WorldWideScience

Sample records for microscopic cluster study

  1. Structures of $p$-shell double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei studied with microscopic cluster models

    OpenAIRE

    Kanada-En'yo, Yoshiko

    2018-01-01

    $0s$-orbit $\\Lambda$ states in $p$-shell double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei ($^{\\ \\,A}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}Z$), $^{\\ \\,8}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Li}$, $^{\\ \\,9}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Li}$, $^{10,11,12}_{\\ \\ \\ \\ \\ \\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{Be}$, $^{12,13}_{\\ \\ \\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{B}$, and $^{\\,14}_{\\Lambda\\Lambda}\\textrm{C}$ are investigated. Microscopic cluster models are applied to core nuclear part and a potential model is adopted for $\\Lambda$ particles. The $\\Lambda$-core potential is a folding ...

  2. Microscopic Cluster Theory for Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, M; Kuehl, T; Ursescu, D; Fritzsche, S

    2006-01-01

    For a better understanding of the dynamics of complex exotic nuclei it is of crucial importance to develop a practical microscopic theory easy to be applied to a wide range of masses. In this paper we propose to calculate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei within a dynamic model based on the EoM theory

  3. A new clustering algorithm for scanning electron microscope images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Amr; Duraisamy, Prakash; Karim, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning it with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with the sample atoms, producing various signals that are collected by detectors. The gathered signals contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is generally scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. The most common configuration for an SEM produces a single value per pixel, with the results usually rendered as grayscale images. The captured images may be produced with insufficient brightness, anomalous contrast, jagged edges, and poor quality due to low signal-to-noise ratio, grained topography and poor surface details. The segmentation of the SEM images is a tackling problems in the presence of the previously mentioned distortions. In this paper, we are stressing on the clustering of these type of images. In that sense, we evaluate the performance of the well-known unsupervised clustering and classification techniques such as connectivity based clustering (hierarchical clustering), centroid-based clustering, distribution-based clustering and density-based clustering. Furthermore, we propose a new spatial fuzzy clustering technique that works efficiently on this type of images and compare its results against these regular techniques in terms of clustering validation metrics.

  4. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations

  5. Electron microscope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  6. Microscopic description of the nuclear-cluster theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.C.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this series of lectures is to explain the foundation of, the techniques used in, and the results obtained by microscopic cluster theory (MCT). In particular, the important role played by the Pauli principle in determining nuclear characteristics will be extensively discussed

  7. Microscopic Electron Variations Measured Simultaneously By The Cluster Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, A. M.; Carozzi, T. D.; Gough, M. P.; Beloff, N.

    Data is used from the Particle Correlator experiments running on each of the four Cluster spacecraft so as to determine common microscopic behaviour in the elec- tron population observed over the macroscopic Cluster separations. The Cluster par- ticle correlator experiments operate by forming on board Auto Correlation Functions (ACFs) generated from short time series of electron counts obtained, as a function of electron energy, from the PEACE HEEA sensor. The information on the microscopic variation of the electron flux covers the frequency range DC up to 41 kHz (encom- passing typical electron plasma frequencies and electron gyro frequencies and their harmonics), the electron energy range is that covered by the PEACE HEEA sensor (within the range 1 eV to 26 keV). Results are presented of coherent electron struc- tures observed simultaneously by the four spacecraft in the differing plasma interac- tion regions and boundaries encountered by Cluster. As an aid to understanding the plasma interactions, use is made of numerical simulations which model both the un- derlying statistical properties of the electrons and also the manner in which particle correlator experiments operate.

  8. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1991-01-01

    This year our laboratory has continued to make progress in the design of electron-optical systems, in the study of structure-function relationships of large multi-subunit proteins, in the development of new image processing software and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. We present an algebraic approach to the symmetrical Einzel (unipotential) lens wherein we simplify the analysis by specifying a field shape that meets some preferred set of boundary or other conditions and then calculate the fields. In a second study we generalize this approach to study of three element electrostatic lenses of which the symmetrical Einzel lens is a particular form. The purpose is to develop a method for assisting in the design of a lens for a particular purpose. In our biological work we study a stable and functional dodecameric complex of globin chains from the hemoglobin of Lumbricus terrestris. This is a complex lacking the ''linker'' subunit first imaged in this lab and required for maintenance of the native structure. In addition, we do a complete work-up on the hemoglobin of the marine polychaete Eudistylia vancouverii demonstrating the presence of a hierarchy of globin complexes. We demonstrate stable field-emission in the sub-angstrom STEM and the preliminary alignment of the beam. We continue our exploration of a algorithms for alignment of sequences of protein and DNA. Our computer facilities now include four second generation RISC workstations and we continue to take increasing advantage of the floating-point and graphical performance of these devices

  9. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1990-01-01

    Our laboratory has made significant progress this year in devising improved electron-optical systems, in studying invertebrate hemoglobins with the STEM, and in achieving a workable sub-angstrom STEM. Our goal in electron optics is to improve resolution by producing spherical and chromatic aberration coefficients with signs opposite those of magnetic lenses. We have progressed toward this goal through calculations that explore the addition of electrodes to electron mirrors to reduce these two geometric aberrations and by devising a beam separation system that won't introduce asymmetrical aberrations. Some promising new designs of magnetic lenses for SEM applications have also been investigated. We have continued our exploration of the quaternary structure of the invertebrate hemoglobins and are now among the top laboratories in this area of expertise. In addition, we have overcome many of our electronic difficulties on the sub-angstrom STEM and have made significant progress toward achieving an operational system. The addition of an IBM RISC-6000 workstation to our lab has significantly increased our image processing capabilities

  10. Quantitative properties of clustering within modern microscopic nuclear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volya, A.; Tchuvil’sky, Yu. M.

    2016-01-01

    A method for studying cluster spectroscopic properties of nuclear fragmentation, such as spectroscopic amplitudes, cluster form factors, and spectroscopic factors, is developed on the basis of modern precision nuclear models that take into account the mixing of large-scale shell-model configurations. Alpha-cluster channels are considered as an example. A mathematical proof of the need for taking into account the channel-wave-function renormalization generated by exchange terms of the antisymmetrization operator (Fliessbach effect) is given. Examples where this effect is confirmed by a high quality of the description of experimental data are presented. By and large, the method in question extends substantially the possibilities for studying clustering phenomena in nuclei and for improving the quality of their description.

  11. Electron microscope study of vacancy clusters produced by quenching in magnesium; Etude par microscopie electronique des amas de lacunes crees par trempe dans le magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, V; Espinasse, J; Mairy, C; Hillairet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    Vacancy clustering in quenched magnesium has been studied by transmission electron microscopy. The nature of the vacancy loops observed, seems to depend essentially on the impurity content of the metal; this effect can be attributed to a variation of the stacking fault energy of magnesium due to impurities. (authors) [French] On a etudie par microscopie electronique en transmission les defauts crees par trempe dans le magnesium. Un effet considerable des impuretes du metal sur la nature des boucles obtenues par condensation de lacunes a ete mis en evidence; cet effet semble s'expliquer de facon satisfaisante par un abaissement de l'energie de faute d'empilement du magnesium du aux impuretes. (auteur)

  12. Cluster secondary ion mass spectrometry microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András; Smith, Donald F; Jungmann, Julia H; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-30

    Microscope mode imaging for secondary ion mass spectrometry is a technique with the promise of simultaneous high spatial resolution and high-speed imaging of biomolecules from complex surfaces. Technological developments such as new position-sensitive detectors, in combination with polyatomic primary ion sources, are required to exploit the full potential of microscope mode mass spectrometry imaging, i.e. to efficiently push the limits of ultra-high spatial resolution, sample throughput and sensitivity. In this work, a C60 primary source was combined with a commercial mass microscope for microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The detector setup is a pixelated detector from the Medipix/Timepix family with high-voltage post-acceleration capabilities. The system's mass spectral and imaging performance is tested with various benchmark samples and thin tissue sections. The high secondary ion yield (with respect to 'traditional' monatomic primary ion sources) of the C60 primary ion source and the increased sensitivity of the high voltage detector setup improve microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. The analysis time and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved compared with other microscope mode imaging systems, all at high spatial resolution. We have demonstrated the unique capabilities of a C60 ion microscope with a Timepix detector for high spatial resolution microscope mode secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. MACROSCOPICAL AND MICROSCOPICAL STUDIES ON THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caesalpinia crista leaves are bipinnate of about six pairs with alternate leaflets while the stem us fibrous, cylindrical hollow and prickly. Microscopical examination revealed the presence of strained cuticle, straight-walled epidermal cells, paracytic stomata, unicellular covering trichomes, fibres, prisms as well as cluster of ...

  14. Electron microscope study of irradiated beryllium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisson, A.A.

    1965-06-01

    The beryllium oxide is studied first by fractography, before and after irradiation, using sintered samples. The fractures are examined under different aspects. The higher density sintered samples, with transgranular fractures are the most interesting for a microscopic study. It is possible to mark the difference between the 'pores' left by the sintering process and the 'bubbles' of gases that can be produced by former thermal treatments. After irradiation, the grain boundaries are very much weakened. By annealing, it is possible to observe the evolution of the gases produced by the reaction (n, 2n) and (n. α) and gathered on the grain boundaries. The irradiated beryllium oxide is afterwards studied by transmission. For that, a simple method has been used: little chips of the crushed material are examined. Clusters of point defects produced by neutrons are thus detected in crystals irradiated at the three following doses: 6 x 10 19 , 9 x 10 19 and 2 x 10 20 n f cm -2 at a temperature below 100 deg. C. For the irradiation at 6 x 10 19 n f cm -2 , the defects are merely visible, but at 2 x l0 20 n f cm -2 the crystals an crowded with clusters and the Kikuchi lines have disappeared from the micro-diffraction diagrams. The evolution of the clusters into dislocation loops is studied by a series of annealings. The activation energy (0,37 eV) calculated from the annealing curves suggests that it must be interstitials that condense into dislocation loops. Samples irradiated at high temperatures (650, 900 and 1100 deg. C) are also studied. In those specimens the size of the loops is not the same as the equilibrium size obtained after out of pile annealing at the same temperature. Those former loops are more specifically studied and their Burgers vector is determined by micro-diffraction. (author) [fr

  15. Theoretical study of the microscopic appearance of the capture and storage of CO2 by zeolites: Studies of Zn-imidazole and triazole clusters with CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulmene, Rida

    2016-01-01

    Several experimental and theoretical studies have shown the ability of zeolitic-imidazole frameworks (ZIFs) materials to capture the CO 2 gas. In this study, we have focused on the interaction of CO 2 with one of the sub-unit of ZIFs i.e. the complex between the imidazole and zinc (Im-Zn+q, q = 0,1, 2) or triazole without zinc. Various adsorption sites are examined for these complexes.The calculations were performed using ab initio methods MP2; CCSD(T)-F12 and density functional theory with PBE PBE0, M1 and M05-2X functionals with different basis set (aug-cc-pVDZ, aug-cc-pVTZ and 6-311++G(d, p), tightly integrated in GAUSSIAN and MOLPRO packages. The Grimme corrections for dispersion forces description (DFT-D3) are also included. Our results shows that the stability of our complex structures is achieved by the presence of strong covalent bonds (chemical bonds of organic ligands) and also by Van der Waals and hydrogen weak bonds. Both types of bonding are in competition. This allowed us to better understand the experimental observations. (author)

  16. Nuclear clustering - a cluster core model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Selvi, G.; Nandhini, N.; Balasubramaniam, M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear clustering, similar to other clustering phenomenon in nature is a much warranted study, since it would help us in understanding the nature of binding of the nucleons inside the nucleus, closed shell behaviour when the system is highly deformed, dynamics and structure at extremes. Several models account for the clustering phenomenon of nuclei. We present in this work, a cluster core model study of nuclear clustering in light mass nuclei

  17. Study of the sup 3 H( sup 3 H, 2n) sup 4 He and sup 3 He( sup 3 He, 2p) sup 4 He reactions in the framework of three-cluster microscopic model

    CERN Document Server

    Vasilevsky, V S; Arickx, F; Broeckhove, J

    2002-01-01

    The reactions sup 3 H( sup 3 H, 2n) sup 4 He and sup 3 He( sup 3 He, 2p) sup 4 He are investigated within a fully microscopic cluster model featuring a three-cluster exit channel. A Hyperspherical Harmonics basis is used to describe the three-cluster continuum. The resulting astrophysical s-factor of both reactions is in good agreement with experimental data. Analysis of the low-energy scattering parameters reveals no evidence for a hidden resonance state would increase the cross-section of the reactions, and would help to resolve the solar neutrino problem.

  18. 14O+p elastic scattering in a microscopic cluster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D.; Leo, F.

    2006-01-01

    The 14O+p elastic scattering is analyzed in a fully microscopic cluster model. With the Resonating Group Method associated with the microscopic R-matrix theory, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated. Data on 16O+p are used to test the precision of the model. For the 14O+p elastic scattering, an excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. Resonances properties in 15F are discussed

  19. Spectra of nuclei 9Be and 9B in a three-cluster microscopic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, A.V.; Vasilevsky, V.S.; Kovalenko, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Within a microscopic three-cluster α + α + n(p) model, which is a three-cluster version of the algebraic approach to the Resonating Group Method (RGM), we consider the spectra of the low-lying states of mirror nuclei 9 Be and 9 B in the energy range from zero to 5 MeV excitation. The obtained theoretical results are compared with the available experimental data

  20. Microscopic hydrodynamics study with nuclear track membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilun Guo; Yuhua Zhao; Yulan Wang; Hiuhong Hao; Brandt, R.; Vater, P.

    1988-01-01

    Microscopic hydrodynamics has been studied using different liquids and nuclear track membranes with pores perpendicularly piercing through them. The flow rate of water and alcohol has been studied with polycarbonate track membranes with pore diameters 1.48 micrometres and 1.08 micrometres. It has been shown that the flow rate both for water and alcohol on a microscopic scale can be determined by the Poiseuille law which characterizes macroscopic laminar flow. The Reynolds number used in macroscopic fluid flow has been calculated from the flow rate and parameters of the liquids and the geometry of the pores. It has been shown that this Reynolds number can also be used to characterize microscopic flow. Based on the above results, the filtration capacity (or limit) of polycarbonate track microfilters for water had been calculated. Some possible limits on the application of the calculation are pointed out and discussed. (author)

  1. Study of Scanning Tunneling Microscope control electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, A.J.; Pancarobo, M.; Denisenko, N.; Aguilar, M.; Rejon, V.; Pena, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical study of Scanning Tunneling Microscope control electronics is made. The knowledge of its behaviour allows us to determine accurately the region where the unstable operation could effect the measurements, and also to set the optimal working parameters. Each feedback circuitry compound is discussed as well as their mutual interaction. Different working conditions analysis and results are presented. (Author) 12 refs

  2. SUPERVISED AUTOMATIC HISTOGRAM CLUSTERING AND WATERSHED SEGMENTATION. APPLICATION TO MICROSCOPIC MEDICAL COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Lezoray

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an approach to the segmentation of microscopic color images is addressed, and applied to medical images. The approach combines a clustering method and a region growing method. Each color plane is segmented independently relying on a watershed based clustering of the plane histogram. The marginal segmentation maps intersect in a label concordance map. The latter map is simplified based on the assumption that the color planes are correlated. This produces a simplified label concordance map containing labeled and unlabeled pixels. The formers are used as an image of seeds for a color watershed. This fast and robust segmentation scheme is applied to several types of medical images.

  3. Microscopic cluster model analysis of 14O+p elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.; Leo, F.

    2005-01-01

    The 14 O+p elastic scattering is discussed in detail in a fully microscopic cluster model. The 14 O cluster is described by a closed p shell for protons and a closed p3/2 subshell for neutrons in the translation-invariant harmonic-oscillator model. The exchange and spin-orbit parameters of the effective forces are tuned on the energy levels of the 15 C mirror system. With the generator-coordinate and microscopic R-matrix methods, phase shifts and cross sections are calculated for the 14 O+p elastic scattering. An excellent agreement is found with recent experimental data. A comparison is performed with phenomenological R-matrix fits. Resonances properties in 15 F are discussed

  4. Light nuclei: an experimental proving ground for the microscopic cluster model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    A selected review is given of comparisons of experimental data for low-mass nuclear systems with results of calculations using microscopic cluster models. Stress is on the mass-4, -7, and -8 systems. Topics include influence of components of the nucleon-nucleon force, some consequences of the Pauli principle, effects of the Coulomb-exchange interaction, specific distortion, absorption in elastic scattering, and future needs and directions. Some as yet unpublished results are presented

  5. Field ion microscope studies on thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaleru, A.; Scortaru, A.

    1976-01-01

    A review of the progress made in the last years in FIM application to thin film structure studies and adatom properties important in the nucleation stage of thin film growth: substrate binding and mobility of individual adatoms, behaviour of adatoms clusters is presented. (author)

  6. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  7. A method to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster using conventional optical microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyeonggon; Attota, Ravikiran; Tondare, Vipin; Vladár, András E.; Kavuri, Premsagar

    2015-01-01

    We present a method that uses conventional optical microscopes to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster, which is typically not possible using traditional image-based optical methods due to the diffraction limit. The method, called through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM), uses a series of optical images taken at varying focus levels to achieve this. The optical images cannot directly resolve the individual nanoparticles, but contain information related to the number of particles. The TSOM method makes use of this information to determine the number of nanoparticles in a cluster. Initial good agreement between the simulations and the measurements is also presented. The TSOM method can be applied to fluorescent and non-fluorescent as well as metallic and non-metallic nano-scale materials, including soft materials, making it attractive for tag-less, high-speed, optical analysis of nanoparticles down to 45 nm diameter

  8. Nucleus and cytoplasm segmentation in microscopic images using K-means clustering and region growing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrafzadeh, Omid; Dehnavi, Alireza Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Segmentation of leukocytes acts as the foundation for all automated image-based hematological disease recognition systems. Most of the time, hematologists are interested in evaluation of white blood cells only. Digital image processing techniques can help them in their analysis and diagnosis. The main objective of this paper is to detect leukocytes from a blood smear microscopic image and segment them into their two dominant elements, nucleus and cytoplasm. The segmentation is conducted using two stages of applying K-means clustering. First, the nuclei are segmented using K-means clustering. Then, a proposed method based on region growing is applied to separate the connected nuclei. Next, the nuclei are subtracted from the original image. Finally, the cytoplasm is segmented using the second stage of K-means clustering. The results indicate that the proposed method is able to extract the nucleus and cytoplasm regions accurately and works well even though there is no significant contrast between the components in the image. In this paper, a method based on K-means clustering and region growing is proposed in order to detect leukocytes from a blood smear microscopic image and segment its components, the nucleus and the cytoplasm. As region growing step of the algorithm relies on the information of edges, it will not able to separate the connected nuclei more accurately in poor edges and it requires at least a weak edge to exist between the nuclei. The nucleus and cytoplasm segments of a leukocyte can be used for feature extraction and classification which leads to automated leukemia detection.

  9. Microscopic description of 7Li and 7Be for the DWBA treatment of cluster transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, K.F.; Lovas, R.G.; Gyarmati, B.; Vertse, T.; Nagarajan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    The overlap of the α-t interaction times, the 7 Li wave function with the product of the α and t wave functions, and the analogous quantity for the charge-conjugate system are calculated on microscopic grounds. This quantity contains the structure information on the 7 Li nucleus in the standard finite-range DWBA description of α and t stripping from and pick-up to 7 Li. This nucleus is described in the generator-coordinate model assuming the α+t two-cluster structure and schematic nucleon-nucleon forces. The model reproduces the measured g.s. properties reasonably. The microscopic potential overlap is obtained to be very different from those calculated with using local macroscopic α-t interactions, but the difference in the 12 C( 7 Li,t) 16 O cross section is only dramatic at backward angles. To facilitate further DWBA analyses, several versions of the potential overlap as well as the overlap without the potential are given in an easily accessible form. (author)

  10. Microscopic studies of RIB target materials and ion induced nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karmakar, Prasanta; Bhattacharya, Shampa; Roy, Tapatee Kundu; Bhowmick, Debasis; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2010-01-01

    The invention of electron microscope and scanning probe microscope has empowered us to visualize the tiny world that has explored many fundamental laws of natures. Further technological advancements have made these tools capable to probe micron size structures to individual atom. These microscopes are used to image and study micron size fibers or grain structures used for high yield radioactive products, to few nanometer size ripple, dot and hole structures produced by ion irradiation. Electron Microscope has also been used to characterize the ion beam synthesized dilute magnetic systems

  11. Electron microscope studies on nuclear track filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roell, I.; Siegmon, W.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear track filters became more and more important in various fields of application. The filtration process can be described by a set of suitable parameters. For some applications it may be necessary to know the structure of the surface and the pores themselves. In most cases the etching process yields surfaces and pore geometries that are quite different from ideal planes and cylinders. In the presented work the production of different filter types will be described. The resulting surfaces and pore structures have been investigated by means of a scanning electron microscope. (author)

  12. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  13. Moessbauer studies of microscopic disorder in solid electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, M.

    1987-01-01

    We implement for the first time Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) to investigate short-range properties of disorder in solid electrolytes. MS in 129 I and 119 Sn was carried out in RbAg 4 I 5 and as impurity in Ag 2 Se, respectively. Measurements were performed both in the superionic and the normal phases. It is shown that localized cation hopping is an inherent feature of the α-AgI-type solid electrolytes. In RbAg 4 I 5 , at temperatures far below T c , a small fraction of Ag is still locally mobile and at T>T c , its concentration increases exponentially. A strong linear temperature dependence of the point-charge electric field gradient is observed and explained in terms of local hopping. With 119 Sn in Ag 2 Se we observe the onset of 'local melting' of the Ag surroundingt the SnSe 4 cluster at 50 K below the bulk superionic phase transition. The characteristic features of MS related to microscopic studies of solid electrolytes are fully described. (orig.)

  14. Dental Wear: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental wear can be differentiated into different types on the basis of morphological and etiological factors. The present research was carried out on twelve extracted human teeth with dental wear (three teeth showing each type of wear: erosion, attrition, abrasion, and abfraction studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The study aimed, through analysis of the macro- and micromorphological features of the lesions (considering the enamel, dentin, enamel prisms, dentinal tubules, and pulp, to clarify the different clinical and diagnostic presentations of dental wear and their possible significance. Our results, which confirm current knowledge, provide a complete overview of the distinctive morphology of each lesion type. It is important to identify the type of dental wear lesion in order to recognize the contributing etiological factors and, consequently, identify other more complex, nondental disorders (such as gastroesophageal reflux, eating disorders. It is clear that each type of lesion has a specific morphology and mechanism, and further clinical studies are needed to clarify the etiological processes, particularly those underlying the onset of abfraction.

  15. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga + -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga + density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Analytical electron microscope study of eight ataxites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, P. M.; Goldstein, J. I.; Williams, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Optical and electron optical (SEM, TEM, AEM) techniques were employed to investigate the fine structure of eight ataxite-iron meteorites. Structural studies indicated that the ataxites can be divided into two groups: a Widmanstaetten decomposition group and a martensite decomposition group. The Widmanstaetten decomposition group has a Type I plessite microstructure and the central taenite regions contain highly dislocated lath martensite. The steep M shaped Ni gradients in the taenite are consistent with the fast cooling rates, of not less than 500 C/my, observed for this group. The martensite decomposition group has a Type III plessite microstructure and contains all the chemical group IVB ataxites. The maximum taenite Ni contents vary from 47.5 to 52.7 wt % and are consistent with slow cooling to low temperatures of not greater than 350 C at cooling rates of not greater than 25 C/my.

  17. Microscopic study of edema in hydatidiform mole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivar C. Castejón

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: the purpose of this study is to use light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of edema on the structure of the molar vesicle. Methods: samples were taken from the complete hydatidiform mole and processed using conventional light and scanning electron microscopy techniques and an observation protocol that identified four variables: factors underlying the development of edema; the condition of the trophoblast basement membrane, development of the villi, accumulation and degeneration of sulphated mucosubstances at stromal level. Results: light microscopy showed a permeable trophoblastic basement membrane, a swollen syncytium, edematous regions disorganizating the stromal region and causing ischemic necrosis of cells. Using scanning electron microscopy, the basement membrane was found to be distended and thickened, with large irregular holes for the entry and movement of liquid, leaving a wide range of fluids during the influx process and depriving stromal cells of nutrition. Conclusions: a new three-dimensional view of the changes brought about by the entry of fluids into the stroma of molar hydropic vesicles was provided by scanning electron microscopy and confirmed by light microscopy, thereby explaining the changes occurring at the level of the stroma as an effect of the edema.

  18. Cluster properties of the one-dimensional lattice gas: the microscopic meaning of grand potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronczak, Agata

    2013-02-01

    Using a concrete example, we demonstrate how the combinatorial approach to a general system of particles, which was introduced in detail in an earlier paper [Fronczak, Phys. Rev. E 86, 041139 (2012)], works and where this approach provides a genuine extension of results obtained through more traditional methods of statistical mechanics. We study the cluster properties of a one-dimensional lattice gas with nearest-neighbor interactions. Three cases (the infinite temperature limit, the range of finite temperatures, and the zero temperature limit) are discussed separately, yielding interesting results and providing alternative proof of known results. In particular, the closed-form expression for the grand partition function in the zero temperature limit is obtained, which results in the nonanalytic behavior of the grand potential, in accordance with the Yang-Lee theory.

  19. Iterative Stable Alignment and Clustering of 2D Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengfan; Fang, Jia; Chittuluru, Johnathan; Asturias, Francisco J.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification of homogeneous subsets of images in a macromolecular electron microscopy (EM) image data set is a critical step in single-particle analysis. The task is handled by iterative algorithms, whose performance is compromised by the compounded limitations of image alignment and K-means clustering. Here we describe an approach, iterative stable alignment and clustering (ISAC) that, relying on a new clustering method and on the concepts of stability and reproducibility, can extract validated, homogeneous subsets of images. ISAC requires only a small number of simple parameters and, with minimal human intervention, can eliminate bias from two-dimensional image clustering and maximize the quality of group averages that can be used for ab initio three-dimensional structural determination and analysis of macromolecular conformational variability. Repeated testing of the stability and reproducibility of a solution within ISAC eliminates heterogeneous or incorrect classes and introduces critical validation to the process of EM image clustering. PMID:22325773

  20. Virtual reality microscope versus conventional microscope regarding time to diagnosis: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randell, Rebecca; Ruddle, Roy A; Mello-Thoms, Claudia; Thomas, Rhys G; Quirke, Phil; Treanor, Darren

    2013-01-01

      To create and evaluate a virtual reality (VR) microscope that is as efficient as the conventional microscope, seeking to support the introduction of digital slides into routine practice.   A VR microscope was designed and implemented by combining ultra-high-resolution displays with VR technology, techniques for fast interaction, and high usability. It was evaluated using a mixed factorial experimental design with technology and task as within-participant variables and grade of histopathologist as a between-participant variable. Time to diagnosis was similar for the conventional and VR microscopes. However, there was a significant difference in the mean magnification used between the two technologies, with participants working at a higher level of magnification on the VR microscope.   The results suggest that, with the right technology, efficient use of digital pathology for routine practice is a realistic possibility. Further work is required to explore what magnification is required on the VR microscope for histopathologists to identify diagnostic features, and the effect on this of the digital slide production process. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  1. Efficacy of oral exfoliative cytology in diabetes mellitus patients: a light microscopic and confocal microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Deepika; Malathi, N; Reddy, B Thirupathi

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has become a global problem. By monitoring the health status of these individuals, diabetic complications can be prevented. We aimed to analyze alterations in the morphology and cytomorphometry of buccal epithelial cells of type 2 DM patients using oral exfoliative cytology technique and determine its importance in public health screening, diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus. The study was carried out in 100 type 2 DM patients and 30 healthy individuals. Smears were taken from the right buccal mucosa and stained by the Papanicolaou technique. Staining with Acridine orange was carried out to view qualitative changes with confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM-510 Meta). The cytomorphometry was evaluated using IMAGE PRO PLUS 5.5 software with Evolution LC camera. All findings were statistically analyzed. The results showed that with increase in fasting plasma glucose levels, there is significant increase in nuclear area, decrease in cytoplasmic area, and increase in nuclear cytoplasmic ratio (p inclusion, candida and keratinization. In the present study, we found significant alterations in the cytomorphometry and cytomorphology of buccal epithelial cells of type 2 DM patients. This study supports and extends the view that these cellular changes can alert the clinician to the possibility of diabetes and aid in monitoring of diabetes throughout the lifetime of the patient.

  2. Microscopic study of low-lying yrast spectra and deformation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    73, No. 4. — journal of. October 2009 physics pp. 657–668. Microscopic study of low-lying yrast spectra and deformation systematics in neutron-rich. 98−106Sr isotopes ... with a large and rigid moment of inertia. 98Sr is predicted to have a ... 2 energy as neutron number N changes from 58 to 60. The onset of deformation in ...

  3. Further microscopic studies of the fission barriers of heavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nhan Hao, T.V.; Le Bloas, J.; Bonneau, L.; Quentin, P.; Koh, Meng-Hock

    2012-01-01

    Two systematic sources of error in most current microscopic evaluations of fission-barrier heights are studied. They are concerned with an approximate treatment of the Coulomb exchange terms (known as the Slater approximation) in the self-consistent mean-fields and the projection on good parity states (e.g., of positive parity for the spontaneous fission of an even–even nucleus) of left–right reflection asymmetric intrinsic solutions (e.g., around the second barrier). Approximate or unprojected solutions are shown to lead each to an underestimation of the barrier heights by a few hundred keV. (author)

  4. Microscopic study of rock for estimating long-term behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yasuaki

    2004-02-01

    Micro-structure of rock plays an essential role for their long-term behavior. For understanding long-term characteristics of granite we here present the followings: 1) observation of microcrack initiation and propagation by Conforcal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM) under uniaxial compression (before loading and at each loading stage), 2) characterization of the mechanism of microcrack initiation and propagation observed by stereoscopic microscope under uniaxial/triaxial compression and relaxation tests, and 3) a study of strong discontinuity analysis included in the homogenization theory to predict the long-term behavior of micro/macro-level stress for granite. First, CLSM was used to acquire clearly focused three-dimensional images of granite specimens, and observed the change of microscale structure including the mineral configuration under applying uniaxial compression stress. Then though microcracks have ever thought to be initiated and propagated on intergranular boundaries, we understand through the CLSM observation that new microcracks are generated from the ends of pre-existing cracks which are distributed in quartz and biotite. Second, we showed the results of stress-relaxation test of granite specimens observed by an optical microscope under water-saturated triaxial compression condition. Since microcrack generation and propagation play an essential role to predict the long-term behavior of rock, we managed the experiments with careful attention of 1) keeping constant edge-displacement and constant strain in the whole specimen accurately, and 2) measuring the relaxed stress exactly. Next, in order to simulate the experimental results which indicate that initiation and propagation of microcracks control the stress-relaxation phenomenon, we introduce a homogenization analysis procedure together with the strong discontinuity analysis which has recently established the mechanical implication and mathematical foundation. The numerical results show that we can

  5. Cluster expression in fission and fusion in high-dimensional macroscopic-microscopic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Akira; Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Moller, Peter; Sierk, Arnold J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the relation between the fission-fusion potential-energy surfaces of very heavy nuclei and the formation process of these nuclei in cold-fusion reactions. In the potential-energy surfaces, we find a pronounced valley structure, with one valley corresponding to the cold-fusion reaction, the other to fission. As the touching point is approached in the cold-fusion entrance channel, an instability towards dynamical deformation of the projectile occurs, which enhances the fusion cross section. These two 'cluster effects' enhance the production of superheavy nuclei in cold-fusion reactions, in addition to the effect of the low compound-system excitation energy in these reactions. Heavy-ion fusion reactions have been used extensively to synthesize heavy elements beyond actinide nuclei. In order to proceed further in this direction, we need to understand the formation process more precisely, not just the decay process. The dynamics of the formation process are considerably more complex than the dynamics necessary to interpret the spontaneous-fission decay of heavy elements. However, before implementing a full dynamical description it is useful to understand the basic properties of the potential-energy landscape encountered in the initial stages of the collision. The collision process and entrance-channel landscape can conveniently be separated into two parts, namely the early-stage separated system before touching and the late-stage composite system after touching. The transition between these two stages is particularly important, but not very well understood until now. To understand better the transition between the two stages we analyze here in detail the potential energy landscape or 'collision surface' of the system both outside and inside the touching configuration of the target and projectile. In Sec. 2, we discuss calculated five-dimensional potential-energy landscapes inside touching and identify major features. In Sec. 3, we present calculated

  6. Microscopic study of rock for estimating long-term behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yasuaki

    1997-03-01

    One must consider micro-structures of rock and rock mass in order to predict the long-term behavior for more than ten thousand years. First we observe the micro-crack distribution of granite which is commonly distributed in Japan, and is widely used for several structures. The creep under constant load and the relaxation under constant displacement are typical time dependent phenomena, and we performed a series of relaxation tests under microscope observation in laboratory. The specimen that is preserved in water is granite as mentioned above. The aim of this experiment is to observe the sequential propagation of micro-cracks and its affect to the macroscopic response of the rock material under relaxation state. Next, a viscoelastic homogenization method is applied for analyzing the behavior of granite that is composed of several kinds of minerals (i.e., a polycrystalline material). The homogenization method developed for analyzing mechanics of composite materials is a mathematical theory that can describe the macroscopic behavior accounting for the microscopic characteristics with periodic microstructures. In this study, it is applied to a polycrystalline rock which involves a few minerals and micro-cracks. Furthermore, it is required to apply the homogenization analysis for rock materials which show a nonlinear time dependent behavior, so we develop a new elasto-visco-plastic homogenization theory, and its validity is checked for some ground structures made by clay. (author)

  7. Studying dark energy with galaxy cluster surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, Joseph J.; O'Shea, Brian; Evrard, August E.; Bialek, John; Haiman, Zoltan

    2003-01-01

    Galaxy cluster surveys provide a powerful means of studying the density and nature of the dark energy. The redshift distribution of detected clusters in a deep, large solid angle SZE or X-ray survey is highly sensitive to the dark energy equation of state. Accurate constraints at the 5% level on the dark energy equation of state require that systematic biases in the mass estimators must be controlled at better than the ∼10% level. Observed regularity in the cluster population and the availability of multiple, independent mass estimators suggests these precise measurements are possible. Using hydrodynamical simulations that include preheating, we show that the level of preheating required to explain local galaxy cluster structure has a dramatic effect on X-ray cluster surveys, but only a mild effect on SZE surveys. This suggests that SZE surveys may be optimal for cosmology while X-ray surveys are well suited for studies of the thermal history of the intracluster medium

  8. Are clusters of dietary patterns and cluster membership stable over time? Results of a longitudinal cluster analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walthouwer, Michel Jean Louis; Oenema, Anke; Soetens, Katja; Lechner, Lilian; de Vries, Hein

    2014-11-01

    Developing nutrition education interventions based on clusters of dietary patterns can only be done adequately when it is clear if distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived and reproduced over time, if cluster membership is stable, and if it is predictable which type of people belong to a certain cluster. Hence, this study aimed to: (1) identify clusters of dietary patterns among Dutch adults, (2) test the reproducibility of these clusters and stability of cluster membership over time, and (3) identify sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. This study had a longitudinal design with online measurements at baseline (N=483) and 6 months follow-up (N=379). Dietary intake was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed, followed by a K-means cluster analysis. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify the sociodemographic predictors of cluster membership and cluster transition. At baseline and follow-up, a comparable three-cluster solution was derived, distinguishing a healthy, moderately healthy, and unhealthy dietary pattern. Male and lower educated participants were significantly more likely to have a less healthy dietary pattern. Further, 251 (66.2%) participants remained in the same cluster, 45 (11.9%) participants changed to an unhealthier cluster, and 83 (21.9%) participants shifted to a healthier cluster. Men and people living alone were significantly more likely to shift toward a less healthy dietary pattern. Distinctive clusters of dietary patterns can be derived. Yet, cluster membership is unstable and only few sociodemographic factors were associated with cluster membership and cluster transition. These findings imply that clusters based on dietary intake may not be suitable as a basis for nutrition education interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron-microscope study of cloud and fog nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, S; Okita, T

    1952-01-01

    Droplets of clouds on a mountain and of fog in an urban area were captured and the form, nature and size of their nuclei were studied by means of an electron-microscope and by a chamber of constant humidity. These nuclei have similar form and nature to the hygroscopic particles in haze and to the artificially produced combustion particles. No sea-salt nuclei were found in our observations, therefore, sea-spray appears to be an insignificant source of condensation nuclei. It was found that both the cloud and the fog nuclei originated in combustion products which were the mixture of hygroscopic and non-hygroscopic substances, and that the greater part of the nuclei did not contain pure sulfuric acid.

  10. Pigmentosis tubae, a new entity: light and electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, G.A.; Reimann, B.E.; Greenberg, H.L.; Miles, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    The authors noted an unusual finding in the fallopian tubes of a 31-year-old woman who had received external and internal whole pelvis radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Aggregates of macrophages containing pigment, identified in a subepithelial location, were reminiscent of melanosis coli, which is caused by abuse of anthracene-containing laxatives. Electron microscopic examination of the pigment revealed cytoplasmic material with the appearance of lipofuscin, identical to the pigment described in cases of colonic melanosis. After a careful study of possible etiologic agents, it was concluded that the pigment most likely resulted from cellular damage caused by radiotherapy. The authors are not aware of any other reported case of this entity, which will be called pigmentosis tubae

  11. Study of the diffraction in the microscope: Annular condenser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocci, L; Echarri, R M; Simon, J M

    2011-01-01

    In this work we study the diffraction in the microscope when an annular condenser is used to illuminate the object. We calculate the point spread function (PSF) for a pinhole in an opaque screen illuminated with an annular condenser, consisting in an 1D array of incoherent point sources. We compare it with the PSF for a self-luminous point object, finding that the central disk of the diffraction pattern is narrower and the first intensity minimum is deeper for illuminated objects. We also analyze the resolution of the system by means of the intensity profile produced by two points objects, finding that two self luminous point objects are better resolved than two illuminated objects at the same distance. This suggests that the correlation introduced in the object diminishes the resolution in the former case.

  12. Pulsed EPR for studying silver clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Wasowicz, T.; Sadlo, J.; Reijerse, E.J.; Kevan, L.

    1996-01-01

    The cationic silver clusters of different nuclearity have been produced by radiolysis of zeolite A and SAPO molecular sieves containing Ag + as exchangeable cations. The pulsed EPR spectroscopy has been applied for studying the local environment of silver cluster in order to understand the mechanism of cluster formation and stabilization. the electron spin echo modulation (ESEM) results on Ag 6 n+ cluster in dehydration zeolite A indicate that the hexameric silver is stabilized only in sodalite cages which are surrounded by α-cages containing no water molecules. Trimeric silver clusters formed in hydrated A zeolites strongly interact with water, thus the paramagnetic center can be considered as a cluster-water adduct. In SAPO-molecular sieves, silver clusters are formed only in the presence of adsorbed alcohol molecules. From ESEM it is determined that Ag 4 n+ in SAPO-42 is stabilized in α cages, where it is directly coordinated by two methanol molecules. Dimeric silver, Ag 2 + in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 is located in 6-ring channels and interacts with three CH 3 OH molecules, each in different 10 ring or 12 ring channels. The differences of Ag 2 + stability in SAPO-5 and SAPO-11 are also discussed. (Author)

  13. Electron microscope study of irradiated beryllium oxide; Etude au microscope electronique de l'oxyde de beryllium irradie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisson, A A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-06-01

    The beryllium oxide is studied first by fractography, before and after irradiation, using sintered samples. The fractures are examined under different aspects. The higher density sintered samples, with transgranular fractures are the most interesting for a microscopic study. It is possible to mark the difference between the 'pores' left by the sintering process and the 'bubbles' of gases that can be produced by former thermal treatments. After irradiation, the grain boundaries are very much weakened. By annealing, it is possible to observe the evolution of the gases produced by the reaction (n, 2n) and (n. {alpha}) and gathered on the grain boundaries. The irradiated beryllium oxide is afterwards studied by transmission. For that, a simple method has been used: little chips of the crushed material are examined. Clusters of point defects produced by neutrons are thus detected in crystals irradiated at the three following doses: 6 x 10{sup 19}, 9 x 10{sup 19} and 2 x 10{sup 20} n{sub f} cm{sup -2} at a temperature below 100 deg. C. For the irradiation at 6 x 10{sup 19} n{sub f} cm{sup -2}, the defects are merely visible, but at 2 x l0{sup 20} n{sub f} cm{sup -2} the crystals an crowded with clusters and the Kikuchi lines have disappeared from the micro-diffraction diagrams. The evolution of the clusters into dislocation loops is studied by a series of annealings. The activation energy (0,37 eV) calculated from the annealing curves suggests that it must be interstitials that condense into dislocation loops. Samples irradiated at high temperatures (650, 900 and 1100 deg. C) are also studied. In those specimens the size of the loops is not the same as the equilibrium size obtained after out of pile annealing at the same temperature. Those former loops are more specifically studied and their Burgers vector is determined by micro-diffraction. (author) [French] L'oxyde de beryllium est d'abord etudie, par une methode fractographique, avant et apres irradiation, en

  14. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris, E-mail: hammel@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  15. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  16. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems

  17. Microscopic study of neutron-rich dysprosium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor; Lerma, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry-based models. Ground-state, γ and β bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in 160-168 Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q . Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered, whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain, are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band head of γ and β bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus 170 Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study a full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model. (orig.)

  18. Microscopic study of neutron-rich dysprosium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Carlos E. [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico); Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Velazquez, Victor [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, Apartado Postal 70-542, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Lerma, Sergio [Universidad Veracruzana, Facultad de Fisica e Inteligencia Artificial, Xalapa (Mexico)

    2013-01-15

    Microscopic studies in heavy nuclei are very scarce due to large valence spaces involved. This computational problem can be avoided by means of the use of symmetry-based models. Ground-state, {gamma} and {beta} bands, and their B(E2) transition strengths in {sup 160-168}Dy isotopes, are studied in the framework of the pseudo-SU(3) model which includes the preserving symmetry Q . Q term and the symmetry-breaking Nilsson and pairing terms, systematically parametrized. Additionally, three rotor-like terms are considered, whose free parameters, fixed for all members of the chain, are used to fine tune the moment of inertia of rotational bands and the band head of {gamma} and {beta} bands. The model succesfully describes in a systematic way rotational features in these nuclei and allows to extrapolate toward the midshell nucleus {sup 170}Dy. The results presented show that it is possible to study a full chain of isotopes or isotones in the region with the present model. (orig.)

  19. Microscopic study on dynamic barrier in fusion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xizhen; Tian Junlong; Zhao Kai; Li Zhuxia; Wang Ning

    2004-01-01

    The authors briefly review the fusion process of very heavy nuclear systems and some theoretical models. The authors propose a microscopic transport dynamic model, i.e. the Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamic model, for describing fusion reactions of heavy systems, in which the dynamical behavior of the fusion barrier in heavy fusion systems has been studied firstly. The authors find that with the incident energy decreasing the lowest dynamic barrier is obtained which approaches to the adiabatic static barrier and with increase of the incident energy the dynamic barrier goes up to the diabatic static barrier. The authors also indicate that how the dynamical fusion barrier is correlated with the development of the configuration of fusion partners along the fusion path. Associating the single-particle potentials obtained at different stages of fusion with the Two Center Shell Model, authors can study the time evolution of the single particle states of fusion system in configuration space of single particle orbits along the fusion path. (author)

  20. Pulp tissue in sex determination: A fluorescent microscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Amit; Singh, Harkanwal Preet; Leekha, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To determine and compare the reliability of pulp tissue in determination of sex and to analyze whether caries have any effect on fluorescent body test. Materials and Methods: This study was carried on 50 maxillary and mandibular teeth (25 male teeth and 25 female teeth), which were indicated for extraction. The teeth are categorized into 5 groups, 10 each (5 from males and 5 from females) on the basis of caries progression. The pulp cells are stained with quinacrine hydrochloride and observed with fluorescent microscope for fluorescent body. Gender is determined by identification of Y chromosome fluorescence in dental pulp. Results: Fluorescent bodies were found to be more in sound teeth in males as the caries increase the mean percentage of fluorescent bodies observed decreases in males. We also observed the fluorescent spots in females, and the value of the spot increases in female as the caries progresses, thereby giving false positive results in females. Conclusion: Sex determination by fluorescent staining of the Y chromosome is a reliable technique in teeth with healthy pulps or caries with enamel or up to half way of dentin. Teeth with caries involving pulp cannot be used for sex determination. PMID:25125912

  1. Microscopic Study of Surface Microtopographic Characteristics of Dental Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezin, M.; Croharé, L.; Ibañez, J.C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine and compare the micro topographic characteristics of dental implants submitted to different surface treatments, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Implants were divided into 7 groups of 3 specimens each, according to the surface treatment used: group 1: Osseotite, BIOMET 3i; group 2: SLA surface, Institut Straumann AG; group 3: Oxalife surface, Tree-Oss implant; group 4: B&W implant surface; group 5: Q-implant surface; group 6: ML implant surface; group 7: RBM surface, Rosterdent implant. The surfaces were examined under SEM (Carl Zeiss FE-SEM-SIGMA). Image Proplus software was used to determine the number and mean diameter of pores per area unit (mm). The data obtained were analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test. A confocal laser microscope (LEXT-OLS4100 Olympus) was used to conduct the comparative study of surface roughness (Ra). Data were analyzed using Tukey's HSD test. Results: The largest average pore diameter calculated in microns was found in group 5 (3.45 µm+/-1.91) while the smallest in group 7 (1.47µm+/-1.29). Significant differences were observed among each one of the groups studied (p<0.05). The largest number of pores/mm2 was found in group 2 (229343) and the smallest number in group 4 (10937). Group 2 showed significant differences regarding the other groups (p<0.05). The greatest roughness (Ra) was observed in group 2 (0.975µm+/-0.115) and the smallest in group 4 (0.304µm+/-0.063). Group 2 was significantly different from the other groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: The micro topography observed in the different groups presented dissimilar and specific features, depending on the chemical treatment used for the surfaces.. PMID:27335615

  2. Electron microscopic study on radiosensitivity of uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwai, S; Shiozawa, K; Tsukamoto, T; Noguchi, H; Tsukahara, Y [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1974-11-01

    The effects of 1000 R of tele-cobalt upon the changes in the primary lesions of uterine cervical cancer with time were studied with an electron microscope. In addition, twenty cases which were proven to have cancer tissues (10 cases of IInd stage of cancer, 8 cases of IIIrd stage of cancer and 2 cases of IVth stage of cancer) were studied. Four cases were favourably sensitive, 7 cases moderately sensitive and 9 cases unfavourably sensitive to radiation. In favourably radio-sensitive cases, the changes in the cancer cells first appeared in the nucleus. There were other changes such as local clumping of chromatin and, specifically, vacuolization of the nucleus. The changes in the endoplasmic reticulum appeared somewhat late. In addition, the disturbance of mitochondria and the decrease or disappearance of ribosomes were specifically due to radiation injury. From the point of view of changes with time, Golgi's apparatus was enlarged and the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum was degenerated at the 1st day. At the 3rd day, vacuolization of the nucleus appeared, the nuclear corpuscles were increased, the nucleoplasm became thin, and mitochondria was enlarged and degenerated. At the 5th day, the nuclear membrane disappeared, the nucleus was destroyed, large vacuolization of the endoplasmic reticulum was seen, free ribosomes were decreased, and changes around the endoplasmic reticulum were observed. At the 7th day, collagen around the endoplasmic reticulum appeared. In favourably radiosensitive cases, individual tumor cells showed the same degeneration, which fairly corresponded to that evaluated by the histological observation. The disturbance of the cells was caused by radiation, so-called ''burning'' of the cells. Radiation protection of the cells against burning was considered in terms of their radiosensitivity.

  3. Cluster model of the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, H.; Ikeda, K.

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews the development of the cluster model study. The stress is put on two points; one is how the cluster structure has come to be regarded as a fundamental structure in light nuclei together with the shell-model structure, and the other is how at present the cluster model is extended to and connected with the studies of the various subjects many of which are in the neighbouring fields. The authors the present the main theme with detailed explanations of the fundamentals of the microscopic cluster model which have promoted the development of the cluster mode. Examples of the microscopic cluster model study of light nuclear structure are given

  4. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    environmental as well as technical problems during fuel gas utilization. ... adsorption on some alloys of Pd, namely PdAu, PdAg ... ried out on small neutral and charged Au24,26,27, Cu,28 ... study of Zanti et al.29 on Pdn (n = 1–9) clusters.

  5. Microscopic analysis of Be,1110 elastic scattering on protons and nuclei, and breakup processes of 11Be within the 10Be +n cluster model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, V. K.; Kadrev, D. N.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Spasova, K.; Lukyanov, K. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Gaidarov, M. K.

    2015-03-01

    The density distributions of 10Be and 11Be nuclei obtained within the quantum Monte Carlo model and the generator coordinate method are used to calculate the microscopic optical potentials (OPs) and cross sections of elastic scattering of these nuclei on protons and 12C at energies E energy approximation. In this hybrid model of OP the free parameters are the depths of the real and imaginary parts obtained by fitting the experimental data. The well-known energy dependence of the volume integrals is used as a physical constraint to resolve the ambiguities of the parameter values. The role of the spin-orbit potential and the surface contribution to the OP is studied for an adequate description of available experimental elastic scattering cross-section data. Also, the cluster model, in which 11Be consists of a n -halo and the 10Be core, is adopted. Within the latter, the breakup cross sections of 11Be nucleus on 9Be,93Nb,181Ta , and 238U targets and momentum distributions of 10Be fragments are calculated and compared with the existing experimental data.

  6. Microscopic study of rock for estimating long-term behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yasuaki

    2002-03-01

    Micro-structure of rock plays a essential role for their long-term behavior. For elucidating long-term characteristics of granite we here present the followings: 1) Conforcal Laser Scanning Microscope (LSM) observation of joint surfaces of granite and Fourier analysis, 2) characterization of the mechanism of microcrack initiation and propagation observed by stereoscopic microscope under uniaxial/triaxial compression and relaxation tests, 3) observation of microcrack initiation and propagation by LSM under uniaxial compression, and 4) a viscoelastic homogenization theory to predict the long-term behavior of micro/macro-level stress for granite. Rock image processing and analysis become a fundamental procedure to determine rock surface discontinuities. But the complexity of rock surface discontinuities seems beyond the manual image processing method. In Chapter 2 a Conforcal Laser Scanning Microscope that can acquire three-dimensional images is introduced to observe the rock roughness of a discontinuity. Then, scanning three-dimensional images are changed its data form in order to adapt various image analysis programs, and granitic rock roughness of discontinuities are displayed by graphic images. For example, these datas are analyzed by Discrete Fourier Transformation (DFT) program and Inverse Discrete Fourier Transformation (IDFT) program. Microcrack generation and propagation play an essential role to predict the long-term behavior of rock. In Chapter 3 a progressive development of cracking in granite is revealed by using stereoscopic microscope under triaxial compression condition and by using LSM under uniaxial compression condition. With a viscoelastic theory applied in homogenization method, we can calculate macro behavior of medium influenced by its micro structure by analyse the long-term time-dependent behavior of granite under the same condition to the relaxation experiment. (author)

  7. A Monte Carlo study of macroscopic and microscopic dose descriptors for kilovoltage cellular dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, P. A. K.; Thomson, Rowan M.

    2017-02-01

    This work investigates how doses to cellular targets depend on cell morphology, as well as relations between cellular doses and doses to bulk tissues and water. Multicellular models of five healthy and cancerous soft tissues are developed based on typical values of cell compartment sizes, elemental compositions and number densities found in the literature. Cells are modelled as two concentric spheres with nucleus and cytoplasm compartments. Monte Carlo simulations are used to calculate the absorbed dose to the nucleus and cytoplasm for incident photon energies of 20-370 keV, relevant for brachytherapy, diagnostic radiology, and out-of-field radiation in higher-energy external beam radiotherapy. Simulations involving cell clusters, single cells and single nuclear cavities are carried out for cell radii between 5 and 10~μ m, and nuclear radii between 2 and 9~μ m. Seven nucleus and cytoplasm elemental compositions representative of animal cells are considered. The presence of a cytoplasm, extracellular matrix and surrounding cells can affect the nuclear dose by up to 13 % . Differences in cell and nucleus size can affect dose to the nucleus (cytoplasm) of the central cell in a cluster of 13 cells by up to 13 % (8 % ). Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that neither water nor bulk tissue are reliable substitutes for subcellular targets for incident photon energies  <50 keV: nuclear (cytoplasm) doses differ from dose-to-medium by up to 32 % (18 % ), and from dose-to-water by up to 21 % (8 % ). The largest differences between dose descriptors are seen for the lowest incident photon energies; differences are less than 3 % for energies ≥slant 90 keV. The sensitivity of results with regard to the parameters of the microscopic tissue structure model and cell model geometry, and the importance of the nucleus and cytoplasm as targets for radiation-induced cell death emphasize the importance of accurate models for cellular dosimetry studies.

  8. Microscopic study of superdeformation in the A = 150 mass region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigollet, C.; Gall, B. [CNRS, Strasbourg (France); Bonche, P. [CEN Saclay, Gif sur Yvette (France)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The authors are presently investigating the properties of superdeformed (SD) nuclear states in the A=150 mass region. For that purpose, they use the cranked HFB method in which pairing correlations are treated dynamically by means of the Lipkin-Nogami prescription. Their goal is to take advantage of the large amount of experimental data to test the predictive power of their microscopic approach and of the effective interaction. In the present communication, they focus on {sup 152}Dy and {sup 153}Dy for which there are recent experimental data. In particular lifetime measurements have allowed to extract electric quadrupole moments. The new Skyrme effective force SLy4 is used to describe the nucleon-nucleon interaction, while for the pairing channel the authors use a density-dependent zero-range interaction.

  9. Electron microscopic study on SrGdMnO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hiromi; Ishizawa, Nobuo; Kamegashira, Naoki; Zulhadjri; Shishido, Toetsu

    2006-01-01

    Single crystals of SrGdMnO 4 have been synthesized by the floating zone method. The structure was characterized as the K 2 NiF 4 -type, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Presence of weak reflections breaking the archetypal tetragonal symmetry was observed from the selected area diffraction (SAD). The compound was found to have an orthorhombic unit cell of a ≅ b = 0.532(4) nm, c = 1.271(6) nm, by taking the a and b axes along the diagonal directions on the basal plane of the tetragonal archetype. Structural change occurred around 1018 K. The weak reflections disappeared in the SAD pattern, suggesting that crystal is of the archetype above 1018 K

  10. Fragmentation of atomic clusters: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M.J.; Jellinek, J.

    1994-01-01

    Collisionless fragmentation of nonrotating model n-atom metal clusters (n=12, 13, and 14) is studied using isoergic molecular-dynamics simulations. Minimum-energy paths for fragmentation are mapped out as functions of the distance between the centers of mass of the fragments. These paths provide information on the fragmentation energies for the different fragmentation channels. Fragmentation patterns (distributions of the fragmentation channel probabilities) and global and channel-specific fragmentation rate constants are computed and analyzed as functions of the internal energy and of the size of the clusters. The trends derived from the dynamics are compared with those obtained using the RRK and TST statistical approaches. The dynamics of the fragmentation process is analyzed in terms of characteristic quantities such as the distance between the centers of mass of the fragments, their relative translational energy, and their interaction energy, all considered as functions of time

  11. Microscopic study of {sup 1}S{sub 0} superfluidity in dilute neutron matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlou, G.E.; Mavrommatis, E. [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Physics Department, Division of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Athens (Greece); Moustakidis, C. [Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki, Department of Theoretical Physics, Thessaloniki (Greece); Clark, J.W. [Washington University, McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and Department of Physics, St. Louis, MO (United States); University of Madeira, Center for Mathematical Sciences, Funchal (Portugal)

    2017-05-15

    Singlet S-wave superfluidity of dilute neutron matter is studied within the correlated BCS method, which takes into account both pairing and short-range correlations. First, the equation of state (EOS) of normal neutron matter is calculated within the Correlated Basis Function (CBF) method in the lowest cluster order using the {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}P components of the Argonne V{sub 18} potential, assuming trial Jastrow-type correlation functions. The {sup 1}S{sub 0} superfluid gap is then calculated with the corresponding component of the Argonne V{sub 18} potential and the optimally determined correlation functions. The dependence of our results on the chosen forms for the correlation functions is studied, and the role of the P-wave channel is investigated. Where comparison is meaningful, the values obtained for the {sup 1}S{sub 0} gap within this simplified scheme are consistent with the results of similar and more elaborate microscopic methods. (orig.)

  12. Somatic Embryos in Catharanthus roseus: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid ASLAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don is an important medicinal plant as it contains several anti-cancerous compounds, like vinblastine and vincristine. Plant tissue culture technology (organogenesis and embryogenesis has currently been used in fast mass propagating raw materials for secondary metabolite synthesis. In this present communication, scanning electron microscopic (SEM study of somatic embryos was conducted and discussed. The embryogenic callus was first induced from hypocotyls of in vitro germinated seeds on which somatic embryos, differentiated in numbers, particularly on 2,4-D (1.0 mg/L Murashige and Skoog (MS was medium. To understand more about the regeneration method and in vitro formed embryos SEM was performed. The SEM study revealed normal somatic embryo origin and development from globular to heart-, torpedo- and then into cotyledonary-stage of embryos. At early stage, the embryos were clustered together in a callus mass and could not easily be detached from the parental tissue. The embryos were often long cylindrical structure with or without typical notch at the tip. Secondary embryos were also formed on primary embryo structure. The advanced cotyledonary embryos showed prominent roots and shoot axis, which germinated into plantlets. The morphology, structure and other details of somatic embryos at various stages were presented.

  13. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints - A light microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, LC; Liem, RSB; deBont, LGM

    Objective. To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Study design. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients.

  14. Electron microscopical studies of the common bile duct in reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Rahko

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available In a previous publication the authors have described some ultrastructural characteristics of granulated cells in the common bile duct of the reindeer. On the basis of the same material, electron microscopic observations on other tissue elements of bile duct wall are now reported. The surface and glandular epithelium were composed of tall columnar epithelial cells with villous structures on the luminal surfaces. The parietal cytoplasmic membranes of epithelial cells were equipped with intercellular desmosomes while intraepithelial globule leucocytes did not form any junctional complex with other cells. Apical cytoplasmic areas of superficial epithelial cells showed electron-dense small bodies possibly consisting of mucinous substances. The goblet and deep glandular cells, on the other hand, contained numerous large mucin granules with less electron-dense matrices. It appears that their secretions are more abundant than those in superficial epithelial cells which obviously are absorptive as their main function. The nuclei and other cytoplasmic organelles showed profiles similar to those in epithelial cells generally. The lumen of the bile ducts was usually empty or contained fine-granular or amorphous material. An unusual feature was the presence of parts of globule leucocytes or even almost whole cells occurring freely in ductal secretions.Elektronimikroskooppinen tutkimus yhteisen sappikäytävän rakenteesta porolla.Abstract in Finnish / Yhteenveto: Aikaisemmassa julkaisussa tekijät kuvasivat poron yhteisen sappikäytävän (ductus hepaticus communis seinämän jyväsellisten solujen hienorakennetta. Tässä artikkelissa selostetaan saman aineiston perusteella (6 tervettä teurasporoa elektronimikroskooppisia havaintoja sappikäytäväseinämän muista kudosrakenteista. Sappikäytäväseinämän pinta- ja rauhasepiteeli koostuu korkeista epiteelisoluista. Pinnallisia epiteelisoluja kattavat säännölliset mikrovillukset, ja niillä on vain v

  15. Segmentation of White Blood Cells From Microscopic Images Using a Novel Combination of K-Means Clustering and Modified Watershed Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghane, Narjes; Vard, Alireza; Talebi, Ardeshir; Nematollahy, Pardis

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of white blood cells (WBCs) is the first step to diagnose some particular diseases such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, leukemia, and other blood-related diseases that are usually done by pathologists using an optical microscope. This process is time-consuming, extremely tedious, and expensive and needs experienced experts in this field. Thus, a computer-aided diagnosis system that assists pathologists in the diagnostic process can be so effective. Segmentation of WBCs is usually a first step in developing a computer-aided diagnosis system. The main purpose of this paper is to segment WBCs from microscopic images. For this purpose, we present a novel combination of thresholding, k-means clustering, and modified watershed algorithms in three stages including (1) segmentation of WBCs from a microscopic image, (2) extraction of nuclei from cell's image, and (3) separation of overlapping cells and nuclei. The evaluation results of the proposed method show that similarity measures, precision, and sensitivity respectively were 92.07, 96.07, and 94.30% for nucleus segmentation and 92.93, 97.41, and 93.78% for cell segmentation. In addition, statistical analysis presents high similarity between manual segmentation and the results obtained by the proposed method.

