylene blue and 1,4-naphthoquinones might also affect the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we tested the latter hypothesis using an established system of transgenic P. falciparum cell lines and the antimalarial agents atovaquone and chloroquine as controls. In contrast to atovaquone, methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione do not inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain. A systematic comparison of the morphologies of drug-treated parasites furthermore suggests that the three drugs do not share a mechanism of action. Our findings support the idea that methylene blue and 3-[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-menadione exert their antimalarial activity as redox-active subversive substrates. PMID:23439633

  20. Mitochondrial dysfunctions in neurodegenerative diseases: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hroudová, Jana; Singh, Namrata; Fišar, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunctions are supposed to be responsible for many neurodegenerative diseases dominating in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). A growing body of evidence suggests that defects in mitochondrial metabolism and particularly of electron transport chain may play a role in pathogenesis of AD. Structurally and functionally damaged mitochondria do not produce sufficient ATP and are more prominent in producing proapoptotic factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this can be an early stage of several mitochondrial disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunctions may be caused by both mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA that code mitochondrial components and by environmental causes. In the following review, common aspects of mitochondrial impairment concerned about neurodegenerative diseases are summarized including ROS production, impaired mitochondrial dynamics, and apoptosis. Also, damaged function of electron transport chain complexes and interactions between pathological proteins and mitochondria are described for AD particularly and marginally for PD and HD.

  1. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases are caused by CoQ10 deficiency, and CoQ10 supplementation is clearly beneficial in these cases. It might provide some relief from other mitochondrial diseases. Creatine, L-carnitine, and CoQ10 supplements often are combined into a “ ...

  2. Competitive and cooperative adsorption of arsenate and citrate on goethite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Rong; JIA Yongfeng; WANG Chengzhi

    2009-01-01

    The fate of arsenic in natural environments is influenced by adsorption onto metal (hydr)oxides. The extent of arsenic adsorption is strongly affected by coexisting dissolved natural organic acids. Recently, some studies reported that there existed competitive adsorption between arsenate and citrate on goethite. Humic acid is known to interact strongly with arsenate by forming complexes in aqueous solution, hence it is necessary to undertake a comprehensive study of the adsorption of arsenate/citrate onto goethite in the presence of one another. The results showed that at the arsenate concentrations used in this study (0.006--0.27 mmol/L), citrate decreased arsenate adsorption at acidic pH but no effect was observed at alkaline pH. In comparison, citrate adsorption was inhibited at acidic pH, but enhanced at alkaline pH by arsenate. This was probably due to the formation of complex between arsenate and citrate like the case of arsenate with humic acid. These results implied that the mechanism of the adsorption of arsenate and citrate onto goethite in the presence of one another involved not only competition for binding sites, but the cooperation between the two species at the water-goethite interface as well.

  3. Role of mitochondrial calcium uniporter in regulating mitochondrial fission in the cerebral cortexes of living rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Nan; Wang, Peng; Wang, Shilei; Li, Shuhong; Li, Yu; Wang, Jinying; Wang, Min

    2014-06-01

    The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports Ca2+ from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial matrix and thus maintains Ca2+ homeostasis. Previous studies have reported that inhibition of MCU by ruthenium red (RR) protects the brain from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and that mitochondrial fission plays an important role in I/R injury. However, it is still not known whether MCU affects mitochondrial fission. In the present study, treatment with RR was found to decrease the concentration of free calcium in the mitochondria, calcineurin enzyme activity and dynamin-related protein 1 expression, and treatment with spermine was found to have the opposite effect in organisms subjected to occlusion of the middle cerebral artery lasting 2 h followed by 24 h reperfusion. These results indicate that MCU may be related to mitochondrial fission via modulating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and this relationship between MCU and mitochondrial fission may protect the brain from I/R injury.

  4. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  5. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  6. Alkali absorption and citrate excretion in calcium nephrolithiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, K.; Williams, R. H.; Oh, M. S.; Padalino, P.; Adams-Huet, B.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The role of net gastrointestinal (GI) alkali absorption in the development of hypocitraturia was investigated. The net GI absorption of alkali was estimated from the difference between simple urinary cations (Ca, Mg, Na, and K) and anions (Cl and P). In 131 normal subjects, the 24 h urinary citrate was positively correlated with the net GI absorption of alkali (r = 0.49, p < 0.001). In 11 patients with distal renal tubular acidosis (RTA), urinary citrate excretion was subnormal relative to net GI alkali absorption, with data from most patients residing outside the 95% confidence ellipse described for normal subjects. However, the normal relationship between urinary citrate and net absorbed alkali was maintained in 11 patients with chronic diarrheal syndrome (CDS) and in 124 stone-forming patients devoid of RTA or CDS, half of whom had "idiopathic" hypocitraturia. The 18 stone-forming patients without RTA or CDS received potassium citrate (30-60 mEq/day). Both urinary citrate and net GI alkali absorption increased, yielding a significantly positive correlation (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001), with the slope indistinguishable from that of normal subjects. Thus, urinary citrate was normally dependent on the net GI absorption of alkali. This dependence was less marked in RTA, confirming the renal origin of hypocitraturia. However, the normal dependence was maintained in CDS and in idiopathic hypocitraturia, suggesting that reduced citrate excretion was largely dietary in origin as a result of low net alkali absorption (from a probable relative deficiency of vegetables and fruits or a relative excess of animal proteins).

  7. Tissue-specific and substrate-specific mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline cardiac and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen;

    2015-01-01

    fibers. Biopsies of left ventricular cardiac muscle and soleus muscle, a type I-rich oxidative skeletal muscle, were obtained from 15 healthy domestic cats. Enzymatic activity of citrate synthase (CS), a biomarker of mitochondrial content, was measured. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with various kinds...... of non-fatty-acid substrates and fatty-acid substrate in permeabilized muscle fiber was measured by using high-resolution respirometry. CS activity in the heart was 3 times higher than in the soleus muscle. Mitochondrial state 3 respiration, ADP-stimulated respiration, with complex I-linked and complex I...

  8. Reduced expression of citrate synthase leads to excessive superoxide formation and cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Quanxiang; Zhao, Mengmeng; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Xiaochun; Nie, Yao; Li, Ping; Liu, Tingyan; Ge, Ruli; Han, Fengchan

    2017-02-16

    A/J mice are a mouse model of age-related hearing loss. It has been demonstrated that a mutation in gene of citrate synthase (CS) contributes to the early onset of hearing loss occurring at about one month of age. To understand the effects of a decreased CS activity that results from the mutation in Cs gene on hearing loss in A/J mice, human kidney cell line (293T) was transiently transfected with short hairpin RNA for Cs (shRNA-Cs) to reduce expression of CS. In comparison with those of cells transfected with a scrambled sequence (shRNA-NC), the oxygen consumption rate and adenosine trisphosphate (ATP) production level were decreased in 293T cells transfected with shRNA-Cs. Meanwhile, excessive superoxide production was induced as determined by mitochondrial superoxide formation assay (MitoSOX) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) detection. Moreover, the expression levels of BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein) and CHOP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein), markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, were upregulated. Furthermore, apoptosis related molecule caspase-3 and the mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced. It is therefore concluded that downregulation of Cs expression in 293T cells leads to low level of ATP production, excessive superoxide formation and cell apoptosis, which implies a possible mechanism for hearing loss in A/J mice.

  9. Kinetic simulation of malate-aspartate and citrate-pyruvate shuttles in association with Krebs cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Kalyani; Vadlakonda, Lakshmipathi; Mitra, Chanchal K

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we have kinetically simulated two mitochondrial shuttles, malate-aspartate shuttle (used for transferring reducing equivalents) and citrate-pyruvate shuttle (used for transferring carbon skeletons). However, the functions of these shuttles are not limited to the points mentioned above, and they can be used in different arrangements to meet different cellular requirements. Both the shuttles are intricately associated with Krebs cycle through the metabolites involved. The study of this system of shuttles and Krebs cycle explores the response of the system in different metabolic environments. Here, we have simulated these subsets individually and then combined them to study the interactions among them and to bring out the dynamics of these pathways in focus. Four antiports and a pyruvate pump were modelled along with the metabolic reactions on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Michaelis-Menten approach was extended for deriving rate equations of every component of the system. Kinetic simulation was carried out using ordinary differential equation solver in GNU Octave. It was observed that all the components attained steady state, sooner or later, depending on the system conditions. Progress curves and phase plots were plotted to understand the steady state behaviour of the metabolites involved. A comparative analysis between experimental and simulated data show fair agreement thus validating the usefulness and applicability of the model.

  10. Treatment Efficacy and Safety During Plasma Exchange With Citrate Anticoagulation: A Randomized Study of 4 Versus 15% Citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonic, Manja; Gubensek, Jakob; Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka; Ponikvar, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    In plasma exchange (PE), contrary to dialysis, there is no ultrafiltration, and the volume of anticoagulant contributes to volume overload of the patient and might also reduce PE efficiency through dilution. To reduce the volume of citrate, we compared 4 and 15% citrate anticoagulation protocols in PE in a randomized study, aiming to evaluate PE efficacy, anticoagulation efficiency, and overall safety. In addition to standard biochemical analyses during PE treatments, the elimination rate (ER) of immunoglobulins was calculated to evaluate PE efficacy. Anticoagulation was evaluated by postfilter ionized calcium, visual evaluation of the extracorporeal system, and change in the sieving coefficient (SC) during PE. Accumulation of citrate was determined by calculating the total-to-ionized calcium ratio and measuring the citrate concentration after PE. One hundred forty procedures (70 in each group) were performed in 37 patients. The mean citrate infusion rate was 197 ± 10 mL/h in the 4% and 59 ± 5.5 mL/h in the 15% groups, respectively; the total volume of infused citrate was 502 ± 77 mL versus 164 ± 52 mL (P comparable. Ionized calcium was stable during the procedures, and there were no significant side effects. Although postfilter ionized calcium was on the upper limit of the target range (0.41 ± 0.16 vs. 0.37 ± 0.14 mmol/L, P = 0.38), the visual assessment score was excellent, and even a rise in SC was observed during the procedures in both groups. The total-to-ionized calcium ratio was increased in 20 versus 22% of procedures, and citrate concentrations after PE were also similar (1306 ± 441 vs. 1263 ± 405 μmol/L). To conclude, we were unable to show superior PE efficacy in the 15% citrate group, but we significantly reduced the infused volume, which is important in patients with fluid overload. Both citrate protocols were found to provide excellent anticoagulation without significant metabolic disturbances

  11. Grape seed extract targets mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress leading to cytoprotective autophagy and apoptotic death in human head and neck cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Sangeeta; Deep, Gagan; Lopert, Pamela; Patel, Manisha; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a major killer worldwide and innovative measures are urgently warranted to lower the morbidity and mortality caused by this malignancy. Aberrant redox and metabolic status in HNSCC cells offer a unique opportunity to specifically target cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated the efficacy of grape seed extract (GSE) to target the redox and bioenergetic alterations in HNSCC cells. GSE treatment decreased the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity, increased the mitochondrial superoxide levels and depleted the levels of cellular antioxidant (glutathione), thus resulting in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in human HNSCC Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Polyethylene glycol-SOD addition reversed the GSE-mediated apoptosis without restoring complex III activity. Along with redox changes, GSE inhibited the extracellular acidification rate (representing glycolysis) and oxygen consumption rate (indicating oxidative phosphorylation) leading to metabolic stress in HNSCC cells. Molecular studies revealed that GSE activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and suppressed Akt/mTOR/4E-BP1/S6K signaling in both Detroit 562 and FaDu cells. Interestingly, GSE increased the autophagic load specifically in FaDu cells, and autophagy inhibition significantly augmented the apoptosis in these cells. Consistent with in vitro results, in vivo analyses also showed that GSE feeding in nude mice activated AMPK and induced-autophagy in FaDu xenograft tumor tissues. Overall, these findings are innovative as we for the first time showed that GSE targets ETC complex III and induces oxidative and metabolic stress, thereby, causing autophagy and apoptotic death in HNSCC cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Disruption of mitochondrial function in interpopulation hybrids of Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher K; Burton, Ronald S

    2006-07-01

    Electron transport system (ETS) function in mitochondria is essential for the aerobic production of energy. Because ETS function requires extensive interactions between mitochondrial and nuclear gene products, coadaptation between mitochondrial and nuclear genomes may evolve within populations. Hybridization between allopatric populations may then expose functional incompatibilities between genomes that have not coevolved. The intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has high levels of nucleotide divergence among populations at mitochondrial loci and suffers F2 hybrid breakdown in interpopulation hybrids. We hypothesize that hybridization results in incompatibilities among subunits in ETS enzyme complexes and that these incompatibilities result in diminished mitochondrial function and fitness. To test this hypothesis, we measured fitness, mitochondrial function, and ETS enzyme activity in inbred recombinant hybrid lines of Tigriopus californicus. We found that (1) both fitness and mitochondrial function are reduced in hybrid lines, (2) only those ETS enzymes with both nuclear and mitochondrial subunits show a loss of activity in hybrid lines, and (3) positive relationships exist between ETS enzyme activity and mitochondrial function and between mitochondrial function and fitness. We also present evidence that hybrid lines harboring mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and mitochondrial RNA polymerase (mtRPOL) from the same parental source population have higher fitness than those with mtDNA and mtRPOL from different populations, suggesting that mitochondrial gene regulation may play a role in disruption of mitochondrial performance and fitness of hybrids. These results suggest that disruption of coadaptation between nuclear and mitochondrial genes contributes to the phenomenon of hybrid breakdown.

  13. Exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals during gestation lowers energy expenditure and impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Erin J; Ragauskas, Alyse; Jaligama, Sridhar; Redd, JeAnna R; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Peloquin, Matthew J; Saravia, Jordy; Han, Joan C; Cormier, Stephania A; Bridges, Dave

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the effects of in utero exposure to environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) on growth, metabolism, energy utilization, and skeletal muscle mitochondria in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. Pregnant mice were treated with laboratory-generated, combustion-derived particular matter (MCP230). The adult offspring were placed on a high-fat diet for 12 wk, after which we observed a 9.8% increase in their body weight. The increase in body size observed in the MCP230-exposed mice was not associated with increases in food intake but was associated with a reduction in physical activity and lower energy expenditure. The reduced energy expenditure in mice indirectly exposed to MCP230 was associated with reductions in skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA copy number, lower mRNA levels of electron transport genes, and reduced citrate synthase activity. Upregulation of key genes involved in ameliorating oxidative stress was also observed in the muscle of MCP230-exposed mice. These findings suggest that gestational exposure to MCP230 leads to a reduction in energy expenditure at least in part through alterations to mitochondrial metabolism in the skeletal muscle.

  14. Theoretical Study on Sulfur Dioxide Absorption with Citrate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛娟琴; 洪涛; 王召启; 李林波

    2006-01-01

    The citrate absorption of SO2 is currently one of the most successful and economic methods to harness sulfur dioxide pollution.In order to theoretically elucidate the mechanism of SO2 absorption by citrate solution and provide theoretical instruction for experiments and industrial process, the theory of multi-buffer solution, combined with computer numerical calculation methods, was applied to study the distribution parameters of the components of the citrate solution in the process of SO2 absorption and the following results were obtained: (1) HCi2- and H2Ci- in the citrate solution played the dominant role in the absorption and desorption processes; (2) Through the calculation for the buffer capacity of citrate solution, it was found that the pH of the absorption and desorption solution should be in the range of 2~8, while at pH=4.5 the buffer capacity reached its maximum. Some valuable parameters were obtained, which are instructive to the ensuing experiments and industrial design.

  15. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  16. Targeted mutagenesis of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrases VA and VB implicates both enzymes in ammonia detoxification and glucose metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Gul N.; Rubbelke, Timothy S.; Hendin, Joshua; Nguyen, Hien; Waheed, Abdul; Shoemaker, James D.; Sly, William S.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies with carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors implicated mitochondrial CA in ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis. Subsequent studies identified two mitochondrial CAs. To distinguish the contribution of each enzyme, we studied the effects of targeted disruption of the murine CA genes, called Car5A and Car5B. The Car5A mutation had several deleterious consequences. Car5A null mice were smaller than wild-type littermates and bred poorly. However, on sodium–potassium citrate-supplemented wate...

  17. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling and calorie restriction increase fasting eNOS, akt and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M Cerqueira

    Full Text Available Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis promoted by eNOS activation is believed to play a central role in the beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR. Since treatment of mice with dinitrophenol (DNP promotes health and lifespan benefits similar to those observed in CR, we hypothesized that it could also impact biogenesis. We found that DNP and CR increase citrate synthase activity, PGC-1α, cytochrome c oxidase and mitofusin-2 expression, as well as fasting plasma levels of NO• products. In addition, eNOS and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue was activated in fasting CR and DNP animals. Overall, our results indicate that systemic mild uncoupling activates eNOS and Akt-dependent pathways leading to mitochondrial biogenesis.

  18. Strongly bound citrate stabilizes the apatite nanocrystals in bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Y.-Y.; Rawal, A.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-10-12

    Nanocrystals of apatitic calcium phosphate impart the organic-inorganic nanocomposite in bone with favorable mechanical properties. So far, the factors preventing crystal growth beyond the favorable thickness of ca. 3 nm have not been identified. Here we show that the apatite surfaces are studded with strongly bound citrate molecules, whose signals have been identified unambiguously by multinuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. NMR reveals that bound citrate accounts for 5.5 wt% of the organic matter in bone and covers apatite at a density of about 1 molecule per (2 nm){sup 2}, with its three carboxylate groups at distances of 0.3 to 0.45 nm from the apatite surface. Bound citrate is highly conserved, being found in fish, avian, and mammalian bone, which indicates its critical role in interfering with crystal thickening and stabilizing the apatite nanocrystals in bone

  19. Effect of sildenafil citrate on penile erection of rhesus macaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-BinHuang; Cheng-LiangXiong; Cheng-GaoYu; Jie-LingZhou; Ji-YunShen

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effect of sildenafil citrate on penile erection of male rhesus macaque. Methods:Twenty Macaca mulatta were divided into the sildenafil treated and the control groups of l0 animals each. The penile size, the corpus cavernosal electromyogram (EMG) and the intra-corpus cavernosal pressure (ICP) were determined. Results: The diameter of penis and the ICP were significantly increased and the corpus cavernosal EMG significantly reduced in the sildenafil group. Conclusion: Sildenafil citrate increases the penile size and ICP and reduces the corpus cavernosal EMG in male rhesus macaque. (Asian J Androl 2004 Sep; 6: 233-235)

  20. Mitochondrial biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Michele, Roberto; Carimi, Francesco; Frommer, Wolf B

    2014-03-01

    Biosensors offer an innovative tool for measuring the dynamics of a wide range of metabolites in living organisms. Biosensors are genetically encoded, and thus can be specifically targeted to specific compartments of organelles by fusion to proteins or targeting sequences. Mitochondria are central to eukaryotic cell metabolism and present a complex structure with multiple compartments. Over the past decade, genetically encoded sensors for molecules involved in energy production, reactive oxygen species and secondary messengers have helped to unravel key aspects of mitochondrial physiology. To date, sensors for ATP, NADH, pH, hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, redox state, cAMP, calcium and zinc have been used in the matrix, intermembrane space and in the outer membrane region of mitochondria of animal and plant cells. This review summarizes the different types of sensors employed in mitochondria and their main limits and advantages, and it provides an outlook for the future application of biosensor technology in studying mitochondrial biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of citric acid and citrate on protoplasmic droplet of bovine epididymal sperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Abdy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFor evaluation of citric acid and citrate effects on bovine epididymal protoplasmic droplets, fifty bovine testes were collected in the October 2007 till June 2008 from Urmia slaughterhouse and transported to the laboratory in a cool container filled with 5 °C ice pack. Caudal epididymis was incised and sperm cells were put into Petri dishes containing hams f10 media with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS, which were kept in 37 °C, CO2 incubator. Then sperm cells were counted and 50-milion per mL concentration was prepared. After this stage, three dilutions of citric acid (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 N and one dilution of citrate (1N, based on normal osmolarity and normal pH were added to a micro tube containing 25 milion per mL sperm. Then one-step eosin-nigrosin staining in 30-60-120-240-360 minutes was performed and slides were evaluated with 1000-x phase contrast microscope and 200 sperm cells per slide were counted. The results revealed significant difference between blank and citric acid 0.3 N. The proportion of protoplasmic droplet in group consisting of 0.3 N acid citric in 120-240-360 minutes, was significantly lower than that of blank (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference between citrate – blank and citric acid 0.1N-blank groups, but after 240 minutes significant difference was observed between blank & citric acid 0.2 N (P < 0.05. In conclusions citric acid based on dilution and time duration can reduce the proportion of bovine epididymal sperm cytoplasmic droplets.

