WorldWideScience

Sample records for micromechanical microphone read-out

  1. MICROMECHANICAL MICROPHONE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    and dirt, which partly or totally will be able to destroy its characteristics, a sealing acoustic membrane (6, 7) is placed on each side of the transducer element. The transducer element can for example be a capacitive transducer with external bias or an electret based transducer. The microphone, which can...

  2. Read-out electronics for DC squid magnetic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-01-01

    Read-out electronics for DC SQUID sensor systems, the read-out electronics incorporating low Johnson noise radio-frequency flux-locked loop circuitry and digital signal processing algorithms in order to improve upon the prior art by a factor of at least ten, thereby alleviating problems caused by magnetic interference when operating DC SQUID sensor systems in magnetically unshielded environments.

  3. Upgrade of the ALICE-TPC read-out electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junique, A; Mager, M; Musa, L; Rehman, A Ur, E-mail: Magnus.Mager@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2010-12-15

    The ALICE experiment at CERN LHC employs a large volume time projection chamber (TPC) as its main tracking device. Instigated by analyses indicating that the high level trigger is capable of sifting events with rare physics probes, it is endeavoured to read out the TPC an order of magnitude faster then was reckoned during the design of its read-out electronics. Based on an analysis of the read-out performance of the current system, an upgrade of the front-end read-out network is proposed. The performance of the foreseen architecture is simulated with raw data from real 7 TeV pp collisions. Events are superimposed in order to emulate the future ALICE running conditions: high multiplicity events generated either by PbPb collisions or by the superposition (pile-up) of a large number of pp collisions. The first prototype of the main building block has been produced and characterised, demonstrating the feasibility of the approach.

  4. Upgrade of the ALICE-TPC read-out electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Junique, A; Musa , L; Rehman , A U

    2010-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN LHC employs a large volume time projection chamber (TPC) as its main tracking device. Instigated by analyses indicating that the high level trigger is capable of sifting events with rare physics probes, it is endeavoured to read out the TPC an order of magnitude faster then was reckoned during the design of its read-out electronics. Based on an analysis of the read-out performance of the current system, an upgrade of the front-end read-out network is proposed. The performance of the foreseen architecture is simulated with raw data from real 7 TeV pp collisions. Events are superimposed in order to emulate the future ALICE running conditions: high multiplicity events generated either by PbPb collisions or by the superposition (pile-up) of a large number of pp collisions. The first prototype of the main building block has been produced and characterised, demonstrating the feasibility of the approach

  5. Optimised cantilever biosensor with piezoresistive read-out

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, J.; Hansen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    We present a cantilever-based biochemical sensor with piezoresistive read-out which has been optimised for measuring surface stress. The resistors and the electrical wiring on the chip are encapsulated in low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) silicon nitride, so that the chip is well sui...

  6. DS read-out transcription in transgenic tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudenko, George N.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1994-01-01

    To select for Ds transposition in transgenic tomato plants a phenotypic excision assay, based on restoration of hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT II) gene expression, was employed. Some tomato plants, however, expressed the marker gene even though the Ds had not excised. Read-out transcriptional

  7. Computational micromechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, M.

    1996-09-01

    Selected issues in computational micromechanics are reviewed, with particular emphasis on multiple-scale problems and micromechanical models of material behavior. Examples considered include: the bridging of atomistic and continuum scales, with application to nanoindentation and the brittle-to-ductile transition; the development of dislocation-based constitutive relations for pure metallic crystals and intermetallic compounds, with applications to fracture of single crystals and bicrystals; the simulation of non-planar three-dimensional crack growth at the microscale, with application to mixed mode I III effective behavior and crack trapping and bridging in fiber-reinforced composites; and the direct micromechanical simulation of fragmentation of brittle solids and subsequent flow of the comminuted phase.

  8. Dynamically Reconfigurable Microphone Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Static + 2 Wireless Using only a standard computer sound card, a robot is limited to binaural inputs. Even when using wireless microphones, the audio...Abstract—Robotic sound localization has traditionally been restricted to either on-robot microphone arrays or embedded microphones in aware...a microphone array has a significant impact on the mathematics of sound source localization. Arrays, for instance, are commonly designed to

  9. The TOTEM T1 read out card motherboard

    CERN Document Server

    Minutoli, S; Robutti, E

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Read Out Card (ROC) motherboard, which is the main component of the T1 forward telescope front-end electronic system. The ROC main objectives are to acquire tracking data and trigger information from the detector. It performs data conversion from electrical to optical format and transfers the data streams to the next level of the system and it implements Slow Control modules which are able to receive, decode and distribute the LHC machine low jitter clock and fast command. The ROC also provides a spy mezzanine connection based on programmable FPGA and USB2.0 for laboratory and portable DAQ debugging system

  10. The TOTEM T1 read out card motherboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minutoli, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Robutti, E.

    2010-12-01

    This article describes the Read Out Card (ROC) motherboard, which is the main component of the T1 forward telescope front-end electronic system. The ROC main objectives are to acquire tracking data and trigger information from the detector. It performs data conversion from electrical to optical format and transfers the data streams to the next level of the system and it implements Slow Control modules which are able to receive, decode and distribute the LHC machine low jitter clock and fast command. The ROC also provides a spy mezzanine connection based on programmable FPGA and USB2.0 for laboratory and portable DAQ debugging system.

  11. The Read Out Controller for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    Coliban, Radu Mihai; The ATLAS collaboration; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Levinson, Lorne; Vermeulen, Jos

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the New Small Wheel data path, we designed the Read Out Controller (ROC) ASIC for handling, preprocessing and formatting the data generated by the NSW VMM upstream chips. The ROC will concentrate the data streams from 8VMMs, filter data based on the BCID and transmit the data to FELIX via the L1DDC. ROC is composed of 8 VMM Capture modules, a cross-bar and 4 SubROC modules. The output data is sent via 4 high-speed e-links.

  12. A new electronic read-out for the YAPPET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Damiani, C; Malaguti, R; Guerra, A D; Domenico, G D; Zavattini, G

    2002-01-01

    A small animal PET-SPECT scanner (YAPPET) prototype was built at the Physics Department of the Ferrara University and is presently being used at the Nuclear Medicine Department for radiopharmaceutical studies on rats. The first YAPPET prototype shows very good performances, but needs some improvements before it can be fully used for intensive radiopharmaceutical research. The main problem of the actual prototype is its heavy electronics, based on NIM and CAMAC standard modules. For this reason a new, compact read-out electronics was developed and tested. The results of a first series of tests made on the first prototype will be presented in the paper.

  13. A continuous read-out TPC for the ALICE upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, C.

    2016-07-01

    The largest gaseous Time Projection Chamber (TPC) in the world, the ALICE TPC, will be upgraded based on Micro Pattern Gas Detector technology during the second long shutdown of the CERN Large Hadron Collider in 2018/19. The upgraded detector will operate continuously without the use of a triggered gating grid. It will thus be able to read all minimum bias Pb-Pb events that the LHC will deliver at the anticipated peak interaction rate of 50 kHz for the high luminosity heavy-ion era. New read-out electronics will send the continuous data stream to a new online farm at rates up to 1 TByte/s. A fractional ion feedback of below 1% is required to keep distortions due to space charge in the TPC drift volume at a tolerable level. The new read-out chambers will consist of quadruple stacks of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEM), combining GEM foils with a different hole pitch. Other key requirements such as energy resolution and operational stability have to be met as well. A careful optimisation of the performance in terms of all these parameters was achieved during an extensive R&D program. A working point well within the design specifications was identified with an ion backflow of 0.63%, a local energy resolution of 11.3% (sigma) and a discharge probability comparable to that of standard triple GEM detectors.

  14. Precision Instrumentation Amplifiers and Read-Out Integrated Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Rong; Makinwa, Kofi A A

    2013-01-01

    This book presents innovative solutions in the design of precision instrumentation amplifier and read-out ICs, which can be used to boost millivolt-level signals transmitted by modern sensors, to levels compatible with the input ranges of typical Analog-to-Digital Converters (ADCs).  The discussion includes the theory, design and realization of interface electronics for bridge transducers and thermocouples. It describes the use of power efficient techniques to mitigate low frequency errors, resulting in interface electronics with high accuracy, low noise and low drift. Since this book is mainly about techniques for eliminating low frequency errors, it describes the nature of these errors and the associated dynamic offset cancellation techniques used to mitigate them.  Surveys comprehensively offset cancellation and accuracy improvement techniques applied in precision amplifier designs; Presents techniques in precision circuit design to mitigate low frequency errors in millivolt-level signals transmitted by ...

  15. The ATLAS liquid Argon calorimeters read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Fayard, L; La Marra, D; Léger, A; Matricon, P; Perrot, G; Poggioli, L; Prast, J; Riu, I; Simion, S

    2004-01-01

    The calorimetry of the ATLAS experiment takes advantage of different detectors based on the liquid Argon (LAr) technology. Signals from the LAr calorimeters are processed by various stages before being delivered to the Data Acquisition system. The calorimeter cell signals are received by the front-end boards, which digitize a predetermined number of samples of the bipolar waveform and sends them to the Read-Out Driver (ROD) boards. The ROD board receives triggered data from 1028 calorimeter cells, and determines the precise energy and timing of the signals by processing the discrete samplings of the pulse. In addition, it formats the digital stream for the following elements of the DAQ chain, and performs monitoring. The architecture and functionality of the ATLAS LAr ROD board are discussed, along with the final design of the Processing Unit boards housing the Digital Signal Processors (DSP). (9 refs).

  16. The read-out ASIC for the Space NUCLEON project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkin, E.; Voronin, A.; Karmanov, D.; Kudryashov, I.; Podorozhniy, D.; Shumikhin, V.

    2015-04-01

    This paper summarizes the design results for the read-out ASIC for the space NUCLEON project of the Russian Federal Space Agency ROSCOSMOS. The ASIC with a unique high dynamic range (1-40 000 mip) at low power consumption ( 50, generated by silicon detectors, having capacitances up to 100 pF. The chip structure includes 32 analog channels, each consisting of a charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) with a p-MOS input transistor (W = 8 mm, L = 0.5 μ m), a shaper (peaking time of 2 us) and a T&H circuit. The ASIC showed a 120 pC dynamic range at a SNR of 2.5 for the particles with minimal ionization energy (1 mip). The chip was fabricated by the 0.35 um CMOS process via Europractice and tested both at lab conditions and in the SPS beam at CERN.

  17. Foam Micromechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraynik, A.M.; Neilsen, M.K.; Reinelt, D.A.; Warren, W.E.

    1998-11-03

    Foam evokes many different images: waves breaking at the seashore, the head on a pint of Guinness, an elegant dessert, shaving, the comfortable cushion on which you may be seated... From the mundane to the high tech, foams, emulsions, and cellular solids encompass a broad range of materials and applications. Soap suds, mayonnaise, and foamed polymers provide practical motivation and only hint at the variety of materials at issue. Typical of mukiphase materiaIs, the rheoIogy or mechanical behavior of foams is more complicated than that of the constituent phases alone, which may be gas, liquid, or solid. For example, a soap froth exhibits a static shear modulus-a hallmark of an elastic solid-even though it is composed primarily of two Newtonian fluids (water and air), which have no shear modulus. This apparent paradox is easily resolved. Soap froth contains a small amount of surfactant that stabilizes the delicate network of thin liq- uid films against rupture. The soap-film network deforms in response to a macroscopic strain; this increases interracial area and the corresponding sur- face energy, and provides the strain energy of classical elasticity theory [1]. This physical mechanism is easily imagined but very challenging to quantify for a realistic three-dimensional soap froth in view of its complex geome- try. Foam micromechanics addresses the connection between constituent properties, cell-level structure, and macroscopic mechanical behavior. This article is a survey of micromechanics applied to gas-liquid foams, liquid-liquid emulsions, and cellular solids. We will focus on static response where the foam deformation is very slow and rate-dependent phenomena such as viscous flow can be neglected. This includes nonlinear elasticity when deformations are large but reversible. We will also discuss elastic- plastic behavior, which involves yield phenomena. Foam structures based on polyhedra packed to fill space provide a unify- ing geometrical theme. Because a two

  18. The Read Out Controller for the ATLAS New Small Wheel

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)781403; The ATLAS collaboration; Popa, Stefan; Tulbure, Traian Tiberiu; Ivanovici, Mihail; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Levinson, Lorne; Vermeulen, Jos

    2016-01-01

    In the upgrade process of the ATLAS detector, the innermost stations of the endcaps (Small Wheels, SW) will be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have two chamber technologies, one for the Level-1 trigger function (small-strip Thin Gap Chambers, sTGC) and one primarily dedicated to precision tracking (Micromegas detectors, MM). Custom front-end Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) will be used to read and filter information from both the sTGC and MM detectors. In the context of the New Small Wheel data path, we designed the Read Out Controller (ROC) ASIC for handling, preprocessing and formatting the data generated by the NSW VMM upstream chips. The ROC will concentrate the data streams from 8 VMMs, filter data based on the BCID and transmit the data to FELIX via the L1DDC. ROC is composed of 8 VMM Capture modules, a cross-bar and 4 SubROC modules. The output data is sent via 4 high-speed e-links.

  19. PARISROC, a Photomultiplier Array Integrated Read Out Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Di Lorenzo, S Conforti; Dulucq, F; De La Taille, C; Martin-Chassard, G; Berni, M El; Wei, W

    2010-01-01

    PARISROC is a complete read out chip, in AMS SiGe 0.35 !m technology, for photomultipliers array. It allows triggerless acquisition for next generation neutrino experiments and it belongs to an R&D program funded by the French national agency for research (ANR) called PMm2: ?Innovative electronics for photodetectors array used in High Energy Physics and Astroparticles? (ref.ANR-06-BLAN-0186). The ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) integrates 16 independent and auto triggered channels with variable gain and provides charge and time measurement by a Wilkinson ADC (Analog to Digital Converter) and a 24-bit Counter. The charge measurement should be performed from 1 up to 300 photo- electrons (p.e.) with a good linearity. The time measurement allowed to a coarse time with a 24-bit counter at 10 MHz and a fine time on a 100ns ramp to achieve a resolution of 1 ns. The ASIC sends out only the relevant data through network cables to the central data storage. This paper describes the front-end electroni...

  20. The COMPASS RICH-1 read-out system

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, G; Bradamante, Franco; Bressan, A; Chapiro, A; Cicuttin, A; Ciliberti, P; Colavita, A A; Costa, S; Crespo, M; Cristaudo, P; Dalla Torre, S; Díaz, V; Fauland, P; Fratnik, F

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the reconfigurable read-out system for the 82944 RICH-1 channels of the COMPASS experiment (NA58) at CERN. The system is based on 192 identical large front-end boards (BORA board). BORA was designed for acquiring, digitizing, threshold subtracting and transmitting event data. The overall operation of the board is controlled and supervised by a DSP tightly interacting with an FPGA that acts as a parallel co-processor. The DSP allows characterizing each analog channel by locally calculating noise and pedestal. Each BORA communicates with the outside world through two optical fibers and through a dedicated DSP network. One optical fiber is used to receive event triggers, and the other one is used to transmit event data to subsequent processing stages of the acquisition system. The DSP network allows reconfiguring and reprogramming the DSPs and FPGAs as well as acquiring sample events to visualize the overall operation of the system. The whole RICH has eight DSP networks working in parallel. ...

  1. Modeling high signal-to-noise ratio in a novel silicon MEMS microphone with comb readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manz, Johannes; Dehe, Alfons; Schrag, Gabriele

    2017-05-01

    Strong competition within the consumer market urges the companies to constantly improve the quality of their devices. For silicon microphones excellent sound quality is the key feature in this respect which means that improving the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), being strongly correlated with the sound quality is a major task to fulfill the growing demands of the market. MEMS microphones with conventional capacitive readout suffer from noise caused by viscous damping losses arising from perforations in the backplate [1]. Therefore, we conceived a novel microphone design based on capacitive read-out via comb structures, which is supposed to show a reduction in fluidic damping compared to conventional MEMS microphones. In order to evaluate the potential of the proposed design, we developed a fully energy-coupled, modular system-level model taking into account the mechanical motion, the slide film damping between the comb fingers, the acoustic impact of the package and the capacitive read-out. All submodels are physically based scaling with all relevant design parameters. We carried out noise analyses and due to the modular and physics-based character of the model, were able to discriminate the noise contributions of different parts of the microphone. This enables us to identify design variants of this concept which exhibit a SNR of up to 73 dB (A). This is superior to conventional and at least comparable to high-performance variants of the current state-of-the art MEMS microphones [2].

  2. Evaluation of Fermi Read-out of the ATLAS Tilecal Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Agnvall, S; Albiol, F; Alifanov, A; Amaral, P; Amelin, D V; Amorim, A; Anderson, K J; Angelini, C; Antola, A; Astesan, F; Astvatsaturov, A R; Autiero, D; Badaud, F; Barreira, G; Benetta, R; Berglund, S R; Blanchot, G; Blucher, E; Blaj, C; Bodö, P; Bogush, A A; Bohm, C; Boldea, V; Borisov, O N; Bosman, M; Bouhemaid, N; Brette, P; Breveglieri, L; Bromberg, C; Brossard, M; Budagov, Yu A; Calôba, L P; Carvalho, J; Casado, M P; Castera, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Chadelas, R; Chevaleyre, J C; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Cobal, M; Cogswell, F; Colaço, F; Constantinescu, S; Costanzo, D; Crouau, M; Dadda, L; Daudon, F; David, J; David, M; Davidek, T; Dawson, J; De, K; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Downing, R; Dugne, J J; Efthymiopoulos, I; Engström, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Evans, H; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fristedt, A; Gallas, E J; Gaspar, M; Gildemeister, O; Givoletto, M; Glagolev, V V; Goggi, Giorgio V; Gómez, A; Gong, S; Guz, Yu; Grabskii, V; Grieco, M; Hakopian, H H; Haney, M W; Hansen, M; Hellman, S; Henriques, A; Hentzell, H; Holmberg, T; Holmgren, S O; Honoré, P F; Huston, J; Ivanyushenkov, Yu M; Jon-And, K; Juste, A; Kakurin, S; Karapetian, G V; Karyukhin, A N; Kérek, A; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kopikov, S V; Kostrikov, M E; Kostyukhin, V; Kukhtin, V V; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Kurzbauer, W; Lami, S; Landi, G; Lapin, V; Lazzeroni, C; Lebedev, A; Leitner, R; Li, J; Lippi, M; Le Dortz, O; Löfstedt, B; Lomakin, Yu F; Lomakina, O V; Lokajícek, M; Lund-Jensen, B; Maio, A; Malyukov, S N; Mariani, R; Marroquin, F; Martins, J P; Mazzoni, E; Merritt, F S; Michel, B; Miller, R; Minashvili, I A; Miralles, L; Mnatzakanian, E A; Montarou, G; Motto, S; Muanza, G S; Némécek, S; Nessi, Marzio; Ödmark, A; Onofre, A; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Patriarca, J; Pereira, A; Perlas, J A; Persson, S T; Petit, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinhão, J; Poggioli, Luc; Poirot, S; Polesello, G; Price, L E; Proudfoot, J; Pukhov, O; Reinmuth, G; Renzoni, G; Richards, R; Riu, I; Romanov, V; Ronceux, B; Rumyantsev, V; Rusakovitch, N A; Sami, M; Sanders, H; Santos, J; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Sawyer, L; Says, L P; Schwemling, P; Seixas, J M; Selldén, B; Semenov, A A; Shchelchkov, A S; Shochet, M J; Simaitis, V J; Sissakian, A N; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O; Sonderegger, P; Soustruznik, K; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E A; Stefanelli, R; Stephens, R; Suk, M; Sundblad, R; Svensson, C; Tang, F; Tardell, S; Tas, P; Teubert, F; Thaler, J J; Tokár, S; Topilin, N D; Trka, Z; Turcot, A S; Turcotte, M; Valkár, S; Varanda, M J; Vartapetian, A H; Vazeille, F; Vinogradov, V; Vivaldi, F; Vorozhtsov, S B; Wagner, D; White, A; Wolters, H; Yamdagni, N; Yarygin, G; Yosef, C; Yuan, J; Zaitsev, A; Zdrazil, M

    1998-01-01

    Prototypes of the \\fermi{} system have been used to read out a prototype of the \\atlas{} hadron calorimeter in a beam test at the CERN SPS. The \\fermi{} read-out system, using a compressor and a 40 MHz sampling ADC, is compared to a standard charge integrating read-out by measuring the energy resolution of the calorimeter separately with the two systems on the same events. Signal processing techniques have been designed to optimize the treatment of \\fermi{} data. The resulting energy resolution is better than the one obtained with the standard read-out.

  3. Feasibility of a Frequency-Multiplexed TES Read-Out Using Superconducting Tunnel Junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a feasibility study of a frequency multiplexed read-out scheme for large number transition edge sensor arrays. The read-out makes use of frequency up- and down-conversion and RF-to-DC conversion with superconducting-isolator-superconducting tunnel junctions operating at GHz frequencies,

  4. An Electromechanical Model for the Cochlear Microphonic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teal, Paul D.; Lineton, Ben; Elliott, Stephen J.

    2011-11-01

    The first of the many electrical signals generated in the ear, nerves and brain as a response to a sound incident on the ear is the cochlear microphonic (CM). The CM is generated by the hair cells of the cochlea, primarily the outer hairs cells. The potentials of this signal are a nonlinear filtered version of the acoustic pressure at the tympanic membrane. The CM signal has been used very little in recent years for clinical audiology and audiological research. This is because of uncertainty in interpreting the CM signal as a diagnostic measure, and also because of the difficulty of obtaining the signal, which has usually required the use of a transtympanic electrode. There are however, several potential clinical and research applications for acquisition of the CM. To promote understanding of the CM, and potential clinical application, a model is presented which can account for the generation of the cochlear microphonic signal. The model incorporates micro-mechanical and macro-mechanical aspects of previously published models of the basilar membrane and reticular lamina, as well as cochlear fluid mechanics, piezoelectric activity and capacitance of the outer hair cells. It also models the electrical coupling of signals along the scalae.

  5. A new read-out architecture for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Valero, Alberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    TileCal is the Tile hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The LHC has planned a series of upgrades culminating in the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) which will increase of order five to seven times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity. TileCal will undergo an upgrade to accommodate to the HL-LHC parameters. The TileCal read-out electronics will be redesigned introducing a new read-out strategy. The new TileCal read-out architecture is presented including a description of the main electronics modules and some preliminary results obtained with the first demonstrator system.

  6. Development of ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Read-out Electronics for the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Newcomer, Mitchel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The high-luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider will provide a 5-7 times greater instantaneous and total luminosities than assumed in the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters and their read-out system. An improved trigger system with higher acceptance rate and longer latency and a better radiation tolerance require an upgrade of the read-out electronics. Concepts for the future read-out of the 183.000 calorimeter channels at 40-80 MHz and 16 bit dynamic range, and the development of radiation tolerant, low noise, low power and high-bandwidth electronic components will be presented.

  7. Studies of MaPMTs with beetle-chip read-out

    CERN Document Server

    Muheim, F

    2005-01-01

    We have evaluated the 64-channel Multianode Photo-Multiplier (MaPMT) with 8-stage dynodes for the LHCb RICH detectors. With a Beetle1.2 chip to read-out the MaPMT, we have demonstrated that the MaPMT performance is as expected using particle beams and LED light sources. We have also measured the pulse shape from 12-stage dynode MaPMTs, read out with the Beetle1.2-MA0 chip.

  8. Studies of MaPMTs with beetle-chip read-out

    CERN Document Server

    Muheim, F

    2005-01-01

    We have evaluated the 64-channel Multianode Photo-Multiplier (MaPMT) with 8-stage dynodes for the LHCb RICH detectors. With a Beetle 1.2 chip to read-out the MaPMT, we have demonstrated that the MaPMT performance is as expected using particle beams and LED light sources. We have also measured the pulse shape from 12-stage dynode MaPMTs, read out with the Beetle 1.2-MA0 chip.

  9. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    CERN Document Server

    Akerstedt, H; The ATLAS collaboration; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, C; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new read-out system will be installed in one slice of ...

  10. A read-out buffer prototype for ATLAS high level triggers

    CERN Document Server

    Calvet, D; Huet, M; Le Dû, P; Mandjavidze, I D; Mur, M

    2000-01-01

    Read-Out Buffers are critical components in the dataflow chain of the ATLAS Trigger/DAQ system. At up to 75 kHz, after each Level-1 trigger accept signal, these devices receive and store digitized data from groups of front-end electronic channels. Several Read-Out Buffers are grouped to form a Read-Out Buffer Complex that acts as a data server for the High Level Triggers selection algorithms and for the final data collection system. This paper describes a functional prototype of a Read-Out Buffer based on a custom made PCI mezzanine card that is designed to accept input data at up to 160 MB/s, to store up to 8 MB of data and to distribute data chunks at the desired request rate. We describe the hardware of the card that is based on an Intel I960 processor and CPLDs. We present the integration of several of these cards in a Read-Out Buffer Complex. We measure various performance figures and we discuss to which extent these can fulfill ATLAS needs. 5 Refs.

  11. Reliable and redundant FPGA based read-out design in the ATLAS TileCal Demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akerstedt, Henrik; Muschter, Steffen; Drake, Gary; Anderson, Kelby; Bohm, Christian; Oreglia, Mark; Tang, Fukun

    2015-10-01

    The Tile Calorimeter at ATLAS [1] is a hadron calorimeter based on steel plates and scintillating tiles read out by PMTs. The current read-out system uses standard ADCs and custom ASICs to digitize and temporarily store the data on the detector. However, only a subset of the data is actually read out to the counting room. The on-detector electronics will be replaced around 2023. To achieve the required reliability the upgraded system will be highly redundant. Here the ASICs will be replaced with Kintex-7 FPGAs from Xilinx. This, in addition to the use of multiple 10 Gbps optical read-out links, will allow a full read-out of all detector data. Due to the higher radiation levels expected when the beam luminosity is increased, opportunities for repairs will be less frequent. The circuitry and firmware must therefore be designed for sufficiently high reliability using redundancy and radiation tolerant components. Within a year, a hybrid demonstrator including the new readout system will be installed in one slice of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. This will allow the proposed upgrade to be thoroughly evaluated well before the planned 2023 deployment in all slices, especially with regard to long term reliability. Different firmware strategies alongside with their integration in the demonstrator are presented in the context of high reliability protection against hardware malfunction and radiation induced errors.

  12. Fiber Optic Microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. C.; George, Thomas; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Research into advanced pressure sensors using fiber-optic technology is aimed at developing compact size microphones. Fiber optic sensors are inherently immune to electromagnetic noise, and are very sensitive, light weight, and highly flexible. In FY 98, NASA researchers successfully designed and assembled a prototype fiber-optic microphone. The sensing technique employed was fiber optic Fabry-Perot interferometry. The sensing head is composed of an optical fiber terminated in a miniature ferrule with a thin, silicon-microfabricated diaphragm mounted on it. The optical fiber is a single mode fiber with a core diameter of 8 micron, with the cleaved end positioned 50 micron from the diaphragm surface. The diaphragm is made up of a 0.2 micron thick silicon nitride membrane whose inner surface is metallized with layers of 30 nm titanium, 30 nm platinum, and 0.2 micron gold for efficient reflection. The active sensing area is approximately 1.5 mm in diameter. The measured differential pressure tolerance of this diaphragm is more than 1 bar, yielding a dynamic range of more than 100 dB.

  13. Read-out calibration of a SOI capacitive transducer using the pull-in voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, L.; Rocha, L. A.; Cretu, E.; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2008-06-01

    The pull-in voltage of a parallel plate electrostatic transducer is used to determine the amount of over-etching in fabricated devices. A detailed analysis of the capacitor behaviour over the full displacement range yields a model, which is used to describe the relation between over-etching and measured pull-in voltage. SEM photos confirm the over-etching measurement based on pull-in voltage. This information is used to linearize a charge amplifying read-out circuit with an intrinsic nonlinear transfer function. The remaining nonlinearity error of the read-out is less than 1%.

  14. The Read-Out Shutter Unit of the Euclid VIS Instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Genolet, L; Paltani, S; Autissier, N; Larcheveque, C; Thomas, C

    2016-01-01

    Euclid is the second medium-size mission (M2) of the ESA Cosmic Vision Program, currently scheduled for a launch in 2020. The two instruments on-board Euclid, VIS and NISP, will provide key measurements to investigate the nature of dark energy, advancing our knowledge on cosmology. We present in this contribution the development and manufacturing status of the VIS Read-out Shutter Unit, whose main function is to prevent direct light from falling onto the VIS CCDs during the read-out of the scientific exposures and to allow the dark-current/bias calibrations of the instrument.

  15. Biodegradable micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Greve, Anders; Schmid, Silvan

    The development of biopolymers for food packaging, medical engineering or drug delivery is a growing field of research [1]. At the same time, the interest in methods for detailed analysis of biopolymers is increasing. Micromechanical sensors are versatile tools for the characterization of mechani......The development of biopolymers for food packaging, medical engineering or drug delivery is a growing field of research [1]. At the same time, the interest in methods for detailed analysis of biopolymers is increasing. Micromechanical sensors are versatile tools for the characterization...... of biopolymers to microfabrication is challenging, as these polymers are affected by common processes such as photolithography or wet etching. Here, we present two methods for fabrication of biodegradable micromechanical sensors. First, we fabricated bulk biopolymer microcantilevers using nanoimprint lithography...

  16. Setup, tests and results for the ATLAS TileCal Read Out Driver production

    CERN Document Server

    Valero, Alberto; Castillo, V; Cuenca, C; Ferrer, A; Fullana, E; González, V; Higón, E; Munar, A; Poveda, J; Ruiz-Martínez, A; Salvachúa, B; Sanchís, E; Solans, C; Soret, J; Torres, J; Valls, J A

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe the performance and test results of the production of the 38 ATLAS TileCal Read Out Drivers (RODs). We first describe the basic hardware specifications and firmware functionality of the modules, the test-bench setup used for production and the test procedure to qualify the boards. We then finally show and discuss the performance results.

  17. Added value of IP-10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, Sivmakumaran; Ritz, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    We have explored the added value of IFNγ-inducible protein 10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific immunity in young Indian children where the sensitivity of the IGRA for tuberculosis (TB) is poor. Reduced frequency of indeterminate results and an increased sensitivity for TB...

  18. Controlling and Monitoring the Data Flow of the LHCb Read-out and DAQ Network

    CERN Document Server

    Schwemmer, Rainer; Neufeld, N; Svantesson, D

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb read-out uses a set of 320 FPGA based boards as interface between the on-detector hardware and the GBE DAQ network. The boards are the logical Level 1 (L1) read-out electronics and aggregate the experiment’s raw data into event fragments that are sent to the DAQ network. To control the many parameters of the read-out boards, an embedded PC is included on each board, connecting to the boards ICs and FPGAs. The data from the L1 boards is sent through an aggregation network into the High Level Trigger farm. The farm comprises approximately 1500 PCs which at first assemble the fragments from the L1 boards and then do a partial reconstruction and selection of the events. In total there are approximately 3500 network connections. Data is pushed through the network and there is no mechanism for resending packets. Loss of data on a small scale is acceptable but care has to be taken to avoid data loss if possible. To monitor and debug losses, different probes are inserted throughout the entire read-out cha...

  19. A new read-out architecture for the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Phase-II Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Valero, Alberto; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    TileCal is the Tile hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The LHC has planned a series of upgrades culminating in the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) which will increase of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity. TileCal will undergo an upgrade to accommodate to the HL-LHC parameters. The TileCal read-out electronics will be redesigned introducing a new read-out strategy. The data generated in the detector will be transferred to the new Read-Out Drivers (sRODs) located in off-detector for every bunch crossing before any event selection is applied. Furthermore, the sROD will be responsible of providing preprocessed trigger information to the ATLAS first level of trigger. It will implement pipeline memories to cope with the latencies and rates specified in the new trigger schema and in overall it will represent the interface between the data acquisition, trigger and control systems and the on-detector electronics. The new TileCal read-out architecture will be presented includi...

  20. A new pixel level digital read out integrated circuits for ultraviolet imaging sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Lan, Tian-yi; Yuan, Yong-gang; Li, Xiang-yang

    2014-11-01

    The ultraviolet imaging sensors consist of two important parts: the array of detectors and the read out integrated circuits. Along with the demand for the fine resolution, large input dynamic range and high integration degree of the imaging sensors, the functions of read out integrated circuits are becoming more and more important. The on chip analog to digital conversion is the main directions of research on this area. In this paper, we presented a new digital read out integrated circuits for ultraviolet imaging sensors. The proposed circuits have an analog to digital converter in each pixel, which enable the parallel analog to digital conversion of the whole pixel array. The developed circuits have a 50um×50um pixel area with a 128×128 size, and are designed in a 0.35um four metal double poly mixed signal CMOS process. The simulation results show that the designed analog to digital converter has an accuracy of 0.2mV and can achieve the dynamic range of 88dB. The proposed circuits realize the low noise and high speed digital output of read out integrated circuits for ultraviolet imaging sensors.

  1. Test beam results for silicon microstrip detectors with VLSI read-out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Litke, A.; Schwarz, A.; Turala, M.; Lueth, V.; Breakstone, A.; Parker, S.

    1986-04-01

    A telescope consisting of three silicon microstrip detectors has been tested in a high energy positron beam at SLAC. Each detector has trips with 25 micron pitch and is read out by two 128-channel NMOS integrated circuits (''Microplex''). Results on the signal-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution, and two-track separation are given.

  2. Cantilever-based sensor with integrated optical read-out using single mode waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Maria; Zauner, Dan; Calleja, Montserrat;

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the design, fabrication and mechanical characterisation of an integrated optical read-out scheme for cantilever-based biosensors. A cantilever can be used as a biosensor by monitoring its bending caused by the surface stress generated due to chemical reactions occurring on its ...

  3. Silicon microphones - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwstra, Siebe; Storgaard-Larsen, Torben; Scheeper, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Two application areas of microphones are discussed, those for precision measurement and those for hearing instruments. Silicon microphones are under investigation for both areas, and Danish industry plays a key role in both. The opportunities of silicon, as well as the challenges and expectations......, are discussed. For precision measurement the challenge for silicon is large, while for hearing instruments silicon seems to be very promising....

  4. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schössler, S.; Bromberger, B.; Brandis, M.; Schmidt, L. Ph H.; Tittelmeier, K.; Czasch, A.; Dangendorf, V.; Jagutzki, O.

    2012-02-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and γ radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy γ radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate γ energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  5. Read-out electronics for fast photon detection with COMPASS RICH-1

    CERN Document Server

    Abbon, P

    2008-01-01

    A new read-out electronics system has been developed for the fast photon detection of the central region of the COMPASS RICH-1. The project is based on multi-anode photomultipliers read out by the high-sensitivity MAD4 preamplifier-discriminator and the dead-time free F1 TDC chip characterised by high time resolution. The system has been designed taking into account the high photon flux in the central region of the detector and the high rate requirement of the COMPASS experiment. The system is described in detail together with the measured performances. The new electronics system has been installed and used for the 2006 data taking; it entirely fulfils the expected performances.

  6. Time and position sensitive single photon detector for scintillator read-out

    CERN Document Server

    Schössler, Sven; Brandis, Michal; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Tittelmeier, Kai; Czasch, Achim; Dangendorf, Volker; Jagutzki, Ottmar

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a photon counting detector system for combined neutron and gamma radiography which can determine position, time and intensity of a secondary photon flash created by a high-energy particle or photon within a scintillator screen. The system is based on a micro-channel plate photomultiplier concept utilizing image charge coupling to a position- and time-sensitive read-out anode placed outside the vacuum tube in air, aided by a standard photomultiplier and very fast pulse-height analyzing electronics. Due to the low dead time of all system components it can cope with the high throughput demands of a proposed combined fast neutron and dual discrete energy gamma radiography method (FNDDER). We show tests with different types of delay-line read-out anodes and present a novel pulse-height-to-time converter circuit with its potential to discriminate gamma energies for the projected FNDDER devices for an automated cargo container inspection system (ACCIS).

  7. Single-shot read-out of a superconducting qubit using a Josephson parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Philip; Bengtsson, Andreas; Simoen, Michaël; Gustavsson, Simon; Shumeiko, Vitaly; Oliver, W. D.; Wilson, C. M.; Delsing, Per; Bylander, Jonas

    2016-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a read-out technique for a superconducting qubit by dispersively coupling it with a Josephson parametric oscillator. We employ a tunable quarter wavelength superconducting resonator and modulate its resonant frequency at twice its value with an amplitude surpassing the threshold for parametric instability. We map the qubit states onto two distinct states of classical parametric oscillation: one oscillating state, with 185+/-15 photons in the resonator, and one with zero oscillation amplitude. This high contrast obviates a following quantum-limited amplifier. We demonstrate proof-of-principle, single-shot read-out performance, and present an error budget indicating that this method can surpass the fidelity threshold required for quantum computing.

  8. Integrated optical read-out for polymeric cantilever-based sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenje, Maria

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents a novel read-out method developed for cantilever-based sensors. Cantilevers are thin beams clamped at one end and during the last 10 years they have emerged as an interesting new type of bio/chemical sensor. The specific recognition of a chemical manifests itself as a bending...... Young’s modulus instead of the conventional materials Si and Si3N4. Here, a novel read-out method is presented where optical waveguides are used to integrate the light into the cantilever. It is an all-polymer device where both the cantilever and the waveguides are fabricated in the negative resist SU-8....... Waveguides are structured on either side of the cantilever that is free-hanging in a microfluidic channel. Light is guided into the system and is either transmitted through the cantilever or reflected off the cantilever front-end, depending on the mode of operation. This work shows that waveguides, only...

  9. Single-shot read-out of a superconducting qubit using a Josephson parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Philip; Bengtsson, Andreas; Simoen, Michaël; Gustavsson, Simon; Shumeiko, Vitaly; Oliver, W. D.; Wilson, C. M.; Delsing, Per; Bylander, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate a read-out technique for a superconducting qubit by dispersively coupling it with a Josephson parametric oscillator. We employ a tunable quarter wavelength superconducting resonator and modulate its resonant frequency at twice its value with an amplitude surpassing the threshold for parametric instability. We map the qubit states onto two distinct states of classical parametric oscillation: one oscillating state, with 185±15 photons in the resonator, and one with zero oscillation amplitude. This high contrast obviates a following quantum-limited amplifier. We demonstrate proof-of-principle, single-shot read-out performance, and present an error budget indicating that this method can surpass the fidelity threshold required for quantum computing. PMID:27156732

  10. A Complete Set of Firmware for the TileCal Read-Out Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Valero, A; Cuenca, C; Ferrer, A; Fullana, E; González, V; Higón, E; Poveda, J; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Salvachúa, B; Sanchís, E; Solans, C; Torres, J; Valls, J A

    2007-01-01

    TileCal is the hadronic tile calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at LHC/CERN. The Read-Out Driver (ROD) is the main component of the TileCal back-end electronics. The ROD is a VME 64x 9u board with multiple programmable devices which requires a complete set of firmware. This paper describes the firmware and functionalities of all these programmable devices, especially the DSP Processing Units daughterboards where the data processing takes place.