  16. Apoptosis study of the macrophage via near-field scanning optical microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D-C; Chen, K-Y; Chen, G-Y; Chen, S-H; Wun, S-J

    2008-01-01

    The cell apoptosis phenomenon was studied by traditional optical microscope with much lower resolution and also observed by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with nano-resolution recently. They both detect the cell apoptosis through the change of cell topography. In this study, the cell apoptosis was investigated via Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope (NSOM). The cell topography, with nano-scaled resolution, and its optical characteristics were observed by NSOM at the same measurement scanning. The macrophage was chosen as the cell investigated. To understand the cell apoptosis process is the goal set for the research. The apoptosis process was related to the variations of the optical characteristics of the cell

  17. Miniaturized Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope for In Situ Planetary Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Abbott, Terry; Medley, Stephanie; Gregory, Don; Thaisen, Kevin; Taylor , Lawrence; Ramsey, Brian; Jerman, Gregory; Sampson, Allen; Harvey, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    The exploration of remote planetary surfaces calls for the advancement of low power, highly-miniaturized instrumentation. Instruments of this nature that are capable of multiple types of analyses will prove to be particularly useful as we prepare for human return to the moon, and as we continue to explore increasingly remote locations in our Solar System. To this end, our group has been developing a miniaturized Environmental-Scanning Electron Microscope (mESEM) capable of remote investigations of mineralogical samples through in-situ topographical and chemical analysis on a fine scale. The functioning of an SEM is well known: an electron beam is focused to nanometer-scale onto a given sample where resulting emissions such as backscattered and secondary electrons, X-rays, and visible light are registered. Raster scanning the primary electron beam across the sample then gives a fine-scale image of the surface topography (texture), crystalline structure and orientation, with accompanying elemental composition. The flexibility in the types of measurements the mESEM is capable of, makes it ideally suited for a variety of applications. The mESEM is appropriate for use on multiple planetary surfaces, and for a variety of mission goals (from science to non-destructive analysis to ISRU). We will identify potential applications and range of potential uses related to planetary exploration. Over the past few of years we have initiated fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept assembly, consisting of a cold-field-emission electron gun and custom high-voltage power supply, electrostatic electron-beam focusing column, and scanning-imaging electronics plus backscatter detector. Current project status will be discussed. This effort is funded through the NASA Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences - Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program.

  18. A cluster algorithm for jet studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daum, H.J.; Meyer, H.; Buerger, J.

    1980-10-01

    A procedure is described which determines the number of jets in hadronic final states by means of a cluster algorithm. In addition it yields a measurement of the energy and the direction of each jet. The properties of this method are studied using Monte Carlo simulations of different types of e + e - -annihilation final states. It is shown that in case of 3-jet events direct comparison with the underlying parton structure can be made. Possible further applications of this method are discussed. (orig.)

  19. A facility for using cluster research to study environmental problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    This report begins by describing the general application of cluster based research to environmental chemistry and the development of a Cluster Structure and Dynamics Research Facility (CSDRF). Next, four important areas of cluster research are described in more detail, including how they can impact environmental problems. These are: surface-supported clusters, water and contaminant interactions, time-resolved dynamic studies in clusters, and cluster structures and reactions. These facilities and equipment required for each area of research are then presented. The appendices contain workshop agenda and a listing of the researchers who participated in the workshop discussions that led to this report.

  20. A facility for using cluster research to study environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This report begins by describing the general application of cluster based research to environmental chemistry and the development of a Cluster Structure and Dynamics Research Facility (CSDRF). Next, four important areas of cluster research are described in more detail, including how they can impact environmental problems. These are: surface-supported clusters, water and contaminant interactions, time-resolved dynamic studies in clusters, and cluster structures and reactions. These facilities and equipment required for each area of research are then presented. The appendices contain workshop agenda and a listing of the researchers who participated in the workshop discussions that led to this report

  1. Electron irradiation effects and recovery of defect clusters in TiC through high voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Michio; Kirihara, Tomoo; Ushijima, Susumu; Ohashi, Hideki.

    1984-01-01

    Titanium carbide(TiCsub(0.8)) prepared by plasma-jet melting was irradiated to an electron dose less than 6x10 26 e/m 2 from room temperature to 800 0 C. The number density and average size of the defect clusters formed at irradiation temperatures below 400 0 C were less than those formed above 600 0 C. Since TiCsub(0.8) has an order structure of carbon below around 600 0 C, the ordered phase is more resistant to radiation than the disordered one in higher temperatures. The clusters decrease in number density and develop to dislocation loops during post irradiation annealing above 1,000 0 C. The burgers vector of the loops was determined as a/2 . There were two temperature region for the recovery of the defect clusters. It is conceivable that the first one appeared in the temperature region around 600 0 C caused by migration of carbon vacancies, and the second one appeared above 1,000 0 C by migration of titanium vacancies. (author)

  2. Feasibility Study of Parallel Finite Element Analysis on Cluster-of-Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Masae; Okuda, Hiroshi

    With the rapid growth of WAN infrastructure and development of Grid middleware, it's become a realistic and attractive methodology to connect cluster machines on wide-area network for the execution of computation-demanding applications. Many existing parallel finite element (FE) applications have been, however, designed and developed with a single computing resource in mind, since such applications require frequent synchronization and communication among processes. There have been few FE applications that can exploit the distributed environment so far. In this study, we explore the feasibility of FE applications on the cluster-of-clusters. First, we classify FE applications into two types, tightly coupled applications (TCA) and loosely coupled applications (LCA) based on their communication pattern. A prototype of each application is implemented on the cluster-of-clusters. We perform numerical experiments executing TCA and LCA on both the cluster-of-clusters and a single cluster. Thorough these experiments, by comparing the performances and communication cost in each case, we evaluate the feasibility of FEA on the cluster-of-clusters.

  3. Microscopic solvation of a lithium atom in water-ammonia mixed clusters: solvent coordination and electron localization in presence of a counterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratihar, Subha; Chandra, Amalendu

    2008-07-14

    The microsolvation structures and energetics of water-ammonia mixed clusters containing a lithium atom, i.e., Li(H(2)O)(n)(NH(3)), n = 1-5, are investigated by means of ab initio theoretical calculations. Several structural aspects such as the solvent coordination to the metal ion and binding motifs of the free valence electron of the metal are investigated. We also study the energetics aspects such as the dependence of vertical ionization energies on the cluster size, and all these structural and energetics aspects are compared to the corresponding results of previously studied anionic water-ammonia clusters without a metal ion. It is found that the Li-O and Li-N interactions play a very important role in stabilizing the lithium-water-ammonia clusters, and the presence of these metal ion-solvent interactions also affect the characteristics of electron solvation in these clusters. This is seen from the spatial distribution of the singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) which holds the ejected valence electron of the Li atom. For very small clusters, SOMO electron density is found to exist mainly at the vicinity of the Li atom, whereas for larger clusters, it is distributed outside the first solvation shell. The free dangling hydrogens of water and ammonia molecules are involved in capturing the SOMO electron density. In some of the conformers, OH{e}HO and OH{e}HN types of interactions are found to be present. The presence of the metal ion at the center of the cluster ensures that the ejected electron is solvated at a surface state only, whereas both surface and interiorlike states were found for the free electron in the corresponding anionic clusters without a metal ion. The vertical ionization energies of the present clusters are found to be higher than the vertical detachment energies of the corresponding anionic clusters which signify a relatively stronger binding of the free electron in the presence of the positive metal counterion. The shifts in different

  4. Automatic Recognition of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in Blood Microscopic Images Using K-means Clustering and Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Fatemeh; Najafabadi, Tooraj Abbasian; Araabi, Babak Nadjar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is a subtype of acute leukemia, which is characterized by the accumulation of myeloid blasts in the bone marrow. Careful microscopic examination of stained blood smear or bone marrow aspirate is still the most significant diagnostic methodology for initial AML screening and considered as the first step toward diagnosis. It is time-consuming and due to the elusive nature of the signs and symptoms of AML; wrong diagnosis may occur by pathologists. Therefore, the need for automation of leukemia detection has arisen. In this paper, an automatic technique for identification and detection of AML and its prevalent subtypes, i.e., M2-M5 is presented. At first, microscopic images are acquired from blood smears of patients with AML and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, color segmentation strategy is applied for segmenting white blood cells from other blood components and then discriminative features, i.e., irregularity, nucleus-cytoplasm ratio, Hausdorff dimension, shape, color, and texture features are extracted from the entire nucleus in the whole images containing multiple nuclei. Images are classified to cancerous and noncancerous images by binary support vector machine (SVM) classifier with 10-fold cross validation technique. Classifier performance is evaluated by three parameters, i.e., sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Cancerous images are also classified into their prevalent subtypes by multi-SVM classifier. The results show that the proposed algorithm has achieved an acceptable performance for diagnosis of AML and its common subtypes. Therefore, it can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists.

  5. Transcranial Doppler study in patients with cluster headache ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hemodynamic changes occur in the cerebral blood flow during cluster headache. Objective: The aim of the present work was to study the middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities and vasoreactivity in cluster headache patients as baseline values and after administration of 100% oxygen during the cluster ...

  6. Comparison of microscopic and endoscopic view of the internal acoustic meatus: A cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montibeller, Guilherme Ramina; Hendrix, Philipp; Fries, Fabian N; Becker, Kurt W; Oertel, Joachim

    2018-04-01

    The endoscope is thought to provide an improved exposure of the internal acoustic meatus after retrosigmoid craniotomy for microsurgical resection of intrameatal tumors. The aim of this study is to quantify the differences in internal acoustic meatus (IAM) exposure comparing microscopic and endoscopic visualization. A retrosigmoid approach was performed on 5 cadaver heads. A millimeter gauge was introduced into the internal acoustic meatus, and examinations with a surgical microscope and 0°, 30° and 70° rigid endoscopes were performed. The extent of IAM depth visualized with the microscope and the different angled endoscopes were analyzed. The microscopic view allowed an average IAM depth visualization of 2.8 mm. The endoscope allowed an improved exposure of IAM in all cases. The 0°, 30° and 70° endoscopes permitted an exposure that was respectively 96% (5.5 mm), 139% (6.7 mm) and 200% (8.4 mm) more lateral than the microscopic view. Angled optics, however, provided an image distortion, specifically the 70° endoscope. The endoscope provides a superior visualization of the IAM compared to the microscope when using a retrosigmoid approach. The 30° endoscope represented an ideal compromise of superior visualization with marginal image distortion. Additional implementation of the endoscope into microsurgery of intrameatal tumors likely facilitates complete tumor removal and might spare facial and vestibulocochlear function. Clin. Anat. 31:398-403, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A scanning electron microscopic study of biliary stent materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkel, A. M.; van Marle, J.; van Veen, H.; Groen, A. K.; Huibregtse, K.

    2000-01-01

    Clogging of biliary stents remains an important problem. In vitro studies have shown less sludge formation in Teflon stents. Recently, clinical studies with Teflon stents have produced contradictory results. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the surface properties of the

  8. Measurement Error Correction Formula for Cluster-Level Group Differences in Cluster Randomized and Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun-Joo; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Multilevel modeling (MLM) is frequently used to detect cluster-level group differences in cluster randomized trial and observational studies. Group differences on the outcomes (posttest scores) are detected by controlling for the covariate (pretest scores) as a proxy variable for unobserved factors that predict future attributes. The pretest and…

  9. Histological and electron microscopic study of the postulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate [DEHP] is a plasticizer (softener) used to increase the flexibility of polyvinyl chloride (plastic). Animal studies following acute and chronic exposure of DEHP show several toxic changes in many organs including the liver. There have been no studies of compound specific techniques for reducing ...

  10. An Atomic Force Microscopical Study of the Synaptonemal Complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, C.A.J.; Dietrich, A.J.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Marle, J.; Heyting, C.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomal structure which is specific for meiosis, the synaptonemal complex (SC), plays a major role in chromosome pairing and the recombination of genetic material. The SC was studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results of this study confirm the results of light and electron

  11. Study of aluminum-doped silicon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Shichang; Li Baoxing; Yang Jiansong

    2007-01-01

    Using full-muffin-tin-orbital molecular-dynamics (FP-LMTO-MD) method, we have investigated the effect of aluminum heteroatoms on the geometric structures and bond characteristics of Si n (n=5-10) clusters in detail. It is found that the geometric framework of the ground state structures for Si n (n=5-10) clusters change to some extent upon the substitution of Al atoms in some Si atoms. The effect of aluminum doping on the silicon clusters depends on the geometric structures of Si n (n=5-10) clusters. In particular, the calculations suggest that the aluminum doping would improve the bond strength of some Si-Si bonds in the mixed Si n - m Al m clusters

  12. Recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells in microscopic images using k-means clustering and support vector machine classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Morteza Moradi; Kermani, Saeed; Talebi, Ardeshir; Oghli, Mostafa Ghelich

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of pediatric cancer which is categorized into three L1, L2, and L3 and could be detected through screening of blood and bone marrow smears by pathologists. Due to being time-consuming and tediousness of the procedure, a computer-based system is acquired for convenient detection of Acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Microscopic images are acquired from blood and bone marrow smears of patients with Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and normal cases. After applying image preprocessing, cells nuclei are segmented by k-means algorithm. Then geometric and statistical features are extracted from nuclei and finally these cells are classified to cancerous and noncancerous cells by means of support vector machine classifier with 10-fold cross validation. These cells are also classified into their sub-types by multi-Support vector machine classifier. Classifier is evaluated by these parameters: Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy which values for cancerous and noncancerous cells 98%, 95%, and 97%, respectively. These parameters are also used for evaluation of cell sub-types which values in mean 84.3%, 97.3%, and 95.6%, respectively. The results show that proposed algorithm could achieve an acceptable performance for the diagnosis of Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and its sub-types and can be used as an assistant diagnostic tool for pathologists.

  13. Coupling microscopic and mesoscopic scales to simulate chemical equilibrium between a nanometric carbon cluster and detonation products fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourasseau, Emeric; Maillet, Jean-Bernard

    2011-04-21

    This paper presents a new method to obtain chemical equilibrium properties of detonation products mixtures including a solid carbon phase. In this work, the solid phase is modelled through a mesoparticle immersed in the fluid, such that the heterogeneous character of the mixture is explicitly taken into account. Inner properties of the clusters are taken from an equation of state obtained in a previous work, and interaction potential between the nanocluster and the fluid particles is derived from all-atoms simulations using the LCBOPII potential (Long range Carbon Bond Order Potential II). It appears that differences in chemical equilibrium results obtained with this method and the "composite ensemble method" (A. Hervouet et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2008, 112.), where fluid and solid phases are considered as non-interacting, are not significant, underlining the fact that considering the inhomogeneity of such system is crucial.

  14. Probe Microscopic Studies of DNA Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Umemura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids of DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs are promising nanobioconjugates for nanobiosensors, carriers for drug delivery, and other biological applications. In this review, nanoscopic characterization of DNA-CNT hybrids, in particular, characterization by scanning probe microscopy (SPM, is summarized. In many studies, topographical imaging by atomic force microscopy has been performed. However, some researchers have demonstrated advanced SPM operations in order to maximize its unique and valuable functions. Such sophisticated approaches are attractive and will have a significant impact on future studies of DNA-CNT hybrids.

  15. [Scanning electron microscope study of chemically disinfected endodontic files].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, G; Mateos, M; Navarro, J L; Canalda, C

    1991-01-01

    Forty stainless steel endodontic files were observed at scanning electron microscopy after being subjected to ten disinfection cycles of 10 minutes each one, immersed in different chemical disinfectants. Corrosion was not observed on the surface of the files in circumstances that this study was made.

  16. NMR studies of macroscopic and microscopic properties of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    The work presented is concerned with studies of orientational order in liquid crystals and the behaviour of certain mesophases. The experimental technique used in common with all the work is deuterium NMR spectroscopy. Much of the work involves studies of the orientational order of deuteriated solute molecules dissolved in liquid crystal solvents. Chapter 1 gives an introduction to liquid crystals followed by a quantitative description of orientational order. Deuterium NMR in liquid crystals is described and an outline of the molecular field theory behind the orientational order of a rigid, biaxial solute in a uniaxial mesophase is given. In Chapter 2 a novel type of mesophase induction is studied using NMR, where a solute induces up to two extra phases in a discotic mesogen depending on its concentration. The purpose of this work is to try to gain an understanding into the mechanism of the phase induction involved. Chapter 3 is concerned primarily with the macroscopic behaviour of the nematic phase formed by a semi-rigid main-chain polymer in solution. Of particular interest is the study of the reorientation of the monodomain, once the director has been rotated with respect to the magnetic field of the NMR spectrometer. A mesogen which has been claimed to exhibit a biaxial nematic phase is studied in Chapter 4, in order to determine the symmetry of the phase using NMR. Finally, Chapter 5 deals with the differing behaviour of a liquid crystal monomer and its dimer dissolved in common nematic solvents in order to determine whether this agrees with molecular field theory. (author)

  17. Intersegmental interactions in supercoiled DNA: atomic force microscope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Miloseska, Lela; Potaman, Vladimir N.; Sinden, Richard R.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2003-10-15

    Intersegmental interactions in DNA facilitated by the neutralization of electrostatic repulsion was studied as a function of salt concentration and DNA supercoiling. DNA samples with defined superhelical densities were deposited onto aminopropyl mica at different ionic conditions and imaged in air after drying of the samples. Similar to hydrodynamic data, we did not observe a collapse of supercoiled DNA, as proposed earlier by cryo-EM studies. Instead, the formation of the contacts between DNA helices within supercoiled loops with no visible space between the duplexes was observed. The length of such close contacts increased upon increasing NaCl concentration. DNA supercoiling was a critical factor for the stabilization of intersegmental contacts. Implications of the observed effect for understanding DNA compaction in the cell and for regulation DNA transactions via interaction of distantly separated DNA regions are discussed.

  18. Multiscale structural study using scanning X-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Arima, Taka-hisa

    2016-01-01

    Correspondence between structures at the atomic- and meso-scales can be given by scanning X-ray microscopy integrated with polarized X-ray diffractometry. Symmetry is the common structural feature available across multiple hierarchies. This article introduces a symmetry evaluation technique based on polarized X-ray diffractometry and describes two embodiments: chirality domain observation and antiferromagnetic domain observation. Multiscale structural studies would play an important role in uncovering universality of hierarchical structure. (author)

  19. Transmission electron microscopic study of reduced Ca2UO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasevec, V.; Prodan, A.; Holc, J.; Kolar, D.

    1983-01-01

    Structural changes of Ca 2 UO 5 during reduction in hydrogen were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that monoclinic Ca 2 UO 5 changes into triclinic Ca 4 U 2 O 9 . They are related, respectively, to the fluorite and the bixbyite (C-M 2 O 3 ) structures, so that the product is a superstructure of the latter. Reduction occurs along the (100)/sub t/ planes originating from the (006)/sub m/ planes of the parent structure by diminishing the coordination number of the Ca cation from 7 to 6. 5 figures

  20. Note: long-range scanning tunneling microscope for the study of nanostructures on insulating substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Mendoza, Aday J; Rodrigo, José G; Island, Joshua; Burzuri, Enrique; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; van der Zant, Herre S J; Agraït, Nicolás

    2014-02-01

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful tool for studying the electronic properties at the atomic level, however, it is of relatively small scanning range and the fact that it can only operate on conducting samples prevents its application to study heterogeneous samples consisting of conducting and insulating regions. Here we present a long-range scanning tunneling microscope capable of detecting conducting micro and nanostructures on insulating substrates using a technique based on the capacitance between the tip and the sample and performing STM studies.

  1. Note: Long-range scanning tunneling microscope for the study of nanostructures on insulating substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina-Mendoza, Aday J., E-mail: aday.molina@uam.es [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Rodrigo, José G.; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC) and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales “Nicolás Cabrera,” Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Island, Joshua; Burzuri, Enrique; Zant, Herre S. J. van der [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5046, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Agraït, Nicolás [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC) and Instituto Universitario de Ciencia de Materiales “Nicolás Cabrera,” Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia IMDEA-Nanociencia, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-15

    The scanning tunneling microscope (STM) is a powerful tool for studying the electronic properties at the atomic level, however, it is of relatively small scanning range and the fact that it can only operate on conducting samples prevents its application to study heterogeneous samples consisting of conducting and insulating regions. Here we present a long-range scanning tunneling microscope capable of detecting conducting micro and nanostructures on insulating substrates using a technique based on the capacitance between the tip and the sample and performing STM studies.

  2. Microscopic and endoscopic anatomical study of the extended transsphenoidal approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Xin-tao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Traditional transsphenoidal approach has less treatment effect in invasive pituitary adenoma. To remove tumors growing outside the sella become one of the challenges in neurosurgery. This study aims to study anatomical characteristics of the extended transsphenoidal approach for clinical operation. Methods A mimetic surgery was performed on 10 adult cadaver heads through extended transsphenoidal approach by endoscopy. The study data of related anatomic structures were measured. Results The distance from sphenoidal ostium to anterior nasal spine is (59.68 ± 4.28 mm (52.62-63.16 mm, to posterior nasal aperture is (12.88 ± 1.46 mm (10.47-15.61 mm. The incidence of optic nerve and internal carotid artery protuberance in the lateral wall of sphenoidal sinus is 11/20 and 17/20, respectivly. The medial wall of the cavernous sinus is comprised of one dural layer. The incidence of anterior intercavernous sinus, posterior intercavernous sinus, inferior intercavernous sinus and basilar sinus is 17/20, 12/20, 11/20 and 20/20, respectively. The distance between the bilateral hidden segment of internal carotid artery is (15.30 ± 1.25 mm (12.42-21.76 mm, between the bilateral inferior horizontal segment midpoint is (14.03 ± 1.19 mm (10.42-18.43 mm, between the bilateral anterior vertical segment is (18.87 ± 1.44 mm (16.75-24.88 mm, and between the bilateral inner edge of tuberculum sellae is (12.73 ± 0.94 mm (9.97-16.18 mm. In 7 cases (7/20, the intracavernous carotid is in direct contact with the sellar part of the medial wall; in all cases (20/20, the venous plexus extends into the space between the intracavernous carotid and the sphenoidal part of the medial wall. The incidence of the intracavernous carotid coursing along the inferior one third of the pituitary gland is 9/20, along the inferior two thirds of the pituitary gland is 7/20, along the all the thirds of the pituitary gland is 3/20, while below the level of the sellar floor is

  3. Microscopical Studies of Structural and Electronic Properties of Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of point defects in semiconductors, e.g. radiation defects, impurities or passivating defects can excellently be studied by the hyperfine technique of Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC). The serious limitation of this method, the small number of chemically different radioactive PAC probe atoms can be widely overcome by means of ISOLDE. Providing shortliving isotopes, which represent common dopants as well as suitable PAC probe atoms, the ISOLDE facility enables a much broader application of PAC to problems in semiconductor physics.\\\\ Using the probe atom $^{111m}$ Cd , the whole class of III-V compounds becomes accessible for PAC investigations. First successful experiments in GaAs, InP and GaP have been performed, concerning impurity complex formation and plasma induced defects. In Si and Ge, the electronic properties~-~especially their influence on acceptor-donor interaction~-~could be exemplarily st...

  4. Study and microscopic characterization of the cadmium telluride deep levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biglari, B.

    1989-05-01

    The spectroscopic methods PICTS, QTS and CTS were developed and perfected to investigate deep level analysis of high resistivity CdTe crystals which were either undoped, or doped with chlorine and copper. Crystals which were grown in space were also investigated. The main characterization of defect levels was determined and different correlations were established between the material's resistivity, chemical residues, dopant concentration and the nuclear radiation detector parameters. Using PICTS and CTS techniques, the generation of defects, under strong gamma-ray irradiation and particle bombardment was also studied. The influence of hydrogen on the main electrical characteristics of CdTe, in particular its ability to passivate the electrical activity of many deep defect and impurity states have been demonstrated. The compensation effects of Cl, Cu and H + are interpreted using the qualitative models based on different possibilities of pairing or triplet formation between the ions of these dopants and those of defects [fr

  5. Raman microscopic studies of PVD deposited hard ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constable, C.P.

    2000-01-01

    PVD hard ceramic coatings grown via the combined cathodic arc/unbalance magnetron deposition process were studied using Raman microscopy. Characteristic spectra from binary, multicomponent, multilayered and superlattice coatings were acquired to gain knowledge of the solid-state physics associated with Raman scattering from polycrystalline PVD coatings and to compile a comprehensive spectral database. Defect-induced first order scattering mechanisms were observed which gave rise to two pronounced groups of bands related to the acoustical (150- 300cm -1 ) and optical (400-7 50cm -1 ) parts of the phonon spectrum. Evidence was gathered to support the theory that the optic modes were mainly due to the vibrations of the lighter elements and the acoustic modes due to the vibrations of the heavier elements within the lattice. A study into the deformation and disordering on the Raman spectral bands of PVD coatings was performed. TiAIN and TiZrN coatings were intentionally damaged via scratching methods. These scratches were then analysed by Raman mapping, both across and along, and a detailed spectral interpretation performed. Band broadening occurred which was related to 'phonon relaxation mechanisms' as a direct result of the breaking up of coating grains resulting in a larger proportion of grain boundaries per-unit-volume. A direct correlation of the amount of damage with band width was observed. Band shifts were also found to occur which were due to the stresses caused by the scratching process. These shifts were found to be the largest at the edges of scratches. The Raman mapping of 'droplets', a defect inherent to PVD deposition processes, found that higher compressive stresses and large amounts of disorder occurred for coating growth onto droplets. Strategies designed to evaluate the ability of Raman microscopy to monitor the extent of real wear on cutting tools were evaluated. The removal of a coating layer and subsequent detection of a base layer proved

  6. Field-ion microscope studies of the defect structure of the primary state of damage of irradiated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidman, D.N.

    1975-01-01

    A review is presented of field ion microscope applications in studies of point defect distribution in irradiated metals. FIM results on the primary state of radiation damage in neutron and ion-irradiated iridium and tungsten, at both room-temperature and 78 0 K, showed that it consists of: (1) isolated vacancies; (2) depleted zones; (3) compact vacancy clusters of voids; and (4) dislocation loops. The fraction of vacancies stored in the dislocation loops represented a small fraction of the total vacancy concentration; in the case of tungsten it was approximately 10 percent. These FIM observations provide a simple explanation of the low yield-factor, determined by transmission electron microscopy, for a number of ion-irradiated metals

  7. Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinoma of the intestine. An immunohistochemical and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Teglbjaerg, P S

    1989-01-01

    reaction for neuron-specific enolase (NSE) was found in three tumors and a positive reaction for chromogranin was found in one tumor. On electron microscopic study, intracytoplasmic whorls of intermediate filaments were seen in the perinuclear area. Dense core "neurosecretory" granules were rarely seen......Pleomorphic (giant cell) carcinomas have been described in the lungs, thyroid, pancreas, and gallbladder. Two pleomorphic carcinomas of the small bowel and two of the large bowel are presented. On light microscopic study, the carcinomas were solid, without squamous or glandular differentiation...

  8. Small gold clusters on graphene, their mobility and clustering: a DFT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amft, Martin; Sanyal, Biplab; Eriksson, Olle; Skorodumova, Natalia V

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by the experimentally observed high mobility of gold atoms on graphene and their tendency to form nanometer-sized clusters, we present a density functional theory study of the ground state structures of small gold clusters on graphene, their mobility and clustering. Our detailed analysis of the electronic structures identifies the opportunity to form strong gold-gold bonds and the graphene-mediated interaction of the pre-adsorbed fragments as the driving forces behind gold's tendency to aggregate on graphene. While clusters containing up to three gold atoms have one unambiguous ground state structure, both gas phase isomers of a cluster with four gold atoms can be found on graphene. In the gas phase the diamond-shaped Au 4 D cluster is the ground state structure, whereas the Y-shaped Au 4 Y becomes the actual ground state when adsorbed on graphene. As we show, both clusters can be produced on graphene by two distinct clustering processes. We also studied in detail the stepwise formation of a gold dimer out of two pre-adsorbed adatoms, as well as the formation of Au 3 . All reactions are exothermic and no further activation barriers, apart from the diffusion barriers, were found. The diffusion barriers of all studied clusters range from 4 to 36 meV only, and are substantially exceeded by the adsorption energies of - 0.1 to - 0.59 eV. This explains the high mobility of Au 1-4 on graphene along the C-C bonds.

  9. Clustering of near clusters versus cluster compactness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Gao; Yipeng Jing

    1989-01-01

    The clustering properties of near Zwicky clusters are studied by using the two-point angular correlation function. The angular correlation functions for compact and medium compact clusters, for open clusters, and for all near Zwicky clusters are estimated. The results show much stronger clustering for compact and medium compact clusters than for open clusters, and that open clusters have nearly the same clustering strength as galaxies. A detailed study of the compactness-dependence of correlation function strength is worth investigating. (author)

  10. Oxidation mechanism of nickel particles studied in an environmental transmission electron microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeangros, Q.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of nickel particles was studied in situ in an environmental transmission electron microscope in 3.2 mbar of O2 between ambient temperature and 600°C. Several different transmission electron microscopy imaging techniques, electron diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy were...... diffusion of Ni2+ along NiO grain boundaries, self-diffusion of Ni2+ ions and vacancies, growth of NiO grains and nucleation of voids at Ni/NiO interfaces. We also observed the formation of transverse cracks in a growing NiO film in situ in the electron microscope....

  11. Experimental studies of the chemistry of metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, E.K.; Riley, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The procedures for studying chemical reactions of metal clusters in a continuous-flow reactor are described, and examples of such studies are given. Experiments to be discussed include kinetics and thermodynamics measurements, and determination of the composition of clusters saturated with various adsorbate reagents. Specific systems to be covered include the reaction of iron clusters with ammonia and with hydrogen, the reaction of nickel clusters with hydrogen and with ammonia, and the reaction of platinum clusters with ethylene. The last two reactions are characterized by complex, multi-step processes that lead to adsorbate decomposition and hydrogen desorption from the clusters. Methods for probing these processes will be discussed. 26 refs., 8 figs

  12. Integrated spectral study of small angular diameter galactic open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariá, J. J.; Ahumada, A. V.; Bica, E.; Pavani, D. B.; Parisi, M. C.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents flux-calibrated integrated spectra obtained at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO, Argentina) for a sample of 9 Galactic open clusters of small angular diameter. The spectra cover the optical range (3800-6800 Å), with a resolution of ˜14 Å. With one exception (Ruprecht 158), the selected clusters are projected into the fourth Galactic quadrant (282o evaluate their membership status. The current cluster sample complements that of 46 open clusters previously studied by our group in an effort to gather a spectral library with several clusters per age bin. The cluster spectral library that we have been building is an important tool to tie studies of resolved and unresolved stellar content.

  13. New microscope produced by Lambda Praha Co. applicable to field studies of microorganisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 5 (2008), s. 457-461 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : lambda * microscope * field studies Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  14. Immunologic status of children with thyroid cancer living near Chernobyl (flow cytometric and electron microscopic study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, K.P.; Gruzov, M.A.; Bolshova, B.V.; Afanasyeva, V.V.; Shlyakhovenko, V.S.; Vishnevskaya, O.A.; Tronko, N.D.

    1996-01-01

    It hag been carded out a light, election microscopic and flow cytometric study of blood leukocyte of children with malignant tumors (papillary carcinoma) of thyroid gland who were living at the moment of the accident near Chernobyl. The results obtained point out the presence of some disturbances of immune status of these children

  15. Poly(diacetylene) Monolayers Studied with a Fluorescence Scanning Near-Field Optical Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, Marco H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Gaub, Hermann E.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1994-01-01

    A novel and powerful method to study the optical properties of thin lipid films which a resolution superior to confocal microscopy is presented. With a scanning near-field optical microscope, fluorescence images of a Langmuir-Blodgett film of diethylene glycol diamine pentacosadiynoic amide are

  16. Study of a few cluster candidates in the Magellanic Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Samyaday; Subramaniam Subramaniam, Annapurni; Sohn, Young-Jong

    2018-06-01

    The Magellanic Clouds (LMC & SMC) are gas rich, metal poor, dwarf satellite galaxies to our Milky Way that are interacting with each other. The Magellanic Bridge (MB), joining the larger and smaller Cloud is considered to be a signature of this interaction process. Studies have revealed that the MB, apart from gas also hosts stellar populations and star clusters. The number of clusters, with well-estimated parameters within the MB is still underway. In this work, we study a sample of 9 previously cataloged star clusters in the MB region. We use Washington C, Harris R and Cousins I bands data from literature, taken using the 4-m Blanco telescope to estimate the cluster properties (size, age, reddening). We also identify and separate out genuine cluster candidates from possible clusters/asterism. The increase in number of genuine cluster candidates with well-estimated parameters is important in the context of understanding cluster formation and evolution in such low-metallicity, and tidally disrupted environment. The clusters studied here can also help estimate distances to different parts of the MB, as recent studies indicate that portions of MB near the SMC is a closer to us, than the LMC.

  17. clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Author for correspondence (zh4403701@126.com). MS received 15 ... lic clusters using density functional theory (DFT)-GGA of the DMOL3 package. ... In the process of geometric optimization, con- vergence thresholds ..... and Postgraduate Research & Practice Innovation Program of. Jiangsu Province ...

  18. Clustering of Unhealthy Behaviors in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study

    OpenAIRE

    Héroux, Mariane; Janssen, Ian; Lee, Duck-chul; Sui, Xuemei; Hebert, James R.; Blair, Steven N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Clustering of unhealthy behaviors has been reported in previous studies; however the link with all-cause mortality and differences between those with and without chronic disease requires further investigation. Objectives To observe the clustering effects of unhealthy diet, fitness, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption in adults with and without chronic disease and to assess all-cause mortality risk according to the clustering of unhealthy behaviors. Methods Participants were ...

  19. Multi-wavelength study of young and massive galaxy clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemonon, Ludovic

    1999-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are the most massive objects gravitationally bound observed. They are the consequence of the evolution of most important perturbations in the cosmological microwave background. Their formation depends strongly of the cosmology, so they represent key objects to understand the Universe. The aim of this thesis is to study the processes of formation in clusters of galaxies well far away than previous studies clone, by high-resolution observations obtained by using most powerful telescope in each studied wavelength: X-ray, visible, infrared and radio. After data reductions of 12 clusters located at 0.1; z; 0.3, I was able to classified them in three categories: dynamically perturbed clusters, with substructures in their X-ray/optical image or velocity distribution of galaxies; cooling flows clusters, more relaxed than previous, with huge amount of gas cooling in their center; AGN contaminated, where the central dominant galaxy is an AGN which contaminate considerably the X-ray emission. I have obtained a measurement of the baryonic fraction of the Universe mass, and an estimation of the Universe matter density parameter at the mega-parsec scale, claiming for a low density universe. The ISOCAM data showed the effect of the ICM interactions on the star formation in cluster galaxies, and demonstrated that optical and mid-IR deduced star-formation are not basically compatible. They also showed how IR-emitting galaxies distribute in clusters, most noticeably how 15 um galaxies are located preferably on the edge of clusters. X-ray and radio data showed that clusters at z 0.25 could be find in several dynamical state, similarly with nearby ones, from relaxed to severely perturbed. All clusters present signs of past or present merging, in agreement with hierarchical structure formation scenario. This clusters database is an excellent starting point to study process of merging in clusters since they showed different aspect of this evolution. (author) [fr

  20. Normal microscopic architecture of acetabular labrum of hip joint: a qualitative original study with clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkantsinikoudis, Nikolaos; Dermon, Antonios; Kommata, Vassiliki; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Soukakos, Panagiotis; Dermon, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Normal histologic architecture of acetabular labrum, regarding presence of Free Nerve Endings (FNEs) and Nerve End Organs (NEOs) has been four times described. Nevertheless, elderly cadaveric specimens and individuals were recruited, leading to considerably high unreliability probability due to microscopic degenerative alterations. Aim of this paper is to analyze distribution pattern of FNEs and NEOs in acetabular labra of healthy middle-aged individuals, configuring thus more reliably acetabular labrum microscopic profile. Six patients with middle age 52 ± 2.5 years were enrolled in this study. Injury of acetabular labrum and normal hip radiograph were present in all cases. Patients were all subjected to successful hip hemi-arthroplasty and derived acetabular labra were subsequently histologically processed and observed under a compound microscope. FNEs and NEOs were detected in all specimens. All types of NEOs were identified, including Paccini, Golgi-Mazzoni, Ruffini and Krause corpuscles. FNEs and NEOs were both in ventral part and in chondral side of labrum predominantly detected. FNEs and NEOs presence was greater in ventral side of labrum, being thus in partial agreement with previous studies results. Further study is required, in order to elucidate the exact acetabular labrum normal microscopic anatomy. IV.

  1. Normal microscopic architecture of acetabular labrum of hip joint: a qualitative original study with clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkantsinikoudis, Nikolaos; Dermon, Antonios; Kommata, Vassiliki; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Soukakos, Panagiotis; Dermon, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Normal histologic architecture of acetabular labrum, regarding presence of Free Nerve Endings (FNEs) and Nerve End Organs (NEOs) has been four times described. Nevertheless, elderly cadaveric specimens and individuals were recruited, leading to considerably high unreliability probability due to microscopic degenerative alterations. Aim of this paper is to analyze distribution pattern of FNEs and NEOs in acetabular labra of healthy middle-aged individuals, configuring thus more reliably acetabular labrum microscopic profile. Materials and methods Six patients with middle age 52 ± 2.5 years were enrolled in this study. Injury of acetabular labrum and normal hip radiograph were present in all cases. Patients were all subjected to successful hip hemi-arthroplasty and derived acetabular labra were subsequently histologically processed and observed under a compound microscope. Results FNEs and NEOs were detected in all specimens. All types of NEOs were identified, including Paccini, Golgi-Mazzoni, Ruffini and Krause corpuscles. FNEs and NEOs were both in ventral part and in chondral side of labrum predominantly detected. Conclusion FNEs and NEOs presence was greater in ventral side of labrum, being thus in partial agreement with previous studies results. Further study is required, in order to elucidate the exact acetabular labrum normal microscopic anatomy. Level of evidence IV. PMID:29264339

  2. Microscopic study of elastic and inelastic ALPHA-nucleus scattering at medium energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao Tien Khoa; Hoang Si Than; Do Cong Cuong; Ngo Van Luyen; Nguyen Ngoc Quynh; Nguyen Tuan Anh

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of the inelastic α + 12 C scattering at medium energies have indicated that the strength of the Hoyle state (the isoscalar O 2 + excitation at 7.65 MeV in 12 C) seems to exhaust only 7 to 9% of the monopole energy weighted sum rule (EWSR), compared to about 15% of the EWSR extracted from inelastic electron scattering data. The full monopole transition strength predicted by realistic microscopic α-cluster models of the Hoyle state can be shown to exhaust up to 22% of the EWSR. To explore the missing monopole strength in the inelastic α + 12 C scattering, we have performed a fully microscopic folding model analysis of the inelastic α + 12 C scattering at E lab =104 to 240 MeV using the 3-α resonating group wave function of the Hoyle state obtained by Kamimura, and a complex density-dependent M3Y interaction newly parametrized based on the Brueckner Hartree Fock results for nuclear matter. Our folding model analysis has shown consistently that the missing monopole strength of the Hoyle state is not associated with the uncertainties in the analysis of the α + 12 C scattering, but is most likely due to the short lifetime and weakly bound structure of this state which significantly enhances absorption in the exit α + 12 C * (O 2 + ) channel. (author)

  3. Cluster-cluster clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, J.; Dekel, A.; Efstathiou, G.; Frenk, C.S.; Yale Univ., New Haven, CT; California Univ., Santa Barbara; Cambridge Univ., England; Sussex Univ., Brighton, England)

    1985-01-01

    The cluster correlation function xi sub c(r) is compared with the particle correlation function, xi(r) in cosmological N-body simulations with a wide range of initial conditions. The experiments include scale-free initial conditions, pancake models with a coherence length in the initial density field, and hybrid models. Three N-body techniques and two cluster-finding algorithms are used. In scale-free models with white noise initial conditions, xi sub c and xi are essentially identical. In scale-free models with more power on large scales, it is found that the amplitude of xi sub c increases with cluster richness; in this case the clusters give a biased estimate of the particle correlations. In the pancake and hybrid models (with n = 0 or 1), xi sub c is steeper than xi, but the cluster correlation length exceeds that of the points by less than a factor of 2, independent of cluster richness. Thus the high amplitude of xi sub c found in studies of rich clusters of galaxies is inconsistent with white noise and pancake models and may indicate a primordial fluctuation spectrum with substantial power on large scales. 30 references

  4. Atomic force microscopic study of the influence of physical stresses on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adya, Ashok K; Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-01-01

    Morphological changes in the cell surfaces of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681), and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354), in response to thermal and osmotic stresses, were investigated using an atomic force microscope. With this microscope imaging, together with measurements of culture viability and cell size, it was possible to relate topological changes of the cell surface at nanoscale with cellular stress physiology. As expected, when the yeasts were exposed to thermostress or osmostress, their viability together with the mean cell volume decreased in conjunction with the increase in thermal or osmotic shock. Nevertheless, the viability of cells stressed for up to 1 h remained relatively high. For example, viabilities were >50% and >90% for the thermostressed, and >60% and >70% for the osmostressed S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe, respectively. Mean cell volume measurements, and bearing and roughness analyses of atomic force microscope images of stressed yeasts indicate that Schiz. pombe may be more resistant to physical stresses than S. cerevisiae. Overall, this study has highlighted the usefulness of atomic force microscope in studies of yeast stress physiology.

  5. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs

  6. Mass spectrometric studies of the cluster formation of radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, S L [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    1994-12-31

    A new experimental system is developed to study the cluster formation of radon progeny with neutral molecules in the environment, which includes a modified mass spectrometer and a surface barrier detector. With the system, the cluster research is carried out at molecular level at which the mass of individual cluster formed is measured. A theory is also proposed to treat the cluster formation as a discrete process based on the ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions. Comparison between the theory and experiment is given. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Using version information in architectural clustering : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierda, A.; Dortmans, E.; Somers, L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a case study that uses clustering to group classes of an existing objectoriented system of significant size into subsystems. The clustering process is based on the structural relations between the classes: associations, generalizations and dependencies. We experiment with

  8. An observational study of disk-population globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armandroff, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    Integrated-light spectroscopy was obtained for twenty-seven globular clusters at the Ca II infrared triplet. Line strengths and radial velocities were measured from the spectra. For the well-studied clusters in the sample, the strength of the CA II lines is very well correlated with previous metallicity estimates obtained using a variety of techniques. The greatly reduced effect of interstellar extinction at these wavelengths compared to the blue region of the spectrum has permitted observations of some of the most heavily reddened clusters in the Galaxy. For several such clusters, the Ca II triplet metallicities are in poor agreement with metallicity estimates from infrared photometry by Malkan. Color-magnitude diagrams were constructed for six previously unstudied metal-rich globular clusters and for the well-studied cluster 47 Tuc. The V magnitudes of the horizontal branch stars in the six clusters are in poor agreement with previous estimates based on secondary methods. The horizontal branch morphologies and reddenings of the program clusters were also determined. Using the improved set of metallicities, radial velocities, and distance moduli, the spatial distribution, kinematics, and metallicity distribution of the Galactic globulars were analyzed. The revised data supports Zinn's conclusion that the metal-rich clusters form a highly flattened, rapidly rotating disk system, while the metal-poor clusters make up the familiar, spherically distributed, slowly rotating halo population. The scale height, metallicity distribution, and kinematics of the metal-rich globulars are in good agreement with those of the stellar thick disk. Luminosity functions were constructed, and no significant difference is found between disk and halo samples. Metallicity gradients seem to be present in the disk cluster system. The implications of these results for the formation and evol

  9. Study of skin of an Egyptian mummy using a scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mańkowska-Pliszka Hanna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The first study of modified human remains using an electron microscope was carried out at the end of the 1950 and in 1979 the first result of the study involving a scanning electron microscope (SEM was published for the first time. The study was mainly focused on the structure of tissues and cells. With the help of this technique cell and tissue elements, viruses and bacterial endospores as well as the structure of epithelium and the collagen contents of dermis were identified and described. In the above-mentioned case the object of the study using a SEM was a free part of the right hand (forearm with the dorsal and palmar parts of hand of unknown origin, with signs of mummification revealed during microscopic analysis. Our study was aimed at finding the answer to the question if the mummification of the studied limb was natural or intentional, and if the study using a SEM could link the anonymous remains with ancient Egypt.

  10. Study of pressure losses in the EL 4 cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriaud, Ch.

    1964-01-01

    The evolution of research on the EL-4 cluster is examined here from the pressure losses point of view. These may be split up into separate pressure losses along the rode and in pressure losses corresponding to various particularities of the cluster. Tests have been carried out on series of three or four clusters placed in a channel. Water was first used, and then carbon dioxide at 60 bars. In all cases the following two parameters were varied: the Reynolds' number, and the rotation of a cluster around its axis with respect to the surrounding clusters. The influence of the gap between to successive clusters has also been studied. The first tests were carried out on clusters without jackets, the subsequent ones on clusters fitted with jackets. It was thus possible to study various types of element assemblies. The results are given in the form of curves representing: the evolution of the independent pressure loss coefficients as a function of the Reynolds number. (author) [fr

  11. New implementation of a shear-force microscope suitable to study topographical features over wide areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ustione, A.; Cricenti, A.; Piacentini, M.; Felici, A. C.

    2006-01-01

    A new implementation of a shear-force microscope is described that uses a shear-force detection system to perform topographical imaging of large areas (∼1x1 mm 2 ). This implementation finds very interesting application in the study of archeological or artistic samples. Three dc motors are used to move a sample during a scan, allowing the probe tip to follow the surface and to face height differences of several tens of micrometers. This large-area topographical imaging mode exploits new subroutines that were added to the existing homemade software; these subroutines were created in Microsoft VISUAL BASIC 6.0 programming language. With this new feature our shear-force microscope can be used to study topographical details over large areas of archaeological samples in a nondestructive way. We show results detecting worn reliefs over a coin

  12. Accumulation of enriched uranium UO2F2 in ultrastructure as studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Wang Yuanchang

    1992-01-01

    A study was made on the retention of soluble enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 in ultrastructure by electron microscopic autoradiography. The early dynamic accumulation of radioactivity in the body showed that enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 was mainly localized in kidneys, especially accumulated in epithelial cells of proximal convoluted tubules leading to degeneration and necrosis of the tubules. In liver cells, enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 at first deposited in nuclei of the cells and in soluble proteins of the plasma, and later accumulated selectively in mitochondria and lysosomes. On electron microscopic autoradiographic study it was shown that the dynamic retention of radioactivity of enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 in skeleton increased steadily through the time period of exposure. Enriched uranium UO 2 F 2 chiefly deposited in nuclei and mitochondria of osteoblasts as well as of osteoclasts

  13. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described

  14. EXAFS study influence of pH on microscopic structure of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianliang; Chongqing Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, Chongqing; Pan Gang; Zhu Mengqiang; Chen Hao; Hu Tiandou; Wu Ziyu; Xie Yaning; Du Yonghua

    2004-01-01

    Microscopic local structures of Zn(II) were studied using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy under different pH conditions. When pH 2+ (aq) was coordinated with six water molecules and the average Zn-O distance was measured to be 2.08 Angstrom, which indicated that hydrated Zn 2+ (aq) ions were in octahedral geometry under acid conditions. Under alkaline conditions, Zn 2+ (aq) was coordinated with four water molecules and the average Zn-O distance was measured to be 1.96 Angstrom, which indicated that hydrated Zn 2+ (aq) ions were in tetrahedral geometry. EXAFS results provided detailed information on the form and microscopic structure of hydrated Zn(II) ions under different pH conditions, which were fundamental for understanding the reactivity of Zn(II) in solutions and at particle-water interfaces. (authors)

  15. Role of delta excitations in pion-, photon- and nucleon-nucleus reactions studied with microscopic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, A.

    1995-01-01

    Delta excitation plays a prominent role in intermediate heavy reactions. In this paper, comment is made on the calculations done for pion-, photon- and nucleon-nucleus reactions using the Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) model and the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) model. First, it is recalled how to include delta degrees in microscopic models in general. Then, the comparison of the microscopic calculation performed by the author with the experimental data is presented. Deltas in microscopic models are discussed. Pion-nucleus reactions have been studied since pion beams became available, especially for exploring the delta resonance in a nuclear medium. The dependence of pion absorption cross section on incident pion energy is shown. The photon-induced pion production in the resonance energy region was studied with the BUU model. The calculated results of neutral pion photo-production are shown. In both inelastic proton scattering and (p,n) charge exchange reaction, the excitation of delta resonance can be observed clearly in the experimental data. The results of the AMD calculation for 12 C(p,p') reaction are shown. (K.I.)

  16. Electron microscopic study of the spilt irradiation effects on the rat parotid ductal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Soo; Lee, Sang Rae

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of split irradiation on the salivary ductal cells, especially on the intercalated cells of the rat parotid glands. For this study, 24 Sprague-Dawley strain rats were irradiated on the head and neck region with two equal split doses of 9 Gy for a 4 hours interval by Co-60 teletherapy unit, Picker's mode l 4M 60. The conditions of irradiation were that field size, dose rate, SSD and depth were 12 X 5 cm, 222 cGy/min, 50 cm and 1 cm, respectively. The experimental animals were sacrificed 1, 2, 3, 6, 12, hours and 1, 3, 7, days after the irradiation and the changes of the irradiated intercalated cells of the parotid glands were examined under light and electron microscope. The results were as follows: 1. By the split irradiation, the degenerative changes of intercalated cells of the parotid glands appeared at 3 hours after irradiation and the most severe cellular degeneration observed at 6 hours after irradiation. The repair processes began from 12 hours after irradiation and have matured progressively. 2. Under electron microscope, loss of nuclear membrane, microvilli and secretory granules, derangement of chromosomes, degeneration of cytoplasm, atrophy or reduction of intracytoplasmic organelles were observed in the intercalated ductal cells after split irradiation. 3. Under light microscope, derangement of ductal cells, widening of cytoplasms and nuclei, hyperchromatism and proliferation of ductal cells were observed in intercalated ducts after split irradiation.

  17. Feasibility of Telementoring for Microneurosurgical Procedures Using a Microscope: A Proof-of-Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Bryan M; Tackla, Ryan D; Gupte, Akshay; Darrow, David; Sorenson, Jeffery; Zuccarello, Mario; Grande, Andrew W

    2017-03-01

    Our pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of our telementoring-telescripting model to facilitate seamless communication between surgeons while the operating surgeon is using a microscope. As a first proof of concept, 4 students identified 20 anatomic landmarks on a dry human skull with or without telementoring guidance. To assess the ability to communicate operative information, a senior neurosurgery resident evaluated the student's ability and timing to complete a stepwise craniotomy on a cadaveric head, with and without telementoring guidance; a second portion included exposure of the anterior circulation. The mentor was able to annotate directly onto the operator's visual field, which was visible to the operator without looking away from the binocular view. The students showed that they were familiar with half (50% ± 10%) of the structures for identification and none was familiar with the steps to complete a craniotomy before using our system. With the guidance of a remote surgeon projected into the visual field of the microscope, the students were able to correctly identify 100% of the structures and complete a craniotomy. Our system also proved effective in guiding a more experienced neurosurgery resident through complex operative steps associated with exposure of the anterior circulation. Our pilot study showed a platform feasible in providing effective operative direction to inexperienced operators while operating using a microscope. A remote mentor was able to view the visual field of the microscope, annotate on the visual stream, and have the annotated stream appear in the binocular view for the operating mentee. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Faraday Rotation Measure Study of Cluster Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, M. M.; Clarke, T. E.

    2001-12-01

    Magnetic fields are thought to play an important role in galaxy cluster evolution. To this end in this study, we looked at polarized radio sources viewed at small impact parameters to the cores of non-cooling flow clusters. By looking at non-cooling flow clusters we hoped to establish what magnetic fields of clusters look like in the absence of the compressed central magnetic fields of the cooling-flow cores. Clarke, Kronberg and Boehringer (2001) examined Faraday rotation measures of radio probes at relatively large impact parameters to the cores of galaxy clusters. The current study is an extension of the Clarke et al. analysis to probe the magnetic fields in the cores of galaxy clusters. We looked at the Faraday rotation of electromagnetic waves from background or imbedded radio galaxies, which were observed with the VLA in A&B arrays. Our results are consistent with previous findings and exhibit a trend towards higher rotation measures and in turn higher magnetic fields at small impact parameters to cluster cores. This research was made possible through funding from the National Science Foundation.

  19. Astrophysical parameters of ten poorly studied open star clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadross, Ashraf Latif; El-Bendary, Reda; Osman, Anas; Ismail, Nader; Bakry, Abdel Aziz

    2012-01-01

    We present the fundamental parameters of ten open star clusters, nominated from Kronberger et al. who presented some newly discovered stellar groups on the basis of the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry and Digitized Sky Survey visual images. Star counts and photometric parameters (radius, membership, distance, color excess, age, luminosity function, mass function, total mass, and dynamical relaxation time) have been determined for these ten clusters for the first time. In order to calibrate our procedures, the main parameters (distance, age, and color excess) have been re-estimated for another five clusters, which are also studied by Kronberger et al. (research papers)

  20. Characterizing Suicide in Toronto: An Observational Study and Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyor, Mark; Schaffer, Ayal; Streiner, David L

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether people who have died from suicide in a large epidemiologic sample form clusters based on demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors. Method: We conducted a coroner’s chart review for 2886 people who died in Toronto, Ontario, from 1998 to 2010, and whose death was ruled as suicide by the Office of the Chief Coroner of Ontario. A cluster analysis using known suicide risk factors was performed to determine whether suicide deaths separate into distinct groups. Clusters were compared according to person- and suicide-specific factors. Results: Five clusters emerged. Cluster 1 had the highest proportion of females and nonviolent methods, and all had depression and a past suicide attempt. Cluster 2 had the highest proportion of people with a recent stressor and violent suicide methods, and all were married. Cluster 3 had mostly males between the ages of 20 and 64, and all had either experienced recent stressors, suffered from mental illness, or had a history of substance abuse. Cluster 4 had the youngest people and the highest proportion of deaths by jumping from height, few were married, and nearly one-half had bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Cluster 5 had all unmarried people with no prior suicide attempts, and were the least likely to have an identified mental illness and most likely to leave a suicide note. Conclusions: People who die from suicide assort into different patterns of demographic, clinical, and death-specific characteristics. Identifying and studying subgroups of suicides may advance our understanding of the heterogeneous nature of suicide and help to inform development of more targeted suicide prevention strategies. PMID:24444321

  1. Limits on visibility of single heavy atoms in the scanning transmission electron microscope: an experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Theoretical calculations of the visibility of single heavy atoms on thin carbon substrates have predicted higher signal to noise ratios then experimentally observed. Six experimental measurements were performed to determine where the theory is inadequate, five to determine the absolute value of heavy atom scattering cross sections in practical units, and one to determine substrate noise in some practical units. The practical unit of measure was chosen to be the scattering power of one carbon atom as determined by an internal standard, Tobacco Mosaic Virus. Measurements were performed on the following targets on thin carbon substrates: single isolated uranium atoms; silicotungstate clusters; colloidal platinum particles; fd bacteriophage embedded in negative strain; and fd bacteriophage reacted with a known quantity of heavy atom reagent. These measurements suggest that the scattering power of one heavy atom is approximately 9 +- 4 carbon atom equivalents, instead of 15 to 24 predicted by theory. The same techniques were used to measure intensity fluctuations from area to area of a clean substrate. Substrate noise was found to be less than expected for squares of width less than 10A, but up to 2.5 times greater than expected for larger squares. These signal and noise measurements have been combined to give an empirical formula for calculating signal to noise ratios from specimen and microscope parameters.

  2. Structural properties of silicon clusters: An empirical potential study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, X.G.; Zheng, Q.Q.; He Yizhen

    1993-09-01

    By using our newly proposed empirical interatomic potential for silicon, the structure and some dynamical properties of silicon cluster Si n (10 ≤ n ≤ 24) have been studied. It is found that the obtained results are close to those from ab-initio methods. From present results, we can gain a new insight into the understanding of the experimental data on the Si n clusters. (author). 20 refs, 6 figs

  3. Clustering of unhealthy behaviors in the aerobics center longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héroux, Mariane; Janssen, Ian; Lee, Duck-chul; Sui, Xuemei; Hebert, James R; Blair, Steven N

    2012-04-01

    Clustering of unhealthy behaviors has been reported in previous studies; however the link with all-cause mortality and differences between those with and without chronic disease requires further investigation. To observe the clustering effects of unhealthy diet, fitness, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption in adults with and without chronic disease and to assess all-cause mortality risk according to the clustering of unhealthy behaviors. Participants were 13,621 adults (aged 20-84) from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study. Four health behaviors were observed (diet, fitness, smoking, and drinking). Baseline characteristics of the study population and bivariate relations between pairs of the health behaviors were evaluated separately for those with and without chronic disease using cross-tabulation and a chi-square test. The odds of partaking in unhealthy behaviors were also calculated. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to assess clustering. Cox regression was used to assess the relationship between the behaviors and mortality. The four health behaviors were related to each other. LCA results suggested that two classes existed. Participants in class 1 had a higher probability of partaking in each of the four unhealthy behaviors than participants in class 2. No differences in health behavior clustering were found between participants with and without chronic disease. Mortality risk increased relative to the number of unhealthy behaviors participants engaged in. Unhealthy behaviors cluster together irrespective of chronic disease status. Such findings suggest that multi-behavioral intervention strategies can be similar in those with and without chronic disease.

  4. From virtual clustering analysis to self-consistent clustering analysis: a mathematical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wing Kam

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new homogenization algorithm, virtual clustering analysis (VCA), as well as provide a mathematical framework for the recently proposed self-consistent clustering analysis (SCA) (Liu et al. in Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 306:319-341, 2016). In the mathematical theory, we clarify the key assumptions and ideas of VCA and SCA, and derive the continuous and discrete Lippmann-Schwinger equations. Based on a key postulation of "once response similarly, always response similarly", clustering is performed in an offline stage by machine learning techniques (k-means and SOM), and facilitates substantial reduction of computational complexity in an online predictive stage. The clear mathematical setup allows for the first time a convergence study of clustering refinement in one space dimension. Convergence is proved rigorously, and found to be of second order from numerical investigations. Furthermore, we propose to suitably enlarge the domain in VCA, such that the boundary terms may be neglected in the Lippmann-Schwinger equation, by virtue of the Saint-Venant's principle. In contrast, they were not obtained in the original SCA paper, and we discover these terms may well be responsible for the numerical dependency on the choice of reference material property. Since VCA enhances the accuracy by overcoming the modeling error, and reduce the numerical cost by avoiding an outer loop iteration for attaining the material property consistency in SCA, its efficiency is expected even higher than the recently proposed SCA algorithm.