  2. ATP citrate lyase mediated cytosolic acetyl-CoA biosynthesis increases mevalonate production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Sarah; Denby, Charles M; Van Vu, T; Baidoo, Edward E K; Wang, George; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-03-03

    With increasing concern about the environmental impact of a petroleum based economy, focus has shifted towards greener production strategies including metabolic engineering of microbes for the conversion of plant-based feedstocks to second generation biofuels and industrial chemicals. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive host for this purpose as it has been extensively engineered for production of various fuels and chemicals. Many of the target molecules are derived from the central metabolite and molecular building block, acetyl-CoA. To date, it has been difficult to engineer S. cerevisiae to continuously convert sugars present in biomass-based feedstocks to acetyl-CoA derived products due to intrinsic physiological constraints-in respiring cells, the precursor pyruvate is directed away from the endogenous cytosolic acetyl-CoA biosynthesis pathway towards the mitochondria, and in fermenting cells pyruvate is directed towards the byproduct ethanol. In this study we incorporated an alternative mode of acetyl-CoA biosynthesis mediated by ATP citrate lyase (ACL) that may obviate such constraints. We characterized the activity of several heterologously expressed ACLs in crude cell lysates, and found that ACL from Aspergillus nidulans demonstrated the highest activity. We employed a push/pull strategy to shunt citrate towards ACL by deletion of the mitochondrial NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) and engineering higher flux through the upper mevalonate pathway. We demonstrated that combining the two modifications increases accumulation of mevalonate pathway intermediates, and that both modifications are required to substantially increase production. Finally, we incorporated a block strategy by replacing the native ERG12 (mevalonate kinase) promoter with the copper-repressible CTR3 promoter to maximize accumulation of the commercially important molecule mevalonate. By combining the push/pull/block strategies, we significantly improved mevalonate

  3. MLN64 induces mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased mitochondrial cholesterol content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Balboa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein that has been implicated in cholesterol transport from endosomal membranes to the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, in toxin-induced resistance, and in mitochondrial dysfunction. Down-regulation of MLN64 in Niemann-Pick C1 deficient cells decreased mitochondrial cholesterol content, suggesting that MLN64 functions independently of NPC1. However, the role of MLN64 in the maintenance of endosomal cholesterol flow and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We have previously described that hepatic MLN64 overexpression increases liver cholesterol content and induces liver damage. Here, we studied the function of MLN64 in normal and NPC1-deficient cells and we evaluated whether MLN64 overexpressing cells exhibit alterations in mitochondrial function. We used recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer to overexpress MLN64 in mouse liver and hepatic cells; and RNA interference to down-regulate MLN64 in NPC1-deficient cells. In MLN64-overexpressing cells, we found increased mitochondrial cholesterol content and decreased glutathione (GSH levels and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we found decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation and increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in MLN64-overexpressing cells and in NPC1-deficient cells. Consequently, MLN64 expression was increased in NPC1-deficient cells and reduction of its expression restore mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide levels. Our findings suggest that MLN64 overexpression induces an increase in mitochondrial cholesterol content and consequently a decrease in mitochondrial GSH content leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, we demonstrate that MLN64 expression is increased in NPC cells and plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria.

  4. MLN64 induces mitochondrial dysfunction associated with increased mitochondrial cholesterol content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa, Elisa; Castro, Juan; Pinochet, María-José; Cancino, Gonzalo I; Matías, Nuria; José Sáez, Pablo; Martínez, Alexis; Álvarez, Alejandra R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernandez-Checa, José C; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2017-08-01

    MLN64 is a late endosomal cholesterol-binding membrane protein that has been implicated in cholesterol transport from endosomal membranes to the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, in toxin-induced resistance, and in mitochondrial dysfunction. Down-regulation of MLN64 in Niemann-Pick C1 deficient cells decreased mitochondrial cholesterol content, suggesting that MLN64 functions independently of NPC1. However, the role of MLN64 in the maintenance of endosomal cholesterol flow and intracellular cholesterol homeostasis remains unclear. We have previously described that hepatic MLN64 overexpression increases liver cholesterol content and induces liver damage. Here, we studied the function of MLN64 in normal and NPC1-deficient cells and we evaluated whether MLN64 overexpressing cells exhibit alterations in mitochondrial function. We used recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer to overexpress MLN64 in mouse liver and hepatic cells; and RNA interference to down-regulate MLN64 in NPC1-deficient cells. In MLN64-overexpressing cells, we found increased mitochondrial cholesterol content and decreased glutathione (GSH) levels and ATPase activity. Furthermore, we found decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation and increased mitochondrial superoxide levels in MLN64-overexpressing cells and in NPC1-deficient cells. Consequently, MLN64 expression was increased in NPC1-deficient cells and reduction of its expression restore mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide levels. Our findings suggest that MLN64 overexpression induces an increase in mitochondrial cholesterol content and consequently a decrease in mitochondrial GSH content leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, we demonstrate that MLN64 expression is increased in NPC cells and plays a key role in cholesterol transport into the mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Hemodiafiltration using pre-dilutional on-line citrate dialysate: A new technique for regional citrate anticoagulation: A feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhouane Bousselmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, observational, feasibility study was carried out on four patients with end-stage renal failure undergoing bicarbonate hemodialysis to study the feasibility of an on-line hemodiafiltration technique using a citrate dialysate with pre-dilutional infusion of citrate as a technique for regional citrate anticoagulation. All patients had contraindication to systemic heparin anticoagulation. The dialysis technique consisted of an on-line hemodiafiltration with a citrate dialysate without calcium using a Fresenius 4008S dialysis machine and Fresenius Polysulfone F60 dialyzers. The infusion solution was procured directly from the dialysate and was infused into the arterial line. To avoid the risk of hypocalcemia, calcium gluconate was infused to the venous return line. The study was carried out in two stages. During the first stage, the citrate infusion rate was 80 mL/min and the calcium infusion rate was 9 mmol/h. At the second stage, the rates were 100 mL/min and 11 mmol/h, respectively. The primary endpoint of this study was the incidence of thrombosis in the extracorporeal blood circuit and/or the dialyzer. A total of 78 sessions were conducted. All the sessions were well tolerated clinically and there were no major incidents in any of the four patients. At the first stage of the study, there were five incidences of small clots in the venous blood chamber, an incidence of extracorporeal blood circuit thrombosis of 12.5%. At the second stage of the study, no cases of extracorporeal blood circuit or dialyzer thrombosis were noted. Hemodiafiltration with on-line citrate dialysate infusion to the arterial line is safe and allows an effective regional anticoagulation of the extracorporeal blood circuit without the need for systemic anticoagulation.

  6. A test of the citrate method of PMI estimation from skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah J; Christensen, Angi M

    2017-01-01

    Citrate content in bone has been shown to be associated with the postmortem interval (PMI), with citrate decreasing after death as a function of time. Here we test this method using porcine ribs for the period of 1-165days after death, and also assess citrate content and variation from samples placed into two different postmortem environments (terrestrial and aquatic). Higher citrate variation, lower citrate recovery, and a weaker association with time were found in this study as compared to others. Citrate content, however, was found to decrease with increasing PMI, and the method was found to be easy and inexpensive to apply. No significant differences were found in citrate loss between terrestrial and aquatic environments. Although more research is needed, citrate content appears to be a promising new approach in estimating PMI from skeletal remains. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-González, Carmen; Moukadiri, Ismaïl; Villarroya, Magda; López-Pascual, Ernesto; Tuck, Simon; Armengod, M-Eugenia

    2017-07-01

    Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs). Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively) exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the pathological phenotype

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed.

  9. Aspirin increases mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppala, Radha; Dudiak, Brianne; Beck, Megan E; Bharathi, Sivakama S; Zhang, Yuxun; Stolz, Donna B; Goetzman, Eric S

    2017-01-08

    The metabolic effects of salicylates are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of aspirin on fatty acid oxidation. Aspirin increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation, but inhibited peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation, in two different cell lines. Aspirin increased mitochondrial protein acetylation and was found to be a stronger acetylating agent in vitro than acetyl-CoA. However, aspirin-induced acetylation did not alter the activity of fatty acid oxidation proteins, and knocking out the mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 did not affect the induction of long-chain fatty acid oxidation by aspirin. Aspirin did not change oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids, which can freely traverse the mitochondrial membrane. Together, these data indicate that aspirin does not directly alter mitochondrial matrix fatty acid oxidation enzymes, but most likely exerts its effects at the level of long-chain fatty acid transport into mitochondria. The drive on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation may be a compensatory response to altered mitochondrial morphology and inhibited electron transport chain function, both of which were observed after 24 h incubation of cells with aspirin. These studies provide insight into the pathophysiology of Reye Syndrome, which is known to be triggered by aspirin ingestion in patients with fatty acid oxidation disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Melatonin in Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Related Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatramanujam Srinivasan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered one of the major causative factors in the aging process, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, septic shock, and neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and Huntington's disease (HD. Increased free radical generation, enhanced mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase activity, enhanced NO production, decreased respiratory complex activity, impaired electron transport system, and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore all have been suggested as factors responsible for impaired mitochondrial function. Melatonin, the major hormone of the pineal gland, also acts as an antioxidant and as a regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetic function. Both in vitro and in vivo, melatonin was effective for preventing oxidative stress/nitrosative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction seen in experimental models of PD, AD, and HD. In addition, melatonin is known to retard aging and to inhibit the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R lesions by maintaining respiratory complex activities, electron transport chain, and ATP production in mitochondria. Melatonin is selectively taken up by mitochondrial membranes, a function not shared by other antioxidants. Melatonin has thus emerged as a major potential therapeutic tool for treating neurodegenerative disorders such as PD or AD, and for preventing the lethal effects of septic shock or I/R.

  11. Enhanced citrate production through gene insertion in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongh, Wian de; Nielsen, Jens

    2007-01-01

    The effect of inserting genes involved in the reductive branch of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle on citrate production by Aspergillus niger was evaluated. Several different genes were inserted individually and in combination, i.e. malate dehydrogenase (mdh2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two...

  12. Genetics of mesophilic citrate fermenting lactic acid bacteria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David, S.

    1992-01-01

    A prerequisite for the stabilization of important features, such as aroma production, in starter strains used in dairy fermentations, is an extensive knowledge of the genetic basis of these properties. In this thesis the genetic basis of citrate metabolism in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis var. di

  13. Polymeric architectures of bismuth citrate based on dimeric building blocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Four bismuth complexes, (H2En)[Bi2(cit)2(H2O)4/3]·(H2O)x (1), (H2En)3[Bi2(cit)2Cl4]·(H2O)x (2), (HPy)2[Bi2(cit)2(H2O)8/5]·(H2O)x (3) and (H2En)[Bi2(cit)2](H2O)x (4) [cit = citrate4-; En = ethylenediamine; Py = pyridine] have been synthesized and crystallized. The crystal structures reveal that the basic building blocks in all of these complexes are bismuth citrate dimeric units which combine to form polymeric architectures. The embedded protonated ethylenediamine and pyridine moieties in the polymeric frameworks have been identified by X-ray crystallography and solid-state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C NMR. Based on the framework of complex 1, a structural model of a clinically used antiulcer drug, ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC) was generated. The behavior of the protonated amine-bismuth citrate complexes in acidic aqueous solution has been studied by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

  14. Acute effect of citrate bath on postdialysis alkalaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia De Sequera Ortiz

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Dialysis with citrate provides better control of postdialysis acid-base balance, decreases/avoids postdialysis alkalaemia, and lowers the increase in Cac and Cai. This finding is of special interest in patients with predisposing factors for arrhythmia and patients with respiratory failure, carbon dioxide retention, calcifications and advanced liver disease.

  15. {sup 14}N NQR spectrum of sildenafil citrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, David, E-mail: david.stephenson@sta.uwi.edu; Singh, Nadia [University of the West Indies, Chemistry Department (Trinidad and Tobago)

    2015-04-15

    The {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectrum of sildenafil citrate tablets has been recorded allowing the quadrupole coupling constants and asymmetry parameters of all six unique nitrogen atoms in its structure to be determined. A density function calculation gives results that are largely in agreement with the experimental values.

  16. NFU1 gene mutation and mitochondrial disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin G Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial respiratory chains consist of approximately 100 structural proteins. Thirteen of these structural proteins are encoded by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, and the others by nuclear DNA (nDNA. Mutation in any of the mitochondrial structural-protein related genes, regardless of whether they are in the nDNA or mtDNA, might cause mitochondrial disorders. In the recent past, new nuclear genes required for assembly, maintenance, and translation of respiratory chain proteins have been found. Mutation in these genes might also cause mitochondrial disorders (MD. NFU1 gene is one of such genes and has a role in the assembly of iron–sulfur cluster (ISC. ISCs are included in a variety of metalloproteins, such as the ferredoxins, as well as in enzymatic reactions and have been first identified in the oxidation-reduction reactions of mitochondrial electron transport. It is important to be aware of NFU1 gene mutations that may cause severe mitochondrial respiratory chain defects, mitochondrial encephalomyopathies and death, early in life.

  17. Mayenite Synthesized Using the Citrate Sol-Gel Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ude, Sabina N [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Jones, Gregory L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A citrate sol-gel method has been used to synthesize mayenite (Ca12Al14O33). X-ray powder diffraction data show that the samples synthesized using the citrate sol-gel method contained CaAl2O4 and CaCO3 along with mayenite when fired ex-situ in air at 800 C but were single phase when fired at 900 C and above. Using high temperature x-ray diffraction, data collected in-situ in air at temperatures of 600 C and below showed only amorphous content; however, data collected at higher temperatures indicated the first phase to crystallize is CaCO3. High temperature x-ray diffraction data collected in 4% H2/96% N2 does not show the presence of CaCO3, and Ca12Al14O33 starts to form around 850 C. In comparison, x-ray powder diffraction data collected ex-situ on samples synthesized using traditional solid-state synthesis shows that single phase was not reached until samples were fired at 1350 C. DTA/TGA data collected either in a nitrogen environment or air on samples synthesized using the citrate gel method suggest the complete decomposition of metastable phases and the formation of mayenite at 900 C, although the phase evolution is very different depending on the environment. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements showed a slightly higher surface area of 7.4 0.1 m2/g in the citrate gel synthesized samples compared to solid-state synthesized sample with a surface area of 1.61 0.02 m2/g. SEM images show a larger particle size for samples synthesized using the solid-state method compared to those synthesized using the citrate gel method.

  18. Exercise Training Alleviates Hypoxia-induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in the Lymphocytes of Sedentary Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsing-Hua; Chang, Shao-Chiang; Chou, Cheng-Hsien; Weng, Tzu-Pin; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2016-01-01

    This study elucidates how interval and continuous exercise regimens affect the mitochondrial functionality of lymphocytes under hypoxic stress. Sixty healthy sedentary males were randomly assigned to engage in either high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 3 min intervals at 80% and 40% VO2max, n = 20) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT, sustained 60% VO2max, n = 20) for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks or were assigned to a control group that did not receive exercise intervention (n = 20). Lymphocyte phenotypes/mitochondrial functionality under hypoxic exercise (HE, 100 W under 12% O2) were determined before and after the various interventions. Before the intervention, HE (i) increased the mobilization of senescent (CD57+/CD28−) lymphocytes into the blood, (ii) decreased the ATP-linked O2 consumption rate (OCR), the reserve capacity of OCR, and the citrate synthase activity in the mitochondria, and (iii) lowered the mitochondrial membrane potential (MP) and elevated the matrix oxidant burden (MOB) of lymphocytes. However, both HIIT and MICT significantly (i) decreased blood senescent lymphocyte counts, (ii) enhanced the mitochondrial OCR with increased citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase activities, (iii) increased mitochondrial MP and decreased MOB and (iv) increased the ratio of mitofusin to DRP-1 in lymphocytes after HE. Thus, we concluded that either HIIT or MICT effectively improves lymphocyte mitochondrial functionality by enhancing oxidative phosphorylation and suppressing oxidative damage under hypoxic conditions. PMID:27731374

  19. Exercise Training Alleviates Hypoxia-induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in the Lymphocytes of Sedentary Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsing-Hua; Chang, Shao-Chiang; Chou, Cheng-Hsien; Weng, Tzu-Pin; Hsu, Chih-Chin; Wang, Jong-Shyan

    2016-10-12

    This study elucidates how interval and continuous exercise regimens affect the mitochondrial functionality of lymphocytes under hypoxic stress. Sixty healthy sedentary males were randomly assigned to engage in either high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 3 min intervals at 80% and 40% VO2max, n = 20) or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT, sustained 60% VO2max, n = 20) for 30 min/day, 5 days/week for 6 weeks or were assigned to a control group that did not receive exercise intervention (n = 20). Lymphocyte phenotypes/mitochondrial functionality under hypoxic exercise (HE, 100 W under 12% O2) were determined before and after the various interventions. Before the intervention, HE (i) increased the mobilization of senescent (CD57(+)/CD28(-)) lymphocytes into the blood, (ii) decreased the ATP-linked O2 consumption rate (OCR), the reserve capacity of OCR, and the citrate synthase activity in the mitochondria, and (iii) lowered the mitochondrial membrane potential (MP) and elevated the matrix oxidant burden (MOB) of lymphocytes. However, both HIIT and MICT significantly (i) decreased blood senescent lymphocyte counts, (ii) enhanced the mitochondrial OCR with increased citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase activities, (iii) increased mitochondrial MP and decreased MOB and (iv) increased the ratio of mitofusin to DRP-1 in lymphocytes after HE. Thus, we concluded that either HIIT or MICT effectively improves lymphocyte mitochondrial functionality by enhancing oxidative phosphorylation and suppressing oxidative damage under hypoxic conditions.

  20. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs of human genes required for mitochondrial tRNA modification cause similar electron transport chain defects but different nuclear responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Navarro-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Several oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS diseases are caused by defects in the post-transcriptional modification of mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs. Mutations in MTO1 or GTPBP3 impair the modification of the wobble uridine at position 5 of the pyrimidine ring and cause heart failure. Mutations in TRMU affect modification at position 2 and cause liver disease. Presently, the molecular basis of the diseases and why mutations in the different genes lead to such different clinical symptoms is poorly understood. Here we use Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism to investigate how defects in the TRMU, GTPBP3 and MTO1 orthologues (designated as mttu-1, mtcu-1, and mtcu-2, respectively exert their effects. We found that whereas the inactivation of each C. elegans gene is associated with a mild OXPHOS dysfunction, mutations in mtcu-1 or mtcu-2 cause changes in the expression of metabolic and mitochondrial stress response genes that are quite different from those caused by mttu-1 mutations. Our data suggest that retrograde signaling promotes defect-specific metabolic reprogramming, which is able to rescue the OXPHOS dysfunction in the single mutants by stimulating the oxidative tricarboxylic acid cycle flux through complex II. This adaptive response, however, appears to be associated with a biological cost since the single mutant worms exhibit thermosensitivity and decreased fertility and, in the case of mttu-1, longer reproductive cycle. Notably, mttu-1 worms also exhibit increased lifespan. We further show that mtcu-1; mttu-1 and mtcu-2; mttu-1 double mutants display severe growth defects and sterility. The animal models presented here support the idea that the pathological states in humans may initially develop not as a direct consequence of a bioenergetic defect, but from the cell's maladaptive response to the hypomodification status of mt-tRNAs. Our work highlights the important association of the defect-specific metabolic rewiring with the

  1. Barth syndrome: cellular compensation of mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis inhibition due to changes in cardiolipin remodeling linked to tafazzin (TAZ) gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalvez, François; D'Aurelio, Marilena; Boutant, Marie; Moustapha, Aoula; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Landes, Thomas; Arnauné-Pelloquin, Laeticia; Vial, Guillaume; Taleux, Nellie; Slomianny, Christian; Wanders, Ronald J; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Bellenguer, Pascale; Møller, Ian Max; Gottlieb, Eyal; Vaz, Frederic M; Manfredi, Giovanni; Petit, Patrice X

    2013-08-01

    Cardiolipin is a mitochondrion-specific phospholipid that stabilizes the assembly of respiratory chain complexes, favoring full-yield operation. It also mediates key steps in apoptosis. In Barth syndrome, an X chromosome-linked cardiomyopathy caused by tafazzin mutations, cardiolipins display acyl chain modifications and are present at abnormally low concentrations, whereas monolysocardiolipin accumulates. Using immortalized lymphoblasts from Barth syndrome patients, we showed that the production of abnormal cardiolipin led to mitochondrial alterations. Indeed, the lack of normal cardiolipin led to changes in electron transport chain stability, resulting in cellular defects. We found a destabilization of the supercomplex (respirasome) I+III2+IVn but also decreased amounts of individual complexes I and IV and supercomplexes I+III and III+IV. No changes were observed in the amounts of individual complex III and complex II. We also found decreased levels of complex V. This complex is not part of the supercomplex suggesting that cardiolipin is required not only for the association/stabilization of the complexes into supercomplexes but also for the modulation of the amount of individual respiratory chain complexes. However, these alterations were compensated by an increase in mitochondrial mass, as demonstrated by electron microscopy and measurements of citrate synthase activity. We suggest that this compensatory increase in mitochondrial content prevents a decrease in mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis in the cells. We also show, by extensive flow cytometry analysis, that the type II apoptosis pathway was blocked at the mitochondrial level and that the mitochondria of patients with Barth syndrome cannot bind active caspase-8. Signal transduction is thus blocked before any mitochondrial event can occur. Remarkably, basal levels of superoxide anion production were slightly higher in patients' cells than in control cells as previously evidenced via an increased

  2. Mitochondrial Morphology and Fundamental Parameters of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Are Altered in Caenorhabditis elegans Strains Deficient in Mitochondrial Dynamics and Homeostasis Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Rooney, John P; Kubik, Laura L; Gonzalez, Claudia P; Song, Dong Hoon; Meyer, Joel N

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to myriad human diseases and toxicant exposures, highlighting the need for assays capable of rapidly assessing mitochondrial health in vivo. Here, using the Seahorse XFe24 Analyzer and the pharmacological inhibitors dicyclohexylcarbodiimide and oligomycin (ATP-synthase inhibitors), carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (mitochondrial uncoupler) and sodium azide (cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor), we measured the fundamental parameters of mitochondrial respiratory chain function: basal oxygen consumption, ATP-linked respiration, maximal respiratory capacity, spare respiratory capacity and proton leak in the model organism Caenhorhabditis elegans. Since mutations in mitochondrial homeostasis genes cause mitochondrial dysfunction and have been linked to human disease, we measured mitochondrial respiratory function in mitochondrial fission (drp-1)-, fusion (fzo-1)-, mitophagy (pdr-1, pink-1)-, and electron transport chain complex III (isp-1)-deficient C. elegans. All showed altered function, but the nature of the alterations varied between the tested strains. We report increased basal oxygen consumption in drp-1; reduced maximal respiration in drp-1, fzo-1, and isp-1; reduced spare respiratory capacity in drp-1 and fzo-1; reduced proton leak in fzo-1 and isp-1; and increased proton leak in pink-1 nematodes. As mitochondrial morphology can play a role in mitochondrial energetics, we also quantified the mitochondrial aspect ratio for each mutant strain using a novel method, and for the first time report increased aspect ratios in pdr-1- and pink-1-deficient nematodes.

  3. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. cytochrome c oxidase | NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV | amino acids | citrate synthase

  4. Obesity augments the age-induced increase in mitochondrial capacity for H(2) O(2) release in Zucker fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jeppesen, Jacob; Madsen, K;

    2012-01-01

    determined and related to citrate synthase activity to determine intrinsic mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial-specific super-oxide dismuthase (MnSOD) protein content was determined in isolated mitochondria and muscle homogenate. Catalase protein content was determined in muscle homogenate. Results: Young...... was associated with increased mitochondrial hydrogenperoxide release. MnSOD tended to be higher in the obese strain in the isolated mitochondria. Regardless of age, catalase protein content was significantly lower in the obese rats. Conclusions: This study shows that the augmented increase in obesity and insulin...