  11. Simulation of an efficiency measurement of the CMS pixel Read-Out Chip at high rates.

    CERN Document Server

    Delcourt, Martin

    2014-01-01

    My summer student project investigates the effects on the efficiency of out-of-sync events during a beam test at Fermilab on pixel detectors for the phase 1 upgrade of the CMS. While the best results of this project came from direct lab measurements, most of my work was focused on the development of a wider simulation to have a better understanding of the behaviour of the read-out chips during the beam test.

  12. High sensitivity phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detector with combined amplitude and phase read-out

    OpenAIRE

    Bellini, F.; Cardani, L; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; M. Martinez; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of wide-area cryogenic light detectors with good energy resolution is one of the priorities of next generation bolometric experiments searching for rare interactions, as the simultaneous read-out of the light and heat signals enables background suppression through particle identification. Among the proposed technological approaches for the phonon sensor, the naturally-multiplexed Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) stand out for their excellent intrinsic energy resolution and ...

  13. Characterisation and modelling of transition edge sensor distributed read-out imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Whitford, Chris H.; Fraser, George W.; Goldie, David J.

    2006-04-01

    We report on the experimental characterisation and modelling of Transition Edge Sensor (TES)-based Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), for use as position-sensitive detectors in X-ray astronomy. Latest experimental results from prototype DROIDs using Ir TESs with Au absorbers are reported. Through modelling and the development of signal processing algorithms we are able to design the DROID for optimum spectral and spatial resolution depending upon application.

  14. Characterisation and modelling of transition edge sensor distributed read-out imaging devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Stephen J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Research Centre, Leicester University, Michael Atiyah Building, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sts@star.le.ac.uk; Whitford, Chris H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Research Centre, Leicester University, Michael Atiyah Building, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fraser, George W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Space Research Centre, Leicester University, Michael Atiyah Building, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Goldie, David J. [Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, Cambridge University, Madingley Road Cambridge, CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    We report on the experimental characterisation and modelling of Transition Edge Sensor (TES)-based Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), for use as position-sensitive detectors in X-ray astronomy. Latest experimental results from prototype DROIDs using Ir TESs with Au absorbers are reported. Through modelling and the development of signal processing algorithms we are able to design the DROID for optimum spectral and spatial resolution depending upon application.

  15. Optically read out GEM-based TPC operation and preliminary scintillation studies

    CERN Document Server

    Galgoczi, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this project was to realise the reconstruction of tracks in an optically read out GEM (Gas Electron Multiplier) based Time Projection Chamber (TPC). Secondary goal was to initialise a series of systematic studies on the scintillation of particles in Ar/CF4 (80-20%) mixture. Track reconstruction is needed for primary scintillation studies as only tracks fully contained can be considered. A vetoing and trigerring logic was built for the TPC from NIM modules.

  16. Design and Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer RPC Read Out Driver

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, A; Cevenini, F; Della Pietra; Della Volpe; Izzo, V

    2008-01-01

    The RPC subsystem of the ATLAS muon spectrometer provides the Level-1 trigger in the barrel and it is read out by a specific DAQ system. On-detector electronics pack the RPC data in frames, tagged with an event number assigned by the trigger logic, and transmit them to the counting room on optical fibre. Data from each sector are then routed together to a Read-Out Driver (ROD) board. This is a custom processor that parses the frames, checks their coherence and builds a data structure for all the RPCs of one of the 32 sectors of the spectrometer. Each ROD sends the event fragments to a Read-Out subsystem for further event building and analysis. The ROD is a VME64x board, designed around two Xilinx Virtex-II FPGAs and an ARM7 microcontroller. In this paper we describe the board architecture and the event binding algorithm. The boards have been installed in the ATLAS USA15 control room and have been successfully used in the ATLAS commissioning runs.

  17. Controlling and Monitoring the Data Flow of the LHCb Read-out and DAQ Network

    CERN Multimedia

    Schwemmer, R; Neufeld, N; Svantesson, D

    2011-01-01

    The LHCb readout uses a set of 320 FPGA based boards as interface between the on-detector hardware and the GBE DAQ network. The boards are the logical Level 1 (L1) read-out electronics and aggregate the experiment's raw data into event fragments that are sent to the DAQ network. To control the many parameters of the read-out boards, an embedded PC is included on each board, connecting to the boards ICs and FPGAs. The data from the L1 boards is sent through an aggregation network into the High Level Trigger farm. The farm comprises approximately 1500 PCs which at first assemble the fragments from the L1 boards and then do a partial reconstruction and selection of the events. In total there are approximately 3500 network connections. Data is pushed through the network and there is no mechanism for resending packets. Loss of data on a small scale is acceptable but care has to be taken to avoid data loss if possible. To monitor and debug losses, different probes are inserted throughout the entire read-out chain t...

  18. AC Read-Out Circuits for Single Pixel Characterization of TES Microcalorimeters and Bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardi, L.; van de Kuur, J.; Bandler, S.; Bruijn, M.; de Korte, P.; Gao, J. R.; den Hartog, R.; Hijmering, R. A.; Hoevers, H.; Koshropanah, P.; Kilbourne, C.; Lindemann, M. A.; Parra Borderias, M.; Ridder, M.

    2011-01-01

    SRON is developing Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) for the read-out of transition edge sensor (TES) soft x-ray microcalorimeters for the XMS instrument of the International X-ray Observatory and far-infrared bolometers for the SAFARI instrument on the Japanese mission SPICA. In FDM the TESs are AC voltage biased at frequencies from 0.5 to 6 MHz in a superconducting LC resonant circuit and the signal is read-out by low noise and high dynamic range SQUIDs amplifiers. The TES works as an amplitude modulator. We report on several AC bias experiments performed on different detectors. In particular, we discuss the results on the characterization of Goddard Space Flight Center x-ray pixels and SRON bolometers. The paper focuses on the analysis of different read-out configurations developed to optimize the noise and the impedance matching between the detectors and the SQUID amplifier. A novel feedback network electronics has been developed to keep the SQUID in flux locked loop, when coupled to superconducting high Q circuits, and to optimally tune the resonant bias circuit. The achieved detector performances are discussed in view of the instrument requirement for the two space missions.

  19. Micromechanics of hierarchical materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    A short overview of micromechanical models of hierarchical materials (hybrid composites, biomaterials, fractal materials, etc.) is given. Several examples of the modeling of strength and damage in hierarchical materials are summarized, among them, 3D FE model of hybrid composites...... with nanoengineered matrix, fiber bundle model of UD composites with hierarchically clustered fibers and 3D multilevel model of wood considered as a gradient, cellular material with layered composite cell walls. The main areas of research in micromechanics of hierarchical materials are identified, among them......, the investigations of the effects of load redistribution between reinforcing elements at different scale levels, of the possibilities to control different material properties and to ensure synergy of strengthening effects at different scale levels and using the nanoreinforcement effects. The main future directions...

  20. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  1. Construction and performance of large wire spark chambers with magnetostrictive read-out

    CERN Document Server

    Grayer, G; Dietl, H; Hyams, Bernard David; Jones, C; Koch, W; Lorenz, E; Lütjens, G; Männer, W; Meissburger, J; Stierlin, U; Weilhammer, P

    1972-01-01

    Describes the construction and performance of wire spark chambers having an active area of 3.60*0.90 m/sup 2/, a gap of 10 mm, and a wire spacing of 1 mm. Magnetostrictive read-out from both planes gives two coordinate values per chamber. Chambers of this type, together with smaller ones of similar construction, have been part of a magnet spectrometer which performed reliably between May 1970 and May 1971; during this time they were pulsed approximately 10/sup 7/ times. (9 refs).

  2. Design and performance testing of the read-out boards for the CMS-DT chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Read-out boards (ROB) are one of the key elements of readout system for CMS barrel muon drift chambers. To insure proper and reliable operation under all detector environmental conditions an exhaustive set of tests have been developed and performed on the 30 pre-series ROB's before production starts. These tests include operation under CMS radiation conditions to detect and estimate SEU rates, validation with real chamber signals and trigger rates, studies of time resolution and linearity, crosstalk analysis, track pattern generation for calibration and on-line tests, and temperature cycling to uncover marginal conditions. We present the status of the ROB and tests results. (5 refs).

  3. Photoelectron Yields of Scintillation Counters with Embedded Wavelength-Shifting Fibers Read Out With Silicon Photomultipliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artikov, Akram; et al.

    2017-09-19

    Photoelectron yields of extruded scintillation counters with titanium dioxide coating and embedded wavelength shifting fibers read out by silicon photomultipliers have been measured at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility using 120\\,GeV protons. The yields were measured as a function of transverse, longitudinal, and angular positions for a variety of scintillator compositions and reflective coating mixtures, fiber diameters, and photosensor sizes. Timing performance was also studied. These studies were carried out by the Cosmic Ray Veto Group of the Mu2e collaboration as part of their R\\&D program.

  4. Gafchromic EBT3 film dosimetry in electron beams - energy dependence and improved film read-out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, Petri; Ojala, Jarkko; Kaijaluoto, Sampsa; Jokelainen, Ilkka; Kosunen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    For megavoltage photon radiation, the fundamental dosimetry characteristics of Gafchromic EBT3 film were determined in 60Co gamma ray beam with addition of experimental and Monte Carlo (MC)-simulated energy dependence of the film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, and 16 MeV electron beams in water phantom. For the film read-out, two phase correction of scanner sensitivity was applied: a matrix correction for scanning area and dose-dependent correction by iterative procedure. With these corrections, the uniformity of response can be improved to be within ± 50 pixel values (PVs). To improve the read-out accuracy, a procedure with flipped film orientations was established. With the method, scanner uniformity can be improved further and dust particles, scratches and/or dirt on scan-ner glass can be detected and eliminated. Responses from red and green channels were averaged for read-out, which decreased the effect of noise present in values from separate channels. Since the signal level with the blue channel is considerably lower than with other channels, the signal variation due to different perturbation effects increases the noise level so that the blue channel is not recommended to be used for dose determination. However, the blue channel can be used for the detection of emulsion thickness variations for film quality evaluations with unexposed films. With electron beams ranging from 6 MeV to 16 MeV and at reference measurement conditions in water, the energy dependence of the EBT3 film is uniform within 0.5%, with uncertainties close to 1.6% (k = 2). Including 6 MV photon beam and the electron beams mentioned, the energy dependence is within 1.1%. No notable differences were found between the experimental and MC-simulated responses, indicating negligible change in intrinsic energy dependence of the EBT3 film for 6 MV photon beam and 6 MeV-16 MeV electron beams. Based on the dosimetric characteristics of the EBT3 film, the read-out procedure established

  5. Electronics for the CMS muon drift tube chambers the read-out minicrate

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Oller, Juan Carlos; Willmott, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    On the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experimentat the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory, the drift tube chambers are responsible for muon detection and precise momentum measurement. In this paper the first level of the read out electronics for these drift tube chambers is described. These drift tube chambers will be located inside the muon barrel detector in the so-called minicrates (MCs), attached to the chambers. The read out boards (ROBs) are the main component of this first level data acquisition system, and they are responsible for the time digitalization related to Level 1 Accept (L1A) trigger of the incoming signals from the front-end electronics, followed by a consequent data merging to the next stages of the data acquisition system. ROBs' architecture and functionality have been exhaustively tested, as well as their capability of operation beyond the expected environmental conditions inside the CMS detector. Due to the satisfactory results obtained, final production of ROBs and their a...

  6. Innovative multi-cantilever array sensor system with MOEMS read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaldi, F.; Bieniek, T.; Janus, P.; Grabiec, P.; Majstrzyk, W.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2016-11-01

    Cantilever based sensor system are a well-established sensor family exploited in several every-day life applications as well as in high-end research areas. The very high sensitivity of such systems and the possibility to design and functionalize the cantilevers to create purpose built and highly selective sensors have increased the interest of the scientific community and the industry in further exploiting this promising sensors type. Optical deflection detection systems for cantilever sensors provide a reliable, flexible method for reading information from cantilevers with the highest sensitivity. However the need of using multi-cantilever arrays in several fields of application such as medicine, biology or safety related areas, make the optical method less suitable due to its structural complexity. Working in the frame of a the Joint Undertaking project Lab4MEMS II our group proposes a novel and innovative approach to solve this issue, by integrating a Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical-System (MOEMS) with dedicated optics, electronics and software with a MOEMS micro-mirror, ultimately developed in the frame of Lab4MEMSII. In this way we are able to present a closely packed, lightweight solution combining the advantages of standard optical read-out systems with the possibility of recording multiple read-outs from large cantilever arrays quasi simultaneously.

  7. The selective read-out processor for the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Girão de Almeida, Nuño Miguel; Faure, Jean Louis; Gachelin, Olivier; Gras, Philippe; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Mur, Michel; Varela, João

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the selective read-out processor (SRP) proposed for the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at LHC (CERN). The aim is to reduce raw ECAL data to a level acceptable by the CMS data acquisition (DAQ) system. For each positive level 1 trigger, the SRP is guided by trigger primitive generation electronics to identify ECAL regions with energy deposition satisfying certain programmable criteria. It then directs the ECAL read-out electronics to apply predefined zero suppression levels to the crystal data, depending whether the crystals fall within these regions or not. The main challenges for the SRP are some 200 high speed (1.6 Gbit/s) I/O channels, asynchronous operation at up to 100 kHz level 1 trigger rate, a 5- mu s real-time latency requirement and a need to retain flexibility in choice of selection algorithms. The architecture adopted for the SRP is based on modern parallel optic pluggable modules and high density field programmable gate array ...

  8. The NA62 Gigatracker: Detector properties and pixel read-out architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorini, M., E-mail: Massimiliano.Fiorini@cern.c [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carassiti, V. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Ceccucci, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cortina, E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Dellacasa, G. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marchetto, F. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Martin, E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Noy, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Petrucci, F. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Riedler, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rivetti, A. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Tiuraniemi, S. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-12-11

    The beam spectrometer of the NA62 experiment, named Gigatracker, has to perform single track reconstruction with unprecedented time resolution (150 ps rms) in a harsh radiation environment. To meet these requirements, and in order to reduce material budget to a minimum, three hybrid silicon pixel detector stations will be installed in vacuum. An adequate strategy to compensate for the discriminator time-walk must be implemented and R and D investigating two different options is ongoing. Two read-out chip prototypes have been designed in order to compare their performance: one approach is based on the use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC, while the other one is based on the use of a time-over-threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels. This paper describes the Gigatracker system, presents the global architectures of both read-out ASICs and reviews the current status of the R and D project.

  9. Single-shot read-out of an individual electron spin in a quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzerman, J M; Hanson, R; Willems Van Beveren, L H; Witkamp, B; Vandersypen, L M K; Kouwenhoven, L P

    2004-07-22

    Spin is a fundamental property of all elementary particles. Classically it can be viewed as a tiny magnetic moment, but a measurement of an electron spin along the direction of an external magnetic field can have only two outcomes: parallel or anti-parallel to the field. This discreteness reflects the quantum mechanical nature of spin. Ensembles of many spins have found diverse applications ranging from magnetic resonance imaging to magneto-electronic devices, while individual spins are considered as carriers for quantum information. Read-out of single spin states has been achieved using optical techniques, and is within reach of magnetic resonance force microscopy. However, electrical read-out of single spins has so far remained elusive. Here we demonstrate electrical single-shot measurement of the state of an individual electron spin in a semiconductor quantum dot. We use spin-to-charge conversion of a single electron confined in the dot, and detect the single-electron charge using a quantum point contact; the spin measurement visibility is approximately 65%. Furthermore, we observe very long single-spin energy relaxation times (up to approximately 0.85 ms at a magnetic field of 8 T), which are encouraging for the use of electron spins as carriers of quantum information.

  10. Micromechanics of hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The following summarizes the key points addressed during a tutorial session on the Micromechanics of Hearing that took place at the 12th International Workshop on the Mechanics of Hearing held at Cape Sounio, Greece, in June 2014. The tutorial was intended to present an overview of basic ideas and to address topics of current interest relevant to the Workshop. The session was recorded, and the audio file and accompanying visual content of the presentation can be found in the Mechanics of Hearing Digital Library (www.mechanicsofhearing.org).

  11. Biodegradable micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Greve, Anders; Schmid, Silvan

    of mechanical and thermal properties of polymers. For example, measurements of the resonance frequency of cantilevers were used to characterize thin polymer coatings in various environmental conditions [2]. Also, the influence of humidity on the Young’s modulus of SU-8 was evaluated [3]. However, introduction...... of biopolymers to microfabrication is challenging, as these polymers are affected by common processes such as photolithography or wet etching. Here, we present two methods for fabrication of biodegradable micromechanical sensors. First, we fabricated bulk biopolymer microcantilevers using nanoimprint lithography...

  12. Analysis of read-out heating rate effects on the glow peaks of TLD-100 using WinGCF software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauk, Sabar, E-mail: sabar@usm.my [Physics Section, School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Hussin, Siti Fatimah [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Alam, Md. Shah [Physics Section, School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Physics Department, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet (Bangladesh)

    2016-01-22

    This study was done to analyze the effects of the read-out heating rate on the LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) glow peaks using WinGCF computer software. The TLDs were exposed to X-ray photons with a potential difference of 72 kVp and 200 mAs in air and were read-out using a Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The TLDs were read-out using four read-out heating rates at 10, 7, 4 and 1 °C s{sup −1}. It was observed that lowering the heating rate could separate more glow peaks. The activation energy for peak 5 was found to be lower than that for peak 4. The peak maximum temperature and the integral value of the main peak decreased as the heating rate decreases.

  13. CMOS Integrated Single Electron Transistor Electrometry (CMOS-SET) circuit design for nanosecond quantum-bit read-out.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurrieri, Thomas M.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Levy, James E.

    2008-08-01

    Novel single electron transistor (SET) read-out circuit designs are described. The circuits use a silicon SET interfaced to a CMOS voltage mode or current mode comparator to obtain a digital read-out of the state of the qubit. The design assumes standard submicron (0.35 um) CMOS SOI technology using room temperature SPICE models. Implications and uncertainties related to the temperature scaling of these models to 100mK operation are discussed. Using this technology, the simulations predict a read-out operation speed of approximately Ins and a power dissipation per cell as low as 2nW for single-shot read-out, which is a significant advantage over currently used radio frequency SET (RF-SET) approaches.

  14. Bio-Inspired Micromechanical Directional Acoustic Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, William; Alves, Fabio; Karunasiri, Gamani

    Conventional directional sound sensors employ an array of spatially separated microphones and the direction is determined using arrival times and amplitudes. In nature, insects such as the Ormia ochracea fly can determine the direction of sound using a hearing organ much smaller than the wavelength of sound it detects. The fly's eardrums are mechanically coupled, only separated by about 1 mm, and have remarkable directional sensitivity. A micromechanical sensor based on the fly's hearing system was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using MEMS technology. The sensor consists of two 1 mm2 wings connected using a bridge and to the substrate using two torsional legs. The dimensions of the sensor and material stiffness determine the frequency response of the sensor. The vibration of the wings in response to incident sound at the bending resonance was measured using a laser vibrometer and found to be about 1 μm/Pa. The electronic response of the sensor to sound was measured using integrated comb finger capacitors and found to be about 25 V/Pa. The fabricated sensors showed good directional sensitivity. In this talk, the design, fabrication and characteristics of the directional sound sensor will be described. Supported by ONR and TDSI.

  15. A Prototype of the Read-out Subsystem of the BESⅢ DAQ Based on PowerPC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the prototype of the read-out subsystem which will be subject to the BESⅢ data acquisition system. According to the purpose of the BESⅢ, the event rate will be about 4000 Hz and the data rate up to 50 Mbytes/sec after Level 1 trigger. The read-out subsystem consists of some read-out crates and a read-out computer whose function is to initialize the hardware, to collect the event data from the front-end electronics after Level 1 trigger, to transfer data fragments to the computer in online form through two levels of computer pre-processing and high-speed network transmission. In this model, the crate level read-out implementation is based on the commercial single board computer MVME5100 running the VxWorks operating system.The article outlines the structure of the crate level testing platform of hardware and software. It puts emphasis on the framework of the read-out test model, data process flow and test method at crate level. Especially, it enumerates the key technologies in the process of design and analyses the test results. In addition, results which summarize the performance of the single board computer from the data transferring aspects will be presented.

  16. A Prototype of the Read-out Subsystem of the BESIII DAQ Based on PowerPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ning; Chu, Yuanping; Jin, Ge; Zhao, Jingwei

    2005-10-01

    This article describes the prototype of the read-out subsystem which will be subject to the BESIII data acquisition system. According to the purpose of the BESIII, the event rate will be about 4000 Hz and the data rate up to 50 Mbytes/sec after Level 1 trigger. The read-out subsystem consists of some read-out crates and a read-out computer whose function is to initialize the hardware, to collect the event data from the front-end electronics after Level 1 trigger, to transfer data fragments to the computer in online form through two levels of computer pre-processing and high-speed network transmission. In this model, the crate level read-out implementation is based on the commercial single board computer MVME5100 running the VxWorks operating system. The article outlines the structure of the crate level testing platform of hardware and software. It puts emphasis on the framework of the read-out test model, data process flow and test method at crate level. Especially, it enumerates the key technologies in the process of design and analyses the test results. In addition, results which summarize the performance of the single board computer from the data transferring aspects will be presented.

  17. A read-out system for the Medipix2 chip capable of 500 frames per second

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorino, M. [IFAE Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: maiorino@ifae.es; Martinez, R. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Pellegrini, G. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Blanchot, G. [IFAE Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Chmeissani, M. [IFAE Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, J. [IFAE Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lozano, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Puigdengoles, C. [IFAE Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Ullan, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, IMB-CNM-CSIC, UAB Campus, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    High-speed X-ray-imaging acquisition technique is a growing field that can be used to understand microscopic mechanism of different phenomena in biology and material science. IFAE and CNM developed a very high-speed readout system, named DEMAS, for the Medipix2. The system is able to read a single Medipix2 chip through the parallel bus at a rate of 1 kHz.With a duty cycle of 50%, the real sampling speed is 500 frames per second (fps). This implies that 1 ms is allocated to the exposure time and another millisecond is devoted to the read-out of the chip. In such configuration, the raw data throughput is about 500 Mbit/s. For the first time we present examples of acquisition at 500 fps of moving samples with X-rays working in direct capture and photon counting mode.

  18. Current feedback operational amplifiers as fast charge sensitive preamplifiers for photomultiplier read out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giachero, A; Gotti, C; Maino, M; Pessina, G, E-mail: claudio.gotti@mib.infn.it [INFN - Sezione di Milano-Bicocca, I-20126, Milano (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Fast charge sensitive preamplifiers were built using commercial current feedback operational amplifiers for fast read out of charge pulses from a photomultiplier tube. Current feedback opamps prove to be particularly well suited for this application where the charge from the detector is large, of the order of one million electrons, and high timing resolution is required. A proper circuit arrangement allows very fast signals, with rise times down to one nanosecond, while keeping the amplifier stable. After a review of current feedback circuit topology and stability constraints, we provide a 'recipe' to build stable and very fast charge sensitive preamplifiers from any current feedback opamp by adding just a few external components. The noise performance of the circuit topology has been evaluated and is reported in terms of equivalent noise charge.

  19. Current feedback operational amplifiers as fast charge sensitive preamplifiers for photomultiplier read out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2011-05-01

    Fast charge sensitive preamplifiers were built using commercial current feedback operational amplifiers for fast read out of charge pulses from a photomultiplier tube. Current feedback opamps prove to be particularly well suited for this application where the charge from the detector is large, of the order of one million electrons, and high timing resolution is required. A proper circuit arrangement allows very fast signals, with rise times down to one nanosecond, while keeping the amplifier stable. After a review of current feedback circuit topology and stability constraints, we provide a "recipe" to build stable and very fast charge sensitive preamplifiers from any current feedback opamp by adding just a few external components. The noise performance of the circuit topology has been evaluated and is reported in terms of equivalent noise charge.

  20. Distributed read-out imaging devices for x-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Roland H.; Martin, Didier D.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Verhoeve, Peter; Rando, Nicola; Peacock, Anthony J.; Brammertz, G.; Krumrey, Michael K.; Goldie, D. J.; Venn, R.

    2000-07-01

    We present an experimental study of the performance of Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), 1- and 2-D photon-counting imaging spectrometers, based on Ta/Al-based STJs placed on a Ta absorber. Results obtained with highly collimated illumination with 10 keV X-ray photons clearly demonstrate the imaging capabilities of 2-D DROIDs. The derived spatial FWHM resolution is 7 micrometers for a 200 X 200 micrometers 2 absorber. With a 1-D DROID we have measured an intrinsic energy resolution of 15 eV FWHM for 6 keV photons. At high energies (E > 6 keV) the resolution is limited by spatial fluctuations in the qp recombination rate.

  1. High sensitivity phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detector with combined amplitude and phase read-out

    CERN Document Server

    Bellini, F; Casali, N; Castellano, M G; Colantoni, I; Cosmelli, C; Cruciani, A; D'Addabbo, A; Di Domizio, S; Martinez, M; Tomei, C; Vignati, M

    2016-01-01

    The development of wide-area cryogenic light detectors with good energy resolution is one of the priorities of next generation bolometric experiments searching for rare interactions, as the simultaneous read-out of the light and heat signals enables background suppression through particle identification. Among the proposed technological approaches for the phonon sensor, the naturally-multiplexed Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) stand out for their excellent intrinsic energy resolution and reproducibility. To satisfy the large surface requirement (several cm$^2$) KIDs are deposited on an insulating substrate that converts the impinging photons into phonons.A fraction of phonons is absorbed by the KID, producing a signal proportional to the energy of the original photons. The potential of this technique was proved by the CALDER project, that reached a baseline resolution of 154$\\pm$7 eV RMS by sampling a 2$\\times$2 cm$^2$ Silicon substrate with 4 Aluminum KIDs. In this paper we present a prototype of Aluminu...

  2. Study of the VMM1 read-out chip in a neutron irradiation environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, T.; Fanourakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kokkoris, M.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Papageorgiou, K.; Tsipolitis, G.

    2016-05-01

    Within 2015, the LHC operated close to the design energy of √s = 13-14 TeV delivering instantaneous luminosities up to Script L = 5 × 1033 cm-2s-1. The ATLAS Phase-I upgrade in 2018/19 will introduce the MicroMEGAS detectors in the area of the small wheel at the end caps. Accompanying new electronics are designed and built such as the VMM front end ASIC, which provides energy, timing and triggering information and allows fast data read-out. The first VMM version (VMM1) has been widely produced and tested in various test beams, whilst the second version (VMM2) is currently being tested. This paper focuses on the VMM1 single event upset studies and more specifically on the response of the configuration registers under harsh radiation environments. Similar conditions are expected at Run III with Script L = 2 × 1034 cm-2s-1 and a mean of 55 interactions per bunch crossing. Two VMM1s were exposed in a neutron irradiation environment using the TANDEM Van Der Graaff accelerator at NSCR Demokritos, Athens, Greece. The results showed a rate of SEU occurrences at a measured cross section of (4.1±0.8)×10-14 cm2/bit for each VMM. Consequently, when extrapolating this value to the luminosity expected in Run III, the occurrence is roughly 6 SEUs/min in all the read-out system comprising 40,000 VMMs installed during the Phase-I upgrade.

  3. Development of radiation tolerant monolithic active pixel sensors with fast column parallel read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziel, M.; Dorokhov, A.; Fontaine, J.-C.; De Masi, R.; Winter, M.

    2010-12-01

    Monolithic active pixel sensors (MAPS) [1] (Turchetta et al., 2001) are being developed at IPHC—Strasbourg to equip the EUDET telescope [2] (Haas, 2006) and vertex detectors for future high energy physics experiments, including the STAR upgrade at RHIC [3] (T.S. Collaboration, 2005) and the CBM experiment at FAIR/GSI [4] (Heuser, 2006). High granularity, low material budget and high read-out speed are systematically required for most applications, complemented, for some of them, with high radiation tolerance. A specific column-parallel architecture, implemented in the MIMOSA-22 sensor, was developed to achieve fast read-out MAPS. Previous studies of the front-end architecture integrated in this sensor, which includes in-pixel amplification, have shown that the fixed pattern noise increase consecutive to ionizing radiation can be controlled by means of a negative feedback [5] (Hu-Guo et al., 2008). However, an unexpected rise of the temporal noise was observed. A second version of this chip (MIMOSA-22bis) was produced in order to search for possible improvements of the radiation tolerance, regarding this type of noise. In this prototype, the feedback transistor was tuned in order to mitigate the sensitivity of the pixel to ionizing radiation. The performances of the pixels after irradiation were investigated for two types of feedback transistors: enclosed layout transistor (ELT) [6] (Snoeys et al., 2000) and "standard" transistor with either large or small transconductance. The noise performance of all test structures was studied in various conditions (expected in future experiments) regarding temperature, integration time and ionizing radiation dose. Test results are presented in this paper. Based on these observations, ideas for further improvement of the radiation tolerance of column parallel MAPS are derived.

  4. A Micromechanical RF Channelizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Mehmet

    The power consumption of a radio generally goes as the number and strength of the RF signals it must process. In particular, a radio receiver would consume much less power if the signal presented to its electronics contained only the desired signal in a tiny percent bandwidth frequency channel, rather than the typical mix of signals containing unwanted energy outside the desired channel. Unfortunately, a lack of filters capable of selecting single channel bandwidths at RF forces the front-ends of contemporary receivers to accept unwanted signals, and thus, to operate with sub-optimal efficiency. This dissertation focuses on the degree to which capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators can achieve the aforementioned RF channel-selecting filters. It aims to first show theoretically that with appropriate scaling capacitive-gap transducers are strong enough to meet the needed coupling requirements; and second, to fully detail an architecture and design procedure needed to realize said filters. Finally, this dissertation provides an actual experimentally demonstrated RF channel-select filter designed using the developed procedures and confirming theoretical predictions. Specifically, this dissertation introduces four methods that make possible the design and fabrication of RF channel-select filters. The first of these introduces a small-signal equivalent circuit for parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical resonators that employs negative capacitance to model the dependence of resonance frequency on electrical stiffness in a way that facilitates the analysis of micromechanical circuits loaded with arbitrary electrical impedances. The new circuit model not only correctly predicts the dependence of electrical stiffness on the impedances loading the input and output electrodes of parallel-plate capacitive-gap transduced micromechanical device, but does so in a visually intuitive way that identifies current drive as most appropriate for

  5. PCI Based Read-out Receiver Card in the ALICE DAQ System

    CERN Document Server

    Carena, W; Dénes, E; Divià, R; Schossmaier, K; Soós, C; Sulyán, J; Vascotto, Alessandro; Van de Vyvre, P

    2001-01-01

    The Detector Data Link (DDL) is the high-speed optical link for the ALICE experiment. This link shall transfer the data coming from the detectors at 100 MB/s rate. The main components of the link have been developed: the destination Interface Unit (DIU), the Source Interface Unit (SIU) and the Read-out Receiver Card (RORC). The first RORC version is based on the VME bus. The performance tests show that the maximum VME bandwidth could be reached. Meanwhile the PCI bus became very popular and is used in many platforms. The development of a PCI-based version has been started. The document describes the prototype version in three sections. An overview explains the main purpose of the card: to provide an interface between the DDL and the PCI bus. Acting as a 32bit/33MHz PCI master the card is able to write or read directly to or from the system memory from or to the DDL, respectively. Beside these functions the card can also be used as an autonomous data generator. The card has been designed to be well adapted to ...

  6. Photodiode read-out of the ALICE photon spectrometer $PbWO_{4}$ crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Man'ko, V I; Sibiryak, Yu; Volkov, M; Klovning, A; Maeland, O A; Odland, O H; Rongved, R; Skaali, B

    1999-01-01

    Proposal of abstract for LEB99, Snowmass, Colorado, 20-24 September 1999The PHOton Spectrometer of the ALICE experiment is an electromagnetic calorimeter of high granularity consisting of 17280 lead-tungstate (PWO) crystals of dimensions 22x22x180 mm3, read out by large-area PIN-diodes with very low-noise front-end electronics. The crystal assembly is operated at -25C to increase the PWO light yield. A 16.1x17.1 mm2 photodiode, optimized for the PWO emissio spectrum at 400-500 nm, has been developed. The 20x20 mm2 preamplifier PCB is attached to the back side of the diode ceramic frame. The charge sensitive preamplifier is built in discrete logic with two input JFETs for optimum matching with the ~150pF PIN-diode. A prototype shaper has been designed and built in discrete logic. For a detector matrix of 64 units the measured ENCs are between 450-550e at -25C. Beam tests demonstrate that the required energy resolution is reached.Summary:The PHOton Spectrometer of the ALICE experiment is an electromagnetic calo...

  7. Evolution of the ReadOut System of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borga, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Joos, M; Schumacher, J; Tremblet, L; Vandelli, W; Vermeulen, J; Werner, P; Wickens, F

    2014-01-01

    The ReadOut System (ROS) is a central and essential part of the ATLAS data-acquisition system. It receives and buffers event data accepted from all sub-detectors and first-level trigger subsystems. Event data are subsequently forwarded to the High-Level Trigger system and Event Builder via a GbE-based network. The ATLAS ROS will be completely renewed in view of the demanding conditions expected during LHC Run 2 and Run 3. The new ROS will consist of roughly 100 Linux-based 2U-high rack-mounted server PCs, each equipped with 2 PCIe I/O cards and four 10GbE interfaces. The FPGA-based PCIe I/O cards, developed by the ALICE collaboration, will be configured with ATLAS-specific firmware, called RobinNP. They will provide connectivity to about 2000 point-to-point optical links conveying the ATLAS event data. This dense configuration provides an excellent test bench for studying I/O efficiency and challenges in current COTS PC architectures with non-uniform memory and I/O access paths. In this paper the requirements...

  8. Evolution of the ReadOut System of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Borga, A; The ATLAS collaboration; Green, B; Kugel, A; Joos, M; Panduro Vazquez, W; Schumacher, J; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tremblet, L; Vandelli, W; Vermeulen, J; Werner, P; Wickens, F

    2014-01-01

    The ReadOut System (ROS) is a central and essential part of the ATLAS DAQ system. It receives and buffers data of events accepted by the first-level trigger from all subdetectors and first-level trigger subsystems. Event data are subsequently forwarded to the High-Level Trigger system and Event Builder via a 1 GbE-based network. The ATLAS ROS is completely renewed in view of the demanding conditions expected during LHC Run 2 and Run 3, to replace obsolete technologies and space constraints require it to be compact. The new ROS will consist of roughly 100 Linux-based 2U high rack mounted server PCs, each equipped with 2 PCIe I/O cards and two four 10 GbE interfaces. The FPGA-based PCIe I/O cards, developed by the ALICE collaboration, will be configured with ATLAS-specific firmware, the so-called RobinNP firmware. They will provide the connectivity to about 2000 optical point-to-point links conveying the ATLAS event data. This dense configuration provides an excellent test bench for studying I/O efficiency and ...

  9. ORANGE: A high sensitivity particle tracker based on optically read out GEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafini, M.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.

    2017-02-01

    GEM-based detectors had a noticeable development in last years and have successfully been employed in different fields from High Energy Physics to imaging applications. Light production associated to the electron multiplication allows to perform an optical readout of these devices. The big progress achieved in CMOS-based photosensors makes possible to develop a high sensitivity, high granularity and low noise readout. In this paper we present the results obtained by reading out the light produced by a triple-GEM structure by means of a 4 mega-pixel CMOS sensor having a noise level less than two photons per pixel. The choice of a CF4 rich gas mixture (He/CF4 60/40) and a detailed optimisation of the electric fields allowed to reach a light-yield high enough to obtain very visible signals from minimum ionizing particles. In a test performed with 450 MeV electron beam, 800 photons per millimeter were collected and a space resolution of about 75 μ m was obtained.

  10. Systematic study of new types of Hamamatsu MPPCs read out with the NINO ASIC

    CERN Document Server

    Doroud, K; Williams, M C S; Yamamoto, K; Zichichi, A; Zuyeuski, R

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade there have been commercial TOF-PET scanners constructed using Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMT) that have achieved View the MathML source~500ps FWHM Coincidence Time Resolution (CTR). A new device known as the Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of the PMT. Therefore implementing a SiPM based TOF-PET scanner is of high interest. Recently Philips has introduced a TOF-PET scanner that uses digital Silicon PhotoMultipliers (d-SiPMs) which has a CTR of 350 ps. Here we will report on the timing performance of two Hamamatsu 3×3 mm2 analogue-SiPMs read out with the NINO ASIC: this is an ultra-fast amplifier/discriminator with a differential architecture. The differential architecture is very important since the single-ended readout uses the ground as the signal return; as the ground is also the reference level for the discriminators, the result is high crosstalk and degraded time resolution. However differential readout allows the scaling up from a si...

  11. High sensitivity phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detector with combined amplitude and phase read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Bellini, F.; Castellano, M. G.; Cosmelli, C.; D'Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Martinez, M.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2017-01-01

    Developing wide-area cryogenic light detectors with baseline resolution better than 20 eV is one of the priorities of next generation bolometric experiments searching for rare interactions, as the simultaneous read-out of the light and heat signals enables background suppression through particle identification. Among the proposed technological approaches for the phonon sensor, the naturally multiplexed Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) stand out for their excellent intrinsic energy resolution and reproducibility. The potential of this technique was proved by the CALDER project that reached a baseline resolution of 154 ± 7 eV RMS by sampling a 2 × 2 cm2 Silicon substrate with 4 Aluminum KIDs. In this paper, we present a prototype of Aluminum KID with improved geometry and quality factor. The design improvement, as well as the combined analysis of amplitude and phase signals, allowed to reach a baseline resolution of 82 ± 4 eV by sampling the same substrate with a single Aluminum KID.

  12. Prototyping the read-out chain of the CBM Microvertex Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, P.; Wiebusch, M.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Deveaux, M.; Koziel, M.; Michel, J.; Milanovic, B.; Müntz, C.; Tischler, T.; Stroth, J.

    2016-03-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) Experiment at the future FAIR (Darmstadt/Germany) will study the phase diagram of hadronic matter in the regime of highest net-baryon densities. The fixed target experiment will explore the nuclear fireballs created in violent heavy ion reactions with a rich number of probes. To reconstruct the decay topologies of open-charm particles as well as to track low-momentum particles, an ultra-light and precise Microvertex Detector (MVD) is required. The necessary performance in terms of spatial resolution, material budget and rate capability will be reached by equipping the MVD with highly granular, radiation-hard CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (CPS) developped at IPHC Strasbourg, which are operated in the target vacuum of the experiment. This contribution introduces the concept of the MVD and puts a focus on the latest results obtained from the R&D of the electronics and read-out chain of the device. Moreover, we briefly introduce the PRESTO project, which realises a prototype of a full size quadrant of an MVD detector station.

  13. Efficiency and timing resolution of scintillator tiles read out with silicon photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooth, O.; Weingarten, S.; Weinstock, L.