  5. The interperiosteo-dural concept applied to the perisellar compartment: a microanatomical and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Patrick; Travers, Nadine; Lescanne, Emmanuel; Arbeille, Brigitte; Jan, Michel; Velut, Stéphane

    2010-11-01

    The dura mater has 2 dural layers: the endosteal layer (outer layer), which is firmly attached to the bone, and the meningeal layer (inner layer), which directly covers the brain. These 2 dural layers join together in the middle temporal fossa or the convexity and separate into the orbital, lateral sellar compartment (LSC), or spinal epidural space to form the extradural neural axis compartment (EDNAC). The aim of this work was to anatomically verify the concept of the EDNAC by using electron microscopy. The authors studied the cadaveric heads obtained from 13 adults. Ten of the specimens (or 20 perisellar areas) were injected with colored latex and fixed in formalin. They carefully removed each brain to allow a superior approach to the perisellar area. The 3 other specimens were studied by microscopic and ultrastructural methods to describe the EDNAC in the perisellar area. Special attention was paid to the dural layers surrounding the perisellar area. The authors studied the anatomy of the meningeal architecture of the LSC, the petroclival venous confluence, the orbit, and the trigeminal cave. After dissection, the authors took photographs of the dural layers with the aid of optical magnification. The 3 remaining heads, obtained from fresh cadavers, were prepared for electron microscopic study. The EDNAC is limited by the endosteal layer and the meningeal layer and contains fat and/or venous blood. The endosteal layer and meningeal layer were not identical on electron microscopy; this finding can be readily related to the histology of the meninges. In this study, the authors demonstrated the existence of the EDNAC concept in the perisellar area by using dissected cadaveric heads and verified the reality of the concept of the meningeal layer with electron microscopy. These findings clearly demonstrated the existence of the EDNAC, a notion that has generally been accepted but never demonstrated microscopically.

  6. WIYN Open Cluster Study. XXXII. Stellar Radial Velocities in the Old Open Cluster NGC 188

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Aaron M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Harris, Hugh C.; McClure, Robert D.

    2008-06-01

    We present the results of our ongoing radial-velocity (RV) survey of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188. Our WIYN 3.5 m data set spans a time baseline of 11 years, a magnitude range of 12 =3 measurements, finding 473 to be likely cluster members. We detect 124 velocity-variable cluster members, all of which are likely to be dynamically hard-binary stars. Using our single member stars, we find an average cluster radial velocity of -42.36 ± 0.04 km s-1. We use our precise RV and proper-motion membership data to greatly reduce field-star contamination in our cleaned color-magnitude diagram, from which we identify six stars of note that lie far from a standard single-star isochrone. We present a detailed study of the spatial distribution of cluster-member populations, and find the binaries to be centrally concentrated, providing evidence for the presence of mass segregation in NGC 188. We observe the BSs to populate a bimodal spatial distribution that is not centrally concentrated, suggesting that we may be observing two populations of BSs in NGC 188, including a centrally concentrated distribution as well as a halo population. Finally, we find NGC 188 to have a global RV dispersion of 0.64 ± 0.04 km s-1, which may be inflated by up to 0.23 km s-1 from unresolved binaries. When corrected for unresolved binaries, the NGC 188 RV dispersion has a nearly isothermal radial distribution. We use this mean-corrected velocity dispersion to derive a virial mass of 2300 ± 460 M sun .

  7. Immunoelectron Microscopic Study of Podoplanin Localization in Mouse Salivary Gland Myoepithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Minoru; Amano, Ikuko; Tsuruga, Eichi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2010-01-01

    We have recently reported that salivary gland cells express the lymphatic endothelial cell marker podoplanin. The present study was aimed to immunohistochemically investigate the expression of the myoepithelial cell marker α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) on podoplanin-positive cells in mouse parotid and sublingual glands, and to elucidate podoplanin localization in salivary gland myoepithelial cells by immunoelectron microscopic study. The distribution of myoepithelial cells expressing podoplanin and α-SMA was examined by immunofluorescent staining, and the localization of reaction products of anti-podoplanin antibody was investigated by pre-embedded immunoelectron microscopic method. In immunohistochemistry, the surfaces of both the mucous acini terminal portion and ducts were covered by a number of extensive myoepithelial cellular processes expressing podoplanin, and the immunostaining level with anti-podoplanin antibody to myoepithelial cells completely coincided with the immunostaining level with anti-α-SMA antibody. These findings suggest that podoplanin is a salivary gland myoepithelial cell antigen, and that the detection level directly reflects the myoepithelial cell distribution. In immunoelectron microscopic study, a number of reaction products with anti-podoplanin antibody were found at the Golgi apparatus binding to the endoplasmic reticulum in the cytoplasm of myoepithelial cells between sublingual gland acinar cells, and were also found at the myoepithelial cell membrane. These findings suggest that salivary gland myoepithelial cells constantly produce podoplanin and glycosylate at the Golgi apparatus, and transport them to the cell membrane. Podoplanin may be involved in maintaining the homeostasis of myoepithelial cells through its characteristic as a mucin-type transmembrane glycoprotein. PMID:20514295

  8. Effect of fluoride and cobalt on forming enamel: scanning electron microscope and X-ray microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashrafi, S.H.; Eisenmann, D.R.; Zaki, A.E.; Liss, R.

    1988-01-01

    The forming surfaces of enamel of rat incisors were examined by scanning electron microscope one hour after injection of either 5 mg/100 g body weight of sodium fluoride or 12 mg/100 g body weight of cobalt chloride. The cell debris from the surfaces of the separated incisors was either gently wiped off with soft facial tissues or chemically removed by treating with NaOH, NaOCl or trypsin. Best results to remove cell debris were obtained from 0.25% trypsin treatment. SEM studies revealed that the surface of the normal secretory enamel was characteristic in appearance with well-developed smooth prism outlines. In fluoride specimens the prism outlines were feathery in appearance, laced with protruding spine-shaped clusters of mineral crystals. In the case of cobalt treatment, prism outlines were less uniform and in some areas they were incomplete. The calcium concentration of surface enamel was significantly lower in the cobalt-treated specimens than those from control and fluoride-treated animals. The Ca:Mg ratio was also lower in cobalt-treated specimens as compared to control and fluoride-treated ones

  9. Microscopic study of carrier transport in the organic semiconductor zinc-phthalocyanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Joao Piroto [ESTeSC, Polytechnic Institute of Coimbra, 3040-854 Coimbra (Portugal); CEMDRX, Physics Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Alberto, Helena Vieira; Vilao, Rui Cesar; Gil, Joao M.; Weidinger, Alois; Campos, Nuno Ayres de [CEMDRX, Physics Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Larga, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Nominally undoped zinc-phthalocyanine (ZnPc) was investigated using Muon Spin Rotation ({mu}SR) to probe microscopic carrier transport properties. The study focused on the relaxation of the positive muon's polarisation produced by spin-flip scattering with charge carriers. An energy of 71(8) meV was found for the temperature activation of carrier jumps, a value that does not match the activation energies known in ZnPc from electrical measurements, and that was attributed to a fast transport component in this material. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Atomic force microscopic study of the effects of ethanol on yeast cell surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Adya, Ashok K; Walker, Graeme M

    2006-02-01

    The detrimental effects of ethanol toxicity on the cell surface morphology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354) were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). In combination with culture viability and mean cell volume measurements AFM studies allowed us to relate the cell surface morphological changes, observed on nanometer lateral resolution, with the cellular stress physiology. Exposing yeasts to increasing stressful concentrations of ethanol led to decreased cell viabilities and mean cell volumes. Together with the roughness and bearing volume analyses of the AFM images, the results provided novel insight into the relative ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Sc. pombe.

  11. Epidemiologic studies of radioactively contaminated environments and cancer clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, J.D. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on epidemiologic studies which address the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations. Investigations of the possible adverse effects of living in radioactively contaminated environments are difficult to conduct, however, because human populations tend to be fairly mobile, cumulative exposures to individuals from environmental conditions are difficult to estimate, and the risks associated with such exposures tend to be small relative to background levels of disease. Such studies can be arbitrarily classified as geographic correlation surveys, analytic studies, and cluster evaluations. Geographic correlation studies (ecological surveys) relate disease in populations to area characteristics. Although exposure to individuals is unknown, these exploratory or hypothesis-generating studies can identify areas to target for further in-depth evaluation. Analytic investigations relate individual exposure information to disease occurrence. Unusual occurrences of disease in time and place (clusters) occasionally point to a common environmental factor; cluster evaluations have been most successful in identifying the source of infectious disease outbreaks

  12. Assessing the Penetrating Abilities of Experimental Preparation with Dental Infiltrant Features Using Optical Microscope: Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skucha-Nowak, Małgorzata; Machorowska-Pieniążek, Agnieszka; Tanasiewicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the infiltration technique is to penetrate demineralized enamel with a low viscosity resin. Icon® (DMG) is the first ever and so far the only dental infiltrant. Bacteriostaticity is one of the properties that should be inherent in dental infiltrants, but Icon lacks this feature. The aim of the preliminary study was to properly choose a dye which would allow us to assess the penetrating abilities of our own, experimental preparation with features of a dental infiltrant with bacteriostatic properties and to compare using an optical microscope the depth of infiltration of the designed experimental preparation with the infiltrant available on the market. The preparation is supposed to infiltrate decalcified human enamel and be assessed with an optical microscope. Eosin, neutral fuchsine and methylene blue were added to experimental preparation with dental infiltrant features and to Icon® (DMG) in order to assess the depth of penetration of the experimental solution into the decalcified layers of enamel. The experimental solution mixes well with eosin, neutral fuchsine, and methylene blue. During the preliminary study, the authors concluded that the experimental solution mixes well with methylene blue, neutral fuchsine, and eosin. An addition of eosin to a preparation which infiltrates inner, demineralized enamel layers, facilitates the assessment of such a preparation with an optical microscope. A designed experimental solution with the main ingredients, i.e., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and tetraethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) with a ratio of 75% to 25% penetrates the demineralized (decalcified) inner parts of the enamel and polymerizes when exposed to light. In order to assess the infiltration of the experimental solution into the demineralized enamel layers, it is required to improve the measurement techniques that utilize optical microscopy.

  13. Microscopic study of rock for estimating long-term behavior. Research document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yasuaki

    2003-02-01

    Micro-structure of rock plays an essential role for their long-term behavior. For elucidating long-term characteristics of granite we here present the followings: 1) Conformal Lase Scanning Microscope (LSM) observation of configuration of a joint in granite, its Fourier analysis and the change under uniaxial stress condition, 2) characterization of the mechanism of microcrack initiation and propagation observed by stereoscopic microscope under uniaxial/triaxial compression and relaxation tests, 3) observation of microcrack initiation and propagation by LSM under uniaxial compression, and 4) a study of strong discontinuity analysis included in the homogenization theory to predict the long-term behavior of micro/macro-level stress for granite. Rock image processing and analysis become a fundamental procedure to determine rock surface discontinuities. In Chapter 2 LSM that can acquire three-dimensional images is introduced to observe the roughness of discontinuity in a rock specimen. Then, discontinuities appeared on circular sections are identified by LSM and characterized by a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) analysis. The change of discontinuities is observed under applying stress. Microcrack generation and propagation play an essential role to predict the long-term behavior of rock. In Chapter 3 a progressive development of cracking in granite is revealed by using stereoscopic microscope under water-saturated triaxial compression condition. Next by using LSM observe the procedure of micro-cracking under uniaxial compression condition. Obviously the micro-crack initiation and propagation controls the time-dependent behavior of granite. We have analysed the behavior by a viscoelastic theory applied in homogenization method. However since it is difficult to determine the inter-granular properties of constituent crystals and to represent the stress-dependent nonlinear characteristics by this method, we study a strong discontinuity analysis included in the

  14. Studies on Microscopic Structure of Diesel Sprays under Atmospheric and High Gas Pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Deshmukh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the spray structure of diesel from a 200-μm, single-hole solenoid injector is studied using microscopic imaging at injection pressures of 700, 1000 and 1400 bar for various gas pressures. A long-distance microscope with a high resolution camera is used for spray visualization with a direct imaging technique. This study shows that even at very high injection pressures, the spray structure in an ambient environment of atmospheric pressure reveals presence of entangled ligaments and non-spherical droplets during the injection period. With increase in the injection pressure, the ligaments tend to get smaller and spread radially. The spray structure studies are also conducted at high gas pressures in a specially designed high pressure chamber with optical access. The near nozzle spray structure at the end of the injection shows that the liquid jet breakup is improved with increase in gas density. The droplet size measurement is possible only late in the injection duration when the breakup appears to be complete and mostly spherical droplets are observed. Hence, droplet size measurements are performed after 1.3 ms from start of the injection pulse. Spatial and temporal variation in Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD is observed and reported for the case corresponding to an injection pressure of 700 bar. Overall, this study has highlighted the importance of verifying the extentof atomization and droplet shape even in dense sprays before using conventional dropsizing methods such as PDPA.

  15. The reactions of loaded carbon nanotubes, studied by novel electron microscope techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawcliffe, A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel electron microscope technique, controlled environment transmission electron microscopy (CETEM), has been used to investigate the reaction of materials loaded within the internal cavities of carbon nanotubes. CETEM allows the introduction of up to 20 mbar of gas around an electron microscope sample, while maintaining a high resolution imaging capability. The microscope is stable, flexible and reliable under these conditions and high resolution images of encapsulated transmission metal oxide reduction have been recorded at 460 deg. C. Recently discovered carbon nanotubes have in theory many applications, many of which will require controlled reliable loading of the internal cavity. However, at present, there is little experimental evidence to confirm theoretical descriptions of the fundamental mechanisms which govern both the extent of loading and the state in which it is found. Similarly, reaction within the cavity and the effect of encapsulation on the nano-scale particle distribution must also be understood, and CETEM proves to be an ideal technique for the study of these processes. Nanotubes have been loaded from aqueous solution with (NH 4 ) 2 IrCI 6 and with molten MoO 3 or K 2 WO 4 /WO 3 . Bulk samples of the first salt are known to decompose spontaneously in air at 200 deg. C, and the bulk oxides are partially reduced at temperature under hydrogen to give potentially useful conducting phases. Comparing the reaction of these materials it is thus possible to: investigate the effect of loading on their reaction; compare the reaction of these materials in- and out-side the tube cavity; and assess the result of violent loading processes on the tubes themselves. Fortuitously, a spontaneous decomposition, a solid-gas reduction and a phase rearrangement were all recorded, allowing mechanistic implications of encapsulation to be considered for each of these reactions. Perhaps surprisingly, the results can be largely interpreted using the reported bulk

  16. Electron Microscopic Changes of Rabbit Retina after Chromovitrectomy Using Combined Dyes (Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Aznabaev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate on experimental model electron-microscopic changes of rabbit retina after staining of the posterior eye segmentwith combined dyes based on Trypan blue and Brilliant blue G for the assessment of their safety. Methods. The study was performed onChinchilla breed rabbits. Combined dyes based on Trypan blue and Brilliant blue were used: MembraneBlue-Dual (DORC, Netherlandsand “Staining solution for ophthalmic surgery” (JCS “Optimedservis”, Russia. Standard three-port vitrectomy technique was used. After vitreous removal dyes were injected in vitreous cavity and exposed for 10 seconds and then removed. The vitreous cavity was filled by a balanced salt solution. An electron-microscopic evaluation was performed on 5, 14 and 30 days after surgery. Eyes were enucleated in 20 minutes after animal was killed by air embolization. Intact eyes were used as a control, all samples were prepared in same сonditions. The damage of the retina architectonics and the presence of intracellular inclusions were evaluated. Results. The staged character of pathomorphological changes was revealed. On the 5th day moderate edema and hydropic dystrophy of neurons were registered. On the 14th day, there was no negative dynamics. On day 30, the signs of edema and dystrophy of neurons practically disappeared, which may indicate a fundamental reversibility of the registered changes. Conclusion. Investigated dyes for staining intraocular structures based on Trypan blue and Brilliant blue did not cause significant histomorphological changes and toxic effects on retinal cell structures. Detected electron microscopic changes were insignificant, had reversible character and could be mostly caused by a surgical injury.

  17. Microwave Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Makes ultra-high-resolution field measurements. The Microwave Microscope (MWM) has been used in support of several NRL experimental programs involving sea...

  18. Structural and functional changes in the intenstine of irradiated and hypothermic irradiated rats : a scanning and transmission electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, S.; Chaudhuri, Swapna; Roy, Bijon

    1982-01-01

    Severe destructive changes in the intestine of rats following whole body exposure to gamma rays (832 rads) were observed by light microscope, scanning and transmission electron microscope studies. Hypothermia (15deg C rectal temperature) induced prior to irradiation protected the intestinal mucosa from destruction. A simultaneous study showed that glucose absorption decreased significantly in irradiated rats, whereas it was increased in hypothermic irradiated animals. (author)

  19. A scanning electron microscopic study of 34 cases of acute granulocytic, myelomonocytic, monoblastic and histiocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polliack, A; McKenzie, S; Gee, T; Lampen, N; de Harven, E; Clarkson, B D

    1975-09-01

    This report describes the surface architecture of leukemic cells, as seen by scanning electron microscopy in 34 patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia. Six patients with myeloblastic, 4 with promyelocytic, 10 with myelomonocytic, 8 with monocytic, 4 with histiocytic and 2 with undifferentiated leukemia were studied. Under the scanning electron microscope most leukemia histiocytes and monocytes appeared similar and were characterized by the presence of large, well developed broad-based ruffled membranes or prominent raised ridge-like profiles, resembling ithis respect normal monocytes. Most cells from patients with acute promyelocytic or myeloblastic leukemia exhibited narrower ridge-like profiles whereas some showed ruffles or microvilli. Patients with myelomonocytic leukemia showed mixed populations of cells with ridge-like profiles and ruffled membranes whereas cells from two patients with undifferentiated leukemia had smooth surfaces, similar to those encountered in cells from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It appears that nonlymphoblastic and lymphoblastic leukemia cells (particularly histiocytes and monocytes) can frequently be distinquished on the basis of their surface architecture. The surface features of leukemic histiocytes and monocytes are similar, suggesting that they may belong to the same cell series. The monocytes seem to have characteristic surface features recognizable with the scanning electron microscope and differ from most cells from patients with acute granulocytic leukemia. Although overlap of surface features and misidentification can occur, scanning electron microscopy is a useful adjunct to other modes of microscopy in the study and diagnosis of acute leukemia.

  20. In vivo study of rat cortical hemodynamics using a stereotaxic-apparatus-compatible photoacoustic microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Heng; Chen, Qian; Qi, Weizhi; Chen, Xingxing; Xi, Lei

    2018-04-19

    Brain imaging is an important technique in cognitive neuroscience. In this article, we designed a stereotaxic-apparatus-compatible photoacoustic microscope for the studies of rat cortical hemodynamics. Compared with existing optical resolution photoacoustic microscopy (ORPAM) systems, the probe owns feature of fast, light and miniature. In this microscope, we integrated a miniaturized ultrasound transducer with a center frequency of 10 MHz to detect photoacoustic signals and a 2-dimensional (2D) microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scanner to achieve raster scanning of the optical focus. Based on phantom evaluation, this imaging probe has a high lateral resolution of 3.8 μm and an effective imaging domain of 2 × 2 mm 2 . Different from conventional ORPAMs, combining with standard stereotaxic apparatus enables broad studies of rodent brains without any motion artifact. To show its capability, we successfully captured red blood cell flow in the capillary, monitored the vascular changes during bleeding and blood infusion and visualized cortical hemodynamics induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Follicle and oocyte growth in early postnatal calves: cytochemical, autoradiographical and electron microscopical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhawi, A.J.; Kaňka, J.; Motlík, J.

    1991-01-01

    The initiation of oocyte and follicle growth was studied in 1- and 3-d-old calf ovaries using cytochemical, autoradiographical and electron microscopical approaches. Attention was only paid to unilaminar ovarian follicles that were classified into 3 categories: unilaminar flattened (UF), unilaminar flatto-cuboidal (UFC) and unilaminar cuboidal (UC) ovarian follicles when the oocyte was surrounded by 1 layer of flattened, a mixture of flattened and cuboidal and entirely cuboidal follicle cells, respectively. Our findings suggested that oocytes within each of these follicle categories were in different developmental stages. Furthermore, electron microscopic observations revealed that early after birth, oocyte nuclei characteristic of diplotene configuration (aggregation of the nuclear chromatin into moderately electron-dense small patches and fibrillo-granular texture of the nucleolus) were encountered in 41% of the UF follicles. The rest of the UF as well as all of the UFC and UC follicles were found to contain dictyate oocytes in which the chromatin was highly decondensed and the nucleolus differentiated into fibrillar, fibrillo-granular and granular components. The present results also indicated that the complete transition of the surrounding follicle cells from flattened to cuboidal shape and the morphological changes of the oocyte endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria were 2 complementary events essential for initiation of oocyte growth

  2. Present status of the microscopic study of low-lying collective states in spherical and transitional nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumori, Toshio; Takada, Kenjiro; Sakata, Fumihiko.

    1981-12-01

    The history and the present status of the microscopic study of the low-lying collective excited states in spherical and transitional nuclei are discussed by putting emphasis on explaining the rather modern microscopic investigations of the concept of collective subspace. Importance of the dynamical interplay between the pairing and the quadrupole correlations is emphasized as a crucial element to mediate coupling between the collective and non-collective subspace. (author)

  3. Study and application of microscopic depletion model in core simulator of COSINE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaoyu; Wang Su; Yan Yuhang; Liu Zhanquan; Chen Yixue; Huang Kai

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic depletion correction is one of the commonly used techniques that could improve the historical effect and attain higher precision of diffusion calculation and alleviate the inaccuracy caused by historical effect. Core simulator of COSINE project (core and system integrated engine for design and analysis) has developed a hybrid macroscopic-microscopic depletion model to track important isotopes during each depletion history and correct the macro cross sections. The basic theory was discussed in this paper. The effect and results of microscopic depletion correction were also analyzed. The preliminary test results demonstrate that the microscopic depletion model is effective and practicable for improving the precision of core calculation. (authors)

  4. Isomers of Cu6 cluster: a density function theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Yanhui; Wang Shanshan; Li Gongping

    2008-01-01

    The possible structure of Cu 6 cluster has been given with the GaussView that is a graphical user interface software. The structure optimization was performed on the B3LYP functional and SDD basic set of the quantum computational software of Gaussian03. And eight isomers of Cu 6 cluster were calculated. The binding energy and the structure of eight isomers have been investigated in detail. The result showed that the value of the binding energy was in reasonable agreement with available experimental data, as well as with other theoretical results, and the most stable structure was the triangle of plane. Three new isomers of the Cu 6 cluster have been got in our work, which would be the valuable data for the further theoretical and experimental study. (authors)

  5. Theoretical study of lithium clusters by electronic stress tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Nozaki, Hiroo; Komazawa, Naoya; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2012-01-01

    We study the electronic structure of small lithium clusters Li_n (n = 2 ∼ 8) using the electronic stress tensor. We find that the three eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor of the Li clusters are negative and degenerate, just like the stress tensor of liquid. This leads us to propose that we may characterize a metallic bond in terms of the electronic stress tensor. Our proposal is that in addition to the negativity of the three eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor, their degeneracy characterizes some aspects of the metallic nature of chemical bonding. To quantify the degree of degeneracy, we use the differential eigenvalues of the electronic stress tensor. By comparing the Li clusters and hydrocarbon molecules, we show that the sign of the largest eigenvalue and the differential eigenvalues could be useful indices to evaluate the metallicity or covalency of a chemical bond.

  6. Optical study of the DAFT/FADA galaxy cluster survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, N.; Durret, F.; Clowe, D.; Adami, C.

    2013-11-01

    DAFT/FADA (Dark energy American French Team) is a large survey of ˜90 high redshift (0.42×10^{14} M_{⊙}) clusters with HST weak lensing oriented data, plus BVRIZJ 4m ground based follow up to compute photometric redshifts. The main goals of this survey are to constrain dark energy parameters using weak lensing tomography and to study a large homogeneous sample of high redshift massive clusters. We will briefly review the latest results of this optical survey, focusing on two ongoing works: the calculation of galaxy luminosity functions from photometric redshift catalogs and the weak lensing analysis of ground based data.

  7. Irradiation-related amorphization and crystallization: In situ transmission electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.

    1994-01-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and diffraction to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are twelve such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the US. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies involving electron and ion beam induced and enhanced phase transformations and presents results of several in situ experiments to illustrate the dynamics of this approach in the materials science of irradiation effects. The paper describes the ion- and electron-induced amorphization of CuTi; the ion-irradiation-enhanced transformation of TiCr 2 ; and the ion- and electron-irradiation-enhanced crystallization of CoSi 2

  8. Study of mechanically stimulated ferroelectric domain formation using scanning probe microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J H; Baek, J; Khim, Z G [School of Physics and Nano-Systems Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The stress-related ferroelectric properties have been studied on the Triglycine sulfate (TGS) by scanning probe microscope (SPM). Together with normal stress of the tip, the lateral stress is applied to the sample with piezoelectric transducers. With this study, we characterized the way the ferroelectricity of TGS responds to the axis-specific stress. Specially, the b-directional stress applicable to the surface can amount to several GPa such that the polarization switching by mechanical stress is observable. Although the lateral stress is not strong enough to view such phenomena, a-axis(c-axis) stress still affects the polarization value so as to fortify (lessen) the electric field inside, respectively. These contrasting results can be explained by the sign relation of piezo-coefficients about the individual axis. This work can be a touchstone of future researches in characterizing the electromechanical properties of more popular ferroelectrics such as PZT or BTO.

  9. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of the Pecten Oculi in the Quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris F. Pourlis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to extend the microscopic investigations of the pecten oculi in the quail in order to add some information on the unresolved functional anatomy of this unique avian organ. The pecten oculi of the quail was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Eighteen- to-twenty two highly vascularised accordion-like folds were joined apically by a heavily pigmented bridge of tissue, which holds the pecten in a fanlike shape, widest at the base. The structure of the double layered limiting membrane was recorded. The presence of hyalocytes with macrophage-like appearance was illustrated. It is assumed that the pecten oculi of the quail resembles that of the chicken. Illustrated morphological features of this species may add information on the active physiological role of the pecten. But still, the functional significance of this organ is a matter of controversies.

  10. Uptake and processing of [3H]retinoids in rat liver studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendriks, H.F.; Elhanany, E.; Brouwer, A.; de Leeuw, A.M.; Knook, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The role of rat liver cell organelles in retinoid uptake and processing was studied by electron microscopic autoradiography. [ 3 H]Retinoids were administered either orally, to make an inventory of the cell organelles involved, or intravenously as chylomicron remnant constituents to study retinoid processing by the liver with time. No qualitative differences were observed between the two routes of administration. Time-related changes in the distribution of grains were studied using chylomicron remnant [ 3 H]retinoids. The percentages of grains observed over cells and the space of Disse at 5 and 30 min after administration were, respectively: parenchymal cells, 72.6 and 70.4%; fat-storing cells, 5.0 and 18.1%, and the space of Disse, 14.4 and 8.9%. Low numbers of grains were observed over endothelial and Kupffer cells. The percentages of grains observed over parenchymal cell organelles were, respectively: sinusoidal area, 59.6 and 34.4%; smooth endoplasmic reticulum associated with glycogen, 13.8 and 13.4%; mitochondria, 5.4 and 13.6%; rough endoplasmic reticulum, 4.2 and 7.3%, and rough endoplasmic reticulum associated with mitochondria, 3.7 and 6.5%. It is concluded that chylomicron remnant [ 3 H]retinoids in combination with electron microscopic autoradiography provide a good system to study the liver processing of retinoids in vivo. These results, obtained in the intact liver under physiological conditions, further substantiate that retinoids are processed through parenchymal cells before storage occurs in fat-storing cell lipid droplets, that retinoid uptake is not mediated through lysosomes and that the endoplasmic reticulum is a major organelle in retinoid processing

  11. A theoretical study on interaction of proline with gold cluster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with Au3 (Pakiari and Jamshidi 2007) and interaction of. ∗. Author for correspondence (harjinder.singh@iiit.ac.in) small gold clusters with xDNA base pairs (Sharma et al. 2009) have motivated us to carry out a theoretical study on interaction of proline with gold nanoparticles. Proline is unique among the natural amino acids ...

  12. Familial clustering in burnout: a twin-family study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middeldorp, C.M.; Stubbe, J.H.; Cath, D.C.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Research on risk factors for burnout has mainly focused on circumstances at work and on personal characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate whether burnout clusters within families and, if so, whether this is due to genetic influences or to environmental factors shared by

  13. Language Learner Motivational Types: A Cluster Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Mostafa; Teimouri, Yasser

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to identify different second language (L2) learner motivational types drawing on the framework of the L2 motivational self system. A total of 1,278 secondary school students learning English in Iran completed a questionnaire survey. Cluster analysis yielded five different groups based on the strength of different variables within…

  14. The nervus terminalis in the mouse: light and electron microscopic immunocytochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennes, L

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing neurons and fibers in the olfactory bulb was studied with light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry in combination with retrograde transport of "True Blue" and horseradish peroxidase and lesion experiments. GnRH-positive neurons are found in the septal roots of the nervus terminalis, in the ganglion terminale, intrafascicularly throughout the nervus terminalis, in a dorso-ventral band in the caudal olfactory bulb, in various layers of the main and accessory olfactory bulb, and in the basal aspects of the nasal epithelium. Electron microscopic studies show that the nerve fibers in the nervus terminalis are not myelinated and are not surrounded by Schwann cell sheaths. In the ganglion terminale, "smooth" GnRH neurons are seen in juxtaposition to immunonegative neurons. Occasionally, axosomatic specializations are found in the ganglion terminale, but such synaptic contacts are not seen intrafascicularly in the nervus terminalis. Retrograde transport studies indicate that certain GnRH neurons in the septal roots of the nervus terminalis were linked to the amygdala. In addition, a subpopulation of nervus terminalis-related GnRH neurons has access to fenestrated capillaries whereas other GnRH neurons terminate at the nasal epithelium. Lesions of the nervus terminalis caudal to the ganglion terminale result in sprouting of GnRH fibers at both sites of the knife cut. The results suggest that GnRH in the olfactory system of the mouse can influence a variety of target sites either via the blood stream, via the external cerebrospinal fluid or via synaptic/asynaptic contacts with, for example, the receptor cells in the nasal mucosa.

  15. Natural course of untreated cluster headache: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Ji; Choi, Hyun Ah; Shin, Jong Hwa; Park, Hea Ree; Chung, Chin-Sang

    2018-04-01

    Objective To determine the natural course of cluster headache. Methods We screened patients with cluster headache who were diagnosed at Samsung Medical Center and lost to follow-up for ≥5 years. Eligible patients were interviewed by phone about the longitudinal changes in headache characteristics and disease course. Remission was defined as symptom-free 1) for longer than twice the longest between-bout period and 2) for ≥5 years. Results Forty-two patients lost to follow-up for mean 7.5 (range, 5.0-15.7) years were included. The length of the last bout did not differ from the first one, while the last between-bout period was longer than the first one ( p = 0.012). Characteristics of cluster headache decreased over time: Side-locked unilaterality (from 92.9% to 78.9%), seasonal and circadian rhythmicity (from 63.9% to 60.9% and from 62.2 to 40.5%, respectively), and autonomic symptoms (from 95.2% to 75.0%). Remission occurred in 14 (33.3%) patients at a mean age of 42.3 (range, 27-65) years, which was not different from the age of last bouts in active patients ( p = 0.623). There was a trend for more seasonal and circadian predilection at baseline in the active group ( p = 0.056 and 0.063, respectively) and fewer lifetime bouts and shorter disease duration in patients in remission ( p = 0.063 and 0.090). Conclusions This study first shows the natural courses of cluster headache. Features of cluster headache become less prominent over time. Remission occurred regardless of age. Although no single predictor of remission was found, our data suggest that remission of cluster headache might not be a consequence of more advanced age, longer duration of disease, or accumulation of lifetime bouts.

  16. Model study in chemisorption: atomic hydrogen on beryllium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauschlicher, C.W. Jr.

    1976-08-01

    The interaction between atomic hydrogen and the (0001) surface of Be metal has been studied by ab initio electronic structure theory. Self-consistent-field (SCF) calculations have been performed using minimum, optimized minimum, double zeta and mixed basis sets for clusters as large as 22 Be atoms. The binding energy and equilibrium geometry (the distance to the surface) were determined for 4 sites. Both spatially restricted (the wavefunction was constrained to transform as one of the irreducible representations of the molecular point group) and unrestricted SCF calculations were performed. Using only the optimized minimum basis set, clusters containing as many as 22 beryllium atoms have been investigated. From a variety of considerations, this cluster is seen to be nearly converged within the model used, providing the most reliable results for chemisorption. The site dependence of the frequency is shown to be a geometrical effect depending on the number and angle of the bonds. The diffusion of atomic hydrogen through a perfect beryllium crystal is predicted to be energetically unfavorable. The cohesive energy, the ionization energy and the singlet-triplet separation were computed for the clusters without hydrogen. These quantities can be seen as a measure of the total amount of edge effects. The chemisorptive properties are not related to the total amount of edge effects, but rather the edge effects felt by the adsorbate bonding berylliums. This lack of correlation with the total edge effects illustrates the local nature of the bonding, further strengthening the cluster model for chemisorption. A detailed discussion of the bonding and electronic structure is included. The remaining edge effects for the Be 22 cluster are discussed

  17. Craniovertebral junction 360°: A combined microscopic and endoscopic anatomical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhdeep Singh Jhawar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: With advances in endoscopic and microscopic techniques, access to lesions and bony anomalies around CVJ is becoming easier and straightforward. A combination of microscopic and endoscopic techniques is more useful to understand this anatomy and may aid in the development of future combined approaches.

  18. Compact cryogenic Kerr microscope for time-resolved studies of electron spin transport in microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizo, P. J.; Pugzlys, A.; Liu, J.; Reuter, D.; Wieck, A. D.; van der Wal, C. H.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Pugžlys, A.

    2008-01-01

    A compact cryogenic Kerr microscope for operation in the small volume of high-field magnets is described. It is suited for measurements both in Voigt and Faraday configurations. Coupled with a pulsed laser source, the microscope is used to measure the time-resolved Kerr rotation response of

  19. Studies of superconductors using a low-temperature, high-field scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirtley, J.R.; Feenstra, R.M.; Fein, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    We have developed a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) capable of operating at temperatures as low as 0.4 K and fields as high as 8 T. We have used this STM to study the energy gap of the high-T/sub c/ superconductors La--Sr--Cu--O and Y--Ba--Cu--O. We find that the reduced gap for these oxide superconductors falls in the range 3<2Δ/k/sub B/T/sub c/<7, for polycrystalline, single-crystal, and thin-film samples. We have also simultaneously imaged the surface topography and superconducting energy gap for thin films of the granular superconductor NbN. We occasionally see regions with smaller best-fit gaps that correlate with surface topographical features, but have been unable so far to image flux vortices

  20. Accumulation of fission fragment 147Pm in subcellular level studied by electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Wang Yuanchang

    1990-11-01

    The subcellular localization of fission fragment 147 Pm in tissue cells by electron microscopic autoradiography was investigated. The early harm of internal contaminated accumulation of 147 Pm appeared in blood cells and endothelium cells, obviously in erythrocytes. Then 147 Pm was selectively deposited in ultrastructure of liver cells. Autoradiographic study demonstrated that dense tracks appeared in mitochondria and lysosome of podal cells within renal corpuscle. In nucleus as well as in mitochondria and microbodies of epicyte of kidney near-convoluted tubule, there are numerous radioactive 149 Pm accumulated. With the prolongation of observing time, 149 Pm was selectively and steadily deposited in subcellular level of organic component bone. The radionuclides could be accumulated in nucleus of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. In organelles, the radionuclides was mainly accumulated in rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Autoradiographic tracks of 149 Pm was obviously found to be localized in combined point between Golgi complex and transitive vesicle of rough endoplasmic reticulum

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopic Studies of Microwave Sintered Al-SiC Nanocomposites and Their Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Himyan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Al-metal matrix composites (AMMCs reinforced with diverse volume fraction of SiC nanoparticles were synthesized using microwave sintering process. The effects of the reinforcing SiC particles on physical, microstructure, mechanical, and electrical properties were studied. The phase, microstructural, and surface analyses of the composites were systematically conducted using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and surface profilometer techniques, respectively. The microstructural examination revealed the homogeneous distribution of SiC particles in the Al matrix. Microhardness and compressive strength of nanocomposites were found to be increasing with the increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. Electrical conductivity of the nanocomposites decreases with increasing the SiC content.

  2. Electron microscope autoradiographic studies of the erythroblasts of a case of congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia, type II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramasinghe, S N [Saint Mary' s Hospital Medical School, London (UK); Parry, T E [Department of Haematology, Llandough Hospital, Penarth, Glamorgan, Wales; Hughes, M [Division of Experimental Pathology, The Mathilda and Terence Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Bute Gardens, London, England

    1978-01-01

    The bone marrow cells of a patient with congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia, type II, were incubated with /sup 3/H-thymidine /sup 3/H-uridine or /sup 3/H-leucine for 1 h and studied using the technique of electron microscope autoradiography. Several of the erythroblasts which either displayed the characteristic subsurface double membranes or showed various non-specific abnormalities of the nuclear membrane were found to be actively engaged in DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Both members of some pairs of erythroblasts which were joined together by a spindle bridge were found to be engaged in DNA synthesis, indicating that some spindle bridges persist for a period longer than the duration of the G/sub 1/ phase. A small proportion of mononucleate and binucleate late (non-dividing) erythroblasts showed a marked depression or arrest of protein synthesis and some or all of such cells were presumably destined to be phagocytosed by the bone marrow macrophages.

  3. Nanoscopic morphological changes in yeast cell surfaces caused by oxidative stress: an atomic force microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Elisabetta; Walker, Graeme M; Adya, Ashok K

    2009-06-01

    Nanoscopic changes in the cell surface morphology of the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae (strain NCYC 1681) and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (strain DVPB 1354), due to their exposure to varying concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (oxidative stress), were investigated using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Increasing hydrogen peroxide concentration led to a decrease in cell viabilities and mean cell volumes, and an increase in the surface roughness of the yeasts. In addition, AFM studies revealed that oxidative stress caused cell compression in both S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe cells and an increase in the number of aged yeasts. These results confirmed the importance and usefulness of AFM in investigating the morphology of stressed microbial cells at the nanoscale. The results also provided novel information on the relative oxidative stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae and Schiz. pombe.

  4. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium--niobium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1979-06-01

    An in-situ study of the as-quenched omega phase transformation in Zr--15% Nb was conducted between the temperatures of 77 and 300/sup 0/K using analytical electron microscopy. The domain size of the omega regions observed in this investigation was on the order of 30 A, consistent with previous observations in this system. No alignment of omega domains along <222> directions of the bcc lattice was observed and in-situ thermal cycling experiments failed to produce a long period structure of alternating ..beta.. and ..omega.. phase regions as predicted by one theory of this transformation. Several techniques of microstructural analysis were developed, refined, and standardized. Grouped under the general classification of Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) they provide the experimentalist with a unique tool for the microcharacterization of solids, allowing semiquantitative to quantitative analysis of the morphology, crystallography, elemental composition, and electronic structure of regions as small as 20 A in diameter. These techniques have complications, and it was necessary to study the AEM system used in this work so that instrumental artifacts which invalidate the information produced in the microscope environment might be eliminated. Once these factors had been corrected, it was possible to obtain a wealth of information about the microvolume of material under investigation. The microanalytical techniques employed during this research include: energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy (CTEM, STEM), transmission scanning electron diffraction (TSED), the stationary diffraction pattern technique, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) using a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (DSTEM).

  5. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium--niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1979-06-01

    An in-situ study of the as-quenched omega phase transformation in Zr--15% Nb was conducted between the temperatures of 77 and 300 0 K using analytical electron microscopy. The domain size of the omega regions observed in this investigation was on the order of 30 A, consistent with previous observations in this system. No alignment of omega domains along directions of the bcc lattice was observed and in-situ thermal cycling experiments failed to produce a long period structure of alternating β and ω phase regions as predicted by one theory of this transformation. Several techniques of microstructural analysis were developed, refined, and standardized. Grouped under the general classification of Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) they provide the experimentalist with a unique tool for the microcharacterization of solids, allowing semiquantitative to quantitative analysis of the morphology, crystallography, elemental composition, and electronic structure of regions as small as 20 A in diameter. These techniques have complications, and it was necessary to study the AEM system used in this work so that instrumental artifacts which invalidate the information produced in the microscope environment might be eliminated. Once these factors had been corrected, it was possible to obtain a wealth of information about the microvolume of material under investigation. The microanalytical techniques employed during this research include: energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy (CTEM, STEM), transmission scanning electron diffraction (TSED), the stationary diffraction pattern technique, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (ELS) using a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope

  6. Astrometric and photometric study of the open cluster NGC 2323

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin M.Y.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of the open cluster NGC 2323 using astrometric and photometric data. In our study we used two methods that are able to separate open cluster’s stars from those that belong to the stellar background. Our results of calculations by these two methods indicate that: 1 according to the membership probability, NGC 2323 should contain 497 stars, 2 the cluster center should be at 07h 02m 48.s02 and -08° 20' 17''74,3 the limiting radius of NGC 2323 is 2.31 ± 0.04 pc, the surface number density at this radius is 98.16 stars pc −2, 4 the magnitude function has a maximum at about mv = 14 mag, 5 the total mass of NGC 2323 is estimated dynamically by using astrometric data to be 890 M_, and statistically by using photometric data to be 900 M_, and 6 the distance and age of the cluster are found to be equal to 900 ± 100 pc, and 140 ± 20 Myr, respectively. Finally the dynamical evolution parameter τ of the cluster is about 436.2.

  7. Study of cluster headache: A hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Bhargava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cluster headache (CH is uncommon and most painful of all primary headaches, and continues to be managed suboptimally because of wrong diagnosis. It needs to be diagnosed correctly and specifically treated. There are few studies and none from this region on CH. Materials and Methods: To study the detailed clinical profile of CH patients and to compare them among both the genders. Study was conducted at Mahatma Gandhi hospital, Jodhpur (from January 2011to December 2013. Study comprises 30 CH patients diagnosed according to International Headache Society guidelines (ICHD-II. Routine investigations and MRI brain was done in all patients. All measurements were reported as mean ± SD. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-square test, and continuous variables were compared using Student′s t-test. SPSS for Windows, Version 16.0, was used for statistical analyses with the significance level set at P = 0.05. Results: M: F ratio was 9:1. Age at presentation was from 22-60 years (mean - 38 years. Latency before diagnosis was 3 months-12 years (mean - 3.5 years. All suffered from episodic CH and aura was found in none. Pain was strictly unilateral (right-19, left-11, predominantly over temporal region-18 (60%. Pain intensity was severe in 27 (90% and moderate in 3 (10%. Pain quality was throbbing in 12 (40%. Peak intensity was reached in 5 minutes-30 minutes and attack duration varied from 30 minutes to 3 hours (mean - 2.45 hours. Among autonomic features, conjunctival injection-23 (76.6% and lacrimation-25 (83.3% were most common. Restlessness during episode was found in 80%. CH duration varied from 10 days to 12 weeks. Circadian periodicity for attacks was noted in 24 (80%. Conclusion: Results are consistent with other studies on many accounts, but is different from Western studies with respect to low frequency of family history, chronic CH, restlessness and aura preceeding the attack. Detailed elicitation of history is

  8. Microscopic Polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body, specifically the feet, lower legs and, in bed-ridden patients, the buttocks. The skin findings of cutaneous ... that are in contact with the lungs’ microscopic air sacs – the condition may quickly pose a threat ...

  9. Breast Cancer Symptom Clusters Derived from Social Media and Research Study Data Using Improved K-Medoid Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Qing; Yang, Christopher C; Marshall, Sarah A; Avis, Nancy E; Ip, Edward H

    2016-06-01

    Most cancer patients, including patients with breast cancer, experience multiple symptoms simultaneously while receiving active treatment. Some symptoms tend to occur together and may be related, such as hot flashes and night sweats. Co-occurring symptoms may have a multiplicative effect on patients' functioning, mental health, and quality of life. Symptom clusters in the context of oncology were originally described as groups of three or more related symptoms. Some authors have suggested symptom clusters may have practical applications, such as the formulation of more effective therapeutic interventions that address the combined effects of symptoms rather than treating each symptom separately. Most studies that have sought to identify clusters in breast cancer survivors have relied on traditional research studies. Social media, such as online health-related forums, contain a bevy of user-generated content in the form of threads and posts, and could be used as a data source to identify and characterize symptom clusters among cancer patients. The present study seeks to determine patterns of symptom clusters in breast cancer survivors derived from both social media and research study data using improved K-Medoid clustering. A total of 50,426 publicly available messages were collected from Medhelp.com and 653 questionnaires were collected as part of a research study. The network of symptoms built from social media was sparse compared to that of the research study data, making the social media data easier to partition. The proposed revised K-Medoid clustering helps to improve the clustering performance by re-assigning some of the negative-ASW (average silhouette width) symptoms to other clusters after initial K-Medoid clustering. This retains an overall non-decreasing ASW and avoids the problem of trapping in local optima. The overall ASW, individual ASW, and improved interpretation of the final clustering solution suggest improvement. The clustering results suggest

  10. Breast Cancer Symptom Clusters Derived from Social Media and Research Study Data Using Improved K-Medoid Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Qing; Yang, Christopher C.; Marshall, Sarah A.; Avis, Nancy E.; Ip, Edward H.

    2017-01-01

    Most cancer patients, including patients with breast cancer, experience multiple symptoms simultaneously while receiving active treatment. Some symptoms tend to occur together and may be related, such as hot flashes and night sweats. Co-occurring symptoms may have a multiplicative effect on patients’ functioning, mental health, and quality of life. Symptom clusters in the context of oncology were originally described as groups of three or more related symptoms. Some authors have suggested symptom clusters may have practical applications, such as the formulation of more effective therapeutic interventions that address the combined effects of symptoms rather than treating each symptom separately. Most studies that have sought to identify clusters in breast cancer survivors have relied on traditional research studies. Social media, such as online health-related forums, contain a bevy of user-generated content in the form of threads and posts, and could be used as a data source to identify and characterize symptom clusters among cancer patients. The present study seeks to determine patterns of symptom clusters in breast cancer survivors derived from both social media and research study data using improved K-Medoid clustering. A total of 50,426 publicly available messages were collected from Medhelp.com and 653 questionnaires were collected as part of a research study. The network of symptoms built from social media was sparse compared to that of the research study data, making the social media data easier to partition. The proposed revised K-Medoid clustering helps to improve the clustering performance by re-assigning some of the negative-ASW (average silhouette width) symptoms to other clusters after initial K-Medoid clustering. This retains an overall non-decreasing ASW and avoids the problem of trapping in local optima. The overall ASW, individual ASW, and improved interpretation of the final clustering solution suggest improvement. The clustering results suggest

  11. Proceedings of the workshop on microscopic and phenomenological studies of the interactions between light-heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.

    1993-01-01

    The workshop 'Microscopic and Phenomenological Studies of the Interactions between Light-Heavy Ions' was held at Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo from Dec. 24 to Dec. 26, 1991. The workshop included 1) studies of the nucleus-nucleus interactions of the systems as 16 O- 16 O, 16 O- 15 N, etc., or the studies of the elastic and inelastic scatterings and the transfer reactions in such systems, 2) structure and reactions of neutron-rich nuclei, 3) microscopic derivation of the effective two-nucleon interactions, 4) development of the methods of techniques applied to the heavier systems. (author)

  12. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuexing [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs-. In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy.

  13. Study of clusters using negative ion photodetachment spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yuexing.

    1995-12-01

    The weak van der Waals interaction between an open-shell halogen atom and a closed-shell atom or molecule has been investigated using zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy. This technique is also applied to study the low-lying electronic states in GaAs and GaAs - . In addition, the spectroscopy and electron detachment dynamics of several small carbon cluster anions are studied using resonant multiphoton detachment spectroscopy

  14. Isocentric rotational performance of the Elekta Precise Table studied using a USB-microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Hans L; Zimmermann, Sune J; Riis, Poul

    2010-01-01

    The isocentric three-dimensional performance of the Elekta Precise Table was investigated. A pointer was attached to the radiation head of the accelerator and positioned at the geometric rotational axis of the head. A USB-microscope was mounted on the treatment tabletop to measure the table...... position relative to the pointer tip. The table performance was mapped in terms of USB-microscope images of the pointer tip at different table angles and load configurations. The USB-microscope was used as a detector to measure the pointer tip positions with a resolution down to 0.01 mm. A new elastic...

  15. An AO-assisted Variability Study of Four Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, R.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Strader, J.; Hakala, P.; Catelan, M.; Peacock, M. B.; Simunovic, M.

    2016-09-01

    The image-subtraction technique applied to study variable stars in globular clusters represented a leap in the number of new detections, with the drawback that many of these new light curves could not be transformed to magnitudes due to severe crowding. In this paper, we present observations of four Galactic globular clusters, M 2 (NGC 7089), M 10 (NGC 6254), M 80 (NGC 6093), and NGC 1261, taken with the ground-layer adaptive optics module at the SOAR Telescope, SAM. We show that the higher image quality provided by SAM allows for the calibration of the light curves of the great majority of the variables near the cores of these clusters as well as the detection of new variables, even in clusters where image-subtraction searches were already conducted. We report the discovery of 15 new variables in M 2 (12 RR Lyrae stars and 3 SX Phe stars), 12 new variables in M 10 (11 SX Phe and 1 long-period variable), and 1 new W UMa-type variable in NGC 1261. No new detections are found in M 80, but previous uncertain detections are confirmed and the corresponding light curves are calibrated into magnitudes. Additionally, based on the number of detected variables and new Hubble Space Telescope/UVIS photometry, we revisit a previous suggestion that M 80 may be the globular cluster with the richest population of blue stragglers in our Galaxy. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and Michigan State University (MSU).

  16. Development of an Ultrafast Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Dynamic Surface Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nunes

    1999-01-01

    .... The microscope has demonstrated atomic resolution. We have a femtosecond laser system, optics for delivering ultrafast laser pulses to the STM, and a computer controlled delay line for time-resolved measurements...

  17. Microscopic hyperspectral imaging studies of normal and diabetic retina of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A microscopic hyperspectral imager was developed based on the microscopic technology and the spectral imaging technology. Some microscopic hyperspectral images of retina sections of the normal, the diabetic, and the treated rats were collected by the new imager. Single-band images and pseudo-color images of each group were obtained and the typical transmittance spectrums were ex-tracted. The results showed that the transmittance of outer nuclear layer cells of the diabetic group was generally higher than that of the normal. A small absorption peak appeared near the 180th band in the spectrum of the diabetic group and this peak weakened or disappeared in the spectrum of the treated group. Our findings indicate that the microscopic hyperspectral images include wealthy information of retina sections which is helpful for the ophthalmologist to reveal the pathogenesis of diabetic reti-nopathy and explore the therapeutic effect of drugs.

  18. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopic studies for bioeffects of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Cai, Xiaoqing; Li, Jiang; Zhong, Zengtao; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-04-01

    There have been increasing interests in studying biological effects of nanomaterials, which are nevertheless faced up with many challenges due to the nanoscale dimensions and unique chemical properties of nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy, an advanced imaging technology with high spatial resolution and excellent elemental specificity, provides a new platform for studying interactions between nanomaterials and living systems. In this article, we review the recent progress of X-ray microscopic studies on bioeffects of nanomaterials in several living systems including cells, model organisms, animals and plants. We aim to provide an overview of the state of the art, and the advantages of using synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy for characterizing in vitro and in vivo behaviors and biodistribution of nanomaterials. We also expect that the use of a combination of new synchrotron techniques should offer unprecedented opportunities for better understanding complex interactions at the nano-biological interface and accounting for unique bioeffects of nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy is a non-destructive imaging technique that enables high resolution spatial mapping of metals with elemental level detection methods. This review summarizes the current use and perspectives of this novel technique in studying the biology and tissue interactions of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Topographic Features of Five K-file Brands in Iranian Market: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahravan, Arash; Gorjestani, Hedayat; Izadi, Arash; Mortazavi, Nazanin

    2018-01-01

    Endodontic files which are used to clean and shape the root canal space differ from each other regarding technical specifications. Recently, K-type files are repeatedly studied on their cutting efficiency. This study aims to evaluate the tip design and cutting efficiency of 5 brands of K-files, available in Iran dental market (naming Dentsply, Thomas, Mani, Perfect and Larmrose). In this descriptive study, topographic features of file tips were investigated by the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Those features included tip symmetry, tip design, tip angle, and the distance from the tip to the lowest flute. SEM images (×250 magnification) of files were prepared. Statistical tests (Fisher's exact test, Chi -square, ANOVA, and t test) were used and P brands. No significant differences were found with respect to distance from the file tip to the lowermost flute between different file brands of this study ( P =0.2, One way ANOVA). Dentsply and Mani files possessed the most symmetrical tips and greatest tip angles. With respect to tip length, all 5 brands were satisfactory. However, neither of 5 brands evaluated topographically were outstanding in every aspect.

  20. Rheo-optical Raman study of microscopic deformation in high-density polyethylene under hot drawing

    OpenAIRE

    Kida, Takumitsu; Hiejima, Yusuke; Nitta, Koh-hei

    2015-01-01

    In situ observation of the microscopic structural changes in high-density polyethylene during hot drawing was performed by incorporating a temperature-controlled tensile machine into a Raman spectroscopy apparatus. It was found that the load sharing and molecular orientation during elongation drastically changed at 50°C. The microscopic stress of the crystalline chains decreased with increasing temperature and diminished around 50°C. Moreover, the orientation of the crystalline chains was gre...

  1. Transmission electron microscope studies of crystalline LiNbO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pareja, R.; Gonzalez, R.; Chen, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope investigations in both as-grown and hydrogen-reduced LiNbO 3 reveal that niobium oxide precipitates can be produced by in situ irradiations in the electron microscope. The precipitation process is produced by a combined effect of ionizing electrons and the thermal heating of the specimens during irradiation. It is proposed that the composition of the precipitates is primarily Nb 2 O 5

  2. How the macroscopic current correlates with the microscopic flux-line distribution in a type-II superconductor: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecher, Johannes; Zehetmayer, Martin; Weber, Harald W

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the real-space flux-line lattice (FLL) of pristine and neutron irradiated conventional type-II superconductors using scanning tunnelling microscopy. Our work is focused on the magnetic field range, where the critical current density shows a second peak as a result of neutron irradiation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy images, including more than 2000 flux lines, are used to evaluate various microscopic parameters describing the disorder of the FLL, such as the defect density, the nearest neighbour distances and correlation functions. These parameters are compared with the macroscopic critical current density of the samples. The results show a direct correlation of the micro- and macroscopic properties. We observe a clear transition from an ordered to a disordered lattice at the onset of the second peak. Moreover, we discuss the defects of the FLL and their accumulation to large clusters in the second peak region. (papers)

  3. Dielectric properties of isolated clusters beam deflection studies

    CERN Document Server

    Heiles, Sven

    2013-01-01

    A broad range of state-of-the-art methods to determine properties of clusters are presented. The experimental setup and underlying physical concepts of these experiments are described. Furthermore, existing theoretical models to explain the experimental observations are introduced and the possibility to deduce structural information from measurements of dielectric properties is discussed. Additional case studies are presented in the book to emphasize the possibilities but also drawbacks of the methods.

  4. Transmission electron microscopic study of pyrochlore to defect-fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, Chinnathambi, E-mail: Karthikchinnathambi@boisestate.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Anderson, Thomas J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Gout, Delphine [Oak Ridge National Lab, Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ubic, Rick [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise State University, 1910 University drive, Boise, ID 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates, Ln{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Ln=Y, La, Pr, Nd, Tb, Dy, Yb and Lu), has been identified. Neutron diffraction showed that the structure transforms from well-ordered pyrochloric to fully fluoritic through the lanthanide series from La to Lu with a corresponding increase in the position parameter x of the 48f (Fd3{sup Macron }m) oxygen site from 0.330 to 0.375. As evidenced by the selected area electron diffraction, La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} exhibited a well-ordered pyrocholoric structure with the presence of intense superlattice spots, which became weak and diffuse (in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}) before disappearing completely as the series progressed towards the Lu end. High resolution electron microscopic studies showed the breakdown of the pyrochlore ordering in the form of antiphase domains resulting in diffused smoke-like superlattice spots in the case of Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscopic studies showed the ordered pyrochlore to defect fluorite transition in rare-earth pyrohafnates to occur via the formation of anti-phase domains to start with. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrochlore to fluorite structural transition in rare earth pyrohafnates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer La{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Pr{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} showed well ordered pyrochlore structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering in Dy{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Break down of pyrochlore ordering due to antiphase boundaries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rest of the series showed fluoritic structure.

  5. Gross and microscopic findings in patients submitted to nonablative full-face resurfacing using intense pulsed light: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, Enrique; Ibiett, Erick Valencia

    2002-08-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) is a noncoherent, nonlaser, filtered flashlamp emitting a broadband visible light that has been shown to be effective in photoepilation, as well as in a number of vascular and pigmented lesions of the skin. Their efficacy has also been reported recently in the treatment of photodamaged facial skin. In the last condition, however, there are few studies showing the clinical and microscopic changes produced by IPL. To assess the gross and microscopic changes that occur in photodamaged skin submitted to nonablative full-face resurfacing (NAFFR) using IPL. Five women were submitted to five NAFFR sessions using IPL, one every 2 weeks. Skin biopsies and photographs were taken on all of the patients before the first procedure and after the last one, as well as weekly clinical assessment. Data concerning skin features (wrinkles, oiliness, thickness, dilated pores, and general appearance) were all assessed. Microscopic improvement of the aging features in the epidermis and dermis were all assessed. For the statistical analysis a t test for small samples was used. All the patients showed clinical and microscopic improvement in every one of the parameters assessed. The t test for small samples showed a statistically significant difference (P Facial photodamage was clinically and microscopically improved using IPL. Use of IPL as a rejuvenating method seems to be promising, with minimal side effects, a wide safety margin, and minimal downtime.

  6. Kidney lesions in Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a light-, immunofluorescence-, and electron-microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, W. D.; Croker, B. P.; Tisher, C. C.

    1979-01-01

    The essential pathologic lesion in Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a vasculitis that may involve the kidneys as well as the heart, brain, skin, and subcutaneous tissues. Histopathologic information concerning the response of the kidneys in RMSF is rather limited, however. In this study renal tissue from 17 children who died of RMSF was examined by light, electron, and immunofluorescence microscopy. A lymphocytic or mixed inflammation, or both, involving vessels and interstitium of the kidney was found in all patients. In addition, 10 patients had histologic evidence of acute tubular necrosis, and another 3 had glomerular lesions consisting of focal segmental tuft necrosis or increased cellularity secondary to neutophilic infiltration, or both. Immunofluorescence- and electron-microscopic studies failed to demonstrate immune-complex deposition within glomeruli, a finding that suggests that immunoglobulin and classic immune complexes were not involved in the pathogenesis of the renal lesions at the time of death. These findings suggest the possibility that the pathogenesis of the renal lesion in RMSF may be due to a direct action of the organism (Rickettsia rickettsii) on the vessel wall. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 PMID:525676

  7. Scanning electron microscope studies of adsorption and crystal growth on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, P.