  5. Towards a functional definition of the mitochondrial human proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Fasano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial human proteome project (mt-HPP was initiated by the Italian HPP group as a part of both the chromosome-centric initiative (C-HPP and the “biology and disease driven” initiative (B/D-HPP. In recent years several reports highlighted how mitochondrial biology and disease are regulated by specific interactions with non-mitochondrial proteins. Thus, it is of great relevance to extend our present view of the mitochondrial proteome not only to those proteins that are encoded by or transported to mitochondria, but also to their interactors that take part in mitochondria functionality. Here, we propose a graphical representation of the functional mitochondrial proteome by retrieving mitochondrial proteins from the NeXtProt database and adding to the network their interactors as annotated in the IntAct database. Notably, the network may represent a reference to map all the proteins that are currently being identified in mitochondrial proteomics studies.

  6. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca(2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santo-Domingo, Jaime; Wiederkehr, Andreas; De Marchi, Umberto

    2015-11-26

    Mitochondria sense, shape and integrate signals, and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca(2+) waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance, the molecular nature of the proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and down-stream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio, but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state, which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redox-sensitive sensors, real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca(2+) combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca(2+) and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review, we describe mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings, revealing how mitochondrial Ca(2+) influences the matrix redox state. As a result, mitochondrial Ca(2+) is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  7. Modulation of the matrix redox signaling by mitochondrial Ca2+

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jaime; Santo-Domingo; Andreas; Wiederkehr; Umberto; De; Marchi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria sense,shape and integrate signals,and thus function as central players in cellular signal transduction. Ca2+ waves and redox reactions are two such intracellular signals modulated by mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ transport is of utmost physio-pathological relevance with a strong impact on metabolism and cell fate. Despite its importance,the molecular nature of the proteins involvedin mitochondrial Ca2+ transport has been revealed only recently. Mitochondrial Ca2+ promotes energy metabolism through the activation of matrix dehydrogenases and downstream stimulation of the respiratory chain. These changes also alter the mitochondrial NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio,but at the same time will increase reactive oxygen species(ROS) production. Reducing equivalents and ROS are having opposite effects on the mitochondrial redox state,which are hard to dissect. With the recent development of genetically encoded mitochondrial-targeted redoxsensitive sensors,real-time monitoring of matrix thiol redox dynamics has become possible. The discoveries of the molecular nature of mitochondrial transporters of Ca2+ combined with the utilization of the novel redox sensors is shedding light on the complex relation between mitochondrial Ca2+ and redox signals and their impact on cell function. In this review,we describe mitochondrial Ca2+ handling,focusing on a number of newly identified proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and release. We further discuss our recent findings,revealing how mitochondrial Ca2+ influences the matrix redox state. As a result,mitochondrial Ca2+ is able to modulate the many mitochondrial redox-regulated processes linked to normal physiology and disease.

  8. Characteristics of mitochondrial calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Taku; Tomita, Hiroshi; Tamai, Makoto; Ishiguro, Sei-Ichi

    2007-09-01

    Calpains are considered to be cytoplasmic enzymes, although several studies have shown that calpain-like protease activities also exist in mitochondria. We partially purified mitochondrial calpain from swine liver mitochondria and characterized. Only one type of mitochondrial calpain was detected by the column chromatographies. The mitochondrial calpain was stained with anti-mu-calpain and calpain small subunit antibodies. The susceptibility of mitochondrial calpain to calpain inhibitors and the optimum pH differ from those of cytosolic mu- and m-calpains. The Ca(2+)-dependency of mitochondrial calpain was similar to that of cytosolic mu-calpain. Therefore, we named the protease mitochondrial mu-like calpain. In zymogram analysis, two types of caseinolytic enzymes existed in mitochondria and showed different mobilities from cytosolic mu- and m-calpains. The upper major band was stained with anti-mu-calpain and calpain small subunit antibodies (mitochondrial calpain I, mitochondrial mu-like calpain). The lower band was stained only with anti-calpain small subunit antibody (mitochondrial calpain II, unknown mitochondrial calpain). Calpastatin was not detected in mitochondrial compartments. The mitochondrial calpain processed apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to truncated AIF (tAIF), releasing tAIF into the intermembrane space. These results indicate that mitochondrial calpain, which differs from mu- and m-calpains, seems to be a ubiquitous calpain and may play a role in mitochondrial apoptotic signalling.

  9. Metformin-clomiphene citrate vs. clomiphene citrate alone: Polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqueela Ayaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the commonest endocrinopathy in women that is associated with reproductive and metabolic disorders. Objectives: We compared the ovulation and conception rates after the treatment with clomiphene citrate (CC alone and in combination with metformin in infertile patients presented with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled trial of independent cases and controls was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hera General Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia from February 01 to December 31, 2008. The 42 subjects diagnosed as PCOS were divided into group A and B (21 subjects in each for management with CC + metformin and CC alone, respectively. Group A received 500 mg three times a day of metformin continuously from the first cycle for 6 months or till pregnancy was confirmed. In both groups CC was started at a dose of 50 mg from day-2 till day-6 of the menstrual cycle. The dose of CC was increased to 100 mg in second and 150 mg in third cycle, and then remained 150 mg for the remaining three cycles. With ovulation the dose of CC was unaltered in both groups. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 16. Results: More than 50% females in both groups were had body mass index > 25. Group A achieved high rate of regular cycles, ovulation success, and conception than group B (71.4% vs. 38.1%; P = 0.03, (76.2% vs. 38.1%; P = 0.021, and (66.6% vs. 28.6%; P = 0.01, respectively. Conclusion: Management with metformin + CC increased the ovulation and conception rates.

  10. Transposon-mediated alteration of TaMATE1B expression in wheat confers constitutive citrate efflux from root apices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovkach, Andriy; Ryan, Peter R; Richardson, Alan E; Lewis, David C; Rathjen, Tina M; Ramesh, Sunita; Tyerman, Stephen D; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    2013-02-01

    The TaMATE1B gene (for multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) from wheat (Triticum aestivum) was isolated and shown to encode a citrate transporter that is located on the plasma membrane. TaMATE1B expression in roots was induced by iron deficiency but not by phosphorus deficiency or aluminum treatment. The coding region of TaMATE1B was identical in a genotype showing citrate efflux from root apices (cv Carazinho) to one that lacked citrate efflux (cv Egret). However, sequence upstream of the coding region differed between these two genotypes in two ways. The first difference was a single-nucleotide polymorphism located approximately 2 kb upstream from the start codon in cv Egret. The second difference was an 11.1-kb transposon-like element located 25 bp upstream of the start codon in cv Carazinho that was absent from cv Egret. The influence of these polymorphisms on TaMATE1B expression was investigated using fusions to green fluorescent protein expressed in transgenic lines of rice (Oryza sativa). Fluorescence measurements in roots of rice indicated that 1.5- and 2.3-kb regions upstream of TaMATE1B in cv Carazinho (which incorporated 3' regions of the transposon-like element) generated 20-fold greater expression in the apical 1 mm of root compared with the native promoter in cv Egret. By contrast, fluorescence in more mature tissues was similar in both cultivars. The presence of the single-nucleotide polymorphism alone consistently generated 2-fold greater fluorescence than the cv Egret promoter. We conclude that the transposon-like element in cv Carazinho extends TaMATE1B expression to the root apex, where it confers citrate efflux and enhanced aluminum tolerance.

  11. Elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs metabolic adaptations to exercise in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D Crane

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a complex phenomenon that is inherently tied to energy provision and is implicated in many metabolic disorders. Exercise training increases mitochondrial oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle yet it remains unclear if oxidative stress plays a role in regulating these adaptations. We demonstrate that the chronic elevation in mitochondrial oxidative stress present in Sod2 (+/- mice impairs the functional and biochemical mitochondrial adaptations to exercise. Following exercise training Sod2 (+/- mice fail to increase maximal work capacity, mitochondrial enzyme activity and mtDNA copy number, despite a normal augmentation of mitochondrial proteins. Additionally, exercised Sod2 (+/- mice cannot compensate for their higher amount of basal mitochondrial oxidative damage and exhibit poor electron transport chain complex assembly that accounts for their compromised adaptation. Overall, these results demonstrate that chronic skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative stress does not impact exercise induced mitochondrial biogenesis, but impairs the resulting mitochondrial protein function and can limit metabolic plasticity.

  12. Mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and longevity: a causal or protective role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, Daniel A; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Van Remmen, Holly

    2013-10-20

    Among the most highly investigated theories of aging is the mitochondrial theory of aging. The basis of this theory includes a central role for altered or compromised mitochondrial function in the pathophysiologic declines associated with aging. In general, studies in various organisms, including nematodes, rodents, and humans, have largely upheld that aging is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, results from a number of studies directly testing the mitochondrial theory of aging by modulating oxidant production or scavenging in vivo in rodents have generally been inconsistent with predictions of the theory. Interestingly, electron transport chain mutations or deletions in invertebrates and mice that causes mitochondrial dysfunction paradoxically leads to enhanced longevity, further challenging the mitochondrial theory of aging. How can mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to lifespan extension in the mitochondrial mutants, and what does it mean for the mitochondrial theory of aging? It will be important to determine the potential mechanisms that lead to enhanced longevity in the mammalian mitochondrial mutants.

  13. Integrated compound profiling screens identify the mitochondrial electron transport chain as the molecular target of the natural products manassantin, sesquicillin, and arctigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kevin; Selinger, Douglas W; Solomon, Jonathan M; Wu, Hua; Schmitt, Esther; Serluca, Fabrizio C; Curtis, Daniel; Benson, John D

    2013-01-18

    Phenotypic compound screens can be used to identify novel targets in signaling pathways and disease processes, but the usefulness of these screens depends on the ability to quickly determine the target and mechanism of action of the molecules identified as hits. One fast route to discovering the mechanism of action of a compound is to profile its properties and to match this profile with those of compounds of known mechanism of action. In this work, the Novartis collection of over 12,000 pure natural products was screened for effects on early zebrafish development. The largest phenotypic class of hits, which caused developmental arrest without necrosis, contained known electron transport chain inhibitors and many compounds of unknown mechanism of action. High-throughput transcriptional profiling revealed that these compounds are mechanistically related to one another. Metabolic and biochemical assays confirmed that all of the molecules that induced developmental arrest without necrosis inhibited the electron transport chain. These experiments demonstrate that the electron transport chain is the target of the natural products manassantin, sesquicillin, and arctigenin. The overlap between the zebrafish and transcriptional profiling screens was not perfect, indicating that multiple profiling screens are necessary to fully characterize molecules of unknown function. Together, zebrafish screening and transcriptional profiling represent sensitive and scalable approaches for identifying bioactive compounds and elucidating their mechanism of action.

  14. Production of technical-grade sodium citrate from glycerol-containing biodiesel waste by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Vinokurova, Natalia G; Lunina, Julia N; Zelenkova, Nina F; Morgunov, Igor G

    2015-10-01

    The production of technical-grade sodium citrate from the glycerol-containing biodiesel waste by Yarrowia lipolytica was studied. Batch experiments showed that citrate was actively produced within 144 h, then citrate formation decreased presumably due to inhibition of enzymes involved in this process. In contrast, when the method of repeated batch cultivation was used, the formation of citrate continued for more than 500 h. In this case, the final concentration of citrate in the culture liquid reached 79-82 g/L. Trisodium citrate was isolated from the culture liquid filtrate by the addition of a small amount of NaOH, so that the pH of the filtrate increased to 7-8. This simple and economic isolation procedure gave the yield of crude preparation containing trisodium citrate 5.5-hydrate up to 82-86%.

  15. Dynamics of the mitochondrial network during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanfer, Gil; Kornmann, Benoît

    2016-04-15

    During mitosis, cells undergo massive deformation and reorganization, impacting on all cellular structures. Mitochondria, in particular, are highly dynamic organelles, which constantly undergo events of fission, fusion and cytoskeleton-based transport. This plasticity ensures the proper distribution of the metabolism, and the proper inheritance of functional organelles. During cell cycle, mitochondria undergo dramatic changes in distribution. In this review, we focus on the dynamic events that target mitochondria during mitosis. We describe how the cell-cycle-dependent microtubule-associated protein centromeric protein F (Cenp-F) is recruited to mitochondria by the mitochondrial Rho GTPase (Miro) to promote mitochondrial transport and re-distribution following cell division.

  16. Mitochondrial dynamics in neuronal injury, development and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flippo, Kyle H; Strack, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    Mitochondria fulfill numerous cellular functions including ATP production, Ca(2+) buffering, neurotransmitter synthesis and degradation, ROS production and sequestration, apoptosis and intermediate metabolism. Mitochondrial dynamics, a collective term for the processes of mitochondrial fission, fusion and transport, governs mitochondrial function and localization within the cell. Correct balance of mitochondrial dynamics is especially important in neurons as mutations in fission and fusion enzymes cause peripheral neuropathies and impaired development of the nervous system in humans. Regulation of mitochondrial dynamics is partly accomplished through post-translational modification of mitochondrial fission and fusion enzymes, in turn influencing mitochondrial bioenergetics and transport. The importance of post-translational regulation is highlighted by numerous neurodegenerative disorders associated with post-translational modification of the mitochondrial fission enzyme Drp1. Not surprisingly, mitochondrial dynamics also play an important physiological role in the development of the nervous system and synaptic plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings underlying the mechanisms and regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in relation to neurological disease, as well as the development and plasticity of the nervous system. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Oxidation of Alpha-Ketoglutarate Is Required for Reductive Carboxylation in Cancer Cells with Mitochondrial Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Mullen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian cells generate citrate by decarboxylating pyruvate in the mitochondria to supply the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle. In contrast, hypoxia and other impairments of mitochondrial function induce an alternative pathway that produces citrate by reductively carboxylating α-ketoglutarate (AKG via NADPH-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH. It is unknown how cells generate reducing equivalents necessary to supply reductive carboxylation in the setting of mitochondrial impairment. Here, we identified shared metabolic features in cells using reductive carboxylation. Paradoxically, reductive carboxylation was accompanied by concomitant AKG oxidation in the TCA cycle. Inhibiting AKG oxidation decreased reducing equivalent availability and suppressed reductive carboxylation. Interrupting transfer of reducing equivalents from NADH to NADPH by nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase increased NADH abundance and decreased NADPH abundance while suppressing reductive carboxylation. The data demonstrate that reductive carboxylation requires bidirectional AKG metabolism along oxidative and reductive pathways, with the oxidative pathway producing reducing equivalents used to operate IDH in reverse.

  18. Aprataxin localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    aborted ligation reactions. We report herein that aprataxin localizes to mitochondria in human cells and we identify an N-terminal amino acid sequence that targets certain isoforms of the protein to this intracellular compartment. We also show that transcripts encoding this unique N-terminal stretch...... are expressed in the human brain, with highest production in the cerebellum. Depletion of aprataxin in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and primary skeletal muscle myoblasts results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which is revealed by reduced citrate synthase activity and mtDNA copy number. Moreover, mt...

  19. Mitochondrial dynamics and inherited peripheral nerve diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareyson, Davide; Saveri, Paola; Sagnelli, Anna; Piscosquito, Giuseppe

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral nerves have peculiar energetic requirements because of considerable length of axons and therefore correct mitochondria functioning and distribution along nerves is fundamental. Mitochondrial dynamics refers to the continuous change in size, shape, and position of mitochondria within cells. Abnormalities of mitochondrial dynamics produced by mutations in proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion (mitofusin-2, MFN2), fission (ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein-1, GDAP1), and mitochondrial axonal transport usually present with a Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) phenotype. MFN2 mutations cause CMT type 2A by altering mitochondrial fusion and trafficking along the axonal microtubule system. CMT2A is an axonal autosomal dominant CMT type which in most cases is characterized by early onset and rather severe course. GDAP1 mutations also alter fission, fusion and transport of mitochondria and are associated either with recessive demyelinating (CMT4A) and axonal CMT (AR-CMT2K) and, less commonly, with dominant, milder, axonal CMT (CMT2K). OPA1 (Optic Atrophy-1) is involved in fusion of mitochondrial inner membrane, and its heterozygous mutations lead to early-onset and progressive dominant optic atrophy which may be complicated by other neurological symptoms including peripheral neuropathy. Mutations in several proteins fundamental for the axonal transport or forming the axonal cytoskeleton result in peripheral neuropathy, i.e., CMT, distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) or hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), as well as in hereditary spastic paraplegia. Indeed, mitochondrial transport involves directly or indirectly components of the kinesin superfamily (KIF5A, KIF1A, KIF1B), responsible of anterograde transport, and of the dynein complex and related proteins (DYNC1H1, dynactin, dynamin-2), implicated in retrograde flow. Microtubules, neurofilaments, and chaperones such as heat shock proteins (HSPs) also have a fundamental

  20. 78 FR 34642 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... dihydrate and anhydrous forms of sodium citrate, otherwise known as citric acid sodium salt, and the monohydrate and monopotassium forms of potassium citrate.\\1\\ Sodium citrate also includes both trisodium... monosodium salt, respectively. Citric acid and sodium citrate are classifiable under 2918.14.0000 and...

  1. Renal Localization of {sup 67}Ga Citrate in Noninfectious Nephritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Wook; Jeong, Min Soo; Rhee, Sunn Kgoo; Kim, Sam Yong; Shin, Young Tai; Ro, Heung Kyu [Chungnam University College of Medicine, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-07-15

    {sup 67}Ga citrate scan has been requested for detection or follow-up of inflammatory or neoplastic disease. Visualization of {sup 67}Ga citrate in the kidneys at 48 and 72 hr post injection is usually interpreted as evidence of renal pathology. But precise mechanisms of abnormal {sup 67}Ga uptake in kidneys were unknown. We undertook a study to determine the clinical value of {sup 67}Ga citrate imaging of the kidneys in 68 patients with primary or secondary nephropathy confirmed by renal biopsy and 66 control patients without renal disease. Renal uptake in 48 to 72 hr images was graded as follows: Grade 0=background activity;1=faint uptake greater than background; 2=definite uptake, but less than lumbar vertebrae;3 same uptake as lumbar vertebrae, but less than liver; 4=same or higher uptake than liver. The results were as follows. 1) 42 of 68(62%) patients with noninfectious nephritis showed grade 2 or higher {sup 67}Ga renal uptake but only 10 percent of control patients showed similar uptake. 2) In 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 8 of 9 (89%) patients with lupus nephritis exhibited marked renal uptake. 3) 36 of 41 patients (88%) with combined nephrotic syndrome showed Grade 2 or higher renal uptake. 4) Renal {sup 67}Ga uptake was correlated with clinical severity of nephrotic syndrome determined by serum albumin level, 24 hr urine protein excretion and serum lipid levels. 5) After complete remission of nephrotic syndrome, renal uptake in all 8 patients who were initially Grade 3 or 4, decreased to Grade 1 or 0. In conclusion, we think that the mechanism of renal {sup 67}Ga uptake in nephrotic syndrome might be related to the pathogenesis of nephrotic syndrome. In systemic lupus erythematosus, {sup 67}Ga citrate scan is useful in predicting renal involvement.

  2. A multi-center comparison of diagnostic methods for the biochemical evaluation of suspected mitochondrial disorders

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A multicenter comparison of mitochondrial respiratory chain and complex V enzyme activity tests was performed. The average reproducibility of the enzyme assays is 16% in human muscle samples. In a blinded diagnostic accuracy test in patient fibroblasts and SURF1 knock-out mouse muscle, each lab made the correct diagnosis except for two complex I results. We recommend that enzyme activities be evaluated based on ratios, e.g. with complex IV or citrate synthase activity. In spite of large varia...

  3. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  4. Sildenafil citrate and uteroplacental perfusion in fetal growth restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Vahid Dastjerdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine whether the phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, Sildenafil citrate, affects uteroplacental perfusion. Materials and Methods: Based on a randomized double-blinded and placebo-controlled trial, forty one pregnant women with documented intrauterine growth retardation at 24-37 weeks of gestation were evaluated for the effect of a single dose of Sildenafil citrate on uteroplacental circulation as determined by Doppler ultrasound study of the umbilical and middle cerebral arteries. Statistical analysis included χ2 -test to compare proportions, and independent-samples t-test and paired student′s t-test to compare continuous variables. Results: Sildenafil group fetuses demonstrated a significant decrease in systolic/diastolic ratios (0.60 [SD 0.40] [95% Cl 0.37-0.84], P=0.000, and pulsatility index (0.12 [SD 0.15] [95% Cl 0.02-0.22], P=0.019 for the umbilical artery and a significant increase in middle cerebral artery pulsatility index (MCA PI (0.51 [SD 0.60] [95% Cl 0.16-0.85], P=0.008. Conclusion: Doppler velocimetry index values reflect decreased placental bed vascular resistance after Sildenafil. Sildenafil citrate can improve fetoplacental perfusion in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction. It could be a potential therapeutic strategy to improve uteroplacental blood flow in pregnancies with fetal growth restriction (FGR.

  5. Mitochondrial Composition,Function and Stress Response in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard P.Jacoby; Lei Li; Shaobai Huang; Chun Pong Lee; A.Harvey Millar; Nicolas L.Taylor

    2012-01-01

    The primary function of mitochondria is respiration,where catabolism of substrates is coupled to ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation.In plants,mitochondrial composition is relatively complex and flexible and has specific pathways to support photosynthetic processes in illuminated leaves.This review begins with outlining current models of mitochondrial composition in plant cells,with an emphasis upon the assembly of the complexes of the classical electron transport chain (ETC).Next,we focus upon the comparative analysis of mitochondrial function from different tissue types.A prominent theme in the plant mitochondrial literature involves linking mitochondrial composition to environmental stress responses,and this review then gives a detailed outline of how oxidative stress impacts upon the plant mitochondrial proteome with particular attention to the role of transition metals.This is followed by an analysis of the signaling capacity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species,which studies the transcriptional changes of stress responsive genes as a framework to define specific signals emanating from the mitochondrion.Finally,specific mitochondrial roles during exposure to harsh environments are outlined,with attention paid to mitochondrial delivery of energy and intermediates,mitochondrial support for photosynthesis,and mitochondrial processes operating within root cells that mediate tolerance to anoxia and unfavorable soil chemistries.