    2016-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) are semiconductor photo sensors that have the potential to replace photomultiplier tubes (PMT) in various fields of application. We present detectors consisting of 30 × 30 × 0.5 cm3 fast plastic scintillator tiles read out with SiPMs. The detectors offer great electronic and mechanical advantages over the classical PMT-scintillator combination. SiPMs are very compact devices that run independent of magnetic fields at low voltages and no light guides between the scintillator and the SiPM are necessary in the presented layouts. Three prototypes, two of which with integrated wavelength shifting fibres, have been tested in a proton beam at the COSY accelerator at Forschungszentrum Jülich. The different layouts are compared in terms of most probable pulse height, detection efficiency and noise behaviour as well as timing resolution. The spatial distributions of these properties across the scintillator surface are presented. The best layout can be operated at a mean efficiency of bar epsilon=99.9 % while sustaining low noise rates in the order of 10 Hz with a timing resolution of less than 3 ns. Both efficiency and timing resolution show good spatial homogeneity.

  14. Large-format distributed read-out imaging devices for X-ray imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, Roland; Kozorezov, A.; Martin, D.; Brammertz, G.; Verhoeve, P.; Peacock, A.; Scholze, F.; Goldie, D. J.

    2002-02-01

    We present an experimental study of the performance of Distributed Read-Out Imaging Devices (DROIDs), based on two Ta/Al-based superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) placed on either side of a Ta absorber strip. We focus our discussion on the prospects of building large-format photon-counting imaging spectrometers for applications at optical, UV and soft X-ray energies. Tunnel-limited spectroscopic resolutions have already been demonstrated for optical photons. With a 20×100 μm2 absorber we have measured an intrinsic energy resolution of 2 eV FWHM for 500 eV photons. This demonstrates that at soft X-ray energies resolutions close to the tunnel limit are also feasible for this type of detectors. A detailed analysis of pulse-shapes with numerical models allows us to assess the main parameters that determine the performance of these detectors. Extrapolation of these models indicates that it is possible to extend the length of the absorber to 1.5 mm, without a serious degradation of the detector's performance. .

  15. Firmware development and testing of the ATLAS IBL Read-Out Driver card

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, S-P; The ATLAS collaboration; Falchieri, D; Gabrielli, A; Hauck, S; Hsu, S-C; Kretz, M; Kugel, A; Travaglini, R; Wensing, M

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Experiment is reworking and upgrading systems during the current LHC shutdown. In particular, the Pixel detector is inserting an additional inner layer called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The Read-Out Driver card (ROD), the Back-of-Crate card (BOC), and the S-Link together form the essential frontend data path of the IBL’s off-detector DAQ system. The strategy for IBL ROD firmware development focused on migrating and tailoring HDL code blocks from Pixel ROD to ensure modular compatibility in future ROD upgrades, in which a unified code version will interface with IBL and Pixel layers. Essential features such as data formatting, frontend-specific error handling, and calibration are added to the ROD data path. An IBL DAQ testbench using a realistic frontend chip model was created to serve as an initial framework for full offline electronic system simulation. In this document, major firmware achievements concerning the IBL ROD data path implementation, tested in testbench and on ROD prototypes, will be ...

  16. Scintillating fiber detectors for precise time and position measurements read out with Si-PMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damyanova, A.; Bravar, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the development and performance of compact scintillating fiber detectors read out with silicon photo-multipliers (Si-PMs). The compact size, fast response, and insensitivity to magnetic fields make these detectors suitable for a variety of applications where precise tracking and timing information is required. These detectors will be used with different particle beams (electrons, protons, heavy ions) at very high rates. In particular, we present the SciFi tracker/time of flight detector that is being developed for the Mu3e experiment at PSI (search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ → eee at very high rates). We also present the SciFi beam position detectors that will be employed in NA61 at CERN to track the incoming proton and heavy ion beam particles. We are considering different readout scenarios in which (a) each fiber is individually coupled to a single Si-PM photo-sensor and (b) fibers are arranged in columns and coupled to a Si-PM arrays.

  17. Studies of Read-Out Electronics and Trigger for Muon Drift Tube Detectors at High Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. For precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs-Boson and searches for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model, the LHC luminosity of $L=10^{34}cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ is planned to be increased by a factor of ten leading to the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In order to cope with the higher background and data rates, the LHC experiments need to be upgraded. In this thesis, studies for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer are presented with respect to the read-out electronics of the Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) and the small-diameter Muon Drift Tube (sMDT) chambers and the Level-1 muon trigger. Due to the reduced tube diameter of sMDT chambers, background occupancy and space charge effects are suppressed by an order of magnitude compar...

  18. Remembering words in context as predicted by an associative read-out model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Markus J; Kuchinke, Lars; Biemann, Chris; Tamm, Sascha; Jacobs, Arthur M

    2011-01-01

    Interactive activation models (IAMs) simulate orthographic and phonological processes in implicit memory tasks, but they neither account for associative relations between words nor explicit memory performance. To overcome both limitations, we introduce the associative read-out model (AROM), an IAM extended by an associative layer implementing long-term associations between words. According to Hebbian learning, two words were defined as "associated" if they co-occurred significantly often in the sentences of a large corpus. In a study-test task, a greater amount of associated items in the stimulus set increased the "yes" response rates of non-learned and learned words. To model test-phase performance, the associative layer is initialized with greater activation for learned than for non-learned items. Because IAMs scale inhibitory activation changes by the initial activation, learned items gain a greater signal variability than non-learned items, irrespective of the choice of the free parameters. This explains why the slope of the z-transformed receiver-operating characteristics (z-ROCs) is lower one during recognition memory. When fitting the model to the empirical z-ROCs, it likewise predicted which word is recognized with which probability at the item-level. Since many of the strongest associates reflect semantic relations to the presented word (e.g., synonymy), the AROM merges form-based aspects of meaning representation with meaning relations between words.

  19. The ATLAS ReadOut System—Performance with first data and perspective for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, G.; Della Volpe, D.; Gorini, B.; Green, B.; Joos, M.; Kieft, G.; Kordas, K.; Kugel, A.; Misiejuk, A.; Schroer, N.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tremblet, L.; Vermeulen, J.; Wickens, F.; Werner, P.

    2010-11-01

    The ATLAS ReadOut System (ROS) receives data fragments from ∼ 1600 detector readout links, buffers them and provides them on demand to the second-level trigger or to the event building system. The ROS is implemented with ∼ 150 PCs. Each PC houses a few, typically 4, custom-built PCI boards (ROBIN) and a 4-port PCIe Gigabit Ethernet NIC. The PCs run a multi-threaded object-oriented application managing the requests for data retrieval and for data deletion coming through the NIC, and the collection and output of data from the ROBINs. At a nominal event fragment arrival rate of 75 kHz the ROS has to concurrently service up to approximately 20 kHz of data requests from the second-level trigger and up to 3.5 kHz of requests from event building nodes. The full system has been commissioned in 2007. Performance of the system in terms of stability and reliability, results of laboratory rate capability measurements and upgrade scenarios are discussed in this paper.

  20. The ATLAS ReadOut System performance with first data and perspective for the future

    CERN Document Server

    Crone, G; Gorini, B; Green, B; Joos, M; Kieft, G; Kordas, K; Kugel, A; Misiejuk, A; Schroer, N; Teixeira-Dias, P; Tremblet, L; Vermeulen, J; Wickens, F; Werner, P

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS ReadOut System (ROS) receives data fragments from ~1600 detector readout links, buffers them and provides them on demand to the second-level trigger or to the event building system. The ROS is implemented with ~150 PCs. Each PC houses a few, typically 4, custom-built PCI boards (ROBIN) and a 4-port PCIe Gigabit Ethernet NIC. The PCs run a multi-threaded object-oriented application managing the requests for data retrieval and for data deletion coming through the NIC, and the collection and output of data from the ROBINs. At a nominal event fragment arrival rate of 75 kHz the ROS has to concurrently service up to approximately 20 kHz of data requests from the second-level trigger and up to 3.5 kHz of requests from event building nodes. The full system has been commissioned in 2007. Performance of the system in terms of stability and reliability, results of laboratory rate capability measurements and upgrade scenarios are discussed in this paper.

  1. The monitoring system of the ATLAS muon spectrometer read out driver

    CERN Document Server

    Capasso, Luciano

    My PhD work focuses upon the Read Out Driver (ROD) of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. The ROD is a VME64x board, designed around two Xilinx Virtex-II FPGAs and an ARM7 microcontroller and it is located off-detector, in a counting room of the ATLAS cavern at the CERN. The readout data of the ATLAS’ RPC Muon spectrometer are collected by the front-end electronics and transferred via optical fibres to the ROD boards in the counting room. The ROD arranges all the data fragments of a sector of the spectrometer in a unique event. This is made by the Event Builder Logic, a cluster of Finite State Machines that parses the fragments, checks their syntax and builds an event containing all the sector data. In the presentation I will describe the Builder Monitor, developed by me in order to analyze the Event Builder timing performance. It is designed around a 32-bit soft-core microprocessor, embedded in the same FPGA hosting the Builder logic. This approach makes it possible to track the algorithm execution in the field. ...

  2. MCP detector read out with a bare quad Timepix at kilohertz frame rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallerga, J.; Raffanti, R.; Tremsin, A.; McPhate, J.; Siegmund, O.

    2011-01-01

    The existing Berkeley neutron sensitive MCP/Timepix hybrid detector has been very successful at demonstrating energy resolved spatial imaging with a single Timepix ASIC read out at a ~ 30 Hz frame rate where each neutron's position and time (energy) is determined (X,Y,E). By increasing the detector format using a quad arrangement of Timepix readouts and increasing the frame rate to 1 kHz, we can increase our total event throughput by a factor of 120, thereby taking full advantage of the high fluxes of modern pulsed neutron sources (106 n cm-2 s-1). The key to this conversion is a new design for the ASIC readout, called the Berkeley Quad Timepix detector, consisting of 3 major subsystems. The first is a quad (2 × 2) bare Timepix ASIC board mounted directly behind the neutron sensitive MCPs in a hermetic vacuum enclosure with a sapphire window. The data from the Timepix ASICs flow to the second subsystem called the Interface board whose field programmable gate array (FPGA) rearranges and converts the digital bit stream to LVDS logic levels before sending downstream to the third subsystem, the Roach board. The Roach board is also FPGA based, and takes the data from all the ASICs and analyses the frames to extract information on the input events to pass on to the host PC. This paper describes in detail the hardware and firmware designs to accomplish this task.

  3. Calibration of High Frequency MEMS Microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Humphreys, William M.; Bartram, Scott M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and controlling aircraft noise is one of the major research topics of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program. One of the measurement technologies used to acquire noise data is the microphone directional array (DA). Traditional direction array hardware, consisting of commercially available condenser microphones and preamplifiers can be too expensive and their installation in hard-walled wind tunnel test sections too complicated. An emerging micro-machining technology coupled with the latest cutting edge technologies for smaller and faster systems have opened the way for development of MEMS microphones. The MEMS microphone devices are available in the market but suffer from certain important shortcomings. Based on early experiments with array prototypes, it has been found that both the bandwidth and the sound pressure level dynamic range of the microphones should be increased significantly to improve the performance and flexibility of the overall array. Thus, in collaboration with an outside MEMS design vendor, NASA Langley modified commercially available MEMS microphone as shown in Figure 1 to meet the new requirements. Coupled with the design of the enhanced MEMS microphones was the development of a new calibration method for simultaneously obtaining the sensitivity and phase response of the devices over their entire broadband frequency range. Over the years, several methods have been used for microphone calibration. Some of the common methods of microphone calibration are Coupler (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous), Pistonphone, Electrostatic actuator, and Free-field calibration (Reciprocity, Substitution, and Simultaneous). Traditionally, electrostatic actuators (EA) have been used to characterize air-condenser microphones for wideband frequency ranges; however, MEMS microphones are not adaptable to the EA method due to their construction and very small diaphragm size. Hence a substitution-based, free-field method was developed to

  4. Microphone Phenomena Observed with EFL Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Wilma B.

    This study investigated changes in the speech patterns of Japanese college students in an intensive English language course when using a microphone, focusing in part on possible links to "karaoke" activities common in Japan, in which participants sing along with music using a microphone. The researcher first observed several karaoke…

  5. Micromechanics of shear banding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, J.J.

    1992-08-01

    Shear-banding is one of many instabilities observed during the plastic flow of solids. It is a consequence of the dislocation mechanism which makes plastic flow fundamentally inhomogeneous, and is exacerbated by local adiabatic heating. Dislocation lines tend to be clustered on sets of neighboring glide planes because they are heterogeneously generated; especially through the Koehler multiple-cross-glide mechanism. Factors that influence their mobilities also play a role. Strain-hardening decreases the mobilities within shear bands thereby tending to spread (delocalize) them. Strain-softening has the inverse effect. This paper reviews the micro-mechanisms of these phenomena. It will be shown that heat production is also a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the microscopic flow, and that dislocation dipoles play an important role. They are often not directly observable, but their presence may be inferred from changes in thermal conductivity. It is argued that after deformation at low temperatures dipoles are distributed a la Pareto so there are many more small than large ones. Instability at upper yield point, the shapes of shear-band fronts, and mechanism of heat generation are also considered. It is shown that strain-rate acceleration plays a more important role than strain-rate itself in adiabatic instability.

  6. Micromechanism of Ferroelectrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiCHEN; Dai-NingFANG; 等

    1997-01-01

    As one of the most important advanced electronic materials,ferroelectric and its nonlinear behavior have always been an interesting subject of study in the field of physics and materials science.Recently ferroelectrics has been applied more widely with the rapid development of the Smart/Intelligent materials,As the elementary components of sensors and actuators,ferroelectrics may be subjected to high stresses and electric fields and performance failure may rasult due to the complexity of the environment where the Smart/Intelligent materials are used.Therefore,it is very important to describe the constitutive behavior of the feroelectrics,which can serve as important basis for the design and application of the Smart/Intelligent materials.The main attempt here is to establish the explicit form of constitutive laws of ferroelectric single crystal in the framework of the micromechanics internal variable theory[1],After the “soft” approximation.this model can also be used to exhibit the nonlinear properties of ferroelectric ceramics.

  7. Systematic study of new types of Hamamatsu MPPCs read out with the NINO ASIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroud, K. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi, Roma (Italy); Rodriguez, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); ICSC World Laboratory, Geneva (Switzerland); Williams, M.C.S., E-mail: crispin.williams@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna (Italy); Yamamoto, K. [Solid State Division, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., Hamamatsu (Japan); Zichichi, A. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche E. Fermi, Roma (Italy); CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); INFN and Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna (Italy); Zuyeuski, R. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); ICSC World Laboratory, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Over the last decade there have been commercial TOF-PET scanners constructed using Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMT) that have achieved ∼500ps FWHM Coincidence Time Resolution (CTR). A new device known as the Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) has the potential to overcome some of the limitations of the PMT. Therefore implementing a SiPM based TOF-PET scanner is of high interest. Recently Philips has introduced a TOF-PET scanner that uses digital Silicon PhotoMultipliers (d-SiPMs) which has a CTR of 350 ps. Here we will report on the timing performance of two Hamamatsu 3×3 mm{sup 2} analogue-SiPMs read out with the NINO ASIC: this is an ultra-fast amplifier/discriminator with a differential architecture. The differential architecture is very important since the single-ended readout uses the ground as the signal return; as the ground is also the reference level for the discriminators, the result is high crosstalk and degraded time resolution. However differential readout allows the scaling up from a single cell to a multi-cell device with no loss of time resolution; this becomes increasingly important for the highly segmented detectors that are being built today, both for particle and for medical instrumentation. We obtained excellent results for both the Single Photon Time Resolution (SPTR) and for the CTR using a LYSO crystal of 15 mm length. Such a crystal length has sufficient detection efficiency for 511 keV gammas to make an excellent PET device. The results presented here are proof that a TOF-PET detector with a CTR of 175 ps is indeed possible. This is the first step that defines the starting point of our SuperNINO project.

  8. Distributed Read-out Imaging Device array for astronomical observations in UV/VIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmering, Richard A.

    2009-12-01

    STJ (Superconducting Tunneling Junctions) are being developed as spectro-photometers in wavelengths ranging from the NIR to X-rays. 10x12 arrays of STJs have already been successfully used as optical imaging spectrometers with the S-Cam 3, on the William Hershel Telescope on La Palma and on the Optical Ground Station on Tenerife. To overcome the limited field of view which can be achieved with single STJ arrays, DROIDS (Distributed Read Out Imaging Devices) are being developed which produce next to energy and timing also produce positional information with each detector element. These DROIDS consist of a superconducting absorber strip with proximized STJs on either end. The STJs are a Ta/Al/AlOx/Al/Ta 100/30/1/30/100nm sandwich of which the bottom electrode Ta layer is one with the 100nm thick absorber layer. The ratio of the two signals from the STJs provides information on the absorption position and the sum signal is a measure for the energy of the absorbed photon. In this thesis we present different important processes which are involved with the detection of optical photons using DROIDs. This includes the spatial and spectral resolution, confinement of the quasiparticles in the proximized STJs to enhance tunnelling and quasiparticle creation resulting from absorption of a photon in the proximized STJ. We have combined our findings in the development of a 2D theoretical model which describes the diffusion of quasiparticles and imperfect confinement via exchange of quasiparticles between the absorber and STJ. Finally we will present some of the first results obtained with an array of 60 360x33.5 μm2 DROIDs in 3x20 format.

  9. Optimizing read-out of the NECTAr front-end electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorobiov, S., E-mail: vorobiov@lpta.in2p3.fr [LUPM, Universite Montpellier II and IN2P3/CNRS, Montpellier (France); DESY-Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Feinstein, F. [LUPM, Universite Montpellier II and IN2P3/CNRS, Montpellier (France); Bolmont, J.; Corona, P. [LPNHE, Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Paris (France); Delagnes, E. [IRFU/DSM/CEA, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Falvard, A. [LUPM, Universite Montpellier II and IN2P3/CNRS, Montpellier (France); Gascon, D. [ICC-UB, Universitat Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Glicenstein, J.-F. [IRFU/DSM/CEA, Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Naumann, C.L.; Nayman, P. [LPNHE, Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Paris (France); Ribo, M.; Sanuy, A. [ICC-UB, Universitat Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Tavernet, J.-P.; Toussenel, F.; Vincent, P. [LPNHE, Universite Paris VI and Universite Paris VII and IN2P3/CNRS, Paris (France)

    2012-12-11

    We describe the optimization of the read-out specifications of the NECTAr front-end electronics for the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). The NECTAr project aims at building and testing a demonstrator module of a new front-end electronics design, which takes an advantage of the know-how acquired while building the cameras of the CAT, H.E.S.S.-I and H.E.S.S.-II experiments. The goal of the optimization work is to define the specifications of the digitizing electronics of a CTA camera, in particular integration time window, sampling rate, analog bandwidth using physics simulations. We employed for this work real photomultiplier pulses, sampled at 100 ps with a 600 MHz bandwidth oscilloscope. The individual pulses are drawn randomly at the times at which the photo-electrons, originating from atmospheric showers, arrive at the focal planes of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The timing information is extracted from the existing CTA simulations on the GRID and organized in a local database, together with all the relevant physical parameters (energy, primary particle type, zenith angle, distance from the shower axis, pixel offset from the optical axis, night-sky background level, etc.), and detector configurations (telescope types, camera/mirror configurations, etc.). While investigating the parameter space, an optimal pixel charge integration time window, which minimizes relative error in the measured charge, has been determined. This will allow to gain in sensitivity and to lower the energy threshold of CTA telescopes. We present results of our optimizations and first measurements obtained using the NECTAr demonstrator module.

  10. A finite state machine read-out chip for integrated surface acoustic wave sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, Sambarta; Iliadis, Agis A.

    2015-01-01

    A finite state machine based integrated sensor circuit suitable for the read-out module of a monolithically integrated SAW sensor on Si is reported. The primary sensor closed loop consists of a voltage controlled oscillator (VCO), a peak detecting comparator, a finite state machine (FSM), and a monolithically integrated SAW sensor device. The output of the system oscillates within a narrow voltage range that correlates with the SAW pass-band response. The period of oscillation is of the order of the SAW phase delay. We use timing information from the FSM to convert SAW phase delay to an on-chip 10 bit digital output operating on the principle of time to digital conversion (TDC). The control inputs of this digital conversion block are generated by a second finite state machine operating under a divided system clock. The average output varies with changes in SAW center frequency, thus tracking mass sensing events in real time. Based on measured VCO gain of 16 MHz/V our system will convert a 10 kHz SAW frequency shift to a corresponding mean voltage shift of 0.7 mV. A corresponding shift in phase delay is converted to a one or two bit shift in the TDC output code. The system can handle alternate SAW center frequencies and group delays simply by adjusting the VCO control and TDC delay control inputs. Because of frequency to voltage and phase to digital conversion, this topology does not require external frequency counter setups and is uniquely suitable for full monolithic integration of autonomous sensor systems and tags.

  11. High performance digital read out integrated circuit (DROIC) for infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Genki; Olah, Robert; Oduor, Patrick; Dutta, Achyut K.; Dhar, Nibir K.

    2016-05-01

    Banpil Photonics has developed a high-performance Digital Read-Out Integrated Circuit (DROIC) for image sensors and camera systems targeting various military, industrial and commercial Infrared (IR) imaging applications. The on-chip digitization of the pixel output eliminates the necessity for an external analog-to-digital converter (ADC), which not only cuts costs, but also enables miniaturization of packaging to achieve SWaP-C camera systems. In addition, the DROIC offers new opportunities for greater on-chip processing intelligence that are not possible in conventional analog ROICs prevalent today. Conventional ROICs, which typically can enhance only one high performance attribute such as frame rate, power consumption or noise level, fail when simultaneously targeting the most aggressive performance requirements demanded in imaging applications today. Additionally, scaling analog readout circuits to meet such requirements leads to expensive, high-power consumption with large and complex systems that are untenable in the trend towards SWaP-C. We present the implementation of a VGA format (640x512 pixels 15μm pitch) capacitivetransimpedance amplifier (CTIA) DROIC architecture that incorporates a 12-bit ADC at the pixel level. The CTIA pixel input circuitry has two gain modes with programmable full-well capacity values of 100K e- and 500K e-. The DROIC has been developed with a system-on-chip architecture in mind, where all the timing and biasing are generated internally without requiring any critical external inputs. The chip is configurable with many parameters programmable through a serial programmable interface (SPI). It features a global shutter, low power, and high frame rates programmable from 30 up 500 frames per second in full VGA format supported through 24 LVDS outputs. This DROIC, suitable for hybridization with focal plane arrays (FPA) is ideal for high-performance uncooled camera applications ranging from near IR (NIR) and shortwave IR (SWIR) to mid

  12. Added value of IP-10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, Sivmakumaran; Ritz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We have explored the added value of IFNγ-inducible protein 10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis specific immunity in young Indian children where the sensitivity of the IGRA for tuberculosis (TB) is poor. Reduced frequency of indeterminate results and an increased sensitivity for TB, sug...

  13. A flexible COME and KISS QDC and TDC read-out scheme for PMT, MAPD and diamond detector applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rost, Adrian [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    A flexible COME and KISS Charge-to-Digital-Converter (QDC) and Time-to-Digital-Converter (TDC) read-out scheme will be presented which can be used in a wide range of read-out applications in high energy physics experiments. The focus is on a calorimeter detector read-out via photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or via multi-pixel avalanche photo-diodes (MAPDs), as well as on diamond detectors for the HADES and CBM experiments at the future FAIR facility in Darmstadt. The detector input signals are integrated with the help of simple analogue electronics (KISS: Keep it Small and Simple). Afterwards the charge measurement is transformed into a Time-over-Threshold (ToT) measurement using an commercial (COME: Use Commercial Elements) FPGA as a discriminator. The well-established TRBv3 platform will provide a precise FPGA TDC for a ToT measurement of the discriminated signals. An 8-channel prototype board PaDiWa-AMPS was manufactured and successfully tested in the laboratory and under beam conditions. In this contribution the current status of the read-out concept is shown.

  14. Study and simulation of the read-out electronics design for a high-resolution plastic scintillating fiber based hodoscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco, José María, E-mail: jose.maria.blasco@uv.es [Universitat de València, Calle Gascó Oliag n" o5, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Sanchis, E. [Universitat de València, Calle Gascó Oliag n" o5, 46010, Valencia (Spain); Granero, D. [Eresa Grupo Médico (Spain); Martín, J.D.; González, V.; Sanchis-Sánchez, E. [Universitat de València, Calle Gascó Oliag n" o5, 46010, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-06-01

    Highlights: • Plastic Scintillating Fibers for high-resolution hodoscopy. • Silicon photodiode read-out electronics design. • Plastic scintillating fibers coupled to Silicon photodiodes read-out. • Charged particle detection with plastic scintillating fibers. - Abstract: This work presents the study and simulation of a high-resolution charged particle detection device for beam positioning, monitoring and calibration, together with its read-out proposal. To provide the precise positional information of the beam, the detection system has been based on Plastic Scintillating Fibers (PSF), while the read-out on a Silicon-PhotoDiode (Si-PD) array. To carry out the study, a PSF prototype with one detection plane has been experimentally tested with a β particle source. Besides, Monte Carlo simulations of the complete system have also been conducted. Both simulations and experimental tests give consistency to the results obtained. The work presented in this article show the usefulness of this proposal for high-precision charged particle positioning, achieving resolutions up to 100 µm.

  15. Mapping Speech Spectra from Throat Microphone to Close-Speaking Microphone: A Neural Network Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Yegnanarayana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Speech recorded from a throat microphone is robust to the surrounding noise, but sounds unnatural unlike the speech recorded from a close-speaking microphone. This paper addresses the issue of improving the perceptual quality of the throat microphone speech by mapping the speech spectra from the throat microphone to the close-speaking microphone. A neural network model is used to capture the speaker-dependent functional relationship between the feature vectors (cepstral coefficients of the two speech signals. A method is proposed to ensure the stability of the all-pole synthesis filter. Objective evaluations indicate the effectiveness of the proposed mapping scheme. The advantage of this method is that the model gives a smooth estimate of the spectra of the close-speaking microphone speech. No distortions are perceived in the reconstructed speech. This mapping technique is also used for bandwidth extension of telephone speech.

  16. Mic it! microphones, microphone techniques, and their impact on the final mix

    CERN Document Server

    Corbett, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Capture great sound in the first place, and spend less time ""fixing it in the mix"" with Ian Corbett's Mic It! Microphones, Microphone Techniques, and Their Impact on the Final Mix. With his expert guidance, you'll quickly understand essential audio concepts as they relate to microphones and mic techniques, and learn how to apply them to your recording situation. Whether you only ever buy one microphone, are equipping a studio on a budget, or have a vast selection of great mics to use, you'll learn to better use whatever tools you have. Mic It! gives you the background to design and discover

  17. Test of Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors for picosecond time measurements with a new multipurpose read-out board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, N.; Al Ghoul, H.; Arcidiacono, R.; Cartiglia, N.; Forthomme, L.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Royon, C.

    2017-09-01

    Ultra Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD) are sensors optimized for timing measurements employing a thin multiplication layer to increase the output signal. A multipurpose read-out board hosting a low-cost, low-power fast amplifier was designed at the University of Kansas and tested at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) using a 180 GeV pion beam. The amplifier has been designed to read out a wide range of detectors and it was optimized in this test for the UFSD output signal. In this paper we report the results of the experimental tests using 50 μm thick UFSD with a sensitive area of 1 . 4mm2. A timing precision below 30 ps was achieved.

  18. Study and simulation of the read-out electronics design for a high-resolution plastic scintillating fiber based hodoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, José María; Sanchis, E.; Granero, D.; Martín, J. D.; González, V.; Sanchis-Sánchez, E.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents the study and simulation of a high-resolution charged particle detection device for beam positioning, monitoring and calibration, together with its read-out proposal. To provide the precise positional information of the beam, the detection system has been based on Plastic Scintillating Fibers (PSF), while the read-out on a Silicon-PhotoDiode (Si-PD) array. To carry out the study, a PSF prototype with one detection plane has been experimentally tested with a β particle source. Besides, Monte Carlo simulations of the complete system have also been conducted. Both simulations and experimental tests give consistency to the results obtained. The work presented in this article show the usefulness of this proposal for high-precision charged particle positioning, achieving resolutions up to 100 μm.

  19. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández, C; Fouz-Iglesias, M C; Marin, J; Oller, J C; Willmott, C

    2002-01-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  20. A time resolution study with a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoykov, A.; Scheuermann, R.; Sedlak, K.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we attempt to establish the best time resolution attainable with a scintillation counter consisting of a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode. The measured time resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of the energy deposited in the scintillator, and scales to σ=18 ps at 1 MeV. This result competes with the best ones reported for photomultiplier tubes.

  1. A time resolution study with a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoykov, A., E-mail: alexey.stoykov@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Scheuermann, R.; Sedlak, K. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-12-11

    In this work we attempt to establish the best time resolution attainable with a scintillation counter consisting of a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode. The measured time resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of the energy deposited in the scintillator, and scales to {sigma}=18ps at 1 MeV. This result competes with the best ones reported for photomultiplier tubes.

  2. A time-resolution study with a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode

    CERN Document Server

    Stoykov, A; Sedlak, K

    2011-01-01

    In this work we attempt to establish the best time resolution attainable with a scintillation counter consisting of a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode. The measured time resolution is inversely proportional to the square root of the energy deposited in the scintillator, and scales to 18ps (sigma) at 1MeV. This result competes with the best ones reported for photomultiplier tubes.

  3. Charge collection and charge sharing in heavily irradiated n-side read-out silicon microstrip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casse, G. E-mail: gcasse@hep.ph.liv.ac.uk; Allport, P.P.; Biagi, S.F.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Greenall, A.; Turner, P.R

    2003-09-21

    Hadron radiation damage of n-bulk silicon detectors leads to a change in the effective space charge from positive to negative. This effect is called type inversion. Type inversion occurs after exposure to a fluence of a few 10{sup 13} proton cm{sup -2} and is characterized by migration of the diode junction to the n{sup +} implanted side (n-side) of the detector. After inversion the charge collection efficiency (CCE) of segmented detectors at low voltage is higher when the n-side, rather than the p-side, is read out. A p-side read out (p-in-n) and an n-side read out (n-in-n) strip detector with identical strip geometry and a wafer thickness of 200 {mu}m were simultaneously and inhomogenously irradiated to a maximum fluence of 7x10{sup 14} proton cm{sup -2} with 24 GeV c{sup -1} protons. A comparison of the CCE at very high irradiation doses is shown with these two read out geometries. The inhomogeneous irradiation induces an inhomogenous distribution of the effective space charge with a transverse component of the electric field that could in principle affect the resolution properties of the microstrip detector. The inter-strip charge sharing properties, as a function of dose, for the n-in-n detector have been measured. No systematic distortion of the reconstructed cluster position was detected within the limits of the measurement accuracy. The detectors were manufactured using oxygen enriched silicon substrates to limit the degradation of the full depletion voltage under charged hadron irradiation. The measured CCE confirms that the use of oxygenated n-in-n detectors is viable up to fluences of 7x10{sup 14} proton cm{sup -2}.

  4. Read-out and coherent manipulation of an isolated nuclear spin using a single-molecule magnet spin-transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The realization of a functional quantum computer is one of the most ambitious technologically goals of today's scientists. Its basic building block is composed of a two-level quantum system, namely a quantum bit (or qubit). Among the other existing concepts, spin based devices are very attractive since they benefit from the steady progress in nanofabrication and allow for the electrical read-out of the qubit state. In this context, nuclear spin based devices exhibit an additional gain of cohe...

  5. Resolution and Efficiency of Monitored Drift-Tube Chambers with Final Read-out Electronics at High Background Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dubbert, J; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck-Möck, S; Rauscher, F; Richter, R; Staude, A; Stiller, W

    2003-01-01

    The performance of a monitored drift-tube chamber for ATLAS with the final read-out electronics was tested at the Gamma Irradiation facility at CERN under varyin photon irradiation rates of up to 990~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$ which corresponds to 10 times the highest background rate expected in ATLAS. The signal pulse-height measurement of the final read-out electronics was used to perform time-slewing corrections. The corrections improve the average single-tube resolution from 106~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the nominal discriminator threshold of 44~mV without irradiation, and from 114~$\\mu$m to 89~$\\mu$m at the maximum nominal irradiation rate in ATLAS of 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The reduction of the threshold from 44~mV to 34~mV and the time-slewing corrections lead to an average single-tube resolution of 82~$\\mu$m without photon background and of 89~$\\mu$m at 100~Hz\\,cm$^{-2}$. The measured muon detection efficiency agrees with the expectation for the final read-out electronics.

  6. Design, construction, quality checks and test results of first resistive-Micromegas read-out boards for the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Iengo, Paolo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The development work carried out at CERN to push the Micromegas technology to a new frontier is now coming to an end. The construction of the first read-out boards for the upgrade of the ATLAS muon system will demonstrate in full-scale the feasibility of this ambitious project. The read-out boards, representing the heart of the detector, are manufactured in industries, making the Micromegas for ATLAS the first MPGD for a large experiment with a relevant part industrially produced. The boards are 50 cm wide and up to 220 cm long, carrying copper strips 315 μm wide with 415 μm pitch. Interconnected resistive strips, having the same pattern as the copper strips, provide spark protection. The boards are completed by the creation of cylindrical pillars 128 μm high, 280 μm in diameter and arranged in a triangular array 7 mm aside. The total number of boards to be produced for ATLAS is 2048 of 32 different types. We will review the main design parameters of the read-out boards for the ATLAS Micromegas, following...

  7. Micro-Mechanical Temperature Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tom

    Temperature is the most frequently measured physical quantity in the world. The field of thermometry is therefore constantly evolving towards better temperature sensors and better temperature measurements. The aim of this Ph.D. project was to improve an existing type of micro-mechanical temperature...... sensor or to develop a new one. Two types of micro-mechanical temperature sensors have been studied: Bilayer cantilevers and string-like beam resonators. Both sensor types utilize thermally generated stress. Bilayer cantilevers are frequently used as temperature sensors at the micro-scale, and the goal....... The reduced sensitivity was due to initial bending of the cantilevers and poor adhesion between the two cantilever materials. No further attempts were made to improve the sensitivity of bilayer cantilevers. The concept of using string-like resonators as temperature sensors has, for the first time, been...

  8. Determining Micromechanical Strain in Nitinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strasberg, Matthew; /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    Nitinol is a superelastic alloy made of equal parts nickel and titanium. Due to its unique shape memory properties, nitinol is used to make medical stents, lifesaving devices used to allow blood flow in occluded arteries. Micromechanical models and even nitinol-specific finite element analysis (FEA) software are insufficient for unerringly predicting fatigue and resultant failure. Due to the sensitive nature of its application, a better understanding of nitinol on a granular scale is being pursued through X-ray diffraction techniques at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Through analysis of powder diffraction patterns of nitinol under increasing tensile loads, localized strain can be calculated. We compare these results with micromechanical predictions in order to advance nitinol-relevant FEA tools. From this we hope to gain a greater understanding of how nitinol fatigues under multi-axial loads.

  9. Micromechanical Analyses of Sturzstroms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imre, Bernd; Laue, Jan; Springman, Sarah M.

    2010-05-01

    have been made observable and reproducible within a physical and a distinct element numerical modelling environment (DEM). As link between field evidence gained from the deposits of natural sturzstroms, the physical model within the ETH Geotechnical Drum Centrifuge (Springman et al., 2001) and the numerical model PFC-3D (Cundall and Strack, 1979; Itasca, 2005), serves a deterministic fractal analytical comminution model (Sammis et al., 1987; Steacy and Sammis, 1991). This approach allowed studying the effects of dynamic fragmentation within sturzstroms at true (macro) scale within the distinct element model, by allowing for a micro-mechanical, distinct particle based, and cyclic description of fragmentation at the same time, without losing significant computational efficiency. Theses experiments indicate rock mass and boundary conditions, which allow an alternating fragmenting and dilating dispersive regime to evolve and to be sustained long enough to replicate the spreading and run out of sturzstroms. The fragmenting spreading model supported here is able to explain the run out of a dry granular flow, beyond the travel distance predicted by a Coulomb frictional sliding model, without resorting to explanations by mechanics that can only be valid for certain, specific of the boundary conditions. The implications derived suggest that a sturzstrom, because of its strong relation to internal fractal fragmentation and other inertial effects, constitutes a landslide category of its own. Its mechanics differ significantly from all other gravity driven mass flows. This proposition does not exclude the possible appearance of frictionites, Toma hills or suspension flows etc., but it considers them as secondary features. The application of a fractal comminution model to describe natural and experimental sturzstrom deposits turned out to be a useful tool for sturzstrom research. Implemented within the DEM, it allows simulating the key features of sturzstrom successfully and

  10. Extending a context model for microphone forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraetzer, Christian; Qian, Kun; Dittmann, Jana

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we extend an existing context model for statistical pattern recognition based microphone forensics by: first, generating a generalized model for this process and second, using this general model to construct a complex new application scenario model for microphone forensic investigations on the detection of playback recordings (a.k.a. replays, re-recordings, double-recordings). Thereby, we build the theoretical basis for answering the question whether an audio recording was made to record a playback or natural sound. The results of our investigations on the research question of playback detection imply that it is possible with our approach on our evaluation set of six microphones. If the recorded sound is not modified prior to playback, we achieve in our tests 89.00% positive indications on the correct two microphones involved. If the sound is post-processed (here, by normalization) this figure decreases (in our normalization example to 36.00%, while another 50.67% of the tests still indicate two microphones, of which one has actually not been involved in the recording and playback recording process).

  11. SU-8 cantilevers for bio/chemical sensing; Fabrication, characterisation and development of novel read-out methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, M.; Keller, Stephan Urs; Lillemose, Michael;

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present the activities within our research group over the last five years with cantilevers fabricated in the polymer SU-8. We believe that SU-8 is an interesting polymer for fabrication of cantilevers for bio/chemical sensing due to its simple processing and low Young's modulus. We show...... examples of different integrated read-out methods and their characterisation. We also show that SU-8 cantilevers have a reduced sensitivity to changes in the environmental temperature and pH of the buffer solution. Moreover, we show that the SU-8 cantilever surface can be functionalised directly...

  12. Charge Identification of Highly Ionizing Particles in Desensitized Nuclear Emulsion Using High Speed Read-Out System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshito, T.; Kodama, K.; Yusa, K.; Ozaki, M.; Amako, K.; Kameoka, S.; Murakami, K.; Sasaki, T.; Aoki, S.; Ban, T.; Fukuda, T.; Naganawa, N.; Nakamura, T.; Natsume, M.; Niwa, K.; Takahashi, S.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanematsu, N.; Komori, M.; Sato, S.; Asai, M.; /Nagoya U. /Aichi U. of Education /Gunma U., Maebashi /JAXA, Sagamihara /KEK, Tsukuba /Kobe

    2006-05-10

    We performed an experimental study of charge identification of heavy ions from helium to carbon having energy of about 290 MeV/u using an emulsion chamber. Emulsion was desensitized by means of forced fading (refreshing) to expand a dynamic range of response to highly charged particles. For the track reconstruction and charge identification, the fully automated high speed emulsion read-out system, which was originally developed for identifying minimum ionizing particles, was used without any modification. Clear track by track charge identification up to Z=6 was demonstrated. The refreshing technique has proved to be a powerful technique to expand response of emulsion film to highly ionizing particles.