    1980-03-01

    An ultra high vacuum scanning electron microscope (UHV-SEM), equipped with additional surface science techniques (AES, RHEED, work function), has been used to study the adsorption and growth of Cs and Ag on polycrystalline and (110) single crystal of W. These are used to study the layer plus island, or Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. The technique and apparatus are described. In the temperature range of 15 0 C, a whole variety of growth phenomena in the system Ag/W(110) has been seen by SEM. Two intermediate layers are followed by island growth, except at T > approximately equal to 500 0 C where island growth starts at a lower coverage. At T 0 C, layer-like growth is deduced from both AES and SEM measurements. The forms, crystallographic orientations and nucleation densities of islands have been explored in detail using a combination of SEM, AES and EBSP techniques. AES results at room temperature and at 500 0 C have been analysed and the results fit very well with SEM observations. A growth model for Ag/W(110) has been presented and atomistic nucleation theory has been extended, to understand the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode in general and the Ag/W(110) results in particular. (author)

  8. Phase boundary in compatible and incompatible polymer blends studied by micro indentation test and microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mina, M. F.; Akhtar, F.; Haque, M.E.

    2003-10-01

    The phase boundary of incompatible polymer blends such as poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/natural rubber (NR) and polyestyrene (PS)/NR as well as compatible blends such as PMMA/NR/epoxidizer NR (compatibilizer) and PS/NR/styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) block copolymer (compatibilizer) was studied by means of microhardness (H) technique and microscopy. Solution grown films of neat PMMA, PS and blended films of PMMA/NR, PS/NR, PMMA/NR/ENR and PS/NR/SBS were cast using a common solvent (toluene). While the neat PMMA and PS provide constant hardness values of 178 and 173 MPa, respectively, the binary (incompatible) and the ternary (compatible) blends show a conspicuous H-decrease (PMMA/NR=140 MPa, PS/NR=167 MPa, PMMA/NR/ENR=109 MPa and PS/NR/SBS=127 MPa). Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy reveal clear difference of the phase boundary of compatible (smooth boundary) and incompatible (sharp boundary) blends. Besides, the compatibilizer blends are characterised by the thinnest phase boundary (30 μm), which is found about 60 μm in the incompatible blends, showing a final hardness value that demonstrates the compatibilizer to be smoothly distributed in the interface between the two blend components. Results highlight that microindentation technique, in combination with microscopic observations, is a sensitive tool for studying the breadth and quality of the interphase boundary in non- or compatibilized polymer blends and other inhomogeneous materials. (author)

  9. Martian Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  10. A cluster dynamics study of fission gases in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skorek, Richard

    2013-01-01

    During in-pile irradiation of nuclear fuels a lot of rare gases are produced, mainly xenon and krypton. The behaviour of these highly insoluble fission gases may lead to an additional load of the cladding, which may have detrimental safety consequences. For these reasons, fission gas behaviour (diffusion and clustering) has been extensively studied for years.In this work, we present an application of Cluster Dynamics to address the behaviour of fission gases in UO_2 which simultaneously describes changes in rare gas atom and point defect concentrations in addition to the bubble size distribution. This technique, applied to Kr implanted and annealed samples, yields a precise interpretation of the release curves and helps justifying the estimation of the Kr diffusion coefficient, which is a data very difficult to obtain due to the insolubility of the gas. (author) [fr

  11. Poloidal ULF oscillations in the dayside magnetosphere: a Cluster study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. I. Eriksson

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Three ULF wave events, all occurring in the dayside magnetopshere during magnetically quiet times, are studied using the Cluster satellites. The multi-point measurements obtained from Cluster are used to determine the azimuthal wave number for the events by means of the phase shift and the azimuthal separation between the satellites. Also, the polarisation of the electric and magnetic fields is examined in a field-aligned coordinate system, which, in turn, gives the mode of the oscillations. The large-inclination orbits of Cluster allow us to examine the phase relationship between the electric and magnetic fields along the field lines. The events studied have large azimuthal wave numbers (m~100, two of them have eastward propagation and all are in the poloidal mode, consistent with the large wave numbers. We also use particle data from geosynchronous satellites to look for signatures of proton injections, but none of the events show any sign of enhanced proton flux. Thus, the drift-bounce resonance instability seems unlikely to have played any part in the excitation of these pulsations. As for the drift-mirror instability we conclude that it would require an unreasonably high plasma pressure for the instability criterion to be satisfied.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Wave propagation – Magnetospheric physics (Plasma waves and instabilities; Instruments and techniques

  12. GW and Bethe-Salpeter study of small water clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blase, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.blase@neel.cnrs.fr; Boulanger, Paul [CNRS, Institut NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Bruneval, Fabien [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Métallurgie Physique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fernandez-Serra, Marivi [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Institute for Advanced Computational Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-3800 (United States); Duchemin, Ivan [INAC, SP2M/L-Sim, CEA/UJF Cedex 09, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2016-01-21

    We study within the GW and Bethe-Salpeter many-body perturbation theories the electronic and optical properties of small (H{sub 2}O){sub n} water clusters (n = 1-6). Comparison with high-level CCSD(T) Coupled-Cluster at the Single Double (Triple) levels and ADC(3) Green’s function third order algebraic diagrammatic construction calculations indicates that the standard non-self-consistent G{sub 0}W{sub 0}@PBE or G{sub 0}W{sub 0}@PBE0 approaches significantly underestimate the ionization energy by about 1.1 eV and 0.5 eV, respectively. Consequently, the related Bethe-Salpeter lowest optical excitations are found to be located much too low in energy when building transitions from a non-self-consistent G{sub 0}W{sub 0} description of the quasiparticle spectrum. Simple self-consistent schemes, with update of the eigenvalues only, are shown to provide a weak dependence on the Kohn-Sham starting point and a much better agreement with reference calculations. The present findings rationalize the theory to experiment possible discrepancies observed in previous G{sub 0}W{sub 0} and Bethe-Salpeter studies of bulk water. The increase of the optical gap with increasing cluster size is consistent with the evolution from gas to dense ice or water phases and results from an enhanced screening of the electron-hole interaction.

  13. Microscopic Analysis and Quality Assessment of Induced Sputum From Children With Pneumonia in the PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, David R; Morpeth, Susan C; Hammitt, Laura L; Driscoll, Amanda J; Watson, Nora L; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Ahmed, Dilruba; Awori, Juliet O; DeLuca, Andrea N; Ebruke, Bernard E; Higdon, Melissa M; Jorakate, Possawat; Karron, Ruth A; Kazungu, Sidi; Kwenda, Geoffrey; Hossain, Lokman; Makprasert, Sirirat; Moore, David P; Mudau, Azwifarwi; Mwaba, John; Panchalingam, Sandra; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Salaudeen, Rasheed; Toure, Aliou; Zeger, Scott L; Howie, Stephen R C

    2017-06-15

    It is standard practice for laboratories to assess the cellular quality of expectorated sputum specimens to check that they originated from the lower respiratory tract. The presence of low numbers of squamous epithelial cells (SECs) and high numbers of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells are regarded as indicative of a lower respiratory tract specimen. However, these quality ratings have never been evaluated for induced sputum specimens from children with suspected pneumonia. We evaluated induced sputum Gram stain smears and cultures from hospitalized children aged 1-59 months enrolled in a large study of community-acquired pneumonia. We hypothesized that a specimen representative of the lower respiratory tract will contain smaller quantities of oropharyngeal flora and be more likely to have a predominance of potential pathogens compared to a specimen containing mainly saliva. The prevalence of potential pathogens cultured from induced sputum specimens and quantity of oropharyngeal flora were compared for different quantities of SECs and PMNs. Of 3772 induced sputum specimens, 2608 (69%) had 25 PMNs per LPF, measures traditionally associated with specimens from the lower respiratory tract in adults. Using isolation of low quantities of oropharyngeal flora and higher prevalence of potential pathogens as markers of higher quality, 25 PMNs per LPF) was the microscopic variable most associated with high quality of induced sputum. Quantity of SECs may be a useful quality measure of induced sputum from young children with pneumonia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  14. Electron microscopic radioautographic studies on macromolecular synthesis in mitochondria of animal cells in aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    Study aging changes of intramitochondrial DNA, RNA, protein synthesis of mouse organs during the development and aging, 30 groups of developing and aging mice (3 individuals each), from fetal day 19 to postnatal newborn at day 1, 3, 9, 14 and adult at month 1, 2, 6, 12 to 24, were injected with either 3 H-thymidine, 3 H-uriidine, or 3 H-leucine, sacrificed 1 h later and liver, adrenal, lung and testis tissues observed by electron microscopic radioautography. Accordingly, numbers of mitochondria per cell profile area, numbers of labeled mitochondria and the mitochondrial labeling index labeled with 3 H-labeled precursors showing DNA, RNA, protein synthesis in these cells (hepatocytes, 3 zones of the adrenal cortices - zona glomerulosa, fasciculata and reticularis -, adrenal medullary cells, pulmonary cells and testis cells) were counted per cells and compared among the respective developing and aging groups. The numbers of mitochondria in these cells increased from fetal day 19 to postnatal month 1 and 2. However, the numbers of labeled mitochondria and the labeling indices of intramitochondrial DNA, RNA, protein syntheses incorporating the 3 H-labeled precursors in the described tissue cells increased from fetal day 19 to postnatal month 1 and decreased to month 24. These data support that the activity of intramitochnodrial DNA, RNA, protein syntheses in cells of these tissues increased and decreased by development and aging in mice. The intramitochondrial DNA, RNA and protein syntheses in some other organs were also reviewed and discussed. (author)

  15. Transmission electron microscopical study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panfilov, Peter, E-mail: peter.panfilov@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kabanova, Anna [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Guo, Jinming; Zhang, Zaoli [Erich Schmid Institute for Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Leoben (Austria)

    2017-02-01

    Statement of significance: This is the first transmission electron microscopic study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale. Samples for TEM were prepared by mechanical thinning and chemical polishing that allowed obtaining the electron transparent foils. It was firstly shown that human dentin possesses the layered morphology: the layers are oriented normally to the main axis of a tooth and have the thickness of ~ 50 nm. HA inorganic phase of teenage crown dentin is in the amorphous state. The cellular structure, which was formed from collagen fibers (diameter is ~ 5 nm), are observed near DEJ region in teenage dentin, whereas bioorganic phase of teenage crown dentin near the pulp camera does not contain the collagen fibers. Cracks in dentin thin foils have sharp tips, but big angles of opening (~ 30{sup °}) with plastic zone ahead crack tip. It means that young crown human dentin exhibits ductile or viscous-elastic fracture behavior on the nanometer scale. - Highlights: • Dentin has layered morphology. • Mineral component of dentin is in amorphous state. • Collagen fibers form cellular structure in dentin. • Cracks in dentin behave by elastic-plastic manner.

  16. Electron microscopic radioautographic studies on macromolecular synthesis in mitochondria of animal cells in aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Tetsuji, E-mail: nagata@kowagakuen.ac.j [Shinshu Univ. School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan). Dept. of Anatomy and Cell Biology

    2010-07-01

    Study aging changes of intramitochondrial DNA, RNA, protein synthesis of mouse organs during the development and aging, 30 groups of developing and aging mice (3 individuals each), from fetal day 19 to postnatal newborn at day 1, 3, 9, 14 and adult at month 1, 2, 6, 12 to 24, were injected with either {sup 3}H-thymidine, {sup 3}H-uriidine, or {sup 3}H-leucine, sacrificed 1 h later and liver, adrenal, lung and testis tissues observed by electron microscopic radioautography. Accordingly, numbers of mitochondria per cell profile area, numbers of labeled mitochondria and the mitochondrial labeling index labeled with {sup 3}H-labeled precursors showing DNA, RNA, protein synthesis in these cells (hepatocytes, 3 zones of the adrenal cortices - zona glomerulosa, fasciculata and reticularis -, adrenal medullary cells, pulmonary cells and testis cells) were counted per cells and compared among the respective developing and aging groups. The numbers of mitochondria in these cells increased from fetal day 19 to postnatal month 1 and 2. However, the numbers of labeled mitochondria and the labeling indices of intramitochondrial DNA, RNA, protein syntheses incorporating the {sup 3}H-labeled precursors in the described tissue cells increased from fetal day 19 to postnatal month 1 and decreased to month 24. These data support that the activity of intramitochnodrial DNA, RNA, protein syntheses in cells of these tissues increased and decreased by development and aging in mice. The intramitochondrial DNA, RNA and protein syntheses in some other organs were also reviewed and discussed. (author)

  17. Atom probe field ion microscope study of the range and diffusivity of helium in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1978-08-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) atom-probe field-ion microscope (FIM) specifically designed for the study of defects in metals is described. With this automated system 600 TOF min -1 can be recorded and analyzed. Performance tests of the instrument demonstrated that (1) the seven isotopes of molybdenum and the five isotopes of tungsten can be clearly resolved; and (2) the concentration and spatial distribution of all constitutents present at levels greater than 0.05 at. % in a W--25 at. % Re, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti, Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr (TZM), a low swelling stainless steel (LS1A) and a metallic glass (Metglas 2826) can be measured. The effect of the rate of field evaporation on the quantitative atom probe analysis of a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy and a Mo--1.0 at. % Ti--0.08 at. % Zr alloy was investigated. As the field evaporation rate increased the measured Ti concentration was found to also increase. A simple qualitative model was proposed to explain the observation. The spatial distribution of titanium in a fast neutron irradiated Mo--1.0 at. % Ti alloy has been investigated. No evidence of Ti segregation to the voids was detected nor has any evidence of significant resolution of Ti from the TiC precipitates been detected. A small amount of segregation of carbon to a void was detected

  18. Electron microscopic studies on ameloblast using /sup 45/Ca as tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, K [Gifu Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1974-02-01

    In order to study the functional role of ameloblast on inorganic substance, electron microscopic autoradiography was prepared from dental germ of incisor and molar teeth of young rats using /sup 45/Ca as the tracer and following results were obtained. At 15 minutes after /sup 45/Ca administration, /sup 45/Ca appeared in cells of each stage of development, reaching the peak after 30 minutes and gradually shifting from the inside of cells to matrix. /sup 45/Ca was localized in the cells in the nuclear substance, rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi area and mitochondria. Especially in the mitochondria, silver grains are accumulated in high concentration, suggesting a major role in the storage and accumulation of Ca. /sup 45/Ca passed through the mature ameloblasts rapidly. After 15 minutes, silver grains were noted in the matrix formation. After 2 hours, scarcely any silver grains were noted in the cells, most of them being shifted to calcifing area from the matrix formation. As the pathway of transport of /sup 45/Ca, intracellular passage is mainly adopted in the stage of matrix formation, without transport through the intercellular space. Even if a considerable separation occurred between each cell in the mature stage, no silver grains were noted in this area. These results would indicate an important role of ameloblast in the transport and storage of inorganic substances through the movement of Ca.

  19. An in vitro atomic force microscopic study of commercially available dental luting materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordje, Antonijevic; Denis, Brajkovic; Nenadovic, Milos; Petar, Milovanovic; Marija, Djuric; Zlatko, Rakocevic

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the surface roughness parameters of four different types of dental luting agents used for cementation of implant restorations. Five specimens (8 mm high and 1 mm thick) of each cement were made using metal ring steelless molds. Atomic Force Microscope was employed to analyze different surface texture parameters of the materials. Bearing ratio analysis was used to calculate the potential microgap size between the cement and implant material and to calculate the depth of the valleys on the cement surface, while power spectral density (PSD) measurements were performed to measure the percentage of the surface prone to bacterial adhesion. Glass ionomer cement showed significantly lower value of average surface roughness then the other groups of the materials (P cement experience the lowest percentage of the surface which promote bacterial colonization. Glas ionomer cements present the surface roughness parameters that are less favorable for bacterial adhesion than that of zinc phosphate, resin-modified glass ionomer and resin cements. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Microscopic studies of electric dipole resonances in 1p shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kissener, H.R.; Rotter, I.; Goncharova, N.G.

    1986-05-01

    Recent data on total and partial photonuclear cross sections in the GDR region of the nuclei 6 Li to 16 O are compared with theoretical predictions, mostly from shell model and continuum shell model studies. The influence of the size of the configuration space, of the adopted residual interaction and of the continuous spectrum on the isovector E1 response is discussed to some detail. The observed trends of the localization, the shape and width, the isospin and the configurational structure of the GDR with increasing 1p shell occupation are related to the microscopic structure of the nuclear ground state. Particular attention is given to the partial (γ, N/sub i/) disintegration channels. Complex-particle emission and isospin mixing in the nuclear states are discussed for a few cases. An attempt is made to bring some systematics also in the evidence on excited-state giant resonances through the 1p shell region. The photonuclear GDR is compared with other giant multipole excitations, mostly for the example of the 14 C nucleus. (author)

  1. Transmission electron microscopical study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panfilov, Peter; Kabanova, Anna; Guo, Jinming; Zhang, Zaoli

    2017-01-01

    Statement of significance: This is the first transmission electron microscopic study of teenage crown dentin on the nanometer scale. Samples for TEM were prepared by mechanical thinning and chemical polishing that allowed obtaining the electron transparent foils. It was firstly shown that human dentin possesses the layered morphology: the layers are oriented normally to the main axis of a tooth and have the thickness of ~ 50 nm. HA inorganic phase of teenage crown dentin is in the amorphous state. The cellular structure, which was formed from collagen fibers (diameter is ~ 5 nm), are observed near DEJ region in teenage dentin, whereas bioorganic phase of teenage crown dentin near the pulp camera does not contain the collagen fibers. Cracks in dentin thin foils have sharp tips, but big angles of opening (~ 30 ° ) with plastic zone ahead crack tip. It means that young crown human dentin exhibits ductile or viscous-elastic fracture behavior on the nanometer scale. - Highlights: • Dentin has layered morphology. • Mineral component of dentin is in amorphous state. • Collagen fibers form cellular structure in dentin. • Cracks in dentin behave by elastic-plastic manner.

  2. High resolution transmission electron microscopic study of nanoporous carbon consisting of curved single graphite sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.N.; Bursill, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    A high resolution transmission electron microscopic study of a nanoporous carbon rich in curved graphite monolayers is presented. Observations of very thin regions. including the effect of tilting the specimen with respect to the electron beam, are reported. The initiation of single sheet material on an oriented graphite substrate is also observed. When combined with image simulations and independent measurements of the density (1.37g cm -3 ) and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 2 bonding fraction (0.16), these observations suggest that this material is a two phase mixture containing a relatively low density aggregation of essentially capped single shells like squat nanotubes and polyhedra, plus a relatively dense 'amorphous' carbon structure which may be described using a random-Schwarzite model. Some negatively-curved sheets were also identified in the low density phase. Finally, some discussion is offered regarding the growth mechanisms responsible for this nanoporous carbon and its relationship with the structures of amorphous carbons across a broad range of densities, porosities and sp 3 /sp 2 +sp 3 bonding fractions

  3. Study of Cluster-size Effect on Damage Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Nakai, Atsuko; Matsuo, Jiro; Takaoka, Gikan

    2003-01-01

    Computer simulation and experiments were performed in order to understand the effect of cluster size on damage formation. Results of molecular dynamics simulations of cluster impact on solid targets derived the model function, which explains the relationship among cluster size, incident energy and number of displacements. On the other hand, time of flight mass measurement system was installed a cluster irradiation system, so that cluster ion beam which cluster size distribution is well known can be irradiated on the target. The damage properties under various cluster irradiation conditions were examined using RBS. The results from computer simulations and experiments showed good agreements with each other, which suggests that irradiation damage by cluster ion beam can be controlled by selecting cluster size distribution and incident energy

  4. Comprehensive study of unexpected microscope condensers formed in sample arrangements commonly used in optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Darshan B; Aldawsari, Mabkhoot Mudith S; Alharbi, Bandar Mohammed H; Sen, Sanchari; Grave de Peralta, Luis

    2015-09-01

    We show that various setups for optical microscopy which are commonly used in biomedical laboratories behave like efficient microscope condensers that are responsible for observed subwavelength resolution. We present a series of experiments and simulations that reveal how inclined illumination from such unexpected condensers occurs when the sample is perpendicularly illuminated by a microscope's built-in white-light source. In addition, we demonstrate an inexpensive add-on optical module that serves as an efficient and lightweight microscope condenser. Using such add-on optical module in combination with a low-numerical-aperture objective lens and Fourier plane imaging microscopy technique, we demonstrate detection of photonic crystals with a period nearly eight times smaller than the Rayleigh resolution limit.

  5. Microscopic study of weathering of white Flemish stone from the monumental Church of Our Lady in Breda, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larbi, J.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Naldini, S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the use of an integrated microscopic method to assist in the investigation of the causes and the extent of decay of the stones and ornaments in the gothic Clurch of Out Lady in Breda, The Netherlands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether conservation measures were

  6. Histological changes in kidneys of adult rats treated with Monosodium glutamate: A light microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh BR, Ujwal Gajbe, Anil Kumar Reddy, Vandana Kumbhare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Monosodium Glutamate (MSG, which is chemically known as AJI-NO-MOTO also familiar as MSG in routine life. MSG is always considered to be a controversial food additive used in the world. It is a natural excitatory neurotransmitter, helps in transmitting the fast synaptic signals in one third of CNS. Liver and kidney play a crucial role in metabolism as well as elimination of MSG from the body. Present study is to detect structural changes in adult rat kidney tissue treated with MSG; observations are done with a light microscope. Materials & Methods: The study was conducted in the department of Anatomy, J.N.M.C, Sawangi (M Wardha. Thirty (30 adult Wistar rats (2-3 months old weighing about (200 ± 20g were used in the current study, animals were divided into three groups (Group – A, B, C. Group A: Control, Group B: 3 mg /gm body weight, Group C: 6 mg /gm body weight, MSG were administered orally daily for 45 days along with the regular diet. Observations & Results: The Mean values of animals weight at the end of experiment (46th day respectively were 251.2 ± 13, 244.4 ± 19.9 and 320 ± 31.1. Early degenerative changes like, Glomerular shrinkage (GSr, loss of brush border in proximal convoluted tubules and Cloudy degeneration was observed in sections of kidney treated with 3 mg/gm body weight of MSG. Animals treated with 6 mg/gm body weight of MSG showed rare changes like interstitial chronic inflammatory infiltrate with vacuolation in some of the glomeruli, and much glomerular shrinkage invaginated by fatty lobules. Conclusion: The effects of MSG on kidney tissues of adult rats revealed that the revelatory changes are directly proportional to the doses of MSG.

  7. Multi-wavelength study of PPDs using an OPO tunable pulse laser microscope system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Koji; Nakamura, Isamu

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new pulsed laser microscope system whose wavelength is continuously tunable from 410 nm to 2200 nm by using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system. The laser spot can be focused to ∼2μm diameter, small enough to measure pixel-by-pixel performance of PPDs (pixelated photon detectors). Using multi-wavelength laser light, we plan to probe PPDs at various depths, thanks to their different penetration lengths in the silicon layer. In this paper, details of the commissioning of the laser microscope system and pilot measurements on a PPD at several wavelengths will be presented.

  8. Multi-wavelength study of PPDs using an OPO tunable pulse laser microscope system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimura, Koji, E-mail: koji.yoshimura@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nakamura, Isamu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2012-12-11

    We have developed a new pulsed laser microscope system whose wavelength is continuously tunable from 410 nm to 2200 nm by using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system. The laser spot can be focused to {approx}2{mu}m diameter, small enough to measure pixel-by-pixel performance of PPDs (pixelated photon detectors). Using multi-wavelength laser light, we plan to probe PPDs at various depths, thanks to their different penetration lengths in the silicon layer. In this paper, details of the commissioning of the laser microscope system and pilot measurements on a PPD at several wavelengths will be presented.

  9. Conductance of single atoms and molecules studied with a scanning tunnelling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, N; Kroeger, J; Limot, L; Berndt, R

    2007-01-01

    The conductance of single atoms and molecules is investigated with a low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscope. In a controlled and reproducible way, clean Ag(111) surfaces, individual silver atoms on Ag(111) as well as individual C 60 molecules adsorbed on Cu(100) are contacted with the tip of the microscope. Upon contact the conductance changes discontinuously in the case of the tip-surface junction while the tip-atom and tip-molecule junctions exhibit a continuous transition from the tunnelling to the contact regime

  10. Electron microscope studies. Progress report, 1 July 1964--1 June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  11. Studies on electronic properties of solids in Japan. Traces toward microscopic world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Takehiko

    2005-01-01

    Properties of solids are determined by the microscopic structure where quantum mechanics stands. Throughout the 20th century physicists have made progress in developing the methods to explore the microscopic world of materials. In the latter half of the 20th century, starting with catching-up modes, Japanese solid-state physicists have been at some leading edges in the last decade. Trace towards the frontiers are briefly reviewed placing emphasis upon the material development and the investigation, and ways to go are mentioned. (author)

  12. Improved Ant Colony Clustering Algorithm and Its Performance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Clustering analysis is used in many disciplines and applications; it is an important tool that descriptively identifies homogeneous groups of objects based on attribute values. The ant colony clustering algorithm is a swarm-intelligent method used for clustering problems that is inspired by the behavior of ant colonies that cluster their corpses and sort their larvae. A new abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm using a data combination mechanism is proposed to improve the computational efficiency and accuracy of the ant colony clustering algorithm. The abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm is used to cluster benchmark problems, and its performance is compared with the ant colony clustering algorithm and other methods used in existing literature. Based on similar computational difficulties and complexities, the results show that the abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm produces results that are not only more accurate but also more efficiently determined than the ant colony clustering algorithm and the other methods. Thus, the abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm can be used for efficient multivariate data clustering. PMID:26839533

  13. Transcranial Doppler study in patients with cluster headache

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soleiman A.M. Tahoon

    2013-03-11

    Mar 11, 2013 ... ities and vasoreactivity in cluster headache patients as baseline values and after ... Peer review under responsibility of Alexandria University Faculty of. Medicine. .... Dahl A, Russel D, Nyberg-Hansen R, Rootwelt K. Cluster.

  14. Study of Nb-oxide Nb-Pb film structures by tunnel scanning microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golyamina, E.M.; Troyanovskij, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The surface of niobium films, which were earlier used to create niobium-niobium oxide-lead film structures on their base, was investigated, using tunnel scanning microscope. The results obtained agree well with the observed properties of these structures, containing josephson and tunnel junctions

  15. Microscopic study of the α-16O interaction on the basis of the realistic effective interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Shinichiro; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Yabana, Kazuhiro.

    1989-01-01

    We calculate the α- 16 O complex potential by the totally microscopic method where we use the many-body theory taking into account the Pauli principle explicitly and the realistic effective interactions. The comparison of the theoretical inter-nucleus potential with the phenomenological 'unique' optical potential is performed. (author)

  16. Self healing phenomena in concretes and masonry mortars: A microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.; Hees, R.P.J. van; Lubelli, B.A.; Rooij, M.R. de

    2007-01-01

    A microscopic survey of over 1000 of samples of concrete and masonry mortars from structures in the Netherlands shows that, in practice, self healing occurs in historic lime and lime – puzzolana mortars, in contrast to modern cement bound concretes and mortars. Self healing may be effected by the

  17. A three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscope for deformation studies of polycrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster Nielsen, Søren; Lauridsen, E.M.; Juul Jensen, D.

    2001-01-01

    -dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope installed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble provides a fast and non-destructive technique for mapping the embedded grains within thick samples in three dimensions. All essential features like the position, volume, orientation, stress...

  18. Electron microscopic studies on odontoblasts using 45Ca as the tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Eiji

    1980-01-01

    In order to study the relationship between odontoblasts and inorganic salts, odontoblasts of 10-day old rats' incisions and molars were used. The animals were sacrificed 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour or 2 hours after 45 Ca administration to obtain the specimen. The specimens were processed for electron microscopic autoradiography. 15 minutes after 45 Ca administration, silver grains indicated 45 Ca uptake was already noted within the cells. 45 Ca was localized in the mitochondria, Golgi area, rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum and partially within the karyoplasm. After 30 minutes' administration, the number of silver grains were generally increased as compared with the findings obtained after 15 minutes' administration. The localization was similar with those after 15 minutes' administration but some were found in the ribosomes and smooth surfaced endoplasmic reticulum with numerous silver grains within small vesicles derived from the Golgi apparatus as well. A movement of 45 Ca from the protruding part to the stroma was also noted. 1 hour after the administration, the number of silver grains were generally decreased, with a more pronounced movement towards stroma from the protruding part. The marked movement of silver grains was obtained onto the collagen fibers in the stroma. In the mitochondria, however, considerable number of silver grains were still seen. In this section, on the other hand, numerous silver grains were seen in the intercellular space, in addition to the pathway of intracellular route, indicating the Ca shift from outside of the cells. After 2 hours' 45 Ca administration, the tendency towards the decrease of the silver grains became more remarkable, the movement of 45 Ca via the extracellular pathway described above was also frequently found. (author)

  19. Macro and microscopic study of avian tuberculosis at Savannah´s Bogotá zoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Neira Rairán

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian tuberculosis diagnosis was made in captive wild birds (Burhinus bistriatus and Porphyrula martinica from a zoo park at Sabana de Bogotá (Colombia. Based on this diagnosis, a surveillance approach was designed in order to demonstrate whether or not a focus of tuberculosis infection caused by Micobacterium avium was present at this zoo with the purpose to identify a possible hazard to prevent the infection of other bird population, visitors and workers of the park. Clinical, morphological (gross and microscopic are described in this article, but microbiological (culture in specific media, epidemiological (DPP and molecular (PCR studies, will be shown in other journal. In this work animals were organized en three different groups as follow: Five Hy line Brown chicken tuberculosis free coming from a commercial farm (sentinel group. A mixed group birds (102 animals from the pens around the primary focus (28 dukes, 25 “guacamayas”, 26 parrots and 23 rapacious birds, (highest risk group. Five birds within the pen in which the diagnosis was made (contaminated birds group. It was demonstrated granulomatous lesions in animals from the sentinel group as well as in those from the pen in which the first diagnosis was made. Lesions were founded in liver, spleen, lungs, kidneys, intestines and in one case in the white matter and leptomeniges of the spinal cord were affected. Ziehl – Neelsen positive rods were identified in all the affected tissues. No tuberculosis lesions were found in animals caged in neighborhood pens. It was concluded that there is an infectious focus of tuberculosis (micobacteriosis caused by M. avium in the zoo, but the focus is located only in one pen and this focus could represent a critical risk of infection with M. avium for some of the birds within the zoo, wild and eventually commercials birds and the human beings as well. It is recommended that prevention, control and eradication measurements have to be made to prevent

  20. Determination and microscopic study of incipient defects in irradiated power reactor fuel rods. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasupathi, V.; Perrin, J.S.; Roberts, E.

    1978-05-01

    This report presents the results of nondestructive and destructive examinations carried out on the Point Beach-1 (PWR) and Dresden-3 (BWR) candidate fuel rods selected for the study of pellet-clad interaction (PCI) induced incipient defects. In addition, the report includes results of examination of sections from Oskarshamn-1 (BWR) fuel rods. Eddy current examination of Point Beach-1 rods showed indications of possible incipient defects in the fuel rods. The profilometry and the gamma scan data also indicated that the source of the eddy current indications may be incipient defects. No failed rods or rods with incipient failure were found in the sample from Point Beach-1. Despite the lack of success in finding incipient defects and filed rods, the mechanism for fuel rod failures in Point Beach-1 is postulated to be PCI-related, with high startup rates and fuel handling being the key elements. Nine out of the 10 candidate fuel rods from Dresden-3 (BWR) were failed, and all the failed rods had leaked water so that the initial mechanism was observed. Examination of clad inner surfaces of the specimens from failed and unfailed rods showed fuel deposits of widely varying appearance. The deposits were found to contain uranium, cesium, and tellurium. Transmission electron microscopy of clad specimens showed evidence of microscopic strain. Metallographic examination of fuel pellets from the peak transient power location showed extensive grain boundary separation and axial movement of the fuel indicative of rapid release of fission products. Examination of Oskarshamn clad specimens did not show any stress corrosion crack (SCC) type defects. The defects found in the examinations appear to be related to secondary hydriding. The clad inner surface of the Oskarshamn specimens also showed uranium-rich deposits of varying features

  1. Electron microscopic studies of the matrix formation of hard tissue organized cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Ching-Eng

    1982-01-01

    In order to study the functions of odontoblast, especially on the matrix formation, odontoblasts of rats' incisor and molar teeth were used. The animals were sacrificed 5 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours and 24 hours after 3 H-proline administration to obtain the specimen. The specimens were processed for electron microscopic autoradiography. The following results were obtained. 1. 5 minutes after 3 H-proline administration: Silver grains indicated 3 H-proline uptake were already noted within the cells and localized in the rough surfaced endoplasmic reticulum and surrounding ribosomes, partially within the karyoplasm. 2. 15 minutes after 3 H-proline administration: The number of silver grains were generally increased as compared with the findings obtained in 5 minutes. The localization moved to the Golgi apparatus and their surroundings. 3. 30 minutes after 3 H-proline administration: Silver grains obtained in Tome's fibers area and some in predentin. In this area granules derived from Golgi body were found. 4. 1 hour after 3 H-proline administration: The number of silver grains were generally decreased and more pronounced movement toward predentin, the marked movement of silver grains were obtained onto the collagen fibers and surroundings. 5. 2 hours after 3 H-proline administration: Silver grains moved to the calcified area and there collagen fibers became more remarkable. 6. 24 hours after 3 H-proline administration: No silver grains were founded in the odontoblast side but deposited in the predentin calcified area with stable condition. Based on the results of these observations, odontoblasts were shown to perform the function of synthesis, storage, transportation and control of collagen formation in addition to the role of matrix formation. (author)

  2. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  3. Transmission electron microscope studies of the nuclear envelope in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Merav; Tzur, Yonatan B; Neufeld, Esther; Feinstein, Naomi; Delannoy, Michael R; Wilson, Katherine L; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear membranes and nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are conserved in both animals and plants. However, the lamina composition and the dimensions of NPCs vary between plants, yeast, and vertebrates. In this study, we established a protocol that preserves the structure of Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic cells for high-resolution studies with thin-section transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We show that the NPCs are bigger in C. elegans embryos than in yeast, with dimensions similar to those in higher eukaryotes. We also localized the C. elegans nuclear envelope proteins Ce-lamin and Ce-emerin by pre-embedding gold labeling immunoelectron microscopy. Both proteins are present at or near the inner nuclear membrane. A fraction of Ce-lamin, but not Ce-emerin, is present in the nuclear interior. Removing the nuclear membranes leaves both Ce-lamin and Ce-emerin associated with the chromatin. Eliminating the single lamin protein caused cell death as visualized by characteristic changes in nuclear architecture including condensation of chromatin, clustering of NPCs, membrane blebbing, and the presence of vesicles inside the nucleus. Taken together, these results show evolutionarily conserved protein localization, interactions, and functions of the C. elegans nuclear envelope.

  4. A facility for using cluster research to study environmental problems. Workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    This report begins by describing the general application of cluster based research to environmental chemistry and the development of a Cluster Structure and Dynamics Research Facility (CSDRF). Next, four important areas of cluster research are described in more detail, including how they can impact environmental problems. These are: surface-supported clusters, water and contaminant interactions, time-resolved dynamic studies in clusters, and cluster structures and reactions. These facilities and equipment required for each area of research are then presented. The appendices contain workshop agenda and a listing of the researchers who participated in the workshop discussions that led to this report.

  5. A compact light-sheet microscope for the study of the mammalian central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Haslehurst, Peter; Scott, Suzanne; Emptage, Nigel; Dholakia, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the transient processes integral to neuronal function demands rapid and high-resolution imaging techniques over a large field of view, which cannot be achieved with conventional scanning microscopes. Here we describe a compact light sheet fluorescence microscope, featuring a 45° inverted geometry and an integrated photolysis laser, that is optimized for applications in neuroscience, in particular fast imaging of sub-neuronal structures in mammalian brain slices. We demonstrate the utility of this design for three-dimensional morphological reconstruction, activation of a single synapse with localized photolysis, and fast imaging of neuronal Ca2+ signalling across a large field of view. The developed system opens up a host of novel applications for the neuroscience community. PMID:27215692

  6. Ultrastructural alterations in ciliary cells exposed to ionizing radiation. A scanning and transmission electron microscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldetorp, L; Mecklenburg, C v; Haakansson, C H [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Hospital; Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoology)

    1977-01-01

    Early effects of ionizing radiation were investigated in an experimental in vitro system using the ciliary cells of the tracheal mucous membrane of the rabbit, irradiated at 30/sup 0/C and at more than 90% humidity. The changes in physiological activities of the ciliary cells caused by irradation were continously registered during the irradation. The specimens were examined immediately after irradiation electron microscopically. The morphological changes in irradiated material after 10-70 Gy are compared with normal material. After 40-70 Gy, scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of vesicles on cilia, and club-like protrusions and adhesion of their tips. After 30-70 Gy, a swelling of mitochondrial membranes and cristae was apparent transmission electron microscopically. The membrane alterations caused by irradiation are assumed to disturb the permeability and flow of ATP from the mitochondria, which in turn leads to the recorded changes in the activity of the ciliated cells.

  7. Microscopical study of K isomers in the nuclear region A ∼ 180

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libert, J.; Quentin, P.; Pillet, N.; Ponsa, A.

    1997-01-01

    At present the K isomers are the best candidates for high density energy storage, although one of the major problems resides in the availability of simple and fast storage mechanisms. To respond to this question it is necessary to know thoroughly the structure of the concerned isomers and low energy modes of excitation. Particularly, proper to this type of studies is the region of A ∼ 180, where a large number of K isomers are known at present ( 178 Hf, 179 Hf and 180 Ta). Microscopic calculations using Skyrme SIII plus a simple pairing interaction lead to a good reproduction of certain single particle and collective spectroscopic properties of 178 Hf. In this region the spectroscopic properties are governed by three single proton states (5/2 - , 7/2 - and 9/2 + ) and by two single neutron states (7/2 + , 9/2 - ). The computed quasi-particle spectrum reproduces within 100 keV the energies of the isomeric states 16 + , 14 - , 25/2 - and 9 - . Based on this agreement one can predict a band spectroscopy rich in high K values due to a plenty of possible single particle combinations which have themselves high K value. Particularly, one have to stress the quasi-degeneracy of a K π = 15 + with the 16 + configuration in 178 Hf. Should this prediction experimentally be confirmed interesting consequences have to be expected on the spectroscopy above the 16 + isomer of 178 Hf as well as on the states implied in the decay of this storage state. Actually, 1 MeV above the 16 + state one can note isolated states reachable by parity breaking (or not breaking) transitions which could be mixture of K = 15, 14, 13, etc structures due to Coriolis interaction. The calculation reported are although simple (the approximation of the free quasi-particles on the BCS vacuum of 178 Hf). Under current study are the quantitative consequences of the Coriolis coupling, the decrease of pairing gaps with increasing quasi-particle number, the Hartree-Fock polarization (even and odd under time

  8. Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Atomic-Scale Studies of Spin Transport, Spin Relaxation, and Magnetism in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-09

    Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Atomic-Scale Studies of Spin Transport, Spin Relaxation, and Magnetism in Graphene Report Term: 0-Other Email ...Principal: Y Name: Jay A Gupta Email : gupta.208@osu.edu Name: Roland K Kawakami Email : kawakami.15@osu.edu RPPR Final Report as of 13-Nov-2017...studies on films and devices. Optimization of the Cr tip will be the next important step to establish this technique. We are writing up these early

  9. AFM (Atomic force microscope and its use in studying the surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škvarla Jiří

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the present knowledge about the use of AFM in the mineral processing research. First, the development and fundamentals of the AFM imaging are presented in relation to other imaging techniques (especially STM, Scanning tunneling microscope. Further, the role of the sensing tip-surface interactions is mentioned. Finally, the surface force measurements in the AFM force calibration mode are diskussed.

  10. Modification of calcite crystal growth by abalone shell proteins: an atomic force microscope study.

    OpenAIRE

    Walters, D A; Smith, B L; Belcher, A M; Paloczi, G T; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E; Hansma, P K

    1997-01-01

    A family of soluble proteins from the shell of Haliotis rufescens was introduced over a growing calcite crystal being scanned in situ by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Atomic step edges on the crystal surface were altered in shape and speed of growth by the proteins. Proteins attached nonuniformly to the surface, indicating different interactions with crystallographically different step edges. The observed changes were consistent with the habit modification induced by this family of protei...

  11. Study of Remote Globular Cluster Satellites of M87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Arushi; Shao, Andrew; Toloba, Elisa; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Zhang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    We present a sample of “orphan” globular clusters (GCs) with previously unknown parent galaxies, which we determine to be remote satellites of M87, a massive elliptical galaxy at the center of the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies. Because GCs were formed in the early universe along with their original parent galaxies, which were cannibalized by massive galaxies such as M87, they share similar age and chemical properties. In this study, we first confirm that M87 is the adoptive parent galaxy of our orphan GCs using photometric and spectroscopic data to analyze spatial and velocity distributions. Next, we increase the signal-to-noise ratio of our samples’ spectra through a process known as coaddition. We utilize spectroscopic absorption lines to determine the age and metallicity of our orphan GCs through comparison to stellar population synthesis models, which we then relate to the GCs’ original parent galaxies using a mass-metallicity relation. Our finding that remote GCs of M87 likely developed in galaxies with ~1010 solar masses implies that M87’s outer halo is formed of relatively massive galaxies, serving as important parameters for developing theories about the formation and evolution of massive galaxies.This research was funded in part by NASA/STScI and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program at UC Santa Cruz.

  12. Spectroscopic and electrochemical study of polynuclear clusters from ruthenium acetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriano, C.

    1989-01-01

    The chemistry of the trinuclear clusters [Ru sub(3) O (CH sub(3) CO sub(2)) sub(4) L sub(3)] where L = imidazole, pyridine or pyrazine type of ligands, was investigated based on spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. These complexes are of great interest from the point of view of their electronic and redox properties, providing multisite species for electron transfer processes. They were isolated in solid state, and characterized by means of elementary analyses and infrared spectra. The electrochemical behaviour in acetonitrile solution was typically reversible; the cyclic voltammograms exhibited a series of four or five mono electronic waves ascribed to the sucessive Ru sup(IV) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) / Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III) Ru sup(III)/ --- Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) Ru sup(II) redox couples. The differences between the successive redox potentials were about 1 V, indicating strong metal-metal interaction in the trinuclear Ru sub(3) centre. The E values were strongly sensitive to the nature of the N-heterocyclic ligand, increasing with the pi-acceptor properties of the pyridine and pyrazine derivatives, but in a much less pronounced way in the case of the imidazole derivatives. Resonance Raman studies for the pyrazine cluster showed selective intensification of the vibrational modes of the Ru-pyrazine chromophore, and the trinuclear centre, using excitation wavelengths coinciding with the metal-to-pyrazine and metal-metal bands, respectively. (author)

  13. Structure of bimetallic clusters. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies of Rh--Cu clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meitzner, G.; Via, G.H.; Lytle, F.W.; Sinfelt, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation of the structure of the bimetallic clusters present in rhodium--copper catalysts was conducted with the use of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements. Two catalysts were studied, both employing silica as a support for the clusters and both containing 1 wt. % rhodium. In one catalyst the Cu:Rh atomic ratio was 1:2 and in the other 1:1. Studies were made of the EXAFS associated with the K absorption edges of the rhodium and copper. The results of the EXAFS studies indicate that copper concentrates at the surface of the rhodium--copper clusters. In this regard the results are similar to our earlier reported results on ruthenium--copper clusters. However, the extent of surface segregation of the copper appears to be less pronounced for rhodium--copper clusters. This result is reasonable on the basis that rhodium and copper, unlike ruthenium and copper, exhibit at least some miscibility in the bulk

  14. Photometric studies of globular clusters in the Andromeda Nebula. Luminosity function for old globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharov, A.S.; Lyutyj, V.M.

    1989-01-01

    The luminosity function for old globular clusters in M 31 is presented. The objects were selected according to their structural and photometric properties. At the usually accepted normal (Gaussian) distribution, the luminosity function is characterized by the following parameters: the mean magnitude, corrected for the extinction inside M 31, V-bar 0 =16 m ,38±0 m .08, and the absolute magnitude M-bar v =-8 m .29 assuming )m-M) v =23 m .67, standard deviation σ M v =1 m .16±0 m .08 and total object number N=300±17. Old globular clusters in M 31 are in the average about one magnitude more luminous then those in our Galaxy (M v ≅ -7 m .3). Intrinsic luminosity dispersions of globular clusters are nearly the same in both galaxies. Available data on globular clusters in the Local Group galaxies against the universality of globular luminosity function with identical parameters M v and σ M v

  15. A compact atomic force-scanning tunneling microscope for studying microelectronics and environmental aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.

    1996-06-01

    This dissertation describes the characteristics and the construction of a compact atomic force/scanning tunneling microscope (AFM/STM). The basics and the method of preparing a tunneling junction between a chemically etched tunneling tip and a micro-manufactured cantilever is outlined by analyzing the forces between tunneling tip and cantilever as well as between force-sensing tip and sample surfaces. To our best knowledge this instrument is the first one using a commercial cantilever with only one piezoelectric tube carrying the whole tunneling sensor. The feedback control system has been optimized after a careful analysis of the electronic loop characteristics. The mode of operation has been determined by analyzing the dynamic characteristics of the scan heads and by investigating the time characteristics of the data acquisition system. The vibration isolation system has been calibrated by analyzing the characteristics of the damping setup and the stiffness of the scan head. The calculated results agree well with the measured ones. Also, a software package for data acquisition and real time display as well as for image processing and three-dimensional visualization has been developed. With this home-made software package, the images can be processed by means of a convolution filter, a Wiener filter and other 2-D FFT filters, and can be displayed in different ways. Atomic resolution images of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and graphite surfaces have been obtained in AFM and STM mode. New theoretical explanations have been given for the observed anomalous STM and AFM images of graphite by calculating the asymmetric distribution of quantum conductance and tip-surface forces on a graphite surface. This not only resolved the theoretical puzzles of STM and AFM of graphite, but also revealed the relation between atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy of graphite. Applications of STM and AFM to micro-electronic devices have been investigated

  16. A spectroscopic and microscopic study of uranium speciation in the infiltration pond sediments at Hanford, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Zachara, J.M.; McKinley, J.P.; Smith, S.C.; Qafoku, O.; Catalano, J.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The infiltration ponds in the '300 area' of the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site received large volumes of nuclear waste that contained tens of metric tons of uranium along with high concentrations of other metals such as Cu, Fe, Mn, Al and Ca during their operations from 1943 to 1975. Leaching and migration of uranium in the pond sediments threatens the integrity of the Columbia River that is with 100 m of these ponds. A clear understanding of the speciation of uranium in the pond sediments is key to predict the dissolution and migration behavior of uranium and to develop any necessary containment or decontamination strategies. In this work, we studied the speciation of uranium in a series of Hanford infiltration pond sediments and its changes after dissolution in various solution media including DDI water, sodium bicarbonate (pH 9.5) and 1 M sodium acetate (pH 4.8), using liquid-helium temperature time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence imaging spectro-microscopy (TRLFISM), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS analysis indicated that uranium in the sediment primarily existed in the 6+ oxidation state. The TRLFS spectra of uranium in several sediments resembled those in natural, uranyl-bearing calcite and those reported for uranium co-precipitated synthetic calcite and aragonite, suggesting the presence of similar uranyl coordination environments. The TRLFS spectra varied with both sediment location and depth and there was not a linear correlation between the spectral intensity and the overall concentration of uranium, indicating the presence of multiple uranium species. While for some sediment the major spectral characteristics appeared to remain the same after extraction using DDI water, sodium bicarbonate and even sodium acetate, for others, spectral changes were observed. Comparison of the sediment uranium TRLFS spectra with a standard spectral

  17. Theoretical study of structures of Ga5N5 cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Bin; Cao Peilin

    2002-01-01

    The structures and energies of a Ga 5 N 5 cluster have been calculated using a full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital (FP-LMTO) method, combined with molecular dynamics technique. Twenty-four structures for a Ga 5 N 5 cluster have been obtained. The most stable structure is a C 1 planar structure with a N 3 subunit. The Ga 5 N 5 clusters show a preference for a N 3 subunit, revealing the same behavior as in the Ga 3 N 3 and Ga 4 N 4 clusters. The existence of strong N-N bonds dominates the structure of a Ga 5 N 5 cluster. Through the calculation of the density of states we found that the most stable structure of Ga 5 N 5 clusters presented semiconductor-like properties

  18. A Preliminary Study Application Clustering System in Acoustic Emission Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiful Bahari Nur Amira Afiza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE is a non-destructive testing known as assessment on damage detection in structural engineering. It also can be used to discriminate the different types of damage occurring in a composite materials. The main problem associated with the data analysis is the discrimination between the different AE sources and analysis of the AE signal in order to identify the most critical damage mechanism. Clustering analysis is a technique in which the set of object are assigned to a group called cluster. The objective of the cluster analysis is to separate a set of data into several classes that reflect the internal structure of data. In this paper was used k-means algorithm for partitioned clustering method, numerous effort have been made to improve the performance of application k-means clustering algorithm. This paper presents a current review on application clustering system in Acoustic Emission.

  19. A theoretical study of cluster radioactivity in platinum isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Deepthy Maria; Ashok, Nithu; Joseph, Antony [University of Calicut, Department of Physics, Malappuram, Kerala (India)

    2018-01-15

    The probable cluster decay modes in platinum isotopes are predicted with the help of effective liquid drop model. The calculated half-lives are compared with those of universal decay law model and with the experimental data. The investigation affirms the decisive role of neutron magicity in the phenomenon of cluster radioactivity. It is found that the probability of cluster emission decreases with the increase in the neutron number of parent nucleus. Geiger-Nuttall plots of the probable decay modes show linear behaviour, which in turn leads to the equation for logarithmic half-life for the clusters emitted from Pt isotopes. (orig.)

  20. Microscopic study of multichannel processes in a six nucleon system. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskij, V.S.; Filippov, G.F.; Chopovskij, L.L.; Velaskes, H.

    1986-01-01

    The algorithm used to calculate the matrix elements of the potential energy operator of nucleons central interaction on cluster model functions describing the interaction of 3 H+ 3 H, 3 H+ 3 He and 3 He+ 3 He systems is given a detailed treatment. The explicit form of matrix elements is presented for the states with spin S=0, 1 and isospin T=1

  1. Low temperature scanning electron microscopic studies on the interaction of globodera rostochiensis woll. and trichoderma harzianum rifai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saifullah, A.; Khan, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Low temperature scanning electron microscopic (LTSEM) studies revealed that Trichoderma harzianum infected mature potato cysts nematode eggs by penetrating directly the cyst wall or via natural opening of mouth. Mycelial penetration on cyst wall or egg surface has been seen. The penetration of cyst wall or egg surface was either chemical or mechanical (directly or with appresorium) or both. Freeze fractionation showed the presence of mycelia inside the eggs. (author)

  2. Investigations in space-related molecular biology. [cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.; Pritzker, A. N.

    1974-01-01

    Improved instrumentation and preparation techniques for high resolution, high voltage cryo-electron microscopic and diffraction studies on terrestrial and extraterrestrial specimens are reported. Computer correlated ultrastructural and biochemical work on hydrated and dried cell membranes and related biological systems provided information on membrane organization, ice crystal formation and ordered water, RNA virus linked to cancer, lunar rock samples, and organometallic superconducting compounds. Apollo 11, 12, 14, and 15 specimens were analyzed

  3. Scanning electron microscopic (Sem studies on fourth instar larva and pupa of Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston (Anophelinae: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagbir Singh Kirti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anopheles (Cellia stephensi Liston is a major vector species of malaria in Indian subcontinent. Taxonomists have worked on its various morphological aspects and immature stages to explore additional and new taxonomic attributes. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM studies have been conducted on the fourth instar larva and pupa of An. stephensi to find additional taxonomic features for the first time from Punjab state.

  4. Theoretical study of the effect of probe shape on adhesion force between probe and substrate in atomic force microscope experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Li; Hu, Junhui; Kong, Lingjiang

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative description of adhesion force dependence on the probe shapes are of importance in many scientific and industrial fields. In order to elucidate how the adhesion force varied with the probe shape in atomic force microscope manipulation experiment, we performed a theoretical study of the influences of the probe shape (the sphere and parabolic probe) on the adhesion force at different humidity. We found that the combined action of the triple point and the Kelvin radius guiding th...

  5. [Quality assessment of microscopic examination in tuberculosis diagnostic laboratories: a preliminary study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simşek, Hülya; Ceyhan, Ismail; Tarhan, Gülnur; Güner, Uğur

    2010-10-01

    Recently, the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has based on smear microscopy in the Direct Observed Treatment Strategy (DOTS) programme which provides the basis of treatment worldwide. Microscopic detection of AFB (Acid-Fast Bacilli) is one of the main components in the National TB Control Programmes (NTCP). Precision level in microscopy procedures and evaluations are the most important steps for accurate diagnosis of the disease and to initiate proper treatment. Therefore, the external quality assessment (EQA) is the most important implement to provide the reliability and validity of tests. In countries where NTCP are performed, this task is fulfilled by the National Reference Laboratories (NRL) according to the guidelines of the World Health Organization (WHO). For this purpose a pilot study was initiated by the central NRL of Turkey for EQA of AFB smear microscopy as part of the NTCP on January 1, 2005. A total of 5 laboratories of which 2 were district TB laboratories (A, B), 2 were tuberculosis control dispensaries (C, D), 1 was a national reference laboratory (E), participated in this study. Blind re-checking method (re-examination of randomly selected slides) was used for the evaluation, and the slides were sent to the central NRL with 3 months interval, four times a year, selected according to LQAS (Lot Quality Assurance Sampling) guides. In the re-evaluation of the slides, false positivity (FP), false negativity (FN) and quantification errors (QE) were noted. Laboratory A, sent totally 525 slides between January 1, 2005 and April 1, 2008. In the result of re-checking, 514 (97.9%) slides were found concordant, and 11 (2.1%) were discordant (10 FP, 1 FN). Laboratory B, participated in the study between October 1, 2005 and July 1, 2006 and of the 67 re-examined slides, 60 (89.5%) were concordant and 7 (10.5%) were discordant (2 FP, 0 FN, 5 QE). Laboratory C, sent 235 slides between January 1, 2005 and April 1, 2006; of them 218 (92.8%) were detected

  6. Thermal effects of white light illumination during microsurgery: clinical pilot study on the application safety of surgical microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibst, Raimund; Saal, David; Russ, Detlef; Kunzi-Rapp, Karin; Kienle, Alwin; Stock, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Modern operating microscopes offer high power illumination to ensure optimal visualization, but can also cause thermal damage. The aim of our study is to quantify the thermal effects in vivo and discuss conditions for safe use. In a pilot study on volunteers, we measured the temperature at the skin surface during microscope illumination, including the influence of anaesthesia and the effects of staining, draping, or moistening of the skin. Irradiation within the limit given by safety regulations (200 mW/cm(2)) results in skin surface temperature of 43 degrees C. Higher intensities (forearm 335 mW/cm(2), back 250 mW/cm(2)) are tolerated, resulting in reversible hyperaemia. At a very high illumination intensity (750 mW/cm(2)), pain occurs within 30 s at temperatures of 46 degrees C+/-1 degrees C (hand and forearm), and 43 degrees C+/-2 degrees C (back), respectively. Anaesthesia has no distinct effect on the temperature, whereas staining and drapes result in much higher temperatures (>100 degrees C). Moistening at practicable flow rates can reduce temperature efficiently when combined with a light absorbing and water absorbent drape. In conclusion, surgeons must be aware that surgical microscope illumination without protective means can cause skin temperatures to rise much above pain threshold, which in our study serves as a (conservative) benchmark for potential damage.

  7. Contribution of radiation chemistry to the study of metal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloni, J

    1998-11-01

    Radiation chemistry dates from the discovery of radioactivity one century ago by H. Becquerel and P. and M. Curie. The complex phenomena induced by ionizing radiation have been explained progressively. At present, the methodology of radiation chemistry, particularly in the pulsed mode, provides a powerful means to study not only the early processes after the energy absorption, but more generally a broad diversity of chemical and biochemical reaction mechanisms. Among them, the new area of metal cluster chemistry illustrates how radiation chemistry contributed to this field in suggesting fruitful original concepts, in guiding and controlling specific syntheses, and in the detailed elaboration of the mechanisms of complex and long-unsolved processes, such as the dynamics of nucleation, electron transfer catalysis and photographic development.

  8. Comparison of cross-sectional transmission electron microscope studies of thin germanium epilayers grown on differently oriented silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, D J; Myronov, M; Leadley, D R; Walther, T

    2017-12-01

    We compare transmission electron microscopical analyses of the onset of islanding in the germanium-on-silicon (Ge/Si) system for three different Si substrate orientations: (001), (11¯0) and (11¯1)Si. The Ge was deposited by reduced pressure chemical vapour deposition and forms islands on the surface of all Si wafers; however, the morphology (aspect ratio) of the deposited islands is different for each type of wafer. Moreover, the mechanism for strain relaxation is different for each type of wafer owing to the different orientation of the (111) slip planes with the growth surface. Ge grown on (001)Si is initially pseudomorphically strained, yielding small, almost symmetrical islands of high aspect ratio (clusters or domes) on top interdiffused SiGe pedestals, without any evidence of plastic relaxation by dislocations, which would nucleate later-on when the islands might have coalesced and then the Matthews-Blakeslee limit is reached. For (11¯0)Si, islands are flatter and more asymmetric, and this is correlated with plastic relaxation of some islands by dislocations. In the case of growth on (11¯1)Si wafers, there is evidence of immediate strain relaxation taking place by numerous dislocations and also twinning. In the case of untwined film/substrate interfaces, Burgers circuits drawn around certain (amorphous-like) regions show a nonclosure with an edge-type a/4[1¯12] Burgers vector component visible in projection along [110]. Microtwins of multiples of half unit cells in thickness have been observed which occur at the growth interface between the Si(11¯1) buffer layer and the overlying Ge material. Models of the growth mechanisms to explain the interfacial configurations of each type of wafer are suggested. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Scanning-electron-microscope study of normal-impingement erosion of ductile metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Salik, J.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the erosion of annealed copper and aluminum surfaces produced by both single- and multiple-particle impacts. Macroscopic 3.2 mm diameter steel balls and microscopic, brittle erodant particles were projected by a gas gun system so as to impact at normal incidence at speeds up to 140 m/sec. During the impacts by the brittle erodant particles, at lower speeds the erosion behavior was similar to that observed for the larger steel balls. At higher velocities, particle fragmentation and the subsequent cutting by the radial wash of debris created a marked change in the erosion mechanism.

  10. Transmission electron-microscopic studies of structural changes in polycrystalline graphite after high temperature irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Shtrombakh, Ya.I.; Karpukhin, V.I.

    1985-01-01

    Transmission electron-microscopic investigation of polycrystalline graphite before and after irradiation is carried out. The direct use of graphite samples after ion thinning, as an inquiry subject is the basic peculiarity of the work. Main structural components of MPG-6 graphite before and after irradiation are revealed, the structural mechanism of the reactor graphite destruction under irradiation is demonstrated. The mean values of L αm and L cm crystallite dimensions are determined. Radiation defects, occuring in some crystallites after irradiation are revealed by the dark-field electron microscopy method

  11. Microscope Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction study of near-stoichiometric Ti:LiNbO3 waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, De-Long; Siu, G.G.; Pun, E.Y.B.