  6. Mitochondrial Machineries for Protein Import and Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Nils; Pfanner, Nikolaus

    2017-03-15

    Mitochondria are essential organelles with numerous functions in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Most of the >1,000 different mitochondrial proteins are synthesized as precursors in the cytosol and are imported into mitochondria by five transport pathways. The protein import machineries of the mitochondrial membranes and aqueous compartments reveal a remarkable variability of mechanisms for protein recognition, translocation, and sorting. The protein translocases do not operate as separate entities but are connected to each other and to machineries with functions in energetics, membrane organization, and quality control. Here, we discuss the versatility and dynamic organization of the mitochondrial protein import machineries. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial protein translocation is crucial for understanding the integration of protein translocases into a large network that controls organelle biogenesis, function, and dynamics. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biochemistry Volume 86 is June 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  7. Mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T

    2008-07-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last 20 years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium-dependent protein kinases that in turn activate transcription factors and coactivators such as PGC-1alpha that regulates the expression of genes coding for mitochondrial components. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis involves the balance of mitochondrial fission-fusion. Mitochondrial malfunction or defects in any of the many pathways involved in mitochondrial biogenesis can lead to degenerative diseases and possibly play an important part in aging.

  8. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Chad R.; Han, Dong-Ho; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Kim, Sang Hyun; Holloszy, John O.

    2011-01-01

    It has been reported that 30% calorie restriction (CR) for 3 mo results in large increases in mitochondrial biogenesis in heart, brain, liver, and adipose tissue, with concomitant increases in respiration and ATP synthesis. We found these results surprising, and performed this study to determine whether 30% CR does induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, and/or skeletal muscle. To this end, we measured the levels of a range of mitochondrial proteins, and mRNAs. With the exception of long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase protein level, which was increased ∼60% in adipose tissue, none of the mitochondrial proteins or mRNAs that we measured were increased in rats subjected to 30% CR for 14 wk. There was also no increase in citrate synthase activity. Because it is not possible to have an increase in mitochondria without any increase in key mitochondrial proteins, we conclude that 30% CR does not induce an increase in mitochondria in heart, brain, liver, adipose tissue, or skeletal muscle in laboratory rodents.—Hancock, C. R., Han, D.-H., Higashida, K., Kim, S. H., Holloszy, J. O. Does calorie restriction induce mitochondrial biogenesis? A reevaluation. PMID:21048043

  9. Melatonin reduces hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetic obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agil, Ahmad; El-Hammadi, Mazen; Jiménez-Aranda, Aroa; Tassi, Mohamed; Abdo, Walied; Fernández-Vázquez, Gumersindo; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-08-01

    Hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to play a role in the development of liver steatosis and insulin resistance, which are both common characteristics of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It was hypothesized that the antioxidant properties of melatonin could potentially improve the impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria in diabetic obese animals. Male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and lean littermates (ZL) were given either melatonin (10 mg/kg BW/day) orally for 6 wk (M-ZDF and M-ZL) or vehicle as control groups (C-ZDF and C-ZL). Hepatic function was evaluated by measurement of serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase levels, liver histopathology and electron microscopy, and hepatic mitochondrial functions. Several impaired functions of hepatic mitochondria were observed in C-ZDF in comparison with C-ZL rats. Melatonin treatment to ZDF rats decreases serum levels of ALT (P diabetic-induced mitochondrial abnormalities, glycogen, and lipid accumulation. Melatonin improves mitochondrial dysfunction in M-ZDF rats by increasing activities of mitochondrial citrate synthase (P melatonin augments ATP production (P melatonin reduces liver steatosis and mitochondria dysfunction in ZDF rats. Therefore, it may be beneficial in the treatment of diabesity.

  10. Effect of Hyperglycemia on Mitochondrial Respiration in Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Rasmus; Højberg, Patricia M V; Almdal, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Skeletal muscle mitochondrial content is reduced in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Whether hyperglycemia inhibits mitochondrial biogenesis and/or function is unknown. This study examined the effect of different levels of glycemia on skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in patients with T2......DM. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eleven patients with T2DM [9 males, 2 females; age, 52.8 +/- 2.5 yr (mean +/- se); body mass index, 30.2 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)] in poor glycemic control were treated with insulin aspart and NPH insulin for a median period of 46 d (range, 31-59). Mitochondrial respiration...... and citrate synthase activity (a marker of mitochondrial content) were measured before and after treatment. Eleven healthy subjects (age, 53.3 +/- 2.7 yr; body mass index, 30.6 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2)) were included as controls. RESULTS: Hemoglobin A1c (9.1 +/- 0.5 to 7.5 +/- 0.3%; P

  11. C. elegans ATAD-3 is essential for mitochondrial activity and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hoffmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian ATAD3 is a mitochondrial protein, which is thought to play an important role in nucleoid organization. However, its exact function is still unresolved. RESULTS: Here, we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans ATAD3 homologue (ATAD-3 and investigate its importance for mitochondrial function and development. We show that ATAD-3 is highly conserved among different species and RNA mediated interference against atad-3 causes severe defects, characterized by early larval arrest, gonadal dysfunction and embryonic lethality. Investigation of mitochondrial physiology revealed a disturbance in organellar structure while biogenesis and function, as indicated by complex I and citrate synthase activities, appeared to be unaltered according to the developmental stage. Nevertheless, we observed very low complex I and citrate synthase activities in L1 larvae populations in comparison to higher larval and adult stages. Our findings indicate that atad-3(RNAi animals arrest at developmental stages with low mitochondrial activity. In addition, a reduced intestinal fat storage and low lysosomal content after depletion of ATAD-3 suggests a central role of this protein for metabolic activity. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, our data clearly indicate that ATAD-3 is essential for C. elegans development in vivo. Moreover, our results suggest that the protein is important for the upregulation of mitochondrial activity during the transition to higher larval stages.

  12. CitI, a Transcription Factor Involved in Regulation of Citrate Metabolism in Lactic Acid Bacteria†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mauricio G.; Magni, Christian; de Mendoza, Diego; López, Paloma

    2005-01-01

    A large variety of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) can utilize citrate under fermentative conditions. Although much information concerning the metabolic pathways leading to citrate utilization by LAB has been gathered, the mechanisms regulating these pathways are obscure. In Weissella paramesenteroides (formerly called Leuconostoc paramesenteroides), transcription of the citMDEFCGRP citrate operon and the upstream divergent gene citI is induced by the presence of citrate in the medium. Although genetic experiments have suggested that CitI is a transcriptional activator whose activity can be modulated in response to citrate availability, specific details of the interaction between CitI and DNA remained unknown. In this study, we show that CitI recognizes two A+T-rich operator sites located between citI and citM and that the DNA-binding affinity of CitI is increased by citrate. Subsequently, this citrate signal propagation leads to the activation of the cit operon through an enhanced recruitment of RNA polymerase to its promoters. Our results indicate that the control of CitI by the cellular pools of citrate provides a mechanism for sensing the availability of citrate and adjusting the expression of the cit operon accordingly. In addition, this is the first reported example of a transcription factor directly functioning as a citrate-activated switch allowing the cell to optimize the generation of metabolic energy. PMID:16030208

  13. Ferric Citrate Controls Phosphorus and Delivers Iron in Patients on Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J.; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T.; Whittier, Frederick C.; Linfert, Douglas R.; Galphin, Claude M.; Athreya, Balaji P.; Nossuli, A. Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J.; Blumenthal, Samuel S.; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S.; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P.

    2015-01-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of −2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (Pferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; Pferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; Pagent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  14. Diversity in degrees of freedom of mitochondrial transit peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staiger, C.; Hinneburg, A.; Kloesgen, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins are synthesized in the cytosol of eukaryotic cells as precursor proteins carrying N-terminal extensions called transit peptides or presequences, which mediate their specific transport into mitochondria. However, plant cells possess a second potential target organelle

  15. 柠檬酸铅在柠檬酸钠溶液中溶解行为%Dissolution behavior of lead citrate in sodium citrate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何东升; 李巧双; 杨典奇; 杨聪; 王贤晨; 杨家宽

    2014-01-01

    Lead citrate was prepared by the reaction of lead oxide and citrate. The effects of dissolution time, dissolution tempera-ture, sodium citrate concentration, and the addition amount of citric acid on the dissolution rate of lead citrate in sodium citrate solution were investigated. Experimental results show that, dissolution temperature, sodium citrate concentration, and the addition amount of citric acid are the main influencing factors. Increasing the dissolution temperature or the sodium citrate concentration can significantly improve the dissolution rate of lead citrate. The dissolution rate of lead citrate has a positive linear relation with the dissolution tempera-ture, and the fitted linear equation is Y=0.76+0.63T. Adding citric acid can inhibit the dissolution of lead citrate.%通过氧化铅与柠檬酸反应制备了柠檬酸铅,考察了溶解时间、溶解温度、柠檬酸钠浓度和柠檬酸加入量对柠檬酸铅在柠檬酸钠溶液中溶解率的影响.结果表明:温度、柠檬酸钠浓度及柠檬酸加入量是主要影响因素,升高温度和提高柠檬酸钠浓度可显著提高柠檬酸铅溶解率;温度和溶解率呈正线性关系,拟合的线性方程为Y=0.76+0.63T;加入柠檬酸则对柠檬酸铅溶解有抑制作用.

  16. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tara D; Hylin, Michael J; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Waxham, M Neal; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  17. Fructose induces mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers apoptosis in skeletal muscle cells by provoking oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Natasha; Maurya, Chandan K; Arha, Deepti; Avisetti, Deepa R; Prathapan, Ayyappan; Raj, Palayyan S; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G; Kalivendi, Shasi V; Tamrakar, Akhilesh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance, a major characteristic of type 2 diabetes. There is evidence that oxidative stress results from the increased production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species leads to mitochondrial dysfunction, tissue damage, insulin resistance, and other complications observed in type 2 diabetes. It has been suggested that intake of high fructose contributes to insulin resistance and other metabolic disturbances. However, there is limited information about the direct effect of fructose on the mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle, the major metabolic determinant of whole body insulin activity. Here, we assessed the effect of fructose exposure on mitochondria-mediated mechanisms in skeletal muscle cells. Exposure of L6 myotubes to high fructose stimulated the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide (NO), and the expression of inducible NO synthase. Fructose-induced oxidative stress was associated with increased translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 to the nucleus, decreases in mitochondrial DNA content and mitochondrial dysfunctions, as evidenced by decreased activities of citrate synthase and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased activity of the mitochondrial respiratory complexes, and impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism. Furthermore, positive Annexin-propidium iodide staining and altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and caspases in L6 myotubes indicated that the cells progressively became apoptotic upon fructose exposure. Taken together, these findings suggest that exposure of skeletal muscle cells to fructose induced oxidative stress that decreased mitochondrial DNA content and triggered mitochondrial dysfunction, which caused apoptosis.

  18. Strokes in mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Pizova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is suggested that mitochondrial diseases might be identified in 22—33% of cryptogenic stroke cases in young subjects. The incidence of mitochondrial disorders in patients with stroke is unknown; it is 0.8 to 7.2% according to the data of some authors. The paper gives data on the prevalence, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of mitochondrial diseases, such as mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like syndrome (MELAS and insulin-like episodes; myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF syndrome, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (sporadic multisystem mitochondrial pathology.

  19. Identification of three relationships linking cadmium accumulation to cadmium tolerance and zinc and citrate accumulation in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorrig, Walid; Rouached, Aïda; Shahzad, Zaigham; Abdelly, Chedly; Davidian, Jean-Claude; Berthomieu, Pierre

    2010-10-15

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is a plant species that shows high accumulation of cadmium, a toxic heavy metal. Lettuce is therefore a good model both for identifying determinants controlling cadmium accumulation in plant tissues and for developing breeding strategies aimed at limiting cadmium accumulation in edible tissues. In this work, 14-day-old plants from three lettuce varieties were grown for 8 days on media supplemented with cadmium concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 microM. Growth, as well as Cd(2+), Zn(2+), K(+), Ca(2+), NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), phosphate, malate and citrate root an shoot contents were analyzed. The three lettuce varieties Paris Island Cos, Red Salad Bowl and Kordaat displayed differential abilities to accumulate cadmium in roots and shoots, Paris Island Cos displaying the lowest cadmium content and Kordaat the highest. From the global analysis of the three varieties, three main trends were identified. First, a common negative correlation linked cadmium tissue content and relative dry weight reduction in response to cadmium treatments in the three varieties. Second, increasing cadmium concentration in the culture medium resulted in a parallel increase in zinc tissue content in all lettuce varieties. A common strong positive correlation between cadmium and zinc contents was observed for all varieties. This suggested that systems enabling zinc and cadmium transport were induced by cadmium. Finally, the cadmium treatments had a contrasting effect on anion contents in tissues. Interestingly, citrate content in shoots was correlated with cadmium translocation from roots to shoots, suggesting that citrate might play a role in cadmium transport in the xylem vessels. Altogether, these results shed light on three main strategies developed by lettuce to cope with cadmium, which could help to develop breeding strategies aimed at limiting cadmium accumulation in lettuce.

  20. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... chromatography linked on-line with tandem mass spectrometry, have identified >400 mitochondrial proteins, including subunits of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, supercomplexes, phosphorylated proteins and oxidized proteins. The results also highlight a range of new mitochondrial proteins, new mitochondrial...... functions and possible new mechanisms for regulating mitochondrial metabolism. More than 70 identified proteins in Arabidopsis mitochondrial samples lack similarity to any protein of known function. In some cases, unknown proteins were found to form part of protein complexes, which allows a functional...

  1. Drug-induced mitochondrial neuropathy in children: a conceptual framework for critical windows of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kendall B

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial disease arises from genetic or nongenetic events that interfere either directly or indirectly with the bioenergetic function of the mitochondrion and manifest clinically in some form of metabolic disorder. In primary mitochondrial disease, the critical molecular target is one or more of the individual subunits of the respiratory complexes or their assembly and incorporation into the inner mitochondrial membrane, whereas with secondary mitochondrial disease the bioenergetic deficits are secondary to effects on targets other than the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. Primary genetic events include mutations to or altered expression of proteins targeted to the mitochondrial compartment, whether they are encoded by the nuclear or mitochondrial genome. In this review, we emphasize the occurrence of nongenetic mitochondrial disease resulting from therapeutic drug administration, review the broad scope of drugs implicated in affecting specific primary mitochondrial targets, and describe evidence demonstrating critical windows of risk for the developing neonate to drug-induced mitochondrial disease and neuropathy.

  2. Metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates mitochondrial fission in response to energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Erin Quan; Herzig, Sébastien; Courchet, Julien; Lewis, Tommy L; Losón, Oliver C; Hellberg, Kristina; Young, Nathan P; Chen, Hsiuchen; Polleux, Franck; Chan, David C; Shaw, Reuben J

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondria undergo fragmentation in response to electron transport chain (ETC) poisons and mitochondrial DNA-linked disease mutations, yet how these stimuli mechanistically connect to the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery is poorly understood. We found that the energy-sensing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is genetically required for cells to undergo rapid mitochondrial fragmentation after treatment with ETC inhibitors. Moreover, direct pharmacological activation of AMPK was sufficient to rapidly promote mitochondrial fragmentation even in the absence of mitochondrial stress. A screen for substrates of AMPK identified mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), a mitochondrial outer-membrane receptor for DRP1, the cytoplasmic guanosine triphosphatase that catalyzes mitochondrial fission. Nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic alleles of the AMPK sites in MFF revealed that it is a key effector of AMPK-mediated mitochondrial fission.

  3. Protective effect of sildenafil citrate on contralateral testis injury after unilateral testicular torsion/detorsion

    OpenAIRE

    Yíldíz,Hamit; Durmus, Ali Said; Şimşek,Halil; Yaman, Mine

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study was designed to investigate prevention of contralateral testicular injury with sildenafil citrate after unilateral testicular torsion/detorsion. METHODS: Thirty-seven adult male rats were divided into four groups: sham operated (group 1, n = 7), torsion/detorsion + saline (group 2, n = 10), torsion/detorsion + 0.7 mg of sildenafil citrate (group 3, n = 10) and torsion/detorsion + 1.4 mg of sildenafil citrate (group 4, n = 10). Unilateral testicular torsion was created b...

  4. Kif5 regulates mitochondrial movement, morphology, function and neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iworima, Diepiriye G; Pasqualotto, Bryce A; Rintoul, Gordon L

    2016-04-01

    Due to the unique architecture of neurons, trafficking of mitochondria throughout processes to regions of high energetic demand is critical to sustain neuronal health. It has been suggested that compromised mitochondrial trafficking may play a role in neurodegenerative diseases. We evaluated the consequences of disrupted kif5c-mediated mitochondrial trafficking on mitochondrial form and function in primary rat cortical neurons. Morphological changes in mitochondria appeared to be due to remodelling, a phenomenon distinct from mitochondrial fission, which resulted in punctate-shaped mitochondria. We also demonstrated that neurons displaying punctate mitochondria exhibited relatively decreased ROS and increased cellular ATP levels using ROS-sensitive GFP and ATP FRET probes, respectively. Somewhat unexpectedly, neurons overexpressing the dominant negative form of kif5c exhibited enhanced survival following excitotoxicity, suggesting that the impairment of mitochondrial trafficking conferred some form of neuroprotection. However, when neurons were exposed to H2O2, disruption of kif5c exacerbated cell death indicating that the effect on cell viability was dependent on the mode of toxicity. Our results suggest a novel role of kif5c. In addition to mediating mitochondrial transport, kif5c plays a role in the mechanism of regulating mitochondrial morphology. Our results also suggest that kif5c mediated mitochondrial dynamics may play an important role in regulating mitochondrial function and in turn cellular health. Moreover, our studies demonstrate an interesting interplay between the regulation of mitochondrial motility and morphology.

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in the limelight of Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Starkov, Anatoly A; Beal, M Flint; Thomas, Bobby

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative movement disorder with unknown etiology. It is marked by widespread neurodegeneration in the brain with profound loss of A9 midbrain dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta. Several theories of biochemical abnormalities have been linked to pathogenesis of PD of which mitochondrial dysfunction due to an impairment of mitochondrial complex I and subsequent oxidative stress seems to take the center stage in experimental models of PD and in postmortem tissues of sporadic forms of illness. Recent identification of specific gene mutations and their influence on mitochondrial functions has further reinforced the relevance of mitochondrial abnormalities in disease pathogenesis. In both sporadic and familial forms of PD abnormal mitochondrial paradigms associated with disease include impaired functioning of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, aging associated damage to mitochondrial DNA, impaired calcium buffering, and anomalies in mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. Here we provide an overview of specific mitochondrial functions affected in sporadic and familial PD that play a role in disease pathogenesis. We propose to utilize these gained insights to further streamline and focus the research to better understand mitochondria's role in disease development and exploit potential mitochondrial targets for therapeutic interventions in PD pathogenesis.

  6. Engineering genetically encoded nanosensors for real-time in vivo measurements of citrate concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Ewald

    Full Text Available Citrate is an intermediate in catabolic as well as biosynthetic pathways and is an important regulatory molecule in the control of glycolysis and lipid metabolism. Mass spectrometric and NMR based metabolomics allow measuring citrate concentrations, but only with limited spatial and temporal resolution. Methods are so far lacking to monitor citrate levels in real-time in-vivo. Here, we present a series of genetically encoded citrate sensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET. We screened databases for citrate-binding proteins and tested three candidates in vitro. The citrate binding domain of the Klebsiella pneumoniae histidine sensor kinase CitA, inserted between the FRET pair Venus/CFP, yielded a sensor highly specific for citrate. We optimized the peptide linkers to achieve maximal FRET change upon citrate binding. By modifying residues in the citrate binding pocket, we were able to construct seven sensors with different affinities spanning a concentration range of three orders of magnitude without losing specificity. In a first in vivo application we show that E. coli maintains the capacity to take up glucose or acetate within seconds even after long-term starvation.

  7. 78 FR 63228 - Determination That Potassium Citrate, 10 Milliequivalents/Packet and 20 Milliequivalents/Packet...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... management of renal tubular acidosis with calcium stones, hypocitraturic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis of any etiology, and uric acid lithiasis with or without calcium stones. Potassium Citrate, 10...

  8. Renal uptake of /sup 67/Ga-citrate in renal amyloidosis due to Familiar Mediterranean Fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzo-Marraco, J.; Abos-Olivares, M.D.; Iribar-Ibabe, M.C.; Prats-Rivera, E.; Banzo-Marraco, J.I.; Teijeiro-Vidal, J.; Nerin-Mora, E.; Nerin de la Puerta, I.

    1981-06-01

    Renal uptake of /sup 67/Ga-citrate is described in a patient with biopsy-proven amyloidosis of the kidneys, due to Familiar Mediterranean Fever. After administration 150 MBq (4mCi) /sup 67/Ga-citrate, scans were done at 48, 72, and 120 h. Intense uptake was noted in both kidneys. A renal biopsy done 5 days after the /sup 67/Ga-citrate scan revealed a pattern typical of amyloidosis. Gallium scanning can be useful in patients with fever of unknown origin. Renal amyloidosis can be considered when renal uptake of /sup 67/Ga-citrate associated with nephrotic syndrome is observed.

  9. Clinical efficacy of toothpaste containing potassium citrate in treating dentin hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ya Shen

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity in this study was 38%. The use of desensitizing toothpaste containing potassium citrate with oral hygiene instruction can effectively reduce dentin hypersensitivity.