  13. M.i.p. detection performances of a 100 us read-out CMOS pixel sensor with digitised outputs

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Marc; Besson, Auguste; Colledani, Claude; Degerli, Yavuz; De Masi, Rita; Dorokhov, Andrei; Doziere, Guy; Dulinski, Wojciech; Gelin, Marie; Guilloux, Fabrice; Himmi, Abdelkader; Hu-Guo, Christine; Morel, Frederic; Orsini, Fabienne; Valin, Isabelle; Voutsinas, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    Swift, high resolution CMOS pixel sensors are being developed for the ILC vertex detector, aiming to allow approaching the interaction point very closely. A major issue is the time resolution of the sensors needed to deal with the high occupancy generated by the beam related background. A 128x576 pixel sensor providing digitised outputs at a read-out time of 92.5 us, was fabricated in 2008 within the EU project EUDET, and tested with charged particles at the CERN-SPS. Its prominent performances in terms of noise, detection efficiency versus fake hit rate, spatial resolution and radiation tolerance are overviewed. They validate the sensor architecture.

  14. Estimation of the proton energy spectrum in knee region by analog read-out of ARGO-YBJ experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Xiao-Bo; CHEN Song-Zhan; ZHA Min; ZHANG Xue-Yao; FENG Cun-Feng

    2008-01-01

    Based on the six months data set of ARGO-YBJ experiment with analog read-out and its Monte Carlo simulation,we study the difference between different primaries induced showers by using the space-time information of the charged particles in Extensive Air Showers.With five parameters which can efficiently pick out primary proton induced showers as inputs of an artificial neural network,the proton spectrum from 100 TeV to 10 PeV can be obtained.

  15. Two-microphone Separation of Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    of Speech Mixtures," 2006, submited for journal publication. See also, [2] Michael Syskind Pedersen, DeLiang Wang, Jan Larsen and Ulrik Kjems: "Overcomplete Blind Source Separation by Combining ICA and Binary Time-Frequency Masking," in proceedings of IEEE International workshop on Machine Learning......In this demonstration we show the separation of 3-7 mixed speech sources based on information from two microphones. Separation with background noise is demonstrated too. The algorithms are described in 1] Michael Syskind Pedersen, DeLiang Wang, Jan Larsen and Ulrik Kjems: "Two-microphone Separation...

  16. Skiroc A Front-end Chip to Read Out the Imaging Silicon-Tungsten Calorimeter for ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchel, Michel; Fleury, Julien; de La Taille, Christophe; Martin-Chassard,Gisèle; Raux, Ludovic; Wicek, Francois; Bohner, Gérard; Gay, Pascal; Lecoq, Jacques; Manen, Samuel; Royer, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Integration and low-power consumption of the read-out ASIC for the International Linear Collider (ILC) 82-millionchannel W-Si calorimeter must reach an unprecedented level as it will be embedded inside the detector. Uniformity and dynamic range performance has to reach the accuracy to achieve calorimetric measurement. A first step towards this goal has been a 10,000-channel physics prototype of 18*18 cm which is currently in test beam in CERN. A new version of a full integrated read out chip (SKIROC) has been designed to equip the technologic prototype to be built for 2009. Based on the running physics prototype ASIC (FLC_PHY3), it embeds most of the required features expected for the final detector. The dynamic range has been improved from 500 to 2000 MIP. An auto-trigger capability has been added allowing built-in zero suppress. The number of channel has been doubled reaching 36 to fit smaller silicon pads and the lownoise charge preamplifier now accepts both AC and DC coupled detectors. After an exhaustive...

  17. Description of an Advantageous Optical Label-Free Biosensing Interferometric Read-Out Method to Measure Biological Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Holgado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we report a new, simple, and reliable optical read-out detection method able to assess Rotavirus present in human sera as well as in the viral pollution sources. It is based on the interference of two interferometers used as biophotonic transducers. The method significantly improves the optical label-free biosensing response measuring both, the concentration of the AgR and its corresponding size. Two different immunoassays were carried out: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA, and the recognition by its antibody (anti-BSA; and Rotavirus (AgR and the recognition by its antibody (anti-AgR. In the cases studied, and using as model interferometer a simple Fabry-Perot transducer, we demonstrate a biosensing enhancement of two orders of magnitude in the Limit of Detection (LoD. In fact, this read-out optical method may have significant implications to enhance other optical label-free photonic transducers reported in the scientific literature.

  18. AIDA: A 16-channel amplifier ASIC to read out the advanced implantation detector array for experiments in nuclear decay spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, D. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Coleman-Smith, P. J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Davinson, T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I. H. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Page, R. D. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Thomas, S. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    We have designed a read-out ASIC for nuclear decay spectroscopy as part of the AIDA project - the Advanced Implantation Detector Array. AIDA will be installed in experiments at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in GSI, Darmstadt. The AIDA ASIC will measure the signals when unstable nuclei are implanted into the detector, followed by the much smaller signals when the nuclei subsequently decay. Implant energies can be as high as 20 GeV; decay products need to be measured down to 25 keV within just a few microseconds of the initial implants. The ASIC uses two amplifiers per detector channel, one covering the 20 GeV dynamic range, the other selectable over a 20 MeV or 1 GeV range. The amplifiers are linked together by bypass transistors which are normally switched off. The arrival of a large signal causes saturation of the low-energy amplifier and a fluctuation of the input voltage, which activates the link to the high-energy amplifier. The bypass transistors switch on and the input charge is integrated by the high-energy amplifier. The signal is shaped and stored by a peak-hold, then read out on a multiplexed output. Control logic resets the amplifiers and bypass circuit, allowing the low-energy amplifier to measure the subsequent decay signal. We present simulations and test results, demonstrating the AIDA ASIC operation over a wide range of input signals. (authors)

  19. CMOS biosensor system for on-chip cell culture with read-out circuitry and microfluidic packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, David; Christen, Jennifer Blain

    2012-01-01

    A 1.5 mm × 3 mm CMOS chip with sensors for monitoring on-chip cell cultures has been designed. The chip is designed in a 0.5 µm CMOS process which has 3 metal layers and 2 poly layers and is a 5 volt process. The chip contains ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs), as well as ISFETs with read-out circuitry, for monitoring the pH of solutions placed on top of the chip. Interdigitated electrode structures (IDESs) are made using the top metal of the process to be used for sensing cellular attachment and proliferation via impendence. IDES read-out circuits and IDES test structures are included. The chip also contains test amplifiers, bandgap reference test structures, and connections for post-processing. We designed the chip to accommodate packaging into an environment where it will be directly exposed to a cell culture environment. Specifically we designed the chip to have the incorporated sensors near the center of the chip allowing for connections made around the edge of the chip to be sealed off using an epoxy or similar material to prevent shorting. Preliminary electrical characterization results for our amplifier indicate a gain of 48 dB, a bandwidth of 1.65 kHz, and a common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 72 dB. We also present a packaging technique using a flexible pcb substrate.

  20. A noiseless kilohertz frame rate imaging detector based on microchannel plates read out with the Medipix2 CMOS pixel chip

    CERN Document Server

    Mikulec, Bettina; Ferrère, Didier; La Marra, Daniel; McPhate, J B; Tremsin, A S; Siegmund, O H W; Vallerga, J V; Clement, J; Ponchut, C; Rigal, J M; CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    A new hybrid optical imaging detector is described that is being developed for the next generation adaptive optics (AO) wavefront sensors (WFS) for ground-based telescopes. The detector consists of a photocathode and proximity focused microchannel plates (MCPs) read out by the Medipix2 CMOS pixel ASIC. Each pixel of the Medipix2 device measures 55x55 um2 and comprises pre-amplifier, a window discriminator and a 14-bit counter. The 256x256 Medipix2 array can be read out noiselessly in 287 us. The readout can be electronically shuttered down to a temporal window of a few us. The Medipix2 is buttable on 3 sides to produce 512x(n*256) pixel devices. Measurements with ultraviolet light yield a spatial resolution of the detector at the Nyquist limit. Sub-pixel resolution can be achieved using centroiding algorithms. For the AO application, very high continuous frame rates of the order of 1 kHz are required for a matrix of 512x512 pixels. The design concepts of a parallel readout board are presented that will allow ...

  1. Optimization of Microphone Locations for Acoustic Liner Impedance Eduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; June, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    Two impedance eduction methods are explored for use with data acquired in the NASA Langley Grazing Flow Impedance Tube. The first is an indirect method based on the convected Helmholtz equation, and the second is a direct method based on the Kumaresan and Tufts algorithm. Synthesized no-flow data, with random jitter to represent measurement error, are used to evaluate a number of possible microphone locations. Statistical approaches are used to evaluate the suitability of each set of microphone locations. Given the computational resources required, small sample statistics are employed for the indirect method. Since the direct method is much less computationally intensive, a Monte Carlo approach is employed to gather its statistics. A comparison of results achieved with full and reduced sets of microphone locations is used to determine which sets of microphone locations are acceptable. For the indirect method, each array that includes microphones in all three regions (upstream and downstream hard wall sections, and liner test section) provides acceptable results, even when as few as eight microphones are employed. The best arrays employ microphones well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The direct method is constrained to use microphones opposite the liner. Although a number of arrays are acceptable, the optimum set employs 14 microphones positioned well away from the leading and trailing edges of the liner. The selected sets of microphone locations are also evaluated with data measured for ceramic tubular and perforate-over-honeycomb liners at three flow conditions (Mach 0.0, 0.3, and 0.5). They compare favorably with results attained using all 53 microphone locations. Although different optimum microphone locations are selected for the two impedance eduction methods, there is significant overlap. Thus, the union of these two microphone arrays is preferred, as it supports usage of both methods. This array contains 3 microphones in the upstream

  2. Method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.

    1998-06-16

    A method for preventing micromechanical structures from adhering to another object includes the step of immersing a micromechanical structure and its associated substrate in a chemical species that does not stick to itself. The method can be employed during the manufacture of micromechanical structures to prevent micromechanical parts from sticking or adhering to one another and their associated substrate surface. 3 figs.

  3. $\\mu$MECH Micromechanics Library

    CERN Document Server

    Svoboda, Ladislav; Janda, Tomáš; Vorel, Jan; Novák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the project of an open source C/C++ library of analytical solutions to micromechanical fields within media with ellipsoidal heterogeneities. The solutions are based on Eshelby's stress-free, in general polynomial, eigenstrains and equivalent inclusion method. To some extent, the interactions among inclusions in a non-dilute medium are taken into account by means of the self-compatibility algorithm. Moreover, the library is furnished with a powerful I/O interface and conventional homogenization tools. Advantages and limitations of the implemented strategies are addressed through comparisons with reference solutions by means of the Finite Element Method.

  4. Circular microphone array for multi channel audio recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsebos, E.M.; De Vries, D.; Boone, M.M.; Schuurmans, T.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    An audio system has a circular microphone array with a number of microphones arranged on a circle for receiving a sound field. A digital signal processor is provided for processing output signals from these microphones. To establish well controlled and sharp directivity patterns the audio system per

  5. PECVD silicon nitride diaphragms for condenser microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeper, P.R.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, P.

    1991-01-01

    The application of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon nitride as a diaphragm material for condenser microphones has been investigated. By means of adjusting the SiH4/NH3 gas-flow composition, silicon-rich silicon nitride films have been obtained with a relatively low tensile s

  6. The acoustic center of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    center from the inverse distance law is analyzed. Experimental values of the acoustic center of laboratory standard microphones are presented, and numerical results obtained using the boundary element method supplement the experimental data. Estimated uncertainties are also presented. The results...... reported confirm values previously defined in an international standard and extend the frequency range....

  7. Two-microphone Separation of Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Matlab source code for underdetermined separation of instaneous speech mixtures. The algorithm is described in [1] Michael Syskind Pedersen, DeLiang Wang, Jan Larsen and Ulrik Kjems: ''Two-microphone Separation of Speech Mixtures,'' 2006, submitted for journal publoication. See also, [2] Michael...

  8. Compressive sensing with a spherical microphone array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Xenaki, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    A wave expansion method is proposed in this work, based on measurements with a spherical microphone array, and formulated in the framework provided by Compressive Sensing. The method promotes sparse solutions via ‘1-norm minimization, so that the measured data are represented by few basis functions...

  9. Hearing aid comprising an array of microphones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, M.M.; Berkhout, A.J.; Merks, I.L.D.M.

    1999-01-01

    Hearing aid for improving the hearing ability of the hard of hearing, comprising an array of microphones, the electrical output signals of which are fed to at least one transmission path belonging to an ear. Means are provided for deriving two array output signals from the output signals of the micr

  10. APPLICATION OF MICROPHONE ARRAYS FOR DISTANT SPEECH CAPTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Stolbov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Application of microphone arrays and beamforming techniques for speech information collection has significant advantages compared to systems operating with a single microphone. This paper presents a brief overview of microphone array systems for collecting distant speech information. The paper is based on an analysis of publications on the use of microphone arrays for speech information collection tasks, as well as on the author’s experience in the development and practical application of planar microphone arrays. The paper describes the main stages of the development of systems for remote capture of audio information. It provides a review of the main applications of microphone arrays, the basic types of microphone arrays and their features. The bulk of the paper deals with planar microphone arrays. We analyze the work of microphone arrays in different acoustic environments. The paper contains the basic equations for calculating the parameters of equidistant planar microphone arrays. Some methods of designing non-equidistant arrays are also mentioned (a list of references is included. We also provide a list of basic digital signal processing algorithms for planar microphone arrays, as well as a list of references on processing algorithms in the frequency domain. The paper includes a list of foreign companies offering systems based on microphone arrays for a wide range of tasks associated with the processing of speech and audio signals. We describe some state-of-the-art speech information collection systems based on microphone arrays. Some promising directions for the development of speech information collection systems using microphone arrays are described in conclusion. The material of the review is usable in designing of microphone arrays for specific practical applications.

  11. Particle Discrimination in TeO$_{2}$ Bolometers using Light Detectors read out by Transition Edge Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Schäffner, K; Bellini, F; Casali, N; Ferroni, F; Hauff, D; Nagorny, N; Pattavina, L; Petricca, F; Pirro, S; Pröbst, F; Reindl, F; Seidel, W; Strauss, R

    2014-01-01

    An active discrimination of the dominant $\\alpha$-background is the prerequisite for future DBD experiments based on TeO$_{2}$ bolometers. We investigate such $\\alpha$-particle rejection in cryogenic TeO$_{2}$ bolometers by the detection of Cherenkov light. For a setup consisting of a large TeO$_{2}$ crystal 285 g and a separate cryogenic light detector, both read out by transition edge sensors at around 10 mK, we obtain an event-by-event identification of e/$\\gamma$- and $\\alpha$-events. In the energy interval ranging from 2400 keV to 2800 keV and covering the Q-value of $^{130}$Te a discrimination power of 3.7 could be demonstrated.

  12. SU-8 Cantilevers for Bio/chemical Sensing; Fabrication, Characterisation and Development of Novel Read-out Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Boisen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the activities within our research group over the last five yearswith cantilevers fabricated in the polymer SU-8. We believe that SU-8 is an interestingpolymer for fabrication of cantilevers for bio/chemical sensing due to its simple processingand low Young’s modulus. We show examples of different integrated read-out methodsand their characterisation. We also show that SU-8 cantilevers have a reduced sensitivity tochanges in the environmental temperature and pH of the buffer solution. Moreover, weshow that the SU-8 cantilever surface can be functionalised directly with receptormolecules for analyte detection, thereby avoiding gold-thiol chemistry.

  13. High-speed single photon counting read out electronics for a digital detection system for clinical synchrotron radiation mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, A.; Arfelli, F.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, R.; Olivo, A.; Pani, S.; Rigon, L.; Vallazza, E.; Venanzi, C.; Castelli, E.

    2004-02-01

    The SYRMEP beam line is currently in the upgrading phase for mammographic examinations on patients at Elettra in Trieste. At the same time, a digital detection system, suitable for in -vivo breast imaging, is under development; it consists of a silicon laminar detector array operating in single photon counting mode. The duration of a clinical examination should not exceed a few seconds. Fast read out electronics is therefore necessary with the aim of avoiding losses in image contrast in presence of high counting rates. A custom ASIC working with 100% efficiency for rates up to 100 kHz per pixel has been designed and tested, and other solutions based on commercially available ASICs are currently under test. Several detector prototypes have been assembled, and images of mammographic test objects have been acquired. Image quality, efficiency and contrast losses have been evaluated in all cases as a function of the counting rate.

  14. A GEANT4 study on the time resolution of a fast plastic scintillator read out by a G-APD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlak, K., E-mail: kamil.sedlak@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Stoykov, A.; Scheuermann, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2012-12-22

    The time resolution of a fast scintillation counter, consisting of a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode, is studied over a wide range of the number of detected photons (primary photoelectrons) using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. Different timing definitions such as first photon detection, leading edge and constant fraction discrimination are considered. In the latter case the predictions are compared with the existing experimental data. We also show that due to the finite scintillation rise time, finite scintillator dimensions and also due to the finite single photon time resolution in G-APD cells, the time resolution for the first detected photon in real detectors substantially deviates from the {sigma}{approx}1/N{sub phe} dependence, theoretically predicted for a scintillator with zero rise time.

  15. A GEANT4 study on the time resolution of a fast plastic scintillator read out by a G-APD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, K.; Stoykov, A.; Scheuermann, R.

    2012-12-01

    The time resolution of a fast scintillation counter, consisting of a plastic scintillator read out by a Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode, is studied over a wide range of the number of detected photons (primary photoelectrons) using the GEANT4 simulation toolkit. Different timing definitions such as first photon detection, leading edge and constant fraction discrimination are considered. In the latter case the predictions are compared with the existing experimental data. We also show that due to the finite scintillation rise time, finite scintillator dimensions and also due to the finite single photon time resolution in G-APD cells, the time resolution for the first detected photon in real detectors substantially deviates from the σ˜1/Nphe dependence, theoretically predicted for a scintillator with zero rise time.

  16. A pixel read-out architecture implementing a two-stage token ring, zero suppression and compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuvelmans, S; Boerrigter, M, E-mail: sander.heuvelmans@bruco.nl [Bruco integrated circuits BV, Oostermaat 2, 7623 CS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Increasing luminosity in high energy physics experiments leads to new challenges in the design of data acquisition systems for pixel detectors. With the upgrade of the LHCb experiment, the data processing will be changed; hit data from every collision will be transported off the pixel chip, without any trigger selection. A read-out architecture is proposed which is able to obtain low hit data loss on limited silicon area by using the logic beneath the pixels as a data buffer. Zero suppression and redundancy reduction ensure that the data rate off chip is minimized. A C++ model has been created for simulation of functionality and data loss, and for system development. A VHDL implementation has been derived from this model.

  17. Characterization of the front-end EASIROC for read-out of SiPM in the ASTRI camera

    CERN Document Server

    Impiombato, D; Belluso, M; Bilotta, S; Bonanno, G; Catalano, O; Grillo, A; La Rosa, G; Marano, D; Mineo, T; Russo, F; Sottile, G

    2013-01-01

    The design and realization of a prototype for the Small-Size class Telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array is one of the cornerstones of the ASTRI project. The prototype will adopt a focal plane camera based on Silicon Photo-Multiplier sensors that coupled with a dual mirror optics configuration represents an innovative solution for the detection of Atmospheric Cherenkov light. These detectors can be read by the Extended Analogue Silicon Photo-Multiplier Integrated Read Out Chip (EASIROC) equipped with 32-channels. In this paper, we report some preliminary results on measurements aimed to evaluate EASIROC capability of autotriggering and measurements of the trigger time walk, jitter, DAC linearity and trigger efficiency vs the injected charge. Moreover, the dynamic range of the ASIC is also reported.

  18. Emulation and Calibration of the SALT Read-out Chip for the Upstream Tracker for Modernised LHCb Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Dendek, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb is one of the four major experiments currently operating at CERN. The main reason for constructing the LHCb forward spectrometer was a precise measurement of the CP violation in heavy quarks section as well as search for a New Physics. To obtain interesting results, the LHCb is mainly focused on study of B meson decays. Unfortunately, due to the present data acquisition architecture, the LHCb experiment is statistically limited for collecting such events. This fact led the LHCb Collaboration to decide to perform far-reaching upgrade. Key part of this upgrade will be replacement of the TT detector. To perform this action, it was requited to design new tracking detector with entirely new front-end electronics. This detector will be called the Upstream Tracker (UT) and the read-out chip — SALT. This note presents an overall discussion on SALT chip. In particular, the emulation process of the SALT data preformed via the software written by the author.

  19. Micromechanics-BEM Analysis for Piezoelectric Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Qinghua

    2005-01-01

    The effective material properties of piezoelectric composites are predicted using micromechanics models of the composite structure combined with a boundary element method (BEM) solution of the governing equation. The composites consist of inclusion and matrix phases. The micromechanics method gives formulae for the overall material constants as functions of the concentration matrix, while the boundary element simulation gives numerical solutions of the boundary displacement and electric potential equations for inclusion or hole problems. Numerical results for a piezoelectric plate with circular inclusions are presented to illustrate applications of the proposed micromechanics-BEM formulation.

  20. A new type of microphone using flexoelectric barium strontium titnate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Seol ryung; Huang, Wenbin; Zhang, Shujun; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2014-03-01

    A flexoelectric bridge-structured microphone using bulk barium strontium titanate (Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3 or BST) ceramic was investigated in this study. The flexoelectric microphone was installed in an anechoic box and exposed to the sound pressure emitted from a loud speaker. Charge sensitivity of the flexoelectric microphone was measured and calibrated using a reference microphone. The 1.5 mm×768 μm×50 μm micro-machined bridge-structured flexoelectric microphone has a sensitivity of 0.92 pC/Pa, while its resonance frequency was calculated to be 98.67 kHz. The analytical and experimental results show that the flexoelectric microphone has both high sensitivity and broad bandwidth, indicating that flexoelectric microphones are potential candidates for many applications.

  1. 3rd Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Ananthasuresh, Gondi; Corves, Burkhard; Petuya, Victor

    2015-01-01

    This book contains applications of micromechanisms and microactuators in several very modern technical fields such as mechatronics, biomechanics, machines, micromachines, robotics and apparatuses. In connection with its topic, the work combines the theoretical results with experimental tests on micromechanisms and microactuators. The book presents the most recent research advances in Machine and Mechanisms Science. It includes the accepted reviewed papers of researchers specialized in the topics of the conference: microactuators and micro-assembly, micro sensors involving movable solids, micro-opto-mechanical devices, mechanical tools for cell and tissue studies, micromanipulation and micro-stages, micro-scale flight and swimming, micro-robotics and surgical tools, micron-scale power generation, miniature manufacturing machines, micromechatronics and micro-mechanisms, biomechanics micro and nano scales and control issues in microsystems.  The presented applications of micromechanisms and microactuators i...

  2. Cantilever-like micromechanical sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Dohn, Søren; Keller, Stephan Sylvest

    2011-01-01

    The field of cantilever-based sensing emerged in the mid-1990s and is today a well-known technology for label-free sensing which holds promise as a technique for cheap, portable, sensitive and highly parallel analysis systems. The research in sensor realization as well as sensor applications has...... increased significantly over the past 10 years. In this review we will present the basic modes of operation in cantilever-like micromechanical sensors and discuss optical and electrical means for signal transduction. The fundamental processes for realizing miniaturized cantilevers are described with focus...... on silicon-and polymer-based technologies. Examples of recent sensor applications are given covering such diverse fields as drug discovery, food diagnostics, material characterizations and explosives detection....

  3. Microphonics in biopotential measurements with capacitive electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Lozano, Pablo S; Pallas-Areny, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    Biopotential measurements with capacitive electrodes do not need any direct contact between electrode and skin, which saves the time devoted to expose and prepare the contact area when measuring with conductive electrodes. However, mechanical vibrations resulting from physiological functions such as respiration and cardiac contraction can change the capacitance of the electrode and affect the recordings. This transformation of mechanical vibrations into undesired electric signals is termed microphonics. We have evaluated microphonics in capacitive ECG recordings obtained from a dressed subject seated on a common chair with electrodes placed on the front side of the backrest of the chair. Depending on the softness of the backrest, the recordings may be clearly affected by the displacement of the thorax back wall due to the respiration and to the heart's mechanical activity.

  4. Two-Microphone Separation of Speech Mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Wang, DeLiang; Larsen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Separation of speech mixtures, often referred to as the cocktail party problem, has been studied for decades. In many source separation tasks, the separation method is limited by the assumption of at least as many sensors as sources. Further, many methods require that the number of signals within...... the recorded mixtures be known in advance. In many real-world applications, these limitations are too restrictive. We propose a novel method for underdetermined blind source separation using an instantaneous mixing model which assumes closely spaced microphones. Two source separation techniques have been...... similar signals. Using two microphones, we can separate, in principle, an arbitrary number of mixed speech signals. We show separation results for mixtures with as many as seven speech signals under instantaneous conditions. We also show that the proposed method is applicable to segregate speech signals...

  5. Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Materials Sciences Corporation AD-A236 756 M.hM. 9 1 0513 IEIN HIfINU IIl- DTIC JUN 06 1991 MICROMECHANICAL EVALUATION OF S 0 CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITES C...Classification) \\() Micromechanical Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composites ) 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) C-F. Yen, Z. Hashin, C. Laird, B.W. Rosen, Z. Wang 13a. TYPE...and strengthen the ceramic composites. In this task, various possibilities of crack propagation in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under

  6. Passive wireless MEMS microphones for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezen, A S; Sivaramakrishnan, S; Hur, S; Rajamani, R; Robbins, W; Nelson, B J

    2005-11-01

    This paper introduces passive wireless telemetry based operation for high frequency acoustic sensors. The focus is on the development, fabrication, and evaluation of wireless, battery-less SAW-IDT MEMS microphones for biomedical applications. Due to the absence of batteries, the developed sensors are small and as a result of the batch manufacturing strategy are inexpensive which enables their utilization as disposable sensors. A pulse modulated surface acoustic wave interdigital transducer (SAW-IDT) based sensing strategy has been formulated. The sensing strategy relies on detecting the ac component of the acoustic pressure signal only and does not require calibration. The proposed sensing strategy has been successfully implemented on an in-house fabricated SAW-IDT sensor and a variable capacitor which mimics the impedance change of a capacitive microphone. Wireless telemetry distances of up to 5 centimeters have been achieved. A silicon MEMS microphone which will be used with the SAW-IDT device is being microfabricated and tested. The complete passive wireless sensor package will include the MEMS microphone wire-bonded on the SAW substrate and interrogated through an on-board antenna. This work on acoustic sensors breaks new ground by introducing high frequency (i.e., audio frequencies) sensor measurement utilizing SAW-IDT sensors. The developed sensors can be used for wireless monitoring of body sounds in a number of different applications, including monitoring breathing sounds in apnea patients, monitoring chest sounds after cardiac surgery, and for feedback sensing in compression (HFCC) vests used for respiratory ventilation. Another promising application is monitoring chest sounds in neonatal care units where the miniature sensors will minimize discomfort for the newborns.

  7. Hydrogel microphones for stealthy underwater listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Song, Jingfeng; Li, Shumin; Elowsky, Christian; Zhou, You; Ducharme, Stephen; Chen, Yong Mei; Zhou, Qin; Tan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Exploring the abundant resources in the ocean requires underwater acoustic detectors with a high-sensitivity reception of low-frequency sound from greater distances and zero reflections. Here we address both challenges by integrating an easily deformable network of metal nanoparticles in a hydrogel matrix for use as a cavity-free microphone. Since metal nanoparticles can be densely implanted as inclusions, and can even be arranged in coherent arrays, this microphone can detect static loads and air breezes from different angles, as well as underwater acoustic signals from 20 Hz to 3 kHz at amplitudes as low as 4 Pa. Unlike dielectric capacitors or cavity-based microphones that respond to stimuli by deforming the device in thickness directions, this hydrogel device responds with a transient modulation of electric double layers, resulting in an extraordinary sensitivity (217 nF kPa-1 or 24 μC N-1 at a bias of 1.0 V) without using any signal amplification tools.

  8. Radiation Tolerant Electronics and Digital Processing for the Phase-1 Read-out Upgrade of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milic, A. [Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter Group, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-07-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon calorimeters are designed and built to study proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV. Liquid argon (LAr) sampling calorimeters are employed for all electromagnetic calorimetry in the pseudorapidity region |η|<3.2, and for hadronic calorimetry in the region from |η|=1.5 to |η|=4.9. Although the nominal LHC experimental programme is still in progress, an upgrade of the read-out electronics is being launched to cope with luminosities of up to 3x10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, which are beyond the original design by a factor of 3. An improved spatial granularity of the trigger primitives is therefore proposed in order to improve the identification performance for trigger signatures, like electrons, photons, tau leptons, jets, total and missing energy, at high background rejection rates. For the upgrade Phase-1 in 2018, new LAr Trigger Digitizer Boards (LTDB) are being designed to receive higher granularity signals, digitize them on detector and send them via fast optical links to a new LAr digital processing system (LDPS). The LDPS applies a digital filtering and identifies significant energy depositions in each trigger channel. The refined trigger primitives are then transmitted to the first level trigger system to extract improved trigger signatures. The read-out of the trigger signals will process 34000 so-called Super Cells at every LHC bunch-crossing at a frequency of 40 MHz. The new LTDB on-detector electronics is designed to be radiation tolerant in order to be operated for the remaining live-time of the ATLAS detector up to a total luminosity of 3000 fb{sup -1}. For the analog-to-digital conversion (12-bit ADC at 40 MSPS), the data serialization and the fast optical link (5.44 Gb/s) custom components have been developed. They have been qualified for the expected radiation environment of a total ionization dose of 1.3 kGy and a hadron fluence of 6 x 10{sup 13} h/cm{sup 2} with energies above

  9. Effect of microphone location in ITE versus BTE hearing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, E L; Church, G T

    1990-07-01

    Sound pressure measurements were made at the hearing aid microphones of 20 subjects with their in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids and a behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid to determine the influence of microphone location on hearing aid input. A probe tube microphone was used to measure the difference in dB SPL between the ITE and BTE microphone locations. ITE microphone location resulted in a maximum high frequency advantage of 9.2 dB in the 2500 to 5000 Hz range. However, the frequency location of this maximal advantage varied a great deal between individuals, precluding the use of a standard ITE microphone correction factor for 2cc coupler to functional gain conversions.

  10. Development and characterization of high-resolution neutron pixel detectors based on Timepix read-out chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, F.; Zemlicka, J.; Jakubek, J.; Dudak, J.; Vavrik, D.; Köster, U.; Atkins, D.; Kaestner, A.; Soltes, J.; Viererbl, L.; Vacik, J.; Tomandl, I.

    2016-12-01

    Using a suitable isotope such as 6Li and 10B semiconductor hybrid pixel detectors can be successfully adapted for position sensitive detection of thermal and cold neutrons via conversion into energetic light ions. The adapted devices then typically provides spatial resolution at the level comparable to the pixel pitch (55 μm) and sensitive area of about few cm2. In this contribution, we describe further progress in neutron imaging performance based on the development of a large-area hybrid pixel detector providing practically continuous neutron sensitive area of 71 × 57 mm2. The measurements characterising the detector performance at the cold neutron imaging instrument ICON at PSI and high-flux imaging beam-line Neutrograph at ILL are presented. At both facilities, high-resolution high-contrast neutron radiography with the newly developed detector has been successfully applied for objects which imaging were previously difficult with hybrid pixel technology (such as various composite materials, objects of cultural heritage etc.). Further, a significant improvement in the spatial resolution of neutron radiography with hybrid semiconductor pixel detector based on the fast read-out Timepix-based detector is presented. The system is equipped with a thin planar 6LiF convertor operated effectively in the event-by-event mode enabling position sensitive detection with spatial resolution better than 10 μm.

  11. Functional Brachyury binding sites establish a temporal read-out of gene expression in the Ciona notochord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Katikala

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of the notochord represented a milestone in Deuterostome evolution. The notochord is necessary for the development of the chordate body plan and for the formation of the vertebral column and numerous organs. It is known that the transcription factor Brachyury is required for notochord formation in all chordates, and that it controls transcription of a large number of target genes. However, studies of the structure of the cis-regulatory modules (CRMs through which this control is exerted are complicated in vertebrates by the genomic complexity and the pan-mesodermal expression territory of Brachyury. We used the ascidian Ciona, in which the single-copy Brachyury is notochord-specific and CRMs are easily identifiable, to carry out a systematic characterization of Brachyury-downstream notochord CRMs. We found that Ciona Brachyury (Ci-Bra controls most of its targets directly, through non-palindromic binding sites that function either synergistically or individually to activate early- and middle-onset genes, respectively, while late-onset target CRMs are controlled indirectly, via transcriptional intermediaries. These results illustrate how a transcriptional regulator can efficiently shape a shallow gene regulatory network into a multi-tiered transcriptional output, and provide insights into the mechanisms that establish temporal read-outs of gene expression in a fast-developing chordate embryo.

  12. An application of CCD read-out technique to neutron distribution measurement using the self-activation method with a CsI scintillator plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohtomi, Akihiro; Kurihara, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Honda, Soichiro; Tokunaga, Masaaki; Uno, Heita; Shinsho, Kiyomitsu; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Koba, Yusuke; Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Ohga, Saiji

    2016-10-01

    In our previous paper, the self-activation of an NaI scintillator had been successfully utilized for detecting photo-neutrons around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine; individual optical pulses from the self-activated scintillator are read-out by photo sensors such as a photomultiplier tube (PMT). In the present work, preliminary observations have been performed in order to apply a direct CCD read-out technique to the self-activation method with a CsI scintillator plate using a Pu-Be source and a 10-MV linac. In conclusion, it has been revealed that the CCD read-out technique is applicable to neutron measurement around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine with the self-activation of a CsI plate. Such application may provide a possibility of novel method for simple neutron dose-distribution measurement.

  13. Microphone Array Design Measures for Hands-Free Speech Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    井上 雅晶; 山田 武志; 中村, 哲; 鹿野 清宏

    1998-01-01

    One of the key technologies for natural man-machine interface is hands-free speech recognition. The performance of hands-free distant- talking speech recognition will be seriously degraded by noise and reverberation in real environments. A microphone array is applied to solve the problem. When applying a microphone array to speech recognition, parameters such as number of microphone elements and their spacing interval affect the performance. In order to optimize these parameters, a measure wh...

  14. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  15. New probe microphone for investigating the acoustics of the ear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Ole; Günthersen, Carsten

    1981-01-01

    A new probe microphone employing a soft tube and a compensation network for the tube response is described. Because of the soft tube, this microphone is especially suited for investigating the acoustics of the outer ear and the ear canal, and some such measurements are given.......A new probe microphone employing a soft tube and a compensation network for the tube response is described. Because of the soft tube, this microphone is especially suited for investigating the acoustics of the outer ear and the ear canal, and some such measurements are given....

  16. Towards a sub 15-dBA optical micromachined microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghwan; Hall, Neal A

    2014-05-01

    Micromachined microphones with grating-based optical-interferometric readout have been demonstrated previously. These microphones are similar in construction to bottom-inlet capacitive microelectromechanical-system (MEMS) microphones, with the exception that optoelectronic emitters and detectors are placed inside the microphone's front or back cavity. A potential advantage of optical microphones in designing for low noise level is the use of highly-perforated microphone backplates to enable low-damping and low thermal-mechanical noise levels. This work presents an experimental study of a microphone diaphragm and backplate designed for optical readout and low thermal-mechanical noise. The backplate is 1 mm × 1 mm and is fabricated in a 2-μm-thick epitaxial silicon layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer and contains a diffraction grating with 4-μm pitch etched at the center. The presented system has a measured thermal-mechanical noise level equal to 22.6 dBA. Through measurement of the electrostatic frequency response and measured noise spectra, a device model for the microphone system is verified. The model is in-turn used to identify design paths towards MEMS microphones with sub 15-dBA noise floors.

  17. Compressive sensing with a spherical microphone array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Grande, Efren; Xenaki, Angeliki

    2016-02-01

    A wave expansion method is proposed in this work, based on measurements with a spherical microphone array, and formulated in the framework provided by Compressive Sensing. The method promotes sparse solutions via ℓ1-norm minimization, so that the measured data are represented by few basis functions. This results in fine spatial resolution and accuracy. This publication covers the theoretical background of the method, including experimental results that illustrate some of the fundamental differences with the "conventional" least-squares approach. The proposed methodology is relevant for source localization, sound field reconstruction, and sound field analysis.

  18. 77 FR 2087 - Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-13

    ... COMMISSION Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same; Institution of Investigation... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain silicon microphone packages... after importation of certain silicon microphone packages and products containing same that infringe...

  19. 76 FR 78042 - Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same Receipt of Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-15

    ... COMMISSION Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled In Re Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same, DN 2864; the... importation of certain silicon microphone packages and products containing same. The complaint names...

  20. Added value of IP-10 as a read-out of Mycobacterium tuberculosis - specific immunity in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, Sivmakumaran; Ritz, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    , suggest a potential for fewer missed cases with a combined IFNγ/IP-10 read-out in a 4 generation IGRA.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share...

  1. An application of CCD read-out technique to neutron distribution measurement using the self-activation method with a CsI scintillator plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohtomi, Akihiro, E-mail: nohtomi@hs.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Kurihara, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Honda, Soichiro; Tokunaga, Masaaki; Uno, Heita [Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Shinsho, Kiyomitsu [Graduate School of Human Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 7-2-10 Higashi-oku, Arakawa-ku, Tokyo 116-8551 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Genichiro [Atomic Energy Research Institute, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashiosaka-shi, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Koba, Yusuke [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ohga, Saiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2016-10-01

    In our previous paper, the self-activation of an NaI scintillator had been successfully utilized for detecting photo-neutrons around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine; individual optical pulses from the self-activated scintillator are read-out by photo sensors such as a photomultiplier tube (PMT). In the present work, preliminary observations have been performed in order to apply a direct CCD read-out technique to the self-activation method with a CsI scintillator plate using a Pu-Be source and a 10-MV linac. In conclusion, it has been revealed that the CCD read-out technique is applicable to neutron measurement around a high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machine with the self-activation of a CsI plate. Such application may provide a possibility of novel method for simple neutron dose-distribution measurement. - Highlights: • Preliminary observations have been performed by a CCD for the CsI self-activation method. • It has been revealed that the CCD read-out technique is applicable to neutron measurement. • Such application may provide a novel method for simple neutron distribution measurement.