    2005-01-01

    The crystalline phase within guiding layers of near-stoichiometric strip and planar Ti:LiNbO 3 wave-guides, prepared by the method of simultaneous work of vapour transport equilibration (VTE) treatment and indiffusion of Ti film, was studied by combined confocal microscope Raman scattering and X-ray powder diffraction. The results show that the strip and planar waveguide layers still retain the LiNbO 3 phase and no other non-LiNbO 3 phases can be identified within the guiding layer. Li/Nb ratios inside and outside the strip and planar waveguide layers were determined from the microscope Raman scattering results and compared to those obtained from the measured optical absorption edge. It is shown that the Li/Nb ratios are homogeneous within the waveguide layer and are close inside and outside the waveguide layer. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Theoretical study of aromaticity in inorganic tetramer clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4 . A positive value represents an unbound state or in other words reflects that doubly negatively charged clusters are extremely reactive. In earlier work34 we have shown that similar isoelectronic neutral clusters like Al2Si2, Ga2Si2 have negative energy eigenvalues of the highest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO), and ...

  13. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Atwani, Osman; Huynh, Chuong; Norris, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope was used to irradiated GaSb surfaces with 5 keV neon. • In-situ imaging using helium beam and ex-situ imaging using an electron beam were performed. • Differences in imaging output between the helium and the electron beam were observed. • Transition occurred in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. • Collision cascade simulations suggested a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms. - Abstract: Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  14. Utilizing Neon Ion Microscope for GaSb nanopatterning studies: Nanostructure formation and comparison with low energy nanopatterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Atwani, Osman, E-mail: oelatwan25@gmail.com [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Huynh, Chuong [Carl Zeiss Microscopy, LLC, One Corporation Way, Peabody, MA 01960 (United States); Norris, Scott [Department of Mathematics, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope was used to irradiated GaSb surfaces with 5 keV neon. • In-situ imaging using helium beam and ex-situ imaging using an electron beam were performed. • Differences in imaging output between the helium and the electron beam were observed. • Transition occurred in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. • Collision cascade simulations suggested a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms. - Abstract: Low energy irradiation of GaSb surfaces has been shown to lead to nanopillar formation. Being performed ex-situ, controlling the parameters of the ion beam for controlled nanopattern formation is challenging. While mainly utilized for imaging and cutting purposes, the development of multibeam (helium/neon) ion microscopes has opened the path towards the use of these microscopes for in-situ ion irradiation and nanopatterning studies. In this study, in-situ irradiation (neon ions)/imaging (helium ions) of GaSb surfaces is performed using Carl Zeiss-neon ion microscope at low energies (5 and 10 keV). Imaging with helium ions, nanodots were shown to form at particular fluences after which are smoothed. Ex-situ imaging with SEM showed nanopore formation of size controlled by the ion energy and fluence. Compared to lower energy ex-situ neon ion irradiation at similar fluxes, where nanopillars are formed, the results demonstrated a transition in the nanostructure type and formation mechanism as the energy is changed from 2 to 5 keV. Simulations show an increase in the ballistic diffusion and a decrease in the strength of phase separation as a function of ion energy in agreement with the suppression of nanopillar formation at higher energies. Collision cascade simulations suggest a transition toward bulk-driven mechanisms.

  15. Initial high-resolution microscopic mapping of active and inactive regulatory sequences proves non-random 3D arrangements in chromatin domain clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Marion; Schmid, Volker J; Kraus, Felix; Markaki, Yolanda; Hellmann, Ines; Maiser, Andreas; Leonhardt, Heinrich; John, Sam; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Cremer, Thomas

    2017-08-07

    The association of active transcription regulatory elements (TREs) with DNAse I hypersensitivity (DHS[+]) and an 'open' local chromatin configuration has long been known. However, the 3D topography of TREs within the nuclear landscape of individual cells in relation to their active or inactive status has remained elusive. Here, we explored the 3D nuclear topography of active and inactive TREs in the context of a recently proposed model for a functionally defined nuclear architecture, where an active and an inactive nuclear compartment (ANC-INC) form two spatially co-aligned and functionally interacting networks. Using 3D structured illumination microscopy, we performed 3D FISH with differently labeled DNA probe sets targeting either sites with DHS[+], apparently active TREs, or DHS[-] sites harboring inactive TREs. Using an in-house image analysis tool, DNA targets were quantitatively mapped on chromatin compaction shaped 3D nuclear landscapes. Our analyses present evidence for a radial 3D organization of chromatin domain clusters (CDCs) with layers of increasing chromatin compaction from the periphery to the CDC core. Segments harboring active TREs are significantly enriched at the decondensed periphery of CDCs with loops penetrating into interchromatin compartment channels, constituting the ANC. In contrast, segments lacking active TREs (DHS[-]) are enriched toward the compacted interior of CDCs (INC). Our results add further evidence in support of the ANC-INC network model. The different 3D topographies of DHS[+] and DHS[-] sites suggest positional changes of TREs between the ANC and INC depending on their functional state, which might provide additional protection against an inappropriate activation. Our finding of a structural organization of CDCs based on radially arranged layers of different chromatin compaction levels indicates a complex higher-order chromatin organization beyond a dichotomic classification of chromatin into an 'open,' active and 'closed

  16. Microscopic dynamics of the hydrogen bonded systems studied by quasi-elastic slow neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padureanu, I.; Aranghel, D.; Radulescu, A.; Ion, M.; Lechner, R. E.; Desmedt, A.; Pieper, J.

    2002-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the dynamical properties in highly viscous liquids such as glycerol, as well the supercooled and glassy state has attracted a great deal of attention. Glycerol is a hydrogen bonded forming system considered as intermediate between fragile and strong glasses with a glass transition temperature T g ∼ 185 K, melting temperature T m 290 K and a sound velocity V S ∼ 3330 m/s. Incoherent neutron scattering experiments from glasses generally show a broad feature with a maximum around 2 to 10 meV. This large contribution of such unusual low frequency excitations obeying the Bose-Einstein statistics to the density of states is referred to as 'boson peak' (BP) with a maximum near a frequency of 1 THz. A very much-debated question is the dramatic changes in the properties as well as the nature of the boson peak and the acoustic modes occurring in the neighborhood of this frequency. So far the experiments were not able to give a definite answer concerning the excitations giving rise to the boson peak. The inelastic X-ray scattering across the liquid glass transition in glycerol revealed propagating collective excitations in the whole liquid-glass transition temperature range. This conclusion challenges the present understanding of glasses and supercooled liquids particularly with their thermal properties. New experiments at lower temperatures than those investigated so far where the phonon scattering processes are less hard have been proposed. The relationship between the low frequency features, the microscopic structure, the nature of the forces and the atomic motions taking place at low frequencies is still an open question. According to the mode coupling theory (MCT) the glass transition is interpreted as a two-step process where the glass structure is softened by fast local motions (β - process) until some temperature T c >T g , where the structure breaks down leading to diffusion (α-process). It is an open question, whether MCT can

  17. Magnetism of iron, cobalt and nickel clusters studied in molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billas, I.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic properties of iron, cobalt and nickel clusters in a molecular beam have been studied in a magnetic Stern-Gerlach deflection experiment. The molecular beam apparatus consists of a laser vaporization cluster source with high intensity and stability and a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer for the deflection measurements. Several novel experimental features have been developed in this work, like a nozzle which can be heated up to 1000 K and a chopper to measure the dwell times of the clusters in the source and their corresponding velocities. These new developments have allowed the measurement and the control of the temperature of the free clusters. The Stern-Gerlach deflection experiments have been performed on Fe, Co and Ni clusters in the mass range from 20 to 700 atoms. All clusters show single-sided deflection toward increasing field. This observation indicates that a spin relaxation process occurs within the isolated clusters. The participation of both the cluster rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom to the spin relaxation has been experimentally demonstrated. The cluster magnetization has been determined as a function of applied magnetic field B and as a function of dwell times of the clusters in the source before the supersonic expansion into vacuum. Superparamagnetic behavior has been observed when the cluster rotational speed is much larger than the Larmor frequency of the cluster magnetic moment μ in the field B. In particular, for μB<< kT, the cluster magnetization depends on B/T. For lower rotational speeds, reduced values of the magnetization have been observed. The magnetic moments of the superparamagnetic Fe, Co and Ni clusters have been measured as a) a function of cluster size N at low temperature and b) as a function of cluster temperature T for various size ranges. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  18. Persistent Spatial Clusters of Prescribed Antimicrobials among Danish Pig Farms – A Register-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertner, Mette; Sanchez, Javier; Boklund, Anette; Stryhn, Henrik; Dupont, Nana; Toft, Nils

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of pathogens resistant to antimicrobials has prompted political initiatives targeting a reduction in the use of veterinary antimicrobials in Denmark, especially for pigs. This study elucidates the tendency of pig farms with a significantly higher antimicrobial use to remain in clusters in certain geographical regions of Denmark. Animal Daily Doses/100 pigs/day were calculated for all three age groups of pigs (weaners, finishers and sows) for each quarter during 2012–13 in 6,143 commercial indoor pig producing farms. The data were split into four time periods of six months. Repeated spatial cluster analyses were performed to identify persistent clusters, i.e. areas included in a significant cluster throughout all four time periods. Antimicrobials prescribed for weaners did not result in any persistent clusters. In contrast, antimicrobial use in finishers clustered persistently in two areas (157 farms), while those issued for sows clustered in one area (51 farms). A multivariate analysis including data on antimicrobial use for weaners, finishers and sows as three separate outcomes resulted in three persistent clusters (551 farms). Compared to farms outside the clusters during this period, weaners, finishers and sows on farms within these clusters had 19%, 104% and 4% higher use of antimicrobials, respectively. Production type, farm type and farm size seemed to have some bearing on the clustering effect. Adding these factors as categorical covariates one at a time in the multivariate analysis reduced the persistent clusters by 24.3%, 30.5% and 34.1%, respectively. PMID:26317206

  19. Theoretical study of the electron-cluster elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descourt, P.; Guet, C.; Farine, M.

    1997-01-01

    The properties of the clusters consisting of some tens to several hundreds of alkali atoms are generally quite well described in the jellium approximation. This approximation treats the cluster as a charged Fermi liquid of finite size. The optical response predicted by this approximation and taking into account the electron-electron correlations of the Hartree-Fock mean field agrees rather well with the experiment. The objective of this work was to obtain a quantal many-body formalism, within jellium approximation, applicable to elastic scattering of electrons from an alkali-metal-cluster. Influence of correlations on the phase shifts was also taken into account

  20. Energy Innovation Clusters and their Influence on Manufacturing: A Case Study Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel-Cox, Jill [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hill, Derek [National Science Foundation (NSF), Washington, DC (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Innovation clusters have been important for recent development of clean energy technologies and their emergence as mature, globally competitive industries. However, the factors that influence the co-location of manufacturing activities with innovation clusters are less clear. A central question for government agencies seeking to grow manufacturing as part of economic development in their location is how innovation clusters influence manufacturing. Thus, this paper examines case studies of innovation clusters for three different clean energy technologies that have developed in at least two locations: solar PV clusters in California and the province of Jiangsu in China, wind turbine clusters in Germany and the U.S. Great Lakes region, and ethanol clusters in the U.S. Midwest and the state of Sao Paulo in Brazil. These case studies provide initial insight into factors and conditions that contribute to technology manufacturing facility location decisions.

  1. A Study on Logistics Cluster Competitiveness among Asia Main Countries using the Porter's Diamond Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Won Chung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement and discussions of logistics cluster competitiveness with a national approach are required to boost agglomeration effects and potentially create logistics efficiency and productivity. This study developed assessment criteria of logistics cluster competitiveness based on Porter's diamond model, calculated the weight of each criterion by the AHP method, and finally evaluated and discussed logistics cluster competitiveness among Asia main countries. The results indicate that there was a large difference in logistics cluster competitiveness among six countries. The logistics cluster competitiveness scores of Singapore (7.93, Japan (7.38, and Hong Kong (7.04 are observably different from those of China (5.40, Korea (5.08, and Malaysia (3.46. Singapore, with the highest competitiveness score, revealed its absolute advantage in logistics cluster indices. These research results intend to provide logistics policy makers with some strategic recommendations, and may serve as a baseline for further logistics cluster studies using Porter's diamond model.

  2. [Ultrastructural organization of cytoplasmatic membrane of Anaerobacter polyendosporus studied by electron microscopic cryofractography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, V I; Suzina, N E; Dmitriev, V V

    2001-01-01

    Anaerobacter polyendosporus cells do not have typical mesosomes. However, the analysis of this anaerobic multispore bacterium by electron microscopic cryofractography showed that its cytoplasmic membrane contains specific intramembrane structures in the form of flat lamellar inverted lipid membranes tenths of nanometers to several microns in size. It was found that these structures are located in the hydrophobic interior between the outer and inner leaflets of the cytoplasmic membrane and do not contain intramembrane particles that are commonly present on freeze-fracture replicas. The flat inverted lipid membranes were revealed in bacterial cells cultivated under normal growth conditions, indicating the existence of a complex-type compartmentalization in biological membranes, which manifests itself in the formation of intramembrane compartments having the appearance of vesicles and inverted lipid membranes.

  3. Laser reflection spot as a pattern in a diamond coating – a microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORDANA S. RISTIĆ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond coatings were deposited by the synchronous and coupled action of a hot filament CVD method and a pulsed CO2 laser in spectro-absorbing and spectro-non-absorbing diamond precursor atmospheres. The obtained coatings were structured/patterned, i.e., they were comprised of uncovered, bare locations. An extra effect observed only in the spectro-active diamond precursor atmosphere was the creation of another laser spot in the coating – a reflection spot. In order to establish the practical usability of the latter one, extensive microscopic investigations were performed with consideration of the morphology changes in the spot of the direct laser beam. Normal incidence SEM images of this spot showed a smooth surface, without any pulse radiation damage. AFM imaging revealed the actual surface condition and gave precise data on the surface characteristics.

  4. Microscopic study of {sup 6}He elastic scattering around the Coulomb barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descouvemont, P. [Physique Nucléaire Théorique et Physique Mathématique, C.P. 229, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-07-07

    We investigate {sup 6}He scattering on {sup 27}Al, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 120}Sn, and {sup 208}Pb in a microscopic version of the Continuum Discretized Coupled Channel (CDCC) method. We essentially focus on energies around the Coulomb barrier. The {sup 6}He nucleus is described by an antisymmetric 6-nucleon wave function, defined in the Resonating Group Method. The {sup 6}He continuum is simulated by square-integrable positive-energy states. The model does not depend on any adjustable parameter as it is based only on well known nucleon-target potentials. We show that experimental elastic cross sections are fairly well reproduced. The calculation suggests that breakup effects increase for high target masses. For a light system such as {sup 6}He+{sup 27}Al, breakup effects are small, and a single-channel approximation provides fair results.

  5. Experimental studies and microscopic analysis of the elastic scattering of low energy nucleons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarrats-Saugnac, Annie.

    1982-05-01

    Data on the elastic scattering of low energy nucleons (between 20 and 40 MeV) by nuclei distributed throughout the entire mass table are examined in the framework of a microscopic approach. Two major problems occur at these low energies which do not occur at higher energies: the Pauli principle limits the interaction possibilities of projectiles with bound nucleons in the nucleus; it is not possible to neglect the antisymmetrization between projectiles and nucleon targets resulting in the addition of a nonlocal term to the potential. A quadratic moment approximation is used. As regards the inhibition of reactions inside the nucleus by the Pauli principle, an effective interaction with a relatively simple analytical form and easy to use for systematic analyses was determined [fr

  6. Intravascular detection of Giardia trophozoites in naturally infected mice. An electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Shewy, K A; Eid, R A

    2003-06-01

    During routine transmission electron microscopic (TEM) examination of mice naturally infected with Giardia muris, an intense infection with Giardia trophozoites was demonstrated within intestinal and renal tissues. Examination of randomly taken sections from these heavily infected tissues revealed marked deep affection with mixed pathology. Duodenal sections were found loaded with Giardia trophozoites in intimate contact with necrotic gut cells. Some of these trophozoites were detected within central lacteal of damaged villi and nearby blood vessels. Interestingly, and for the first time to be demonstrated, morphologically identical G. muris trophozoite was detected in a renal blood vessel. An intense cellular immune reaction was obviously demonstrated with remarkable interaction between giant macrophages and the trophozoites particulates. Involvement of deep tissues by Giardia trophozoites and their presence within vascular channels could open up questions about the possible invasive and disseminative behavior of G. muris, particularly in heavily and naturally infected hosts.

  7. Electron microscope study of the genesis of strain-induced martensite embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudhammer, K.P.; Hecker, S.S.; Murr, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Previous work of Olson and Cohen and Murr, et al., is used to describe the genesis of martensite embryos which form at the intersection of microscopic shear bands in deformed type 304 stainless steel. It is shown that the intersection volume included within intersecting shear bands contains irregular and smaller dispersed volume segments forming α' martensite (bcc). These correspond to the satisfaction of specific intersections of stacking faults or partial dislocations on approximately every second (111)/sub fcc/ plane in one direction, and every third (111)/sub fcc/ plane in the other (conjugate) direction. The requisite stacking fault or partial dislocation arrangements are produced in an irregular fashion resulting in α' martensite embryos nucleating in an incomplete and irregular fashion within the intersection volume. 9 references, 2 figures

  8. Infrared study of new star cluster candidates associated to dusty globules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto King, P.; Barbá, R.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Jaque, M.; Firpo, V.; Nilo, J. L.; Soto, M.; Minniti, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from a study of a sample of small star clusters associated to dusty globules and bright-rimmed clouds that have been observed under ESO/Chile public infrared survey Vista Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV). In this short communication, we analyse the near-infrared properties of a set of four small clusters candidates associated to dark clouds. This sample of clusters associated to dusty globules are selected from the new VVV stellar cluster candidates developed by members of La Serena VVV Group (Barbá et al. 2014). Firstly, we are producing color-color and color-magnitude diagrams for both, cluster candidates and surrounding areas for comparison through PSF photometry. The cluster positions are determined from the morphology on the images and also from the comparison of the observed luminosity function for the cluster candidates and the surrounding star fields. Now, we are working in the procedures to establish the full sample of clusters to be analyzed and methods for subtraction of the star field contamination. These clusters associated to dusty globules are simple laboratories to study the star formation relatively free of the influence of large star-forming regions and populous clusters, and they will be compared with those clusters associated to bright-rimmed globules, which are influenced by the energetic action of nearby O and B massive stars.

  9. Clustering aspects of sd shell nuclei studied by AMD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Masaaki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Taniguchi, Yasutaka [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); En' yo, Yoshiko [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Horiuchi, Hisashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2006-10-10

    The new clustering aspects of sd-shell nuclei found by the recent application of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics are reported. In this paper we present two topics, 'superdeformed band of {sup 32}S and {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O clustering' and 'molecular-orbital and di-nuclei states in {sup 22}Ne'. In the first topic, it will be shown that the superdeformed band of 32S has a considerable amount of {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O cluster component, and can be regarded as to belong to a family of the {sup 16}O + {sup 16}O molecular bands. In the second topic, the presence of the molecularorbital band which has an {alpha} + {sup 16}O cluster core surrounded by two covalently neutrons is suggested together with an {alpha} + {sup 18}O di-nuclei band.

  10. Clustering aspects of sd shell nuclei studied by AMD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Masaaki; Taniguchi, Yasutaka; En'yo, Yoshiko; Horiuchi, Hisashi

    2006-01-01

    The new clustering aspects of sd-shell nuclei found by the recent application of the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics are reported. In this paper we present two topics, 'superdeformed band of 32 S and 16 O + 16 O clustering' and 'molecular-orbital and di-nuclei states in 22 Ne'. In the first topic, it will be shown that the superdeformed band of 32S has a considerable amount of 16 O + 16 O cluster component, and can be regarded as to belong to a family of the 16 O + 16 O molecular bands. In the second topic, the presence of the molecularorbital band which has an α + 16 O cluster core surrounded by two covalently neutrons is suggested together with an α + 18 O di-nuclei band

  11. Photometric studies of globular clusters in the Andromeda nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharov, A.S.; Lyutyj, V.M.

    1983-01-01

    The comparison of the frequency distribution of Bergh Q and Racine R metallicity parameters for globular clusters in the Galaxy and M31 is given. Mean values of the parameters are: in the Galaxy anti Q=-0.31 and anti R=0.40, in M31 anti Q=-0.32 and anti R=0.42. Hence the mean metallicity of globular clusters in two galaxies is identical. The differences in the observed frequency distribution of the parameters, in particular in the limits of general metallicity, are related to the random errors of photometrical measurements of globular clusters, considerably greater in the case of M31. Thereby the preference should be given to Hanes conclusion that globular clusters form a uniform population at least in two close systems. It should not be excepted that in other galaxies mean colour characteristics and hence metallicity of clusters may be of other type. Thus globular clusters related to the M31-NGC 205 satellite have somewhat minor B-V colour factors

  12. Performance analysis of clustering techniques over microarray data: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Rasmita; Misra, Bijan Bihari

    2018-03-01

    Handling big data is one of the major issues in the field of statistical data analysis. In such investigation cluster analysis plays a vital role to deal with the large scale data. There are many clustering techniques with different cluster analysis approach. But which approach suits a particular dataset is difficult to predict. To deal with this problem a grading approach is introduced over many clustering techniques to identify a stable technique. But the grading approach depends on the characteristic of dataset as well as on the validity indices. So a two stage grading approach is implemented. In this study the grading approach is implemented over five clustering techniques like hybrid swarm based clustering (HSC), k-means, partitioning around medoids (PAM), vector quantization (VQ) and agglomerative nesting (AGNES). The experimentation is conducted over five microarray datasets with seven validity indices. The finding of grading approach that a cluster technique is significant is also established by Nemenyi post-hoc hypothetical test.

  13. A new apparatus for the study of electron impact fragmentation of molecular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, G; Burgt, P J M van der

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new experiment for the study of electron-impact induced dissociation and fragmentation of molecular clusters and biomolecules and other species solvated in water clusters. The purpose is to look at clusters that are of interest to biophysics, atmospheric physics, and other fields. The experiment consists of a differentially pumped vacuum system, with an expansion chamber to generate a pulsed supersonic beam of clusters, and a collision chamber where the cluster beam intersects with an electron beam. Water clusters can be seeded with biomolecules emerging from a resistively heated oven. Investigation will be possible into both ion yields and long-lived neutral metastable yields produced by electron-impact fragmentation of relevant clusters and biomolecules

  14. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small bimetallic zirconium–palladium clusters: Ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezi Javan, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Electronic and magnetic properties of small Zr n Pd m (n + m ⩽ 5) have been investigated. • Binding energies of the Zr n clusters are significantly higher than Pd n clusters. • Binding energy of the Pd n clusters increase with substituting one or more Zr atom. • HOMO–LUMO gap of the Zr n Pd m clusters increase in comparison with pure states. - Abstract: Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of small bimetallic zirconium–palladium clusters, Zr n Pd m (n + m ⩽ 5), have been investigated using density functional theory with considering generalized gradient approximation and PBE functional. We have determined the ground state conformations of the bimetallic zirconium–palladium clusters by substitution of Zr and Pd atoms in the optimized lowest energy structures of pure zirconium and palladium clusters. Results reveal that binding energies of the pure Zr n clusters are significantly higher than Pd n clusters with the same number of atoms. Also it is found that binding energy of the Zr n and Pd n clusters increase with growth of the number of consisting atoms in the clusters. Results indicate that, for both Zr n and Pd n clusters the binding energy of planar forms is lower than three-dimensional structures. We have also found that the binding energy of the Pd n clusters increase with substituting one or more Zr atoms in these clusters. We have also studied the HOMO–LUMO energy gap and magnetic moment of the pure and combined Zr and Pd clusters. The energy gap analysis of the pure and combined Pd and Zr clusters show that in generally the HOMO–LUMO gap of the bimetallic Zr n Pd m clusters increase in comparison with their corresponding pure clusters with the same number of atoms. According to the spin polarization DFT calculations all of the Zr n Pd m (n + m ⩽ 5) have net magnetic moments as instance the Zr 2 , Pd 2 and ZrPd clusters show a total magnetic moment value of 2 μ B . Some more discussions around charge population

  15. Studies of cluster X-ray sources. Energy spectra for the Perseus, Virgo, and Coma clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellogg, E.; Baldwin, J.R.; Koch, D.

    1975-01-01

    We present the final Uhuru X-ray differential-energy spectra for the Perseus, Virgo, and Coma clusters of galaxies. The power-law and isothermal bremsstrahlung model forms, both with a low-energy cutoff, are given. For bremsstrahlung, the energy-dependent Gaunt factor is calculated by an improved method. The spectra, best fits to the Uhuru 2-10 keV data, are also compared with other observations of these sources in the energy range 0.1-100 keV. For Perseus, the data above 20 keV favor the bremsstrahlung fit marginally. For Virgo, the data of Catura et al. between 0.25 and 1.0 keV clearly favor the bremsstrahlung curve. For Coma, the weakest of the three sources, the data are less precise, but there is some evidence for a low-energy turnover or cutoff. The implications of such a cutoff are discussed briefly

  16. The scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvan, F.

    1986-01-01

    A newly conceived microscope, based on a pure quantum phenomenon, is an ideal tool to study atom by atom the topography and properties of surfaces. Applications are presented: surface ''reconstruction'' of silicon, lamellar compound study, etc... Spectroscopy by tunnel effect will bring important information on electronic properties; it is presented with an application on silicon [fr

  17. In situ transmission electron microscope studies of ion irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced phase changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Motivated at least initially by materials needs for nuclear reactor development, extensive irradiation effects studies employing transmission electron microscopes (TEM) have been performed for several decades, involving irradiation-induced and irradiation-enhanced microstructural changes, including phase transformations such as precipitation, dissolution, crystallization, amorphization, and order-disorder phenomena. From the introduction of commercial high voltage electron microscopes (HVEM) in the mid-1960s, studies of electron irradiation effects have constituted a major aspect of HVEM application in materials science. For irradiation effects studies two additional developments have had particularly significant impact; the development of TEM specimen holder sin which specimen temperature can be controlled in the range 10-2200 K and the interfacing of ion accelerators which allows in situ TEM studies of irradiation effects and the ion beam modification of materials within this broad temperature range. This paper treats several aspects of in situ studies of electron and ion beam-induced and enhanced phase changes and presents two case studies involving in situ experiments performed in an HVEM to illustrate the strategies of such an approach of the materials research of irradiation effects

  18. Multicolor photometric study of M31 globular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Zhou; Ma Jun; Zhou Xu

    2009-01-01

    We present the photometry of 30 globular clusters (GCs) and GC candidates in 15 intermediate-band filters covering the wavelength region from ∼3000 to ∼10000 A using the archival CCD images of M31 observed as part of the Beijing - Arizona - Taiwan - Connecticut (BATC) Multicolor Sky Survey. We transform these intermediate-band photometric data into the photometry in the standard U BV RI broad-bands. These M31 GC candidates are selected from the Revised Bologna Catalog (RBC V.3.5), and most of these candidates do not have any photometric data. Therefore, the presented photometric data are a supplement to the RBC V.3.5. We find that 4 out of 61 GCs and GC candidates in RBC V.3.5 do not show any signal on the BATC images at their locations. By applying a linear fit of the distribution in the color-magnitude diagram of blue GCs and GC candidates using data from the RBC V.3.5, in this study, we find the 'blue-tilt' of blue M31 GCs with a high confidence at 99.95% or 3.47σ for the confirmed GCs, and > 99.99% or 4.87σ for GCs and GC candidates. (research papers)

  19. Triaxiality in the odd-A nuclei 109−117I studied through a microscopic rotationparticle coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modi Swati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic study of ground state spectrum with the triaxial deformation γ for odd-A Iodine isotopes 109−117I is carried out with the nonadiabatic quasiparticle approach. The rotation-particle coupling is accomplished microscopically such that the matrix elements of a particle-plus-rotor system are written in terms of the rotor energies. The 5/2+ state is confirmed as ground state for odd-A 111−117I and also coming out as lowest in energy for 109I.

  20. Scanning tunneling microscope-quartz crystal microbalance study of temperature gradients at an asperity contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, L; Krim, J

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of atomic-scale friction frequently involve setups where a tip and substrate are initially at different temperatures. The temperature of the sliding interface upon contact has thus become a topic of interest. A method for detecting initial tip-sample temperature differences at an asperity contact is described, which consists of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip in contact with the surface electrode of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The technique makes use of the fact that a QCM is extremely sensitive to abrupt changes in temperature. In order to demonstrate the technique's capabilities, QCM frequency shifts were recorded for varying initial tip-substrate temperature differences as an STM tip was brought into and out of contact. The results are interpreted within the context of a recent model for thermal heat conduction at an asperity contact, and it is concluded that the transient frequency response is attributable to small changes in temperature close to the region of contact rather than a change in the overall temperature of the QCM itself. For the assumed model parameters, the results moreover reveal substantial temperature discontinuities at the boundary between the tip and the sample, for example, on the order of 10-15 °C for initial temperature differences of 20 °C.

  1. Kaolinite flocculation induced by smectite addition - a transmission X-ray microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbik, Marek S; Song, Yen-Fang; Frost, Ray L

    2010-09-01

    The influence of smectite addition on kaolinite suspensions in water was investigated by transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Sedimentation test screening was also conducted. Micrographs were processed by the STatistic IMage Analysing (STIMAN) program and structural parameters were calculated. From the results of the sedimentation tests important influences of small smectite additions to about 3wt.% on kaolinite suspension flocculation has been found. In order to determine the reason for this smectite impact on kaolinite suspension, macroscopic behaviour micro-structural examination using Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM) and SEM has been undertaken. TXM & SEM micrographs of freeze-dried kaolinite-smectite suspensions with up to 20% smectite showed a high degree of orientation of the fabric made of highly oriented particles and greatest density when 3wt.% of smectite was added to the 10wt.% dense kaolinite suspension. In contrast, suspensions containing pure kaolinite do not show such platelet mutual orientation but homogenous network of randomly oriented kaolinite platelets. This suggests that in kaolinite-smectite suspensions, smectite forms highly oriented basic framework into which kaolinite platelets may bond in face to face preferential contacts strengthening structure and allowing them to show plastic behaviour which is cause of platelets orientation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell wall and DNA cosegregation in Bacillus subtilis studied by electron microscope autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaeppi, J.M.; Schaefer, O.; Karamata, D.

    1985-01-01

    Cells of a Bacillus subtilis mutant deficient in both major autolytic enzyme activities were continuously labeled in either cell wall or DNA or both cell wall and DNA. After appropriate periods of chase in minimal as well as in rich medium, thin sections of cells were autoradiographed and examined by electron microscopy. The resolution of the method was adequate to distinguish labeled DNA units from cell wall units. The latter, which could be easily identified, were shown to segregate symmetrically, suggesting a zonal mode of new wall insertion. DNA units could also be clearly recognized despite a limited fragmentation; they segregated asymmetrically with respect to the nearest septum. Analysis of cells simultaneously labeled in cell wall and DNA provided clear visual evidence of their regular but asymmetrical cosegregation, confirming a previous report obtained by light microscope autoradiography. In addition to labeled wall units, electron microscopy of thin sections of aligned cells has revealed fibrillar networks of wall material which are frequently associated with the cell surface. Most likely, these structures correspond to wall sloughed off by the turnover mechanism but not yet degraded to filterable or acid-soluble components

  3. Nurses' beliefs about nursing diagnosis: A study with cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Fabio; Pancani, Luca; Romero-Sánchez, José Manuel; Lumillo-Gutierrez, Iris; Paloma-Castro, Olga; Vellone, Ercole; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2018-06-01

    To identify clusters of nurses in relation to their beliefs about nursing diagnosis among two populations (Italian and Spanish); to investigate differences among clusters of nurses in each population considering the nurses' socio-demographic data, attitudes towards nursing diagnosis, intentions to make nursing diagnosis and actual behaviours in making nursing diagnosis. Nurses' beliefs concerning nursing diagnosis can influence its use in practice but this is still unclear. A cross-sectional design. A convenience sample of nurses in Italy and Spain was enrolled. Data were collected between 2014-2015 using tools, that is, a socio-demographic questionnaire and behavioural, normative and control beliefs, attitudes, intentions and behaviours scales. The sample included 499 nurses (272 Italians & 227 Spanish). Of these, 66.5% of the Italian and 90.7% of the Spanish sample were female. The mean age was 36.5 and 45.2 years old in the Italian and Spanish sample respectively. Six clusters of nurses were identified in Spain and four in Italy. Three clusters were similar among the two populations. Similar significant associations between age, years of work, attitudes towards nursing diagnosis, intentions to make nursing diagnosis and behaviours in making nursing diagnosis and cluster membership in each population were identified. Belief profiles identified unique subsets of nurses that have distinct characteristics. Categorizing nurses by belief patterns may help administrators and educators to tailor interventions aimed at improving nursing diagnosis use in practice. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Transmission electron microscope study of neutron irradiation-induced defects in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Ryuichiro; Kawano, Tetsuya; Fujimoto, Ryoji

    1994-01-01

    Commercial Czochralski-grown silicon (Cz-Si) and float-zone silicon (Fz-Si) wafers were irradiated with fission neutrons at various fluences from 10 19 to 10 22 n/cm 2 at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 1043 K. The irradiation induced defect structures were examined by transmission electron microscopy and ultra high voltage electron microscopy, which were compared with Marlowe code computer simulation results. It was concluded that the vacancy-type damage structure formed at 473 K were initiated from collapse of vacancy-rich regions of cascades, while interstitial type defect clusters formed by irradiation above 673 K were associated with interstitial oxygen atoms and free interstitials which diffused out of the cascades. Complex defect structures were identified to consist of {113} and {111} planar faults by the parallel beam illumination diffraction analysis. (author)

  5. Cluster dynamics: A classical trajectory study of A + A/sub n/arrow-right-leftA*/sub n/+1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, J.W.; Doll, J.D.; Thompson, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamics of the collision of an atom A with a small cluster of atoms, A/sub n/, leading to the formation of a quasibound A*/sub n/+1 complex, which subsequently decays, has been studied using classical trajectories. Pairwise Lennard-Jones potentials (with parameters appropriate for argon) were used to describe the identical point masses (Ar). The results illustrate the feasibility of direct calculations of microscopic rates for nucleation processes. The dissociation of collisionally formed A*/sub n/+1 (n=3,4, and 5) occurs by first-order exponential decay. Furthermore the energy dependence of the dissociation rate constants appears to be well described by the RRK functional form

  6. Preparation of theoretical scanning tunneling microscope images of adsorbed molecules: a theoretical study of benzene on the Cu(110) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapter, J.G.; Rogers, B.L.; Ford, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Since its development in 1982, the Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) has developed into a powerful tool for the study of surfaces and adsorbates. However, the utility of the technique can be further enhanced through the development of techniques for generating theoretical STM images. This is particularly true when studying molecules adsorbed on a substrate, as the results are often interpreted superficially due to an inadequate understanding of the orbital overlap probed in the experiment. A method of preparing theoretical scanning tunneling microscope (STM) images using comparatively inexpensive desktop computers and the commercially available CRYSTAL98 package is presented through a study of benzene adsorbed on the Cu(110) surface. Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Hartree-Fock (HF) methods are used to model clean Cu(110) slabs of various thicknesses and to simulate the adsorption of benzene onto these slabs. Eight possible orientations of benzene on the Cu(110) surface are proposed, and the optimum orientation according to the calculations is presented. Theoretical STM images of the Cu(110) surface and benzene adsorbed on the Cu(110) surface are compared with experimental STM images of the system from a published study. Significant differences are observed and are examined in detail

  7. Tight-binding study of the structural and magnetic properties of vanadium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jijun; Lain, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of small vanadium clusters are studied in the framework of tight-binding theory. According to parameters of the cluster dimer and bulk solid, we developed a tight-binding interatomic potential and calculated the bonding energies for the different possible structures to determine the ground state atomic configurations of the small vanadium clusters. The theoretical bonding energies for the vanadium clusters agree with the experiment much better than the simple droplet model. However, the calculated values for the clusters of odd atomic number are somewhat higher than the measured ones, corresponding to the pair occupation of delocalized 4s 1 electrons. Based on the optimized geometries, we study the magnetic properties of these clusters through a parametrized Hubbard Hamiltonian. We find the small V clusters of ground-state structures exhibit antiferromagnetic behavior while the alignment of local moments in the clusters with the unoptimized structures may show either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic characteristics. The average magnetic moments of the clusters decrease nonmonotonically as cluster size increases and the theoretical results are consistent with the upper limits obtained from a recent experiment. (orig.)

  8. WE-EF-BRA-02: A Monte Carlo Study of Macroscopic and Microscopic Dose Descriptors for Kilovoltage Cellular Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, P; Thomson, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how doses to cellular (microscopic) targets depend on cell morphology, and how cellular doses relate to doses to bulk tissues and water for 20 to 370 keV photon sources using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Methods: Simulation geometries involve cell clusters, single cells, and single nuclear cavities embedded in various healthy and cancerous bulk tissue phantoms. A variety of nucleus and cytoplasm elemental compositions are investigated. Cell and nucleus radii range from 5 to 10 microns and 2 to 9 microns, respectively. Doses to water and bulk tissue cavities are compared to nucleus and cytoplasm doses. Results: Variations in cell dose with simulation geometry are most pronounced for lower energy sources. Nuclear doses are sensitive to the surrounding geometry: the nuclear dose in a multicell model differs from the dose to a cavity of nuclear medium in an otherwise homogeneous bulk tissue phantom by more than 7% at 20 keV. Nuclear doses vary with cell size by up to 20% at 20 keV, with 10% differences persisting up to 90 keV. Bulk tissue and water cavity doses differ from cellular doses by up to 16%. MC results are compared to cavity theory predictions; large and small cavity theories qualitatively predict nuclear doses for energies below and above 50 keV, respectively. Burlin’s (1969) intermediate cavity theory best predicts MC results with an average discrepancy of 4%. Conclusion: Cellular doses vary as a function of source energy, subcellular compartment size, elemental composition, and tissue morphology. Neither water nor bulk tissue is an appropriate surrogate for subcellular targets in radiation dosimetry. The influence of microscopic inhomogeneities in the surrounding environment on the nuclear dose and the importance of the nucleus as a target for radiation-induced cell death emphasizes the potential importance of cellular dosimetry for understanding radiation effects. Funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council

  9. Contribution of alpha cluster exchange to elastic and inelastic 16O--20Ne scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, R.; Schneider, W.F.W.; Jahnke, U.; Hendrie, D.L.; Mahoney, J.; Maguire, C.F.; Scott, D.K.; Wolschin, G.

    1975-01-01

    The cluster structure of the ground state rotational band of 20 Ne was studied via the elastic and inelastic scattering of 50 MeV 20 Ne from 16 O. Angular distributions are compared with microscopic calculations

  10. Computer Study of Cluster Mechanism of Anti-greenhouse Effect

    OpenAIRE

    A. Galashev

    2009-01-01

    Absorption spectra of infra-red (IR) radiation of the disperse water medium absorbing the most important greenhouse gases: CO2 , N2O , CH4 , C2H2 , C2H6 have been calculated by the molecular dynamics method. Loss of the absorbing ability at the formation of clusters due to a reduction of the number of centers interacting with IR radiation, results in an anti-greenhouse effect. Absorption of O3 molecules by the (H2O)50 cluster is investigated at its interaction with Cl- io...

  11. Effect of Piper sarmentosum Extract on the Cardiovascular System of Diabetic Sprague-Dawley Rats: Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zar Chi Thent

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Piper sarmentosum (PS is known to possess the antidiabetic properties, its efficacy towards diabetic cardiovascular tissues is still obscured. The present study aimed to observe the electron microscopic changes on the cardiac tissue and proximal aorta of experimental rats treated with PS extract. Thirty-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: untreated control group (C, PS-treated control group (CTx, untreated diabetic group (D, and PS-treated diabetic group (DTx. Intramuscular injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 50 mg/kg body weight was given to induce diabetes. Following 28 days of diabetes induction, PS extract (0.125 g/kg body weight was administered orally for 28 days. Body weight, fasting blood glucose, and urine glucose levels were measured at 4-week interval. At the end of the study, cardiac tissues and the aorta were viewed under transmission electron microscope (TEM. DTx group showed increase in body weight and decrease in fasting blood glucose and urine glucose level compared to the D group. Under TEM study, DTx group showed lesser ultrastructural degenerative changes in the cardiac tissues and the proximal aorta compared to the D group. The results indicate that PS restores ultrastructural integrity in the diabetic cardiovascular tissues.

  12. First-principles studies on graphene-supported transition metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Sanjubala; Khanna, Shiv N.; Gruner, Markus E.; Entel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical studies on the structure, stability, and magnetic properties of icosahedral TM 13 (TM = Fe, Co, Ni) clusters, deposited on pristine (defect free) and defective graphene sheet as well as graphene flakes, have been carried out within a gradient corrected density functional framework. The defects considered in our study include a carbon vacancy for the graphene sheet and a five-membered and a seven-membered ring structures for graphene flakes (finite graphene chunks). It is observed that the presence of defect in the substrate has a profound influence on the electronic structure and magnetic properties of graphene-transition metal complexes, thereby increasing the binding strength of the TM cluster on to the graphene substrate. Among TM 13 clusters, Co 13 is absorbed relatively more strongly on pristine and defective graphene as compared to Fe 13 and Ni 13 clusters. The adsorbed clusters show reduced magnetic moment compared to the free clusters

  13. Cluster-Bethe-Lattice study of a planar antiferromagnet: Rb2NiF4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, G.A.C. de la; Silva, C.E.T.G. da

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of the Cluster-Bethe-Lattice method is presented for a planar antiferromagnet for which the hamiltonian parameters are known and the one-magnon density of states may be computed exactly. All the square clusters of 1 to 121 atoms are studied both connected to and isolated from the Bethe lattices. It is shown that, even for the largest cluster treated, the approximation is still far from the exact result. It is discussed the limitations of the method [pt

  14. A Study on Logistics Cluster Competitiveness among Asia Main Countries using the Porter's Diamond Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tae Won Chung

    2016-01-01

    Measurement and discussions of logistics cluster competitiveness with a national approach are required to boost agglomeration effects and potentially create logistics efficiency and productivity. This study developed assessment criteria of logistics cluster competitiveness based on Porter's diamond model, calculated the weight of each criterion by the AHP method, and finally evaluated and discussed logistics cluster competitiveness among Asia main countries. The results indicate that there wa...

  15. The young star cluster population of M51 with LEGUS - I. A comprehensive study of cluster formation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, M.; Adamo, A.; Östlin, G.; Calzetti, D.; Grasha, K.; Grebel, E. K.; Shabani, F.; Chandar, R.; Dale, D. A.; Dobbs, C. L.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Fumagalli, M.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Kim, H.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D. A.; Tosi, M.; Ubeda, L.; Walterbos, R.; Whitmore, B. C.; Fedorenko, K.; Mahadevan, S.; Andrews, J. E.; Bright, S. N.; Cook, D. O.; Kahre, L.; Nair, P.; Pellerin, A.; Ryon, J. E.; Ahmad, S. D.; Beale, L. P.; Brown, K.; Clarkson, D. A.; Guidarelli, G. C.; Parziale, R.; Turner, J.; Weber, M.

    2018-01-01

    Recently acquired WFC3 UV (F275W and F336W) imaging mosaics under the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS), combined with archival ACS data of M51, are used to study the young star cluster (YSC) population of this interacting system. Our newly extracted source catalogue contains 2834 cluster candidates, morphologically classified to be compact and uniform in colour, for which ages, masses and extinction are derived. In this first work we study the main properties of the YSC population of the whole galaxy, considering a mass-limited sample. Both luminosity and mass functions follow a power-law shape with slope -2, but at high luminosities and masses a dearth of sources is observed. The analysis of the mass function suggests that it is best fitted by a Schechter function with slope -2 and a truncation mass at 1.00 ± 0.12 × 105 M⊙. Through Monte Carlo simulations, we confirm this result and link the shape of the luminosity function to the presence of a truncation in the mass function. A mass limited age function analysis, between 10 and 200 Myr, suggests that the cluster population is undergoing only moderate disruption. We observe little variation in the shape of the mass function at masses above 1 × 104 M⊙ over this age range. The fraction of star formation happening in the form of bound clusters in M51 is ∼ 20 per cent in the age range 10-100 Myr and little variation is observed over the whole range from 1 to 200 Myr.

  16. Study of two-dimensional Debye clusters using Brownian motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, T.E.; Theisen, W.L.

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional Debye cluster is a system of n identical particles confined in a parabolic well and interacting through a screened Coulomb (i.e., a Debye-Hueckel or Yukawa) potential with a Debye length λ. Experiments were performed for 27 clusters with n=3-63 particles (9 μm diam) in a capacitively coupled 9 W rf discharge at a neutral argon pressure of 13.6 mTorr. In the strong-coupling regime each particle exhibits small amplitude Brownian motion about its equilibrium position. These motions were projected onto the center-of-mass and breathing modes and Fourier analyzed to give resonance curves from which the mode frequencies, amplitudes, and damping rates were determined. The ratio of the breathing frequency to the center-of-mass frequency was compared with theory to self-consistently determine the Debye shielding parameter κ, Debye length λ, particle charge q, and mode temperatures. It is found that 1 < or approx. κ < or approx. 2, and κ decreases weakly with n. The particle charge averaged over all measurements is -14 200±200 e, and q decreases slightly with n. The two center-of-mass modes and the breathing mode are found to have the same temperature, indicating that the clusters are in thermal equilibrium with the neutral gas. The average cluster temperature is 399±5 K

  17. Persistent Spatial Clusters of Prescribed Antimicrobials among Danish Pig Farms - A Register-Based Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fertner, Mette Ely; Sanchez, Javier; Boklund, Anette

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of pathogens resistant to antimicrobials has prompted political initiatives targeting a reduction in the use of veterinary antimicrobials in Denmark, especially for pigs. This study elucidates the tendency of pig farms with a significantly higher antimicrobial use to remain...... in clusters in certain geographical regions of Denmark. Animal Daily Doses/100 pigs/day were calculated for all three age groups of pigs (weaners, finishers and sows) for each quarter during 2012-13 in 6,143 commercial indoor pig producing farms. The data were split into four time periods of six months....... Repeated spatial cluster analyses were performed to identify persistent clusters, i.e. areas included in a significant cluster throughout all four time periods. Antimicrobials prescribed for weaners did not result in any persistent clusters. In contrast, antimicrobial use in finishers clustered...

  18. Studies in the X-Ray Emission of Clusters of Galaxies and Other Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtilek, Jan; Thronson, Harley (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The paper discusses the following: (1) X-ray study of groups of galaxies with Chandra and XMM. (2) X-ray properties of point sources in Chandra deep fields. (3) Study of cluster substructure using wavelet techniques. (4) Combined study of galaxy clusters with X-ray and the S-Z effect. Groups of galaxies are the fundamental building blocks of large scale structure in the Universe. X-ray study of the intragroup medium offers a powerful approach to addressing some of the major questions that still remain about almost all aspects of groups: their ages, origins, importance of composition of various galaxy types, relations to clusters, and origin and enrichment of the intragroup gas. Long exposures with Chandra have opened new opportunities for the study of X-ray background. The presence of substructure within clusters of galaxies has substantial implications for our understanding of cluster evolution as well as fundamental questions in cosmology.

  19. An atomic force microscope for the study of the effects of tip sample interactions on dimensional metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoot, Andrew; Koenders, Ludger; Wolff, Helmut

    2007-02-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been developed for studying interactions between the AFM tip and the sample. Such interactions need to be taken into account when making quantitative measurements. The microscope reported here has both the conventional beam deflection system and a fibre optical interferometer for measuring the movement of the cantilever. Both can be simultaneously used so as to not only servo control the tip movements, but also detect residual movement of the cantilever. Additionally, a high-resolution homodyne differential optical interferometer is used to measure the vertical displacement between the cantilever holder and the sample, thereby providing traceability for vertical height measurements. The instrument is compatible with an x-ray interferometer, thereby facilitating high resolution one-dimensional scans in the X-direction whose metrology is based on the silicon d220 lattice spacing (0.192 nm). This paper concentrates on the first stage of the instrument's development and presents some preliminary results validating the instrument's performance and showing its potential.

  20. Unsupervised Data Mining in nanoscale X-ray Spectro-Microscopic Study of NdFeB Magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyue; Yang, Feifei; Antono, Erin; Yang, Wenge; Pianetta, Piero; Ermon, Stefano; Mehta, Apurva; Liu, Yijin

    2016-09-29

    Novel developments in X-ray based spectro-microscopic characterization techniques have increased the rate of acquisition of spatially resolved spectroscopic data by several orders of magnitude over what was possible a few years ago. This accelerated data acquisition, with high spatial resolution at nanoscale and sensitivity to subtle differences in chemistry and atomic structure, provides a unique opportunity to investigate hierarchically complex and structurally heterogeneous systems found in functional devices and materials systems. However, handling and analyzing the large volume data generated poses significant challenges. Here we apply an unsupervised data-mining algorithm known as DBSCAN to study a rare-earth element based permanent magnet material, Nd 2 Fe 14 B. We are able to reduce a large spectro-microscopic dataset of over 300,000 spectra to 3, preserving much of the underlying information. Scientists can easily and quickly analyze in detail three characteristic spectra. Our approach can rapidly provide a concise representation of a large and complex dataset to materials scientists and chemists. For example, it shows that the surface of common Nd 2 Fe 14 B magnet is chemically and structurally very different from the bulk, suggesting a possible surface alteration effect possibly due to the corrosion, which could affect the material's overall properties.

  1. Unsupervised Data Mining in nanoscale X-ray Spectro-Microscopic Study of NdFeB Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoyue; Yang, Feifei; Antono, Erin; Yang, Wenge; Pianetta, Piero; Ermon, Stefano; Mehta, Apurva; Liu, Yijin

    2016-09-01

    Novel developments in X-ray based spectro-microscopic characterization techniques have increased the rate of acquisition of spatially resolved spectroscopic data by several orders of magnitude over what was possible a few years ago. This accelerated data acquisition, with high spatial resolution at nanoscale and sensitivity to subtle differences in chemistry and atomic structure, provides a unique opportunity to investigate hierarchically complex and structurally heterogeneous systems found in functional devices and materials systems. However, handling and analyzing the large volume data generated poses significant challenges. Here we apply an unsupervised data-mining algorithm known as DBSCAN to study a rare-earth element based permanent magnet material, Nd2Fe14B. We are able to reduce a large spectro-microscopic dataset of over 300,000 spectra to 3, preserving much of the underlying information. Scientists can easily and quickly analyze in detail three characteristic spectra. Our approach can rapidly provide a concise representation of a large and complex dataset to materials scientists and chemists. For example, it shows that the surface of common Nd2Fe14B magnet is chemically and structurally very different from the bulk, suggesting a possible surface alteration effect possibly due to the corrosion, which could affect the material’s overall properties.

  2. Does Microscope Assistance in Cold Steel Tonsillectomy Reduce the Risk of Postoperative Hemorrhage? Results of a Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Posttonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH is the most feared complication. Dissection near the tonsillar capsule under microscopic view (TEmic could be assumed to decrease PTH compared to traditional tonsillectomy (TEtrad. Methods. In this study, patients were evaluated with respect to the need for surgical control (R/N: return/no return to theater (RTT: the day of surgery [0] or thereafter [1]. The findings at resection site and pain were measured. Results. 869 patients were included (183 TEmic; 686 TEtrad. PTH requiring RTT was not seen in the TEmic group on the day of surgery (R0 while PTH requiring RTT subsequently (R1 was seen in 1.1% of the cases. In the TEmic group, hemorrhages without a need for surgical control were observed in 0.6% (N0 and 3.4% (N1, respectively. The corresponding rates for TEtrad were as follows: R0, 0.3%; R1, 1.7%; N0, 0.6%; and N1, 3.6% (p>0.05. Postoperative edema and local infection at resection site were proven to be predictive of PTH (p=0.007. Conclusion. Microscope assistance in tonsillectomy did not statistically have an influence on the PTH even though there was a trend towards lower PTH rate in the TEmic group. Benefit for TEmic was observed in high-volume and long experienced surgeons.

  3. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FILARIAL DETECTION BY MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION AND SEROLOGICAL ASSAY UTILIZING BMR1 AND BMXSP RECOMBINANT ANTIGENS FOR EVALUATION OF FILARIASIS ELIMINATION PROGRAM AT KAMPUNG SAWAH AND PAMULANG, SOUTH TANGERANG DISTRICT, BANTEN, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia F. Nasution

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available South Tangerang district is one of the endemic areas for filariasis; and based on an evaluation study in 2008-2009 which covered several subdistricts, the prevalence of microfilaria was between 1–2.4%. Nevertheless, the evaluation by serological assay has never been reported. A cross-sectional study was conducted to detect the microfilaremia and anti-filarial IgG4 antibody status in Kp Sawah and Pamulang subdistricts. Cluster sampling was performed in Kp Sawah by collecting finger-prick blood (FPB and venous blood samples from inhabitants who lived with and nearby the four elephantiasis subjects in the area. The FPB were only collected in Pamulang area by consecutive sampling method. The detection method included microscopic evaluation of FPB and serological detection using recombinant antigens BmR1 and BmSXP by ELISA and lateral flow rapid tests. Symptomatic patients who had 2nd and 3rd degree of elephantiasis were clinically determined in 10% (4/40 subjects. Among those with elephantiasis, 2 were positive serologically but their microscopic results were all negative (40/40. Meanwhile, the microscopic result for 107 subjects from Pamulang were all negative. The results of the rapid tests showed that 15% (6/40 of the positive cases were detected by Brugia Rapid and 27.5% (11/40 by PanLF. Meanwhile, the ELISA showed that 20% (8/40 of the cases were positive with BmSXP, whereas only 2.5% or 1/40 sample was found to be positive with BmR1. Even though the sensitivity of the Rapid test was lower when compared to microscopic examination for these samples, the assay showed good specificity ranging from 72.5 to 97.5%. The optical density (OD values of ELISA has ranged between 0.3–3.045.

  4. A confocal microscopic study of solitary pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in human airway epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparrow Malcolm P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC are specialized epithelial cells that are thought to play important roles in lung development and airway function. PNEC occur either singly or in clusters called neuroepithelial bodies. Our aim was to characterize the three dimensional morphology of PNEC, their distribution, and their relationship to the epithelial nerves in whole mounts of adult human bronchi using confocal microscopy. Methods Bronchi were resected from non-diseased portions of a lobe of human lung obtained from 8 thoracotomy patients (Table 1 undergoing surgery for the removal of lung tumors. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies to reveal all nerves (PGP 9.5, sensory nerves (calcitonin gene related peptide, CGRP, and PNEC (PGP 9.5, CGRP and gastrin releasing peptide, GRP. The analysis and rendition of the resulting three-dimensional data sets, including side-projections, was performed using NIH-Image software. Images were colorized and super-imposed using Adobe Photoshop. Results PNEC were abundant but not homogenously distributed within the epithelium, with densities ranging from 65/mm2 to denser patches of 250/mm2, depending on the individual wholemount. Rotation of 3-D images revealed a complex morphology; flask-like with the cell body near the basement membrane and a thick stem extending to the lumen. Long processes issued laterally from its base, some lumenal and others with feet-like processes. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP was present in about 20% of PNEC, mainly in the processes. CGRP-positive nerves were sparse, with some associated with the apical part of the PNEC. Conclusion Our 3D-data demonstrates that PNEC are numerous and exhibit a heterogeneous peptide content suggesting an active and diverse PNEC population.

  5. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging

  6. Cluster Policy in the Light of Institutional Context—A Comparative Study of Transition Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Lehmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The business environment in transition countries is often extraordinarily challenging for companies. The transition process these countries find themselves in leads to constant changes in the institutional environment. Hence, institutional voids prevail. These institutional voids cause competitive disadvantages for small and medium enterprises. Cluster policy can address these competitive disadvantages. As cluster policy generally aims at supporting companies’ competitive advantage by spurring innovation and productivity, it can help to bridge institutional voids. This article’s research question aims at analyzing and comparing cluster policies in the institutional context of two transition countries (Serbia and Tunisia and analyzes to what extent cluster policies in these two countries are adapted to institutional voids prevailing there. The case studies offer insights into apparent difficulties of clusters in bridging formal institutional voids, as well as, notably, into the informal void of skill mismatches in the labor market. Still, for some specific voids, clusters do at least implicitly assume a bridging role. While the cluster policies examined do not explicitly target the institutional voids identified, cluster management can—in the course of time—align its service offering more closely with these voids. Bottom-up designed cluster policies can play an especially important role in such an evolution towards bridging institutional voids.

  7. Density functional study of the bonding in small silicon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, R.; Sinnott, S.B.; DePristo, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    We report the ground electronic state, equilibrium geometry, vibrational frequencies, and binding energy for various isomers of Si n (n = 2--8) obtained with the linear combination of atomic orbitals-density functional method. We used both a local density approximation approach and one with gradient corrections. Our local density approximation results concerning the relative stability of electronic states and isomers are in agreement with Hartree--Fock and Moller--Plesset (MP2) calculations [K. Raghavachari and C. M. Rohlfing, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 2219 (1988)]. The binding energies calculated with the gradient corrected functional are in good agreement with experiment (Si 2 and Si 3 ) and with the best theoretical estimates. Our analysis of the bonding reveals two limiting modes of bonding and classes of silicon clusters. One class of clusters is characterized by relatively large s atomic populations and a large number of weak bonds, while the other class of clusters is characterized by relatively small s atomic populations and a small number of strong bonds

  8. STM observations of ferromagnetic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawro, A.; Kasuya, A.

    1998-01-01

    Co, Fe and Ni clusters of nanometer size, deposited on silicon and graphite (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), were observed by a scanning tunneling microscope. Deposition as well as the scanning tunneling microscope measurements were carried out in an ultrahigh vacuum system at room temperature. Detailed analysis of Co cluster height was done with the scanning tunneling microscope equipped with a ferromagnetic tip in a magnetic field up to 70 Oe. It is found that bigger clusters (few nanometers in height) exhibit a dependence of their apparent height on applied magnetic field. We propose that such behaviour originates from the ferromagnetic ordering of cluster and associate this effect to spin polarized tunneling. (author)

  9. Histopathological and electron microscopic studies of lymphangiectasia of the small intestine in Behçet's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hitoshi; Morita, Akira; Morishita, Tetsuo; Tsuchiya, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yoonosuke; Enomoto, Yasuhiro

    1973-01-01

    The gastrointestinal involvement and immunological findings in 16 patients with Behçet's disease are described. Four of 15 biopsy specimens of jejunal mucosa showed marked lymphangiectasia in the lamina propria similar to the appearance which was thought to be a characteristic finding in protein-losing enteropathy. None of the patients had hypoproteinaemia. Increases in serum immunoglobulin IgA were proved in six of 15 cases; in IgM, five of 15; and in IgG, one of 15. Electron microscopic studies showed that there were thousands of precipitated lymph protein bodies in the extracellular spaces of the lamina propria. Ulcers and healed ulcers of the large intestine were studied by light microscopy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:4700433

  10. Fluorescence microscopic and microautoradiographic studies on apoptosis of bone tumor cells induced by 153Sm-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Xiao Dong; Han Xiaofeng

    1997-09-01

    The apoptosis of bone tumor cells treated with internal irradiation by 153 Sm-EDTMP was studied. The morphological changes in bone tumor cells were observed by fluorescence microscopic and microautoradiographic observations. It was found that bone tumor cells internally irradiated with 153 Sm-EDTMP, displayed significant nuclear fragmentation and marked pyknosis as well as apoptotic bodies formation. The microautoradiographic study showed that 153 Sm-EDTMP could permeate through cell membrane and displayed membrane-seeking condensation in tumor cells. Soon afterwards 153 Sm-EDTMP could be phagocytized by the tumor cells and distributed in cytoplasm and nucleus in the form of phagosome. With the prolongation of observing time, the membrane-bounded apoptotic bodies was observed. With the lengthening of internal irradiation time by 153 Sm-EDTMP, the inhibition rate of proliferation of bone tumor cells increased progressively. (10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.)