  10. Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase II as potential control sites for ketogenesis during mitochondrion and peroxisome proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, L; Garras, A; Asins, G; Serra, D; Hegardt, F G; Berge, R K

    1999-05-01

    3-Thia fatty acids are potent hypolipidemic fatty acid derivatives and mitochondrion and peroxisome proliferators. Administration of 3-thia fatty acids to rats was followed by significantly increased levels of plasma ketone bodies, whereas the levels of plasma non-esterified fatty acids decreased. The hepatic mRNA levels of fatty acid binding protein and formation of acid-soluble products, using both palmitoyl-CoA and palmitoyl-L-carnitine as substrates, were increased. Hepatic mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) -II and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) synthase activities, immunodetectable proteins, and mRNA levels increased in parallel. In contrast, the mitochondrial CPT-I mRNA levels were unchanged and CPT-I enzyme activity was slightly reduced in the liver. The CoA ester of the monocarboxylic 3-thia fatty acid, tetradecylthioacetic acid, which accumulates in the liver after administration, inhibited the CPT-I activity in vitro, but not that of CPT-II. Acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase and HMG-CoA lyase activities involved in ketogenesis were increased, whereas the citrate synthase activity was decreased. The present data suggest that 3-thia fatty acids increase both the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria and the capacity of the beta-oxidation process. Under these conditions, the regulation of ketogenesis may be shifted to step(s) beyond CPT-I. This opens the possibility that mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and CPT-II retain some control of ketone body formation.

  11. The order of exercise during concurrent training for rehabilitation does not alter acute genetic expression, mitochondrial enzyme activity or improvements in muscle function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren G MacNeil

    Full Text Available Concurrent exercise combines different modes of exercise (e.g., aerobic and resistance into one training protocol, providing stimuli meant to increase muscle strength, aerobic capacity and mass. As disuse is associated with decrements in strength, aerobic capacity and muscle size concurrent training is an attractive modality for rehabilitation. However, interference between the signaling pathways may result in preferential improvements for one of the exercise modes. We recruited 18 young adults (10 ♂, 8 ♀ to determine if order of exercise mode during concurrent training would differentially affect gene expression, protein content and measures of strength and aerobic capacity after 2 weeks of knee-brace induced disuse. Concurrent exercise sessions were performed 3x/week for 6 weeks at gradually increasing intensities either with endurance exercise preceding (END>RES or following (RES>END resistance exercise. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis before, 3 h after the first exercise bout and 48 h after the end of training. Concurrent exercise altered the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC-1α, PRC, PPARγ, hypertrophy (PGC-1α4, REDD2, Rheb and atrophy (MuRF-1, Runx1, increased electron transport chain complex protein content, citrate synthase and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity, muscle mass, maximum isometric strength and VO 2peak. However, the order in which exercise was completed (END>RES or RES>END only affected the protein content of mitochondrial complex II subunit. In conclusion, concurrent exercise training is an effective modality for the rehabilitation of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, maximum strength, and peak aerobic capacity resulting from disuse, regardless of the order in which the modes of exercise are performed.

  12. Methodology of citrate-based biomaterial development and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M. Richard

    Biomaterials play central roles in modern strategies of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Attempts to find tissue-engineered solutions to cure various injuries or diseases have led to an enormous increase in the number of polymeric biomaterials over the past decade. The breadth of new materials arises from the multiplicity of anatomical locations, cell types, and mode of application, which all place application-specific requirements on the biomaterial. Unfortunately, many of the currently available biodegradable polymers are limited in their versatility to meet the wide range of requirements for tissue engineering. Therefore, a methodology of biomaterial development, which is able to address a broad spectrum of requirements, would be beneficial to the biomaterial field. This work presents a methodology of citrate-based biomaterial design and application to meet the multifaceted needs of tissue engineering. We hypothesize that (1) citric acid, a non-toxic metabolic product of the body (Krebs Cycle), can be exploited as a universal multifunctional monomer and reacted with various diols to produce a new class of soft biodegradable elastomers with the flexibility to tune the material properties of the resulting material to meet a wide range of requirements; (2) the newly developed citrate-based polymers can be used as platform biomaterials for the design of novel tissue engineering scaffolding; and (3) microengineering approaches in the form thin scaffold sheets, microchannels, and a new porogen design can be used to generate complex cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions to mimic tissue complexity and architecture. To test these hypotheses, we first developed a methodology of citrate-based biomaterial development through the synthesis and characterization of a family of in situ crosslinkable and urethane-doped elastomers, which are synthesized using simple, cost-effective strategies and offer a variety methods to tailor the material properties to

  13. Structures of citrate synthase and malate dehydrogenase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Davide M; Spallek, Ralf; Oehlmann, Wulf; Singh, Mahavir; Rizzi, Menico

    2015-02-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is a central metabolic pathway of all aerobic organisms and is responsible for the synthesis of many important precursors and molecules. TCA cycle plays a key role in the metabolism of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is involved in the adaptation process of the bacteria to the host immune response. We present here the first crystal structures of M. tuberculosis malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase, two consecutive enzymes of the TCA, at 2.6 Å and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively. General analogies and local differences with the previously reported homologous protein structures are described. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Bilateral cerebral hemispheric infarction associated with sildenafil citrate (Viagra) use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K-K; Kim, D G; Ku, Y H; Lee, Y J; Kim, W-C; Kim, O J; Kim, H S

    2008-03-01

    Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) is one of the frequently prescribed drugs for men with erectile dysfunction. We describe a 52-year-old man with bilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory infarction after sildenafil use. He ingested 100 mg of sildenafil and about 1 h later, he complained of chest discomfort, palpitation and dizziness followed by mental obtundation, global aphasia and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging documented acute bilateral hemispheric infarction, and cerebral angiography showed occluded bilateral MCA. Despite significant bilateral MCA stenosis and cerebral infarction, systemic hypotension persisted for a day. We presume that cerebral infarction was caused by cardioembolism with sildenafil use.

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario de la Mata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs describe a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic disorders that result from the absence or loss of function of lysosomal hydrolases or transporters, resulting in the progressive accumulation of undigested material in lysosomes. The accumulation of substances affects the function of lysosomes and other organelles, resulting in secondary alterations such as impairment of autophagy, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammation and apoptosis. LSDs frequently involve the central nervous system (CNS, where neuronal dysfunction or loss results in progressive neurodegeneration and premature death. Many LSDs exhibit signs of mitochondrial dysfunction, which include mitochondrial morphological changes, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm, diminished ATP production and increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Furthermore, reduced autophagic flux may lead to the persistence of dysfunctional mitochondria. Gaucher disease (GD, the LSD with the highest prevalence, is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene that results in defective and insufficient activity of the enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Decreased catalytic activity and/or instability of GCase leads to accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph in the lysosomes of macrophage cells and visceral organs. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been reported to occur in numerous cellular and mouse models of GD. The aim of this manuscript is to review the current knowledge and implications of mitochondrial dysfunction in LSDs.

  16. The influence of ferric (III citrate on ATP-hydrolases of Desulfuromonas acetoxidans ІМV В-7384

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Maslovska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Desulfuromonas acetoxidans obtains energy for growth by the anaerobic oxidation of organic compounds with the carbon dioxide formation. It was found that ferrum and manganese are used as terminal electron acceptors in the processes of anaerobic respiration, such as dissimilative Fe3+- and Mn4+-reduction, carried out by these bacteria (Lovely, 1991. D. acetoxidans ІМV B-7384 can be used as anode biocatalyst in microbial fuel cell with high electron recovery through acetate oxidation to the electric current as a result of electron transfer to the anode or 3d-type transition metals, such as ferrum and manganese, in the process of their reduction. Investigation of biochemical changes of D. acetoxidans ІМV B-7384 under the influence of Fe (III compounds is important for optimization of the process of bacterial electricity generation. ATP-hydrolase is located in cytoplasmic membrane, and its subunits are exposed to both the cytoplasm and the external environment. Therefore, the changes of that enzyme activity can be used as an indicator of various stress exposure. Presence of ferric iron ions in the bacterial growth medium could catalyze generation of organic reactive oxygen species, such as peroxyl (ROO- and alkoxyl (RO- radicals. Lipid peroxidation is one of the main reasons of cell damage and it’s following death under the influence of reactive oxygen metabolites. It is known that lipid peroxidation and membrane transport processes are somehow interrelated, but mechanisms of such interaction are still unidentified. In our previous researche we have shown the influence of ferric (III citrate on the intensity of lipid peroxidation of D. аcetoxidans ІМV В-7384. Significant increase of the content of lipid peroxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides, conjugated dienes and malondialdehyde in bacterial cells has been observed under the addition of ferric (III citrate into the cultural medium. The increase of the concentration of lipid

  17. Mitochondrial helicases and mitochondrial genome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamann, Maria Diget; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Kulikowicz, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Helicases are essential enzymes that utilize the energy of nucleotide hydrolysis to drive unwinding of nucleic acid duplexes. Helicases play roles in all aspects of DNA metabolism including DNA repair, DNA replication and transcription. The subcellular locations and functions of several helicases...... have been studied in detail; however, the roles of specific helicases in mitochondrial biology remain poorly characterized. This review presents important recent advances in identifying and characterizing mitochondrial helicases, some of which also operate in the nucleus....

  18. Cardiolipin and mitochondrial cristae organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikon, Nikita; Ryan, Robert O

    2017-03-20

    A fundamental question in cell biology, under investigation for over six decades, is the structural organization of mitochondrial cristae. Long known to harbor electron transport chain proteins, crista membrane integrity is key to establishment of the proton gradient that drives oxidative phosphorylation. Visualization of cristae morphology by electron microscopy/tomography has provided evidence that cristae are tube-like extensions of the mitochondrial inner membrane (IM) that project into the matrix space. Reconciling ultrastructural data with the lipid composition of the IM provides support for a continuously curved cylindrical bilayer capped by a dome-shaped tip. Strain imposed by the degree of curvature is relieved by an asymmetric distribution of phospholipids in monolayer leaflets that comprise cristae membranes. The signature mitochondrial lipid, cardiolipin (~18% of IM phospholipid mass), and phosphatidylethanolamine (34%) segregate to the negatively curved monolayer leaflet facing the crista lumen while the opposing, positively curved, matrix-facing monolayer leaflet contains predominantly phosphatidylcholine. Associated with cristae are numerous proteins that function in distinctive ways to establish and/or maintain their lipid repertoire and structural integrity. By combining unique lipid components with a set of protein modulators, crista membranes adopt and maintain their characteristic morphological and functional properties. Once established, cristae ultrastructure has a direct impact on oxidative phosphorylation, apoptosis, fusion/fission as well as diseases of compromised energy metabolism.

  19. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Diane Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 hours post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 hours. Post-TBI administration of Mdivi-1, a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the hippocampus and improved

  20. Migration-induced variation of fatty acid transporters and cellular metabolic intensity in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; King, Marisa O; Harmon, Erin; Eyster, Kathleen; Swanson, David L

    2015-10-01

    Because lipids are the main fuel supporting avian endurance activity, lipid transport and oxidation capacities may increase during migration. We measured enzyme activities, mRNA expression and protein levels in pectoralis and heart for several key steps of lipid transport and catabolism pathways to investigate whether these pathways were upregulated during migration. We used yellow-rumped (Setophaga coronata) and yellow (S. petechia) warblers and warbling vireos (Vireo gilvus) as study species because they all show migration-induced increases in organismal metabolic capacities. For yellow-rumped warblers, β-hydroxyacyl CoA-dehydrogenase (HOAD) activities and fatty acid transporter mRNA and/or protein levels were higher during spring than fall in pectoralis and heart, except that fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) protein levels showed the opposite pattern in heart. Lipid transporter protein levels, but not mRNA expression, in pectoralis and heart of warbling vireos were higher either during spring or fall than summer, but this was not true for HOAD activities. For yellow warblers, pectoralis, but not heart, protein levels of lipid transporters were upregulated during migration relative to summer, but this pattern was not evident for mRNA expression or HOAD activity. Finally, muscle and heart citrate synthase and carnitine palmitoyl transferase activities showed little seasonal variation for any species. These data suggest that pectoralis and heart lipid transport and catabolism capacities are often, but not universally, important correlates of elevated organismal metabolic capacity during migration. In contrast, migration-induced variation in cellular metabolic intensity and mitochondrial membrane transport are apparently not common correlates of the migratory phenotype in passerines.

  1. Quantification of Heteroaggregation between Citrate-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles and Hematite Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian M; Pike, Daniel J; Kelly, Michael O; Nason, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-03

    Collisions with and attachment to natural colloids (heteroaggregation) is likely to influence significantly the fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This study investigated heteroaggregation between hematite (α-Fe2O3) colloids and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (Cit-AuNPs) using a novel approach involving time-resolved dynamic light scattering and parallel experiments designed to quantify nanoparticle attachment and heteroaggregate surface charge. Experiments were performed in low ionic strength synthetic water at environmentally relevant pH in the presence and absence of Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (SRNOM). In the absence of SRNOM at pH values where Cit-AuNPs and hematite are oppositely charged, attachment efficiencies are high and Cit-AuNPs are capable of destabilizing hematite following an "electrostatic patch" mechanism. Furthermore, maximum observed surface coverages were far below those predicted by geometry alone, a fact predicted by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model that has significant implications for the estimation of heteroaggregate attachment efficiencies. At pH values where both particles are negative or in the presence of small amounts of SRNOM, attachment was minimal. Calculated attachment efficiencies using the measured surface coverages corroborate these findings. The calculation of attachment efficiencies and the identification of mechanisms governing heteroaggregation represents an important step toward predicting the transport, fate, and toxicity of ENPs in the environment.

  2. Kinetics of induced electrodeposition of alloys containing Mo from citrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltowska-Lehman, E. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Cracow (Poland)

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of Ni-Mo alloy electrodeposition from complex citrate-sulphate baths has been investigated by means of steady-state polarization measurements in a system with a rotating disk electrode (RDE). The partial current densities for deposition of Ni and Mo as a function of the solution composition, the cathode potentials and the rate of mass transport were determined. Strong interaction between the discharging metal ions occur: nickel induces molybdenum deposition, but its discharge is markedly inhibited by molybdenum. This effect, related to the formation of intermediate molybdenum oxides, becomes less pronounced when the rotation speed was increased. Hydrogen evolution is associated with molybdenum deposition. An increase of the molybdate ions concentration in the bath, as well as an increase in the rate of mass transport lead to an increase in Mo content in deposits and to the reduction of current efficiency. The surface morphology as a function of the content of molybdenum in the alloy were also investigated. Crack-free, compact, semi-bright Ni-Mo coatings, containing up to about 40 wt% of Mo, characterized by good adhesion to steel substrate were obtained. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Effect of eccentric versus concentric exercise training on mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isner-Horobeti, Marie-Eve; Rasseneur, Laurence; Lonsdorfer-Wolf, Evelyne; Dufour, Stéphane Pascal; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Bouitbir, Jamal; Zoll, Joffrey; Kapchinsky, Sophia; Geny, Bernard; Daussin, Frédéric Nicolas; Burelle, Yan; Richard, Ruddy

    2014-11-01

    The effect of eccentric (ECC) versus concentric (CON) training on metabolic properties in skeletal muscle is understood poorly. We determined the responses in oxidative capacity and mitochondrial H2 O2 production after eccentric (ECC) versus concentric (CON) training performed at similar mechanical power. Forty-eight rats performed 5- or 20-day eccentric (ECC) or concentric (CON) training programs. Mitochondrial respiration, H2 O2 production, citrate synthase activity (CS), and skeletal muscle damage were assessed in gastrocnemius (GAS), soleus (SOL) and vastus intermedius (VI) muscles. Maximal mitochondrial respiration improved only after 20 days of concentric (CON) training in GAS and SOL. H2 O2 production increased specifically after 20 days of eccentric ECC training in VI. Skeletal muscle damage occurred transiently in VI after 5 days of ECC training. Twenty days of ECC versus CON training performed at similar mechanical power output do not increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacities, but it elevates mitochondrial H2 O2 production in VI, presumably linked to transient muscle damage. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mitochondrial acclimation capacities to ocean warming and acidification are limited in the antarctic Nototheniid Fish, Notothenia rossii and Lepidonotothen squamifrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Anneli; Graeve, Martin; Poertner, Hans O; Mark, Felix C

    2013-01-01

    Antarctic notothenioid fish are characterized by their evolutionary adaptation to the cold, thermostable Southern Ocean, which is associated with unique physiological adaptations to withstand the cold and reduce energetic requirements but also entails limited compensation capacities to environmental change. This study compares the capacities of mitochondrial acclimation to ocean warming and acidification between the Antarctic nototheniid Notothenia rossii and the sub-Antarctic Lepidonotothen squamifrons, which share a similar ecology, but different habitat temperatures. After acclimation of L. squamifrons to 9°C and N. rossii to 7°C (normocapnic/hypercapnic, 0.2 kPa CO2/2000 ppm CO2) for 4-6 weeks, we compared the capacities of their mitochondrial respiratory complexes I (CI) and II (CII), their P/O ratios (phosphorylation efficiency), proton leak capacities and mitochondrial membrane fatty acid compositions. Our results reveal reduced CII respiration rates in warm-acclimated L. squamifrons and cold hypercapnia-acclimated N. rossii. Generally, L. squamifrons displayed a greater ability to increase CI contribution during acute warming and after warm-acclimation than N. rossii. Membrane unsaturation was not altered by warm or hypercapnia-acclimation in both species, but membrane fatty acids of warm-acclimated L. squamifrons were less saturated than in warm normocapnia-/hypercapnia-acclimated N. rossii. Proton leak capacities were not affected by warm or hypercapnia-acclimation of N. rossii. We conclude that an acclimatory response of mitochondrial capacities may include higher thermal plasticity of CI supported by enhanced utilization of anaplerotic substrates (via oxidative decarboxylation reactions) feeding into the citrate cycle. L. squamifrons possesses higher relative CI plasticities than N. rossii, which may facilitate the usage of energy efficient NADH-related substrates under conditions of elevated energy demand, possibly induced by ocean warming and

  5. Mitochondrial acclimation capacities to ocean warming and acidification are limited in the antarctic Nototheniid Fish, Notothenia rossii and Lepidonotothen squamifrons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Strobel

    Full Text Available Antarctic notothenioid fish are characterized by their evolutionary adaptation to the cold, thermostable Southern Ocean, which is associated with unique physiological adaptations to withstand the cold and reduce energetic requirements but also entails limited compensation capacities to environmental change. This study compares the capacities of mitochondrial acclimation to ocean warming and acidification between the Antarctic nototheniid Notothenia rossii and the sub-Antarctic Lepidonotothen squamifrons, which share a similar ecology, but different habitat temperatures. After acclimation of L. squamifrons to 9°C and N. rossii to 7°C (normocapnic/hypercapnic, 0.2 kPa CO2/2000 ppm CO2 for 4-6 weeks, we compared the capacities of their mitochondrial respiratory complexes I (CI and II (CII, their P/O ratios (phosphorylation efficiency, proton leak capacities and mitochondrial membrane fatty acid compositions. Our results reveal reduced CII respiration rates in warm-acclimated L. squamifrons and cold hypercapnia-acclimated N. rossii. Generally, L. squamifrons displayed a greater ability to increase CI contribution during acute warming and after warm-acclimation than N. rossii. Membrane unsaturation was not altered by warm or hypercapnia-acclimation in both species, but membrane fatty acids of warm-acclimated L. squamifrons were less saturated than in warm normocapnia-/hypercapnia-acclimated N. rossii. Proton leak capacities were not affected by warm or hypercapnia-acclimation of N. rossii. We conclude that an acclimatory response of mitochondrial capacities may include higher thermal plasticity of CI supported by enhanced utilization of anaplerotic substrates (via oxidative decarboxylation reactions feeding into the citrate cycle. L. squamifrons possesses higher relative CI plasticities than N. rossii, which may facilitate the usage of energy efficient NADH-related substrates under conditions of elevated energy demand, possibly induced by ocean

  6. Green synthesis of multi metal- citrate complexes and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Usha; Warkar, Sudhir G.; Kumar, Anil

    2017-04-01

    Four new multi metal-citrate complexes have been synthesized through green synthetic pathways. Their synthesis by hydrothermal route in the present research is decorated with features such as, a simple one pot synthesis, cost effectiveness, easy to scale up for commercial production, efficient synthesis conditions like mild temperature and shorter duration which further rules out the possibility of forming byproducts which may cause damage to the environment and being environmental benign as it eliminates the use and recovery of harmful organic solvents such as N, N- dimethyl formamide and N, N- diethyl formamide, used by the researchers in the past during the synthesis of similar metal- organic framework complexes. All four complexes are well defined crystalline materials with polynuclear multi metal-citrate framework having cubic crystal structure as indicated by their Powder X-ray Diffraction patterns. These complexes have been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric analysis and Powder XRD techniques.

  7. Formulation, Characterization and Physicochemical Evaluation of Potassium Citrate Effervescent Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Fattahi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to design and formulation of potassium citrate effervescent tablet for reduction of calcium oxalate and urate kidney stones in patients suffering from kidney stones. Methods: In this study, 13 formulations were prepared from potassium citrate and effervescent base in different concentration. The flowability of powders and granules was studied. Then effervescent tablets were prepared by direct compression, fusion and wet granulation methods. The prepared tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, effervescent time, pH, content uniformity. To amend taste of formulations, different flavoring agents were used and then panel test was done by using Latin Square method by 30 volunteers. Results: Formulations obtained from direct compression and fusion methods had good flow but low hardness. Wet granulation improves flowability and other physicochemical properties such as acceptable hardness, effervescence time ≤3 minutes, pH<6, friability < 1%, water percentage < 0.5% and accurate content uniformity. In panel test, both of combination flavors; (orange - lemon and (strawberry - raspberry had good acceptability. Conclusion: The prepared tablets by wet granulation method using PVP solution had more tablet hardness. It is a reproducible process and suitable to produce granules that are compressed into effervescent tablets due to larger agglomerates.

  8. Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Francisca; Moraes, Carlos T.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is a complex process involving the coordinated expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the import of the products of the latter into the organelle and turnover. The mechanisms associated with these events have been intensively studied in the last twenty years and our understanding of their details is much improved. Mitochondrial biogenesis requires the participation of calcium signaling that activates a series of calcium dependent protein kinases that in turn a...