  2. The use and calibration of read-out streaks to increase the dynamic range of the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Page, M J; Breeveld, A A; Hancock, B; Holland, S T; Marshall, F E; Oates, S; Roming, P W A; Siegel, M H; Smith, P J; Carter, M; De Pasquale, M; Symeonidis, M; Yershov, V; Beardmore, A P

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic range of photon counting micro-channel-plate (MCP) intensified charged-coupled device (CCD) instruments such as the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (XMM-OM) is limited at the bright end by coincidence loss, the superposition of multiple photons in the individual frames recorded by the CCD. Photons which arrive during the brief period in which the image frame is transferred for read out of the CCD are displaced in the transfer direction in the recorded images. For sufficiently bright sources, these displaced counts form read-out streaks. Using UVOT observations of Tycho-2 stars, we investigate the use of these read-out streaks to obtain photometry for sources which are too bright (and hence have too much coincidence loss) for normal aperture photometry to be reliable. For read-out-streak photometry, the bright-source limiting factor is coincidence loss within the MCPs rather than the CCD. We find that photometric measurements can be obtained for stars u...

  3. Directional Microphone Hearing Aids in School Environments: Working toward Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Todd A.; Picou, Erin M.; Galster, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The hearing aid microphone setting (omnidirectional or directional) can be selected manually or automatically. This study examined the percentage of time the microphone setting selected using each method was judged to provide the best signalto-noise ratio (SNR) for the talkers of interest in school environments. Method: A total of 26…

  4. Directional Microphone Hearing Aids in School Environments: Working toward Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Todd A.; Picou, Erin M.; Galster, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The hearing aid microphone setting (omnidirectional or directional) can be selected manually or automatically. This study examined the percentage of time the microphone setting selected using each method was judged to provide the best signalto-noise ratio (SNR) for the talkers of interest in school environments. Method: A total of 26…

  5. Comparison of binaural microphones for externalization of sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cubick, Jens; Sánchez Rodríguez, C.; Song, Wookeun;

    2015-01-01

    or with microphones placed inside the ear canals of a person. In this study, binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) were measured with several commercially available binaural microphones, both placed inside the listeners’ ears (individual BRIR) and on a head and torso simulator (generic BRIR). The degree...

  6. Preamplifier with ultra low frequency cutoff for infrasonic condenser microphone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinnerup, Rasmus Trock; Marbjerg, Kresten; Rasmussen, Per

    2012-01-01

    Measuring infrasonic sound sets high requirements on the instruments used. Typically the measurement chain consists of a microphone and a preamplifier. As the input resistance of the preamplifier forms a high pass filter with the capacitance of the microphone in the picofarad range, measuring ult...

  7. Analogy among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-Shian; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-10-07

    We wish to illuminate the analogous link between microfluidic-based devices, and the already established pairing of micromechanics and microelectronics to create a triangular/three-way scientific relationship as a means of interlinking familial disciplines and accomplishing two primary goals: (1) to facilitate the modeling of multidisciplinary domains; and, (2) to enable us to co-simulate the entire system within a compact circuit simulator (e.g., Cadence or SPICE). A microfluidic channel-like structure embedded in a micro-electro-mechanical resonator via our proposed CMOS-MEMS technology is used to illustrate the connections among microfluidics, micromechanics, and microelectronics.

  8. Sensitivity improvement techniques for micromechanical vibrating accelerometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vtorushin Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the problems of detecting a desired signal generated by micromechanical vibrating accelerometer. Three detection methods, namely frequency, amplitude and phase are considered in this paper. These methods are used in micromechanical vibrating accelerometers that incorporate a force sensitive element which transforms measured acceleration into the output signal. Investigations are carried out using the ANSYS finite element program and MATLAB/Simulink support package. Investigation results include the comparative analysis of the output signal characteristics obtained by the different detection methods.

  9. Measurement of Supersonic Jet Noise with Optical Wave Microphone System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masataka KOSAKA; Kunisato SETO; MD. Tawhidul Islam KHAN; Yoichi NAKAZONO

    2005-01-01

    An optical wave microphone system is a new technique of sound measurement. This technique has been developed as a new plasma diagnostic technique to measure electron density fluctuations in the nuclear fusion research. Because the sound wave is a pressure or a density fluctuation, it is possible for this technique to measure the sound wave, too. The acoustical characteristics of the optical wave microphone system were examined by using a speaker as a first step. Next, feasibility of this device to measure jet noise was examined. It was found that the optical wave microphone system could measure the jet noise as well as a sound from speaker.Hence the optical wave microphone system can be considered one of the devices equivalent to condenser microphone. Because of these reason, this device is very convenient to scan the acoustic filed through jet flow from the inside to the out side and more preferable for not disturbing the observation field.

  10. Microphone Diversity Combining for In-Car Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Venditti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a frequency domain diversity approach for two or more microphone signals, for example, for in-car applications. The microphones should be positioned separately to insure diverse signal conditions and incoherent recording of noise. This enables a better compromise for the microphone position with respect to different speaker sizes and noise sources. This work proposes a two-stage approach. In the first stage, the microphone signals are weighted with respect to their signal-to-noise ratio and then summed similar to maximum ratio combining. The combined signal is then used as a reference for a frequency domain least-mean-squares (LMS filter for each input signal. The output SNR is significantly improved compared to coherence-based noise reduction systems, even if one microphone is heavily corrupted by noise.

  11. Measured Temperature Dependence of Scintillation Camera Signals Read Out by Geiger–Müller Mode Avalanche Photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William C. J.; Miyaoka, Robert S.; MacDonald, L. R.; Lewellen, Thomas K.

    2010-01-01

    We are developing a prototype monolithic scintillation camera with optical sensors on the entrance surface (SES) for use with statistically-estimated depth-of-interaction in a continuous scintillator. We opt to use Geiger-Müller mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) for the SES camera since they possess many desirable properties; for the intended application (SES and PET/MR imaging), they offer a thin attenuation profile and an operational insensitivity to large magnetic fields. However, one issue that must be addressed in using GM-APDs in an RF environment (as in MR scanners) is the thermal dissipation that can occur in this semiconductor material. Signals of GM-APDs are strongly dependent on junction temperature. Consequently, we are developing a temperature-controlled GM-APD-based PET camera whose monitored temperature can be used to dynamically account for the temperature dependence of the output signals. Presently, we aim to characterize the output-signal dependence on temperature and bias for a GM-APD-based scintillation camera. We've examined two GM-APDs, a Zecotek prototype MAPD-3N, and a SensL commercial SPMArray2. The dominant effect of temperature on gain that we observe results from a linear dependence of breakdown voltage on temperature (0.071 V/°C and 0.024 V/°C, respectively); at 2.3 V excess bias (voltage above breakdown) the resulting change in gain with temperature (without adjusting bias voltage) is −8.5% per °C for the MAPD-3N and −1.5 % per °C for the SPMArray2. For fixed excess bias, change in dark current with temperature varied widely, decreasing by 25% to 40% as temperature was changed from 20 °C to 10 °C and again by 20% to 35% going from 10 °C to 0 °C. Finally, using two MAPD-3N to read out a pair of 3.5-by-3.5-by-20 mm3 Zecotek LFS-3 scintillators in coincidence, we observe a decrease from 1.7 nsec to 1.5 nsec in coincidence-time resolution as we lowered temperature from 23 °C to 10 °C. PMID:20625461

  12. Measured Temperature Dependence of Scintillation Camera Signals Read Out by Geiger-Müller Mode Avalanche Photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, William C J; Miyaoka, Robert S; Macdonald, L R; Lewellen, Thomas K

    2009-10-24

    We are developing a prototype monolithic scintillation camera with optical sensors on the entrance surface (SES) for use with statistically-estimated depth-of-interaction in a continuous scintillator. We opt to use Geiger-Müller mode avalanche photodiodes (GM-APDs) for the SES camera since they possess many desirable properties; for the intended application (SES and PET/MR imaging), they offer a thin attenuation profile and an operational insensitivity to large magnetic fields. However, one issue that must be addressed in using GM-APDs in an RF environment (as in MR scanners) is the thermal dissipation that can occur in this semiconductor material.Signals of GM-APDs are strongly dependent on junction temperature. Consequently, we are developing a temperature-controlled GM-APD-based PET camera whose monitored temperature can be used to dynamically account for the temperature dependence of the output signals. Presently, we aim to characterize the output-signal dependence on temperature and bias for a GM-APD-based scintillation camera.We've examined two GM-APDs, a Zecotek prototype MAPD-3N, and a SensL commercial SPMArray2. The dominant effect of temperature on gain that we observe results from a linear dependence of breakdown voltage on temperature (0.071 V/°C and 0.024 V/°C, respectively); at 2.3 V excess bias (voltage above breakdown) the resulting change in gain with temperature (without adjusting bias voltage) is -8.5% per °C for the MAPD-3N and -1.5 % per °C for the SPMArray2. For fixed excess bias, change in dark current with temperature varied widely, decreasing by 25% to 40% as temperature was changed from 20 °C to 10 °C and again by 20% to 35% going from 10 °C to 0 °C. Finally, using two MAPD-3N to read out a pair of 3.5-by-3.5-by-20 mm(3) Zecotek LFS-3 scintillators in coincidence, we observe a decrease from 1.7 nsec to 1.5 nsec in coincidence-time resolution as we lowered temperature from 23 °C to 10 °C.

  13. The ribbon microphone - an educational aid: use of a ribbon microphone to teach multi-discipline computer simulation skills

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Marius

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The ribbon microphone serves as an excellent aid to learn computer simulation and computational skills. Simulation of this seemingly simple device is all but trivial. The ribbon microphone is an all-in-one example for simulations in acoustics...

  14. Micromechanical study of plasticity of granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.

    2010-01-01

    Plastic deformation of granular materials is investigated from the micromechanical viewpoint, in which the assembly of particles and interparticle contacts is considered as a mechanical structure. This is done in three ways. Firstly, by investigating the degree of redundancy of the system by compari

  15. Key micromechanics issues in integrated material design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennoura, M.; Aboutajeddine, A.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays the acceleration of material discovery is essential more than ever to hold the fast evolving requirements of innovative products. This acceleration depends on our ability to set up a material design process for tailoring materials from targeted engineering performances. One of the important building block passages, in the material design journey, is the bridging of micro-scale to meso-scale through micromechanical models. Unfortunately, these models include a lot of uncertainties resulting from their inbuilt ad-hoc assumptions, which inevitably impacts the material design process performance. In the present paper, robust design methods are reviewed and subsequently applied to quantify uncertainty in micromechanical models and mitigate its impact on material design performances. This includes examining principles for evaluating the level degree of uncertainty on material design process, and their use in micromechanical models. Also, developing robust design approaches to alleviate uncertainty effects and improve the quality of the design performance. Ultimately, the limitations of these approaches are discussed and the research opportunities, to overcome the shortness of actual approaches in respect to micromechanical models, are clarified.

  16. Design and Fabrication of a Micromechanical Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Background 2.1 Vibrating Gyroscopes In 1851 a French scientist named Leon Focault studied the earth’s rotation through the use of a large pendulum [11...Workshop, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, Feb. 1993, pp. 143-148. 9. A. Boxenhorn and P. Greiff , "A vibratory micromechanical gyroscope," in AIAA Guidance, Navigation

  17. Micromechanical failure in fiber-reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    Micromechanical failure mechanisms occurring in unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites are studied by means of the finite element method as well as experimental testing. This study highlights the effect of micro-scale features such as fiber/matrix interfacial debonding, matrix cracking and mi...

  18. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of measurement microphones is affected by changes in the environmental conditions, mainly temperature and static pressure. This rate of change has been the object of previous studies focused on Laboratory Standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values...... lumped parameter models or numerical calculations. Any of these possibilities require knowledge of the construction details of the microphones, particularly the geometry of the back cavity, and the properties of the membrane. This paper presents an introductory study of the effect of the environmental...

  19. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of condenser measurement microphones depends on the environmental conditions due to the changes in the acoustic properties of the enclosed air between diaphragm and back-electrode and in the cavity behind the backelectrode. A theoretical investigation has been performed based...... of the microphone. The static pressure and temperature coefficients were determined experimentally for about twenty samples of type BK 4160 and BK 4180 microphones. The results agree almost perfectly with the predictions for BK 4160, while some modifications of the lumped parameter values are called for to make...

  20. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of measurement microphones is affected by changes in the environmental conditions, mainly temperature and static pressure. This rate of change has been the object of previous studies focused on Laboratory Standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values...... for these coefficients which are used for calibration purposes. Working standard microphones are not exempt of these influences. However, manufacturers usually provide a low frequency value of the environmental coefficient. While in some applications the influence of this coefficient may be negligible, in others it may...

  1. Comparison of binaural microphones for externalization of sounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cubick, Jens; Sánchez Rodríguez, C.; Song, Wookeun

    2015-01-01

    or with microphones placed inside the ear canals of a person. In this study, binaural room impulse responses (BRIRs) were measured with several commercially available binaural microphones, both placed inside the listeners’ ears (individual BRIR) and on a head and torso simulator (generic BRIR). The degree...... of externalization of speech and noise stimuli was tested in a listening experiment with a multi-stimulus test. No influence was found for the stimulus signal, but the externalization scores were found to be lower for 0◦ incidence. With all microphones, relatively high externalization scores were achieved...

  2. Quantitative read-out of Al2O3:C,Mg-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors using a commercial confocal microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Greilich, Steffen; Niklas, Martin; Lauer, Florian; Bestvater, Felix; Jäkel, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTD) show great potential for applications in ion-beam therapy research, such as dosimetry, advanced beam characterization, in-vivo use or as radiobiological assay. A essential feature of FNTDs is their ability to assess the energy loss of single ions yielding for example LET estimations. This article describes the basic characterisations of FNTDs and our read-out system (a Zeiss LSM710 confocal laser scanning microscope) to enable quantative measurements of energy loss.

  3. Development of a High Dynamic Range Read-out System Using Multi-photodiode for the Total Absorption Calorimeter of CALET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayose, Y.; Shibata, M.; Torii, S.; Shimizu, Y.; Tamura, T.; Hibino, K.; Okuno, S.; Yoshida, K.; Kitamura, H.; Uchihori, Y.; Murakami, H.

    We have been developing the CALET instrument, which is proposed to be launched on the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM), Exposed Facility (EF) of the ISS. CALET consists of an imaging calorimeter (IMC) and a total absorption calorimeter (TASC). The role of IMC is identification of the incident particle by imaging the shower tracks with scintillating fibers. TASC is used for observing the total development of shower particles with a stack of BGO scintillators. A read-out system using multi-photodiode and a front-end circuit including analog ASIC, 16 bit ADC, FPGA was developed to measure the energy deposit with the dynamic range from 1MIP(Minimum Ionization Particle) up to 106MIPs in a BGO bar of TASC. The output signal of 1 MIP was calibrated by cosmic ray muon. The dynamic range of the read-out system was measured with both LED pulser and heavy ions beam in the range from 1MIP to about 2400 MIPs . In this paper, the performance of the read-out system is described.

  4. New Technology-Driven Approaches in the Design of Preamplifiers for Condenser Microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haas-Christensen, Jelena

    to enhance performance of MEMS microphones. A new enhanced performance microphone chip-scale package (CSP) with two microphone dies and the CMOS amplifier has been assembled being the microphone with several dB higher signal-to-noise-ratio comparing to existing microphone products on the market. Due......The topic of this thesis is the design of CMOS preamplifiers for condenser microphones. Increasingly popular type of condenser microphones are MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical) microphones which pose a stringent requirements to the design of interface electronics among other due to their increased...... noise. Besides that, as MEMS microphones are easy to integrate with CMOS circuitry, CMOS circuit design gains importance because it can contribute to the overall improved performance of the system by introducing extra functionalities. Possible methods of sensing a signal from the microphone...

  5. Modelling measurement microphones using BEM with visco-thermal losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2012-01-01

    For many decades, models that can explain the behaviour of measurement condenser microphones have been proposed in the literature. These devices have an apparently simple working principle, a charged capacitor whose charge varies when one of its electrodes, the diaphragm, moves as a result of sound...... waves. However, measurement microphones must be manufactured very carefully due to their sensitivity to small changes of their physical parameters. There are different elements in a microphone, the diaphragm, the gap behind it, a back cavity, a vent for pressure equalization and an external medium. All...... these subsystems form a strongly coupled device that cannot be modelled properly as a superposition of submodels, but rather as a whole. For this reason, the challenge of microphone modelling is still an ongoing area of research. In this work, a newly developed Boundary Element Method implementation that includes...

  6. Source Coding for Wireless Distributed Microphones in Reverberant Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Adel

    2016-01-01

    Modern multimedia systems are more and more shifting toward distributed and networked structures. This includes audio systems, where networks of wireless distributed microphones are replacing the traditional microphone arrays. This allows for flexibility of placement and high spatial diversity....... However, it comes with the price of several challenges, including the limited power and bandwidth resources for wireless transmission of audio recordings. In such a setup, we study the problem of source coding for the compression of the audio recordings before the transmission in order to reduce the power...... consumption and/or transmission bandwidth by reduction in the transmission rates. Source coding for wireless microphones in reverberant environments has several special characteristics which make it more challenging in comparison with regular audio coding. The signals which are acquired by the microphones...

  7. Response of porous SMA: a micromechanical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sepe

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lately porous shape memory alloys (SMA have attracted great interest as low weight materials characterized by high energy dissipation capability. In the present contribution a micromechanical study of porous SMA is proposed, introducing the simplifying hypothesis of periodic distribution of voids. The mechanical response of the heterogeneous porous medium is derived by performing nonlinear finite element micromechanical analyses considering a typical repetitive unit cell made of a circular hole in a dense SMA matrix and prescribing suitable periodicity and continuity conditions. The constitutive behavior and the dissipation energy capability of the porous Nitinol are examined for several porosity levels. Numerical applications are performed in order to test the ability of the proposed procedure to well capture the overall behavior and the key features of the special heterogeneous material.

  8. 4th Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Corves, Burkhard; Jensen, Brian; Lovasz, Erwin-Christian

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together investigations which combine theoretical and experimental results related to such systems as capsule micromechanisms, active micro catheters, nanotube vascular stents, mechanisms for micromilling, different compliant mechanisms including grippers and compliant systems with actuators and sensors, microrobots based on vibrations, tactile sensors, tooth brackets, compliant valves, and space reflectors. This volume contains twenty-two contributions from researchers from ten countries, represented at the 4th Conference on Microactuators and Micromechanisms, which was held in 2016 in Ilmenau, Germany. The aim of the conference was to provide a special opportunity for a know-how exchange and collaboration in various disciplines concerning systems pertaining to micro-technology. This Conference was organized under the patronage of IFToMM (International Federation for the Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science). .

  9. Micromechanics and Microactuators : Proceedings of MAMM 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Corves, Burkhard; Petuya, Victor

    2012-01-01

    This book contains selected papers presented at MAMM 2010, the First Workshop on Microactuators and Micromechanisms. This workshop has brought together scientists, industry experts and students and has provided a special opportunity for know-how exchange and collaboration in various disciplines referring to microsystems technology. The conference was organized by the Technical Committees of Mechanical Transmissions and Micromachines under the patronage of IFToMM, the International Federation for the Promotion of Mechanism and Machine Science.

  10. Micromechanical Behavior and Modelling of Granular Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    elasticity, hypoelasticity , plasticity and viscoplasticity. Despite the large number of models , there is no consensus yet within the research community on...Classification) (U) Micromechanical Behavior and Modelling of Granular MOWo I... 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Emmanuel Petrakis and Ricardo Dobry 13a. TYPE OF...Institute (RPI) on the behavior and modelling of granular media is summarized. The final objective is to develol a constitutive law for granular soil

  11. Analyzing acoustic phenomena with a smartphone microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes how different sound types can be explored using the microphone of a smartphone and a suitable app. Vibrating bodies, such as strings, membranes, or bars, generate air pressure fluctuations in their immediate vicinity, which propagate through the room in the form of sound waves. Depending on the triggering mechanism, it is possible to differentiate between four types of sound waves: tone, sound, noise, and bang. In everyday language, non-experts use the terms "tone" and "sound" synonymously; however, from a physics perspective there are very clear differences between the two terms. This paper presents experiments that enable learners to explore and understand these differences. Tuning forks and musical instruments (e.g., recorders and guitars) can be used as equipment for the experiments. The data are captured using a smartphone equipped with the appropriate app (in this paper we describe the app Audio Kit for iOS systems ). The values captured by the smartphone are displayed in a screen shot and then viewed directly on the smartphone or exported to a computer graphics program for printing.

  12. Study of cochlear microphonic potentials in auditory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ilka do Amaral; Menezes, Pedro de Lemos; Carnaúba, Aline Tenório Lins; de Andrade, Kelly Cristina Lira; Lins, Otávio Gomes

    Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony is a disorder characterized by the presence of Otoacoustic Emissions and Cochlear Microphonic Potentials, an absence or severe alteration of Brainstem Evoked Auditory Potential, auditory thresholds incompatible with speech thresholds and altered acoustic reflexes. The study of the Cochlear Microphonic Potential appears to be the most important tool for an accurate diagnosis of this pathology. Determine the characteristics of the Cochlear Microphonic in Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony using an integrative review. Bibliographic survey of Pubmed and Bireme platforms and MedLine, LILACS and SciELO data banks, with standardized searches up to July 2014, using keywords. Criteria were established for the selection and assessment of the scientific studies surveyed, considering the following aspects: author, year/place, degree of recommendation/level of scientific evidence, objective, sample, age range, mean age, tests, results and conclusion. Of the 1959 articles found, 1914 were excluded for the title, 20 for the abstract, 9 for the text of the article, 2 for being repeated and 14 were selected for the study. The presence of the Cochlear Microphonic is a determining finding in the differential diagnosis of Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony. The protocol for the determination of Cochlear Microphonic must include the use of insert earphones, reverse polarity and blocking the stimulus tube to eliminate electrical artifact interference. The amplitude of the Cochlear Microphonic in Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony shows no significant difference from that of normal individuals. The duration of the Cochlear Microphonic is longer in individuals with Auditory Neuropathy/Dyssynchrony. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  13. SPIROC: design and performances of a dedicated very front-end electronics for an ILC Analog Hadronic CALorimeter (AHCAL) prototype with SiPM read-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti Di Lorenzo, S.; Callier, S.; Fleury, J.; Dulucq, F.; De la Taille, C.; Chassard, G. Martin; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.

    2013-01-01

    For the future e+ e- International Linear Collider (ILC) the ASIC SPIROC (Silicon Photomultiplier Integrated Read-Out Chip) was designed to read out the Analog Hadronic Calorimeter (AHCAL) equipped with Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM). It is an evolution of the FLC_SiPM chip designed by the OMEGA group in 2005. SPIROC2 [1] was realized in AMS SiGe 0.35 μm technology [2] and developed to match the requirements of large dynamic range, low noise, low consumption, high precision and large number of read-out channels. This ASIC is a very front-end read-out chip that integrates 36 self triggered channels with variable gain to achieve charge and time measurements. The charge measurement must be performed from 1 up to 2000 photo-electrons (p.e.) corresponding to 160 fC up to 320 pC for SiPM gain 106. The time measurement is performed with a coarse 12-bit counter related to the bunch crossing clock (up to 5 MHz) and a fine time ramp based on this clock (down to 200 ns) to achieve a resolution of 1 ns. An analog memory array with a depth of 16 for each channel is used to store the time information and the charge measurement. The analog memory content (time and charge) is digitized thanks to an internal 12-bit Wilkinson ADC. The data is then stored in a 4kbytes RAM. A complex digital part is necessary to manage all these features and to transfer the data to the DAQ. SPIROC2 is the second generation of the SPIROC ASIC family designed in 2008 by the OMEGA group. A very similar version (SPIROC2c) was submitted in February 2012 to improve the noise performance and also to integrate a new TDC (Time to Digital Converter) structure. This paper describes SPIROC2 and SPIROC2c ASICs and illustrates the main characteristics thank to a series of measurements.

  14. Oscillation of Angiogenesis and Vascular Dropout in Progressive Human Vascular Disease. [Vascular Pattern as Useful Read-Out of Complex Molecular Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    When analyzed by VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software, vascular patterns provide useful integrative read-outs of complex, interacting molecular signaling pathways. Using VESGEN, we recently discovered and published our innovative, surprising findings that angiogenesis oscillated with vascular dropout throughout progression of diabetic retinopathy, a blinding vascular disease. Our findings provide a potential paradigm shift in the current prevailing view on progression and treatment of this disease, and a new early-stage window of regenerative therapeutic opportunities. The findings also suggest that angiogenesis may oscillate with vascular disease in a homeostatic-like manner during early stages of other inflammatory progressive diseases such as cancer and coronary vascular disease.

  15. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    OpenAIRE

    Mosset, J. -B.; Stoykov, A.; Greuter, U.; Hildebrandt, M.; Schlumpf, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC^4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC^4 filter has been emulated digitally. The dete...

  16. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosset, J.-B.; Stoykov, A.; Greuter, U.; Hildebrandt, M.; Schlumpf, N.

    2016-07-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC4 filter has been emulated digitally. The detector performance obtained with this analog approach is compared with the one obtained with the best performing digital approach.

  17. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    CERN Document Server

    Mosset, J -B; Greuter, U; Hildebrandt, M; Schlumpf, N

    2015-01-01

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):6LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC^4 filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC^4 filter has been emulated digitally. The detector performance obtained with this analog approach is compared with the one obtained with the best performing digital approach.

  18. Micromechanisms of damage in unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    Numerical micromechanical investigations of the mechanical behavior and damage evolution of glass fiber reinforced composites are presented. A program code for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical unit cell models of composites with damageable elements is developed, and used in the nume...

  19. Micromechanical modelling of mechanical behaviour and strength of wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Qing, Hai

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the micromechanical theoretical and numerical models of wood is presented. Different methods of analysis of the effects of wood microstructures at different scale levels on the mechanical behaviour, deformation and strength of wood are discussed and compared. Micromechanical models...

  20. Wireless actuation of bulk acoustic modes in micromechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateen, Farrukh; Brown, Benjamin; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2016-08-01

    We report wireless actuation of a Lamb wave micromechanical resonator from a distance of over 1 m with an efficiency of over 15%. Wireless actuation of conventional micromechanical resonators can have broad impact in a number of applications from wireless communication and implantable biomedical devices to distributed sensor networks.

  1. Experimental micromechanics of the cement-bone interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, K.A.; Miller, M.A.; Cleary, R.J.; Janssen, D.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of cement as a means of fixation of implants to bone, surprisingly little is known about the micromechanical behavior in terms of the local interfacial motion. In this work, we utilized digital image correlation techniques to quantify the micromechanics of the cement-bone

  2. On the interference between the two microphones in free-field reciprocity calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2004-01-01

    One of the fundamental assumptions in free-field reciprocity calibration of microphones is that the microphones can be substituted by point sources at the positions where the acoustic centers are located. However, in practice the microphones have finite dimensions and, at the distance and in the ......One of the fundamental assumptions in free-field reciprocity calibration of microphones is that the microphones can be substituted by point sources at the positions where the acoustic centers are located. However, in practice the microphones have finite dimensions and, at the distance...

  3. A positron emission tomograph based on LSO-APD modules with a sampling ADC read-out system for a students' advanced laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Florian R; Mann, Alexander B; Konorov, Igor; Delso, Gaspar; Paul, Stephan; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2012-06-01

    A one-day laboratory course on positron emission tomography (PET) for the education of physics students and PhD students in medical physics has been set up. In the course, the physical background and the principles of a PET scanner are introduced. Course attendees set the system in operation, calibrate it using a (22)Na point source and reconstruct different source geometries filled with (18)F. The PET scanner features an individual channel read-out of 96 lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator crystals coupled to avalanche photodiodes (APD). The analog data of each APD are digitized by fast sampling analog to digital converters (SADC) and processed within field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) to extract amplitudes and time stamps. All SADCs are continuously sampling with a precise rate of 80MHz, which is synchronous for the whole system. The data is transmitted via USB to a Linux PC, where further processing and the image reconstruction are performed. The course attendees get an insight into detector techniques, modern read-out electronics, data acquisition and PET image reconstruction. In addition, a short introduction to some common software applications used in particle and high energy physics is part of the course.

  4. Photostimulated near-infrared persistent luminescence as a new optical read-out from Cr3+-doped LiGa5O8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Yan, Wuzhao; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Zhen, Zipeng; Xie, Jin; Pan, Zhengwei

    2013-01-01

    In conventional photostimulable storage phosphors, the optical information written by x-ray or ultraviolet irradiation is usually read out as a visible photostimulated luminescence (PSL) signal under the stimulation of a low-energy light with appropriate wavelength. Unlike the transient PSL, here we report a new optical read-out form, photostimulated persistent luminescence (PSPL) in the near-infrared (NIR), from a Cr3+-doped LiGa5O8 NIR persistent phosphor exhibiting a super-long NIR persistent luminescence of more than 1,000 h. An intense PSPL signal peaking at 716 nm can be repeatedly obtained in a period of more than 1,000 h when an ultraviolet-light (250–360 nm) pre-irradiated LiGa5O8:Cr3+ phosphor is repeatedly stimulated with a visible light or a NIR light. The LiGa5O8:Cr3+ phosphor has promising applications in optical information storage, night-vision surveillance, and in vivo bio-imaging. PMID:23532003

  5. Optimisation of the Read-out Electronics of Muon Drift-Tube Chambers for Very High Background Rates at HL-LHC and Future Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Nowak, Sebastian; Gadow, Philipp; Ecker, Katharina; Fink, David; Fras, Markus; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Mueller, Felix; Richter, Robert; Schmid, Clemens; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, Korbinian; Zhao, Yazhou

    2016-01-01

    In the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer, Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers and sMDT chambers with half of the tube diameter of the MDTs are used for precision muon track reconstruction. The sMDT chambers are designed for operation at high counting rates due to neutron and gamma background irradiation expected for the HL-LHC and future hadron colliders. The existing MDT read-out electronics uses bipolar signal shaping which causes an undershoot of opposite polarity and same charge after a signal pulse. At high counting rates and short electronics dead time used for the sMDTs, signal pulses pile up on the undershoot of preceding background pulses leading to a reduction of the signal amplitude and a jitter in the drift time measurement and, therefore, to a degradation of drift tube efficiency and spatial resolution. In order to further increase the rate capability of sMDT tubes, baseline restoration can be used in the read-out electronics to suppress the pile-up effects. A discrete bipolar shaping circuit with baseline...

  6. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottardi, L., E-mail: l.gottardi@sron.nl [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Akamatsu, H.; Bruijn, M.P.; Hartog, R. den; Herder, J.-W. den; Jackson, B. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kiviranta, M. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Kuur, J. van der; Weers, H. van [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2016-07-11

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3–12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum efficiency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-of-the art of the FDM read-out.

  7. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottardi, L.; Akamatsu, H.; Bruijn, M. P.; den Hartog, R.; den Herder, J.-W.; Jackson, B.; Kiviranta, M.; van der Kuur, J.; van Weers, H.

    2016-07-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum efficiency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-of-the art of the FDM read-out.

  8. Micromechanics of Dipolar Chains Using Optical Tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Eric M.; Gast, Alice P.

    1999-01-01

    Here we present our initial study of the micromechanical properties of dipolar chains and columns in a magnetorheological (MR) suspension. Using dual-trap optical tweezers, we are able to directly measure the deformation of the dipolar chains parallel and perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. We observe the field dependence of the mechanical properties such as resistance to deformation, chain reorganization, and rupturing of the chains. These forms of energy dissipation are important for understanding and tuning the yield stress and rheological behavior of an MR suspension.

  9. Improved Open-Microphone Speech Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrash, Victor

    2002-01-01

    Many current and future NASA missions make extreme demands on mission personnel both in terms of work load and in performing under difficult environmental conditions. In situations where hands are impeded or needed for other tasks, eyes are busy attending to the environment, or tasks are sufficiently complex that ease of use of the interface becomes critical, spoken natural language dialog systems offer unique input and output modalities that can improve efficiency and safety. They also offer new capabilities that would not otherwise be available. For example, many NASA applications require astronauts to use computers in micro-gravity or while wearing space suits. Under these circumstances, command and control systems that allow users to issue commands or enter data in hands-and eyes-busy situations become critical. Speech recognition technology designed for current commercial applications limits the performance of the open-ended state-of-the-art dialog systems being developed at NASA. For example, today's recognition systems typically listen to user input only during short segments of the dialog, and user input outside of these short time windows is lost. Mistakes detecting the start and end times of user utterances can lead to mistakes in the recognition output, and the dialog system as a whole has no way to recover from this, or any other, recognition error. Systems also often require the user to signal when that user is going to speak, which is impractical in a hands-free environment, or only allow a system-initiated dialog requiring the user to speak immediately following a system prompt. In this project, SRI has developed software to enable speech recognition in a hands-free, open-microphone environment, eliminating the need for a push-to-talk button or other signaling mechanism. The software continuously captures a user's speech and makes it available to one or more recognizers. By constantly monitoring and storing the audio stream, it provides the spoken

  10. Ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Neal A.; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Parker, Eric Paul; Resnick, Paul James; Okandan, Murat; Serkland, Darwin Keith

    2007-11-01

    Acoustic sensing systems are critical elements in detection of sniper events. The microphones developed in this project enable unique sensing systems that benefit significantly from the enhanced sensitivity and extremely compact foot-print. Surface and bulk micromachining technologies developed at Sandia have allowed the design, fabrication and characterization of these unique sensors. We have demonstrated sensitivity that is only available in 1/2 inch to 1 inch studio reference microphones--with our devices that have only 1 to 2mm diameter membranes in a volume less than 1cm{sup 3}.

  11. Chip-size-packaged silicon microphones [for hearing instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müllenborn, Matthias; Rombach, Pirmin; Klein, Udo;

    2001-01-01

    The first results of silicon microphones that are completely batch-packaged and integrated with signal conditioning circuitry in a chip stack are discussed. The chip stack is designed to be directly mounted into a system, such as a hearing instrument, without further single-chip handling or wire ...... consumption of about 50 μW in the near future, thereby living up to the tight specifications of microphones for hearing instruments. Other potential applications include mobile phones, headsets, and wearable computers, in which space is constrained....

  12. Space discriminative function for microphone array robust speech recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xianyu; Ou Zhijian; Wang Zuoying

    2005-01-01

    Based on W-disjoint orthogonality of speech mixtures, a space discriminative function was proposed to enumerate and localize competing speakers in the surrounding environments. Then, a Wiener-like post-filterer was developed to adaptively suppress interferences. Experimental results with a hands-free speech recognizer under various SNR and competing speakers settings show that nearly 69% error reduction can be obtained with a two-channel small aperture microphone array against the conventional single microphone baseline system. Comparisons were made against traditional delay-and-sum and Griffiths-Jim adaptive beamforming techniques to further assess the effectiveness of this method.

  13. Small foamed polystyrene shield protects low-frequency microphones from wind noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedrick, R. N.

    1964-01-01

    A foamed polystyrene noise shield for microphones has been designed in teardrop shape to minimize air turbulence. The shield slips on and off the microphone head easily and is very effective in low-frequency sound intensity measurements.

  14. Posture Adjustment of Microphone Based on Image Recognition in Automatic Welding System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin'e; Gao Ping; Huang Haibo; Li Xiangpeng; Zheng Liang; Xu Wenkui; Chen Liguo

    2015-01-01

    As the requirements of production process is getting higher and higher with the reduction of volume ,mi-crophone production automation become an urgent need to improve the production efficiency .The most important part is studied and a precise algorithm of calculating the deviation angle of four types microphones is proposed , based on the feature extraction and visual detection .Pretreatment is performed to achieve the real-time microphone image .Canny edge detection and typical feature extraction are used to distinguish the four types of microphones , categorizing them as type M 1 and type M2 .And Hough transformation is used to extract the image features of mi-crophone .Therefore ,the deviation angle between the posture of microphone and the ideal posture in 2D plane can be achieved .Depending on the angle ,the system drives the motor to adjust posture of the microphone .The final purpose is to realize the high efficiency welding of four different types of microphones .

  15. 一种用于电容式MEMS麦克风的读出电路%A Readout Circuit for MEMS Capacitive Microphone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周锋; 李富华; 乔东海; 徐栋; 吕爽; 陈伟庆

    2013-01-01

    在分析电容式MEMS麦克风工作原理的基础上,提出了一种用于电容式MEMS麦克风的读出电路.该读出电路包括低极点频率的高通滤波器和低噪声单位增益缓冲器,高通滤波器用来读出MEMS麦克风在声压作用下产生的小信号,单位增益缓冲器用来隔离高通滤波器和后续信号处理电路,并提供较大的驱动能力.仿真结果表明,当电源电压在1.2~3.6V之间时,读出电路都可以正常工作,且静态电流小于60 μA,等效输入噪声为5.2 μV,电压增益大于-1.56 dB(83.6%).由于消除了失调电压的影响,电路可以处理幅度范围为50 μV~200 mV的小信号(参考X-FAB 0.35 μm CMOS工艺).%Based on the operational principle of MEMS capacitive microphone,a readout circuit was presented for MEMS capacitive microphone.The readout circuit consisted of a high-pass filter with low pole frequency and a low noise unity-gain buffer.The high pass filter was used to read out small signals generated by MEMS microphone in response to acoustic pressure,while the unity-gain buffer was designed to separate high pass filter circuit from the subsequent signal processing circuit and to provide greater driving capability.Simulation results showed that the readout circuit operated properly at supply voltage between 1.2 V and 3.6 V,and it had a quiescent current less than 60 μA,an equivalent input noise of 5.2 μV,and a voltage gain over-1.56 dB (83.6%).The circuit could read out small signals between 50 μV and 200 mV (refer to X-FAB 0.35 μm CMOS process),as the effects of offset voltage were eliminated.

  16. On experimental determination of the random-incidence response of microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2007-01-01

    The random-incidence sensitivity of a microphone is defined as the ratio of the output voltage to the sound pressure that would exist at the position of the acoustic center of the microphone in the absence of the microphone in a sound field with incident plane waves coming from all directions. Th...

  17. 78 FR 38734 - Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same; Notice of Receipt of Complaint... complaint entitled Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing Same, DN 2962; the Commission... importation of certain silicon microphone packages and products containing same. The complaint names...

  18. DigiCam - Fully Digital Compact Read-out and Trigger Electronics for the SST-1M Telescope proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Rajda, P; Bilnik, W.; Błocki, J.; Bogacz, L.; Bulik, T.; Cadoux, F.; Christov, A.; Curyło, M.; della Volpe, D.; Dyrda, M.; Favre, Y.; Frankowski, A.; Grudnik, Ł.; Grudzińska, M.; Heller, M.; Idźkowski, B.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Kasperek, J.; Lalik, K.; Lyard, E.; Mach, E.; Mandat, D.; Marszałek, A.; Michałowski, J.; Moderski, R.; Rameez, M.; Montaruli, T.; Neronov, A.; Niemiec, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Paśko, P.; Pech, M.; Porcelli, A.; Prandini, E.; Schioppa, E. jr; Schovanek, P.; Seweryn, K.; Skowron, K.; Sliusar, V.; Sowiński, M.; Stawarz, Ł.; Stodulska, M.; Stodulski, M.; Toscano, S.; Pujadas, I. Troyano; Walter, R.; Więcek, M.; Zagdański, A.; Żychowski, P.