  11. Probing the inhibitory potency of epigallocatechin gallate against human γB-crystallin aggregation: Spectroscopic, microscopic and simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Susmitnarayan; Dutta, Anirudha; Bag, Sudipta; Biswas, Pranandita; Das, Amit Kumar; Dasgupta, Swagata

    2018-03-01

    Aggregation of human ocular lens proteins, the crystallins is believed to be one of the key reasons for age-onset cataract. Previous studies have shown that human γD-crystallin forms amyloid like fibres under conditions of low pH and elevated temperature. In this article, we have investigated the aggregation propensity of human γB-crystallin in absence and presence of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), in vitro, when exposed to stressful conditions. We have used different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques to elucidate the inhibitory effect of EGCG towards aggregation. The experimental results have been substantiated by molecular dynamics simulation studies. We have shown that EGCG possesses inhibitory potency against the aggregation of human γB-crystallin at low pH and elevated temperature.

  12. Hut clusters on Ge(001) surfaces studied by STM and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    1996-01-01

    Nanoscale hut clusters formed on Ge(001) surfaces by depositing one monolayer of indium and annealing at temperatures between 350 and 500 degrees C were studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. It was found that the hut clusters form regular arrays over...

  13. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics studies for exotic clustering phenomena in neutron-rich nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, M. [Hokkaido University, Department of Physics, Sapporo (Japan); Hokkaido University, Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Faculty of Science, Sapporo (Japan); Suhara, T. [Matsue College of Technology, Matsue (Japan); Kanada-En' yo, Y. [Kyoto University, Department of Physics, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    We present a review of recent works on clustering phenomena in unstable nuclei studied by antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD). The AMD studies in these decades have uncovered novel types of clustering phenomena brought about by the excess neutrons. Among them, this review focuses on the molecule-like structure of unstable nuclei. One of the earliest discussions on the clustering in unstable nuclei was made for neutron-rich Be and B isotopes. AMD calculations predicted that the ground state clustering is enhanced or reduced depending on the number of excess neutrons. Today, the experiments are confirming this prediction as the change of the proton radii. Behind this enhancement and reduction of the clustering, there are underlying shell effects called molecular and atomic orbits. These orbits form covalent and ionic bonding of the clusters analogous to the atomic molecules. It was found that this ''molecular-orbit picture'' reasonably explains the low-lying spectra of Be isotopes. The molecular-orbit picture is extended to other systems having parity asymmetric cluster cores and to the three cluster systems. O and Ne isotopes are the candidates of the former, while the 3α linear chains in C isotopes are the latter. For both subjects, many intensive studies are now in progress. We also pay a special attention to the observables which are the fingerprint of the clustering. In particular, we focus on the monopole and dipole transitions which are recently regarded as good probe for the clustering. We discuss how they have and will reveal the exotic clustering. (orig.)

  14. Determination of feasibility and utility of microscope-integrated optical coherence tomography during ophthalmic surgery: the DISCOVER Study RESCAN Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Justis P; Goshe, Jeff; Dupps, William J; Kaiser, Peter K; Singh, Rishi P; Gans, Richard; Eisengart, Jonathan; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2015-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has transformed the clinical management of a myriad of ophthalmic conditions. Applying OCT to ophthalmic surgery may have implications for surgical decision making and patient outcomes. To assess the feasibility and effect on surgical decision making of a microscope-integrated intraoperative OCT (iOCT) system. Report highlighting the 1-year results (March 2014-February 2015) of the RESCAN 700 portion of the DISCOVER (Determination of Feasibility of Intraoperative Spectral Domain Microscope Combined/Integrated OCT Visualization During En Face Retinal and Ophthalmic Surgery) study, a single-site, multisurgeon, prospective consecutive case series regarding this investigational device. Participants included patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Data on clinical characteristics were collected, and iOCT was performed during surgical milestones, as directed by the operating surgeon. A surgeon questionnaire was issued to each surgeon and was completed after each case to evaluate the role of iOCT during surgery and its particular role in select surgical procedures. Percentage of cases with successful acquisition of iOCT (ie, feasibility). Percentage of cases in which iOCT altered surgical decision making (ie, utility). During year 1 of the DISCOVER study, a total of 227 eyes (91 anterior segment cases and 136 posterior segment cases) underwent imaging with the RESCAN 700 system. Successful imaging (eg, the ability to acquire an OCT image of the tissue of interest) was obtained for 224 of 227 eyes (99% [95% CI, 98%-100%]). During lamellar keratoplasty, the iOCT data provided information that altered the surgeon's decision making in 38% of the cases (eg, complete graft apposition when the surgeon believed there was interface fluid). In membrane peeling procedures, iOCT information was discordant with the surgeon's impression of membrane peel completeness in 19% of cases (eg, lack of residual membrane or presence of occult membrane), thus

  15. Sci-Thur AM: YIS – 06: A Monte Carlo study of macro- and microscopic dose descriptors and the microdosimetric spread using detailed cellular models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, Patricia; Thomson, Rowan [Carleton University (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To develop Monte Carlo models of cell clusters to investigate the relationships between macro- and microscopic dose descriptors, quantify the microdosimetric spread in energy deposition for subcellular targets, and determine how these results depend on the computational model. Methods: Microscopic tissue structure is modelled as clusters of 13 to 150 cells, with cell (nuclear) radii between 5 and 10 microns (2 and 9 microns). Energy imparted per unit mass (specific energy or dose) is scored in the nucleus (D{sub nuc}) and cytoplasm (D{sub cyt}) for incident photon energies from 20 to 370 keV. Dose-to-water (D{sub w,m}) and dose-to-medium (D{sub m,m}) are compared to D{sub nuc} and D{sub cyt}. Single cells and single nuclear cavities are also simulated. Results: D{sub nuc} and D{sub cyt} are sensitive to the surrounding environment with deviations of up to 13% for a single nucleus/cell compared with a multicellular cluster. These dose descriptors vary with cell and nucleus size by up to 10%. D{sub nuc} and D{sub cyt} differ from D{sub w,m} and D{sub m,m} by up to 32%. The microdosimetric spread is sensitive to whether cells are arranged randomly or in a hexagonal lattice, and whether subcellular compartment sizes are sampled from a normal distribution or are constant throughout the cluster. Conclusions: D{sub nuc} and D{sub cyt} are sensitive to cell morphology, elemental composition and the presence of surrounding cells. The microdosimetric spread was investigated using realistic elemental compositions for the nucleus and cytoplasm, and depends strongly on subcellular compartment size, source energy and dose.

  16. Anionic water pentamer and hexamer clusters: An extensive study of structures and energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Aslı; Bozkaya, Uǧur

    2018-03-01

    An extensive study of structures and energetics for anionic pentamer and hexamer clusters is performed employing high level ab initio quantum chemical methods, such as the density-fitted orbital-optimized linearized coupled-cluster doubles (DF-OLCCD), coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD), and coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbative triples [CCSD(T)] methods. In this study, sixteen anionic pentamer clusters and eighteen anionic hexamer clusters are reported. Relative, binding, and vertical detachment energies (VDE) are presented at the complete basis set limit (CBS), extrapolating energies of aug4-cc-pVTZ and aug4-cc-pVQZ custom basis sets. The largest VDE values obtained at the CCSD(T)/CBS level are 9.9 and 11.2 kcal mol-1 for pentamers and hexamers, respectively, which are in very good agreement with the experimental values of 9.5 and 11.1 kcal mol-1. Our binding energy results, at the CCSD(T)/CBS level, indicate strong bindings in anionic clusters due to hydrogen bond interactions. The average binding energy per water molecules is -5.0 and -5.3 kcal mol-1 for pentamers and hexamers, respectively. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the DF-OLCCD method approaches to the CCSD(T) quality for anionic clusters. The inexpensive analytic gradients of DF-OLCCD compared to CCSD or CCSD(T) make it very attractive for high-accuracy studies.

  17. Reactivity of Monolayer Protected Silver Clusters Towards Excess Ligand: A Calorimetric Study

    KAUST Repository

    Baksi, Ananya

    2017-10-31

    Reactivity of monolayer protected atomically precise clusters of noble metals is of significant research interest. Till date very few experimental data are available on the reaction thermodynamics of such clusters. Here we report a calorimetric study of the reaction of glutathione (GSH) protected silver clusters in presence of excess ligand, GSH using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). We have studied Ag11(SG)7 and Ag32(SG)19 clusters and compared their reactivity with GSH protected silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and silver ions. Clusters show intermediate reactivity towards excess ligand com-pared to nanoparticles and silver ions. Several control experiments were performed to understand the degradation mech-anism of these silver clusters and nanoparticles. Effect of dissolved oxygen in the degradation process was studied in de-tail and found that it did not have a significant role, although alternate pathways of degradation with the involvement of oxygen cannot be ruled out. Direct confirmation of the fact that functionalized metal clusters fall in-between NPs and atomic systems in their stability is obtained experimentally for the first time. Several other thermophysical parameters of these clusters were also determined including, density, speed of sound, isentropic compressibility and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  18. Hierarchical clustering of HPV genotype patterns in the ASCUS-LSIL triage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wilson, Lauren E.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Carreon, Joseph D.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Anogenital cancers are associated with about 13 carcinogenic HPV types in a broader group that cause cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Multiple concurrent cervical HPV infections are common which complicate the attribution of HPV types to different grades of CIN. Here we report the analysis of HPV genotype patterns in the ASCUS-LSIL triage study using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. Women who underwent colposcopy at baseline (n = 2780) were grouped into 20 disease categories based on histology and cytology. Disease groups and HPV genotypes were clustered using complete linkage. Risk of 2-year cumulative CIN3+, viral load, colposcopic impression, and age were compared between disease groups and major clusters. Hierarchical clustering yielded four major disease clusters: Cluster 1 included all CIN3 histology with abnormal cytology; Cluster 2 included CIN3 histology with normal cytology and combinations with either CIN2 or high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) cytology; Cluster 3 included older women with normal or low grade histology/cytology and low viral load; Cluster 4 included younger women with low grade histology/cytology, multiple infections, and the highest viral load. Three major groups of HPV genotypes were identified: Group 1 included only HPV16; Group 2 included nine carcinogenic types plus non-carcinogenic HPV53 and HPV66; and Group 3 included non-carcinogenic types plus carcinogenic HPV33 and HPV45. Clustering results suggested that colposcopy missed a prevalent precancer in many women with no biopsy/normal histology and HSIL. This result was confirmed by an elevated 2-year risk of CIN3+ in these groups. Our novel approach to study multiple genotype infections in cervical disease using unsupervised hierarchical clustering can address complex genotype distributions on a population level. PMID:20959485

  19. Studies of dislocation loops produced by irradiation of ZnO in a high-voltage electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Iwanaga, H.; Shibata, N.; Suzuki, K.; Takeuchi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electron-irradiation studies on vapour-grown ZnO ribbon crystals have been carried out in situ in a high-voltage electron microscope. Dislocation loops nucleate both on stacking-fault planes and in the matrix by irradiation with electron accelerated through voltages higher than 700 kV at room temperature. Two types of loops with the Burgers vectors b=1/2c and b=a exist in the matrix, where a=1/3 and c=[0001]. On the other hand, loops with b=1/2c+a/3 and those with b=1/2c are formed on the prismatic fault planes and basal fault planes, respectively. Diffraction-contrast experiments show these loops to be of interstitial type. A re-irradiation experiment after the annealing indicates a possibility that there exist vacancies in the matrix at 700 0 C. (author)

  20. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana—light and scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sapoznikov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana. Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107.

  1. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana-light and scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapoznikov, Olga; Cizek, Petr; Tichy, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas ( Iguana iguana ). Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107.

  2. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana—light and scanning electron microscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, Petr; Tichy, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107. PMID:27920949

  3. Comparative scanning electron microscope study of the degradation of a plasticized polyvinyl chloride waterproofing membrane in different conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, A.; Del Río, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the analysis of several samples of a plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC-P) waterproofing membrane. The samples were extracted from different areas of the same flat roof, which was in service for over 12 years. An original sample of an identical PVC-P membrane that was not installed on the roof was also analyzed. The analysis of the materials was carried out using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). An elemental analysis of every sample was also performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Micrographs and the elemental composition of the samples were compared with the data obtained in the analysis of the original sample. The results show dehydrochlorination of the polymer in two of the samples studied and great deterioration that was not visible to the naked eye in the sample that was totally exposed to the weather. [es

  4. Patients with Cluster A Personality Disorders in Psychotherapy: An Effectiveness Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Bartak (Anna); H. Andrea (Helene); M.D. Spreeuwenberg (Marieke); M.M. Thunnissen (Moniek); U.M. Ziegler (Uli); J.J.M. Dekker (Jack)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract BACKGROUND: While psychopharmacological studies are common in patients with cluster A personality disorders, the effects of psychotherapy have received little attention. The aim of this study is to explore whether psychotherapeutic treatment yields health gains for these

  5. An electron microscopic study on the effects of irradiation on the acinar cells of rat parotid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Kwang Jun; Lee, Sang Rae

    1988-01-01

    The author studies the histopathologic changes according to a single or a split does and the time after irradiation on the acinar cells of rat parotid gland. 99 Sprague Dawley rats, weighing about 120 gm, were divided into control and 3 experimental groups. In experimental groups, Group I and II were delivered a single does of 15 Gy, 18 Gy and Group III and IV were delivered two equal split doses of 9 Gy, 10.5 Gy for a 4 hours interval, respectively. The experimental groups were delivered by a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit with a dose rate of 222 cGy/min, source-skin di stance of 50 cm, depth of 1 cm and a field size of 12 X 5 cm. The animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 days after irradiation and examined by light and electro n microscopy. The results were as follows: 1. As the radiation dose increased and acinar cells delivered a single dose exposure were more damaged, and the change of acinar cells appeared faster than those of a split does exposure. 2. The histopathologic change of acinar cells appeared at 1 hour after irradiation. The recovery from damaged acinar cells appeared at 1 day after irradiation and there was a tendency that the recovery from damage of a split dose exposure was somewhat later than of a single dose exposure. 3. Light microscope showed atrophic change of acinar cells and nucleus, degeneration and vesicle formation of cytoplasm, widening of intercellular space and interlobular space. 4. Electron microscope showed loss of nuclear membrane, degeneration of nucleus and nucleoli, clumping of cytoplasm, widening and degeneration of rough endoplasmic reticulum, loss of cristae of mitochondria, lysosome, autophagosome and lipid droplet. 5. Electron microscopically, the change of rough endoplasmic reticulum was most prominent and this appeared at 1 hour after irradiation as early changes of acinar cells. The nuclear change appeared at 2 hours after irradiation and the loss of cristae of mitochondria was observed at 2 hours after

  6. An electron microscopic study on the effects of irradiation on the acinar cells of rat parotid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwang Jun; Lee, Sang Rae [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-11-15

    The author studies the histopathologic changes according to a single or a split does and the time after irradiation on the acinar cells of rat parotid gland. 99 Sprague Dawley rats, weighing about 120 gm, were divided into control and 3 experimental groups. In experimental groups, Group I and II were delivered a single does of 15 Gy, 18 Gy and Group III and IV were delivered two equal split doses of 9 Gy, 10.5 Gy for a 4 hours interval, respectively. The experimental groups were delivered by a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit with a dose rate of 222 cGy/min, source-skin di stance of 50 cm, depth of 1 cm and a field size of 12 X 5 cm. The animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 days after irradiation and examined by light and electro n microscopy. The results were as follows: 1. As the radiation dose increased and acinar cells delivered a single dose exposure were more damaged, and the change of acinar cells appeared faster than those of a split does exposure. 2. The histopathologic change of acinar cells appeared at 1 hour after irradiation. The recovery from damaged acinar cells appeared at 1 day after irradiation and there was a tendency that the recovery from damage of a split dose exposure was somewhat later than of a single dose exposure. 3. Light microscope showed atrophic change of acinar cells and nucleus, degeneration and vesicle formation of cytoplasm, widening of intercellular space and interlobular space. 4. Electron microscope showed loss of nuclear membrane, degeneration of nucleus and nucleoli, clumping of cytoplasm, widening and degeneration of rough endoplasmic reticulum, loss of cristae of mitochondria, lysosome, autophagosome and lipid droplet. 5. Electron microscopically, the change of rough endoplasmic reticulum was most prominent and this appeared at 1 hour after irradiation as early changes of acinar cells. The nuclear change appeared at 2 hours after irradiation and the loss of cristae of mitochondria was observed at 2 hours after

  7. PENGKLASIFIKASIAN KARAKTERISTIK MAHASISWA BARU DALAM MEMILIH PROGRAM STUDI MENGGUNAKAN ANALISIS CLUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxsi Ary

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - Object Clustering is one of the object mining process which aims to partition an existing object into one or more cluster objects based on their characteristics. Private Universities is one of the alternatives for the community colleges to meet increased demand for educational needs. The number of private colleges, especially in Bandung and generally in Indonesia is quite a lot. The number of colleges and universities means used to attract prospective students to be an interesting thing to study. As a reason for the intense competition in the search for new students, no doubt there are some ways that actually do not need to be done. Issues raised, namely classify new students of characteristics in selecting a course using cluster analysis. Data obtained from the questionnaire prospective new students in February 2014 Data processing using SPSS. The results using analysis SPSS aiming easier to describe the characteristics of each group of new students in choosing courses. Keywords: Clustering, characteristics of students, courses, cluster analysis Abstrak - Pengelompokan Objek (object clustering adalah salah satu proses dari objek mining yang bertujuan untuk mempartisi objek yang ada kedalam satu atau lebih cluster objek berdasarkan karakteristiknya. Perguruan tinggi swasta merupakan salah satu perguruan tinggi alternatif bagi masyarakat untuk menghadapi peningkatan permintaan terhadap kebutuhan pendidikan. Jumlah perguruan tinggi swasta khususnya di Bandung dan umumnya di Indonesia berjumlah cukup banyak. Jumlah perguruan tinggi dan cara yang digunakan perguruan tinggi untuk menarik minat calon mahasiswa menjadi hal yang menarik untuk dikaji. Sebagai alasan ketatnya persaingan dalam mencari calon mahasiswa baru, tidak dipungkiri terdapat beberapa cara yang dilakukan yang sebetulnya tidak perlu dilakukan. Persoalan yang dikemukakan yaitu mengklasifikasikan karakteristik mahasiawa baru dalam memilih program studi menggunakan analisis

  8. WIYN OPEN CLUSTER STUDY. XXIV. STELLAR RADIAL-VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS IN NGC 6819

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabetha Hole, K.; Geller, Aaron M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Meibom, Soeren; Platais, Imants; Latham, David W.

    2009-01-01

    We present the current results from our ongoing radial-velocity (RV) survey of the intermediate-age (2.4 Gyr) open cluster NGC 6819. Using both newly observed and other available photometry and astrometry, we define a primary target sample of 1454 stars that includes main-sequence, subgiant, giant, and blue straggler stars, spanning a magnitude range of 11 ≤V≤ 16.5 and an approximate mass range of 1.1-1.6 M sun . Our sample covers a 23 arcminute (13 pc) square field of view centered on the cluster. We have measured 6571 radial velocities for an unbiased sample of 1207 stars in the direction of the open cluster NGC 6819, with a single-measurement precision of 0.4 km s -1 for most narrow-lined stars. We use our RV data to calculate membership probabilities for stars with ≥3 measurements, providing the first comprehensive membership study of the cluster core that includes stars from the giant branch through the upper main sequence. We identify 480 cluster members. Additionally, we identify velocity-variable systems, all of which are likely hard binaries that dynamically power the cluster. Using our single cluster members, we find a cluster average RV of 2.34 ± 0.05 km s -1 . We use our kinematic cluster members to construct a cleaned color-magnitude diagram from which we identify rich giant, subgiant, and blue straggler populations and a well defined red clump. The cluster displays a morphology near the cluster turnoff clearly indicative of core convective overshoot. Finally, we discuss a few stars of note, one of which is a short-period red-clump binary that we suggest may be the product of a dynamical encounter.

  9. Impurity cluster interaction in fcc metals studied by PAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deicher, M.; Echt, O.; Recknagel, E.; Wichert, T.

    1981-01-01

    A defect configuration of high thermal stability has been observed by PAC in Au, showing the same properties as previously published configuration in Cu and Ni. We prove that these configurations cannot consist of any small defect complex with well-defined size; especially the observed influence of the damaging conditions on the thermal stability of the defects in Au and Cu would contradict such an assumption. It is shown that probe atoms trapped at large clusters of variable size can nevertheless experience a unique electric field gradient, and that in our case intrinsic stacking faults, formed by vacancies, can account for all the measured properties. (orig.)

  10. Microscopic study of low-lying collective bands in 77Kr

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive experimental studies of 77Kr have recently been performed by Sylvan et al [4] and Johnson et al [5] (see also refs [6,7]). These experimental studies have resulted in the identification of positive parity and negative parity collective bands up to very high spin. The ground state for 77Kr is based on K = 5/2+ with the.

  11. Ab initio studies on the reaction of O2 with Ban (n=2,5) clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S.F.; Xue Xinlian; Chen, G.; Yuan, D.W.; Jia Yu; Gong, X.G.

    2006-01-01

    Ab initio theoretical calculations have been performed to study the reaction of O 2 with Ba n (n=2,5) clusters. Our results show that O 2 can easily chemisorb and dissociate on small Ba n clusters and there is no obvious energy barrier in the process of the dissociation. The local magnetic moment contributed by oxygen must vanish during the intermediate states before the O 2 dissociation. Correspondingly, local magnetic moment only decreases from 2μ B to about 1μ B if O 2 molecularly adsorbs onto Ba 5 cluster. The electronic structure analysis indicates that the charge transfer from Ba n cluster to O 2 as well as the orbital hybridization between the cluster and the oxygen molecule may play a key role in O 2 dissociation

  12. History-dependent friction and slow slip from time-dependent microscopic junction laws studied in a statistical framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøgersen, Kjetil; Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Sveinsson, Henrik Andersen; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Scheibert, Julien

    2014-05-01

    To study how macroscopic friction phenomena originate from microscopic junction laws, we introduce a general statistical framework describing the collective behavior of a large number of individual microjunctions forming a macroscopic frictional interface. Each microjunction can switch in time between two states: a pinned state characterized by a displacement-dependent force and a slipping state characterized by a time-dependent force. Instead of tracking each microjunction individually, the state of the interface is described by two coupled distributions for (i) the stretching of pinned junctions and (ii) the time spent in the slipping state. This framework allows for a whole family of microjunction behavior laws, and we show how it represents an overarching structure for many existing models found in the friction literature. We then use this framework to pinpoint the effects of the time scale that controls the duration of the slipping state. First, we show that the model reproduces a series of friction phenomena already observed experimentally. The macroscopic steady-state friction force is velocity dependent, either monotonic (strengthening or weakening) or nonmonotonic (weakening-strengthening), depending on the microscopic behavior of individual junctions. In addition, slow slip, which has been reported in a wide variety of systems, spontaneously occurs in the model if the friction contribution from junctions in the slipping state is time weakening. Next, we show that the model predicts a nontrivial history dependence of the macroscopic static friction force. In particular, the static friction coefficient at the onset of sliding is shown to increase with increasing deceleration during the final phases of the preceding sliding event. We suggest that this form of history dependence of static friction should be investigated in experiments, and we provide the acceleration range in which this effect is expected to be experimentally observable.

  13. Studies of porphyrin-containing specimens using an optical spectrometer connected to a confocal scanning laser microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, O; Rokahr, I; Andersson-Engels, S; Carlsson, K

    1994-12-01

    A spectrometer has been developed for use with a confocal scanning laser microscope. With this unit, spectral information from a single point or a user-defined region within the microscope specimen can be recorded. A glass prism is used to disperse the spectral components of the recorded light over a linear CCD photodiode array with 256 elements. A regulated cooling unit keeps the detector at 277 K, thereby allowing integration times of up to 60 s. The spectral resolving power, lambda/delta lambda, ranges from 350 at lambda = 400 nm to 100 at lambda = 700 nm. Since the entrance aperture of the spectrometer has the same size as the detector pinhole used during normal confocal scanning, the three-dimensional spatial resolution is equivalent to that of normal confocal scanning. Light from the specimen is deflected to the spectrometer by a solenoid controlled mirror, allowing fast and easy switching between normal confocal scanning and spectrometer readings. With this equipment, studies of rodent liver specimens containing porphyrins have been made. The subcellular localization is of interest for the mechanisms of photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumours. Spectroscopic detection is necessary to distinguish the porphyrin signal from other fluorescent components in the specimen. Two different substances were administered to the tissue, Photofrin, a haematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and delta-amino levulinic acid (ALA), a precursor to protoporphyrin IX and haem in the haem cycle. Both are substances under clinical trials for PDT of malignant tumours. Following administration of these compounds to the tissue, the potent photosensitizer and fluorescent compound Photofrin, or protoporphyrin IX, respectively, is accumulated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. How large are the consequences of covariate imbalance in cluster randomized trials: a simulation study with a continuous outcome and a binary covariate at the cluster level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerbeek, Mirjam; van Schie, Sander

    2016-07-11

    The number of clusters in a cluster randomized trial is often low. It is therefore likely random assignment of clusters to treatment conditions results in covariate imbalance. There are no studies that quantify the consequences of covariate imbalance in cluster randomized trials on parameter and standard error bias and on power to detect treatment effects. The consequences of covariance imbalance in unadjusted and adjusted linear mixed models are investigated by means of a simulation study. The factors in this study are the degree of imbalance, the covariate effect size, the cluster size and the intraclass correlation coefficient. The covariate is binary and measured at the cluster level; the outcome is continuous and measured at the individual level. The results show covariate imbalance results in negligible parameter bias and small standard error bias in adjusted linear mixed models. Ignoring the possibility of covariate imbalance while calculating the sample size at the cluster level may result in a loss in power of at most 25 % in the adjusted linear mixed model. The results are more severe for the unadjusted linear mixed model: parameter biases up to 100 % and standard error biases up to 200 % may be observed. Power levels based on the unadjusted linear mixed model are often too low. The consequences are most severe for large clusters and/or small intraclass correlation coefficients since then the required number of clusters to achieve a desired power level is smallest. The possibility of covariate imbalance should be taken into account while calculating the sample size of a cluster randomized trial. Otherwise more sophisticated methods to randomize clusters to treatments should be used, such as stratification or balance algorithms. All relevant covariates should be carefully identified, be actually measured and included in the statistical model to avoid severe levels of parameter and standard error bias and insufficient power levels.

  15. Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscope for the Study of Polymer-Nanotube Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, David

    2000-01-01

    ... optical properties in comparison to the intrinsic polymers Recent absorption and luminescence studies of carbon nanotube composites based on electro-optic polymer hosts such as MEH-PPV, have revealed...

  16. Clonal expansion under the microscope: studying lymphocyte activation and differentiation using live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonsky, Michal; Chain, Benjamin; Friedman, Nir

    2016-03-01

    Clonal expansion of lymphocytes is a hallmark of vertebrate adaptive immunity. A small number of precursor cells that recognize a specific antigen proliferate into expanded clones, differentiate and acquire various effector and memory phenotypes, which promote effective immune responses. Recent studies establish a large degree of heterogeneity in the level of expansion and in cell state between and within expanding clones. Studying these processes in vivo, while providing insightful information on the level of heterogeneity, is challenging due to the complex microenvironment and the inability to continuously track individual cells over extended periods of time. Live cell imaging of ex vivo cultures within micro fabricated arrays provides an attractive methodology for studying clonal expansion. These experiments facilitate continuous acquisition of a large number of parameters on cell number, proliferation, death and differentiation state, with single-cell resolution on thousands of expanding clones that grow within controlled environments. Such data can reveal stochastic and instructive mechanisms that contribute to observed heterogeneity and elucidate the sequential order of differentiation events. Intercellular interactions can also be studied within these arrays by following responses of a controlled number of interacting cells, all trapped within the same microwell. Here we describe implementations of live-cell imaging within microwell arrays for studies of lymphocyte clonal expansion, portray insights already gained from these experiments and outline directions for future research. These tools, together with in vivo experiments tracking single-cell responses, will expand our understanding of adaptive immunity and the ways by which it can be manipulated.

  17. Literature survey on microscopic friction modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand contact and friction conditions, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed in order to take microscopic dependencies into account. Friction is developed on microscopic level by adhesion between contacting asperities, the ploughing effect between asperities and the

  18. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Microscopic Simulations of Complex Hydrodynamic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Holian, Brad

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of a NATO Advanced Study Institute which was held in Alghero, Sardinia, in July 1991. The development of computers in the recent years has lead to the emergence of unconventional ideas aiming at solving old problems. Among these, the possibility of computing directly fluid flows from the trajectories of constituent particles has been much exploited in the last few years: lattice gases cellular automata and more generally Molecular Dynamics have been used to reproduce and study complex flows. Whether or not these methods may someday compete with more traditional approaches is a question which cannot be answered at the present time: it will depend on the new computer architectures as well as on the possibility to develop very simple models to reproduce the most complex phenomena taking place in the approach of fully developed turbulence or plastic flows. In any event, these molecular methods are already used, and sometimes in an applied engineering context, to study strong s...

  19. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  20. Theoretical modelling of semiconductor surfaces microscopic studies of electrons and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, G P

    1999-01-01

    The state-of-the-art theoretical studies of ground state properties, electronic states and atomic vibrations for bulk semiconductors and their surfaces by the application of the pseudopotential method are discussed. Studies of bulk and surface phonon modes have been extended by the application of the phenomenological bond charge model. The coverage of the material, especially of the rapidly growing and technologically important topics of surface reconstruction and chemisorption, is up-to-date and beyond what is currently available in book form. Although theoretical in nature, the book provides

  1. Alcoholic liver injury: defenestration in noncirrhotic livers--a scanning electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Christoffersen, P; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1987-01-01

    The fenestration of hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells in 15 needle biopsies obtained from chronic alcoholics without cirrhosis was studied by scanning electron microscopy. As compared to nonalcoholics, a significant reduction in the number of fenestrae and porosity of the sinusoidal lining wall...... (fractional area of fenestrae) was observed in acinar Zone 3, both in biopsies with and without Zone 3 fibrosis as judged by light microscopy. A significant reduction of porosity as shown in this study may influence the blood hepatocytic exchange and contribute to the alcohol-induced liver injury....

  2. An electron microscopic study of clinical Paget's disease of the nipple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, H; Osther, P J; Nielsen, E H

    1995-01-01

    An ultrastructural study of the epidermis from eight patients with clinical Paget's disease of the nipple supports the epidermotropic theory. There was no evidence that the Paget's cells originated from keratinocytes. We propose the hypothesis that Paget's cells represent transformed ductal cells...

  3. An electron-microscope study of alpha to gamma transformation in an iron-nickel alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobodyuk, V. A.; Khandros, L. G.; Fedas, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures used to study the alpha to gamma conversion in thin foils of an iron alloy with 32% nickel concentration and initial martensite conversion temperature of -60 C are described. Photomicrographs show deformation twinning as well as changes in samples after they were heated. Reverse conversion is discussed and results are examined.

  4. Microscopic insight in the study of yrast bands in selenium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the rotational-like energy spacings of the yrast states with I≥6. ... even–even selenium isotopes, the study of structure of high spin states through mea- ... calculations with this model can achieve a comparable quality to the large-scale ... model in that the PSM uses the angular momentum projected states as the basis.

  5. Microscopic study of positive-parity yrast bands of Th isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tor arrays. Thorium is one of the isotopic mass chains that has been studied. The level ... the valence space and np-interaction in SOP orbits plays a crucial role in determining the ..... parameters suggested by Rozmej [37] in the actinide region.

  6. Lane changing and speed interaction on freeways : An analytical microscopic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyvan Ekbatani, M.; Grebert, V.; Daamen, W.; Knoop, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of lane changing manoeuvre on the capacity, stability, and breakdown of traffic flows is a crucial issue. In a recent study, four distinct lane change strategies on freeways have been empirically found: (1) Speed Leading; (2) Speed Leading with Overtaking; (3) Lane

  7. Variable temperature superconducting microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Yeh, W. J.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed and tested a promising type of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) microscope, which can be used to detect vortex motion and can operate in magnetic fields over a large temperature range. The system utilizes a single-loop coupling transformer, consisting of a patterned high Tc superconducting thin film. At one end of the transformer, a 20 μm diam detecting loop is placed close to the sample. At the other end, a large loop is coupled to a NbTi coil, which is connected to a low Tc SQUID sensor. Transformers in a variety of sizes have been tested and calibrated. The results show that the system is capable of detecting the motion of a single vortex. We have used the microscope to study the behavior of moving vortices at various positions in a YBa2Cu3O7 thin film bridge.

  8. Light and electron microscopic study of Pelomyxa binucleata (Gruber, 1884) (Peloflagellatea, Pelobiontida)

    OpenAIRE

    Frolov, Alexander; Chystjakova, Ludmila; Goodkov, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Morphology of a pelobiont Pelomyxa binucleata (Gruber, 1884) has been studied using light and electron microscopy. The organisation of P. binucleata has been shown to differ from that of P. palustris, P. prima and P. corona. The cell surface of P. binucleata is represented by the plasma membrane with a thin but distinct layer of non structured glycocalyx. The ectoplasm, containing a network of fine fibrils, is separated from the endoplasm with a boundary layer of cisterns and reticulum channe...

  9. A microscopic study of the S band in the generator co-ordinate approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, E.; Ansari, A.

    1985-04-01

    Using particle number and spin projected cranked Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov (CHFB) wave functions in the generator co-ordinate method (GCM) with the cranking frequency as a GC the shortcomings of the usual CHFB theory are removed and the ground as well as the s band are studied simultaneously. In particular, low-spin properties of the s band are discussed for a backbending nucleus 158 Dy. (author)

  10. Microscopic study of differentiation of the facial skin in Ghezel sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hejazi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this Study is determination of histogenesis of the facial skin in ghezel sheep. The study was in the form of descriptive observation conducted on 100 male sheep fetuses which were collected randomly from pregnant ewes at Tabriz abbatoine. The length of the collected fetuses were measured and their age calculated by the formula X= 2.1(Y+17 to be between 40 to 130 days old. Following fixation of the fetuses in 10% buffered formalin samples were separated from the face region having individual and tactile hair follicles. They were studied histologically after the histotechnique and H&E staining procedures. In initial stages of facial skin development, the epidermal layer consisted of a row of cuboidal cells (basal layer covered by a row of squamus cells, the periderm. At the 8th week of gestation the intermediate layer was formed by multiplication of germinal layer cells which was converted to spinosus cell layer at the 14th week of gestation. The skin was cornified at the last trimester of gestation. Formation of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands began at the 9th week of gestation. Sebaceous and sweat glands formed from primary hair follicles and the appearance of myoepithelial cells coincides with the formation of sweet glands. Unlike other mammals in which hair follicle grows obliquely, vertical growth of hair follicle was observed in sheep. It was concluded that the 13th week of gestation is a critical period in the appearance of most ovine fetal akin structures as mellanocytes, myoepithelial cells, sebaceous and sweet glands appear at this time. Based on the results of the present study, the developmental pattern of sheep embryonic skin is similar to that observed in man and other mammals.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopic Study of the Lingual Papillae in the Anatolian Water Buffalo

    OpenAIRE

    Can, M; Atalgin, S. H

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the surface structure of the lingual papillae in Anatolian Water Buffaloes using SEM. Six male Anatolian Water Buffaloes were used. Filiform, lentiform and conical papillae were determined three types as mechanical papillae. Fungiform and vallate papillae were observed two types as gustatory papillae on the tongue in Anatolian Water Buffalo. The filiform papillae were observed on the apex and body of the tongue, besides randomly identified lateral sur...

  12. Analytical electron microscope study of the omega phase transformation in a zirconium-niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The study of the as-quenched omega phase morphology shows that the domain size of Zr-15% Nb is on the order of 30 A. No alignment of omega domains along β directions was observed and samples having undergone thermal cycling in thin foil form, did not develop a long-period structure of alternating β and ω phases below the omega transformation temperature

  13. Study on the lithium compound clusters using laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Keiichi

    2001-01-01

    Lithium-rich nonstoichiometric binary clusters including hyperlithiated molecules were found to be produced by a nanosecond laser ablation of lithium metal or compound target. Structural information on Li 3 O was obtained for the first time from experiments by measuring and analyzing photoionization efficiency curves of mass-selected ions. For example, the structure of Li 3 O was concluded to have both D 3h and C 2v symmetry. In other words, the vibrational wavefunction even at the ground state spreads over the C 2v and D 3h minima, which has been predicted as the global minimum in the latest theoretical calculations. Also, this is the first experimental evidence for electronomers'. (author)

  14. Microscopic study on the carrier distribution in optoelectronic device structures: experiment and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenchao; Xia, Hui; Wang, Shaowei; Deng, Honghai; Wei, Peng; Li, Lu; Liu, Fengqi; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Tianxin

    2011-12-01

    Scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and scanning spreading resistance microscopy (SSRM) both are capable of mapping the 2-demensional carrier distribution in semiconductor device structures, which is essential in determining their electrical and optoelectronic performances. In this work, cross-sectional SCM1,2 is used to study the InGaAs/InP P-i-N junctions prepared by area-selective p-type diffusion. The diffusion lengths in the depth as well as the lateral directions are obtained for junctions under different window sizes in mask, which imply that narrow windows may result in shallow p-n junctions. The analysis is beneficial to design and fabricate focal plane array of near infrared photodetectors with high duty-cycle and quantum efficiency. On the other hand, SSRM provides unparalleled spatial resolution (demanded for studying low-dimensional structures. However, to derive the carrier density from the measured local conductance in individual quantum structures, reliable model for SSRM is necessary but still not well established. Based on the carrier concentration related transport mechanisms, i.e. thermionic emission and thermionic field emission4,5, we developed a numerical model for the tip-sample Schottky contact4. The calculation is confronted with SSRM study on the dose-calibrated quantum wells (QWs).

  15. A study of surface diffusion with the scanning tunneling microscope from fluctuations of the tunneling current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, Lozano [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1996-01-12

    The transport of atoms or molecules over surfaces has been an important area of study for several decades now, with its progress generally limited by the available experimental techniques to characterize the phenomena. A number of methods have been developed over the years to measure surface diffusion yet only very few systems have been characterized to this day mainly due to the physical limitations inherent in these available methods. Even the STM with its astonishing atomically-resolved images of the surface has been limited in terms of its capability to determine mass transport properties. This is because the STM is inherently a ``slow`` instrument, i.e., a finite time is needed for signal averaging in order to produce the image. A need exists for additional surface diffusion measurement techniques, ideally ones which are able to study varied systems and measure a wide range of diffusion rates. The STM (especially because of its highly local nature) presents itself as a promising tool to conduct dynamical studies if its poor time resolution during ``normal operation`` can somehow be overcome. The purpose of this dissertation is to introduce a new technique of using the STM to measure adatom mobility on surfaces -- one with a capacity to achieve excellent time resolution.

  16. Mobile microscope complex GIB-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, A.V.; Gorbachev, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    To study microstructure in operating pipelines of power units a mobile microscope system is developed and successfully used. The system includes a portable microscope, a monitor, power supply and a portable computer. The monitor is used for surveying images from a video camera mounted on the microscope. The magnification on visual examination constitutes x 100 and x 500. Diameters of pipelines examined should not be less than 130 mm. Surface preparation for microstructural studies includes routine mechanical rough grinding and polishing with subsequent etching [ru

  17. NMR study of spin dynamics in mesoscopic molecular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsa, Ferdinando

    1998-03-01

    Recent published and umpublished work regarding the magnetic properties and the spin dynamics of molecules containing rings of 6,8 and 10 spins and of molecules containing clusters of 8 and 12 spins are reviewed. The 1H nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate (NSLR) and the Muon Spin Resonance relaxation in Mn12 (A.Lascialfari, D.Gatteschi, F.Borsa, A.Shastri, Z.H.Jang and P.Carretta, Phys.Rev. B 1 January 1998) and Fe8 clusters are presented and discussed with regards to the high temperature spin dynamics of the Mn (Fe) magnetic moments and with regards to the low temperature superparamagnetic behavior. 1H and 63Cu NMR results are presented for two "quantum" spin rings : Cu6 and Cu8. The Cu6 is a weakly coupled (J/k=60K) ferromagnetic S=1/2 spin ring while Cu8 is a strongly coupled (J/k greater than 400K) antiferromagnetic S=1/2 spin ring.The dependence of the NSRL from temperature and from applied magnetic field are analyzed in terms of the calculated magnetic energy levels of the magnetic ring. The values of the energy gap between the ground state and the first excited state are extracted from the exponential decrease of the NSLR as the temperature is lowered. The results in the Cu ( S=1/2) "quantum" rings are compared with the results in "quantum" chains and ladders and with the results in "classical" Fe (S=5/2) antiferromagnetic rings : Fe6 and Fe10 (A.Lascialfari, D.Gatteschi, F.Borsa and A.Cornia , Phys.Rev. 55B,14341,1997) ).

  18. A microscopic study of giant resonances in nuclei near drip lines

    CERN Document Server

    Sagawa, H; Zhang, X Z

    1999-01-01

    We study giant resonances using the self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculation plus the random phase approximation with Skyrme interactions. Including simultaneously both the isoscalar and the isovector correlation the RPA response function is calculated in the coordinate space so as to take properly into account the continuum effect. Giant monopole states are discussed in relation with the nuclear compression modulus of the nuclear matter K sub n sub m. The core polarization charges are also discussed in comparison with recent empirical data in sup 1 sup 0 sup 0 Sn region.

  19. A scanning electron microscopic study of impala (Aepyceros melampus sperm from the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Ackerman

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Since knowledge of sperm morphological characteristics can play an important role in semen evaluation and fertilisation, baseline data on sperm ultrastructure are required. Live spermatozoa were collected from the cauda epididymis from 64 impala rams in the Kruger National Park and 5082 spermatozoa from 40 of these impala were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The mean length of impala sperm was 59.23 @ 2.7 um. The morphology of normal sperm as well as the occurrence of abnormalities were documented. The morphology of impala sperm were compared with those of other mammals. New findings on appendages of the cytoplasmic droplet are described and interpreted.

  20. Laboratory study of the radioactivity from fission products in microscopic fallout particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.A.; Ward, T.E.; Wesick, J.

    1978-01-01

    An experiment is described wherein simple γ-ray detection and analysis techniques were utilized to study the radioactivity in local precipitation. Gamma spectra from filtered particulate, evaporation residue, and water from a sample of freshly fallen snow were counted, and the relative amount of several radionuclides present were identified. These data show that several isotopes produced in the recent Chinese nuclear detonation (Lop Nor testing ground, Sinkiang Province, 17 November 1976) are observable. Furthermore the data are sufficient to estimate the date of the detonation and to determine some of the characteristics of the explosion

  1. Oriented collision between 15B and 12C studied within Glauber model using microscopically calculated densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vishal; Modi, Swati; Arumugam, P.

    2017-01-01

    Recent advancements in accelerator technology and polarized beams have created opportunities to study oriented collisions of deformed targets. We extend the Glauber model to calculate the interaction cross section for a spherical projectile and a deformed target at different orientation angles of the target. It has been found that the observed reaction cross sections of various systems at high energies can be reproduced with this model. We have used the relativistic mean field (RMF) theory to find the density distribution of nucleons in the projectile and target which are utilised in the Glauber model. We present the variation of interaction cross section of target and projectile with the orientation of deformed target

  2. A transmission electron microscopic study of impala (Aepyceros melampus sperm from the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.J. Ackerman

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Since knowledge of sperm morphology can play an important role in semen evaluation and fertilisation, baseline data are required. Live spermatozoa were collected from the cauda epididymis of 64 impala rams in the Kruger National Park and studied by trans- mission electron microscopy. The morphology of normal sperm was documented. The impala sperm shares characteristics with other members of the Bovidae. The occurrence of appendages on the cytoplasmic droplet of the flagellum of impala sperm is described for the first time. A total of 31 micrographs, showing typical features of impala sperm, in sections through various planes of the sperm, are presented.

  3. The Tubular Penetration Depth and Adaption of Four Sealers: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The tubular penetration and adaptation of the sealer are important factors for successful root canal filling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tubular penetration depth of four different sealers in the coronal, middle, and apical third of root canals as well as the adaptation of these sealers to root canal walls. Materials and Methods. 50 single-rooted teeth were prepared in this study. Forty-eight of them were filled with different sealers (Cortisomol, iRoot SP, AH-Plus, and RealSeal SE and respective core filling materials. Then the specimens were sectioned and scanning electron microscopy was employed to assess the tubular penetration and adaptation of the sealers. Results. Our results demonstrated that the maximum penetration was exhibited by RealSeal SE, followed by AH-Plus, iRoot SP, and Cortisomol. As regards the adaptation property to root canal walls, AH-Plus has best adaptation capacity followed by iRoot SP, RealSeal SE, and Cortisomol. Conclusion. The tubular penetration and adaptation vary with the different sealers investigated. RealSeal SE showed the most optimal tubular penetration, whereas AH-Plus presented the best adaptation to the root canal walls.

  4. Ciliary body toxicities of systemic oxcarbazepine and valproic acid treatments: electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göktaş, Güleser; Aktaş, Zeynep; Erdoğan, Deniz; Seymen, Cemile Merve; Karaca, Emine Esra; Cansu, Ali; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe; Kaplanoğlu, Gülnur Take

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary body is responsible for humour aqueous production in posterior chamber. Valproic acid (VPA) has been widely used for the treatment of epilepsy and other neuropsychiatric diseases such as bipolar disease and major depression. Oxcarbazepine (OXC) is a new anti-epileptic agent that has been used recently for childhood epilepsies such as VPA. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of VPA and OXC treatments used as antiepileptic in ciliary body by electron microscopy. In our study, 40 Wistar rats (21 days old) were divided equally into four groups which were applied saline (group 1), VPA (group 2), OXC (group 3) and VPA + OXC (group 4). The as-prepared ocular tissues were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technique in scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM-TEM) (Carl Zeiss EVO LS10). The results confirmed that VPA caused dense ciliary body degeneration. Additionally, ciliary body degeneration in group 4 was supposed to be due to VPA treatment. Ciliary body damage and secondary outcomes should be considered in patients with long-term VPA therapy.

  5. Comparison of different retreatment techniques and root canal sealers: a scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Simsek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of two retreatment techniques, in terms of the operating time and scanning electron microscopy (SEM results, in removing three different root canal sealers from root canals that were previously filled with gutta-percha. Sixty extracted single-rooted human premolars were divided into three groups and filled with iRoot SP, MM Seal, and AH Plus sealers, along with gutta-percha, through a lateral compaction technique. Root canal fillings of the samples were removed by ESI ultrasonic tips or R-Endo files. The time to reach the working length was recorded. Longitudinally sectioned samples were examined under SEM magnification. Each picture was evaluated in terms of the residual debris. Data were statistically analyzed with the Kruskall-Wallis test. No statistically significant differences were found in terms of operating time (p>0.05. Significant differences in the number of debris-free dentinal tubules were found among the root canal thirds, but this finding was not influenced by the experimental group (p < 0.05. Resin sealer tags were observed inside the dentinal tubules in the MM Seal group. Under the conditions of this study, it may be established that there was no difference among the sealers and retreatment techniques.

  6. Scanning electron microscopical study of the lingual epithelium of green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, F; Latella, G; Montalbano, G; Guerrera, M C; Levanti, M B; Ciriaco, E

    2008-08-01

    During the last few years, green iguanas (Iguana iguana) have turned out to be one of the most popular pets. They are omnivorous. In their way of feeding, this crucial function is performed by capturing of the preys and mostly, this is carried out by the tongue. The role of the tongue is also fundamental during the intra-oral transport and during the swallowing of food. This has been reported in several studies about chameleons, agamids and iguanids, nevertheless published data about the mechanisms of capturing and swallowing the prey, and the morphological descriptions about the tongue epithelium, are scarce. Therefore, the aim of this present study was to analyse the morphology of the lingual epithelium in green iguanas by scanning electron microscopy. Three different areas were demonstrated on the tongue surface: the tongue tip, characterized by a smooth epithelium without papillae, a foretongue, completely covered by numerous closely packed cylindriform papillae, and a hindtongue with conical-like papillae. Some taste buds were recognized on the middle and the posterior parts of the tongue. Different functional roles could be hypothesized for the three tongue areas: the tongue tip could have a role related to the movements of the prey immediately after the capturing, while the middle papillae and the hindtongue could have an important role concerning the swallowing phase.

  7. Silver deposition in the central nervous system and the hematoencephalic barrier studied with the electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN BREEMEN, V L; CLEMENTE, C D

    1955-03-01

    For the purpose of studying the hematoencephalic barrier as it is concerned with silver circulating in the blood stream, silver nitrate was vitally administered to rats in their drinking water over periods of 6 to 8 months. The cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla, area postrema, and choroid plexus were prepared for light and electron microscopy. Silver deposition was found in the perivascular spaces in the choroid plexus, area postrema, in the medulla surrounding the area postrema, and in minute quantities in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and most of the medulla. Two levels of the hematoencephalic barrier were apparently demonstrated in our investigations. The endothelial linings of the vessels in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla constitute the first threshold of the hematoencephalic barrier (specifically here, blood-brain barrier). The cell membranes adjacent to the perivascular spaces form the second threshold, as follows:-the neuroglial cell membranes in the cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla (blood-brain barrier); the membranes of the neuroglial cells in the area postrema (blood-brain barrier); and the membranes of the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus (blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier). This study deals with silver deposition and does not infer that the penetration of ionic silver, if present in the blood stream, would necessarily be limited to the regions described. Bleb-like structures were observed to cover the epithelial cell surfaces in the choroid plexus. They may be cellular projections increasing the cell surface area or they may be secretory droplets.

  8. Real-time studies of battery electrochemical reactions inside a transmission electron microscope.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Kevin; Hudak, Nicholas S.; Liu, Yang; Liu, Xiaohua H.; Fan, Hongyou; Subramanian, Arunkumar; Shaw, Michael J.; Sullivan, John Patrick; Huang, Jian Yu

    2012-01-01

    We report the development of new experimental capabilities and ab initio modeling for real-time studies of Li-ion battery electrochemical reactions. We developed three capabilities for in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies: a capability that uses a nanomanipulator inside the TEM to assemble electrochemical cells with ionic liquid or solid state electrolytes, a capability that uses on-chip assembly of battery components on to TEM-compatible multi-electrode arrays, and a capability that uses a TEM-compatible sealed electrochemical cell that we developed for performing in-situ TEM using volatile battery electrolytes. These capabilities were used to understand lithiation mechanisms in nanoscale battery materials, including SnO{sub 2}, Si, Ge, Al, ZnO, and MnO{sub 2}. The modeling approaches used ab initio molecular dynamics to understand early stages of ethylene carbonate reduction on lithiated-graphite and lithium surfaces and constrained density functional theory to understand ethylene carbonate reduction on passivated electrode surfaces.

  9. Studies of the macroscopic and microscopic morphology (hippocampus of brain in Vencobb broiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Kumar Gupta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to study the anatomy of different parts of brain and histology of hippocampus of Vencobb broiler chicken. Materials and Methods: A 12 adult experimental birds were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. After separation of the brain, gross anatomy features were studied. Brain tissue was fixed in 10% buffered neutral formalin for 2-3 days, and then routine dehydration process in ascending grades of ethyl alcohol was done. After xylene cleaning, paraffin impregnation was prepared. Paraffin blocks were cut, and slides were stained by Harris hematoxylin and eosin. Photography was carried out both under lower (×10 and higher (×40 magnifications. Results: The brain structure (dorsal view of Vencobb bird resembled the outline of a playing card symbol of a “spade.” The brain subdivisions are cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata. Cerebrum was devoid of usual convolutions (elevations, gyri, depressions (grooves, and sulci. The cerebral hemispheres were tightly apposed along a median sulcus called interhemispheric fissure and cerebrum and cerebellum were separated by a small transverse fissure. The olfactory bulb was small structures, and the pineal body was clearly visible. The optic lobes were partially hidden under cerebral hemispheres, but laterally, it was large, prominent rounded or spherical bodies of the midbrain. The hippocampal area appeared as dorso-medial protrusion. Different types of neurons were distinguished in the hippocampus were pyramidal neurons, pyramidal-like neurons, and multipolar neurons, etc. There was rich vascularization in the form of blood capillaries throughout the hippocampus. Conclusion: Cerebrum was pear shaped and largest part of the brain. Cerebrum hemisphere was smooth devoid of convolutions, gyri, and depressions, but in the surface of cerebellum, there was the presence of a number of transverse depression (grooves and sulci subdividing into many folds. Olfactory bulb was poorly

  10. Studies of the macroscopic and microscopic morphology (hippocampus) of brain in Vencobb broiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shailesh Kumar; Behera, Kumaresh; Pradhan, C. R.; Mandal, Arun Kumar; Sethy, Kamdev; Behera, Dayanidhi; Shinde, Kuladip Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to study the anatomy of different parts of brain and histology of hippocampus of Vencobb broiler chicken. Materials and Methods: A 12 adult experimental birds were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. After separation of the brain, gross anatomy features were studied. Brain tissue was fixed in 10% buffered neutral formalin for 2-3 days, and then routine dehydration process in ascending grades of ethyl alcohol was done. After xylene cleaning, paraffin impregnation was prepared. Paraffin blocks were cut, and slides were stained by Harris hematoxylin and eosin. Photography was carried out both under lower (×10) and higher (×40) magnifications. Results: The brain structure (dorsal view) of Vencobb bird resembled the outline of a playing card symbol of a “spade.” The brain subdivisions are cerebrum, cerebellum, and medulla oblongata. Cerebrum was devoid of usual convolutions (elevations), gyri, depressions (grooves), and sulci. The cerebral hemispheres were tightly apposed along a median sulcus called interhemispheric fissure and cerebrum and cerebellum were separated by a small transverse fissure. The olfactory bulb was small structures, and the pineal body was clearly visible. The optic lobes were partially hidden under cerebral hemispheres, but laterally, it was large, prominent rounded or spherical bodies of the midbrain. The hippocampal area appeared as dorso-medial protrusion. Different types of neurons were distinguished in the hippocampus were pyramidal neurons, pyramidal-like neurons, and multipolar neurons, etc. There was rich vascularization in the form of blood capillaries throughout the hippocampus. Conclusion: Cerebrum was pear shaped and largest part of the brain. Cerebrum hemisphere was smooth devoid of convolutions, gyri, and depressions, but in the surface of cerebellum, there was the presence of a number of transverse depression (grooves) and sulci subdividing into many folds. Olfactory bulb was poorly developed

  11. A morphological study of molecularly imprinted polymers using the scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua Gonzalez, Gema; Fernandez Hernando, Pilar; Durand Alegria, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is an emerging technique for producing polymers with applications in affinity-based separation, in biomimetic sensors, in catalysis, etc. This variety of uses relies upon the production of polymers with different affinities, specificities, sensitivities and loading capacities. Research into the development of molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with new or improved morphologies - which involves modification of the polymerisation process - is therefore underway. This paper reports a comparative study of non-covalent MIPs synthesised by 'bulk' polymerisation using digoxin as template. These were synthesised under different conditions, i.e., changing the functional monomers employed (methacrylic acid or 2-vinylpyridine), the porogens (acetonitrile or dichloromethane) used, and by altering the volume of the latter. The polymerisation process was allowed to proceed either under UV light or in a thermostat-controlled waterbath. The surface morphology (was determined by scanning electron microscopy) and the ability of the different polymers to selectively rebind the template was then evaluated

  12. Origin of transverse momentum in relativistic heavy-ion collisions: Microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaettel, B.; Koch, V.; Lang, A.; Weber, K.; Cassing, W.; Mosel, U.

    1991-01-01

    We study the origin of the transverse momentum distribution in heavy-ion collisions within a relativistic transport approach. To achieve a better understanding of the reaction dynamics, we decompose the total p t distribution into a mean-field, N-N collision, and Fermi-momentum part. We find that the origin of the transverse momentum strongly depends on the rapidity region. Our investigation of the impact-parameter and mass dependence suggests that peripheral collisions may be useful to investigate the momentum dependence of the mean-field in the nucleus-nucleus case, whereas the mass dependence could give hints about the N-N-collision part. Only after these two issues are settled it may be possible to extract information about the density dependence in central collisions, which may, however, necessitate reactions at even higher energies than the 800 MeV/nucleon considered in this work

  13. Matrix mineralogy of the Lance CO3 carbonaceous chondrite - A transmission electron microscope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Buseck, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on electron microprobe analyses of three CO chondrites, all of which are falls: Lance, Kainsaz, and Warrenton. The TEM mineralogy results of Lance chondrite show that Fe-rich matrix olivines have been altered to Fe-bearing serpentine and Fe(3+) oxide; matrix metal was also altered to produce Fe(3+) oxides, leaving the residual metal enriched in Ni. Olivine grains in Lance's matrix contain channels along their 100-line and 001-line directions; the formation and convergence of such channels resulted in a grain-size reduction of the olivine. A study of Kainsaz and Warrenton showed that these meteorites do not contain phyllosilicates in their matrices, although both contain Fe(3+) oxide between olivine grains. It is suggested that, prior to its alteration, Lance probably resembled Kainsaz, an unaltered CO3 chondrite.

  14. Studying antimicrobial-induced morphostructural damage of bacteria by Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Shukla

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM method was used to examine the morphostructural changes in bacterial cells induced by antimicrobial agents. SEM-based visual approach is referred the study of bacterial cells and their physiological consequences when affected by antibiotics or antibacterial agents permitting the observation of characteristic morphological defects of cell wall, and provides valuable insights into processes involved in bacterial cell death. This experiment visualized various step-by-step techniques used in the slide preparation of bacterial cells treated with specific antimicrobial agent for analyzing the morphological alterations such as increase of cell wall roughness, cell disruption, cell swelling and lysed cell formation due to loss of intracellular material using SEM analysis when compared with untreated normal cells as a control. The SEM approach used in this visual experiment may analyze the antimicrobial effect of any commercially known or new compounds in a very conducive manner.

  15. Electron microscope studies of methotrexate and radiation effects in human squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Martino, C.

    1974-01-01

    Serial biopsy specimens from two squamous cell carcinomas of the mouth were studied by electron microscopy. This report described the ultrastructural changes in the cells produced by treatment with methotrexate followed by irradiation. The main ultrastructural findings after treatment are: numerous autophagic lysosomes and residual bodies are visible in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells; mitochondria are swollen. The mitochondrial cristae are distorted and disrupted, and mitochondrial matrix disappears; the nucleolus shows a series of morphological changes such as development of a compact nucleolus, aggregation of granular elements, atrophy, dissolution and fragmentation of the nucleolar mass; infiltration of lymphocytes, granulocytes and macrophages in the tumor. The significance of these ultrastructural findings is discussed. (U.S.)