  9. Progress in mitochondrial epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manev, Hari; Dzitoyeva, Svetlana

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria, intracellular organelles with their own genome, have been shown capable of interacting with epigenetic mechanisms in at least four different ways. First, epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of nuclear genome influence mitochondria by modulating the expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Second, a cell-specific mitochondrial DNA content (copy number) and mitochondrial activity determine the methylation pattern of nuclear genes. Third, mitochondrial DNA variants influence the nuclear gene expression patterns and the nuclear DNA (ncDNA) methylation levels. Fourth and most recent line of evidence indicates that mitochondrial DNA similar to ncDNA also is subject to epigenetic modifications, particularly by the 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine marks. The latter interaction of mitochondria with epigenetics has been termed 'mitochondrial epigenetics'. Here we summarize recent developments in this particular area of epigenetic research. Furthermore, we propose the term 'mitoepigenetics' to include all four above-noted types of interactions between mitochondria and epigenetics, and we suggest a more restricted usage of the term 'mitochondrial epigenetics' for molecular events dealing solely with the intra-mitochondrial epigenetics and the modifications of mitochondrial genome.

  10. [Mitochondrial and oocyte development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei-Ping; Ren, Zhao-Rui

    2007-12-01

    Oocyte development and maturation is a complicated process. The nuclear maturation and cytoplasmic maturation must synchronize which can ensure normal oocyte fertilization and following development. Mitochondrial is the most important cellular organell in cytoplasm, and the variation of its distribution during oocyte maturation, the capacity of OXPHOS generating ATP as well as the content or copy number or transcription level of mitochondrial DNA play an important role in oocyte development and maturation. Therefore, the studies on the variation of mitochondrial distribution, function and mitochondrial DNA could enhance our understanding of the physiology of reproduction and provide new insight to solve the difficulties of assisted reproduction as well as cloning embryo technology.

  11. Sexual Dimorphism in the Alterations of Cardiac Muscle Mitochondrial Bioenergetics Associated to the Ageing Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colom, Bartomeu; Oliver, Jordi; Garcia-Palmer, Francisco J

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of cardiac disease is age and sex dependent, but the mechanisms governing these associations remain poorly understood. Mitochondria are the organelles in charge of producing energy for the cells, and their malfunction has been linked to cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Interestingly, heart mitochondrial content and functionality are also age and sex dependent. Here we investigated the combinatory effects of age and sex in mitochondrial bioenergetics that could help to understand their role on cardiac disease. Cardiac mitochondria from 6- and 24-month-old male and female Wistar rats were isolated, and the enzymatic activities of the oxidative-phosphorylative complexes I, III, and IV and ATPase, as well as the protein levels of complex IV, β-ATPase, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were measured. Furthermore, heart DNA content, citrate synthase activity, mitochondrial protein content, oxygen consumption, and H2O2 generation were also determined. Results showed a reduction in heart mitochondrial mass and functionality with age that correlated with increased H2O2 generation. Moreover, sex-dependent differences were found in several of these parameters. In particular, old females exhibited a significant loss of mitochondrial function and increased relative H2O2 production compared with their male counterparts. The results demonstrate a sex dimorphism in the age-associated defects on cardiac mitochondrial function.

  12. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  13. The transport of sulphate and sulphite in rat liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, M; Palmieri, F; Capano, M; Quagliariello, E

    1974-07-01

    1. The mechanism of sulphite and sulphate permeation into rat liver mitochondria was investigated. 2. Extramitochondrial sulphite and sulphate elicit efflux of intramitochondrial phosphate, malate, succinate and malonate. The sulphate-dependent effluxes and the sulphite-dependent efflux of dicarboxylate anions are inhibited by butylmalonate, phenylsuccinate and mersalyl. Inhibition of the phosphate efflux produced by sulphite is caused by mersalyl alone and by N-ethylmaleimide and butylmalonate when present together. 3. External sulphite and sulphate cause efflux of intramitochondrial sulphate, and this is inhibited by butylmalonate, phenylsuccinate and mersalyl. 4. External sulphite and sulphate do not cause efflux of oxoglutarate or citrate. 5. Mitochondria swell when suspended in an iso-osmotic solution of ammonium sulphite; this is not inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl. 6. Low concentrations of sulphite, but not sulphate, produce mitochondrial swelling in iso-osmotic solutions of ammonium malate, succinate, malonate, sulphate, or phosphate in the presence of N-ethylmaleimide. 7. It is concluded that both sulphite and sulphate may be transported by the dicarboxylate carrier of rat liver mitochondria and also that sulphite may permeate by an additional mechanism; the latter may involve the permeation of sulphurous acid or SO(2) or an exchange of the sulphite anion for hydroxyl ion(s).

  14. Characterization of citrate utilization in Corynebacterium glutamicum by transcriptome and proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, Tino; Schluesener, Daniela; Poetsch, Ansgar; Bott, Michael; Wendisch, Volker F

    2007-08-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum grows aerobically on a variety of carbohydrates and organic acids as single or combined sources of carbon and energy. To characterize the citrate utilization in C. glutamicum on a genomewide scale, a comparative analysis was carried out by combining transcriptome and proteome analysis. In cells grown on citrate, transcriptome analysis revealed highest expression changes for two different citrate-uptake systems encoded by citM and tctCBA, whereas genes encoding uptake systems for the glucose- (ptsG), sucrose- (ptsS) and fructose- (ptsF) specific PTS components and permeases for gluconate (gntP) and glutamate (gluC) displayed decreased mRNA levels in citrate-grown cells. This pattern was also observed when cells grown in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium plus citrate were compared with cells grown in LB medium, indicating some kind of catabolite repression. Genes encoding enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (aconitase, succinyl-CoA synthetase, succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase), malic enzyme, PEP carboxykinase, gluconeogenic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ATP synthase displayed increased expression in cells grown on citrate. Accordingly, proteome analysis revealed elevated protein levels of these enzymes and showed a good correlation with the mRNA levels. In conclusion, this study revealed the citrate stimulon in C. glutamicum and the regulated central metabolic genes when grown on citrate.

  15. Bioavailability of zinc and phosphorus in calcareous soils as affected by citrate exudation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duffner, A.; Hoffland, E.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Zinc (Zn) and phosphorus (P) deficiency often occurs at the same time and limits crop production in many soils. It has been suggested that citrate root exudation is a response of plants to both deficiencies. We used white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) as a model plant to clarify if citrate exuded by

  16. Addition of senna improves quality of colonoscopy preparation with magnesium citrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stergios Vradelis; Evangelos Kalaitzakis; Yalda Sharifi; Otto Buchel; Satish Keshav; Roger W Chapman; Barbara Braden

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To prospectively investigate the effectiveness and patient's tolerance of two low-cost bowel cleansing preparation protocols based on magnesium citrate only or the combination of magnesium citrate and senna. METHODS: A total of 342 patients who were referred for colonoscopy underwent a colon cleansing protocol with magnesium citrate alone ( n = 160) or magnesium citrate and senna granules ( n = 182). The colonoscopist rated the overall efficacy of colon cleansing using an established score on a 4-point scale. Patients were questioned before undergoing colonoscopy for side effects and symptoms during bowel preparation. RESULTS: The percentage of procedures rescheduled because of insufficient colon cleansing was 7% in the magnesium citrate group and 4% in the magnesium citrate/senna group ( P = 0.44). Adequate visualization of the colonic mucosa was rated superior under the citramag/senna regimen ( P = 0.004). Both regimens were well tolerated, and did not significantly differ in the occurrence of nausea, bloating or headache. However, abdominal cramps were observed more often under the senna protocol (29.2%) compared to the magnesium citrate only protocol (9.9%, P < 0.0003). CONCLUSION: The addition of senna to the bowel preparation protocol with magnesium citrate significantly improves the cleansing outcome.

  17. 78 FR 34648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and citrate salts from the People's Republic... (202) 482-1503. Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the order is citric acid and...

  18. 78 FR 34338 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ...: Antidumping Duty Orders, 74 FR 25703 (May 29, 2009) (Citric Acid Duty Orders). Methodology The Department has... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (citric acid)......

  19. The development of the rhizosphere: simulation of root exudation for two contrasting exudates: citrate and mucilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Cheng; Bol, Roland; Vetterlein, Doris; Vanderborght, Jan; Schnepf, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Different types of root exudates and their effect on soil/rhizosphere properties have received a lot of attention. Since their influence of rhizosphere properties and processes depends on their concentration in the soil, the assessment of the spatial-temporal exudate concentration distribution around roots is of key importance for understanding the functioning of the rhizosphere. Different root systems have different root architectures. Different types of root exudates diffuse in the rhizosphere with different diffusion coefficient. Both of them are responsible for the dynamics of exudate concentration distribution in the rhizosphere. Hence, simulations of root exudation involving four kinds of plant root systems (Vicia faba, Lupinus albus, Triticum aestivum and Zea mays) and two kinds of root exudates (citrate and mucilage) were conducted. We consider a simplified root architecture where each root is represented by a straight line. Assuming that root tips move at a constant velocity and that mucilage transport is linear, concentration distributions can be obtained from a convolution of the analytical solution of the transport equation in a stationary flow field for an instantaneous point source injection with the spatial-temporal distribution of the source strength. By coupling the analytical equation with a root growth model that delivers the spatial-temporal source term, we simulated exudate concentration distributions for citrate and mucilage with MATLAB. From the simulation results, we inferred the following information about the rhizosphere: (a) the dynamics of the root architecture development is the main effect of exudate distribution in the root zone; (b) a steady rhizosphere with constant width is more likely to develop for individual roots when the diffusion coefficient is small. The simulations suggest that rhizosphere development depends in the following way on the root and exudate properties: the dynamics of the root architecture result in various

  20. Facile synthesis of Ag2S nanoparticles functionalized by carbon-containing citrate shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnikov, S. I.; Gusev, A. I.; Gerasimov, E. Yu.; Rempel, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Silver sulfide nanoparticles with non-toxic citrate shell are synthesized by chemical bath deposition from aqueous mixtures of silver nitrate and sodium sulfide in the presence of sodium citrate used as a complexing and stabilizing agent. The prepared nanoparticles have Ag2S core with monoclinic crystal structure functionalized by a carbon-containing citrate shell. By varying the concentrations of reagents it was possible to prepare core-shell nanoparticles with pre-assigned size of Ag2S core from 10 and 50 nm and pre-assigned thickness from 1.5 to 10 nm of citrate shell. A probable mechanism of formation of carbon-containing citrate shell on Ag2S core has been proposed.

  1. A novel citrate selective electrode based on surfactant modified nano-clinoptilolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminejad, Mahdieh; Nezamzadeh-Ejhieh, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    A citrate-selective sensor was prepared by modification of a PVC membrane with modified nano-clinoptilolite particles by hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium surfactant (SMZ). A Nernstian slope of 29.9 ± 0.2 mV per decade of citrate concentration was obtained over the concentration range of 5.0 × 10(-5)-5.0 × 10(-2) mol L(-1) of citrate. The electrode showed a fast response time (⩽ 10 s) and a detection limit of 1.3 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) of citrate. The linear range and detection limit were respectively changed to 1.0 × 10(-4)-5.0 × 10(-2) mol L(-1) and 1.0 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) of citrate when the micronized clinoptilolite particles were used.

  2. Mitochondrial network energetics in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aon, Miguel A; Cortassa, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    At the core of eukaryotic aerobic life, mitochondrial function like 'hubs' in the web of energetic and redox processes in cells. In the heart, these networks-extending beyond the complex connectivity of biochemical circuit diagrams and apparent morphology-exhibit collective dynamics spanning several spatiotemporal levels of organization, from the cell, to the tissue, and the organ. The network function of mitochondria, i.e., mitochondrial network energetics, represents an advantageous behavior. Its coordinated action, under normal physiology, provides robustness despite failure in a few nodes, and improves energy supply toward a swiftly changing demand. Extensive diffuse loops, encompassing mitochondrial-cytoplasmic reaction/transport networks, control and regulate energy supply and demand in the heart. Under severe energy crises, the network behavior of mitochondria and associated glycolytic and other metabolic networks collapse, thereby triggering fatal arrhythmias.

  3. The mitochondrial connection in auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Anthony T; Pinheiro, Joaquim M B

    2011-01-01

    'Auditory neuropathy' (AN), the term used to codify a primary degeneration of the auditory nerve, can be linked directly or indirectly to mitochondrial dysfunction. These observations are based on the expression of AN in known mitochondrial-based neurological diseases (Friedreich's ataxia, Mohr-Tranebjærg syndrome), in conditions where defects in axonal transport, protein trafficking, and fusion processes perturb and/or disrupt mitochondrial dynamics (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, autosomal dominant optic atrophy), in a common neonatal condition known to be toxic to mitochondria (hyperbilirubinemia), and where respiratory chain deficiencies produce reductions in oxidative phosphorylation that adversely affect peripheral auditory mechanisms. This body of evidence is solidified by data derived from temporal bone and genetic studies, biochemical, molecular biologic, behavioral, electroacoustic, and electrophysiological investigations.

  4. Effect of Nb on barium titanate prepared from citrate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Biljana D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the addition of dopants on the microstructure development and electrical properties of BaTiO3 doped with 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 mol% of Nb and 0.01 mol% of Mn based compounds was studied. Doped barium titanate was prepared using the polymeric precursor method from citrate solutions. The powders calcined at 700°C for 4 hours were analysed by infrared (IR spectroscopy to verify the presence of carbonates, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD for phase formation. The phase composition, microstructure and dielectric properties show a strong dependence on the amount of added niobium.

  5. Use of Blemaren citrate formula in gout patients with nephrolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Eliseev

    2008-01-01

    Results. After completion of a course of Blemaren therapy, there was an 8% reduction in the mean serum UA levels, which correlated with an increase in its daily excretion (by an average of 20%. The highest increase in UA excretion was observed in 20 patients with baseline hypoex-cretion (<700 mg/day: from 226,3 (range 201,6-436,8 to 635,0 (range 272,2-705,6 mg/day (p = 0,01. UA excretion substantially unchanged in patients with normal uricosuria (>700 mg/day. Side effects that could cause the agent to be discontinued were absent. Conclusion. The Blemaren citrate formula used in gout patients with nephrolithiasis causes a significant increase in the renal excretion of UA (p = 0,01, normalizes its metabolic parameters, and shows a high safety, without worsening hepatic and renal functions and electrolyte metabolism.

  6. Sufentanil citrate: a new opioid analgesic for use in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosow, C E

    1984-01-01

    Sufentanil citrate is a potent analogue of fentanyl that has been evaluated primarily for use in opioid anesthesia. It is a pure mu receptor agonist and produces the typical spectrum of opioid effects. The major side effects are truncal rigidity and prolonged respiratory depression. In doses of 4-30 micrograms/kg sufentanil produces hypnosis and suppresses most hemodynamic and hormonal responses to surgery without producing significant cardiovascular depression. In this respect sufentanil and fentanyl have clear advantages over morphine, meperidine and potent inhalation anesthetics. Compared to fentanyl, sufentanil has a more rapid onset and shorter duration of action. The relatively high concentration of commercially available sufentanil injection will make it much more convenient for its intended application than fentanyl injection. This new agent will be used primarily for open-heart surgery and major operations in patients with severe cardiovascular compromise.

  7. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  8. Non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI uptake by T lymphocytes: evidence for the selective acquisition of oligomeric ferric citrate species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Arezes

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential nutrient in several biological processes such as oxygen transport, DNA replication and erythropoiesis. Plasma iron normally circulates bound to transferrin. In iron overload disorders, however, iron concentrations exceed transferrin binding capacity and iron appears complexed with low molecular weight molecules, known as non-transferrin-bound iron (NTBI. NTBI is responsible for the toxicity associated with iron-overload pathologies but the mechanisms leading to NTBI uptake are not fully understood. Here we show for the first time that T lymphocytes are able to take up and accumulate NTBI in a manner that resembles that of hepatocytes. Moreover, we show that both hepatocytes and T lymphocytes take up the oligomeric Fe3Cit3 preferentially to other iron-citrate species, suggesting the existence of a selective NTBI carrier. These results provide a tool for the identification of the still elusive ferric-citrate cellular carrier and may also open a new pathway towards the design of more efficient iron chelators for the treatment of iron overload disorders.

  9. Synthesis of Spin-ladder Sr14Cu24O41 Material by Citrates Sol-gel Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lili; WEI Hui; HU Ni; XIONG Rui; YU Zuxing; TANG Wufeng; SHI Jing

    2008-01-01

    A new process to synthesize polycrystailine samples of Sr14Cu24O41 was presented. Firstly, dry gel powder of Sr14Cu24O41 was synthesized by the citrates sol-gel method, using Sr(NO3)2, Cu(NO3)2, ethylene glycol and citrate acid as raw materials. Then, polycrystalline samples of Sr14Cu24O41 were prepared by solid-state reaction. Thermal Gravimetric and Differential Thermal Analysis(TG-DTA) showed that the temperature for solid-state reaction is at 942 ℃. The samples are identified to be single phase by X-ray Diffraction(XRD)and Scanning Electron Microscopy(SEM). The SEM pictures showed that the first-step particles were at even size of about 100 nm'by this technique. The electronic transport measurements showed that the doping compound were semiconductor with a crossover temperature Tρin the Arrhenius plot of the resistivity versus temprature.

  10. Mutant Parkin impairs mitochondrial function and morphology in human fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Grünewald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in Parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD. The mitochondrially localized E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin has been reported to be involved in respiratory chain function and mitochondrial dynamics. More recent publications also described a link between Parkin and mitophagy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the impact of Parkin mutations on mitochondrial function and morphology in a human cellular model. Fibroblasts were obtained from three members of an Italian PD family with two mutations in Parkin (homozygous c.1072delT, homozygous delEx7, compound-heterozygous c.1072delT/delEx7, as well as from two relatives without mutations. Furthermore, three unrelated compound-heterozygous patients (delEx3-4/duplEx7-12, delEx4/c.924C>T and delEx1/c.924C>T and three unrelated age-matched controls were included. Fibroblasts were cultured under basal or paraquat-induced oxidative stress conditions. ATP synthesis rates and cellular levels were detected luminometrically. Activities of complexes I-IV and citrate synthase were measured spectrophotometrically in mitochondrial preparations or cell lysates. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide. Oxidative stress levels were investigated with the OxyBlot technique. The mitochondrial network was investigated immunocytochemically and the degree of branching was determined with image processing methods. We observed a decrease in the production and overall concentration of ATP coinciding with increased mitochondrial mass in Parkin-mutant fibroblasts. After an oxidative insult, the membrane potential decreased in patient cells but not in controls. We further determined higher levels of oxidized proteins in the mutants both under basal and stress conditions. The degree of mitochondrial network branching was comparable in mutants and

  11. Rôle modeste du citrate comme transporteur d'acétyl-CoA chez l'animal vivant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rous, S

    1971-02-09

    2,4-(14) C-Citrate incorporated to a far greater extent than 1,5-(14) C-citrate into liver, carcass or adipose tissue fatty acids of living mice. This finding excludes the possibility that the acetyl units emerge from the mitochondria in the form of citrate.

  12. 76 FR 17835 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-937] Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic... order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China.... See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension...

  13. 77 FR 9891 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic... Act of 1930, as amended (``the Act''). \\1\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the...

  14. Erythropoietin treatment enhances muscle mitochondrial capacity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plenge, Ulla; Belhage, Bo; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia;

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) treatment has been shown to induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cardiac muscle along with enhanced mitochondrial capacity in mice. We hypothesized that recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) treatment enhances skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity...... in humans. In six healthy volunteers rhEpo was administered by sub-cutaneous injection over 8 weeks with oral iron (100 mg) supplementation taken daily. Mitochondrial OXPHOS was quantified by high-resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized muscle fibers obtained from biopsies of the vastus lateralis...... before and after rhEpo treatment. OXPHOS was determined with the mitochondrial complex I substrates malate, glutamate, pyruvate, and complex II substrate succinate in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations, while maximal electron transport capacity (ETS) was assessed by addition of an uncoupler...

  15. Control mechanisms in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jana Hroudová; Zdeněk Fi(s)ar

    2013-01-01

    Distribution and activity of mitochondria are key factors in neuronal development, synaptic plasticity and axogenesis. The majority of energy sources, necessary for cellular functions, originate from oxidative phosphorylation located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The adenosine-5'- triphosphate production is regulated by many control mechanism–firstly by oxygen, substrate level, adenosine-5'-diphosphate level, mitochondrial membrane potential, and rate of coupling and proton leak. Recently, these mechanisms have been implemented by "second control mechanisms," such as reversible phosphorylation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and electron transport chain complexes, allosteric inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase, thyroid hormones, effects of fatty acids and uncoupling proteins. Impaired function of mitochondria is implicated in many diseases ranging from mitochondrial myopathies to bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Mitochondrial dysfunctions are usually related to the ability of mitochondria to generate adenosine-5'-triphosphate in response to energy demands. Large amounts of reactive oxygen species are released by defective mitochondria, similarly, decline of antioxidative enzyme activities (e.g. in the elderly) enhances reactive oxygen species production. We reviewed data concerning neuroplasticity, physiology, and control of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production.

  16. Pressure overload-induced mild cardiac hypertrophy reduces leftventricular transmural differences in mitochondrial respiratory chainactivity and increases oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel eKINDO

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Increased mechanical stress and contractility characterizes normal left ventricular subendocardium (Endo but whether Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complex activities is reduced as compared to subepicardium (Epi and whether pressure overload-induced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH might modulate transmural gradients through increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production is unknown. Methods: LVH was induced by 6 weeks abdominal aortic banding and cardiac structure and function were determined with echocardiography and catheterization in sham-operated and LVH rats (n=10 for each group. Mitochondrial respiration rates, coupling, content and ROS production were measured in LV Endo and Epi, using saponin-permeabilised fibres, Amplex Red fluorescence and citrate synthase activity.Results: In sham, a transmural respiratory gradient was observed with decreases in endo maximal oxidative capacity (-36.7%, P<0.01 and complex IV activity (-57.4%, P<0.05. Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production was similar in both LV layers.Aortic banding induced mild LVH (+31.7% LV mass, associated with normal LV fractional shortening and end diastolic pressure. LVH reduced maximal oxidative capacity (-23.6 and -33.3%, increased mitochondrial H2O2 production (+86.9 and +73.1%, free radical leak (+27.2% and +36.3% and citrate synthase activity (+27.2% and +36.3% in Endo and Epi, respectively.Transmural mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity was reduced in LVH (-57.4 vs –12.2%; P=0.02. Conclusions: Endo mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activities are reduced compared to LV Epi. Mild LVH impairs mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increases oxidative stress and reduces transmural complex IV activity. Further studies will be helpful to determine whether reduced LV transmural gradient in mitochondrial respiration might be a new marker of a transition from uncomplicated toward complicated LVH.