    2016-01-01

    The SST-1M is one of three prototype small-sized telescope designs proposed for the Cherenkov Telescope Array, and is built by a consortium of Polish and Swiss institutions. The SST-1M will operate with DigiCam - an innovative, compact camera with fully digital read-out and trigger electronics. A high level of integration will be achieved by massively deploying state-of-the-art multi-gigabit transmission channels, beginning from the ADC flash converters, through the internal data and trigger signals transmission over backplanes and cables, to the camera's server link. Such an approach makes it possible to design the camera to fit the size and weight requirements of the SST-1M exactly, and provide low power consumption, high reliability and long lifetime. The structure of the digital electronics will be presented, along with main physical building blocks and the internal architecture of FPGA functional subsystems.

  19. Development FD-SOI MOSFET Amplifiers for Integrated Read-Out Circuit of Superconducting-Tunnel-Junction Single-Photon-Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiuchi, Kenji; et al.

    2015-07-27

    We proposed a new high-resolution single-photon infrared spectrometer for search for radiative decay of cosmic neutrino background (CνB). The superconducting-tunnel-junctions(STJs) are used as a single-photon counting device. Each STJ consists of Nb/Al/AlxOy/Al/Nb layers, and their thicknesses are optimized for the operation temperature at 370 mK cooled by a 3He sorption refrigerator. Our STJs achieved the leak current 250 pA, and the measured data implies that a smaller area STJ fulfills our requirement. FD-SOI MOSFETs are employed to amplify the STJ signal current in order to increase signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). FD-SOI MOSFETs can be operated at cryogenic temperature of 370 mK, which reduces the noise of the signal amplification system. FD-SOI MOSFET characteristics are measured at cryogenic temperature. The Id-Vgs curve shows a sharper turn on with a higher threshold voltage and the Id-Vds curve shows a nonlinear shape in linear region at cryogenic temperature. Taking into account these effects, FD-SOI MOSFETs are available for read-out circuit of STJ detectors. The bias voltage for STJ detectors is 0.4 mV, and it must be well stabilized to deliver high performance. We proposed an FD-SOI MOSFET-based charge integrated amplifier design as a read-out circuit of STJ detectors. The requirements for an operational amplifier used in the amplifier is estimated using SPICE simulation. The op-amp is required to have a fast response (GBW ≥ 100 MHz), and it must have low power dissipation as compared to the cooling power of refrigerator.

  20. Design and analysis of diaphragms in dynamic microphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-Gui Huang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Most contemporary high-end microphones are dynamic microphones, adopting the most basic electromagnetic transduction principles. This study investigated the diaphragm structures of dynamic microphones. The diaphragms were composed of polyimide material, and the boundary settings required for actual operation were provided using finite element model analysis software. The characteristic frequencies caused by grooving variations on the three-dimensional diaphragm were analyzed for the various groove shapes and number. The groove angles and width variations were examined based on the optimal groove shape selected in the aforementioned analysis, and the effects of these shapes were determined based on the analytical results. Acoustic waves cause thin films to vibrate, forming the working principle behind dynamic microphones. The thin film drives a coil to vibrate in a magnetic field and cuts the line of magnetic force, subsequently producing a voltage on both ends of the coil. This audio-frequency-inducted voltage represents an acoustic wave message. The finite element model analysis software was used to conduct electromagnetic induction simulations; the sound source was fed to the diaphragm to drive the coil. The coil vibrations caused the line of magnetic force to be cut, and the final voltages produced were examined and compared.

  1. The static pressure and temperature coefficients of laboratory standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity of condenser measurement microphones depends on the environmental conditions due to the changes in the acoustic properties of the air enclosed between diaphragm and backelectrode and in the cavity behind the backelectrode. A theoretical investigation has been performed based...

  2. Predicting hearing aid microphone preference in everyday listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Brian E; Surr, Rauna K; Cord, Mary T; Dyrlund, Ole

    2004-05-01

    Seventeen hearing-impaired adults were fit with omnidirectional/directional hearing aids, which they wore during a four-week trial. For each listening situation encountered in daily living during a total of seven days, participants selected the preferred microphone mode and described the listening situation in terms of five environmental variables, using a paper and pencil form. Results indicated that hearing-impaired adults typically spend the majority of their active listening time in situations with background noise present and surrounding the listener, and the signal source located in front and relatively near. Microphone preferences were fairly evenly distributed across listening situations but differed depending on the characteristics of the listening environment. The omnidirectional mode tended to be preferred in relatively quiet listening situations or, in the presence of background noise, when the signal source was relatively far away. The directional mode tended to be preferred when background noise was present and the signal source was located in front of and relatively near the listener. Results suggest that knowing only signal location and distance and whether background noise is present or absent, omnidirectional/directional hearing aids can be set in the preferred mode in most everyday listening situations. These findings have relevance for counseling patients when to set manually switchable omnidirectional/directional hearing aids in each microphone mode, as well as for the development of automatic algorithms for selecting omnidirectional versus directional microphone processing.

  3. Free-field calibration of measurement microphones at high frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Torras Rosell, Antoni;

    2011-01-01

    Measurement microphones are typically calibrated in a free field at frequencies up to 50 kHz. This is a sufficiently high frequency for the most of sound measurement applications related with noise assessment. However, other applications such as assessment of the noise emitted by ultrasound clean...

  4. Single and multiple microphone noise reduction strategies in cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinakis, Kostas; Azimi, Behnam; Hu, Yi; Friedland, David R

    2012-06-01

    To restore hearing sensation, cochlear implants deliver electrical pulses to the auditory nerve by relying on sophisticated signal processing algorithms that convert acoustic inputs to electrical stimuli. Although individuals fitted with cochlear implants perform well in quiet, in the presence of background noise, the speech intelligibility of cochlear implant listeners is more susceptible to background noise than that of normal hearing listeners. Traditionally, to increase performance in noise, single-microphone noise reduction strategies have been used. More recently, a number of approaches have suggested that speech intelligibility in noise can be improved further by making use of two or more microphones, instead. Processing strategies based on multiple microphones can better exploit the spatial diversity of speech and noise because such strategies rely mostly on spatial information about the relative position of competing sound sources. In this article, we identify and elucidate the most significant theoretical aspects that underpin single- and multi-microphone noise reduction strategies for cochlear implants. More analytically, we focus on strategies of both types that have been shown to be promising for use in current-generation implant devices. We present data from past and more recent studies, and furthermore we outline the direction that future research in the area of noise reduction for cochlear implants could follow.

  5. A Multifunction Low-Power Preamplifier for MEMS Capacitive Microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jawed, Syed Arsalan; Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Gottardi, Massimo;

    2009-01-01

    A multi-function two-stage chopper-stabilized preamplifier (PAMP) for MEMS capacitive microphones (MCM) is presented. The PAMP integrates digitally controllable gain, high-pass filtering and offset control, adding flexibility to the front-end readout of MCMs. The first stage of the PAMP consists...

  6. Feasible pickup from intact ossicular chain with floating piezoelectric microphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Hou-Yong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Many microphones have been developed to meet with the implantable requirement of totally implantable cochlear implant (TICI. However, a biocompatible one without destroying the intactness of the ossicular chain still remains under investigation. Such an implantable floating piezoelectric microphone (FPM has been manufactured and shows an efficient electroacoustic performance in vitro test at our lab. We examined whether it pick up sensitively from the intact ossicular chain and postulated whether it be an optimal implantable one. Methods Animal controlled experiment: five adult cats (eight ears were sacrificed as the model to test the electroacoustic performance of the FPM. Three groups were studied: (1 the experiment group (on malleus: the FPM glued onto the handle of the malleus of the intact ossicular chains; (2 negative control group (in vivo: the FPM only hung into the tympanic cavity; (3 positive control group (Hy-M30: a HiFi commercial microphone placed close to the site of the experiment ear. The testing speaker played pure tones orderly ranged from 0.25 to 8.0 kHz. The FPM inside the ear and the HiFi microphone simultaneously picked up acoustic vibration which recorded as .wav files to analyze. Results The FPM transformed acoustic vibration sensitively and flatly as did the in vitro test across the frequencies above 2.0 kHz, whereas inefficiently below 1.0 kHz for its overloading mass. Although the HiFi microphone presented more efficiently than the FPM did, there was no significant difference at 3.0 kHz and 8.0 kHz. Conclusions It is feasible to develop such an implantable FPM for future TICIs and TIHAs system on condition that the improvement of Micro Electromechanical System and piezoelectric ceramic material technology would be applied to reduce its weight and minimize its size.

  7. Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, M.; Blom, F.R.; Bouwstra, S.; Lammerink, T.S.J.; Pol, van de F.C.M.; Tilmans, H.A.C.; Popma, Th.J.A.; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    1989-01-01

    Transduction mechanisms and their applications in micromechanical actuators and resonating sensors are presented. They include piezoelectric, dielectric, electro-thermo-mechanic, opto-thermo-mechanic, and thermo-pneumatic mechanisms. Advantages and disadvantages with respect to technology and perfor

  8. Micromechanics Modeling of Fracture in Nanocrystalline Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Piascik, R. S.; Raju, I. S.; Harris, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals have very high theoretical strength, but suffer from a lack of ductility and toughness. Therefore, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of deformation and fracture of these materials before their full potential can be achieved. Because classical fracture mechanics is based on the comparison of computed fracture parameters, such as stress intlmsity factors, to their empirically determined critical values, it does not adequately describe the fundamental physics of fracture required to predict the behavior of nanocrystalline metals. Thus, micromechanics-based techniques must be considered to quanti@ the physical processes of deformation and fracture within nanocrystalline metals. This paper discusses hndamental physicsbased modeling strategies that may be useful for the prediction Iof deformation, crack formation and crack growth within nanocrystalline metals.

  9. Micromechanics and dislocation theory in anisotropic elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Lazar, Markus

    2016-01-01

    In this work, dislocation master-equations valid for anisotropic materials are derived in terms of kernel functions using the framework of micromechanics. The second derivative of the anisotropic Green tensor is calculated in the sense of generalized functions and decomposed into a sum of a $1/R^3$-term plus a Dirac $\\delta$-term. The first term is the so-called "Barnett-term" and the latter is important for the definition of the Green tensor as fundamental solution of the Navier equation. In addition, all dislocation master-equations are specified for Somigliana dislocations with application to 3D crack modeling. Also the interior Eshelby tensor for a spherical inclusion in an anisotropic material is derived as line integral over the unit circle.

  10. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  11. Theory and applications of spherical microphone array processing

    CERN Document Server

    Jarrett, Daniel P; Naylor, Patrick A

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the signal processing algorithms that have been developed to process the signals acquired by a spherical microphone array. Spherical microphone arrays can be used to capture the sound field in three dimensions and have received significant interest from researchers and audio engineers. Algorithms for spherical array processing are different to corresponding algorithms already known in the literature of linear and planar arrays because the spherical geometry can be exploited to great beneficial effect. The authors aim to advance the field of spherical array processing by helping those new to the field to study it efficiently and from a single source, as well as by offering a way for more experienced researchers and engineers to consolidate their understanding, adding either or both of breadth and depth. The level of the presentation corresponds to graduate studies at MSc and PhD level. This book begins with a presentation of some of the essential mathematical and physical theory relevant to ...

  12. Source Coding for Wireless Distributed Microphones in Reverberant Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zahedi, Adel

    2016-01-01

    Modern multimedia systems are more and more shifting toward distributed and networked structures. This includes audio systems, where networks of wireless distributed microphones are replacing the traditional microphone arrays. This allows for flexibility of placement and high spatial diversity......'s recording. This means that ignoring this correlation will be a waste of the scarce power and bandwidth resources. In this thesis, we study both information-theoretic and audio coding aspects of the coding problem in the above-mentioned framework. We formulate rate-distortion problems which take into account...... on the performance of the audio coding system. We derive explicit formulas for the rate-distortion functions, and design coding schemes that asymptotically achieve the performance bounds. We justify the Gaussianity assumption by showing that the results will still be relevant for non-Gaussian sources including audio...

  13. A self-steering close-talking microphone array

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Ke; YANG Xinfeng; XU Boling

    2005-01-01

    For communication in extremely noisy environments, close-talking microphone arrays are useful. Differential microphone array systems possessing excellent nearfield directivity and strong farfield-noise reduction capability are very suitable for close-talking situations. In order to improve the focusing effect at the desired bearing in the nearfield, we propose a novel self-steering system of closetalking arrays with the first-order differential sub-arrays in this paper. Calculations of directivity patterns and directivity factors show that when a kind of optimized beamforming technique is adopted even small arrays with a focusing configuration will exhibit a satisfactory nearfield directivity which is electronically steerable within a specific range. The superiority of the proposed array system is verified by experiments with real acoustic data.

  14. Reconstruction of sound fields with a spherical microphone array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Walton, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Spherical microphone arrays are very well suited for sound field measurements in enclosures or interior spaces, and generally in acoustic environments where sound waves impinge on the array from multiple directions. Because of their directional properties, they make it possible to resolve sound...... waves traveling in any direction. In particular, rigid sphere microphone arrays are robust, and have the favorable property that the scattering introduced by the array can be compensated for - making the array virtually transparent. This study examines a recently proposed sound field reconstruction...... method based on a point source expansion, i.e. equivalent source method, using a rigid spherical array. The study examines the capability of the method to distinguish between sound waves arriving from different directions (i.e., as a sound field separation method). This is representative of the potential...

  15. Audio Sensing Aid based Wireless Microphone Emulation Attacks Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shan-shan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The wireless microphone network is an important PU network for CRN, but there is no effective technology to solve the problem of microphone evaluation attacks. Therefore, this paper propose ASA algorithm, which utilizes three devices to detect MUs, and they are loudspeaker audio sensor (LAS, environment audio sensor (EAS, and radio frequency fingerprint detector (RFFD. LASs are installed near loudspeakers, which have two main effects: One is to sense loudspeakers’ output, and the other is to broadcast warning information to all SUs through the common control channel when detecting valid output. EASs are pocket voice captures provided to SU, and utilized to sense loudspeaker sound at SU’s location. Utilizing EASs and energy detections in SU can detect primary user emulation attack (PUEA fast. But to acquire the information of attacked channels, we need explore RFFDs to analyze the features of PU transmitters. The results show that the proposed algorithm can detect PUEA well.    

  16. Test beam results of the first CMS double-sided strip module prototypes using the CBC2 read-out chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Ali; Mussgiller, Andreas; Hauk, Johannes

    2017-02-01

    The CMS Binary Chip (CBC) is a prototype version of the front-end read-out ASIC to be used in the silicon strip modules of the CMS outer tracking detector during the high luminosity phase of the LHC. The CBC is produced in 130 nm CMOS technology and bump-bonded to the hybrid of a double layer silicon strip module, the so-called 2S-pT module. It has 254 input channels and is designed to provide on-board trigger information to the first level trigger system of CMS, with the capability of cluster-width discrimination and high-pT track identification. In November 2013 the first 2S-pT module prototypes equipped with the CBC chips were put to test at the DESY-II test beam facility. Data were collected exploiting a beam of positrons with an energy ranging from 2 to 4 GeV. In this paper the test setup and the results are presented.

  17. Development of the superconducting detectors and read-out for the X-IFU instrument on board of the X-ray observatory Athena

    CERN Document Server

    Gottardi, Luciano; Bruijn, Marcel P; Hartog, Roland den; Herder, Jan-Willem den; Jackson, Brian; Kiviranta, Mikko; van der Kuur, Jan; van Weers, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Telescope for High-Energy Astrophysics (Athena) has been selected by ESA as its second large-class mission. The future European X-ray observatory will study the hot and energetic Universe with its launch foreseen in 2028. Microcalorimeters based on superconducting Transition-edge sensor (TES) are the chosen technology for the detectors array of the X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU) on board of Athena. The X-IFU is a 2-D imaging integral-field spectrometer operating in the soft X-ray band (0.3 -12 keV). The detector consists of an array of 3840 TESs coupled to X-ray absorbers and read out in the MHz bandwidth using Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) based on Superconducting QUantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs). The proposed design calls for devices with a high filling-factor, high quantum e?ciency, relatively high count-rate capability and an energy resolution of 2.5 eV at 5.9 keV. The paper will review the basic principle and the physics of the TES-based microcalorimeters and present the state-...

  18. Gossipo-3 A prototype of a Front-End Pixel Chip for Read-Out of Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Brezina, Christpoh; van der Graaf, Haryy; Gromov, Vladimir; Kluit, Ruud; Kruth, Andre; Zappon, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In a joint effort of Nikhef (Amsterdam) and the University of Bonn, the Gossipo-3 integrated circuit (IC) has been developed. This circuit is a prototype of a chip dedicated for read-out of various types of position sensitive Micro-Pattern Gas detectors (MPGD). The Gossipo-3 is defined as a set of building blocks to be used in a future highly granulated (60 μm) chip. The pixel circuit can operate in two modes. In Time mode every readout pixel measures the hit arrival time and the charge deposit. For this purpose it has been equipped with a high resolution TDC (1.7 ns) covering dynamic range up to 102 μs. Charge collected by the pixel will be measured using Time-over- Threshold method in the range from 400 e- to 28000 e- with accuracy of 200 e- (standard deviation). In Counting mode every pixel operates as a 24-bit counter, counting the number of incoming hits. The circuit is also optimized to operate at low power consumption (100 mW/cm2) that is required to avoid the need for massive power transport and coo...

  19. MP.EXE Microphone pressure sensitivity calibration calculation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1999-01-01

    MP.EXE is a program which calculates the pressure sensitivity of LS1 microphones as defined in IEC 61094-1, based on measurement results performed as laid down in IEC 61094-2.A very early program was developed and written by K. Rasmussen. The code of the present heavily extended version is written...... by E.S. Olsen.The present manual is written by K.Rasmussen and E.S. Olsen....

  20. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Harvey F.; Patterson, William R.; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m×8 m×3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  1. Factors affecting the performance of large-aperture microphone arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Harvey F; Patterson, William R; Sachar, Joshua

    2002-05-01

    Large arrays of microphones have been proposed and studied as a possible means of acquiring data in offices, conference rooms, and auditoria without requiring close-talking microphones. When such an array essentially surrounds all possible sources, it is said to have a large aperture. Large-aperture arrays have attractive properties of spatial resolution and signal-to-noise enhancement. This paper presents a careful comparison of theoretical and measured performance for an array of 256 microphones using simple delay-and-sum beamforming. This is the largest currently functional, all digital-signal-processing array that we know of. The array is wall-mounted in the moderately adverse environment of a general-purpose laboratory (8 m x 8 m x 3 m). The room has a T60 reverberation time of 550 ms. Reverberation effects in this room severely impact the array's performance. However, the width of the main lobe remains comparable to that of a simplified prediction. Broadband spatial resolution shows a single central peak with 10 dB gain about 0.4 m in diameter at the -3 dB level. Away from that peak, the response is approximately flat over most of the room. Optimal weighting for signal-to-noise enhancement degrades the spatial resolution minimally. Experimentally, we verify that signal-to-noise gain is less than proportional to the square root of the number of microphones probably due to the partial correlation of the noise between channels, to variation of signal intensity with polar angle about the source, and to imperfect correlation of the signal over the array caused by reverberations. We show measurements of the relative importance of each effect in our environment.

  2. Noise Reduction with Microphone Arrays for Speaker Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Z

    2011-12-22

    Reducing acoustic noise in audio recordings is an ongoing problem that plagues many applications. This noise is hard to reduce because of interfering sources and non-stationary behavior of the overall background noise. Many single channel noise reduction algorithms exist but are limited in that the more the noise is reduced; the more the signal of interest is distorted due to the fact that the signal and noise overlap in frequency. Specifically acoustic background noise causes problems in the area of speaker identification. Recording a speaker in the presence of acoustic noise ultimately limits the performance and confidence of speaker identification algorithms. In situations where it is impossible to control the environment where the speech sample is taken, noise reduction filtering algorithms need to be developed to clean the recorded speech of background noise. Because single channel noise reduction algorithms would distort the speech signal, the overall challenge of this project was to see if spatial information provided by microphone arrays could be exploited to aid in speaker identification. The goals are: (1) Test the feasibility of using microphone arrays to reduce background noise in speech recordings; (2) Characterize and compare different multichannel noise reduction algorithms; (3) Provide recommendations for using these multichannel algorithms; and (4) Ultimately answer the question - Can the use of microphone arrays aid in speaker identification?

  3. Micromechanical Study of fabric evolution in quasi-static deformation of granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, Nicolaas P.

    2012-01-01

    In micromechanical studies of granular materials, relations are investigated between macro-level, continuum characteristics and micro-level, (inter) particle characteristics. For quasi-static deformation of granular materials, the fabric tensor is an important micromechanical characteristic that des

  4. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qalandar, K. R., E-mail: kamala@engineering.ucsb.edu; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Turner, K. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Strachan, B. S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Shaw, S. W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2{sup N}. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2{sup j} at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  5. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ita, Stacey Leigh [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  6. Micromechanical Modeling of Concrete at Early Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleubekov, Kairat

    The focus of this research is a micromechanical characterization of Portland cement concrete at early age (less than 28 days). Concrete's viscoelastic properties change significantly at early age due to solidification of its matrix component. Bazant's solidification theory models concrete as a material solidifying in time. This approach is generalized to a three-dimensional characterization of a composite material with a solidifying matrix and elastic inclusions. An integral constitutive relationship was obtained using a generalized correspondence principle and homogenization techniques for elastic composite materials. In light of this approach, effective creep properties of composite spherical assemblage with an aging matrix are obtained. In addition, the elastic Hashin-Monteiro model is generalized to account for the effect of the interfacial transition zone properties on concrete creep. An effective computational platform was developed to evaluate operator expressions in order to obtain relaxation and creep functions numerically. Through numerical examples, it is shown that triaxial generalization of Bazant's solidification model enables robust and computationally efficient prediction of creep deformations in Portland cement concrete.

  7. Robust Speaker Recognition with Combined Use of Acoustic and Throat Microphone Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahidullah, Md; Gonzalez Hautamäki, Rosa; Thomsen, Dennis Alexander Lehmann

    2016-01-01

    Accuracy of automatic speaker recognition (ASV) systems degrades severely in the presence of background noise. In this paper, we study the use of additional side information provided by a body-conducted sensor, throat microphone. Throat microphone signal is much less affected by background noise...... in comparison to acoustic microphone signal. This makes throat microphones potentially useful for feature extraction or speech activity detection. This paper, firstly, proposes a new prototype system for simultaneous data-acquisition of acoustic and throat microphone signals. Secondly, we study the use...... of this additional information for both speech activity detection, feature extraction and fusion of the acoustic and throat microphone signals. We collect a pilot database consisting of 38 subjects including both clean and noisy sessions. We carry out speaker verification experiments using Gaussian mixture model...

  8. Introduction of GRPC Detectors With Semi-digital Read-Out%半数字读出式玻璃板阻抗室

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩然

    2013-01-01

    A large GRPC detector equipped with semi-digital electronics read-out with 1 cm2 lateral granularity was conceived to be used as a sensitive medium in the hadronic calorimeter of the future linear collider experiments. The GRPC detector was designed to provide high detection efficiency, excellent homogeneity and negligible dead zones. Using the ILD software, the energy resolutions under digital and semi-digital were analyzed and compared.%为提高探测器测量粒子流的能量分辨率,未来的国际直线对撞机(ILC)采用了高粒度的量能器和高精的径迹探测器相结合的方法.半数字读出式气体探测器是目前针对ILC上强子量能器所提出的预研之一,它由1 cm2高粒度性读出系统的玻璃板阻抗室组成,具有制作方便、高效率和精准定位等优势.读出系统采用半数字读出方式,具有并行度高,可分辨不同能量粒子等特点.经模拟分析验证,在高能量下,半数字读出方式比数字读出方式的探测器具有更高的能量分辨率.

  9. Micromechanical resonators as a tool for polymer characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bose, Sanjukta

    -static Tg of polymers while the quality factor change provided the frequency dependent shift of Tg to higher temperature. Microcantilevers were successfully employed as a platform for fast estimation of polymer degradation rate with minute amount of sample compared to conventional techniques. A detailed......The aim of this Ph.D. project was the evaluation of micromechanical resonators like cantilevers and strings as analytical tools for characterization of polymers. Spray coating was used as the technique to coat one side of the micromechanical resonators with polymer. Process optimization......-substrate distance, the temperature of the substrate and the speed of the spraying nozzle. Micromechanical string resonators were successfully developed as an analytical tool for sensitive and fast thermal characterization of polymers with only a few nanograms of sample. Both the glass transition (Tg) and sub...

  10. Microphone matching for hybrid-order directional arrays in hearing aid applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Daniel M.; Thompson, Steve C.

    2003-04-01

    The ability of a hearing aid user to distinguish a single speech source amidst general background noise (for example, dinner table or cocktail party conversation) may be improved by a directional array of microphones in the hearing instrument. The theoretical maximum directivity index (DI) of a first-order pairing of microphones is 6 dB, and a second-order array of three microphones is 9.5 dB, assuming all three microphones have identical frequency responses. The close spacing of microphone ports in a hearing aid body means that directivity degrades rapidly with differences in microphone sensitivities. A hybrid of first- and second-order arrays can mitigate this effect, although close microphone matching is still necessary for high directivity. This paper explores the effect of microphone mismatch on the directivity of such arrays, and describes practical criteria for selecting matched microphones out of production batches to maximize a speech intelligibility weighted directivity index. [Work supported by Knowles Electronics, LLC.

  11. MEMS microphone innovations towards high signal to noise ratios (Conference Presentation) (Plenary Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehé, Alfons

    2017-06-01

    After decades of research and more than ten years of successful production in very high volumes Silicon MEMS microphones are mature and unbeatable in form factor and robustness. Audio applications such as video, noise cancellation and speech recognition are key differentiators in smart phones. Microphones with low self-noise enable those functions. Backplate-free microphones enter the signal to noise ratios above 70dB(A). This talk will describe state of the art MEMS technology of Infineon Technologies. An outlook on future technologies such as the comb sensor microphone will be given.

  12. Methods for Room Acoustic Analysis and Synthesis using a Monopole-Dipole Microphone Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, J. S.; Begault, Durand R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In recent work, a microphone array consisting of an omnidirectional microphone and colocated dipole microphones having orthogonally aligned dipole axes was used to examine the directional nature of a room impulse response. The arrival of significant reflections was indicated by peaks in the power of the omnidirectional microphone response; reflection direction of arrival was revealed by comparing zero-lag crosscorrelations between the omnidirectional response and the dipole responses to the omnidirectional response power to estimate arrival direction cosines with respect to the dipole axes.

  13. Micromechanical sensors for the measurement of biopolymer degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gammelgaard, Lene; Jensen, M P

    2011-01-01

    We present microcantilever-based sensors for the characterization of biopolymer degradation by enzymes. Thin films of Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were spray-coated onto SU-8 cantilevers with well-known material properties and dimensions. The micromechanical sensors were immersed in solutions of protei......We present microcantilever-based sensors for the characterization of biopolymer degradation by enzymes. Thin films of Poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) were spray-coated onto SU-8 cantilevers with well-known material properties and dimensions. The micromechanical sensors were immersed in solutions...

  14. MEMS capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Darrin J; Zurcher, Mark A; Semaan, Maroun; Megerian, Cliff A; Ko, Wen H

    2012-12-01

    The design, implementation, and characterization of a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) capacitive accelerometer-based middle ear microphone are presented in this paper. The microphone is intended for middle ear hearing aids as well as future fully implantable cochlear prosthesis. Human temporal bones acoustic response characterization results are used to derive the accelerometer design requirements. The prototype accelerometer is fabricated in a commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI) MEMS process. The sensor occupies a sensing area of 1 mm × 1 mm with a chip area of 2 mm × 2.4 mm and is interfaced with a custom-designed low-noise electronic IC chip over a flexible substrate. The packaged sensor unit occupies an area of 2.5 mm × 6.2 mm with a weight of 25 mg. The sensor unit attached to umbo can detect a sound pressure level (SPL) of 60 dB at 500 Hz, 35 dB at 2 kHz, and 57 dB at 8 kHz. An improved sound detection limit of 34-dB SPL at 150 Hz and 24-dB SPL at 500 Hz can be expected by employing start-of-the-art MEMS fabrication technology, which results in an articulation index of approximately 0.76. Further micro/nanofabrication technology advancement is needed to enhance the microphone sensitivity for improved understanding of normal conversational speech.

  15. High frequency microphone measurements for transition detection on airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Mads

    Time series of pressure fluctuations has been obtained using high frequency microphones distributed over the surface of airfoils undergoing wind tunnel tests in the LM Windtunnel, owned by ’LM Glasfiber’, Denmark. The present report describes the dataanalysis, with special attention given...... pressure) and Tollmien-Schlichting frequencies. The tests were made at Reynolds and Mach numbers corresponding to the operating conditions of a typical horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The Risø B1-18, Risø C2-18 and NACA0015 profiles were tested and the measured transition points are reported....

  16. Reversible Charge Trapping in Bis-Carbazole-Diimide Redox Polymers with Complete Luminescence Quenching Enabling Nondestructive Read-Out by Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The coupling of substituted carbazole compounds through carbon–carbon bond formation upon one-electron oxidation is shown to be a highly versatile approach to the formation of redox polymer films. Although the polymerization of single carbazole units has been proposed earlier, we show that by tethering pairs of carbazoles double sequential dimerization allows for facile formation of redox polymer films with fine control over film thickness. We show that the design of the monomers and in particular the bridging units is key to polymer formation, with the diaminobenzene motif proving advantageous, in terms of the matching to the redox potentials of the monomer and polymer film and thereby avoiding limitations in film thickness (autoinsulation), but introduces unacceptable instability due to the intrinsic redox activity of this moiety. The use of a diimide protecting group both avoids complications due to p-diamino-benzene redox chemistry and provides for a redox polymer in which the photoluminescence of the bis-carbazole moiety can be switched reversibly (on/off) with redox control. The monomer design approach is versatile enabling facile incorporation of additional functional units, such as naphthalene. Here we show that a multicomponent carbazole/naphthalene containing monomer (APCNDI) can form redox polymer films showing both p- and n- conductivity under ambient conditions and allows access to five distinct redox states, and a complex electrochromic response covering the whole of the UV/vis–NIR spectral region. The highly effective quenching of the photoluminescence of both components in poly-APCNDI enables detailed characterization of the redox polymer films. The poly-APCNDI films show extensive charge trapping, which can be read out spectroscopically in the case of films and is characterized as kinetic rather than chemical in origin on the basis of UV/vis–NIR absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopic analyses. The strong resonantly enhanced Raman

  17. Application of MEMS Microphone Array Technology to Airframe Noise Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Shams, Qamar A.; Graves, Sharon S.; Sealey, Bradley S.; Bartram, Scott M.; Comeaux, Toby

    2005-01-01

    Current generation microphone directional array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity data on a variety of aircraft components, resulting in significant gains in test productivity. However, with this gain in productivity has come the desire to install larger and more complex arrays in a variety of ground test facilities, creating new challenges for the designers of array systems. To overcome these challenges, a research study was initiated to identify and develop hardware and fabrication technologies which could be used to construct an array system exhibiting acceptable measurement performance but at much lower cost and with much simpler installation requirements. This paper describes an effort to fabricate a 128-sensor array using commercially available Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) microphones. The MEMS array was used to acquire noise data for an isolated 26%-scale high-fidelity Boeing 777 landing gear in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Stability Tunnel across a range of Mach numbers. The overall performance of the array was excellent, and major noise sources were successfully identified from the measurements.

  18. Single crystal micromechanical resonator and fabrication methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Roy H.; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Homeijer, Sara Jensen; Wiwi, Michael; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Clark, Blythe; Bauer, Todd; Van Deusen, Stuart B.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a single crystal micromechanical resonator. In particular, the resonator includes a lithium niobate or lithium tantalate suspended plate. Also provided are improved microfabrication methods of making resonators, which does not rely on complicated wafer bonding, layer fracturing, and mechanical polishing steps. Rather, the methods allow the resonator and its components to be formed from a single crystal.

  19. Micromechanical study of elastic moduli of loose granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Agnolin, I.; Luding, S.; Rothenburg, L.

    2010-01-01

    In micromechanics of the elastic behaviour of granular materials, the macro-scale continuum elastic moduli are expressed in terms of micro-scale parameters, such as coordination number (the average number of contacts per particle) and interparticle contact stiffnesses in normal and tangential direct

  20. Single Element Excitation and Detection of (Micro-)Mechanical Resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilmans, Harrie A.C.; IJntema, Dominicus .J.; Fluitman, Jan H.J

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe a single-element approach for the excitation and detection of the vibrational motion of (micro-)mechanical resonators. An equivalent electrical one-port network is derived for an electrostatically and a piezoelectrically driven resonator. In this way, the effect of the mechanica

  1. Single crystal micromechanical resonator and fabrication methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Roy H.; Friedmann, Thomas A.; Homeijer, Sara Jensen; Wiwi, Michael; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Clark, Blythe; Bauer, Todd; Van Deusen, Stuart B.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a single crystal micromechanical resonator. In particular, the resonator includes a lithium niobate or lithium tantalate suspended plate. Also provided are improved microfabrication methods of making resonators, which does not rely on complicated wafer bonding, layer fracturing, and mechanical polishing steps. Rather, the methods allow the resonator and its components to be formed from a single crystal.

  2. Environmental coefficients of the free-field sensitivity of measurement microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras-Rosell, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    on Laboratory Standard microphones and few working standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values for these coefficients which are used for calibration purposes. However, there is no description of the environmental coefficients of the free-field sensitivity though there have been...

  3. On determination of microphone response and other parameters by a hybrid experimental and numerical method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Jacobsen, Finn; Rasmussen, Knud

    2008-01-01

    such as the acoustic centres. In this work, a hybrid method is presented. The velocity distributions of condenser Laboratory Standard microphones were measured using a laser vibrometer. This measured velocity distribution was used for estimating the microphone responses and parameters. The agreement with experimental...

  4. Hybrid method for determining the parameters of condenser microphones from measured membrane velocities and numerical calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2009-01-01

    Typically, numerical calculations of the pressure, free-field, and random-incidence response of a condenser microphone are carried out on the basis of an assumed displacement distribution of the diaphragm of the microphone; the conventional assumption is that the displacement follows a Bessel fun...

  5. 76 FR 68207 - Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing the Same; Determination To Rescind in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2011-28488] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-720] Certain Silicon... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain silicon microphone packages and...'') prohibiting the unlicensed entry into the United States of MemsTech silicon microphone packages that...

  6. Practical considerations for a second-order directional hearing aid microphone system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen C.

    2003-04-01

    First-order directional microphone systems for hearing aids have been available for several years. Such a system uses two microphones and has a theoretical maximum free-field directivity index (DI) of 6.0 dB. A second-order microphone system using three microphones could provide a theoretical increase in free-field DI to 9.5 dB. These theoretical maximum DI values assume that the microphones have exactly matched sensitivities at all frequencies of interest. In practice, the individual microphones in the hearing aid always have slightly different sensitivities. For the small microphone separation necessary to fit in a hearing aid, these sensitivity matching errors degrade the directivity from the theoretical values, especially at low frequencies. This paper shows that, for first-order systems the directivity degradation due to sensitivity errors is relatively small. However, for second-order systems with practical microphone sensitivity matching specifications, the directivity degradation below 1 kHz is not tolerable. A hybrid order directive system is proposed that uses first-order processing at low frequencies and second-order directive processing at higher frequencies. This hybrid system is suggested as an alternative that could provide improved directivity index in the frequency regions that are important to speech intelligibility.

  7. Micromechanical Aspects of Hydraulic Fracturing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-torres, S. A.; Behraftar, S.; Scheuermann, A.; Li, L.; Williams, D.

    2014-12-01

    A micromechanical model is developed to simulate the hydraulic fracturing process. The model comprises two key components. Firstly, the solid matrix, assumed as a rock mass with pre-fabricated cracks, is represented by an array of bonded particles simulated by the Discrete Element Model (DEM)[1]. The interaction is ruled by the spheropolyhedra method, which was introduced by the authors previously and has been shown to realistically represent many of the features found in fracturing and communition processes. The second component is the fluid, which is modelled by the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM). It was recently coupled with the spheropolyhedra by the authors and validated. An advantage of this coupled LBM-DEM model is the control of many of the parameters of the fracturing fluid, such as its viscosity and the injection rate. To the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first application of such a coupled scheme for studying hydraulic fracturing[2]. In this first implementation, results are presented for a two-dimensional situation. Fig. 1 shows one snapshot of the LBM-DEM coupled simulation for the hydraulic fracturing where the elements with broken bonds can be identified and the fracture geometry quantified. The simulation involves a variation of the underground stress, particularly the difference between the two principal components of the stress tensor, to explore the effect on the fracture path. A second study focuses on the fluid viscosity to examine the effect of the time scales of different injection plans on the fracture geometry. The developed tool and the presented results have important implications for future studies of the hydraulic fracturing process and technology. references 1. Galindo-Torres, S.A., et al., Breaking processes in three-dimensional bonded granular materials with general shapes. Computer Physics Communications, 2012. 183(2): p. 266-277. 2. Galindo-Torres, S.A., A coupled Discrete Element Lattice Boltzmann Method for the

  8. High temperature sensor/microphone development for active noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrout, Thomas R.

    1993-01-01

    1000 C. Concurrent with the materials study was an effort to define issues involved in the development of a microphone capable of operation at temperatures up to 1000 C; important since microphones capable of operation above 260 C are not generally available. The distinguishing feature of a microphone is its diaphragm which receives sound from the atmosphere: whereas, most other acoustic sensors receive sound through the solid structure on which they are installed. In order to gain an understanding of the potential problems involved in designing and testing a high temperature microphone, a prototype was constructed using a commercially available lithium niobate piezoelectric element in a stainless steel structure. The prototype showed excellent frequency response at room temperature, and responded to acoustic stimulation at 670 C, above which temperature the voltage output rapidly diminished because of decreased resistivity in the element. Samples of the PLS material were also evaluated in a simulated microphone configuration, but their voltage output was found to be a few mV compared to the 10 output of the prototype.

  9. Micromechanical properties of veneer luting resins after curing through ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Elif; Hickel, Reinhard; Bolay, Sükran; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of light-cured luting resin after curing under the ceramic restoration in comparison to dual-cured luting resin, by evaluating the micromechanical properties. Two hundred seventy thin luting composite films of ca. 170 μm in thickness were prepared by using two light-cured luting resins (Variolink Veneer, Ivoclar Vivadent; RelyX Veneer, 3M ESPE) and a dual-cured luting resin (Variolink II, Ivoclar Vivadent). The composites were cured by using a LED-unit (Bluephase®, Ivoclar Vivadent) with three different curing times (10, 20, and 30 s) under two ceramics (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent; IPS Empress® CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) of different thicknesses (0, 0.75, and 2 mm). Forty-five groups were included, each containing six thin films. The samples were stored after curing for 24 h at 37°C by maintaining moisture conditions with distilled water. Micromechanical properties of the composites were measured with an automatic microhardness indenter (Fisherscope H100C, Germany). For each sample, ten indentations were made, thus totalizing 60 measurements per group. Micromechanical properties of the luting resins were statistically analyzed (SPSS 17.0). Significant differences were observed between the micromechanical properties of the luting resins (p mechanical properties compared to the light-cured luting resins. The effect of luting resin type on the micromechanical properties of the luting resins was higher than the effect of curing time, ceramic type and ceramic thickness respectively (*The values of reference without ceramics for 30 s curing time).