  16. Microscopic study of (p, γ) reactions in mass region A = 110-125

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Dipti; Dutta, Saumi; Gangopadhyay, G.; Bhattacharyya, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    To calculate the actual abundance of different nuclei and evolution of the process, a network calculation is needed involving reaction rates for a large number of nuclei. Thus we need to know the interaction potential. As the p-process proceeds along proton rich side of the stability valley, it involves many nuclei which are unstable and inaccessible as targets on earth to do experiments. So theory remains the sole guide to gather information about the reactions. Presently, we are concerned about the nuclei in the mass region A = 110-125. It is imperative to test the theoretical calculations, where experimental data are available, to verify its applicability before extending it to unknown regions. Thus reactions for stable targets in the mass region have been studied in the present work

  17. Descriptive, cytochemical and autoradiographic data on the paranucleolar mass. Electron microscopic study in several Lacertilians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Jean

    1975-01-01

    In several Lacertilians, a nuclear fibrillar area, called paranucleolar mass in previous works, is a constant cytological feature of germ cells and certain somatic cells. This nuclear area shows many similarities with the nuclear area called in different animals nuclear vacuole, paranucleolar vacuole or light area. The ultrastructure and development of the paranucleolar mass is described. The cytochemical study indicates that it is composed of proteins. The autoradiographic results show that it does not incorporate thymidine 3 H or uridine 3 H, which is in agreement with the lack of DNA and RNA proved with cytochemical procedures. It is rarely labelled with leucine 3 H. This last result which seems to be at variance with the proteinaceous nature of the paranucleolar mass is probably due to our short experimental periods in proportion to the long formation of the paranucleolar mass [fr

  18. An electron microscopic study of intraepithelial nerves of oral mucosa of rats during aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dai Ho; You, Dong Soo

    1984-01-01

    Observation made in this study bring home salient features that may contribute towards a better understanding of the relationship between the available physiologic data and anatomical characteristics of those nerve fibers that penetrate into the intraepithelial space in the oral cavity. The present investigation characterized the fine structure of nerve fibers in oral mucosae with respect to the manner in which presumed sensory fibers enter into the intraepithelial space by penetration of the basal lamina. The conclusions were made little discernible qualitative difference exists between young and old animals, concerning the fine structural characteristics of nerve fibers and nerve endings and in old animals, significant reductions exist in the number of neural elements in the intraepithelial space.

  19. Scanning electron microscopic study of Piper betle L. leaves extract effect against Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Zubaidah Haji Abdul; Thurairajah, Nalina

    2011-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that Piper betle L. leaves extract inhibits the adherence of Streptococcus mutans to glass surface, suggesting its potential role in controlling dental plaque development. In this study, the effect of the Piper betle L. extract towards S. mutans (with/without sucrose) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and on partially purified cell-associated glucosyltransferase activity were determined. S. mutans were allowed to adhere to glass beads suspended in 6 different Brain Heart Infusion broths [without sucrose; with sucrose; without sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL(-1) and 4 mg mL(-1)); with sucrose containing the extract (2 mg mL(-1) and 4 mg mL(-1))]. Positive control was 0.12% chlorhexidine. The glass beads were later processed for SEM viewing. Cell surface area and appearance and, cell population of S. mutans adhering to the glass beads were determined upon viewing using the SEM. The glucosyltransferase activity (with/without extract) was also determined. One- and two-way ANOVA were used accordingly. It was found that sucrose increased adherence and cell surface area of S. mutans (pPiper betle L. leaves extract. It was also found that the extract inhibited glucosyltransferase activity and its inhibition at 2.5 mg mL(-1) corresponded to that of 0.12% chlorhexidine. At 4 mg mL(-1) of the extract, the glucosyltransferase activity was undetectable and despite that, bacterial cells still demonstrated adherence capacity. The SEM analysis confirmed the inhibitory effects of the Piper betle L. leaves extract towards cell adherence, cell growth and extracellular polysaccharide formation of S. mutans visually. In bacterial cell adherence, other factors besides glucosyltransferase are involved.

  20. A scanning electron microscopic study of the patterns of external root resorption under different conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindran Sreeja

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine if there are qualitative differences in the appearance of external root resorption patterns of primary teeth undergoing physiologic resorption and permanent teeth undergoing pathological root resorption in different conditions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 40 teeth undergoing external root resorption in different conditions were divided into 4 groups and prepared for examination under scanning electron microscopy at magnifications ranging from 20x to 1000x. Group I: 10 primary molars exfoliated due to physiologic root resorption; Group II: 10 permanent teeth with periapical granulomas showing signs of resorption; Group III:10 permanent teeth therapeutically extracted during the course of orthodontic therapy with evidence of resorption, and Group IV: 10 permanent teeth associated with odontogenic tumors that showed evidence of resorption. RESULTS: In Group I, the primary teeth undergoing resorption showed smooth extensive and predominantly regular areas reflecting the slow ongoing physiologic process. In Group II, the teeth with periapical granulomas showed the resorption was localized to apex with a funnel shaped appearance in most cases. Teeth in Group III, which had been subjected to a short period of light orthodontic force, showed the presence of numerous resorption craters with adjoining areas of cemental repair in some cases. Teeth associated with odontogenic tumors in Group IV showed many variations in the patterns of resorption with extensive loss of root length and a sharp cut appearance of the root in most cases. CONCLUSION: Differences were observed in the patterns of external root resorption among the studied groups of primary and permanent teeth under physiologic and pathological conditions.

  1. A dynamic phase microscopic study of optical characteristics of individual chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tychinsky, V P; Kretushev, A V; Vyshenskaya, T V; Tikhonov, A N

    2004-10-11

    Dynamic phase microscopy (DPM) allows the monitoring of optical path difference (or phase height), h(x,y,t) approximately integraln(x,y,z,t)dz, an integral refractive index projection of the medium, n(x,y,z,t), in optically transparent biological specimens at high spatial and temporal resolutions. In this study, DPM was used for the analysis of fluctuations in the optical characteristics of individual bean chloroplasts in various metabolic states. A "phase image" of an individual chloroplast, which represents a three-dimensional plot of the "phase height", was obtained for the first time, and the frequency spectra of the fluctuations of h(x,y,t) were investigated. The fluctuation patterns, i.e., the intensity and the frequency spectra of phase height fluctuations in bean chloroplasts (Class B) were found to depend on their metabolic state. Under conditions of noncyclic (or pseudocyclic) electron transport, the fluctuations displayed characteristic frequencies in the range of 0.25-0.6 Hz and were space-time-correlated in the chloroplast domains with the cross sizes of approximately 2 microm. The fluctuation intensity decreased in the presence of uncouplers (nigericin and valinomycin, 20 microM). A stronger (in comparison with 20 microM valinomycin) effect of 20 microM nigericin suggests that the light-induced generation of the transmembrane pH difference (DeltapH) makes the main contribution to the increment of space-correlated fluctuations of h(x,y,t). Studies of chloroplasts incubated in media of various osmolarity (50-500 mM sucrose) have shown that structural changes in thylakoids are among other factors responsible for phase height fluctuations.

  2. A study of microscopic dose rate distribution of 99Tcm-MIBI in the liver of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingxi; Zhang Liang'an; Wang Yong; Dai Guangfu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: A microdosimetry model was tried to develop an accurate way to evaluate absorbed dose rates in target cell nuclei from radiopharmaceuticals. Methods: Microscopic frozen section autoradiography was used to determine the subcellular locations of 99 Tc m -MIBI relative to the tissue histology in the liver of mice after injection of 99 Tc m -MIBI via tail for two hours, and a mathematical model was developed to evaluate the microscopic dose rates in cell nuclei. The Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema was also used to evaluate the dose rates at the same time, and a comparison of the results of the two methods was conducted to determine which method is better to accurately estimate microscopic dose rates. Results: The spatial distribution of 99 Tc m -MIBI in the liver of mice at subcellular level was not uniform, and the differences between the microdosimetry model and MIRD schema were significant (P 99 Tc m -labeled pharmaceuticals at the microscopic level

  3. Study of laser-imploded core plasmas with an advanced Kirkpatrick endash Baez x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, R.; Shiraga, H.; Miyanaga, M.; Matsushita, T.; Nakai, M.; Azechi, H.; Mima, K.; Kato, Y.

    1997-01-01

    We developed an advanced Kirkpatrick endash Baez (AKB) x-ray microscope which consisted of two hyperbolic mirrors and two elliptic mirrors. The spatial resolution of approx-lt 3 μm was realized over ∼1 mm diam. This AKB microscope was used for x-ray imaging in laser fusion experiments. Laser absorption nonuniformity with a large wave number on a spherical solid target or a plane slab target was estimated by measurements of x-ray emission from the target surface with the microscope. The x-ray images of the imploded core plasmas were also obtained with the AKB microscope, changing the laser focus condition and the laser energy balance. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  4. Analogies in the microscopic behavior of superfluid and classical helium studied by neturon scattering [Analogieen in het microscopische gedrag van superfluid en klassiek helium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crevecoeur, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis we have presented the results of a neutron scattering study of the analogies in the microscopic behavior of superfluid and classical helium. Therefore we performed both neutron-diffraction experiments to study the structure and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to study the

  5. Proceedings of study meeting on microscopic and phenomenological research of interaction for light heavy-ion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Research Center for Nuclear Physics study meeting 'Microscopic and phenomenological research of interaction for light heavy-ion systems was held on March 7-9, 1990 as the study meeting in the second half of 1990, and 25 researchers took part in it. As the background of holding this study meeting, the fact that recently the rainbow scattering due to nuclear force was discovered experimentally in 16 O- 16 O system, and phenomenologically it was explained only by deep inter-nucleus potential. This should be evaluated as an important foothold for the research on the interaction for light heavy-ion systems and nuclear reaction mechanism. Accordingly, most of the papers presented this time were those related to the inter-nucleus potential and nuclear reaction mechanism. Also the development of theoretical analysis method was carried out and reported. Further, recently the experimental study on the structure and reaction of the neutron rich nucleus has advanced, and the theoretical research related to this topic was reported. (K.I.)

  6. Characteristic Study of the Al 6061 T-6 used in RTP Primary Cooling System Using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonny Anak Lanyau; Yusof Abdullah; Tom, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) is the only nuclear research reactor in Malaysia. Since the first criticality on 28th June 1982, RTP has been going through the safe operation and well maintenance. Along the period of operation almost 30 years, some of the reactor system and component has been refurbished, upgraded and replaced to ensure the functionality and safety to the reactor itself as well as to protect personnel and environment. Primary cooling system is to provide the sufficient cooling to the reactor by removal of the heat generated in the reactor core through the heat transfer process in the heat exchanger. In 2009, RTP has been undergoing the primary cooling system upgrades. Primary cooling system components including aluminium pipes has been dismantled and replaced with the new system. As a part of the ageing management programme and radiation damage study, the disposed aluminum pipes were taken and used in this study. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) is used to study the surface topography and elemental composition in conjunction of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. This paper presents the study that has been conducted. (author)

  7. An Electron Microscopic Study of the Irradiation Effects on the Striated Duct Cells of the Submandibular Gland in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of irradiation on the striated duct cells of the rat submandibular gland ductal tissues which control the characteristics of saliva. For this study, the experimental group was composed of 36 irradiated Sprague Dawley strain rats divided into 8 subgroups- 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours after irradiation. 4 non-irradiated rats were used as the control group. The experimental animals were singly irradiated with a dose of 18 Gy gamma ray to their head and neck region by the Co-6-teletherapy unit and sacrificed after each experimental duration. The specimens were examined with a light microscope with an H-E stain and with a transmission electron microscope. The results of this study were as follows. 1. In the light micrograph, a severe atrophic change occurred in the striated duct cells at 2 hours after irradiation and gradual recovery occurred from 6 hours after irradiation. 2. The nuclear chromosomes of the striated duct cells were changed granular at 2 hours after irradiation. Recovery was observed at 6 hours after irradiation. Nuclear bodies were also observed from 3 hours after irradiation. 3. The mitochondria of the striated duct cells had indistinct cristae at 2 hours after irradiation, and were degenerated or swollen at 3 hours after irradiation. They recovered, however, from 6 hours, with an increasing number at 48 hours a regular arrangement was observed at 72 hours after irradiation. 4. The microvilli showed atrophic changes at 2 hours after irradiation and were almost lost at 3 hours after irradiation. They were observed again from 48 hours after irradiation. 5. The rough endoplasmic reticulum and golgi body were not apparent at 1 hours after irradiation and were dilated with degeneration 2 hours after, but intact rough endoplasmic reticulum were observed from 3 hours after irradiation and developed well at 24 hours after irradiation. By the result of this

  8. A spectroscopic and photometric study of MSP companions in Galactic Globular Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Cocozza, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    This Thesis is devoted to the study of the optical companions of Millisecond Pulsars in Galactic Globular Clusters (GCs) as a part of a large project started at the Department of Astronomy of the Bologna University, in collaboration with other institutions (Astronomical Observatory of Cagliari and Bologna, University of Virginia), specifically dedicated to the study of the environmental effects on passive stellar evolution in galactic GCs. Globular Clusters are very efficien...

  9. Arsenic release from arsenopyrite weathering: Insights from sequential extraction and microscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Ankan [Marshall Miller and Associates, Bluefield VA (United States); Department of Geosciences, Virginia Tech, 4044 Derring Hall, Blacksburg VA 24061 (United States); Schreiber, Madeline E., E-mail: mschreib@vt.edu [Department of Geosciences, Virginia Tech, 4044 Derring Hall, Blacksburg VA 24061 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► We studied arsenopyrite weathering reactions in rocks and sediments at mine site. ► Arsenopyrite oxidizes to scorodite, which dissolves incongruently to Fe hydroxide. ► Weathering of arsenopyrite to Fe hydroxide releases As to water. ► Dominant As reservoir in sediment is Fe hydroxide. -- Abstract: At a former As mine site, arsenopyrite oxidation has resulted in formation of scorodite and As-bearing iron hydroxide, both in host rock and mine tailings. Electron microprobe analysis documents that arsenopyrite weathers along two pathways: one that involves formation of sulfur, and one that does not. In both pathways, arsenopyrite oxidizes to form scorodite, which dissolves incongruently to form As-bearing iron hydroxides. From a mass balance perspective, arsenopyrite oxidation to scorodite conserves As, but as scorodite dissolves incongruently to iron hydroxides, As is released to solution, resulting in elevated As concentrations in the headwater stream adjacent to the site. The As-bearing iron hydroxide is the dominant solid phase reservoir of As in mine tailings and stream sediment, as suggested by sequential extraction. This As-bearing iron hydroxide is stable under the aerobic and pH 4–6 conditions at the site; however, changes in biogeochemical conditions resulting from sediment burial or future remedial efforts, which could promote As release from this reservoir due to reductive dissolution, should be avoided.

  10. Arsenic release from arsenopyrite weathering: Insights from sequential extraction and microscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Ankan; Schreiber, Madeline E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We studied arsenopyrite weathering reactions in rocks and sediments at mine site. ► Arsenopyrite oxidizes to scorodite, which dissolves incongruently to Fe hydroxide. ► Weathering of arsenopyrite to Fe hydroxide releases As to water. ► Dominant As reservoir in sediment is Fe hydroxide. -- Abstract: At a former As mine site, arsenopyrite oxidation has resulted in formation of scorodite and As-bearing iron hydroxide, both in host rock and mine tailings. Electron microprobe analysis documents that arsenopyrite weathers along two pathways: one that involves formation of sulfur, and one that does not. In both pathways, arsenopyrite oxidizes to form scorodite, which dissolves incongruently to form As-bearing iron hydroxides. From a mass balance perspective, arsenopyrite oxidation to scorodite conserves As, but as scorodite dissolves incongruently to iron hydroxides, As is released to solution, resulting in elevated As concentrations in the headwater stream adjacent to the site. The As-bearing iron hydroxide is the dominant solid phase reservoir of As in mine tailings and stream sediment, as suggested by sequential extraction. This As-bearing iron hydroxide is stable under the aerobic and pH 4–6 conditions at the site; however, changes in biogeochemical conditions resulting from sediment burial or future remedial efforts, which could promote As release from this reservoir due to reductive dissolution, should be avoided

  11. Batch-wise adsorption, saxs and microscopic studies of zeolite pelletized with biopolymeric alginate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chmielewská

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Removal of nitrates, sulfate and Zn(II ions from aqueous solutions through adsorption onto biopolymeric alginate/clinoptilolite-rich tuff pellets was studied by using an equilibrium batch technique. The idea of this approach of biosorbent fabrication is to promote the native zeolite adsorption performance and thus to prepare more efficient amphoteric tailor-made products for specific environmental targets. A flexible component, i.e., alginate biopolymer, and a rigid component (pulverized zeolite were crosslinked using Fe(III and Ca(II chlorides, additively. The extent of adsorption was found to be considerably higher than with the other mostly natural adsorbents examined towards similar pollutants. The equilibrium adsorption data for the above pollutants were satisfactorily fitted to Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, respectively. According to the linscale SAXS pattern, there was a strong background visible, which may indicate the presence of a considerable amount of biopolymeric phase in the composite samples analysed. Scanning Tunneling, Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies helped visualize their surface texture and morphology.

  12. Electron microscopic study of spontaneous and experimentally induced leukemia in IRC mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, S.; Ranadive, K.J.; Dmochowski, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spontaneous, serially transplanted, and experimentally induced leukemias of ICRC mice were studied by electron microscopy in an attempt to detect the presence of virus particles, if any, and to observe the influence of chemical and hormonal treatment on the presence of these virus particles. The first series of experiments included spontaneous, serially transplanted, and radiation-induced leukemia. The paucity of type C virus particles was quite conspicuous in spontaneous leukemia. Serially transplanted and radiation-accelerated leukemic lesions showed the presence of some type C and intracisternal type A particles. Found in two of these leukemic lesions (thymus and lymphosarcoma), in addition to type C virus particles, were budding and some mature type B virus particles, and numerous intracytoplasmic type A particles. ''Viropexis'' of type B virus particles has been observed in the lymphosarcoma and in a leukemic thymus gland. The second series of experiments included leukemia induced in ovariectomized ICRC mice with 20-methylcholanthrene (MCA), pituitary transplants, and ovarian hormones (estradiol and estradiol-progesterone). In ovariectomized ICRC mice, leukemic lesions induced by MCA or pituitary transplants, or by MCA and pituitary transplants, showed type C virus particles and, in most cases, intracisternal type A particles. In leukemia induced in ovariectomized ICRC mice by MCA and estradiol, numerous intracytoplasmic type A particles were observed but no type C virus particles

  13. A scanning electron microscopic study of smear layer remaining following use of Greater Taper rotary instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the smear layer in the root canal following the use of Ni-Ti hand ProTaper, HERO shaper and Twisted rotary instruments. Fifteen freshly extracted single rooted human mandibular premolar teeth were selected. Crowns of all teeth were cut off at the cemento-enamel junction with a carborundum disc. The roots were then randomly divided into three groups of 5 samples each. The working length of all teeth was established by the insertion of an endodontic instrument into the canal until its tip is visible at the apical foramen and then subtracted by 0.5 mm. A sequential crown down technique was carried out in all the three groups as follows: Group-I- Specimens in this group were instrumented with ProTaper Ni-Ti hand instruments. Group-II- Specimens were instrumented with HERO shapers. Group-III - The specimens in this group were instrumented with Twisted rotary instruments. Irrigation was done with 3% NaOCl and 15% EDTA in all the three groups. Teeth were carefully split with hammer and chisel and stored in small labeled bottles containing normal saline until SEM evaluation. Results showed that when comparing ProTaper files, Twisted rotary instruments and HERO shaper instruments, HERO shaper series of rotary instruments showed maximum amount of smear layer followed by the Twisted rotary instruments. Hand instruments produced least amount of smear layer.

  14. Microscopic theoretical study of Raman spectra in charge and spin ordered cuprate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, B.K.; Panda, S.K.; Rout, G.C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The model calculation treats CDW interaction as pseudogap for cuprates. • The interplay of Raman active CDW-SDW mixed modes are investigated. • Independent CDW and SDW gap values can be determined from experimental data. -- Abstract: Raman scattering is one of the most powerful methods to investigate the electron as well as the phonon excitations in the systems. In this communication, we present a theoretical study of Raman scattering in the normal state of the high-T C systems in the under-doped region displaying the interplay of the spin-density-wave (SDW) and charge-density-wave (CDW) interactions. The SDW order arises from the repulsive Coulomb interaction of electrons, while the CDW order arises due to strong electron–phonon interaction giving rise to Fermi surface instability. We calculate phonon response function in order to examine the possibility of observing the SDW excitation mode in presence of the CDW interaction present in the same conduction band. The Raman scattering intensity is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon Green’s function assigning an arbitrary spectral width. The spectral density function displays two mixed modes of excitation peaks at energies 2(Δ c ± Δ s ). The evolution of excitation peaks are investigated by varying CDW coupling, SDW coupling and the phonon momentum transfer energy

  15. Microscopic theoretical study of Raman spectra in charge and spin ordered cuprate systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, B. K. [Dept. of Physics, Govt. Autonomous College, Angul, Orissa (India); Panda, S. K. [KD Science College, Pochilima, Hinjilicut, 761 101 Ganjam, Orissa (India); Rout, G.C., E-mail: gcr@iopb.res.in [Condensed Matter Physics Group, PG Dept. of Applied Physics and Ballistics, FM University, Balasore 756 019 (India)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • The model calculation treats CDW interaction as pseudogap for cuprates. • The interplay of Raman active CDW-SDW mixed modes are investigated. • Independent CDW and SDW gap values can be determined from experimental data. -- Abstract: Raman scattering is one of the most powerful methods to investigate the electron as well as the phonon excitations in the systems. In this communication, we present a theoretical study of Raman scattering in the normal state of the high-T{sub C} systems in the under-doped region displaying the interplay of the spin-density-wave (SDW) and charge-density-wave (CDW) interactions. The SDW order arises from the repulsive Coulomb interaction of electrons, while the CDW order arises due to strong electron–phonon interaction giving rise to Fermi surface instability. We calculate phonon response function in order to examine the possibility of observing the SDW excitation mode in presence of the CDW interaction present in the same conduction band. The Raman scattering intensity is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon Green’s function assigning an arbitrary spectral width. The spectral density function displays two mixed modes of excitation peaks at energies 2(Δ{sub c} ± Δ{sub s}). The evolution of excitation peaks are investigated by varying CDW coupling, SDW coupling and the phonon momentum transfer energy.

  16. Scanning electron and light microscopic study of microbial succession on bethlehem st. Nectaire cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellino, S N; Benson, D R

    1992-11-01

    St. Nectaire cheese is a semisoft cheese of French origin that, along with Brie and Camembert cheeses, belongs to the class of surface mold-ripened cheese. The surface microorganisms that develop on the cheese rind during ripening impart a distinctive aroma and flavor to this class of cheese. We have documented the sequential appearance of microorganisms on the cheese rind and in the curd over a 60-day ripening period. Scanning electron microscopy was used to visualize the development of surface fungi and bacteria. Light microscopy of stained paraffin sections was used to study cross sections through the rind. We also monitored the development of bacterial and yeast populations in and the pH of the curd and rind. The earliest stage of ripening (0 to 2 days) is dominated by the lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus cremoris and multilateral budding yeasts, primarily Debaryomyces and Torulopsis species. Geotrichum candidum follows closely, and then zygomycetes of the genus Mucor develop at day 4 of ripening. At day 20, the deuteromycete Trichothecium roseum appears. From day 20 until the end of the ripening process, coryneforms of the genera Brevibacterium and Arthrobacter can be seen near the surface of the cheese rind among fungal hyphae and yeast cells.

  17. Subchondral bone failure in overload arthrosis: a scanning electron microscopic study in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrdin, R W; Stover, S M

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical overload leads to a common arthrosis in the metacarpal condyle of the fetlock joint of racehorses. This is usually asymptomatic but severe forms can cause lameness. Subchondral bone failure is often present and the predictability of the site provided an opportunity to study of the progression of bone failure from microcracks to actual collapse of subchondral bone. Twenty-five fetlock condyles from racehorses with various stages of disease were selected. Stages ranged from mild through severe subchondral bone sclerosis, to the collapse of bone and indentation or loss of cartilage known as 'traumatic osteochondrosis'. Parasagittal slices were radiographed and examined with scanning electron microscopy. Fine matrix cracks were seen in the subchondral bone layer above the calcified cartilage and suggested loss of water or other non-collagenous components. The earliest microcracks appeared to develop in the sclerotic bone within 1-3 mm of the calcified cartilage layer and extend parallel to it in irregular branching lines. Longer cracks or microfractures appeared to develop gaps as fragmentation occurred along the margins. Occasional osteoclastic resorption sites along the fracture lines indicated activated remodeling may have caused previous weakening. In one sample, smoothly ground fragments were found in a fracture gap. Bone collapse occurred when there was compaction of the fragmented matrix along the microfracture. Bone collapse and fracture lines through the calcified cartilage were associated with indentation of articular cartilage at the site.

  18. Light microscopic study of periapical lesions associated with asymptomatic apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabak, S L; Kabak, Y S; Anischenko, S L

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of the study has been to evaluate the degree of chronic inflammation in tissues surrounding the apex of the tooth root in patients with apical periodontitis in the remission phase. The material included 37 apical granulomas and radicular cysts obtained as a result of apiectomy, and 20 teeth which were removed together with the focus of the periapical inflammation. Routine histological techniques, as well as the immunofluorescent and immuno-chemical methods were used to examine the material. Despite the absence of clinical symptoms in 23 of 57 cases, the morphological signs of chronic inflammation were observed in the apical area of the tooth root. Morphological signs of viral invasion of epithelial and stromal cells in the radicular cyst wall were revealed in six cases. The presence of the virus of Herpes simplex I in epithelial cells (five cases) and adenoviral invasion (one case) was confirmed by immuno-fluorescent and immuno-chemical methods. Histological examination often reveals morphological signs of an active inflammatory process in the periapical tissues of patients treated during clinical remission. In our opinion, the presence of viruses in the epithelial cells of the radicular cyst may contribute to the persistence of the active stage of the inflammatory process.

  19. Matrix mineralogy of the Lance CO3 carbonaceous chondrite: A transmission electron microscope study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.P.; Buseck, P.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Lance CO3 carbonaceous chondrite (CC) is less altered than the CI and CM chondrites and so provides a view of the mineralogy and textures resulting from the earliest stages of aqueous alteration of CCs. Matrix olivine in Lance has been partly altered to fine-grained, Fe-bearing serpentine and poorly crystalline Fe 3+ oxide, a process that required both hydration and oxidation. Serpentine occurs as discrete packets separated from the olivine surfaces by the Fe 3+ oxide. The Fe released during the dissolution of olivine was partly incorporated into the serpentine; the remainder was oxidized to form Fe 3+ oxide. Matrix metal was also altered to produce Fe oxides, leaving the residual metal enriched in Ni. Olivine grains in Lance matrix contain channels along their [100] and [001] directions. The formation and convergence of such channels resulted in a grain-size reduction of the olivine. The alteration was pervasive but incomplete, suggesting a limited availability of fluid. A brief study of two other CO chondrites, Kainsaz and Warrenton, shows that these meteorites do not contain phyllosilicates in their matrices, although both contain Fe 3+ oxide between olivine grains. Prior to its alteration, Lance probably resembled Kainsaz, an unaltered CO3 chondrite. The alteration assemblage in Lance is only slightly different from that in Mokoia and essentially the same as that in C3 xenoliths from Murchison. Alteration products in Lance show greater similarities to CI than to CM chondrites

  20. Study of the (d,α) reactions on the nuclei 10B, 11B, 12C, and 13C and the reaction 13C(p,α)10B and their microscopic and semicroscopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd el-Kariem, S.E.S.

    1984-01-01

    In the framework of a systematic analysis of many-particle transfer reactions on light nuclei in the present thesis the two-particle transfer reactions of the type (d,α) on the nucleus 10 B at Esub(d) = 16 MeV and on the nuclei 11 B, 12 C and 13 C at Esub(d) = 24 MeV as well as the three-particle transfer reaction 13 C(p,α) 10 B at eight incident energies between 16 and 45 MeV have been studied. In the case of the residual nuclei 10 B and 11 B transitions up to an excitation energy Esub(x) approx.= 7.5 respectively approx.= 9,0 MeV, in the case of the residual nuclei 8 Be and 9 Be transitions up to Esub(x) approx.= 17 respectively 2.5 MeV were evaluated. Under the assumption that the studied reactions behave as direct one-stage transfer processes the measurement results were analyzed in the framework of the DWBA theory in zero-range approximation. The parameters for the optical potentials used in the DWBA calculations were taken from literature and partly modified by fitting to the angular distributions of the reactions studied here. Microscopic and semimicroscopic calculations were performed. In the semimicroscopic calculations the spectroscopic amplitudes calculated microscopically or in SU(3) approximation were used together with a cluster form factor, in the other case with a microscopically calculated form factor. For the residual nucleus for some higher excited states results on spin, parity, and isospin could be partly obtained, partly confirmed. (orig./HSI) [de

  1. Microscopic study on lasing characteristics of the UVSOR storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hama, H. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)]|[Graduate Univ. for Advanced Stuides, Okazaki (Japan); Yamazaki, J.; Kinoshita, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Characteristics of storage ring free electron laser (SRFEL) at a short wavelength region (UV and visible) has been studied at the UVSOR facility, Institute for Molecular Science. We have measured the laser power evolution by using a biplanar photodiode, and the micro-macro temporal structure of both the laser and the electron bunch with a dualsweep streak camera. The saturated energy of the laser micropulse in the gain-switching (Q-switching) mode has been measured as a function of the ring current. We have not observed a limitation of the output power yet within the beam current can be stored. We have analyzed the saturated micropulse energy based on a model of gain reduction due to the bunch-heating. The bunch-heating process seems to be very complicate. We derived time dependent gain variations from the shape of macropulse and the bunch length. Those two gain variations are almost consistent with each other but slightly different in detail. The gain may be not only simply reduced by the energy spread but also affected by the phase space rotation due to synchrotron oscillation of the electron bunch. As reported in previous issue, the lasing macropulse consists of a couple of micropulses that are simultaneously evolved. From high resolution two-dimensional spectra taken by the dual-sweep streak camera, we noticed considerable internal substructures of the laser micropulse in both the time distribution and the spectral shape. There are a couple of peaks separated with almost same distance in a optical bunch. Such substructure does not seem to result from statistical fluctuations of laser seeds. Although the origin of the substructure of macropulse is not dear at the present, we are going to discuss about SRFEL properties.

  2. Elaphostrongylus spp. from Scandinavian cervidae - a scanning electron microscope study (SEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Stéen

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available Nematodes of the genus Elaphostrongylus collected from moose (Alces alces L., reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L., and red deer (Cervus elaphus L., respectively, were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. Morphological differences in the ribs of the genital bursa were demonstrated. The Elaphostrongylus species from reindeer and red deer differed from each other in four ribs of the genital bursa. These results agree with the morphological characters of E. cervi and E. rangiferi described by Cameron (1931 and Mitskevitch (1960. The genital bursa of Elaphostrongylus sp. from moose, in accordance with the description of E. alces by Steen et al. (1989 showed characteristics differing from those found in Elaphostrongylus spp. from reindeer and red deer respectively. These results support the hypothesis that there are three separate species of Elaphostrongylus present in Scandinavian Cervidae. Svep-elektroniska studier på Elaphostrongylus spp. hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.Abstract in Swedish / Sammandrag: Rundmaskar inom slaktet Elaphostrongylus funna hos alg (Alces alces L., ren (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L. och kronhjort(Cervus elaphus L. studerades med hjalp av svepelelektronmikroskop. De hanliga bursorna med sin a stodjeribbor uppvisade variationer i utseende, langd och placering mellan dessa rundmaskar. De arter av Elaphostrongylus funna hos ren och kronhjort skilde sig åt avseende fyra stodjeribbor på de hanliga bursorna. Dessa resultat stammer val overens med de karaktarer som tidigare ar beskrivna av Cameron(1931 och av Mitskevich (1960. Den hanliga bursan hos arten Elaphostrongylus funnen hos alg, vilken tidigare ar beskriven av Steen et al. (1989, visade upp ett utseende som skilde sig från bursorna hos de Elaphostrongylus-arter funna hos ren och kronhjort. Dessa resultat stoder hypotesen om tre skilda arter av Elaphostrongylus hos skandinaviska hjortdjur.

  3. Microscopic mild focal cortical dysplasia in temporal lobe dual pathology: an electrocorticography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Chacón, L; Estupiñán, B; Lorigados Pedre, L; Trápaga Quincoses, O; García Maeso, I; Sanchez, A; Bender del Busto, J; Garcia, M E; Baez Martin, M; Zaldivar, M; Gómez, A; Orozco, S; Rocha Arrieta, L

    2009-10-01

    Associations between electrophysiological and histological findings might provide an insight into the epileptogenicity of mild focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and a dual pathology. A total of 22 patients with pharmacoresistant TLE were included in the study, 16 of them with histologically confirmed hippocampal sclerosis (HS) associated with neocortical temporal mild Palmini Type-I FCD subtypes and 6 with HS. Intraoperative electrocorticography (ECoG) recordings were analysed for epileptiform discharge frequency and morphology. Associations between histological, and electrocorticography pattern findings in these patients were analysed. Electroclinical outcomes in these patients were also evaluated. Neocortical areas with mild Palmini Type-I FCD showed a significantly higher spike frequency (SF) recorded in the inferior temporal gyrus than those neocortical areas in patients with HS. There was a tendency to higher spike frequency and lower amplitude in neocortical areas with histopathologic subtype IB FCD in relation with IA during intraoperative ECoG. Post-SF excision and amplitude were significantly lower during neocortical post-excision intraoperative ECoG than during neocortical pre-excision recording. There was no difference found in the clinical outcome between patients with and without FCD. Intraoperative electrocorticographic interictal spike frequency recorded in the neocortical inferior temporal gyrus may help to characterize the histopathologic subtypes of mild Palmini Type-I FCD in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and a dual pathology. Our data support the epileptogenicity of neocortical mild FCD in TLE and assessments of ECoG patterns are relevant to determine the extent of the resection in these patients which can influence the electroclinical outcome.

  4. Comparative scanning electron microscopic study of the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Henrique Susin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated comparatively by scanning electron microscopy (SEM the effect of different dental conditioners on dentin micromorphology, when used according to the same protocol. Forty dentin sticks were obtained from 20 caries-free third human molars and were assigned to 4 groups corresponding to 3 conditioners (phosphoric acid 37%, Clearfil SE Bond and iBond and an untreated control group. After application of the conditioners, the specimens were immersed in 50% ethanol solution during 10 s, chemically fixed and dehydrated to prepare them to SEM analysis. In the control group, dentin surface was completely covered by smear layer and all dentinal tubules were occluded. In the phosphoric acid-etched group, dentin surface was completely clean and presented exposed dentinal tubule openings; this was the only group in which the tubules exhibited the funnel-shaped aspect. In the groups conditioned with Clearfil SE Bond primer and iBond, which are less acidic than phosphoric acid, tubule openings were occluded or partially occluded, though smear layer removal was observed. SE Bond was more efficient in removing the smear layer than iBond. In the Clearfil SE Bond group, the cuff-like aspect of peritubular dentin was more evident. It may be concluded all tested conditioners were able to change dentin morphology. However, it cannot be stated that the agent aggressiveness was the only cause of the micromorphological alterations because a single morphological pattern was not established for each group, but rather an association of different aspects, according to the aggressiveness of the tested conditioner.

  5. Delta phase plutonium and its alloys with III B elements: a microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, J.

    2001-01-01

    results for plutonium and IIIB elements alloys are also promising. In addition, to study the properties of low energy, the Gutzwiller approximation is used as a basis for the construction of a 'first principles' calculation scheme for investigating the electronic structure of strongly correlated systems. (author)

  6. Hydrogen spillover on DV (555-777) graphene – vanadium cluster system: First principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, E. Mathan, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com; Thapa, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com [SRM Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India); P, Sabarikirishwaran [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT+D), the interaction of Vanadium adatom and cluster with divacancy (555-777) defective graphene sheet has been studied elaborately. We explore the prospect of hydrogen storage on V{sub 4} cluster adsorbed divacancy graphene system. It has been observed that V{sub 4} cluster (acting as a catalyst) can dissociate the H{sub 2} molecule into H atoms with very low barrier energy. We introduce the spillover of the atomic hydrogen throughout the surface via external mediator gallane (GaH{sub 3}) to form a hydrogenated system.

  7. Macroscopical and microscopical studies of the common bile duct in reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Rahko

    1990-08-01

    Full Text Available The histological structure and secretory function of the common bile duct (ductus hepaticus communis has not been previously described in reindeer. Macroscopical studies were thus performed in 25 reindeer to reveal the morphology and topography of the ductus hepaticus communis and adjoining organs. Histologic structure of the common bile duct was investigated in 20 animals. Our studies showed that the ductus hepaticus communis and pancreaticus join about 2 cm before the duodenal opening to form the common duct. The common bile duct is an elastic tube about 3 to 5 cm long and 2 to 3 mm thick partly surrounded by fat and pancreatic tissues. The wall of the duct, being about 1 mm thick by light microscopy, consisted of folded mucosa surrounded by connective tissue fibres and a serosal layer. Distally, also muscular bands were seen. In some areas separate leucocytes and even lymphatic nodules were present. Surprisingly pancreatic acini occurred in certain areas of the wall, even in close contact to subepithelial tissues. Mucosal epithelium consisted of surface and glandular epithelial cells with mucous secretion. Numerous intraepithelial globule leucocytes were identifiable within the lamina epithelialis.Tutkimus yhteisen sappikäytävän rakenteesta porolla.Abstract in Finnish / Yhteenveto: Yhteisen sappikäytävän (ductus hepaticus communis histologista rakennetta ja eritystoimintaa ei ole aikaisemmin kuvattu porolla. Makroskooppisia tutkimuksia suoritettiin 25 porolla yhteisen sappikäytävän rakenteen ja topografian selvittämiseksi. Seinämän histologinen rakenne selvitettiin 20 porolla. Tutkimukset osoittivat, että porolla ductus hepaticus communis ja ductus pancreaticus yhtyvät noin 2 cm ennen ohutsuolta muodostaakseen yhteisen tiehyeen. Ductus hepaticus communis on noin 3-5 cm pitkä ja 2-3 mm:n läpimittainen käytävä. Se on elastinen ja osit-tain rasva- ja haimakudoksen ympäröimä. Seinämä on mikroskooppisesti noin 1 mm paksu

  8. Transmission positron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Miyoshi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Oshima, Ryuichiro; Matsuya, Miyuki

    2006-01-01

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons

  9. Positron lifetime in vacancy clusters. Application to the study of vacancy-impurity interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbel, C.

    1986-02-01

    Positron lifetime measurements are used to study the vacancy recovery (77-650 K) in 20 K electron irradiated dilute gold or iron alloys in stainless steels. Positron lifetimes in clusters of various shapes and structures are calculated to precise the information obtained by measuring the positron lifetime in a vacancy cluster of unknown size and configuration. From the calculations, we have drawn the following conclusions: - the minimal size of an unknown cluster can be deduced from the measurement of the positron lifetime in the cluster; - a decrease of the positron lifetime when the structure of the cluster evolves, means either a decrease of the size of the cluster, or, the appearance of a relaxed configuration. - The positron lifetime is very useful to discriminate between a spatial planar or relaxed configuration and a tri-dimensional one. In AuGe, AuSb, AuTn alloys, vacancy clusters decorated by solute atoms appear at 250 K. Their configurations are different from those in pure Au. Mobile vacancy-solutes complexes are involved in the clustering process in AuGe, AuSb. The clusters are probably decorated by several solute atoms in AuGe and AuSb where the resistivity evidences a clustering of solute atoms. In AuFe, vacancy-single or multi-complexes stable up to 670 K prevent cluster formation. In FeTi, FeSb, FeAu, vacancy migration is hindered by the formation of vacancy-solute complexes up to 315 K (Ti), up to 670 K (Sb), up to 700 K (Au). In FeSi, FeCu, FeAg, tri-dimensional clusters grow less easily than Fe. This is likely due to the formation of several kinds of small decorated clusters with relaxed or planar configurations. They are peculiarly stable, surviving up to 700 K at least. In Si (resp. Ti) doped 59Fe25Ni16Cr, solute atoms retain the vacancies up to 300 K (resp. 320 K) [fr

  10. Secondary mineralization in carious lesions of human dentin. Electron-probe, electron microscope, and electron diffraction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogiwara, H [Tokyo Dental Coll. (Japan)

    1975-02-01

    Dentinal carious lesions having a remineralized surface layer were studied by means electron-probe microanalysis, electron microscopy, electron diffraction. As the results of electron-probe study, F, Mg, and Na were found to be distributed mainly in the remineralized surface layer and S in the decalcified region where decreases in Ca, P, and Mg concentration were usually observed. The decrease in Mg concentration always started earlier than that of Ca and P concentration. Electron microscope and electron diffraction studies revealed that apatic crystals in the remineralized surface layer were much larger than those in the intact dentin. Although they were less conspicuous, crystals in the decalcified region also were larger than those in the intact region. Dentinal tubules, occluded by many crystals, were frequently seen during the observations. Crystals in the tubules varied in morphology, showing granular, needle, rhomboid, and tabular shapes. By means of electron diffraction, the granular- or needle-shaped crystals were identified as apatite and the rhomboid-shaped crystals as whitlockite. Some of the tabular-shaped crystals appeared to be cotacalcium phosphate.

  11. The deuteron microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Congshan; Zhang Jingshang; Shen Qingbiao

    1991-01-01

    The two particle Green's function is introduced. When the direct interaction between two nucleons is neglected, the first and second order mass operators of two particles are the sum of those for each particle. The nucleon microscopic optical potential is calculated by applying nuclear matter approximation and effective Skyrme interaction. Then the deuteron microscopic optical potential (DMOP) is calculated by using fold formula. For improvement of the theory, the two particle polarization diagram contribution to the imaginary part of the deuteron microscopic optical potential is studied

  12. Using environmental transmission electron microscope to study the in-situ reduction of Co3O4 supported on α-Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehghan-Niri, R.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    in specialized Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) instruments with differentially pumped columns at pressures in the range up to 20 mbar. 1-3 The objective of this work is to study the reduction of Co3O4 nanoparticles directly and observe their morphology and crystallography. The catalysts were produced...... by dispersion of crushed powder directly on steel grids and gold grids. TEM analysis was performed with an FEI TITAN E-cell electron microscope operating at 300 kV. Reduction was done at 360°C and 3.4 mbar H2 flow. The samples were studied before and after reduction by High Resolution TEM (HRTEM) imaging, high...

  13. A clustering approach applied to time-lapse ERT interpretation - Case study of Lascaux cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shan; Sirieix, Colette; Riss, Joëlle; Malaurent, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    The Lascaux cave, located in southwest France, is one of the most important prehistoric cave in the world that shows Paleolithic paintings. This study aims to characterize the structure of the weathered epikarst setting located above the cave using Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) combined with local hydrogeological and climatic environmental data. Twenty ERT profiles were carried out for two years and helped us to record the seasonal and spatial variations of the electrical resistivity of the hydraulic upstream area of the Lascaux cave. The 20 interpreted resistivity models were merged into a single synthetic model using a multidimensional statistical method (Hierarchical Agglomerative Clustering). The individual blocks from the synthetic model associated with a similar resistivity variability were gathered into 7 clusters. We combined the resistivity temporal variations with climatic and hydrogeological data to propose a geo-electrical model that relates to a conceptual geological model. We provide a geological interpretation for each cluster regarding epikarst features. The superficial clusters (no 1 & 2) are linked to effective rainfall and trees, probably a fractured limestone. Another two clusters (no 6 & 7) are linked to detrital formations (sand and clay respectively). The cluster 3 may correspond to a marly limestone that forms a non-permeable horizon. Finally, the electrical behavior of the last two clusters (no 4 & 5) is correlated with the variation of flow rate; they may be a privileged feed zone of the flow in the cave.

  14. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. The Complexities of Implementing Cluster Supply Chain - Case Study of JCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiao; Zhang, Jibiao; Wang, Yang

    As a new type of management pattern, "cluster supply chain" (CSC) can help SMEs to face the global challenges through all kinds of collaboration. However, a major challenge in implementing CSC is the gap between theory and practice in the field. In an effort to provide a better understanding of this emerging phenomenon, this paper presents the implementation process of CSC in the context of JingCheng Mechanical & Electrical Holding co., ltd.(JCH) as a case study. The cast study of JCH suggests that the key problems in the practice of cluster supply chain: How do small firms use cluster supply chain? Only after we clarify the problem, the actual construction and operation of cluster supply chain does show successful results as it should be.

  16. Density functional study of structural and electronic properties of bimetallic silver-gold clusters: Comparison with pure gold and silver clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Burda, Jaroslav; Mitric, Roland; Ge, Maofa; Zampella, Giuseppe; Fantucci, Piercarlo

    2002-08-01

    Bimetallic silver-gold clusters offer an excellent opportunity to study changes in metallic versus "ionic" properties involving charge transfer as a function of the size and the composition, particularly when compared to pure silver and gold clusters. We have determined structures, ionization potentials, and vertical detachment energies for neutral and charged bimetallic AgmAun 3[less-than-or-equal](m+n)[less-than-or-equal]5 clusters. Calculated VDE values compare well with available experimental data. In the stable structures of these clusters Au atoms assume positions which favor the charge transfer from Ag atoms. Heteronuclear bonding is usually preferred to homonuclear bonding in clusters with equal numbers of hetero atoms. In fact, stable structures of neutral Ag2Au2, Ag3Au3, and Ag4Au4 clusters are characterized by the maximum number of hetero bonds and peripheral positions of Au atoms. Bimetallic tetramer as well as hexamer are planar and have common structural properties with corresponding one-component systems, while Ag4Au4 and Ag8 have 3D forms in contrast to Au8 which assumes planar structure. At the density functional level of theory we have shown that this is due to participation of d electrons in bonding of pure Aun clusters while s electrons dominate bonding in pure Agm as well as in bimetallic clusters. In fact, Aun clusters remain planar for larger sizes than Agm and AgnAun clusters. Segregation between two components in bimetallic systems is not favorable, as shown in the example of Ag5Au5 cluster. We have found that the structures of bimetallic clusters with 20 atoms Ag10Au10 and Ag12Au8 are characterized by negatively charged Au subunits embedded in Ag environment. In the latter case, the shape of Au8 is related to a pentagonal bipyramid capped by one atom and contains three exposed negatively charged Au atoms. They might be suitable for activating reactions relevant to catalysis. According to our findings the charge transfer in bimetallic

  17. A comparative ab initio study of Br2*- and Br2 water clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A K; Mukherjee, T; Maity, D K

    2006-01-14

    The work presents ab initio results on structure and electronic properties of Br2*-.nH2O(n=1-10) and Br2.nH2O(n=1-8) hydrated clusters to study the effects of an excess electron on the microhydration of the halide dimer. A nonlocal density functional, namely, Becke's half-and-half hybrid exchange-correlation functional is found to perform well on the present systems with a split valence 6-31++G(d,p) basis function. Geometry optimizations for all the clusters are carried out with several initial guess structures and without imposing any symmetry restriction. Br2*-.nH2O clusters prefer to have symmetrical double hydrogen-bonding structures. Results on Br2.nH2O(n>or=2) cluster show that the O atom of one H2O is oriented towards one Br atom and the H atom of another H2O is directed to other Br atom making Br2 to exist as Br+-Br- entity in the cluster. The binding and solvation energies are calculated for the Br2*-.nH2O and Br2.nH2O clusters. Calculations of the vibrational frequencies show that the formation of Br2*- and Br2 water clusters induces significant shifts from the normal modes of isolated water. Excited-state calculations are carried out on Br2*-.nH2O clusters following configuration interaction with single electron excitation procedure and UV-VIS absorption profiles are simulated. There is an excellent agreement between the present theoretical UV-VIS spectra of Br2*-.10H2O cluster and the reported transient optical spectra for Br2*- in aqueous solution.

  18. First-principle study of silicon cluster doped with rhodium: Rh{sub 2}Si{sub n} (n = 1–11) clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shuai; Luo, Chang Geng; Li, Hua Yang [Department of Physics, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473061 (China); Lu, Cheng, E-mail: lucheng@calypso.cn [Department of Physics, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473061 (China); State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Gen Quan; Lu, Zhi Wen [Department of Physics, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang 473061 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The geometries, stabilities and electronic properties of rhodium-doped silicon clusters Rh{sub 2}Si{sub n} (n = 1–11) have been systematically studied by using density functional calculations at the B3LYP/GENECP level. The optimized results show that the lowest-energy isomers of Rh{sub 2}Si{sub n} clusters favor three-dimensional structures for n = 2–11. Based on the averaged binding energy, fragmentation energy, second-order energy difference and HOMO-LUMO energy gap, the stabilities of Rh{sub 2}Si{sub n} (n = 1–11) clusters have been analyzed. The calculated results suggest that the Rh{sub 2}Si{sub 6} cluster has the strongest relative stability and the doping with rhodium atoms can reduce the chemical stabilities of Si{sub n} clusters. The natural population and natural electron configuration analysis indicate that there is charge transfer from the Si atoms and 5s orbital of the Rh atoms to the 4d and 5p orbitals of Rh atoms. The analysis of electron localization function reveal that the Si–Si bonds are mainly covalent bonds and the Si–Rh bonds are almost ionic bonds. Moreover, the vertical ionization potential, vertical electron affinity, chemical hardness, chemical potential, vibrational spectrum and polarizability are also discussed. - Highlights: • The geometric structures of Rh{sub 2}Si{sub n} (n = 1–11) clusters are determined. • The stabilities and electronic properties of Rh{sub 2}Si{sub n} clusters are discussed. • The Rh{sub 2}Si{sub 6} cluster has the higher stability than other clusters. • The doped rhodium atoms can reduce the chemical stabilities of Si{sub n} clusters.

  19. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  20. A Comparative Evaluation of Adherence of Microorganism to Different Types of Brackets: A Scanning Electron Microscopic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhar, E P; Sahitya, M; Sunil, T; Murthy, Anup R; Rani, M S

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the adherence of microorganism to different types of brackets using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). A double-blinded study was undertaken to evaluate and adherence of microorganisms to different types of brackets using SEM. At random, 12 patients reporting for treatment to the department of Orthodontics VS Dental College and Hospital were selected. Four types of brackets were included in the present study stainless steel, titanium, composite, and ceramic. Brackets were bonded to teeth of the patient on all the four quadrants. The teeth included for bonding were lateral incisor, canine, first premolar, and second premolar. The brackets were left for 72 h. After 72 h brackets were debonded, and they were evaluated by SEM for adherence of microorganism in the slot and tie wings surface. The SEM images were graded, and the adherence of microorganism to the brackets in the surfaces and the four different quadrants were recorded. There is a significant difference in adherence of microorganisms to the various types of brackets (P 0.05) included in the study. The interaction of bracket/surface, bracket/quadrant, surface/quadrants was analyzed, there was no significance of comparison of bracket/surfaces/quadrant but the interaction of bracket/quadrant was found to be significant (bracket/surfaces/quadrant was also found to be significant (bracket material and the least adherence of microorganisms was observed with the titanium bracket material. The adherence of microorganisms is relatively more in the slot area, when compare to the tie wings surface maximum adherence of microorganism is observed in the upper left quadrant and least adherence of microorganism is observed in the lower right quadrant. There is a significant difference in adherence of microorganisms to various types of brackets and the surfaces included in the study. There is no significant difference in the adherence of microorganism to the bracket

  1. Study of Cold Fusion Reactions Using Collective Clusterization Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gurjit; Sandhu, Kirandeep; Sharma, Manoj K.

    2017-10-01

    Within the framework of the dynamical cluster decay model (DCM), the 1n evaporation cross-sections ({σ }1n) of cold fusion reactions (Pb and Bi targets) are calculated for {Z}{CN}=104-113 superheavy nuclei. The calculations are carried out in the fixed range of excitation energy {E}{CN}* =15+/- 1 {MeV}, so that the comparative analysis of reaction dynamics can be worked out. First of all, the fission barriers (B f ) and neutron separation energies ({S}1n) are estimated to account the decreasing cross-sections of cold fusion reactions. In addition to this, the importance of hot optimum orientations of β 2i-deformed nuclei over cold one is explored at fixed angular momentum and neck-length parameters. The hot optimum orientations support all the target-projectile (t,p) combinations, which are explored experimentally in the cold fusion reactions. Some new target-projectile combinations are also predicted for future exploration. Further, the 1n cross-sections are addressed for {Z}{CN}=104-113 superheavy nuclei at comparable excitation energies which show the decent agrement with experimental data upto {Z}{CN}=109 nuclei. Finally, to understand the dynamics of higher-Z superheavy nuclei, the cross-sections are also calculated at maximum available energies around the Coulomb barrier and the effect of non-sticking moment of inertia ({I}{NS}) is also investigated at these energies. Supported by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), in the Form of Research Project Grant No. 03(1341)/15/EMR-II, and to DST, New Delhi, for INSPIRE-Fellowship Grant No. DST/INSPIRE/03/2015/000199

  2. Case Study of Ion Beams Observed By Cluster At Perigee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, V.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Perigee Beam Team

    During substorms the short beams of ions in the keV-to-tens keV energy range are injected into the auroral flux tubes from the magnetotail (sometimes extending up to >100 keV energy) carrying the information on the source distance, scale-size and temporal history of plasma acceleration. We present observations with the CLUSTER crossing inward the auroral zone flux tubes at ~4Re distance near its perigee during the substorm activity on February 14, 2001. The ion beams cover the same region (poleward half) of the auroral oval where the low-energy ions are extracted from the ionosphere, and where the small-scale transient transverse Alfven waves are observed which carry predominantly the downward parallel Poynting flux into the ionosphere. The multiple beams were basically confirmed to be the transient effects, although some effects including the (spatial) velocity filter and the parallel electric fields (im- posed by quasineutrality requirement) may complicate the interpretation. The gener- ation region of ion beams is not limited to most poleward, newly-reconnected flux tubes; the beam generation region could extend across magnetic field inward by as much as >100km (if mapped to the ionosphere). Surprising variety of injection dis- tances observed nearly simultaneously (ranging between >60 Re and ~10 Re) have been inferred when using the full available energy and time resolution, with shorter injection distances be possibly associated with the flow braking process. The beam multiplicity often displays the apparent ~3 min quasiperiodicity inherent to the basic dissipation process, it was not yet explained by any substorm theory.

  3. Electron holography study of magnetization behavior in the writer pole of a perpendicular magnetic recording head by a 1 MV transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kei; Ishida, Yoichi; Akashi, Tetsuya; Shindo, Daisuke; Tonomura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic domain structure of the writer poles of perpendicular magnetic recording heads was studied using electron holography. Although the domain structure of a 100-nm-thick writer pole could be observed with a 300 kV transmission electron microscope, that of the 250-nm-thick writer pole could not be analyzed due to the limited transmission capability of the instrument. On the other hand, the detailed domain structure of the 250-nm-thick writer pole was successfully analyzed by a 1 MV electron microscope using its high transmission capability. The thickness and material dependency of the domain structure of a writer pole were discussed.

  4. [A study of different polishing techniques for amalgams and glass-cermet cement by scanning electron microscope (SEM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaboura, A; Vougiouklakis, G; Argiri, G

    1989-01-01

    Finishing and polishing an amalgam restoration, is considered as an important and necessary step of the restorative procedure. Various polishing techniques have been recommended to success a smooth amalgam surface. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three different polishing treatments on the marginal integrity and surface smoothness of restorations made of three commercially available amalgams and a glass-cermet cement. The materials used were the amalgams, Amalcap (Vivadent), Dispersalloy (Johnson and Johnson), Duralloy (Degussa) and the glass-cermet Katac-Silver (ESPE). The occlusal surfaces of the restorations were polished by the methods: I) round bur, No4-rubber cup-zinc oxide paste in a small brush, II) round bur No 4-bur-brown, green and super green (Shofu) polishing cups and points successively and III) amalgam polishing bur of 12-blades-smooth amalgam polishing bur. Photographs from unpolished and polished surfaces of the restorations, were taken with scanning electron microscope, to evaluate the polishing techniques. An improvement of marginal integrity and surface smoothness of all amalgam restorations was observed after the specimens had been polished with the three techniques. Method II, included Shofu polishers, proved the best results in comparison to the methods I and III. Polishing of glass-cermet cement was impossible with the examined techniques.

  5. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-03-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic scale during catalysis or under reaction conditions. In this HT-NAP-STM, the minimized reactor with a volume of reactant gases of ∼10 ml is thermally isolated from the STM room through a shielding dome installed between the reactor and STM room. An aperture on the dome was made to allow tip to approach to or retract from a catalyst surface in the reactor. This dome minimizes thermal diffusion from hot gas of the reactor to the STM room and thus remains STM head at a constant temperature near to room temperature, allowing observation of surface structures at atomic scale under reaction conditions or during catalysis with minimized thermal drift. The integrated quadrupole mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure products during visualization of surface structure of a catalyst. This synergy allows building an intrinsic correlation between surface structure and its catalytic performance. This correlation offers important insights for understanding of catalysis. Tests were done on graphite in ambient environment, Pt(111) in CO, graphene on Ru(0001) in UHV at high temperature and gaseous environment at high temperature. Atom-resolved surface structure of graphene on Ru(0001) at 500 K in a gaseous environment of 25 Torr was identified.

  6. Human teeth with periapical pathosis after overinstrumentation and overfilling of the root canals: a scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, J H; Brizuela, C; Villota, E

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether overinstrumentation followed by immediate overfilling could be a potential risk in the treatment of infected root canals. Thirty-five human teeth with infected root canals were overinstrumented and overfilled approximately 45 min after their extraction. The experimental teeth were enlarged up to size 40 and the overinstrumentation and overfilling were checked with the aid of a magnifying glass. The specimens were fixed in glutaraldehyde plus sodium cacodylate solution and prepared for scanning electron microscope examination. Bacteria were detected on the flute of the files and mostly at the root apices around the main foramen, remaining firmly attached to resorptive lacunae despite the fact that the apices had undergone great changes, including fracture or zipping. A control group consisting of 10 human teeth root canals containing vital pulps were also overinstrumented and overfilled. No bacteria were detected on the flutes of the files, at the apices or on the extruded master cone overfilling these samples. The high percentage of bacteria adhering to the resorptive lacunae or in the flutes of files used in overinstrumented human teeth with infected root canals carry a potential risk for postoperative pain, clinical discomfort and flare-ups. The hazards observed in these circumstances do not support the one-visit treatment of teeth having acute or chronic periapical abscesses.

  7. The effect of root surface conditioning on smear layer removal in periodontal regeneration (a scanning electron microscopic study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidyawati, D.; Soeroso, Y.; Masulili, S. L. C.

    2017-08-01

    The role of root surface conditioning treatment on smear layer removal of human teeth is affected by periodontitis in periodontal regeneration. The objective of this study is to analyze the smear layer on root surface conditioned with 2.1% minocycline HCl ointment (Periocline), and 24% EDTA gel (Prefgel). A total of 10 human teeth indicated for extraction due to chronic periodontitis were collected and root planed. The teeth were sectioned in thirds of the cervical area, providing 30 samples that were divided into three groups - minocycline ointment treatment, 24% EDTA gel treatment, and saline as a control. The samples were examined by scanning electron microscope. No significant differences in levels of smear layer were observed between the minocycline group and the EDTA group (p=0.759). However, there were significant differences in the level of smear layer after root surface treatment in the minocycline and EDTA groups, compared with the control group (p=0.00). There was a relationship between root surface conditioning treatment and smear layer levels following root planing.

  8. In situ disordering of monoclinic titanium monoxide Ti5O5 studied by transmission electron microscope TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, А А; Van Renterghem, W; Valeeva, А А; Verwerft, M; Van den Berghe, S

    2017-09-07

    The superlattice and domain structures exhibited by ordered titanium monoxide Ti 5 O 5 are disrupted by low energy electron beam irradiation. The effect is attributed to the disordering of the oxygen and titanium sublattices. This disordering is caused by the displacement of both oxygen and titanium atoms by the incident electrons and results in a phase transformation of the monoclinic phase Ti 5 O 5 into cubic B1 titanium monoxide. In order to determine the energies required for the displacement of titanium or oxygen atoms, i.e. threshold displacement energies, a systematic study of the disappearance of superstructure reflections with increasing electron energy and electron bombardment dose has been performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). An incident electron energy threshold between 120 and 140 keV has been observed. This threshold can be ascribed to the displacements of titanium atoms with 4 as well as with 5 oxygen atoms as nearest neighbors. The displacement threshold energy of titanium atoms in Ti 5 O 5 corresponding with the observed incident electron threshold energy lies between 6.0 and 7.5 eV. This surprisingly low value can be explained by the presence of either one or two vacant oxygen lattice sites in the nearest neighbors of all titanium atoms.