  17. Genome-wide identification of citrus ATP-citrate lyase genes and their transcript analysis in fruits reveals their possible role in citrate utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Mei; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2015-02-01

    ATP-citrate lyase (ACL, EC4.1.3.8) catalyzes citrate to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA in the cell cytosol, and has important roles in normal plant growth and in the biosynthesis of some secondary metabolites. We identified three ACL genes, CitACLα1, CitACLα2, and CitACLβ1, in the citrus genome database. Both CitACLα1 and CitACLα2 encode putative ACL α subunits with 82.5 % amino acid identity, whereas CitACLβ1 encodes a putative ACL β subunit. Gene structure analysis showed that CitACLα1 and CitACLα2 had 12 exons and 11 introns, and CitACLβ1 had 16 exons and 15 introns. CitACLα1 and CitACLβ1 were predominantly expressed in flower, and CitACLα2 was predominantly expressed in stem and fibrous roots. As fruits ripen, the transcript levels of CitACLα1, CitACLβ1, and/or CitACLα2 in cultivars 'Niuher' and 'Owari' increased, accompanied by significant decreases in citrate content, while their transcript levels decreased significantly in 'Egan No. 1' and 'Iyokan', although citrate content also decreased. In 'HB pummelo', in which acid content increased as fruit ripened, and in acid-free pummelo, transcript levels of CitACLα2, CitACLβ1, and/or CitACLα1 increased. Moreover, mild drought stress and ABA treatment significantly increased citrate contents in fruits. Transcript levels of the three genes were significantly reduced by mild drought stress, and the transcript level of only CitACLβ1 was significantly reduced by ABA treatment. Taken together, these data indicate that the effects of ACL on citrate use during fruit ripening depends on the cultivar, and the reduction in ACL gene expression may be attributed to citrate increases under mild drought stress or ABA treatment.

  18. Sequestration of Sr-90 Subsurface Contamination in the Hanford 100-N Area by Surface Infiltration of a Ca-Citrate-Phosphate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Oostrom, Martinus; Moore, R. C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Williams, Mark D.; Zhong, Lirong; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; McKinley, James P.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Covert, Matthew A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Garcia, Ben J.

    2009-03-01

    subsurface area. However, the use of real-time surface and cross-borehole geophysics can be used to track the infiltrating Ca-citrate-PO4 front so some adjustments can be made in the infiltration rate to precipitate apatite in desired zones. In addition, the reactive transport code used in this study with field scale physical parameters for sediments can be used to evaluate infiltration strategies along with preliminary water infiltration tests at field scale.

  19. Seasonal upregulation of catabolic enzymes and fatty acid transporters in the flight muscle of migrating hoary bats, Lasiurus cinereus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Liam P; Fenton, M Brock; Guglielmo, Christopher G

    2013-06-01

    The high energy density of fat, and limited capacity for carbohydrate storage suggest that migrating bats should fuel endurance flights with fat, as observed in migrating birds. Yet, cursorial mammals are unable to support high intensity exercise with fat stores. We hypothesized that migratory bats and birds have converged on similar physiological mechanisms to fuel endurance flight with fat. We predicted bats would seasonally upregulate fatty acid transport and oxidation pathways when migration demands were high. We studied seasonal variation in mitochondrial oxidative enzyme activities and fatty acid transport protein expression in the flight muscle of hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus). Carnitine palmitoyl transferase, 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase and citrate synthase activity increased during migration. There were no changes in expression of fatty acid translocase or plasma membrane fatty acid binding protein. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein expression increased 5-fold in migrating females, but did not vary seasonally in males. An aerial insectivore lifestyle, and the coincidence of migration and pregnancy may explain differences in transporter expression compared to previously studied birds. Overall, our results are consistent with seasonal upregulation of lipid metabolism and aerobic capacity, and confirm that migration poses distinct physiological challenges for bats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 3-Bromopyruvate and sodium citrate induce apoptosis in human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803 by inhibiting glycolysis and promoting mitochondria-regulated apoptosis pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xingyu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Tingan, E-mail: moonsonlife@yahoo.com; Xian, Shulin; Lu, Yunfei, E-mail: doctorlife@126.com

    2016-06-17

    Cancer cells are mainly dependent on glycolysis to generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and intermediates required for cell growth and proliferation. Thus, inhibition of glycolysis might be of therapeutic value in antitumor treatment. Our previously studies had found that both 3-bromopyruvate (BP) and sodium citrate (SCT) can inhibit tumor growth and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism involved in the BP and SCT mediated antitumor activity is not entirely clear. In this work, it is demonstrated that BP inhibits the enzyme hexokinase (HK) activity and SCT suppresses the phosphofructokinase (PFK) activity respectively, both the two agents decrease viability, ATP generation and lactate content in the human gastric cancer cell line MGC-803. These effects are directly correlated with blockage of glycolysis. Furthermore, BP and SCT can induce the characteristic manifestations of mitochondria-regulated apoptosis, such as down-regulation of anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and Survivin, up-regulation of pro-apoptosis protein Bax, activation of caspase-3, as well as leakage of cytochrome c (Cyt-c). In summary, our results provided evidences that BP and SCT inhibit the MGC-803 cells growth and proliferation might be correlated with inhibiting glycolysis and promoting mitochondria-regulated apoptosis. -- Highlights: •Blockage of glycolysis might be a novel way to anticancer. •Both 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate could inhibit glycolysis and regulate mitochondrial pathway in cancer cells. •Both 3-bromopyruvate and sodium citrate would be the novel agents on treatment of gastric cancer.

  1. Effect of sodium citrate on preparation of nano-sized cobalt particles by organic colloidal process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaping ZHU; Hao LI; Huiyu SONG; Shijun LIAO

    2009-01-01

    Nano-sized cobalt particles with the diameter of 2 nm were prepared via an organic colloidal process with sodium formate, ethylene glycol and sodium citrate as the reducing agent, the solvent and the complexing agent, respectively. The effects of sodium citrate on the yield, crystal structure, particle size and size distribution of the prepared nano-sized cobalt particles were then investigated. The results show that the average particle diameter decreases from 200 nm to 2 nm when the molar ratio of sodium citrate to cobalt chloride changes from 0 to 6. Furthermore, sodium citrate plays a crucial role in the controlling of size distribution of the nano-sized particles. The size distribution of the particle without sodium citrate addition is in range from tens of nanometers to 300 or 400 nm, while that with sodium citrate addition is limited in the range of (2±0.25) nm. Moreover, it is found that the addition of sodium citrate as a complex agent could decrease the yield of the nano-sized cobalt particle.

  2. Protective effects of sildenafil citrate administration on cisplatin-induced ovarian damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Mine Islimye; Yay, Arzu; Adali, Ertan; Balcioglu, Esra; Inceboz, Umit

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of sildenafil citrate on cisplatin-induced ovarian toxicity. Thirty-two female rats were divided into four groups. Group 1: saline control; group 2: cisplatin; group 3: sildenafil citrate; and group 4: cisplatin plus sildenafil citrate group. In groups 2 and 4, the rats were injected with 5 mg/kg cisplatin intraperitoneally (i.p.). In groups 3 and 4, the rats were injected with 1.4 mg/kg sildenafil citrate i.p. The ovaries were removed two weeks later in all groups. Histopathologic examination, follicle counting and classification were performed. The expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) was detected immunohistochemically in the ovarian tissues. Sildenafil alleviated cisplatin-induced histopathological changes in the ovarian tissue. Primordial, secondary and tertiary follicles were diminished in group 2 compared with group 1 (p sildenafil citrate preserved primordial follicle count in group 4 compared with group 2, and the difference was statistically significant (p sildenafil citrate is beneficial for protecting the ovaries from cisplatin-induced damage. Sildenafil citrate can be a choice for fertility preservation.

  3. Sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate: a review of its use as a colorectal cleanser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Sheridan M; Scott, Lesley J; Wagstaff, Antona J

    2009-01-01

    Oral sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate (CitraFleet; Picolax), consisting of sodium picosulfate (a stimulant laxative) and magnesium citrate (an osmotic laxative), is approved for use in adults (CitraFleet; Picolax) and/or adolescents and children (Picolax) as a colorectal cleansing agent prior to any diagnostic procedure (e.g. colonoscopy or x-ray examination) requiring a clean bowel and/or surgery. It is dispensed in powder form (sodium picosulfate 0.01 g, magnesium oxide 3.5 g, citric acid 12.0 g per sachet), with the magnesium oxide and citric acid components forming magnesium citrate when the powder is dissolved in water. In adult patients, two sachets of sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate was at least as effective and well tolerated as oral magnesium citrate 17.7 or 35.4 g, or oral polyethylene glycol 236 g in adult patients undergoing a double-contrast barium enema procedure in three large, randomized, comparative clinical studies. In contrast, sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate was less effective than a sodium phosphate enema preparation in two studies in patients undergoing flexible sigmoidoscopy. A similar number of patients receiving two sachets of sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate or two 45 mL doses of oral sodium phosphate the day before a double-contrast barium enema procedure achieved satisfactory barium coating and none/minimal faecal residue in one study. However, the data from three of these studies should be interpreted with caution because the administrative regimens used differed from that recommended. Sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate is also an effective and generally well tolerated colorectal cleansing agent in children and adolescents; the preparation was more effective than oral bisacodyl 0.01 or 0.02 g plus a sodium phosphate enema preparation in this population. Further research is thus required to accurately position sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate and fully establish its efficacy and tolerability prior to various

  4. Effects of aging on mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle of American American Quarter Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengcheng; White, Sarah H; Warren, Lori K; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle function, aerobic capacity, and mitochondrial (Mt) function have been found to decline with age in humans and rodents. However, not much is known about age-related changes in Mt function in equine skeletal muscle. Here, we compared fiber-type composition and Mt function in gluteus medius and triceps brachii muscle between young (age 1.8 ± 0.1 yr, n = 24) and aged (age 17-25 yr, n = 10) American Quarter Horses. The percentage of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIX was lower in aged compared with young muscles (gluteus, P = 0.092; triceps, P = 0.012), while the percentages of MHC I (gluteus; P < 0.001) and MHC IIA (triceps; P = 0.023) were increased. Mass-specific Mt density, indicated by citrate synthase activity, was unaffected by age in gluteus, but decreased in aged triceps (P = 0.023). Cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity per milligram tissue and per Mt unit decreased with age in gluteus (P < 0.001 for both) and triceps (P < 0.001 and P = 0.003, respectively). Activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase per milligram tissue was unaffected by age, but increased per Mt unit in aged gluteus and triceps (P = 0.023 and P < 0.001, respectively). Mt respiration of permeabilized muscle fibers per milligram tissue was unaffected by age in both muscles. Main effects of age appeared when respiration was normalized to Mt content, with increases in LEAK, oxidative phosphorylation capacity, and electron transport system capacity (P = 0.038, P = 0.045, and P = 0.007, respectively), independent of muscle. In conclusion, equine skeletal muscle aging was accompanied by a shift in fiber-type composition, decrease in Mt density and COX activity, but preserved Mt respiratory function.

  5. Phase transfer of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles using nonspecifically adsorbed polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkilany, Alaaldin M; Caravana, Aidan C; Hamaly, Majd A; Lerner, Kevin T; Thompson, Lucas B

    2016-01-01

    Many synthetic approaches for gold nanoparticles rely on an aqueous media, resulting in water-soluble nanoparticles, which limits the ability to incorporate gold nanoparticles into other organic solvents or hydrophobic polymeric composites. Surface functionalization and phase transfer approaches using alkylthiols or alkylamines, which strongly bind the gold surface, are common routes to overcome this limitation, however they are typically challenging methods. In this paper we report an approach to transport citrate capped gold nanoparticles into a variety of solvents, including ones that are hydrophobic and not miscible with water without the need for phase transfer agents. We suspend gold nanoparticles in a water-miscible polar organic solvent that also is a solvent for a hydrophobic polymer. After drying, polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles were found to be dispersible in various hydrophobic solvents with maintained colloidal stability. This work investigates two hydrophobic polymers, namely (polymethylmethacrylate and polyvinylacetate), which share common chemical motifs but have significantly different physiochemical properties. Interestingly, a significant difference in their ability to stabilize the transferred gold nanoparticles is observed and discussed.

  6. Mitochondrial gene therapy augments mitochondrial physiology in a Parkinson's disease cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Paula M; Quigley, Caitlin K; Dunham, Lisa D; Papageorge, Christina M; Iyer, Shilpa; Thomas, Ravindar R; Schwarz, Kathleen M; Trimmer, Patricia A; Khan, Shaharyar M; Portell, Francisco R; Bergquist, Kristen E; Bennett, James P

    2009-08-01

    Neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) affects mainly dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, where age-related, increasing percentages of cells lose detectable respiratory activity associated with depletion of intact mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Replenishment of mtDNA might improve neuronal bioenergetic function and prevent further cell death. We developed a technology ("ProtoFection") that uses recombinant human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) engineered with an N-terminal protein transduction domain (PTD) followed by the SOD2 mitochondrial localization signal (MLS) to deliver mtDNA cargo to the mitochondria of living cells. MTD-TFAM (MTD = PTD + MLS = "mitochondrial transduction domain") binds mtDNA and rapidly transports it across plasma membranes to mitochondria. For therapeutic proof-of-principle we tested ProtoFection technology in Parkinson's disease cybrid cells, using mtDNA generated from commercially available human genomic DNA (gDNA; Roche). Nine to 11 weeks after single exposures to MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex, PD cybrid cells with impaired respiration and reduced mtDNA genes increased their mtDNA gene copy numbers up to 24-fold, mtDNA-derived RNAs up to 35-fold, TFAM and ETC proteins, cell respiration, and mitochondrial movement velocities. Cybrid cells with no or minimal basal mitochondrial impairments showed reduced or no responses to treatment, suggesting the possibility of therapeutic selectivity. Exposure of PD but not control cybrid cells to MTD-TFAM protein alone or MTD-TFAM + mtDNA complex increased expression of PGC-1alpha, suggesting activation of mitochondrial biogenesis. ProtoFection technology for mitochondrial gene therapy holds promise for improving bioenergetic function in impaired PD neurons and needs additional development to define its pharmacodynamics and delineate its molecular mechanisms. It also is unclear whether single-donor gDNA for generating mtDNA would be a preferred therapeutic compared with the pooled

  7. Selective Inhibition of Deactivated Mitochondrial Complex I by Biguanides †

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Biguanides are widely used antihyperglycemic agents for diabetes mellitus and prediabetes treatment. Complex I is the rate limiting step of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), a major source of mitochondrial free radical production, and a known target of biguanides. Complex I has two reversible conformational states, active and de-active. The deactivated state is promoted in the absence of substrates, but is rapidly and fully reversed to the active state in the presence of NADH....

  8. Impaired mitochondrial function in human placenta with increased maternal adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, James; Muralimanoharan, Sribalasubashini; Maloyan, Alina; Myatt, Leslie

    2014-09-01

    The placenta plays a key role in regulation of fetal growth and development and in mediating in utero developmental programming. Obesity, which is associated with chronic inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction in many tissues, exerts a programming effect in pregnancy. We determined the effect of increasing maternal adiposity and of fetal sex on placental ATP generation, mitochondrial biogenesis, expression of electron transport chain subunits, and mitochondrial function in isolated trophoblasts. Placental tissue was collected from women with prepregnancy BMI ranging from 18.5 to 45 following C-section at term with no labor. Increasing maternal adiposity was associated with excessive production of reactive oxygen species and a significant reduction in placental ATP levels in placentae with male and female fetuses. To explore the potential mechanism of placental mitochondrial dysfunction, levels of transcription factors regulating the expression of genes involved in electron transport and mitochondrial biogenesis were measured. Our in vitro studies showed significant reduction in mitochondrial respiration in cultured primary trophoblasts with increasing maternal obesity along with an abnormal metabolic flexibility of these cells. This reduction in placental mitochondrial respiration in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity could compromise placental function and potentially underlie the increased susceptibility of these pregnancies to fetal demise in late gestation and to developmental programming.

  9. Measurement of mitochondrial NADH and FAD autofluorescence in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, Fernando; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2015-01-01

    In the process of energy production, mitochondrial networks are key elements to allow metabolism of substrates into ATP. Many pathological conditions have been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction as mitochondria are associated with a wide range of cellular processes. Therefore, any disruption in the energy production induces devastating effects that can ultimately lead to cell death due to chemical ischemia. To address the mitochondrial health and function, there are several bioenergetic parameters reflecting either whole mitochondrial functionality or individual mitochondrial complexes. Particularly, metabolism of nutrients in the tricarboxylic acid cycle provides substrates used to generate electron carriers (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NADH] and flavin adenine dinucleotide [FADH2]) which ultimately donate electrons to the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The levels of NADH and FADH2 can be estimated through imaging of NADH/NAD(P)H or FAD autofluorescence. This report demonstrates how to perform and analyze NADH/NAD(P)H and FAD autofluorescence in a time-course-dependent manner and provides information about NADH and FAD redox indexes both reflecting the activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). Furthermore, total pools of NADH and FAD can be estimated providing information about the rate of substrate supply into the ETC. Finally, the analysis of NADH autofluorescence after induction of maximal respiration can offer information about the pentose phosphate pathway activity where glucose can be alternatively oxidized instead of pyruvate.

  10. Searching for the elusive mitochondrial longevity signal in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Christopher F; Choi, Haeri; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing list of examples where perturbed mitochondrial function is associated with increased longevity, yet the exact mechanisms have remained elusive. This phenomenon was first documented, and has been studied most extensively, in C. elegans. One prominent model proposed that lifespan extension resulting from electron transport chain inhibition is due to induction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. This model requires revision in light of recent data showing that the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, as defined by the field, is neither necessary nor sufficient for lifespan extension in C. elegans. Several additional factors have been proposed to underlie this lifespan extension, which is likely to be multifactorial and complex.

  11. Combined oral administration of bovine collagen peptides with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in ovariectomized rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunLi Liu

    Full Text Available Collagen peptides (CPs and calcium citrate are commonly used as bone health supplements for treating osteoporosis. However, it remains unknown whether the combination of oral bovine CPs with calcium citrate is more effective than administration of either agent alone.Forty 12-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8 for once-daily intragastric administration of different treatments for 3 months at 3 months after ovariectomy (OVX as follows: sham + vehicle; OVX + vehicle; OVX + 750 mg/kg CP; OVX + CP-calcium citrate (75 mg/kg; OVX + calcium citrate (75 mg/kg. After euthanasia, the femurs were removed and analyzed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-computed tomography, and serum samples were analyzed for bone metabolic markers.OVX rats supplemented with CPs or CP-calcium citrate showed osteoprotective effects, with reductions in the OVX-induced decreases in their femoral bone mineral density. Moreover, CP-calcium citrate prevented trabecular bone loss, improved the microarchitecture of the distal femur, and significantly inhibited bone loss with increased bone volume, connectivity density, and trabecular number compared with OVX control rats. CP or CP-calcium citrate administration significantly increased serum procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide levels and reduced serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and C-telopeptide of type I collagen levels.Our data indicate that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate inhibits bone loss in OVX rats. The present findings suggest that combined oral administration of bovine CPs with calcium citrate is a promising alternative for reducing bone loss in osteopenic postmenopausal women.

  12. Citrate impairs the micropore diffusion of phosphate into pure and C-coated goethite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikutta, Christian; Lang, Friederike; Kaupenjohann, Martin

    2006-02-01

    Anions of polycarboxylic low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOA) compete with phosphate for sorption sites of hydrous Fe and Al oxides. To test whether the sorption of LMWOA anions decreases the accessibility of micropores (citrate-induced changes in microporosity and the phosphate sorption kinetics of synthetic goethite in the presence and absence of citrate in batch systems for 3 weeks (500 μM of each ion, pH 5). We also used C-coated goethite obtained after sorption of dissolved organic matter in order to simulate organic coatings in the soil. We analyzed our samples with N 2 adsorption and electrophoretic mobility measurements. Citrate clogged the micropores of both adsorbents by up to 13% within 1 h of contact. The micropore volume decreased with increasing concentration and residence time of citrate. In the absence of citrate, phosphate diffused into micropores of the pure and C-coated goethite. The C coating (5.6 μmol C m -2) did not impair the intraparticle diffusion of phosphate. In the presence of citrate, the diffusion of phosphate into the micropores of both adsorbents was strongly impaired. We attribute this to the micropore clogging and the ligand-induced dissolution of goethite by citrate. While the diffusion limitation of phosphate by citrate was stronger when citrate was added before phosphate to pure goethite, the order of addition of both ions to C-coated goethite had only a minor effect on the intraparticle diffusion of phosphate. Micropore clogging and dissolution of microporous hydrous Fe and Al oxides may be regarded as potential strategies of plants to cope with phosphate deficiency in addition to ligand-exchange.

  13. Anticoagulation during haemodialysis using a citrate-enriched dialysate: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuk-Lun; Yu, Alex W; Tsang, Kwong-Yuen; Shah, Dilip H; Kjellstrand, Carl M; Wong, Siu-Man; Lau, Wai-Yan; Hau, Lap-Man; Ing, Todd S

    2011-02-01

    The feasibility of anticoagulating the extracorporeal circuit during haemodialysis using a simple citrate-enriched dialysate was evaluated in a prospective, randomised, cross-over study of 24 patients who were at high risk for bleeding. A dialysate, with a citrate level of 3 mEq/L (1 mmol/L), was generated by adding citrate to the conventional liquid 'bicarbonate concentrate' of a regular, dual-concentrate, bicarbonate-buffered dialysate delivery system. Each of the 24 patients received two dialysis treatments. For anticoagulation of the extracorporeal circuit, one treatment used the citrate-enriched dialysate (Citrate Group), while the other treatment used conventional saline flushing (Saline Group). The order of the two treatments was randomised. With either method, a heparinized, saline-rinsed dialyser was used, and no heparin was administered during dialysis. Ninety-two per cent (22 out of 24) and 100% of patients tolerated the procedure well in the Citrate Group and the Saline Group, respectively. Eight per cent (two out of 24) of the treatments in each group had to be abandoned because of clotting in the extracorporeal circuit. Significantly less thrombus formation in the venous air traps was detected in the Citrate Group. No patients from either group suffered from hypocalcaemic or bleeding complications, but the immediate post-dialysis and 0.5-h post-dialysis plasma levels of ionised calcium and of magnesium were slightly lower in the Citrate Group than in the Saline Group. Our findings suggest that it is feasible to use the present simple citrate-enriched dialysate to dialyse patients safely and effectively. Furthermore, the approach is much simpler than a conventional, intermittent, saline-flushing method.