  10. A practical implementation of microphone free-field comparison calibration according to the standard IEC 61094-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Torras-Rosell, Antoni; Rasmussen, Knud

    2012-01-01

    An international standard concerned with the calibration of microphones in a free field by comparison has recently been published. The standard contemplates two main calibration methodologies for determining the sensitivity of a microphone under test when compared against a reference microphone...

  11. A practical implementation of microphone free-field comparison calibration according to the standard IEC 61094-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Torras-Rosell, Antoni; Rasmussen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    An international standard concerned with the calibration of microphones in a free field by comparison has recently been published. The standard contemplates two main calibration methodologies for determining the sensitivity of a microphone under test when compared against a reference microphone. ...

  12. A Framework for Speech Enhancement with Ad Hoc Microphone Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavakoli, Vincent Mohammad; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll;

    2016-01-01

    distortion ratio, the PESQ measure, and the STOI intelligibility measure. Major findings in this work are the observed changes in the superiority of different methods for certain conditions. When perceptual quality or intelligibility of the speech are the ultimate goals, there are turning points where......Speech enhancement is vital for improved listening practices. Ad hoc microphone arrays are promising assets for this purpose. Most well-established enhancement techniques with conventional arrays can be adapted into ad hoc scenarios. Despite recent efforts to introduce various ad hoc speech...... enhancement apparatus, a common framework for integration of conventional methods into this new scheme is still missing. This paper establishes such an abstraction based on inter and intra sub-array speech coherencies. Along with measures for signal quality at the input of sub-arrays, a measure of coherency...

  13. Plane-wave decomposition by spherical-convolution microphone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz; Park, Munhum

    2001-05-01

    Reverberant sound fields are widely studied, as they have a significant influence on the acoustic performance of enclosures in a variety of applications. For example, the intelligibility of speech in lecture rooms, the quality of music in auditoria, the noise level in offices, and the production of 3D sound in living rooms are all affected by the enclosed sound field. These sound fields are typically studied through frequency response measurements or statistical measures such as reverberation time, which do not provide detailed spatial information. The aim of the work presented in this seminar is the detailed analysis of reverberant sound fields. A measurement and analysis system based on acoustic theory and signal processing, designed around a spherical microphone array, is presented. Detailed analysis is achieved by decomposition of the sound field into waves, using spherical Fourier transform and spherical convolution. The presentation will include theoretical review, simulation studies, and initial experimental results.

  14. Plane-wave decomposition by spherical-convolution microphone array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz; Park, Munhum

    2004-05-01

    Reverberant sound fields are widely studied, as they have a significant influence on the acoustic performance of enclosures in a variety of applications. For example, the intelligibility of speech in lecture rooms, the quality of music in auditoria, the noise level in offices, and the production of 3D sound in living rooms are all affected by the enclosed sound field. These sound fields are typically studied through frequency response measurements or statistical measures such as reverberation time, which do not provide detailed spatial information. The aim of the work presented in this seminar is the detailed analysis of reverberant sound fields. A measurement and analysis system based on acoustic theory and signal processing, designed around a spherical microphone array, is presented. Detailed analysis is achieved by decomposition of the sound field into waves, using spherical Fourier transform and spherical convolution. The presentation will include theoretical review, simulation studies, and initial experimental results.

  15. Response Identification in the Extremely Low Frequency Region of an Electret Condenser Microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Yih-Nen; Yang, Tzung-Ming; Lee, Shang-Yin

    2011-01-01

    This study shows that a small electret condenser microphone connected to a notebook or a personal computer (PC) has a prominent response in the extremely low frequency region in a specific environment. It confines most acoustic waves within a tiny air cell as follows. The air cell is constructed by drilling a small hole in a digital versatile disk (DVD) plate. A small speaker and an electret condenser microphone are attached to the two sides of the hole. Thus, the acoustic energy emitted by the speaker and reaching the microphone is strong enough to actuate the diaphragm of the latter. The experiments showed that, once small air leakages are allowed on the margin of the speaker, the microphone captured the signal in the range of 0.5 to 20 Hz. Moreover, by removing the plastic cover of the microphone and attaching the microphone head to the vibration surface, the low frequency signal can be effectively captured too. Two examples are included to show the convenience of applying the microphone to pick up the low frequency vibration information of practical systems. PMID:22346594

  16. Response Identification in the Extremely Low Frequency Region of an Electret Condenser Microphone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang-Yin Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study shows that a small electret condenser microphone connected to a notebook or a personal computer (PC has a prominent response in the extremely low frequency region in a specific environment. It confines most acoustic waves within a tiny air cell as follows. The air cell is constructed by drilling a small hole in a digital versatile disk (DVD plate. A small speaker and an electret condenser microphone are attached to the two sides of the hole. Thus, the acoustic energy emitted by the speaker and reaching the microphone is strong enough to actuate the diaphragm of the latter. The experiments showed that, once small air leakages are allowed on the margin of the speaker, the microphone captured the signal in the range of 0.5 to 20 Hz. Moreover, by removing the plastic cover of the microphone and attaching the microphone head to the vibration surface, the low frequency signal can be effectively captured too. Two examples are included to show the convenience of applying the microphone to pick up the low frequency vibration information of practical systems.

  17. Some comparisons of binaural measurements made with different dummy heads and stereo microphone techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapp, Peter A.

    2004-10-01

    Binaural measurements have been made in a number of acoustic environments, and the results from different binaural heads and stereo microphones are compared. The object of the study was not only to establish what practical differences occurred between the various head formats, but also to see if a stereo microphone or pseudohead could be used for making auditorium binaural measurements. Five measurement platforms were employed. These included two binaural dummy heads, binaural in-ear probe microphones, an SAAS pseudohead stereo microphone and a M-S (midside) stereo microphone. In the latter case, three different midside ratios were employed and compared. The measurements were made in a reverberant recital hall (2.5-s RT) and small acoustically treated listening room (RT 0.2 s). Whereas relatively minor differences were found to occur between the heads, significant differences were found to occur with the stereo microphones. It is concluded that while useful information can be obtained from a stereo microphone, it is far from being the same as binaural.

  18. Standoff photoacoustic detections with high-sensitivity microphones and acoustic arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choa, Fow-Sen; Wang, Chen-Chia; Khurgin, Jacob; Samuels, Alan; Trivedi, Sudhir; Gupta, Deepa

    2016-05-01

    Standoff detection of dangerous chemicals like explosives, nerve gases, and harmful aerosols has continuously been an important subject due to the serious concern about terrorist threats to both overseas and homeland lives and facility. Compared with other currently available standoff optical detection techniques, like Raman, photo-thermal, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy,...etc., photoacoustic (PA) sensing has the advantages of background free and very high detection sensitivity, no need of back reflection surfaces, and 1/R instead of 1/R2 signal decay distance dependence. Furthermore, there is still a great room for PA sensitivity improvement by using different PA techniques, including lockin amplifier, employing new microphones, and microphone array techniques. Recently, we have demonstrated standoff PA detection of isopropanol vapor, solid phase TNT and RDX at a standoff distance. To further calibrate the detection sensitivity, we use nerve gas simulants that were generated and calibrated by a commercial vapor generator. For field operations, array of microphones and microphone-reflector pairs can be utilized to achieve noise rejection and signal enhancement. We have experimentally demonstrated signal enhancement and noise reduction using an array of 4 microphone/4 reflector system as well as an array of 16-microphone/1 reflector. In this work we will review and compare different standoff techniques and discuss the advantages of using different photoacoustic techniques. We will also discuss new advancement of using new types of microphone and the performance comparison of using different structure of microphone arrays and combining lock-in amplifier with acoustic arrays. Demonstration of out-door real-time operations with high power mid-IR laser and microphone array will be presented.

  19. A New Calibration Method for Microphone Array with Gain, Phase, and Position Errors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Microphone array can be used in sound source localization and separation. But gain, phase, and position errors can seriously influence the performance of localization algorithms such as multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm. In this paper, a new calibration method for microphone array with gain, phase, and position errors is proposed. Unlike traditional calibration methods for antenna array, the proposed method can be used in the broadband and near-field signal model such as microphone array with arbitrary sensor geometries in one plane. Computer simulations are presented and simulation results show the new method having good performance.

  20. The microstructure and micromechanics of the tendon-bone insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, L.; Kuntz, L. A.; Kunold, E.; Schock, J.; Müller, K. W.; Grabmayr, H.; Stolberg-Stolberg, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Sieber, S. A.; Burgkart, R.; Bausch, A. R.

    2017-06-01

    The exceptional mechanical properties of the load-bearing connection of tendon to bone rely on an intricate interplay of its biomolecular composition, microstructure and micromechanics. Here we identify that the Achilles tendon-bone insertion is characterized by an interface region of ~500 μm with a distinct fibre organization and biomolecular composition. Within this region, we identify a heterogeneous mechanical response by micromechanical testing coupled with multiscale confocal microscopy. This leads to localized strains that can be larger than the remotely applied strain. The subset of fibres that sustain the majority of loading in the interface area changes with the angle of force application. Proteomic analysis detects enrichment of 22 proteins in the interfacial region that are predominantly involved in cartilage and skeletal development as well as proteoglycan metabolism. The presented mechanisms mark a guideline for further biomimetic strategies to rationally design hard-soft interfaces.

  1. Study of intrinsic localized vibrational modes in micromechanical oscillator arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M; Hubbard, B E; English, L Q; Sievers, A J; Ilic, B; Czaplewski, D A; Craighead, H G

    2003-06-01

    Intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) have been observed in micromechanical cantilever arrays, and their creation, locking, interaction, and relaxation dynamics in the presence of a driver have been studied. The micromechanical array is fabricated in a 300 nm thick silicon-nitride film on a silicon substrate, and consists of up to 248 cantilevers of two alternating lengths. To observe the ILMs in this experimental system a line-shaped laser beam is focused on the 1D cantilever array, and the reflected beam is captured with a fast charge coupled device camera. The array is driven near its highest frequency mode with a piezoelectric transducer. Numerical simulations of the nonlinear Klein-Gordon lattice have been carried out to assist with the detailed interpretation of the experimental results. These include pinning and locking of the ILMs when the driver is on, collisions between ILMs, low frequency excitation modes of the locked ILMs and their relaxation behavior after the driver is turned off.

  2. Using dissipative particle dynamics to model micromechanics of responsive hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Alexander; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The ability of responsive hydrogels to undergo complex and reversible shape transformations in response to external stimuli such as temperature, magnetic/electric fields, pH levels, and light intensity has made them the material of choice for tissue scaffolding, drug delivery, bio-adhesive, bio-sensing, and micro-sorting applications. The complex micromechanics and kinetics of these responsive networks however, currently hinders developments in the aforementioned areas. In order to better understand the mechanical properties of these systems and how they change during the volume transition we have developed a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for responsive polymer networks. We use this model to examine the impact of the Flory-Huggins parameter on the bulk and shear moduli. In this fashion we evaluate how environmental factors can affect the micromechanical properties of these networks. Support from NSF CAREER Award (DMR-1255288) is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Computational methods for coupling microstructural and micromechanical materials response simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLM,ELIZABETH A.; BATTAILE,CORBETT C.; BUCHHEIT,THOMAS E.; FANG,HUEI ELIOT; RINTOUL,MARK DANIEL; VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; KNOROVSKY,GERALD A.; NEILSEN,MICHAEL K.; WELLMAN,GERALD W.; SULSKY,DEBORAH; SHEN,YU-LIN; SCHREYER,H. BUCK

    2000-04-01

    Computational materials simulations have traditionally focused on individual phenomena: grain growth, crack propagation, plastic flow, etc. However, real materials behavior results from a complex interplay between phenomena. In this project, the authors explored methods for coupling mesoscale simulations of microstructural evolution and micromechanical response. In one case, massively parallel (MP) simulations for grain evolution and microcracking in alumina stronglink materials were dynamically coupled. In the other, codes for domain coarsening and plastic deformation in CuSi braze alloys were iteratively linked. this program provided the first comparison of two promising ways to integrate mesoscale computer codes. Coupled microstructural/micromechanical codes were applied to experimentally observed microstructures for the first time. In addition to the coupled codes, this project developed a suite of new computational capabilities (PARGRAIN, GLAD, OOF, MPM, polycrystal plasticity, front tracking). The problem of plasticity length scale in continuum calculations was recognized and a solution strategy was developed. The simulations were experimentally validated on stockpile materials.

  4. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Warmack, Robert J.; Wachter, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  5. Application of micromechanics to the characterization of mortar by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M G; Anaya, J J; Izquierdo, M A G; Ullate, L G

    2002-05-01

    Mechanical properties of concrete and mortar structures can be estimated by ultrasonic non-destructive testing. When the ultrasonic velocity is known, there are standardized methods based on considering the concrete a homogeneous material. Cement composites, however, are heterogeneous and porous, and have a negative effect on the mechanical properties of structures. This work studies the impact of porosity on mechanical properties by considering concrete a multiphase material. A micromechanical model is applied in which the material is considered to consist of two phases: a solid matrix and pores. From this method, a set of expressions is obtained that relates the acoustic velocity and Young's modulus of mortar. Experimental work is based on non-destructive and destructive procedures over mortar samples whose porosity is varied. A comparison is drawn between micromechanical and standard methods, showing positive results for the method here proposed.

  6. Micromechanics of Composite Materials Governed by Vector Constitutive Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Aboudi, Jacob; Arnold, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    The high-fidelity generalized method of cells micromechanics theory has been extended for the prediction of the effective property tensor and the corresponding local field distributions for composites whose constituents are governed by vector constitutive laws. As shown, the shear analogy, which can predict effective transverse properties, is not valid in the general three-dimensional case. Consequently, a general derivation is presented that is applicable to both continuously and discontinuously reinforced composites with arbitrary vector constitutive laws and periodic microstructures. Results are given for thermal and electric problems, effective properties and local field distributions, ordered and random microstructures, as well as complex geometries including woven composites. Comparisons of the theory's predictions are made to test data, numerical analysis, and classical expressions from the literature. Further, classical methods cannot provide the local field distributions in the composite, and it is demonstrated that, as the percolation threshold is approached, their predictions are increasingly unreliable. XXXX It has been observed that the bonding between the fibers and matrix in composite materials can be imperfect. In the context of thermal conductivity, such imperfect interfaces have been investigated in micromechanical models by Dunn and Taya (1993), Duan and Karihaloo (2007), Nan et al. (1997) and Hashin (2001). The present HFGMC micromechanical method, derived for perfectly bonded composite materials governed by vector constitutive laws, can be easily generalized to include the effects of weak bonding between the constituents. Such generalizations, in the context of the mechanical micromechanics problem, involve introduction of a traction-separation law at the fiber/matrix interface and have been presented by Aboudi (1987), Bednarcyk and Arnold (2002), Bednarcyk et al. (2004) and Aboudi et al. (2013) and will be addressed in the future.

  7. Third-Order Intermodulation in a Micromechanical Thermal Mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    rier frequency. A variant of the Duffing oscillator model and finite element modeling are used to analyze the origin of nonlinearities in the...micromechanical system. [1503] Index Terms—Bandpass filter, Duffing oscillator , intermediate frequency, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), mixer, non...input intercept point of +30 dBm for interferers spaced at a 50-kHz offset from the carrier frequency. A variant of the Duffing oscillator model and

  8. EDITORIAL: The 18th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 07)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 18th European Workshop on Micromechanics (MME 07), which took place at the University of Minho, Guimarães, Portugal from 16-18 September 2007. Since the first workshop at the University of Twente in 1989 the field of micromechanics has grown substantially and new fields have been added: optics, RF, biomedical, chemistry, and in recent years the emergence of nanotechnology. This year an extensive programme was scheduled with contributions from new materials research to new manufacturing techniques. In addition, the invited speakers presented a review of the state-of-the-art in several main trends in current research, with the focus on micro/nanosystems in the ICT Work Programme in EC FP7. As ever, the two day workshop was attended by delegates from all over Europe, the USA, Brazil, Egypt, Japan and Canada. A total of 96 papers were accepted for presentation and there were a further five keynote presentations. The workshop provides a forum for young researchers to learn about new experimental methods and to enhance their knowledge of the field. This special issue presents a selection of 17 of the best papers from the workshop. The papers highlight fluidic and optical devices, energy scavenging microsystems, neural probe arrays and microtechnology fabrication techniques. All the papers went through the regular reviewing procedure of IOP Publishing, and I am grateful to all the referees for their excellent work. I would also like to extend my thanks to Professor Robert Puers for advice on the final selection of papers and to Ian Forbes of IOP Publishing for managing the entire process. My thanks also go to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. I believe that this special issue will provide a good overview of the topics presented at the workshop and I hope you enjoy reading it.

  9. A micromechanical study of dilatancy of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruyt, N. P.; Rothenburg, L.

    2016-10-01

    In micromechanics of granular materials, relationships are investigated between micro-scale characteristics of particles and contacts and macro-scale, continuum characteristics. Dilatancy is an important property of granular materials, defined as volume changes (dilative or compressive) induced by shear deformation. To obtain detailed information at the micro-scale, two-dimensional Discrete Element Method simulations of isobaric tests with disk-shaped particles have been performed. The required information includes the fabric tensor which characterizes statistical properties of the contact network. The dependence of the dilatancy rate on the shear strength and the fabric tensor has been investigated, based on the results of the simulations employing a dense and a loose initial system. The dilatancy rate depends in a complex, non-unique way on the shear strength, while the dependence on the fabric tensor is more amenable to analytical description. Two micromechanical mechanisms of dilatancy have been identified: (i) dilatancy due to deformation of loops that are determined by the interparticle contact network and (ii) dilatancy due to topological changes in the interparticle contact network that correspond to the creation or disruption of contacts. For the first mechanism the anisotropy in the contact network is the primary parameter, while for the second mechanism the average number of contacts per particle is the primary parameter. A fabric-based micromechanical relation for the dilatancy rate has been formulated that describes these identified mechanisms. Parameters present in this relation are determined by fitting this relation to the results of the Discrete Element Method simulations, using combined data for the dense and the loose initial system. Employing these fitted coefficients, good agreement is obtained between the results of the simulations and the predictions of the micromechanical dilatancy relation.

  10. Optical anisotropy in micromechanically rolled carbon nanotube forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razib, Mohd Asyraf bin Mohd; Rana, Masud; Saleh, Tanveer; Fan, Harrison; Koch, Andrew; Nojeh, Alireza; Takahata, Kenichi; Muthalif, Asan Gani Bin Abdul

    2017-09-01

    The bulk appearance of arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNT arrays or CNT forests) is dark as they absorb most of the incident light. In this paper, two postprocessing techniques have been described where the CNT forest can be patterned by selective bending of the tips of the nanotubes using a rigid cylindrical tool. A tungsten tool was used to bend the vertical structure of CNTs with predefined parameters in two different ways as stated above: bending using the bottom surface of the tool (micromechanical bending (M2B)) and rolling using the side of the tool (micromechanical rolling (M2R)). The processed zone was investigated using a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) and optical setup to reveal the surface morphology and optical characteristics of the patterned CNTs on the substrate. Interestingly, the polarized optical reflection from the micromechanical rolled (M2R) sample was found to be significantly influenced by the rotation of the sample. It was observed that, if the polarization of the light is parallel to the alignment of the CNTs, the reflectance is at least 2 x higher than for the perpendicular direction. Furthermore, the reflectance varied almost linearly with good repeatability ( 10%) as the processed CNT forest sample was rotated from 0° to 90°. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Micromechanics and Piezo Enhancements of HyperSizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Yarrington, Phillip; Collier, Craig S.

    2006-01-01

    The commercial HyperSizer aerospace-composite-material-structure-sizing software has been enhanced by incorporating capabilities for representing coupled thermal, piezoelectric, and piezomagnetic effects on the levels of plies, laminates, and stiffened panels. This enhancement is based on a formulation similar to that of the pre-existing HyperSizer capability for representing thermal effects. As a result of this enhancement, the electric and/or magnetic response of a material or structure to a mechanical or thermal load, or its mechanical response to an applied electric or magnetic field can be predicted. In another major enhancement, a capability for representing micromechanical effects has been added by establishment of a linkage between HyperSizer and Glenn Research Center s Micromechanics Analysis Code With Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) computer program, which was described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. The linkage enables Hyper- Sizer to localize to the fiber and matrix level rather than only to the ply level, making it possible to predict local failures and to predict properties of plies from those of the component fiber and matrix materials. Advanced graphical user interfaces and database structures have been developed to support the new HyperSizer micromechanics capabilities.

  12. Investigation of excimer laser ablation threshold of polymers using a microphone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Joerg; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2002-09-30

    KrF excimer laser ablation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyimide (PI) and polycarbonate (PC) in air was studied by an in situ monitoring technique using a microphone. The microphone signal generated by a short acoustic pulse represented the etch rate of laser ablation depending on the laser fluence, i.e., the ablation 'strength'. From a linear relationship between the microphone output voltage and the laser fluence, the single-pulse ablation thresholds were found to be 30 mJ cm{sup -2} for PET, 37 mJ cm{sup -2} for PI and 51 mJ cm{sup -2} for PC (20-pulses threshold). The ablation thresholds of PET and PI were not influenced by the number of pulses per spot, while PC showed an incubation phenomenon. A microphone technique provides a simple method to determine the excimer laser ablation threshold of polymer films.

  13. Investigation of excimer laser ablation threshold of polymers using a microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Jörg; Niino, Hiroyuki; Yabe, Akira

    2002-09-01

    KrF excimer laser ablation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyimide (PI) and polycarbonate (PC) in air was studied by an in situ monitoring technique using a microphone. The microphone signal generated by a short acoustic pulse represented the etch rate of laser ablation depending on the laser fluence, i.e., the ablation "strength". From a linear relationship between the microphone output voltage and the laser fluence, the single-pulse ablation thresholds were found to be 30 mJ cm -2 for PET, 37 mJ cm -2 for PI and 51 mJ cm -2 for PC (20-pulses threshold). The ablation thresholds of PET and PI were not influenced by the number of pulses per spot, while PC showed an incubation phenomenon. A microphone technique provides a simple method to determine the excimer laser ablation threshold of polymer films.

  14. Detection and Separation of Speech Events in Meeting Recordings Using a Microphone Array

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Asano, Futoshi; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Ogata, Jun; Yamada, Miichi; Nakamura, Masami

    2007-01-01

    ...) framework is proposed. The main feature of this method is that all the information necessary for the adaptation of ABF, including microphone calibration, is obtained from meeting recordings based on the results of speech-event detection...

  15. 78 FR 21977 - Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing the Same; Commission Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing the Same; Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination Terminating Investigation Based on a Settlement...

  16. Bruel and Kjaer 4944 Microphone Grid Frequency Response Function System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Reginald; Lee, Erik

    2010-01-01

    Br el & Kjaer (B&K) 4944B pressure field microphone was judiciously selected to measure acoustic environments, 400Hz 50kHz, in close proximity of the nozzle during multiple firings of solid propellant rocket motors. It is well known that protective grids can affect the frequency response of microphones. B&K recommends operation of the B&K 4944B without a protective grid when recording measurements above 10 to 15 kHz.

  17. Robustness of a Mixed-Order Ambisonics Microphone Array for Sound Field Reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Marton; Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel; Buchholz, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Spherical microphone arrays can be used to capture and reproduce the spatial characteristics of acoustic scenes. A mixed-order Ambisonics (MOA) approach was recently proposed to improve the horizontal spatial resolution of microphone arrays with a given number of transducers. In this paper, the p...... errors was similar to that of HOA arrays with both strategies. The approach based on minimizing the error of the reproduced spherical harmonic functions showed better performance at high frequencies for the MOA layout....

  18. A New Trans-Tympanic Microphone Approach for Fully Implantable Hearing Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Tak Woo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fully implantable hearing devices (FIHDs have been developed as a new technology to overcome the disadvantages of conventional acoustic hearing aids. The implantable microphones currently used in FIHDs, however, have difficulty achieving high sensitivity to environmental sounds, low sensitivity to body noise, and ease of implantation. In general, implantable microphones may be placed under the skin in the temporal bone region of the skull. In this situation, body noise picked up during mastication and touching can be significant, and the layer of skin and hair can both attenuate and distort sounds. The new approach presently proposed is a microphone implanted at the tympanic membrane. This method increases the microphone’s sensitivity by utilizing the pinna’s directionally dependent sound collection capabilities and the natural resonances of the ear canal. The sensitivity and insertion loss of this microphone were measured in human cadaveric specimens in the 0.1 to 16 kHz frequency range. In addition, the maximum stable gain due to feedback between the trans-tympanic microphone and a round-window-drive transducer, was measured. The results confirmed in situ high-performance capabilities of the proposed trans-tympanic microphone.

  19. A three-microphone acoustic reflection technique using transmitted acoustic waves in the airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yuki; Huang, Jyongsu; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Kato, Ryo; Higashino, Mari; Shinomiya, Shohei; Kitadate, Shoko; Takahara, Yutaka; Yamaya, Atsuyo; Saito, Masatoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kojima, Koji; Oikawa, Taku; Nakagawa, Ken; Tsuchihara, Katsuma; Iguchi, Masaharu; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Mizuno, Shiro; Osanai, Kazuhiro; Toga, Hirohisa

    2013-10-15

    The acoustic reflection technique noninvasively measures airway cross-sectional area vs. distance functions and uses a wave tube with a constant cross-sectional area to separate incidental and reflected waves introduced into the mouth or nostril. The accuracy of estimated cross-sectional areas gets worse in the deeper distances due to the nature of marching algorithms, i.e., errors of the estimated areas in the closer distances accumulate to those in the further distances. Here we present a new technique of acoustic reflection from measuring transmitted acoustic waves in the airway with three microphones and without employing a wave tube. Using miniaturized microphones mounted on a catheter, we estimated reflection coefficients among the microphones and separated incidental and reflected waves. A model study showed that the estimated cross-sectional area vs. distance function was coincident with the conventional two-microphone method, and it did not change with altered cross-sectional areas at the microphone position, although the estimated cross-sectional areas are relative values to that at the microphone position. The pharyngeal cross-sectional areas including retropalatal and retroglossal regions and the closing site during sleep was visualized in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The method can be applicable to larger or smaller bronchi to evaluate the airspace and function in these localized airways.

  20. Speech intelligibility differences across sound classes with in-the-ear and free-field microphones in quiet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estis, Julie M; Parisi, Julie A; Moore, Robert E; Brungart, Douglas S

    2011-06-01

    Speech intelligibility performance with an in-the-ear microphone embedded in a custom-molded deep-insertion earplug was compared with results obtained using a free-field microphone. Intelligibility differences between microphones were further analyzed to assess whether reduced intelligibility was specific to certain sound classes. 36 participants completed the Modified Rhyme Test using recordings made with each microphone. While speech intelligibility for both microphones was highly accurate, intelligibility with the free-field microphone was significantly better than with the in-the-ear microphone. There were significant effects of place and manner of sound production. Significant differences in recognition among specific phonemes were also revealed. Implications included modifying the in-the-ear microphone to transmit more high frequency energy. Use of the in-the-ear microphone was limited by significant loss of high-frequency energy of the speech signal which resulted in reduced intelligibility for some sounds; however, the in-the-ear microphone is a promising technology for effective communication in military environments.

  1. Acoustic source localization in mixed field using spherical microphone arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinghua; Wang, Tong

    2014-12-01

    Spherical microphone arrays have been used for source localization in three-dimensional space recently. In this paper, a two-stage algorithm is developed to localize mixed far-field and near-field acoustic sources in free-field environment. In the first stage, an array signal model is constructed in the spherical harmonics domain. The recurrent relation of spherical harmonics is independent of far-field and near-field mode strengths. Therefore, it is used to develop spherical estimating signal parameter via rotational invariance technique (ESPRIT)-like approach to estimate directions of arrival (DOAs) for both far-field and near-field sources. In the second stage, based on the estimated DOAs, simple one-dimensional MUSIC spectrum is exploited to distinguish far-field and near-field sources and estimate the ranges of near-field sources. The proposed algorithm can avoid multidimensional search and parameter pairing. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance for localizing far-field sources, or near-field ones, or mixed field sources.

  2. Phase Calibration of Microphones by Measurement in the Free-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past several years, significant effort has been expended at NASA Langley developing new Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based microphone directional array instrumentation for high-frequency aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels. This new type of array construction solves two challenges which have limited the widespread use of large channel-count arrays, namely by providing a lower cost-per-channel and a simpler method for mounting microphones in wind tunnels and in field-deployable arrays. The current generation of array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity on a variety of airframe components using sophisticated data reduction algorithms [1-2]. Commercially-available MEMS microphones are condenser-type devices and have some desirable characteristics when compared with conventional condenser-type microphones. The most important advantages of MEMS microphones are their size, price, and power consumption. However, the commercially-available units suffer from certain important shortcomings. Based on experiments with array prototypes, it was found that both the bandwidth and the sound pressure limit of the microphones should be increased significantly to improve the performance and flexibility of the microphone array [3]. It was also desired to modify the packaging to eliminate unwanted Helmholtz resonance s exhibited by the commercial devices. Thus, new requirements were defined as follows: Frequency response: 100 Hz to 100 KHz (+/-3dB) Upper sound pressure limit: Design 1: 130 dB SPL (THD less than 5%) Design 2: 150-160 dB SPL (THD less than 5%) Packaging: 3.73 x 6.13 x 1.3 mm can with laser-etched lid. In collaboration with Novusonic Acoustic Innovation, NASA modified a Knowles SiSonic MEMS design to meet these new requirements. Coupled with the design of the enhanced MEMS microphones was the development of a new calibration method for simultaneously obtaining the sensitivity and phase response of

  3. Fatigue Micromechanism Characterization in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers Using Synchrotron Radiation Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-18

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0002 Fatigue micromechanism characterization in carbon fibre reinforced polymers using synchrotron radiation computed...SUBTITLE Fatigue micromechanism characterization in carbon fibre reinforced polymers using synchrotron radiation computed tomography 5a. CONTRACT...particularly within the aerospace sector due to their high specific stiffness and strength. CFRPs are widely identified as being very fatigue resistant, but

  4. On micromechanical characteristics of the critical state of two-dimensional granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.

    2014-01-01

    In micromechanics of quasi-static deformation of granular materials, relationships are investigated between the macro-scale, continuum-mechanical characteristics, and the micro-scale characteristics at the particle and interparticle contact level. An important micromechanical quantity is the fabric

  5. Numerical design and testing of a sound source for secondary calibration of microphones using the Boundary Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador

    2009-01-01

    Secondary calibration of microphones in free field is performed by placing the microphone under calibration in an anechoic chamber with a sound source, and exposing it to a controlled sound field. A calibrated microphone is also measured as a reference. While the two measurements are usually made...... consecutively, a variation of this procedure, where the microphones are measured simultaneously, is considered more advantageous from the metrological point of view. However, it must be guaranteed that the two microphones receive the same excitation from the source, although their positions are some distance...... apart to avoid acoustic interaction. As a part of the project Euromet-792, aiming to investigate and improve methods for secondary free-field calibration of microphones, a sound source suitable for simultaneous secondary free-field calibration has been designed using the Boundary Element Method...

  6. A practical implementation of microphone free-field comparison calibration according to the standard IEC 61094-8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Torras Rosell, Antoni; Rasmussen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    An international standard concerned with the calibration of microphones in a free field by comparison has recently been published. The standard contemplates two main calibration methodologies for determining the sensitivity of a microphone under test when compared against a reference microphone....... A third method, consisting of a combination of the sequential and simultaneous methodologies, has also been investigated. Though the application of time selective techniques is not discussed, the experimental results indicate the immunity to unwanted reflections in the sequential and combined approaches...

  7. SOl-based radial-contour-mode micromechanical disk resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Yingqian; Zhao Zhengping; Yang Yongjun; Hu Xiaodong; Li Qian

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports a radial-contour-mode micromechanical disk resonator for radio frequency applications.This disk resonator with a gold plated layer as the electrodes,was prepared on a silicon-on-insulator wafer,which is supported by an anchor on another silicon wafer through Au-Au thermo-compression bonding.The gap between the disk and the surrounding gold electrodes is 100 nm.The radius of the disk is 20 μm and the thickness is 4.5μm.In results,the resonator shows a resonant frequency of 143 MHz and a quality factor of 5600 in vacuum.

  8. Micromechanical modeling of unidirectional composites with uneven interfacial strengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial; Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2013-01-01

    Composite materials under loads normal to the fiber orientation often fail due to debonding between fibers and matrix. In this paper a micromechanical model is developed to study the interfacial and geometrical effects in fiber-reinforced composites using generalized plane strain by means......, a trapezoidal cohesive zone model is used. A parametric study is carried out to evaluate the influence of the interfacial properties, fiber position and fiber volume fraction on the overall stressestrain response as well as the end-crack opening displacement and the opening crack angle. All the results...

  9. Configuration space representation for micro-mechanism function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, E. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Computer Science Dept.; Allen, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Micromachine Dept.

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes the configuration space representation of mechanical function and shows how it supports the design of micro-mechanisms. The domain characteristics of curved geometry, joint play, and custom joints render traditional design tools inappropriate, but configuration spaces can model these characteristics. They represent the quantitative and the qualitative aspects of kinematic function in a concise geometric format that helps designers visualize system function under a range of operating conditions, find and correct design flaws, study joint play, and optimize performance. The approach is demonstrated on a surface micromachined counter meshing gear discrimination device developed at Sandia National Laboratories.

  10. Simple micromechanical model of protein crystals for their mechanical characterizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteins have been known to perform the excellent mechanical functions and exhibit the remarkable mechanical properties such as high fracture toughness in spider silk protein [1]. This indicates that the mechanical characterization of protein molecules and/or crystals is very essential to understand such remarkable mechanical function of protein molecules. In this study, for gaining insight into mechanical behavior of protein crystals, we developed the micromechanical model by using the empirical potential field prescribed to alpha carbon atoms of a protein crystal in a unit cell. We consider the simple protein crystals for their mechanical behavior under tensile loading to be compared with full atomic models

  11. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  12. PREFACE: 14th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME'03)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolffenbuttel, R. F.

    2004-09-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 14th Micromechanics Europe Workshop (MME'03), which was held at Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands on 2-4 November 2003. Papers have been selected from this workshop for presentation in this special issue. After a careful review by the MME'03 programme committee, 53 submissions were selected for poster presentation at the workshop in addition to 6 invited presentations. These covered the many aspects of our exciting field: technology, simulation, system design, fabrication and characterization in a wide range of applications. These contributions confirm a trend from technology-driven towards application-driven technological research. This trend has become possible because of the availability of mature fabrication technologies for micromechanical structures and is reflected by the presentations of some of the invited speakers. There were invited lectures about applications in the medical field, automotive and copiers, which provide evidence of the relevance of our work in society. Nevertheless, development of technologies rightfully remains a core activity of this workshop. This applies to both the introduction of new technologies, as was reflected by invited presentations on new trends in RIE and nanotechnology, and the addressing of manufacturing issues using available techniques, which will be demonstrated to be crucial in automotive applications. Out of these 59 papers 21 have been selected for presentation in this special issue. Since the scope of the workshop is somewhat wider than that of the journal, selection was based not only on the quality of the work, but also on suitability for presentation in the journal. Moreover, at the workshop, student presentation of research at an early stage was strongly encouraged, whereas publication of work in this journal requires a more advanced level. I would like to express my appreciation for the outstanding efforts

  13. The effect of microphone wind noise on the amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise and its mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Paul; von Hünerbein, Sabine; Cox, Trevor J

    2016-07-01

    Microphone wind noise can corrupt outdoor recordings even when wind shields are used. When monitoring wind turbine noise, microphone wind noise is almost inevitable because measurements cannot be made in still conditions. The effect of microphone wind noise on two amplitude modulation (AM) metrics is quantified in a simulation, showing that even at low wind speeds of 2.5 m/s errors of over 4 dBA can result. As microphone wind noise is intermittent, a wind noise detection algorithm is used to automatically find uncorrupted sections of the recording, and so recover the true AM metrics to within ±2/±0.5 dBA.

  14. The effect of microphone wind noise on the amplitude modulation of wind turbine noise and its mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kendrick, P; Von-Hunerbein, SUM; Cox, TJ

    2016-01-01

    Microphone wind noise can corrupt outdoor recordings even when wind shields are used. When monitoring wind turbine noise, microphone wind noise is almost inevitable because measurements cannot be made in still conditions. The effect of microphone wind noise on two Amplitude Modulation (AM) metrics is quantified in a simulation, showing that even at low wind speeds of 2.5 m/s errors of over 4 dBA can result. As microphone wind noise is intermittent, a wind noise detection algorithm is used to ...

  15. Characteristics of Relocated Quiet Zones Using Virtual Microphone Algorithm in an Active Headrest System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokhoon Ryu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study displays theoretical and experimental investigation on the characteristics of the relocated zone of quiet by a virtual microphone (VM based filtered-x LMS (FxLMS algorithm which can be embedded in a real-time digital controller for an active headrest system. The attenuation changes at the relocated zones of quiet by the variation of the distance between the ear and the error microphone are mainly examined. An active headrest system was implemented for the control experiment at a chair and consists of two (left and right secondary loudspeakers, two error microphones, two observer microphones at ear positions in a HATS, and other electronics including a dSPACE 1401 controller. The VM based FxLMS algorithm achieved an attenuation of about 22 dB in the control experiment against a narrowband primary noise by the variation of the distance between the ear and the error microphone. The important factors for the algorithm are discussed as well.

  16. Identifying Microphone from Noisy Recordings by Using Representative Instance One Class-Classification Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huy Quan Vu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growth of technical developments has created huge challenges for microphone forensics - a sub-category of audio forensic science, because of the availability of numerous digital recording devices and massive amount of recording data. Demand for fast and efficient methods to assure integrity and authenticity of information is becoming more and more important in criminal investigation nowadays. Machine learning has emerged as an important technique to support audio analysis processes of microphone forensic practitioners. However, its application to real life situations using supervised learning is still facing great challenges due to expensiveness in collecting data and updating system. In this paper, we introduce a new machine learning approach which is called One-class Classification (OCC to be applied to microphone forensics; we demonstrate its capability on a corpus of audio samples collected from several microphones. In addition, we propose a representative instance classification framework (RICF that can effectively improve performance of OCC algorithms for recording signal with noise. Experiment results and analysis indicate that OCC has the potential to benefit microphone forensic practitioners in developing new tools and techniques for effective and efficient analysis.