  9. Substrate Dependence of the Freezing Dynamics of Supercooled Water Films: A High-Speed Optical Microscope Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pach, E; Rodriguez, L; Verdaguer, A

    2018-01-18

    The freezing of supercooled water films on different substrates was investigated using a high-speed camera coupled to an optical microscope, obtaining details of the freezing process not described in the literature before. We observed the two well known freezing stages (fast dendritic growth and slow freezing of the water liquid left after the dendritic growth), but we separated the process into different phenomena that were studied separately: two-dimensional dendrite growth on the substrate interface, vertical dendrite growth, formation and evolution of ice domains, trapping of air bubbles and freezing of the water film surface. We found all of these processes to be dependent on both the supercooling temperature and the substrate used. Ice dendrite (or ice front) growth during the first stage was found to be dependent on thermal properties of the substrate but could not be unequivocally related to them. Finally, for low supercooling, a direct relationship was observed between the morphology of the dendrites formed in the first stage, which depends on the substrate, and the roughness and the shape of the surface of the ice, when freezing of the film was completed. This opens the possibility of using surfaces and coatings to control ice morphology beyond anti-icing properties.

  10. An electron microscopic study of the photochemical cross-linking of DNA in guinea pig epidermis by psoralen derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cech, T.; Pathak, M.A.; Biswas, R.K.

    1979-01-01

    Albino guinea pigs were treated with psoralen derivatives plus 320-400 nm ultraviolet radiation, and DNA was extracted from their epidermis. The DNA was assayed for the presence of interstrand cross-links by standard denaturation-renaturation assays and by a new technique, electron microscopy of the DNA under totally denaturing conditions. The latter method allows individual cross-links to be directly observed and counted. When either 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen or 8-methoxypsoralen was applied topically to the skin (8-20 μg/cm 2 ) or administered orally (10-12 mg/kg body weight), followed by exposure to 320-400 nm ultraviolet radiation, most of the epidermal DNA was found to contain a high frequency of cross-links. For example, oral or topical trimethylpsoralen treatment gave an average of one cross-link per 250 nucleotide pairs or about 3 . 10 5 cross-links per guinea pig chromosome. When the dose of either drug was decreased 20-fold to the level used in the clinical treatment of psoriasis, however, no cross-links could be detected in the epidermal DNA. The electron microscopic assay is sensitive enough that one can put an upper limit of 1 cross-link per 10 6 nucleotide pairs (80 cross-links per chromosome) for the low dose studies. The significance of these findings to the understanding of the effectiveness of psoralens in psoriasis therapy is discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Microscopic approach to nuclear anharmonicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi

    1985-01-01

    Present status of microscopic study of nuclear anharmonicity phenomena is reviewed from the viewpoint of the time-dependent Hartree-Bogoliubov approach. Both classical- and quantum-mechanical aspects of this approach are discussed. The Bohr-Mottelson-type collective Hamiltonian for anharmonic gamma vibrations is microscopically derived by means of the self-consistent-collective-coordinate method, and applied to the problem of two-phonon states of 168 Er. (orig.)

  12. Computational study of the Rayleigh light scattering properties of atmospheric pre-nucleation clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, Jonas; Norman, Patrick; Bilde, Merete

    2014-01-01

    The Rayleigh and hyper Rayleigh scattering properties of the binary (H 2SO4)(H2O)n and ternary (H 2SO4)(NH3)(H2O)n clusters are investigated using a quantum mechanical response theory approach. The molecular Rayleigh scattering intensities are expressed using the dipole polarizability α...... and hyperpolarizability β tensors. Using density functional theory, we elucidate the effect of cluster morphology on the scattering properties using a combinatorial sampling approach. We find that the Rayleigh scattering intensity depends quadratically on the number of water molecules in the cluster and that a single...... ammonia molecule is able to induce a high anisotropy, which further increases the scattering intensity. The hyper Rayleigh scattering activities are found to be extremely low. This study presents the first attempt to map the scattering of atmospheric molecular clusters using a bottom-up approach...

  13. A KINEMATIC AND PHOTOMETRIC STUDY OF THE GALACTIC YOUNG STAR CLUSTER NGC 7380

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W. P.; Chen, C. W.; Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Chen Li; Sperauskas, J.; Ogura, K.; Chuang, R. J.; Boyle, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    We present proper motions, radial velocities, and a photometric study of the Galactic open cluster NGC 7380, which is associated with prominent emission nebulosity and dark molecular clouds. On the basis of the sample of highly probable member stars, the star cluster is found to be at a distance of 2.6 ± 0.4 kpc, has an age of around 4 Myr, and a physical size of ∼6 pc across with a tidal structure. The binary O-type star DH Cep is a member of the cluster in its late stage of clearing the surrounding material, and may have triggered the ongoing star formation in neighboring molecular clouds which harbor young stars that are coeval and comoving with, but not gravitationally bound by, the star cluster.

  14. A theoretical study of lithium-doped gallium clusters by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentuerk, Suekrue; Ekincioglu, Yavuz [Dumlupinar Univ., Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2012-05-15

    The geometrical structures, stabilities, and electronic properties of Ga{sub n}Li (n = 1-13) clusters were investigated within the density functional theory (DFT). The impurity lithium atom enhances the stability of Ga{sub n}Li (n = 1-13) clusters, especially Ga{sub n}Li (n = 9-13) compared to Ga{sub n} (n = 9-14), that is at either apex position or side position. The dissociation energy, second-order energy differences, and the energy gaps between highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) indicate that the Ga{sub 7}Li, Ga{sub 9}Li, and Ga{sub 11}Li clusters are more stable within the studied cluster range. Moreover, the variation of the average bond length of Ga - Li is due to the surface effect, and the binding strength increases resulting from the increase of charge amount. (orig.)

  15. Cluster-randomized Studies in Educational Research: Principles and Methodological Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyhaupt, Jens

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies are being performed in educational research to evaluate new teaching methods and approaches. These studies could be performed more efficiently and deliver more convincing results if they more strictly applied and complied with recognized standards of scientific studies. Such an approach could substantially increase the quality in particular of prospective, two-arm (intervention studies that aim to compare two different teaching methods. A key standard in such studies is randomization, which can minimize systematic bias in study findings; such bias may result if the two study arms are not structurally equivalent. If possible, educational research studies should also achieve this standard, although this is not yet generally the case. Some difficulties and concerns exist, particularly regarding organizational and methodological aspects. An important point to consider in educational research studies is that usually individuals cannot be randomized, because of the teaching situation, and instead whole groups have to be randomized (so-called “cluster randomization”. Compared with studies with individual randomization, studies with cluster randomization normally require (significantly larger sample sizes and more complex methods for calculating sample size. Furthermore, cluster-randomized studies require more complex methods for statistical analysis. The consequence of the above is that a competent expert with respective special knowledge needs to be involved in all phases of cluster-randomized studies.Studies to evaluate new teaching methods need to make greater use of randomization in order to achieve scientifically convincing results. Therefore, in this article we describe the general principles of cluster randomization and how to implement these principles, and we also outline practical aspects of using cluster randomization in prospective, two-arm comparative educational research studies.

  16. Cluster-randomized Studies in Educational Research: Principles and Methodological Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyhaupt, Jens; Mayer, Benjamin; Keis, Oliver; Öchsner, Wolfgang; Muche, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies are being performed in educational research to evaluate new teaching methods and approaches. These studies could be performed more efficiently and deliver more convincing results if they more strictly applied and complied with recognized standards of scientific studies. Such an approach could substantially increase the quality in particular of prospective, two-arm (intervention) studies that aim to compare two different teaching methods. A key standard in such studies is randomization, which can minimize systematic bias in study findings; such bias may result if the two study arms are not structurally equivalent. If possible, educational research studies should also achieve this standard, although this is not yet generally the case. Some difficulties and concerns exist, particularly regarding organizational and methodological aspects. An important point to consider in educational research studies is that usually individuals cannot be randomized, because of the teaching situation, and instead whole groups have to be randomized (so-called "cluster randomization"). Compared with studies with individual randomization, studies with cluster randomization normally require (significantly) larger sample sizes and more complex methods for calculating sample size. Furthermore, cluster-randomized studies require more complex methods for statistical analysis. The consequence of the above is that a competent expert with respective special knowledge needs to be involved in all phases of cluster-randomized studies. Studies to evaluate new teaching methods need to make greater use of randomization in order to achieve scientifically convincing results. Therefore, in this article we describe the general principles of cluster randomization and how to implement these principles, and we also outline practical aspects of using cluster randomization in prospective, two-arm comparative educational research studies.

  17. Gas stripping and mixing in galaxy clusters: a numerical comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heß, Steffen; Springel, Volker

    2012-11-01

    The ambient hot intrahalo gas in clusters of galaxies is constantly fed and stirred by infalling galaxies, a process that can be studied in detail with cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. However, different numerical methods yield discrepant predictions for crucial hydrodynamical processes, leading for example to different entropy profiles in clusters of galaxies. In particular, the widely used Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) scheme is suspected to strongly damp fluid instabilities and turbulence, which are both crucial to establish the thermodynamic structure of clusters. In this study, we test to which extent our recently developed Voronoi particle hydrodynamics (VPH) scheme yields different results for the stripping of gas out of infalling galaxies and for the bulk gas properties of cluster. We consider both the evolution of isolated galaxy models that are exposed to a stream of intracluster medium or are dropped into cluster models, as well as non-radiative cosmological simulations of cluster formation. We also compare our particle-based method with results obtained with a fundamentally different discretization approach as implemented in the moving-mesh code AREPO. We find that VPH leads to noticeably faster stripping of gas out of galaxies than SPH, in better agreement with the mesh-code than with SPH. We show that despite the fact that VPH in its present form is not as accurate as the moving mesh code in our investigated cases, its improved accuracy of gradient estimates makes VPH an attractive alternative to SPH.

  18. Comparison of population-averaged and cluster-specific models for the analysis of cluster randomized trials with missing binary outcomes: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Jinhui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstracts Background The objective of this simulation study is to compare the accuracy and efficiency of population-averaged (i.e. generalized estimating equations (GEE and cluster-specific (i.e. random-effects logistic regression (RELR models for analyzing data from cluster randomized trials (CRTs with missing binary responses. Methods In this simulation study, clustered responses were generated from a beta-binomial distribution. The number of clusters per trial arm, the number of subjects per cluster, intra-cluster correlation coefficient, and the percentage of missing data were allowed to vary. Under the assumption of covariate dependent missingness, missing outcomes were handled by complete case analysis, standard multiple imputation (MI and within-cluster MI strategies. Data were analyzed using GEE and RELR. Performance of the methods was assessed using standardized bias, empirical standard error, root mean squared error (RMSE, and coverage probability. Results GEE performs well on all four measures — provided the downward bias of the standard error (when the number of clusters per arm is small is adjusted appropriately — under the following scenarios: complete case analysis for CRTs with a small amount of missing data; standard MI for CRTs with variance inflation factor (VIF 50. RELR performs well only when a small amount of data was missing, and complete case analysis was applied. Conclusion GEE performs well as long as appropriate missing data strategies are adopted based on the design of CRTs and the percentage of missing data. In contrast, RELR does not perform well when either standard or within-cluster MI strategy is applied prior to the analysis.

  19. Dark-field microscopic study of the interactions between gold/silver nanoparticles and giant unilamellar vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Anupama; Zhao, Jian; Cooks, Tiana; Ren, Jun; Lu, Qi

    2018-02-01

    Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are well-established model systems for studying lipid packing and membrane dynamics. With sizes larger than 1 μm, GUVs are easily observable using optical microscopy. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are well known for their biocompatibility and such biomedical applications in drug and gene delivery as well as medical diagnostics and therapeutics. On the other hand, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have long been known for their potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects for such applications as wound dressing and biomedical implants. In this work, we employed the dark-field microscopy (CytoViva Inc.) to study the interactions between AuNPs/AgNPs and GUVs, respectively. The GUVs used in this study were prepared with 1,2 dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) as well as cholesterol (chol) at various mol% concentrations (0, 10, 20, 30, 40%). The electroformed GUVs were allowed to incubate with gold or silver nanoparticles of various sizes (between 10 and 100 nm) for 2 hrs before microscopic examination. The experiment has shown that the size of nanoparticles is a critical factor that determines the penetration rate. In addition, the membrane rigidity increases with the molar concentration of cholesterol hence making the NP penetration more difficult. Comparative studies have been made between AuNPs and AgNPs in regard to NP penetration and loading rate as well as the morphological changes induced in GUVs. This work aims to better understand the mechanisms of AuNP/AgNP and membrane interactions for their respective future applications in nanomedicine and nanotechnology.

  20. Weak lensing study of 16 DAFT/FADA clusters: Substructures and filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Nicolas; Clowe, Douglas; Durret, Florence; Adami, Christophe; Acebrón, Ana; Hernandez-García, Lorena; Márquez, Isabel; Guennou, Loic; Sarron, Florian; Ulmer, Mel

    2016-05-01

    While our current cosmological model places galaxy clusters at the nodes of a filament network (the cosmic web), we still struggle to detect these filaments at high redshifts. We perform a weak lensing study for a sample of 16 massive, medium-high redshift (0.4 DAFT/FADA survey, which are imaged in at least three optical bands with Subaru/Suprime-Cam or CFHT/MegaCam. We estimate the cluster masses using an NFW fit to the shear profile measured in a KSB-like method, adding our contribution to the calibration of the observable-mass relation required for cluster abundance cosmological studies. We compute convergence maps and select structures within these maps, securing their detection with noise resampling techniques. Taking advantage of the large field of view of our data, we study cluster environment, adding information from galaxy density maps at the cluster redshift and from X-ray images when available. We find that clusters show a large variety of weak lensing maps at large scales and that they may all be embedded in filamentary structures at megaparsec scale. We classify these clusters in three categories according to the smoothness of their weak lensing contours and to the amount of substructures: relaxed (~7%), past mergers (~21.5%), and recent or present mergers (~71.5%). The fraction of clusters undergoing merging events observationally supports the hierarchical scenario of cluster growth, and implies that massive clusters are strongly evolving at the studied redshifts. Finally, we report the detection of unusually elongated structures in CLJ0152, MACSJ0454, MACSJ0717, A851, BMW1226, MACSJ1621, and MS1621. This study is based on observations obtained with MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/IRFU, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii

  1. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  2. Laser-induced surface deformation microscope for the study of the dynamic viscoelasticity of plasma membrane in a living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaku, Toshinori; Yui, Hiroharu

    2018-05-15

    A laser-induced surface deformation (LISD) microscope is developed and applied to measurement of the dynamic relaxation responses of the plasma membrane in a living cell. A laser beam is tightly focused on an optional area of cell surface and the focused light induces microscopic deformation on the surface via radiation pressure. The LISD microscope not only allows non-contact and destruction-free measurement but provides power spectra of the surface responses depending on the frequency of the intensity of the laser beam. An optical system for the LISD is equipped via a microscope, allowing us to measure the relaxation responses in sub-cellular-sized regions of the plasma membrane. In addition, the forced oscillation caused by the radiation pressure for surface deformation extends the upper limit of the frequency range in the obtained power spectra to 106 Hz, which enables us to measure relaxation responses in local regions within the plasma membrane. From differences in power-law exponents at higher frequencies, it is realized that a cancerous cell obeys a weaker single power-law than a normal fibroblast cell. Furthermore, the power spectrum of a keratinocyte cell obeys a power-law with two exponents, indicating that alternative mechanical models to a conventional soft glassy rheology model (where single power-laws explain cells' responses below about 103 Hz) are needed for the understanding over a wider frequency range. The LISD microscope would contribute to investigation of microscopic cell rheology, which is important for clarifying the mechanisms of cell migration and tissue construction.

  3. Cohort study on clustering of lifestyle risk factors and understanding its association with stress on health and wellbeing among school teachers in Malaysia (CLUSTer)--a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Foong Ming; Hoe, Victor Chee Wai; Hairi, Noran Naqiah; Buckley, Brian; Wark, Petra A; Koh, David; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Bulgiba, Awang M

    2014-06-17

    The study on Clustering of Lifestyle risk factors and Understanding its association with Stress on health and wellbeing among school Teachers in Malaysia (CLUSTer) is a prospective cohort study which aims to extensively study teachers in Malaysia with respect to clustering of lifestyle risk factors and stress, and subsequently, to follow-up the population for important health outcomes. This study is being conducted in six states within Peninsular Malaysia. From each state, schools from each district are randomly selected and invited to participate in the study. Once the schools agree to participate, all teachers who fulfilled the inclusion criteria are invited to participate. Data collection includes a questionnaire survey and health assessment. Information collected in the questionnaire includes socio-demographic characteristics, participants' medical history and family history of chronic diseases, teaching characteristics and burden, questions on smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activities (IPAQ); a food frequency questionnaire, the job content questionnaire (JCQ); depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS21); health related quality of life (SF12-V2); Voice Handicap Index 10 on voice disorder, questions on chronic pain, sleep duration and obstetric history for female participants. Following blood drawn for predefined clinical tests, additional blood and urine specimens are collected and stored for future analysis. Active follow up of exposure and health outcomes will be carried out every two years via telephone or face to face contact. Data collection started in March 2013 and as of the end of March 2014 has been completed for four states: Kuala Lumpur, Selangor, Melaka and Penang. Approximately 6580 participants have been recruited. The first round of data collection and blood sampling is expected to be completed by the end of 2014 with an expected 10,000 participants recruited. Our study will provide a good basis for exploring the clustering of

  4. Pathology of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis: a light microscopical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of skin lesions and draining lymph nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Gadir, A Fattah A; Theander, Thor G

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whereas the clinical manifestations and treatment of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) have been adequately described before, the pathology received little attention, particularly the African form of PKDL which shows some clinical differences from the disease in India...... leishmaniasis: a light microscopical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of skin lesions and draining lymph nodes....

  5. Assessment of statistical agreement of three techniques for the study of cut marks: 3D digital microscope, laser scanning confocal microscopy and micro-photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-González, Miguel Ángel; Aramendi, Julia; Yravedra, José; Blasco, Ruth; Rosell, Jordi; González-Aguilera, Diego; Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel

    2017-09-01

    In the last few years, the study of cut marks on bone surfaces has become fundamental for the interpretation of prehistoric butchery practices. Due to the difficulties in the correct identification of cut marks, many criteria for their description and classification have been suggested. Different techniques, such as three-dimensional digital microscope (3D DM), laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and micro-photogrammetry (M-PG) have been recently applied to the study of cut marks. Although the 3D DM and LSCM microscopic techniques are the most commonly used for the 3D identification of cut marks, M-PG has also proved to be very efficient and a low-cost method. M-PG is a noninvasive technique that allows the study of the cortical surface without any previous preparation of the samples, and that generates high-resolution models. Despite the current application of microscopic and micro-photogrammetric techniques to taphonomy, their reliability has never been tested. In this paper, we compare 3D DM, LSCM and M-PG in order to assess their resolution and results. In this study, we analyse 26 experimental cut marks generated with a metal knife. The quantitative and qualitative information registered is analysed by means of standard multivariate statistics and geometric morphometrics to assess the similarities and differences obtained with the different methodologies. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. The Awareness and Educational Status on Oral Health of Elite Athletes: A Cross-Sectional Study with Cluster Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Bahar Odabas

    2016-01-01

    In this cross-sectional survey, this study aimed to determine the factors associated with oral health of elite athletes and to determine the clustering tendency of the variables by dendrogram, and to determine the relationship between predefined clusters and see how these clusters can converge. A total of 97 elite (that is, top-level performing)…

  7. Pulse and gamma radiolytic studies of Ag, Cd and mixed clusters in aqueous solutions of carboxymethyl cellulose and gelatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, Sudhir; Gopinathan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse and gamma radiolytic studies in aqueous solutions of Ag, Cd and mixed clusters were carried out in carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) or gelatin. The reaction rate of e aq - with Ag + is lower in the presence of CMC or gelatin and oligomeric clusters of silver, Cd and mixed clusters get stabilized in their presence. (author). 2 refs., 2 figs

  8. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  9. Evaluation of surveillance case definition in the diagnosis of leptospirosis, using the Microscopic Agglutination Test: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassanayake, Dinesh L B; Wimalaratna, Harith; Agampodi, Suneth B; Liyanapathirana, Veranja C; Piyarathna, Thibbotumunuwe A C L; Goonapienuwala, Bimba L

    2009-04-22

    Leptospirosis is endemic in both urban and rural areas of Sri Lanka and there had been many out breaks in the recent past. This study was aimed at validating the leptospirosis surveillance case definition, using the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). The study population consisted of patients with undiagnosed acute febrile illness who were admitted to the medical wards of the Teaching Hospital Kandy, from 1st July 2007 to 31st July 2008. The subjects were screened to diagnose leptospirosis according to the leptospirosis case definition. MAT was performed on blood samples taken from each patient on the 7th day of fever. Leptospirosis case definition was evaluated in regard to sensitivity, specificity and predictive values, using a MAT titre >or= 1:800 for confirming leptospirosis. A total of 123 patients were initially recruited of which 73 had clinical features compatible with the surveillance case definition. Out of the 73 only 57 had a positive MAT result (true positives) leaving 16 as false positives. Out of the 50 who didn't have clinical features compatible with the case definition 45 had a negative MAT as well (true negatives), therefore 5 were false negatives. Total number of MAT positives was 62 out of 123. According to these results the test sensitivity was 91.94%, specificity 73.77%, positive predictive value and negative predictive values were 78.08% and 90% respectively. Diagnostic accuracy of the test was 82.93%. This study confirms that the surveillance case definition has a very high sensitivity and negative predictive value with an average specificity in diagnosing leptospirosis, based on a MAT titre of >or= 1: 800.

  10. Study of radicals, clusters and transition state species by anion photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Don Wesley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Free radicals, elemental and van der Waals clusters and transition state species for bimolecular chemical reactions are investigated using anion photoelectron spectroscopy. Several low-lying electronic states of ozone have been identified via photoelectron spectroscopy of O3-. A characterization of these states is important to models for atmospheric ozone reaction kinetics. The fluoroformyloxyl radical, FCO2, has been investigated, providing vibrational frequencies and energies for two electronic states. The technique has also been employed to make the first direct observation and characterization of the NNO2 molecule. Several electronic states are observed for this species which is believed to play a role as a reactive intermediate in the N + NO2 reaction. The experimental results for all three of these radicals are supplemented by ab initio investigations of their molecular properties. The clusters investigations include studies of elemental carbon clusters (C2- - C11-), and van der Waals clusters (X-(CO2)n, X = I, Br, Cl; n {le} 13 and I- (N2O)n=1--11). Primarily linear clusters are observed for the smaller carbon clusters, while the spectra of the larger clusters contain contribution from cyclic anion photodetachment. Very interesting ion-solvent interactions are observed in the X-(CO2)n clusters. The transition state regions for several bimolecular chemical reactions have also been investigated by photodetachment of a negative ion precursor possessing a geometry similar to that of the transition state species. These spectra show features which are assigned to motions of the unstable neutral complex existing between reactants and products.

  11. GALAXY INFALL BY INTERACTING WITH ITS ENVIRONMENT: A COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF 340 GALAXY CLUSTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Liyi [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Sorbonnelaan 2, 3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Wen, Zhonglue [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Gandhi, Poshak [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Inada, Naohisa [Department of Physics, Nara National College of Technology, Yamatokohriyama, Nara 639-1080 (Japan); Kawaharada, Madoka [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Kodama, Tadayuki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Konami, Saori [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Makishima, Kazuo [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Xu, Haiguang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Minhang, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-07-20

    To study systematically the evolution of the angular extents of the galaxy, intracluster medium (ICM), and dark matter components in galaxy clusters, we compiled the optical and X-ray properties of a sample of 340 clusters with redshifts <0.5, based on all the available data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Chandra / XMM-Newton . For each cluster, the member galaxies were determined primarily with photometric redshift measurements. The radial ICM mass distribution, as well as the total gravitational mass distribution, was derived from a spatially resolved spectral analysis of the X-ray data. When normalizing the radial profile of galaxy number to that of the ICM mass, the relative curve was found to depend significantly on the cluster redshift; it drops more steeply toward the outside in lower-redshift subsamples. The same evolution is found in the galaxy-to-total mass profile, while the ICM-to-total mass profile varies in an opposite way. The behavior of the galaxy-to-ICM distribution does not depend on the cluster mass, suggesting that the detected redshift dependence is not due to mass-related effects, such as sample selection bias. Also, it cannot be ascribed to various redshift-dependent systematic errors. We interpret that the galaxies, the ICM, and the dark matter components had similar angular distributions when a cluster was formed, while the galaxies traveling in the interior of the cluster have continuously fallen toward the center relative to the other components, and the ICM has slightly expanded relative to the dark matter although it suffers strong radiative loss. This cosmological galaxy infall, accompanied by an ICM expansion, can be explained by considering that the galaxies interact strongly with the ICM while they are moving through it. The interaction is considered to create a large energy flow of 10{sup 4445} erg s{sup 1} per cluster from the member galaxies to their environment, which is expected to continue over cosmological timescales.

  12. Study of radicals, clusters and transition state species by anion photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    Free radicals, elemental and van der Waals clusters and transition state species for bimolecular chemical reactions are investigated using anion photoelectron spectroscopy. Several low-lying electronic states of ozone have been identified via photoelectron spectroscopy of O 3 - . A characterization of these states is important to models for atmospheric ozone reaction kinetics. The fluoroformyloxyl radical, FCO 2 , has been investigated, providing vibrational frequencies and energies for two electronic states. The technique has also been employed to make the first direct observation and characterization of the NNO 2 molecule. Several electronic states are observed for this species which is believed to play a role as a reactive intermediate in the N + NO 2 reaction. The experimental results for all three of these radicals are supplemented by ab initio investigations of their molecular properties. The clusters investigations include studies of elemental carbon clusters (C 2 - - C 11 - ), and van der Waals clusters (X - (CO 2 ) n , X = I, Br, Cl; n ≤ 13 and I - (N 2 O) n=1--11 ). Primarily linear clusters are observed for the smaller carbon clusters, while the spectra of the larger clusters contain contribution from cyclic anion photodetachment. Very interesting ion-solvent interactions are observed in the X - (CO 2 )n clusters. The transition state regions for several bimolecular chemical reactions have also been investigated by photodetachment of a negative ion precursor possessing a geometry similar to that of the transition state species. These spectra show features which are assigned to motions of the unstable neutral complex existing between reactants and products

  13. Energetic Study of Helium Cluster Nucleation and Growth in 14YWT through First Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingye Gan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First principles calculations have been performed to energetically investigate the helium cluster nucleation, formation and growth behavior in the nano-structured ferritic alloy 14YWT. The helium displays strong affinity to the oxygen:vacancy (O:Vac pair. By investigating various local environments of the vacancy, we find that the energy cost for He cluster growth increases with the appearance of solutes in the reference unit. He atom tends to join the He cluster in the directions away from the solute atoms. Meanwhile, the He cluster tends to expand in the directions away from the solute atoms. A growth criterion is proposed based on the elastic instability strain of the perfect iron lattice in order to determine the maximum number of He atoms at the vacancy site. We find that up to seven He atoms can be trapped at a single vacancy. However, it is reduced to five if the vacancy is pre-occupied by an oxygen atom. Furthermore, the solute atoms within nanoclusters, such as Ti and Y, will greatly limit the growth of the He cluster. A migration energy barrier study is performed to discuss the reduced mobility of the He atom/He cluster in 14YWT.

  14. Mobility of hydrogen-helium clusters in tungsten studied by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorev, Petr, E-mail: grigorievpit@gmail.com [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400 (Belgium); Ghent University, Applied Physics EA17 FUSION-DC, St.Pietersnieuwstraat, 41 B4, B-9000, Gent (Belgium); Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnologies, and Telecommunications, Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Terentyev, Dmitry; Bonny, Giovanni [SCK-CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Boeretang 200, Mol, 2400 (Belgium); Zhurkin, Evgeny E. [Department of Experimental Nuclear Physics K-89, Institute of Physics, Nanotechnologies, and Telecommunications, Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Oost, Guido van [Ghent University, Applied Physics EA17 FUSION-DC, St.Pietersnieuwstraat, 41 B4, B-9000, Gent (Belgium); Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie [Ghent University, Applied Physics EA17 FUSION-DC, St.Pietersnieuwstraat, 41 B4, B-9000, Gent (Belgium); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Tungsten is a primary candidate material for plasma facing components in fusion reactors. Interaction of plasma components with the material is unavoidable and will lead to degradation of the performance and the lifetime of the in-vessel components. In order to gain better understanding the mechanisms driving the material degradation at atomic level, atomistic simulations are employed. In this work we study migration, stability and self-trapping properties of pure helium and mixed helium-hydrogen clusters in tungsten by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We test two versions of an embedded atom model interatomic potential by comparing it with ab initio data regarding the binding properties of He clusters. By analysing the trajectories of the clusters during molecular dynamics simulations at finite temperatures we obtain the diffusion parameters. The results show that the diffusivity of mixed clusters is significantly lower, than that of pure helium clusters. The latter suggest that the formation of mixed clusters during mixed hydrogen helium plasma exposure will affect the helium diffusivity in the material.

  15. Chemical inhomogeneity in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-10-08

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  16. Chemical inhomogeneity in InxGa1-xN and ZnO. A HRTEM study on atomic scale clustering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, T.P.

    2008-01-01

    Nanostructuration as well as the nucleation and growth of nanoparticles pervades the development of modern materials and devices. Quantitative high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is currently being developed for a structural and chemical analysis at an atomic scale. It is used in this thesis to study the chemical inhomogeneity and clustering in In x Ga 1-x N, InN and ZnO. A methodology for reliable quantitative HRTEM is rst de ned: it necessitates a damage free sample, the avoidance of electron beam damage and the control of microscope instabilities. With these conditions satis ed, the reliability of quantitative HRTEM is demonstrated by an accurate measurement of lattice relaxation in a thin TEM sample. Clustering in an alloy can then be distinguished from a random distribution of atoms. In In x Ga 1-x N for instance, clustering is detected for concentrations x>0.1. The sensitivity is insufficient to determine whether clustering is present for lower concentrations. HRTEM allows to identify the amplitude and the spatial distribution of the decomposition which is attributed to a spinodal decomposition. In InN, nanometer scale metallic indium inclusions are detected. With decreasing size of the metallic clusters, the photoluminescence of the sample shifts towards the infrared. This indicates that the inclusions may be responsible for the infrared activity of InN. Finally, ZnO grown homoepitaxially on zinc-face and oxygen-face substrates is studied. The O-face epilayer is strained whereas the Zn-face epilayer is almost strain free and has a higher crystalline quality. Quantitative analysis of exit wave phases is in good agreement with simulations, but the signal to noise ratio needs to be improved for the detection of single point defects. (orig.)

  17. Occipital nerve stimulation in medically intractable, chronic cluster headache. The ICON study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrink, Leopoldine A; Teernstra, Onno Pm; Haan, Joost

    2013-01-01

    study is performed. DISCUSSION: The ICON study will show if ONS is an effective preventive therapy for patients suffering medically intractable chronic cluster headache and if there is a difference between high- and low-amplitude stimulation. The innovative design of the study will, for the first time......BACKGROUND: About 10% of cluster headache patients have the chronic form. At least 10% of this chronic group is intractable to or cannot tolerate medical treatment. Open pilot studies suggest that occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) might offer effective prevention in these patients. Controlled...

  18. A DFT study of arsine adsorption on palladium doped graphene: Effects of palladium cluster size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunaseth, Manaschai; Mudchimo, Tanabat; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Jungsuttiwong, Siriporn

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The relationship between charge difference and adsorption strength demonstrates that charge migration from Pd_n-SDG to AsH_x significantly enhanced adsorption strength, the Pd_6 clusters doped SDG with a steep slope is recommended as a superior adsorbent material for AsH_3 removal from gas stream. - Highlights: • Pd atom and Pd clusters bind strongly onto the defective graphene surface. • Larger size of Pd cluster adsorbs arsine and its hydrogenated products stronger. • Order of adsorption strength on Pd_n doped graphene: As > AsH > AsH_2 > > AsH_3. • Charge migration characterizes the strong adsorption of AsH_2, AsH, and As. • Pd cluster doped graphene is thermodynamically preferable for arsine removal. - Abstract: In this study, we have investigated the size effects of palladium (Pd) doped single-vacancy defective graphene (SDG) surface to the adsorption of AsH_3 and its dehydrogenated products on Pd using density functional theory calculations. Here, Pd cluster binding study revealed that Pd_6 nanocluster bound strongest to the SDG surface, while adsorption of AsH_x (x = 0–3) on the most stable Pd_n doped SDG showed that dehydrogenated arsine compounds adsorbed onto the surface stronger than the pristine AsH_3 molecule. Charge analysis revealed that considerable amount of charge migration from Pd to dehydrogenated arsine molecules after adsorption may constitute strong adsorption for dehydrogenated arsine. In addition, study of thermodynamic pathways of AsH_3 dehydrogenation on Pd_n doped SDG adsorbents indicated that Pd cluster doping on SDG adsorbent tends to be thermodynamically favorable for AsH_3 decomposition than the single-Pd atom doped SDG. Hence, our study has indicated that Pd_6 clusters doped SDG is more advantageous as adsorbent material for AsH_3 removal.

  19. Scanning electron microscopic study of the otolithic organs in the bichir (Polypterus bichir) and shovel-nose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popper, A N

    1978-09-01

    The anatomy and ultrastructure of the sacculus, lagena, and utriculus of the ear of Polypterus bichir and Scaphirhynchus platorynchus were studied using the scanning electron microscope. The otolithic organs each contain a single dense calcareous otolith in close contact with a sensory epithelium (macula). The maculae have sensory hair cells typical of those found in other vertebrates, surrounded by microvilli-covered supporting cells. The hair cells on each macula are divided into several groups, with all of the cells in each group morphologically polarized in the same direction. The cells of the utricular macula in both species are divided into opposing groups in a pattern similar to that found in other vertebrates. The saccular and lagenar maculae are located in a single large chamber in both species. In Scaphirhychus the two maculae are on the same plane, while in Polypterus they are at right angles to one another. The hair cells on the saccular maculae of both species are divided into two oppositely oriented groups. In Scaphirhynchus the cells on the posterior half of the macula are oriented dorsally on the dorsal half of the macula and ventrally on the ventral half. The anterior region of the macula is rotated and the cells of the dorsal and ventral groups are shifted so that they are oriented on the animal's horizon plane. A similar pattern is found in Polypterus, except that this macula is shaped like a "J" with the vertical portion of the J having horizontal cells and the bottom portion vertical cells. The lagenar maculae in both species have dorsally oriented cells on the anterior side of the macula and ventrally oriented cells on the posterior half of the macula. While these data are not sufficient for clarifying the taxonomic relationship between the two species studied, it is clear that the ears in these species have a number of significant differences from the teleost ear that could have functional and/or taxonomic significance.

  20. Formation of a Parasitophorous Vacuole in a Nonadequate Experimental Host: Electron Microscopical and X-Ray Microanalytical Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižka, Zdeněk

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 1 (2005), 05-12 ISSN 0015-5632 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : electron microscopical * x-ray Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.918, year: 2005

  1. Empirical study of the metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor device characteristics deduced from a microscopic model of memory traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngai, K.L.; Hsia, Y.

    1982-01-01

    A graded-nitride gate dielectric metal-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (MNOS) memory transistor exhibiting superior device characteristics is presented and analyzed based on a qualitative microscopic model of the memory traps. The model is further reviewed to interpret some generic properties of the MNOS memory transistors including memory window, erase-write speed, and the retention-endurance characteristic features

  2. A Comparison Study on Similarity and Dissimilarity Measures in Clustering Continuous Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Seyed Shirkhorshidi

    Full Text Available Similarity or distance measures are core components used by distance-based clustering algorithms to cluster similar data points into the same clusters, while dissimilar or distant data points are placed into different clusters. The performance of similarity measures is mostly addressed in two or three-dimensional spaces, beyond which, to the best of our knowledge, there is no empirical study that has revealed the behavior of similarity measures when dealing with high-dimensional datasets. To fill this gap, a technical framework is proposed in this study to analyze, compare and benchmark the influence of different similarity measures on the results of distance-based clustering algorithms. For reproducibility purposes, fifteen publicly available datasets were used for this study, and consequently, future distance measures can be evaluated and compared with the results of the measures discussed in this work. These datasets were classified as low and high-dimensional categories to study the performance of each measure against each category. This research should help the research community to identify suitable distance measures for datasets and also to facilitate a comparison and evaluation of the newly proposed similarity or distance measures with traditional ones.

  3. Pulse electrochemical machining on Invar alloy: Optical microscopic/SEM and non-contact 3D measurement study of surface analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.H.; Choi, S.G.; Choi, W.K.; Yang, B.Y.; Lee, E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Invar alloy was electrochemically polished and then subjected to PECM (Pulse Electro Chemical Machining) in a mixture of NaCl, glycerin, and distilled water. • Optical microscopic/SEM and non-contact 3D measurement study of Invar surface analyses. • Analysis result shows that applied voltage and electrode shape are factors that affect the surface conditions. - Abstract: In this study, Invar alloy (Fe 63.5%, Ni 36.5%) was electrochemically polished by PECM (Pulse Electro Chemical Machining) in a mixture of NaCl, glycerin, and distilled water. A series of PECM experiments were carried out with different voltages and different electrode shapes, and then the surfaces of polished Invar alloy were investigated. The polished Invar alloy surfaces were investigated by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and non-contact 3D measurement (white light microscopes) and it was found that different applied voltages produced different surface characteristics on the Invar alloy surface because of the locally concentrated applied voltage on the Invar alloy surface. Moreover, we found that the shapes of electrode also have an effect on the surface characteristics on Invar alloy surface by influencing the applied voltage. These experimental findings provide fundamental knowledge for PECM of Invar alloy by surface analysis

  4. Are ribosomal DNA clusters rearrangement hotspots? A case study in the genus Mus (Rodentia, Muridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douzery Emmanuel JP

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in comparative genomics have considerably improved our knowledge of the evolution of mammalian karyotype architecture. One of the breakthroughs was the preferential localization of evolutionary breakpoints in regions enriched in repetitive sequences (segmental duplications, telomeres and centromeres. In this context, we investigated the contribution of ribosomal genes to genome reshuffling since they are generally located in pericentromeric or subtelomeric regions, and form repeat clusters on different chromosomes. The target model was the genus Mus which exhibits a high rate of karyotypic change, a large fraction of which involves centromeres. Results The chromosomal distribution of rDNA clusters was determined by in situ hybridization of mouse probes in 19 species. Using a molecular-based reference tree, the phylogenetic distribution of clusters within the genus was reconstructed, and the temporal association between rDNA clusters, breakpoints and centromeres was tested by maximum likelihood analyses. Our results highlighted the following features of rDNA cluster dynamics in the genus Mus: i rDNA clusters showed extensive diversity in number between species and an almost exclusive pericentromeric location, ii a strong association between rDNA sites and centromeres was retrieved which may be related to their shared constraint of concerted evolution, iii 24% of the observed breakpoints mapped near an rDNA cluster, and iv a substantial rate of rDNA cluster change (insertion, deletion also occurred in the absence of chromosomal rearrangements. Conclusions This study on the dynamics of rDNA clusters within the genus Mus has revealed a strong evolutionary relationship between rDNA clusters and centromeres. Both of these genomic structures coincide with breakpoints in the genus Mus, suggesting that the accumulation of a large number of repeats in the centromeric region may contribute to the high level of chromosome

  5. Poster - 14: Batch Effect Reduction in in-vitro Raman Microscopic Radiosensitivity Study Using Ovarian Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moradi, Hamid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Ahmad, Abrar; Shepherdson, Dean; Nyiri, Balazs; Vuong, Nhung; Niedbala, Gosia; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Eapen, Libni

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To improve classification by reducing batch effect in samples from the ovarian carcinoma cell lines A2780s (parental wild type) and A2780cp (cisplatin cross-radio-resistant), before, right after, and 24 hours after irradiation to 10Gy. Methods: Spectra were acquired with a home built confocal Raman microscope in 3 distinct runs of six samples: unirradiated s&cp (control pair), then 0h and 24h after irradiation. The Raman spectra were noise reduced, then background subtracted with SMIRF algorithm. ∼35 cell spectra were collected from each sample in 1024 channels from 700cm-1 to 1618cm-1. The spectra were analyzed by regularized multiclass LDA. For feature reduction the spectra were grouped into 3 overlapping group pairs: s-cp, 0Gy–10Gy0h and 0Gy10–Gy24h. The three features, the three differences of the mean spectra were mapped to the analysis sub-space by the inverse regularized covariance matrix. The batch effect noticeably confounded the dose and time effect. Results: To remove the batch effect, the 2+2=4D subspace extended by the covariance matrix of the means of the 0Gy control groups was subtracted from the spectra of each sample. Repeating the analysis on the spectra with the control group variability removed, the batch effect was dramatically reduced in the dose and time directions enabling sharp linear discrimination. The cell type classification also improved. Conclusions: We identified a efficient batch effect removal technique crucial to the applicability of Raman microscopy to radiosensitivity studies both on cell cultures and potential clinical diagnostic applications.

  6. Poster - 14: Batch Effect Reduction in in-vitro Raman Microscopic Radiosensitivity Study Using Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moradi, Hamid; Murugkar, Sangeeta; Ahmad, Abrar; Shepherdson, Dean; Nyiri, Balazs; Vuong, Nhung; Niedbala, Gosia; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Eapen, Libni [Carleton University, Carleton University, Carleton University, Carleton University, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, University of Ottawa, The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: To improve classification by reducing batch effect in samples from the ovarian carcinoma cell lines A2780s (parental wild type) and A2780cp (cisplatin cross-radio-resistant), before, right after, and 24 hours after irradiation to 10Gy. Methods: Spectra were acquired with a home built confocal Raman microscope in 3 distinct runs of six samples: unirradiated s&cp (control pair), then 0h and 24h after irradiation. The Raman spectra were noise reduced, then background subtracted with SMIRF algorithm. ∼35 cell spectra were collected from each sample in 1024 channels from 700cm-1 to 1618cm-1. The spectra were analyzed by regularized multiclass LDA. For feature reduction the spectra were grouped into 3 overlapping group pairs: s-cp, 0Gy–10Gy0h and 0Gy10–Gy24h. The three features, the three differences of the mean spectra were mapped to the analysis sub-space by the inverse regularized covariance matrix. The batch effect noticeably confounded the dose and time effect. Results: To remove the batch effect, the 2+2=4D subspace extended by the covariance matrix of the means of the 0Gy control groups was subtracted from the spectra of each sample. Repeating the analysis on the spectra with the control group variability removed, the batch effect was dramatically reduced in the dose and time directions enabling sharp linear discrimination. The cell type classification also improved. Conclusions: We identified a efficient batch effect removal technique crucial to the applicability of Raman microscopy to radiosensitivity studies both on cell cultures and potential clinical diagnostic applications.

  7. Symptom clusters predict mortality among dialysis patients in Norway: a prospective observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amro, Amin; Waldum, Bård; von der Lippe, Nanna; Brekke, Fredrik Barth; Dammen, Toril; Miaskowski, Christine; Os, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis have reduced survival rates compared with the general population. Symptoms are frequent in dialysis patients, and a symptom cluster is defined as two or more related co-occurring symptoms. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between symptom clusters and mortality in dialysis patients. In a prospective observational cohort study of dialysis patients (n = 301), Kidney Disease and Quality of Life Short Form and Beck Depression Inventory questionnaires were administered. To generate symptom clusters, principal component analysis with varimax rotation was used on 11 kidney-specific self-reported physical symptoms. A Beck Depression Inventory score of 16 or greater was defined as clinically significant depressive symptoms. Physical and mental component summary scores were generated from Short Form-36. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was used for the survival analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank statistics were applied to compare survival rates between the groups. Three different symptom clusters were identified; one included loading of several uremic symptoms. In multivariate analyses and after adjustment for health-related quality of life and depressive symptoms, the worst perceived quartile of the "uremic" symptom cluster independently predicted all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.47, 95% CI 1.44-4.22, P = 0.001) compared with the other quartiles during a follow-up period that ranged from four to 52 months. The two other symptom clusters ("neuromuscular" and "skin") or the individual symptoms did not predict mortality. Clustering of uremic symptoms predicted mortality. Assessing co-occurring symptoms rather than single symptoms may help to identify dialysis patients at high risk for mortality. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Field of Study Choice: Using Conjoint Analysis and Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtudiner, Ze'ev; Zwilling, Moti; Kantor, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to measure student's preferences regarding various attributes that affect their decision process while choosing a higher education area of study. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper exhibits two different models which shed light on the perceived value of each examined area of study: conjoint analysis and…

  9. Study of II Galactic quadrant of Milky Way Galaxy using open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Devendra; Ganesh, Shashikiran; Baliyan, Kiran Singh; Yadav, Ramakant Singh; Durgapal, Alok

    2018-04-01

    We have made UBV I CCD observations for the open clusters Teutsch 1, Riddle 4 and Czernik 6 using 1.04-m Sampurnanand telescope located at the ARIES observatory (Manora peak, Nainital, India). We have used 2MASS JHKS data for the clusters Teutsch 126, Teutsch 54 and Czernik 3. For the estimation of fundamental parameters, we have plotted radial density profiles, colour-magnitude and colour-colour diagrams. Using these inputs, we have studied the structure of Milky Way Galaxy in the second Galactic quadrant. We have considered the open clusters that are younger than 1 Gyrs and lay in the longitude range from 90 to 180 deg. Our study shows that up to 3.5 Kpc, the Galactic disc bends towards the southern hemisphere while after 3.5 Kpc it bends towards the northern hemisphere. The distribution of reddening with longitude and age shows a decreasing trend with the longitude and age of the clusters. Our study also indicates that younger clusters have more reddening than older ones.

  10. Studies of cluster-assembled materials: From gas phase to condensed phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin

    Clusters, defined as "a number of similar things that occur together" in Webster's dictionary, has different meanings depending on the given subject. To physicists and chemists, the word cluster means "a group of atoms or molecules formed by interactions ranging from very weak van der Waals interactions to strong ionic bonds." Unlike molecules, which are made by nature and are stable under ambient conditions, clusters discovered in a laboratory are often metastable. Molecules have specific stoichiometry, whereas the cluster's composition can usually be altered atom by atom. Thus, clusters can be taken as intrinsically "artificial molecules" with considerably more tunabilities in their properties. Research into the relative stability and instability of clusters has in recent years become a very active research area, especially following the study by Khanna and Castleman that first suggested that by varying size and composition, clusters can expand the periodic table to the 3 rd-dimension; that is, clusters can mimic the chemistry of atoms and may, therefore, be used as the building blocks of new materials. The discovery of Met-Cars has drawn worldwide interests and has been actively investigated by researchers from a variety of fields, including physics, chemistry and material science. However, the unsuccessful search for a solvent capable of isolating Met-Cars has impeded progress in characterizing the material in the condensed state and, hence, limited its potential applications as a novel nanoscale material. An alternative method involving the deposition of mass-gated species and the subsequent structural investigation via Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been employed. With particularly interesting results, soft-landed deposits of zirconium Met-Cars were found to form a face-centered-cubic (FCC) structure with a lattice parameter ˜ 15A. The production of Met-Cars is conducted with the direct laser vaporization (DLV) of metal/graphite composite pellets

  11. CALL FOR PAPERS: Special cluster issue on `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.

    2005-07-01

    Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (PPCF) invites submissions on the topic of `Experimental studies of zonal flow and turbulence', for consideration for a special topical cluster of articles to be published early in 2006. The topical cluster will be published in an issue of PPCF, combined with regular articles. The Guest Editor for the special cluster will be S-I Itoh, Kyushu University, Japan. There has been remarkable progress in the area of structure formation by turbulence. One of the highlights has been the physics of zonal flow and drift wave turbulence in toroidal plasmas. Extensive theoretical as well as computational studies have revealed the various mechanisms in turbulence and zonal flows. At the same time, experimental research on the zonal flow, geodesic acoustic modes and generation of global electric field by turbulence has evolved rapidly. Fast growth in reports of experimental results has stimulated further efforts to develop increased knowledge and systematic understanding. Each paper considered for the special cluster should describe the present research status and new scientific knowledge/results from the authors on experimental studies of zonal flow, geodesic acoustic modes and generation of electric field by turbulence (including studies of Reynolds-Maxwell stresses, etc). Manuscripts submitted to this special cluster in Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion will be refereed according to the normal criteria and procedures of the journal. The Guest Editor guides the progress of the cluster from the initial open call, through the standard refereeing process, to publication. To be considered for inclusion in the special cluster, articles must be submitted by 2 September 2005 and must clearly state `for inclusion in the Turbulent Plasma Cluster'. Articles submitted after this deadline may not be included in the cluster issue but may be published in a later issue of the journal. Please submit your manuscript electronically via our web site at www

  12. GASP. IX. Jellyfish galaxies in phase-space: an orbital study of intense ram-pressure stripping in clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffé, Yara L.; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Moretti, Alessia; Gullieuszik, Marco; Smith, Rory; Vulcani, Benedetta; Fasano, Giovanni; Fritz, Jacopo; Tonnesen, Stephanie; Bettoni, Daniela; Hau, George; Biviano, Andrea; Bellhouse, Callum; McGee, Sean

    2018-06-01

    It is well known that galaxies falling into clusters can experience gas stripping due to ram pressure by the intra-cluster medium. The most spectacular examples are galaxies with extended tails of optically bright stripped material known as `jellyfish'. We use the first large homogeneous compilation of jellyfish galaxies in clusters from the WINGS and OmegaWINGS surveys, and follow-up MUSE observations from the GASP MUSE programme to investigate the orbital histories of jellyfish galaxies in clusters and reconstruct their stripping history through position versus velocity phase-space diagrams. We construct analytic models to define the regions in phase-space where ram-pressure stripping is at play. We then study the distribution of cluster galaxies in phase-space and find that jellyfish galaxies have on average higher peculiar velocities (and higher cluster velocity dispersion) than the overall population of cluster galaxies at all cluster-centric radii, which is indicative of recent infall into the cluster and radial orbits. In particular, the jellyfish galaxies with the longest gas tails reside very near the cluster cores (in projection) and are moving at very high speeds, which coincides with the conditions of the most intense ram pressure. We conclude that many of the jellyfish galaxies seen in clusters likely formed via fast (˜1-2 Gyr), incremental, outside-in ram-pressure stripping during first infall into the cluster in highly radial orbits.

  13. Density functional theory and surface reactivity study of bimetallic AgnYm (n+m = 10) clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Riaz; Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz; Chatha, Shahzad Ali Shahid; Hussain, Riaz; Hanif, Usman; Ayub, Khurshid

    2018-06-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed on pure silver (Agn), yttrium (Ym) and bimetallic silver yttrium clusters AgnYm (n + m = 2-10) for reactivity descriptors in order to realize sites for nucleophilic and electrophilic attack. The reactivity descriptors of the clusters, studied as a function of cluster size and shape, reveal the presence of different type of reactive sites in a cluster. The size and shape of the pure silver, yttrium and bimetallic silver yttrium cluster (n = 2-10) strongly influences the number and position of active sites for an electrophilic and/or nucleophilic attack. The trends of reactivities through reactivity descriptors are confirmed through comparison with experimental data for CO binding with silver clusters. Moreover, the adsorption of CO on bimetallic silver yttrium clusters is also evaluated. The trends of binding energies support the reactivity descriptors values. Doping of pure cluster with the other element also influence the hardness, softness and chemical reactivity of the clusters. The softness increases as we increase the number of silver atoms in the cluster, whereas the hardness decreases. The chemical reactivity increases with silver doping whereas it decreases by increasing yttrium concentration. Silver atoms are nucleophilic in small clusters but changed to electrophilic in large clusters.

  14. Near-infrared study of new embedded clusters in the Carina complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R. A. P.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.

    2018-05-01

    We analyse the nature of a sample of stellar overdensities that we found projected on the Carina complex. This study is based on the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry and involves the photometry decontamination of field stars, elaboration of intrinsic colour-magnitude diagrams [CMDs; J × (J - Ks)], colour-colour diagrams (J - H) × (H - Ks), and radial density profiles, in order to determine the structure and the main astrophysical parameters of the best candidates. The verification of an overdensity as an embedded cluster requires a CMD consistent with a PMS content and MS stars, if any. From these results, we are able to verify if they are, in fact, embedded clusters. The results were, in general, rewarding: in a sample of 101 overdensities, the analysis provided 15 candidates, of which three were previously catalogued as clusters (CCCP-Cl 16, Treasure Chest, and FSR 1555), and the 12 remaining are discoveries that provided significant results, with ages not above 4.5 Myr and distances compatible with the studied complex. The resulting values for the differential reddening of most candidates were relatively high, confirming that these clusters are still (partially or fully) embedded in the surrounding gas and dust, as a rule within a shell. Histograms with the distribution of the masses, ages, and distances were also produced, to give an overview of the results. We conclude that all the 12 newly found embedded clusters are related to the Carina complex.

  15. Spin dynamics study of magnetic molecular clusters by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cianchi, L.; Del Giallo, F.; Spina, G.; Reiff, W.; Caneschi, A.

    2002-01-01

    Spin dynamics of the two magnetic molecular clusters Fe4 and Fe8, with four and eight Fe(III) ions, respectively, was studied by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy. The transition probabilities W's between the spin states of the ground multiplet were obtained from the fitting of the spectra. For the Fe4 cluster we found that, in the range from 1.38 to 77 K, the trend of W's versus the temperature corresponds to an Orbach's process involving an excited state with energy of about 160 K. For the Fe8, which, due to the presence of a low-energy excited state, could not be studied at temperatures greater than 20 K, the trend of W's in the range from 4 to 18 K seems to correspond to a direct process. The correlation functions of the magnetization were then calculated in terms of the W's. They have an exponential trend for the Fe4 cluster, while a small oscillating component is also present for the Fe8 cluster. For the first of the clusters, τ vs T (τ is the decay time of the magnetization) has a trend which, at low temperatures (T 15 K, τ follows the trend of W -1 . For the Fe8, τ follows an Arrhenius law, but with a prefactor which is smaller than the one obtained susceptibility measurements

  16. Factor-cluster analysis and enrichment study of Mangrove sediments - An example from Mengkabong, Sabah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveena, S.M.; Ahmed, A.; Radojevic, M.; Mohd Harun Abdullah; Aris, A.Z.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the tidal effects in the sediment of Mengkabong mangrove forest, Sabah. Generally, all the studied parameters showed high value at high tide compared to low tide. Factor-cluster analyses were adopted to allow the identification of controlling factors at high and low tides. Factor analysis extracted six controlling factors at high tide and seven controlling factors at low tide. Cluster analysis extracted two district clusters at high and low tides. The study showed that factor-cluster analysis application is a useful tool to single out the controlling factors at high and low tides. this will provide a basis for describing the tidal effects in the mangrove sediment. The salinity and electrical conductivity clusters as well as component loadings at high and low tide explained the tidal process where there is high contribution of seawater to mangrove sediments that controls the sediment chemistry. The geo accumulation index (T geo ) values suggest the mangrove sediments are having background concentrations for Al, Cu, Fe and Zn and unpolluted for Pb. (author)

  17. First principles study of vibrational dynamics of ceria-titania hybrid clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majid, Abdul, E-mail: abdulmajid40@yahoo.com; Bibi, Maryam [University of Gujrat, Department of Physics (Pakistan)

    2017-04-15

    Density functional theory based calculations were performed to study vibrational properties of ceria, titania, and ceria-titania hybrid clusters. The findings revealed the dominance of vibrations related to oxygen when compared to those of metallic atoms in the clusters. In case of hybrid cluster, the softening of normal modes related to exterior oxygen atoms in ceria and softening/hardening of high/low frequency modes related to titania dimmers are observed. The results calculated for monomers conform to symmetry predictions according to which three IR and three Raman active modes were detected for TiO{sub 2}, whereas two IR active and one Raman active modes were observed for CeO{sub 2}. The comparative analysis indicates that the hybrid cluster CeTiO{sub 4} contains simultaneous vibrational fingerprints of the component dimmers. The symmetry, nature of vibrations, IR and Raman activity, intensities, and atomic involvement in different modes of the clusters are described in detail. The study points to engineering of CeTiO{sub 4} to tailor its properties for technological visible region applications in photocatalytic and electrochemical devices.

  18. Exploring spatial evolution of economic clusters: A case study of Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenshan; Sliuzas, Richard; Cai, Jianming; Ottens, Henk F. L.

    2012-10-01

    An identification of economic clusters and analysing their changing spatial patterns is important for understanding urban economic space dynamics. Previous studies, however, suffer from limitations as a consequence of using fixed geographically areas and not combining functional and spatial dynamics. The paper presents an approach, based on local spatial statistics and the case of Beijing to understand the spatial clustering of industries that are functionally interconnected by common or complementary patterns of demand or supply relations. Using register data of business establishments, it identifies economic clusters and analyses their pattern based on postcodes at different time slices during the period 1983-2002. The study shows how the advanced services occupy the urban centre and key sub centres. The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) cluster is mainly concentrated in the north part of the city and circles the urban centre, and the main manufacturing clusters are evolved in the key sub centers. This type of outcomes improves understanding of urban-economic dynamics, which can support spatial and economic planning.

  19. Effects of incident cluster size, substrate temperature, and incident energy on bombardment of Ni clusters onto Cu (0 0 1) surface studied using molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Wu, Cheng-Da; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Guan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The bombardment process of a Ni cluster onto a Cu (0 0 1) surface is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on the tight-binding second-moment approximation (TB-SMA) many-body potential. The effects of incident cluster size, substrate temperature, and incident energy are evaluated in terms of molecular trajectories, kinetic energy, stress, self-diffusion coefficient, and sputtering yield. The simulation results clearly show that the penetration depth and Cu surface damage increase with increasing incident cluster size for a given incident energy per atom. The self-diffusion coefficient and the penetration depth of a cluster significantly increase with increasing substrate temperature. An incident cluster can be scattered into molecules or atoms that become embedded in the surface after incidence. When the incident energy is increased, the number of volcano-like defects and the penetration depth increase. A high sputtering yield can be obtained by increasing the incident energy at high temperature. The sputtering yield significantly increases with cluster size when the incident energy is above 5 eV/atom.

  20. Study on Adaptive Parameter Determination of Cluster Analysis in Urban Management Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J. Y.; Jing, C. F.; Du, M. Y.; Fu, Y. L.; Dai, P. P.

    2017-09-01

    The fine management for cities is the important way to realize the smart city. The data mining which uses spatial clustering analysis for urban management cases can be used in the evaluation of urban public facilities deployment, and support the policy decisions, and also provides technical support for the fine management of the city. Aiming at the problem that DBSCAN algorithm which is based on the density-clustering can not realize parameter adaptive determination, this paper proposed the optimizing method of parameter adaptive determination based on the spatial analysis. Firstly, making analysis of the function Ripley's K for the data set to realize adaptive determination of global parameter MinPts, which means setting the maximum aggregation scale as the range of data clustering. Calculating every point object's highest frequency K value in the range of Eps which uses K-D tree and setting it as the value of clustering density to realize the adaptive determination of global parameter MinPts. Then, the R language was used to optimize the above process to accomplish the precise clustering of typical urban management cases. The experimental results based on the typical case of urban management in XiCheng district of Beijing shows that: The new DBSCAN clustering algorithm this paper presents takes full account of the data's spatial and statistical characteristic which has obvious clustering feature, and has a better applicability and high quality. The results of the study are not only helpful for the formulation of urban management policies and the allocation of urban management supervisors in XiCheng District of Beijing, but also to other cities and related fields.