  14. Cytokine and nitric oxide levels in patients with sepsis--temporal evolvement and relation to platelet mitochondrial respiratory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Sjövall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The levels of nitric oxide (NO and various cytokines are known to be increased during sepsis. These signaling molecules could potentially act as regulators and underlie the enhancement of mitochondrial function described in the later phase of sepsis. Therefore, we investigated the correlation between observed changes in platelet mitochondrial respiration and a set of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as NO plasma levels in patients with sepsis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Platelet mitochondrial respiration and levels of TNFα, MCP-1 (monocyte chemotactic protein-1, INFγ (interferon-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-17 and NO were analyzed in 38 patients with severe sepsis or septic shock at three time points during one week following admission to the ICU. Citrate synthase, mitochondrial DNA and cytochrome c were measured as markers of cellular mitochondrial content. All mitochondrial respiratory states increased over the week analyzed (p<0.001. IL-8 levels correlated with maximal mitochondrial respiration on day 6-7 (p = 0.02, r2 = 0.22 and was also higher in non-survivors compared to survivors on day 3-4 and day 6-7 (p = 0.03 respectively. Neither NO nor any of the other cytokines measured correlated with respiration or mortality. Cytochrome c levels were decreased at day 1-2 by 24±5% (p = 0.03 and returned towards values of the controls at the last two time points. Citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA levels were similar to controls and remained constant throughout the week. CONCLUSIONS: Out of ten analyzed cytokines and nitric oxide, IL-8 correlated with the observed increase in mitochondrial respiration. This suggests that cytokines as well as NO do not play a prominent role in the regulation of platelet mitochondrial respiration in sepsis. Further, the respiratory increase was not accompanied by an increase in markers of mitochondrial content, suggesting a possible role for post

  15. Vimar Is a Novel Regulator of Mitochondrial Fission through Miro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lianggong; Han, Yanping; Li, Yuhong; Ji, Xunming; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    As fundamental processes in mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial fusion, fission and transport are regulated by several core components, including Miro. As an atypical Rho-like small GTPase with high molecular mass, the exchange of GDP/GTP in Miro may require assistance from a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). However, the GEF for Miro has not been identified. While studying mitochondrial morphology in Drosophila, we incidentally observed that the loss of vimar, a gene encoding an atypical GEF, enhanced mitochondrial fission under normal physiological conditions. Because Vimar could co-immunoprecipitate with Miro in vitro, we speculated that Vimar might be the GEF of Miro. In support of this hypothesis, a loss-of-function (LOF) vimar mutant rescued mitochondrial enlargement induced by a gain-of-function (GOF) Miro transgene; whereas a GOF vimar transgene enhanced Miro function. In addition, vimar lost its effect under the expression of a constitutively GTP-bound or GDP-bound Miro mutant background. These results indicate a genetic dependence of vimar on Miro. Moreover, we found that mitochondrial fission played a functional role in high-calcium induced necrosis, and a LOF vimar mutant rescued the mitochondrial fission defect and cell death. This result can also be explained by vimar's function through Miro, because Miro’s effect on mitochondrial morphology is altered upon binding with calcium. In addition, a PINK1 mutant, which induced mitochondrial enlargement and had been considered as a Drosophila model of Parkinson’s disease (PD), caused fly muscle defects, and the loss of vimar could rescue these defects. Furthermore, we found that the mammalian homolog of Vimar, RAP1GDS1, played a similar role in regulating mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a functional conservation of this GEF member. The Miro/Vimar complex may be a promising drug target for diseases in which mitochondrial fission and fusion are dysfunctional. PMID:27716788

  16. Vimar Is a Novel Regulator of Mitochondrial Fission through Miro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianggong Ding

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As fundamental processes in mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial fusion, fission and transport are regulated by several core components, including Miro. As an atypical Rho-like small GTPase with high molecular mass, the exchange of GDP/GTP in Miro may require assistance from a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF. However, the GEF for Miro has not been identified. While studying mitochondrial morphology in Drosophila, we incidentally observed that the loss of vimar, a gene encoding an atypical GEF, enhanced mitochondrial fission under normal physiological conditions. Because Vimar could co-immunoprecipitate with Miro in vitro, we speculated that Vimar might be the GEF of Miro. In support of this hypothesis, a loss-of-function (LOF vimar mutant rescued mitochondrial enlargement induced by a gain-of-function (GOF Miro transgene; whereas a GOF vimar transgene enhanced Miro function. In addition, vimar lost its effect under the expression of a constitutively GTP-bound or GDP-bound Miro mutant background. These results indicate a genetic dependence of vimar on Miro. Moreover, we found that mitochondrial fission played a functional role in high-calcium induced necrosis, and a LOF vimar mutant rescued the mitochondrial fission defect and cell death. This result can also be explained by vimar's function through Miro, because Miro's effect on mitochondrial morphology is altered upon binding with calcium. In addition, a PINK1 mutant, which induced mitochondrial enlargement and had been considered as a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease (PD, caused fly muscle defects, and the loss of vimar could rescue these defects. Furthermore, we found that the mammalian homolog of Vimar, RAP1GDS1, played a similar role in regulating mitochondrial morphology, suggesting a functional conservation of this GEF member. The Miro/Vimar complex may be a promising drug target for diseases in which mitochondrial fission and fusion are dysfunctional.

  17. Flow cytometric probing of mitochondrial function in equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coignoul Freddy

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The morphopathological picture of a subset of equine myopathies is compatible with a primary mitochondrial disease, but functional confirmation in vivo is still pending. The cationic dye JC-1 exhibits potential-dependent accumulation in mitochondria that is detectable by a fluorescence shift from green to orange. As a consequence, mitochondrial membrane potential can be optically measured by the orange/green fluorescence intensity ratio. A flow cytometric standardized analytic procedure of the mitochondrial function of equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells is proposed along with a critical appraisal of the crucial questions of technical aspects, reproducibility, effect of time elapsed between blood sampling and laboratory processing and reference values. Results The JC-1-associated fluorescence orange and green values and their ratio were proved to be stable over time, independent of age and sex and hypersensitive to intoxication with a mitochondrial potential dissipator. Unless time elapsed between blood sampling and laboratory processing does not exceed 5 hours, the values retrieved remain stable. Reference values for clinically normal horses are given. Conclusion Whenever a quantitative measurement of mitochondrial function in a horse is desired, blood samples should be taken in sodium citrate tubes and kept at room temperature for a maximum of 5 hours before the laboratory procedure detailed here is started. The hope is that this new test may help in confirming, studying and preventing equine myopathies that are currently imputed to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. Betaine is a positive regulator of mitochondrial respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Icksoo, E-mail: icksoolee@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • Betaine enhances cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial respiration. • Betaine increases mitochondrial membrane potential and cellular energy levels. • Betaine’s anti-tumorigenic effect might be due to a reversal of the Warburg effect. - Abstract: Betaine protects cells from environmental stress and serves as a methyl donor in several biochemical pathways. It reduces cardiovascular disease risk and protects liver cells from alcoholic liver damage and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Its pretreatment can rescue cells exposed to toxins such as rotenone, chloroform, and LiCl. Furthermore, it has been suggested that betaine can suppress cancer cell growth in vivo and in vitro. Mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes generate the mitochondrial membrane potential, which is essential to produce cellular energy, ATP. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and energy status have been found in many human pathological conditions including aging, cancer, and neurodegenerative disease. In this study we investigated whether betaine directly targets mitochondria. We show that betaine treatment leads to an upregulation of mitochondrial respiration and cytochrome c oxidase activity in H2.35 cells, the proposed rate limiting enzyme of ETC in vivo. Following treatment, the mitochondrial membrane potential was increased and cellular energy levels were elevated. We propose that the anti-proliferative effects of betaine on cancer cells might be due to enhanced mitochondrial function contributing to a reversal of the Warburg effect.

  19. Purification of L-glutamate-dependent citrate lyase from Clostridium sphenoides and electron microscopic analysis of citrate lyase isolated from Rhodopseudomonas gelatinosa, Streptococcus diacetilactis and C. sphenoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antranikian, G; Klinner, C; Kümmel, A; Schwanitz, D; Zimmermann, T; Mayer, F; Gottschalk, G

    1982-08-01

    Citrate lyase from Clostridium sphenoides was purified 72-fold with a yield of 11%. In contrast to citrate lyase from other sources the activity of this enzyme was strictly dependent on the presence of L-glutamate. The purified enzyme was only stable in the presence of 150 mM L-glutamate or 7 mM L-glutamate plus glycerol, sucrose or bovine serum albumin. Changes of the L-glutamate pool and of enzyme activity in growing cells of C. sphenoides indicated that citrate lyase activity in this organism was regulated by the intracellular L-glutamate concentration. Citrate lyase isolated from C. sphenoides, Rhodopseudomonas gelatinosa and Streptococcus diacetilactis was investigated by electron microscopy using the negative staining technique. Three different projections of enzyme molecules were observed: 'star' form, 'ring' form and 'triangle' form. In samples from R. gelatinosa and S. diacetilactis, star and ring forms occurred in a ratio of about 1:9. Using the enzyme from S. diacetilactis it was demonstrated that this ratio could be altered in favour of the star form by the addition of citrate or tricarballylate. The triangle form was observed in less than 1% of all evaluated molecules and may represent a transition form. In lyase samples from C. sphenoides there existed a correlation between enzyme activity and the proportion of stars and rings at varying concentrations of L-glutamate.

  20. Mitochondrial Respiration Is Impaired during Late-Stage Hamster Prion Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Robert; Moore, Roger A; Ward, Anne; Sturdevant, Dan E; Priola, Suzette A

    2017-09-15

    Mitochondria are crucial to proper neuronal function and overall brain health. Mitochondrial dysfunction within the brain has been observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion disease. Several markers of decreased mitochondrial activity during prion infection have been reported, yet the bioenergetic respiratory status of mitochondria from prion-infected animals is unknown. Here we show that clinically ill transgenic mice overexpressing hamster prion protein (Tg7) infected with the hamster prion strain 263K suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial oxygen consumption in response to the respiratory complex II substrate succinate. Characterization of the mitochondrial proteome of purified brain mitochondria from infected and uninfected Tg7 mice showed significant differences in the relative abundance of key mitochondrial electron transport proteins in 263K-infected animals relative to that in controls. Our results suggest that at clinical stages of prion infection, dysregulation of respiratory chain proteins may lead to impairment of mitochondrial respiration in the brain.IMPORTANCE Mitochondrial dysfunction is present in most major neurodegenerative diseases, and some studies have suggested that mitochondrial processes may be altered during prion disease. Here we show that hamster prion-infected transgenic mice overexpressing the hamster prion protein (Tg7 mice) suffer from mitochondrial respiratory deficits. Tg7 mice infected with the 263K hamster prion strain have little or no signs of mitochondrial dysfunction at the disease midpoint but suffer from a severe deficit in mitochondrial respiration at the clinical phase of disease. A proteomic analysis of the isolated brain mitochondria from clinically affected animals showed that several proteins involved in electron transport, mitochondrial dynamics, and mitochondrial protein synthesis were dysregulated. These results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction, possibly exacerbated by prion protein

  1. Experimental evidences of the NO action on a recombinant PrxII F from pea plant and its effect preventing the citrate synthase aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daymi Camejo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation is emerging as a key post-translational protein modification for the transduction of NO as a signaling molecule in plants. This data article supports the research article entitled “Functional and structural changes in plant mitochondrial PrxII F caused by NO” [1]. To identify the Cys residues of the recombinant PrxII F modified after the treatment with S-nitrosylating agents we performed the LC ESI–QTOF tandem MS and MALDI peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. Change in A650 nm was monitored to estimate the thermal aggregation of citrate synthase in the presence S-nitrosylated PrxII F. The effect of the temperature on the oligomerization pattern and aggregation of PrxII F was analysed by SDS-PAGE and changes in absorbance at 650 nm, respectively.

  2. Soy lecithin interferes with mitochondrial function in frozen-thawed ram spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle, I; Gómez-Durán, A; Holt, W V; Muiño-Blanco, T; Cebrián-Pérez, J A

    2012-01-01

    Egg yolk and milk are the 2 major membrane cryoprotectants commonly used in freezing media for the long-term preservation of semen (alone or in combination with others). However, in recent years, there have been increasing arguments against the use of egg yolk or milk because of the risk of introducing diseases through the use of cryopreserved semen. In this study, we analyzed the protective effect of lecithin as an alternative to egg yolk for the cryopreservation of ram semen, using a range of functional markers for sperm viability, motility, apoptosis, and mitochondrial functionality analyses (mitochondrial inner membrane surface [MIMS], mitochondrial inner membrane potential [MIMP], and cell membrane potential) as methods of assessment in samples diluted in 3 different media: Tris-citrate-glucose as control and 2 media supplemented with soy lecithin or egg yolk. The results showed that lecithin was able to effectively protect certain sperm quality characteristics against freezing-induced damage. However, lecithin induced loss of mitochondrial membrane potential or mitochondrial loss that was not reflected by modifications in sperm motility in fresh semen. MIMS and MIMP values decreased in thawed lecithin-treated samples, concomitant with a lower (P lecithin may have affected the inner mitochondrial membrane in frozenthawed spermatozoa and confirmed that sublethal damages that seriously affect sperm functionality, not detected by classic sperm quality analyses, can be evidenced by changes in the inner mitochondrial membrane surface. These findings strengthen the relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and motility and show that the mitochondrial alterations induced by the cryopreservation process could be specific targets for the improvement of semen cryopreservation protocols.

  3. Mitochondrial biogenesis: pharmacological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Organelle biogenesis is concomitant to organelle inheritance during cell division. It is necessary that organelles double their size and divide to give rise to two identical daughter cells. Mitochondrial biogenesis occurs by growth and division of pre-existing organelles and is temporally coordinated with cell cycle events [1]. However, mitochondrial biogenesis is not only produced in association with cell division. It can be produced in response to an oxidative stimulus, to an increase in the energy requirements of the cells, to exercise training, to electrical stimulation, to hormones, during development, in certain mitochondrial diseases, etc. [2]. Mitochondrial biogenesis is therefore defined as the process via which cells increase their individual mitochondrial mass [3]. Recent discoveries have raised attention to mitochondrial biogenesis as a potential target to treat diseases which up to date do not have an efficient cure. Mitochondria, as the major ROS producer and the major antioxidant producer exert a crucial role within the cell mediating processes such as apoptosis, detoxification, Ca2+ buffering, etc. This pivotal role makes mitochondria a potential target to treat a great variety of diseases. Mitochondrial biogenesis can be pharmacologically manipulated. This issue tries to cover a number of approaches to treat several diseases through triggering mitochondrial biogenesis. It contains recent discoveries in this novel field, focusing on advanced mitochondrial therapies to chronic and degenerative diseases, mitochondrial diseases, lifespan extension, mitohormesis, intracellular signaling, new pharmacological targets and natural therapies. It contributes to the field by covering and gathering the scarcely reported pharmacological approaches in the novel and promising field of mitochondrial biogenesis. There are several diseases that have a mitochondrial origin such as chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and the Kearns- Sayre syndrome (KSS

  4. United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Mitochondrial Disease FAQ's MitoFirst Handbook More Information Mito 101 Symposium Archives Get Connected Find an Event Adult Advisory Council Team Ask The Mito Doc Grand Rounds Kids & Teens Medical Child Abuse ...

  5. Kinetics of Ni-Mo electrodeposition from Ni-rich citrate baths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltowska-Lehman, E., E-mail: nmbeltow@imim-pan.krakow.pl; Indyka, P.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of Ni-Mo alloy electrodeposition on steel substrates from an aqueous citrate-ammonia complex baths has been investigated by means of steady-state polarisation measurements in a system with a rotating disc electrode (RDE). Partial current densities for discharge of Ni(II) and Mo(VI) ions and hydrogen evolution as a function of molybdate concentration in the bath, cathode potentials and the rate of mass transport were determined. It has been shown that - under all investigated conditions - Ni-Mo alloy deposition is more favourable than pure nickel and the cathodic process is strongly influenced by the Mo(VI) content in the solution. The Ni(II) electroreduction rate initially increases, as the cathode potential shifts towards more negative values and the concentration of molybdate grows in the solution. However, for the highest examined MoO{sub 4}{sup 2-} content, a considerable decrease in the rate of the process is subsequently observed at certain limit potentials, the values of which depend on molybdate concentration and hydrodynamic conditions. This effect, related to the formation of intermediate molybdenum oxides (characterised by very low overvoltage for hydrogen evolution), becomes less pronounced when the RDE rotation speed is increased. Hydrogen evolution is strongly associated with molybdenum deposition. An increase of the molybdate ions concentration in the bath, as well as an increase in the rate of mass transport, leads to an increase in Mo content in deposits and to the reduction of current efficiency. The Ni-Mo coatings electrodeposited from the designed bath (with the current efficiency of about 70%) containing about 30 wt.% Mo, are characterised by a shiny-grey appearance and good adhesion to the steel substrate. They are characterised by column growth and amorphous microstructure with randomly distributed nanocrystallites of the MoNi{sub 4} intermetallic phase.

  6. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirches, E

    2011-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the 'primary LHON mutations' to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs.

  7. [Mitochondrial diseases and stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, P; Oliveros-Cid, A; Martínez-Vila, E

    1998-04-01

    We review the mitochondrial diseases in which cerebrovascular changes are seen, such as the MERRF syndrome (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers) or the Kearns-Sayre syndrome (progressive external ophthalmoplegia, retinitis pigmentaria, cerebellar disorders and disorders of cardiac conduction), focusing on the syndrome involving mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). We consider the different clinical aspects, diagnostic methods, pathophysiological mechanisms of the cerebrovascular involvement as well as therapeutic approaches.

  8. Mitochondrial protection by resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungvari, Zoltan; Sonntag, William E; de Cabo, Rafael; Baur, Joseph A; Csiszar, Anna

    2011-07-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are thought to play important roles in mammalian aging. Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol that exerts diverse antiaging activities, mimicking some of the molecular and functional effects of dietary restriction. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms underlying the mitochondrial protective effects of resveratrol, which could be exploited for the prevention or amelioration of age-related diseases in the elderly.

  9. Mitochondrial fusion and ERK activity regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein localization in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana Fernanda; Podestá, Ernesto J; Poderoso, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of steroid hormones, known as the transfer of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membrane, is facilitated by StAR, the Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein. We have described that mitochondrial ERK1/2 phosphorylates StAR and that mitochondrial fusion, through the up-regulation of a fusion protein Mitofusin 2, is essential during steroidogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that mitochondrial StAR together with mitochondrial active ERK and PKA are necessary for maximal steroid production. Phosphorylation of StAR by ERK is required for the maintenance of this protein in mitochondria, observed by means of over-expression of a StAR variant lacking the ERK phosphorylation residue. Mitochondrial fusion regulates StAR levels in mitochondria after hormone stimulation. In this study, Mitofusin 2 knockdown and mitochondrial fusion inhibition in MA-10 Leydig cells diminished StAR mRNA levels and concomitantly mitochondrial StAR protein. Together our results unveil the requirement of mitochondrial fusion in the regulation of the localization and mRNA abundance of StAR. We here establish the relevance of mitochondrial phosphorylation events in the correct localization of this key protein to exert its action in specialized cells. These discoveries highlight the importance of mitochondrial fusion and ERK phosphorylation in cholesterol transport by means of directing StAR to the outer mitochondrial membrane to achieve a large number of steroid molecules per unit of StAR.

  10. The impact of citrate introduction at UK syringe exchange programmes: a retrospective cohort study in Cheshire and Merseyside, UK

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    Wareing Michelle

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, it became legal in the UK for syringe exchange programmes (SEPs to provide citrate to injecting drug users to solubilise heroin. Little work has been undertaken on the effect of policy change on SEP function. Here, we examine whether the introduction of citrate in Cheshire and Merseyside SEPs has altered the number of heroin/crack injectors accessing SEPs, the frequency at which heroin/crack injectors visited SEPs and the number of syringes dispensed. Methods Eleven SEPs in Cheshire and Merseyside commenced citrate provision in 2003. SEP-specific data for the six months before and six months after citrate was introduced were extracted from routine monitoring systems relating to heroin and crack injectors. Analyses compared all individuals attending pre and post citrate and matched analyses only those individuals attending in both periods (defined as 'longitudinal attenders'. Non-parametric tests were used throughout. Results Neither new (first seen in either six months period nor established clients visited SEPs more frequently post citrate. New clients collected significantly less syringes per visit post citrate, than pre citrate (14.5,10.0; z = 1.992, P Conclusion The introduction of citrate did not negatively affect SEP attendance. 'Longitudinal attenders' visited SEPs more frequently post citrate, providing staff with greater opportunity for intervention and referral. As the number of syringes they collected each visit remained unchanged the total number of clean syringes made available to this group of injectors increased very slightly between the pre and post citrate periods. However, new clients collected significantly less syringes post citrate than pre citrate, possibly due to staff concerns regarding the amount of citrate (and thus syringes to dispense safely to new clients. These concerns should not be allowed to negatively impact on the number of syringes dispensed.

  11. Closed circuit recovery of copper, lead and iron from electronic waste with citrate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Robinson; Lapidus, Gretchen T

    2017-02-01

    An integral closed circuit hydrometallurgical process is presented for base metal recovery from electronic waste. The leaching medium consists of a sodium citrate solution, from which base metals are retrieved by direct electrowinning, and the barren solution is recycled back to the leaching stage. This leaching-electrowinning cycle was repeated four times. The redox properties of