  17. Micromechanics and constitutive modeling of connective soft tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a micromechanical model for connective soft tissues based on the available histological evidences is developed. The proposed model constituents i.e. collagen fibers and ground matrix are considered as hyperelastic materials. The matrix material is assumed to be isotropic Neo-Hookean while the collagen fibers are considered to be transversely isotropic hyperelastic. In order to take into account the effects of tissue structure in lower scales on the macroscopic behavior of tissue, a strain energy density function (SEDF) is developed for collagen fibers based on tissue hierarchical structure. Macroscopic response and properties of tissue are obtained using the numerical homogenization method with the help of ABAQUS software. The periodic boundary conditions and the proposed constitutive models are implemented into ABAQUS using the DISP and the UMAT subroutines, respectively. The existence of the solution and stable material behavior of proposed constitutive model for collagen fibers are investigated based on the poly-convexity condition. Results of the presented micromechanics model for connective tissues are compared and validated with available experimental data. Effects of geometrical and material parameters variation at microscale on macroscopic mechanical behavior of tissues are investigated. The results show that decrease in collagen content of the connective tissues like the tendon due to diseases leads 20% more stretch than healthy tissue under the same load which can results in connective tissue malfunction and hypermobility in joints.

  18. Micromechanics of TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulota, Mindaugas; Tanpichai, Supachok; Hughes, Mark; Eichhorn, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Composites of poly(lactic) acid (PLA) reinforced with TEMPO-oxidized fibrillated cellulose (TOFC) were prepared to 15, 20, 25, and 30% fiber weight fractions. To aid dispersion and to improve stress transfer, we acetylated the TOFC prior to the fabrication of TOFC-PLA composite films. Raman spectroscopy was employed to study the deformation micromechanics in these systems. Microtensile specimens were prepared from the films and deformed in tension with Raman spectra being collected simultaneously during deformation. A shift in a Raman peak initially located at ~1095 cm(-1), assigned to C-O-C stretching of the cellulose backbone, was observed upon deformation, indicating stress transfer from the matrix to the TOFC reinforcement. The highest band shift rate, with respect to strain, was observed in composites having a 30% weight fraction of TOFC. These composites also displayed a significantly higher strain to failure compared to pure acetylated TOFC film, and to the composites having lower weight fractions of TOFC. The stress-transfer processes that occur in microfibrillated cellulose composites are discussed with reference to the micromechanical data presented. It is shown that these TOFC-based composite materials are progressively dominated by the mechanics of the networks, and a shear-lag type stress transfer between fibers.

  19. Virtual mass effect in dynamic micromechanical mass sensing in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiker, P.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2016-06-01

    Weighing individual micro- or nanoscale particles in solution using dynamic micromechanical sensors is quite challenging: viscous losses dramatically degrade the sensor's performance by both broadening the resonance peak and increasing the effective total mass of the resonator by the dragged liquid. While the virtual mass of the resonator was discussed frequently, little attention has been paid to the virtual mass of particles attached to the resonator's surface and its impact on the accuracy of mass sensing. By means of the in situ detection of a polystyrene microbead in water using a bridge-based microresonator, we demonstrate that the virtual mass of the bead significantly affects the observed frequency shift. In fact, 55 % of the frequency shift was caused by the virtual mass of the adsorbed bead, predicted by Stoke's theory. Based on the observed shift in the resonator's quality factor during particle adsorption, we confirm this significant effect of the virtual mass. Thus, a quantitative analysis of the mass of a single adsorbed particle is strongly diminished if dynamic micromechanical sensors are operated in a liquid environment.

  20. Separating the Wheat from the Chaff: Sensing Wireless Microphones in TVWS

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Huanhuan; Zhang, Wenyi

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes our attempts to establish a systematic approach that overcomes a key difficulty in sensing wireless microphone signals, namely, the inability for most existing detection methods to effectively distinguish between a wireless microphone signal and a sinusoidal continuous wave (CW). Such an inability has led to an excessively high false alarm rate and thus severely limited the utility of sensing-based cognitive transmission in the TV white space (TVWS) spectrum. Having recognized the root of the difficulty, we propose two potential solutions. The first solution focuses on the periodogram as an estimate of the power spectral density (PSD), utilizing the property that a CW has a line spectral component while a wireless microphone signal has a slightly dispersed PSD. In that approach, we formulate the resulting decision model as an one-sided test for Gaussian vectors, based on Kullback-Leibler distance type of decision statistics. The second solution goes beyond the PSD and looks into the spec...

  1. Acoustic Feedback and Echo Cancellation Strategies for Multiple-Microphone and Single-Loudspeaker Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Elmedyb, Thomas Bo; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2011-01-01

    Acoustic feedback/echo cancellation in a multiple-microphone and single-loudspeaker system is often carried out using a cancellation filter for each microphone channel, and the filters are adaptively estimated, independently of each other. In this work, we consider another strategy by estimating...... cancellation performance is achievable compared to the independent estimation strategy. Furthermore, we relate the joint estimation strategy to a stereophonic echo cancellation system and provide analytic expressions for its system behavior....... all the cancellation filters jointly and in this way exploit information from all microphone channels. We determine the statistical system behavior for the joint estimation strategy in terms of the convergence rate and steady-state behavior across time and frequency. We assess if an improved...

  2. Digital signal processing for a thermal neutron detector using ZnS(Ag):{sup 6}LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosset, J.-B., E-mail: jean-baptiste.mosset@psi.ch; Stoykov, A.; Greuter, U.; Hildebrandt, M.; Schlumpf, N.

    2016-07-11

    We present a digital signal processing system based on a photon counting approach which we developed for a thermal neutron detector consisting of ZnS(Ag):{sup 6}LiF scintillating layers read out with WLS fibers and SiPMs. Three digital filters have been evaluated: a moving sum, a moving sum after differentiation and a digital CR-RC{sup 4} filter. The performances of the detector with these filters are presented. A full analog signal processing using a CR-RC{sup 4} filter has been emulated digitally. The detector performance obtained with this analog approach is compared with the one obtained with the best performing digital approach. - Highlights: • Application of digital signal processing for a SiPM-based ZnS:6LiF neutron detector. • Optimisation of detector performances with 3 different digital filters. • Comparison with detector performances with a full analog signal processing.

  3. Performance Analysis of a Cost-Effective Electret Condenser Microphone Directional Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Gerhold, Carl H.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Herring, Gregory C.; Bartram, Scott M.

    2003-01-01

    Microphone directional array technology continues to be a critical part of the overall instrumentation suite for experimental aeroacoustics. Unfortunately, high sensor cost remains one of the limiting factors in the construction of very high-density arrays (i.e., arrays containing several hundred channels or more) which could be used to implement advanced beamforming algorithms. In an effort to reduce the implementation cost of such arrays, the authors have undertaken a systematic performance analysis of a prototype 35-microphone array populated with commercial electret condenser microphones. An ensemble of microphones coupling commercially available electret cartridges with passive signal conditioning circuitry was fabricated for use with the Langley Large Aperture Directional Array (LADA). A performance analysis consisting of three phases was then performed: (1) characterize the acoustic response of the microphones via laboratory testing and calibration, (2) evaluate the beamforming capability of the electret-based LADA using a series of independently controlled point sources in an anechoic environment, and (3) demonstrate the utility of an electret-based directional array in a real-world application, in this case a cold flow jet operating at high subsonic velocities. The results of the investigation revealed a microphone frequency response suitable for directional array use over a range of 250 Hz - 40 kHz, a successful beamforming evaluation using the electret-populated LADA to measure simple point sources at frequencies up to 20 kHz, and a successful demonstration using the array to measure noise generated by the cold flow jet. This paper presents an overview of the tests conducted along with sample data obtained from those tests.

  4. Radiation impedance of condenser microphones and their diffuse-field responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    The relation between the diffuse-field response and the radiation impedance of a microphone has been investigated. Such a relation can be derived from classical theory. The practical measurement of the radiation impedance requires (a) measuring the volume velocity of the membrane of the microphone....... In this way, a hybrid estimate of the radiation impedance is obtained. The resulting estimate of the diffuse-field response is compared with experimental estimates of the diffuse-field response determined using reciprocity and the random-incidence method. The different estimates are in good agreement...

  5. Beamforming with a circular microphone array for localization of environmental sources of noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Finn; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2010-01-01

    It is often enough to localize environmental sources of noise from different directions in a plane. This can be accomplished with a circular microphone array, which can be designed to have practically the same resolution over 360. The microphones can be suspended in free space or they can...... be mounted on a solid cylinder. This investigation examines and compares two techniques based on such arrays, the classical delay-and-sum beamforming and an alternative method called circular harmonics beamforming. The latter is based on decomposing the sound field into a series of circular harmonics...

  6. Beamforming with a circular microphone array for localization of environmental noise sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Finn; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2010-01-01

    It is often enough to localize environmental sources of noise from different directions in a plane. This can be accomplished with a circular microphone array, which can be designed to have practically the same resolution over 360. The microphones can be suspended in free space or they can...... be mounted on a solid cylinder. This investigation examines and compares two techniques based on such arrays, the classical delay-and-sum beamforming and an alternative method called circular harmonics beamforming. The latter is based on decomposing the sound field into a series of circular harmonics...

  7. Sound-field reconstruction performance of a mixed-order Ambisonics microphone array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Marton; Chang, Jiho

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in using spherical microphone arrays for spatial audio recordings. Accurate recordings are important for a range of applications, from virtual sound environments for hearing research through to the evaluation of communication devices, such as hearing...... instruments and mobile phones. Previously, a mixed-order Ambisonics (MOA) approach was proposed to improve the horizontal spatial resolution of spherical arrays. This was achieved by increasing the number of microphones near the horizontal plane while keeping the total number of transducers fixed...

  8. Near field acoustic holography with microphones mounted on a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Moreno, Guillermo; Fernandez Grande, Efren;

    2008-01-01

    . This is potentially very useful for source identification. On the other hand a rigid sphere is somewhat more practical than an open sphere, and it is possible to modify the existing spherical NAH theory so that a similar sound field reconstruction can be made with an array of microphones flush-mounted on a rigid...... sphere. Rigid spheres with flush-mounted microphones are also used for beamforming, and it is known that they are advantageous compared with open spheres for this application. However, whereas beamforming is a far field technique NAH is a near field technique, and spherical NAH based on a rigid sphere...

  9. Beamforming with a circular array of microphones mounted on a rigid sphere (L)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiana Roig, Elisabet; Jacobsen, Finn; Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2011-01-01

    Beamforming with uniform circular microphone arrays can be used for localizing sound sources over 360. Typically, the array microphones are suspended in free space or they are mounted on a solid cylinder. However, the cylinder is often considered to be infinitely long because the scattering problem...... has no exact solution for a finite cylinder. Alternatively one can use a solid sphere. This investigation compares the performance of a circular array mounded on a rigid sphere with that of such an array in free space and mounted on an infinite cylinder, using computer simulations. The examined...

  10. Comparison of Theoretical Basics of Microphone and Piezoelectric Photothermal Spectroscopy of Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Maliński, M.; Chrobak, Ł.; Pawlak, M.

    2017-01-01

    Photothermal spectroscopy has found a wide range of applications as a method of monitoring thermal, optical and recombination parameters of semiconductors. We consider microphone detection, widely used in photoacoustic spectroscopy, and piezoelectric detection. Both methods require knowledge of the temperature distribution in the sample and in its surroundings, the support surface and gas. For the microphone signal, we simulated the temperature at one of the sample surfaces; for the piezoelectric signal, we simulated the spatial temperature distribution orthogonal to the sample surface. We modeled an idealized semiconducting sample and one with surface defects. We found that the amplitude and phase spectra vary between the methods, enabling determination of optical and thermal parameters.

  11. A Target Sound Extraction via 2ch Microphone Array Using Phase Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Kenji; Takahashi, Kota

    In this paper, we propose a novel learning method of linear filters for a target sound extraction in a non—stationary noisy environment via a microphone array with 2 elements. The method is based on a phase difference between two microphones, which is detected from outputs of the Hilbert transformer whose length is corresponding to a fundamental period of vowel parts of speech signals. The cue signal, which has a correlation with a power envelop of target sound, is generated using a mean square of phase difference and applied to the learning. A superior performance of the proposed method is presented by several computer simulation results.

  12. A biomimetic coupled circuit based microphone array for sound source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huping; Xu, Xiangyuan; Jia, Han; Guan, Luyang; Bao, Ming

    2015-09-01

    An equivalent analog circuit is designed to mimic the coupled ears of the fly Ormia ochracea for sound source localization. This coupled circuit receives two signals with tiny phase difference from a space closed two-microphone array, and produces two signals with obvious intensity difference. The response sensitivity can be adjusted through the coupled circuit parameters. The directional characteristics of the coupled circuit have been demonstrated in the experiment. The miniature microphone array can localize the sound source with low computational burden by using the intensity difference. This system has significant advantages in various applications where the array size is limited.

  13. Metrics for performance assessment of mixed-order Ambisonics spherical microphone arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel; Marschall, Marton

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-order Ambisonics (MOA) combines planar (2D) higher order Ambisonics (HOA) with lower order periphonic (3D) Ambisonics. MOA encoding from spherical microphone arrays has the potential to provide versatile recordings that can be played back using 2D, 3D or mixed systems. A procedure to generate...... suitable layouts for a given MOA combination order is introduced consisting of rings of microphones at several elevation angles for any given MOA combination order. Robustness and directivity measures were evaluated for four MOA layouts. Results showed that MOA vertical directivity was similar to 3D HOA...

  14. Micromechanics based simulation of ductile fracture in structural steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellavajjala, Ravi Kiran

    The broader aim of this research is to develop fundamental understanding of ductile fracture process in structural steels, propose robust computational models to quantify the associated damage, and provide numerical tools to simplify the implementation of these computational models into general finite element framework. Mechanical testing on different geometries of test specimens made of ASTM A992 steels is conducted to experimentally characterize the ductile fracture at different stress states under monotonic and ultra-low cycle fatigue (ULCF) loading. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the fractured surfaces is conducted to decipher the underlying microscopic damage mechanisms that cause fracture in ASTM A992 steels. Detailed micromechanical analyses for monotonic and cyclic loading are conducted to understand the influence of stress triaxiality and Lode parameter on the void growth phase of ductile fracture. Based on monotonic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanical void growth model is proposed to predict ductile fracture. This model is then incorporated in to finite element program as a weakly coupled model to simulate the loss of load carrying capacity in the post microvoid coalescence regime for high triaxialities. Based on the cyclic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanics based cyclic void growth model is developed to predict the ULCF life of ASTM A992 steels subjected to high stress triaxialities. Furthermore, a computational fracture locus for ASTM A992 steels is developed and incorporated in to finite element program as an uncoupled ductile fracture model. This model can be used to predict the ductile fracture initiation under monotonic loading in a wide range of triaxiality and Lode parameters. Finally, a coupled microvoid elongation and dilation based continuum damage model is proposed, implemented, calibrated and validated. This model is capable of simulating the local softening caused by the various phases of ductile fracture process under

  15. Nanostructured interfaces for enhancing mechanical properties of composites: Computational micromechanical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Computational micromechanical studies of the effect of nanostructuring and nanoengineering of interfaces, phase and grain boundaries of materials on the mechanical properties and strength of materials and the potential of interface nanostructuring to enhance the materials properties are reviewed....

  16. Micromechanical modeling of rate-dependent behavior of Connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2017-03-07

    In this paper, a constitutive and micromechanical model for prediction of rate-dependent behavior of connective tissues (CTs) is presented. Connective tissues are considered as nonlinear viscoelastic material. The rate-dependent behavior of CTs is incorporated into model using the well-known quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. A planar wavy representative volume element (RVE) is considered based on the tissue microstructure histological evidences. The presented model parameters are identified based on the available experiments in the literature. The presented constitutive model introduced to ABAQUS by means of UMAT subroutine. Results show that, monotonic uniaxial test predictions of the presented model at different strain rates for rat tail tendon (RTT) and human patellar tendon (HPT) are in good agreement with experimental data. Results of incremental stress-relaxation test are also presented to investigate both instantaneous and viscoelastic behavior of connective tissues.

  17. Porosity estimation of aged mortar using a micromechanical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, M G; Anaya, J J; Sanchez, T; Segura, I

    2006-12-22

    Degradation of concrete structures located in high humidity atmospheres or under flowing water is a very important problem. In this study, a method for ultrasonic non-destructive characterization in aged mortar is presented. The proposed method makes a prediction of the behaviour of aged mortar accomplished with a three phase micromechanical model using ultrasonic measurements. Aging mortar was accelerated by immersing the probes in ammonium nitrate solution. Both destructive and non-destructive characterization of mortar was performed. Destructive tests of porosity were performed using a vacuum saturation method and non-destructive characterization was carried out using ultrasonic velocities. Aging experiments show that mortar degradation not only involves a porosity increase, but also microstructural changes in the cement matrix. Experimental results show that the estimated porosity using the proposed non-destructive methodology had a comparable performance to classical destructive techniques.

  18. Micromechanical analysis of the behavior of stiff clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Yu Yin; Ching S. Chang; Pierre-Yves Hicher; Jian-Hua Wang

    2011-01-01

    Cementations formed in geological timescale are observed in various stiff clays.A micromechanical stress strain model is developed for modeling the effect of cementation on the deformation behavior of stiff clay.The proposed approach considers explicitly cementations at intercluster contacts,which is different from conventional model.The concept of inter-cluster bonding is introduced to account for an additional cohesion in shear sliding and a higher yield stress in normal compression.A damage law for inter-cluster bonding is proposed at cluster contacts for the debonding process during mechanical loading.The model is used to simulate numerous stress-path tests on Vallericca stiff clay.The applicability of the present model is evaluated through comparisons between the predicted and the measured results.In order to explain the stress-induced anisotropy arising from extemally applied load,the evolution of local stresses and local strains at inter-cluster planes are discussed.

  19. Micromechanics of intergranular creep failure under cyclic loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Giessen, Erik; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a micromechanical investigation of intergranular creep failure caused by grain boundary cavitation under strain-controlled cyclic loading conditions. Numerical unit cell analyses are carried out for a planar polycrystal model in which the grain material and the grain...... boundaries are modelled individually. The model incorporates power-law creep of the grains, viscous grain boundary sliding between grains as well as the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities until they coalesce and form microcracks. Study of a limiting case with a facet-size microcrack reveals...... a relatively simple phenomenology under either balanced loading, slow-fast loading or balanced loading with a hold period at constant tensile stress. Next, a (non-dimensionalized) parametric study is carried out which focusses on the effect of the diffusive cavity growth rate relative to the overall creep rate...

  20. Integrated optical sensors using micromechanical bridges and cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaodong; Frankena, Hans J.

    1993-03-01

    Micromechanical bridges and cantilevers sensitive to external forces have been fabricated upon Si substrates. They are used as optical waveguides and part of sensor circuits. The waveguides consist of sandwiched layers of an SiO2 buffer, an Al2O3 waveguide and an SiO2 cover. The bridges and cantilevers with very small dimensions such as 100 micrometers in length, 5 micrometers in width and 2.5 micrometers in thickness have been successfully produced. Such bridge- or cantilever-shaped waveguide structures have been applied in acoustic signal detection and noise monitoring. In this paper, the bridge and cantilever structures will be analyzed and experimental results on sound measurement will be presented.

  1. INCREMENTAL MICRO-MECHANICAL MODEL OF PLAIN WOVEN FABRIC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangYitong; HaoYongjiang; LiCuiyu

    2004-01-01

    Warp yarns and weft yarns of plain woven fabric are the principal axes of material of fabric. They are orthogonal in their original configuration, but are obliquely crisscross in deformed configuration in general. In this paper the expressions of incremental components of strain tensor are derived, the non-linear model of woven fabric is linearized physically and its geometric non-linearity survives. The convenience of determining the total deformation is shown by the choice of the coordinate system of the principal axes of the material, with the convergence of the incremental methods illustrated by examples. This incremental model furnishes a basis for numerical simulations of fabric draping and wrinkling based oll the micro-mechanical model of fabric.

  2. Noise suppression for micromechanical resonator via intrinsic dynamic feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hou IAN; Zhi-rui GONG; Chang-pu SUN

    2008-01-01

    We study a dynamic mechanism to passively suppress the thermal noise of a micromechanical resonator through an intrinsic self-feedback that is genuinely non-Markovian.We use two coupled resonators,one as the target resonator and the other as an ancillary resonator,to illustrate the mechanism and its noise reduction effect.The intrinsic feedback is realized through the dynamics of coupling between the two resonators:the motions of the target resonator and the ancillary resonator mutually influence each other in a cyclic fashion.Specifically,the states that the target resonator has attained earlier will affect the state it attains later due to the presence of the ancillary resonator.We show that the feedback mechanism will bring forth the effect of noise suppression in the spectrum of displacement,but not in the spectrum of momentum.

  3. Micromechanics-Based Computational Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mutal, Subodh K.; Duff, Dennis L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Advanced high-temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) hold an enormous potential for use in aerospace propulsion system components and certain land-based applications. However, being relatively new materials, a reliable design properties database of sufficient fidelity does not yet exist. To characterize these materials solely by testing is cost and time prohibitive. Computational simulation then becomes very useful to limit the experimental effort and reduce the design cycle time, Authors have been involved for over a decade in developing micromechanics- based computational simulation techniques (computer codes) to simulate all aspects of CMC behavior including quantification of scatter that these materials exhibit. A brief summary/capability of these computer codes with typical examples along with their use in design/analysis of certain structural components is the subject matter of this presentation.

  4. Squeezing of light via reflection from a silicon micromechanical resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Hill, Jeff T; Chan, Jasper; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Painter, Oskar

    2013-01-01

    We present the measurement of squeezed light generation using an engineered optomechanical system fabricated from a silicon microchip and composed of a micromechanical resonator coupled to a nanophotonic cavity. Laser light is used to measure the fluctuations in the position of the mechanical resonator at a measurement rate comparable to the free dynamics of the mechanical resonator, and greater than its thermal decoherence rate. By approaching the strong continuous measurement regime we observe, through homodyne detection, non-trivial modifications of the reflected light's vacuum fluctuation spectrum. In spite of the mechanical resonator's highly excited thermal state ($10,000$ phonons), we observe squeezing at the level of $4.5 \\pm 0.5%$ below that of shot-noise over a few MHz bandwidth around the mechanical resonance frequency of 28 MHz. This squeezing is interpreted as an unambiguous quantum signature of radiation pressure shot-noise.

  5. Micromechanical study of corrosion products layers. Part I: Experimental characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoux, A., E-mail: dehoux@lmt.ens-cachan.fr [UPMC Univ., Paris 06, LMT-Cachan (ENS Cachan/UMR8535/UPMC) (France); Andra, Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Dechets RadioActifs, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, parc de la croix blanche, 92298 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (France); Bouchelaghem, F.; Berthaud, Y. [UPMC Univ., Paris 06, LMT-Cachan (ENS Cachan/UMR8535/UPMC) (France); Neff, D. [SIS2M/LAPA-Laboratoire Pierre Suee, UMR 9956 CNRS, CEA, Bt. 637, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif/Yvette (France); L' Hostis, V. [DEN, DANS, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d' Etude du Comportement des Betons et des Argiles, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanical characterization of oxide formed on ancient ferrous artefacts has been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The main phases present are goethite, magnetite and maghemite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Typical ranges of the local mechanical properties can be related with the main phases present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Young moduli at the micrometric scale vary between 50 and 200 GPa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Time dependent effects are negligible. - Abstract: A micromechanical characterization had been performed on ancient artefacts corrosion products. The proposed experimental approach allies scanning electron microscopy observations, micro-indentation tests which allow the characterization of the local stiffness of elementary constituents, and finally Raman micro-spectroscopy tests which give access to the local crystallised phases of the samples. The experimental campaign contains a large series of tests, which give us the opportunity to interpret the dispersion of local stiffness measurements.

  6. Micromechanisms of friction and wear introduction to relativistic tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Lyubimov, Dmitrij; Pinchuk, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    The modern vision of the micromechanism of friction and wear is explored, from the examination of ideal and real crystal structure and adhesion properties to the dynamics of solid frictional interaction. The fundamental quantum-mechanical and relativity principles of particle interaction are considered as basis of friction micro-process examination. The changes in solid structure originated from the influence of different kinds of force fields are considered. The principal possibility of relativity effect manifestation by friction is explained. The critical state of friction – triboplasma – was studied. Structural peculiarities of triboplasma, the kinetics of its transformation during frictional interaction as well as the influence of plasma and postplasma processes on tribojunction friction characteristics and complex formation by friction were examined. The book addresses to tribology researchers.

  7. Mechanical properties of Composite Engineering Structures by Multivolume Micromechanical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Novotný

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Engineering structures often consist of elements having the character of a periodically repeated composite structure. A multivolume micromechanical model based on a representative cell division into r1 × r2 × r3 subcells with different elastic material properties has been used in this paper to derive macromechanical characteristics of the composite construction response to applied load and temperature changes. The multivolume method is based on ensuring the equilibrium of the considered volume on an average basis. In the same (average way, the continuity conditions of displacements and tractions at the interfaces between subcells and between neighboring representative elements are imposed, resulting in a homogenization procedure that eliminates the discrete nature of the composite model. The details of the method are shown for the case of a concrete block pavement. A parametric study is presented illustrating the influence of joint thickness, joint filling material properties and the quality of bonding between block and filler elements.

  8. Micromechanical analysis of interaction energy for SMA reinforced composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The energy of the interaction between the matrix and the inclusions in shape memory alloy (SMA) re- inforced composite is one of the most important and complicated parts in thermodynamic constitutive theory. In this paper, the interaction energy is derived based on the classical theory of micromechanics and the thermodynamic theory. The SMA composite is treated as three phases, namely the austenitic phase, the martensite phase and the matrix phase. The interaction among the three phases is analyzed in a way close to the fact. The present expression is used to calculate the interaction energy of a typical SMA composite with attentions paid to understand of the effects of the matrix material, the fiber ge- ometry, and the fiber/matrix volume ratio. It is shown that the method developed in this paper is credible compared with the references. Some useful conclusions are obtained.

  9. Micromechanical analysis of interaction enersy for SMA reinforced composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU YuPing; DUI GuanSuo; DUO Liu

    2009-01-01

    The energy of the interaction between the matrix and the inclusions in shape memory alloy (SMA) re-inforced composite is one of the most important and complicated parts in thermodynamic constitutive theory. In this paper, the interaction energy is derived based on the classical theory of micromechanics and the thermodynamic theory. The SMA composite is treated as three phases, namely the austenitic phase, the martensite phase and the matrix phase. The interaction among the three phases is analyzed in a way close to the fact. The present expression is used to calculate the interaction energy of a typical SMA composite with attentions paid to understand of the effects of the matrix material, the fiber ge-ometry, and the fiber/matrix volume ratio. It is shown that the method developed in this paper is credi-ble compared with the references. Some useful conclusions are obtained.

  10. Concentration independent modulation of local micromechanics in a fibrin gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell A Kotlarchyk

    Full Text Available Methods for tuning extracellular matrix (ECM mechanics in 3D cell culture that rely on increasing the concentration of either protein or cross-linking molecules fail to control important parameters such as pore size, ligand density, and molecular diffusivity. Alternatively, ECM stiffness can be modulated independently from protein concentration by mechanically loading the ECM. We have developed a novel device for generating stiffness gradients in naturally derived ECMs, where stiffness is tuned by inducing strain, while local mechanical properties are directly determined by laser tweezers based active microrheology (AMR. Hydrogel substrates polymerized within 35 mm diameter Petri dishes are strained non-uniformly by the precise rotation of an embedded cylindrical post, and exhibit a position-dependent stiffness with little to no modulation of local mesh geometry. Here we present the device in the context of fibrin hydrogels. First AMR is used to directly measure local micromechanics in unstrained hydrogels of increasing fibrin concentration. Changes in stiffness are then mapped within our device, where fibrin concentration is held constant. Fluorescence confocal imaging and orbital particle tracking are used to quantify structural changes in fibrin on the micro and nano levels respectively. The micromechanical strain stiffening measured by microrheology is not accompanied by ECM microstructural changes under our applied loads, as measured by confocal microscopy. However, super-resolution orbital tracking reveals nanostructural straightening, lengthening, and reduced movement of fibrin fibers. Furthermore, we show that aortic smooth muscle cells cultured within our device are morphologically sensitive to the induced mechanical gradient. Our results demonstrate a powerful cell culture tool that can be used in the study of mechanical effects on cellular physiology in naturally derived 3D ECM tissues.

  11. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: A revised scope for Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering A revised scope for Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Ian

    2010-05-01

    Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is well known for publishing excellent work in highly competitive timescales. The journal's coverage has consistently evolved to reflect the current state of the field, and from May 2010 it will revisit its scope once again. The aims of the journal remain unchanged, however: to be the first choice of authors and readers in MEMS and micro-scale research. The new scope continues to focus on highlighting the link between fabrication technologies and their capacity to create novel devices. This link will be considered paramount in the journal, and both prospective authors and readers should let it serve as an inspiration to them. The burgeoning fields of NEMS and nano-scale engineering are more explicitly supported in the new scope. Research which ten years ago would have been considered science fiction has, through the tireless efforts of the community, become reality. The Editorial Board feel it is important to reflect the growing significance of this work in the scope. The new scope, drafted by Editor-in-Chief Professor Mark Allen, and approved by the Editorial Board, is as follows: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering covers all aspects of microelectromechanical structures, devices, and systems, as well as micromechanics and micromechatronics. The journal focuses on original work in fabrication and integration technologies, on the micro- and nano-scale. The journal aims to highlight the link between new fabrication technologies and their capacity to create novel devices. Original work in microengineering and nanoengineering is also reported. Such work is defined as applications of these fabrication and integration technologies to structures in which key attributes of the devices or systems depend on specific micro- or nano-scale features. Such applications span the physical, chemical, electrical and biological realms. New fabrication and integration techniques for both silicon and non-silicon materials are

  12. Superelement methods applications to micromechanics of high temperature metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, J. J.; Chamis, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    Adaptation of the superelement finite-element method for micromechanics of continuous fiber high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC) is described. The method is used to predict the thermomechanical behavior of P100-graphite/copper composites using MSC/NASTRAN and it is also used to validate those predicted by using an in-house computer program designed to perform micromechanics for HT-MMC. Typical results presented in the paper include unidirectional composite thermal properties, mechanical properties, and microstresses.

  13. A time-selective technique for free-field reciprocity calibration of condenser microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Jacobsen, Finn

    2003-01-01

    of the diffraction of the body of the microphone, and thus, its sensitivity will change. In the two cases, a technique based on the reciprocity theorem can be applied for obtaining the absolute sensitivity either under uniform pressure or free-field conditions. In this paper, signal-processing techniques...

  14. A note on determination of the diffuse-field sensitivity of microphones using the reciprocity technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Jacobsen, Finn

    2008-01-01

    angles of incidence but also on the accuracy of the frequency response at normal incidence. By contrast, this paper is concerned with determining the absolute diffuse-field response of a microphone using the reciprocity technique. To examine this possibility, a reciprocity calibration setup is used...

  15. MP.EXE, a Calculation Program for Pressure Reciprocity Calibration of Microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1998-01-01

    A computer program is described which calculates the pressure sensitivity of microphones based on measurements of the electrical transfer impedance in a reciprocity calibration set-up. The calculations are performed according to the International Standard IEC 6194-2. In addition a number of options...

  16. Free-field reciprocity calibration of laboratory standard (LS) microphones using a time selective technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador

    2006-01-01

    Although the basic principle of reciprocity calibration of microphones in a free field is simple, the practical problems are complicated due to the low signal-to-noise ratio and the influence of cross talk and reflections from the surroundings. The influence of uncorrelated noise can be reduced...

  17. Efficient voice activity detection in reverberant enclosures using far field microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petsatodis, Theodore; Boukis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    An algorithm suitable for voice activity detection under reverberant conditions is proposed in this paper. Due to the use of far-filed microphones the proposed solution processes speech signals of highly-varying intensity and signal to noise ratio, that are contaminated with several echoes. The c...

  18. Temperature compensated, humidity insensitive, high-Tg TOPAS FBGs for accelerometers and microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, W.; Markos, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest work on Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) in microstructured polymer optical fibers (mPOFs) and their application as strain sensing transducers in devices, such as accelerometers and microphones. We demonstrate how the cross-sensitivity of the FBG to temperature...

  19. Benefits of the Fiber Optic versus the Electret Microphone in Voice Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, Kyriaki; Fisher, Helene R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Voice disorders that result in reduced loudness may cause difficulty in communicating, socializing and participating in occupational activities. Amplification is often recommended in order to facilitate functional communication, reduce vocal load and avoid developing maladaptive compensatory behaviours. The most common microphone used…

  20. Calculation methods for the physical properties of air used in the calibration of microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Knud

    1997-01-01

    It is suggested that a mutual agreement be obtained among the European metrology laboratories on the procedure used to determine the acoustic properties of humid air when calibrating microphones and reporting the results. A unification of this procedure will ease the comparison of calibration res...... results among the various laboratories. The present report refers the background and presents a proposal for these procedures....

  1. On the influence of microphone array geometry on HRTF-based Sound Source Localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmani, Mojtaba; Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Tan, Zheng-Hua;

    2015-01-01

    . Furthermore, to demonstrate the analysis results, we show the impact of HRTFs similarities and microphone array geometry on an exemplary HRTF-based SSL algorithm, called MLSSL. This algorithm is well-suited for this purpose as it allows to estimate the Direction-of-Arrival (DoA) of the target sound using any...

  2. An investigation of methods for free-field comparison calibration of measurement microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera-Figueroa, Salvador; Moreno Pescador, Guillermo; Jacobsen, Finn

    2010-01-01

    method requires the sound field to have good temporal stability. The simultaneous method requires instead that the sound pressure is the same in the positions where the microphones are placed. In this paper the results of the application of the two methods are compared. A third combined method...

  3. Direct Measurement of the Speed of Sound Using a Microphone and a Speaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Tejedor, José A.; Castro-Palacio, Juan C.; Monsoriu, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple and accurate experiment to obtain the speed of sound in air using a conventional speaker and a microphone connected to a computer. A free open source digital audio editor and recording computer software application allows determination of the time-of-flight of the wave for different distances, from which the speed of sound is…

  4. Evaluation of Methods for In-Situ Calibration of Field-Deployable Microphone Phased Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M.; Lockard, David P.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Culliton, William G.; McSwain, Robert G.

    2017-01-01

    Current field-deployable microphone phased arrays for aeroacoustic flight testing require the placement of hundreds of individual sensors over a large area. Depending on the duration of the test campaign, the microphones may be required to stay deployed at the testing site for weeks or even months. This presents a challenge in regards to tracking the response (i.e., sensitivity) of the individual sensors as a function of time in order to evaluate the health of the array. To address this challenge, two different methods for in-situ tracking of microphone responses are described. The first relies on the use of an aerial sound source attached as a payload on a hovering small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) vehicle. The second relies on the use of individually excited ground-based sound sources strategically placed throughout the array pattern. Testing of the two methods was performed in microphone array deployments conducted at Fort A.P. Hill in 2015 and at Edwards Air Force Base in 2016. The results indicate that the drift in individual sensor responses can be tracked reasonably well using both methods. Thus, in-situ response tracking methods are useful as a diagnostic tool for monitoring the health of a phased array during long duration deployments.

  5. An analytical-numerical method for determining the mechanical response of a condenser microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homentcovschi, Dorel; Miles, Ronald N.

    2011-01-01

    The paper is based on determining the reaction pressure on the diaphragm of a condenser microphone by integrating numerically the frequency domain Stokes system describing the velocity and the pressure in the air domain beneath the diaphragm. Afterwards, the membrane displacement can be obtained analytically or numerically. The method is general and can be applied to any geometry of the backplate holes, slits, and backchamber. As examples, the method is applied to the Bruel & Kjaer (B&K) 4134 1/2-inch microphone determining the mechanical sensitivity and the mechano-thermal noise for a domain of frequencies and also the displacement field of the membrane for two specified frequencies. These elements compare well with the measured values published in the literature. Also a new design, completely micromachined (including the backvolume) of the B&K micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEM) 1/4-inch measurement microphone is proposed. It is shown that its mechanical performances are very similar to those of the B&K MEMS measurement microphone. PMID:22225026

  6. Ad Hoc Microphone Array Beamforming Using the Primal-Dual Method of Multipliers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavakoli, Vincent Mohammad; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Heusdens, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In the recent years, there have been increasing amount of researches aiming at optimal beamforming with ad hoc microphone arrays, mostly with fusion-based schemes. However, huge amount of computational complexity and communication overhead impede many of these algorithms from being useful...

  7. On Acoustic Feedback Cancellation Using Probe Noise in Multiple-Microphone and Single-Loudspeaker Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Elmedyb, Thomas Bo; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2012-01-01

    of the adaptive estimation is significantly decreased when keeping the steady-state error unchanged. The goal of this work is to derive analytic expressions for the system behavior such as convergence rate and steady-state error for a multiple-microphone and single-loudspeaker audio system, where the acoustic...

  8. A Micro-Machined Microphone Based on a Combination of Electret and Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kumjae; Jeon, Junsik; West, James Edward; Moon, Wonkyu

    2015-08-18

    Capacitive-type transduction is now widely used in MEMS microphones. However, its sensitivity decreases with reducing size, due to decreasing air gap capacitance. In the present study, we proposed and developed the Electret Gate of Field Effect Transistor (ElGoFET) transduction based on an electret and FET (field-effect-transistor) as a novel mechanism of MEMS microphone transduction. The ElGoFET transduction has the advantage that the sensitivity is dependent on the ratio of capacitance components in the transduction structure. Hence, ElGoFET transduction has high sensitivity even with a smaller air gap capacitance, due to a miniaturization of the transducer. A FET with a floating-gate electrode embedded on a membrane was designed and fabricated and an electret was fabricated by ion implantation with Ga(+) ions. During the assembly process between the FET and the electret, the operating point of the FET was characterized using the static response of the FET induced by the electric field due to the trapped positive charge at the electret. Additionally, we evaluated the microphone performance of the ElGoFET by measuring the acoustic response in air using a semi-anechoic room. The results confirmed that the proposed transduction mechanism has potential for microphone applications.

  9. 76 FR 4936 - Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Silicon Microphone Packages and Products Containing the Same; Notice of Commission Determination To Review in Part an Initial Determination; On Review Taking No Position on Two Issues...

  10. Pseudo-Coherence-Based MVDR Beamformer for Speech Enhancement with Ad Hoc Microphone Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavakoli, Vincent Mohammad; Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2015-01-01

    . This paper proposes minimum variance distortionless response filtering based on multichannel pseudo-coherence for speech enhancement with ad hoc microphone arrays. This method requires neither position information nor control of the trade-off used in the distortion weighted methods. Furthermore, certain...

  11. Spatial perception of sound fields recorded by spherical microphone arrays with varying spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Amir; Ahrens, Jens; Geier, Matthias; Spors, Sascha; Wierstorf, Hagen; Rafaely, Boaz

    2013-05-01

    The area of sound field synthesis has significantly advanced in the past decade, facilitated by the development of high-quality sound-field capturing and re-synthesis systems. Spherical microphone arrays are among the most recently developed systems for sound field capturing, enabling processing and analysis of three-dimensional sound fields in the spherical harmonics domain. In spite of these developments, a clear relation between sound fields recorded by spherical microphone arrays and their perception with a re-synthesis system has not yet been established, although some relation to scalar measures of spatial perception was recently presented. This paper presents an experimental study of spatial sound perception with the use of a spherical microphone array for sound recording and headphone-based binaural sound synthesis. Sound field analysis and processing is performed in the spherical harmonics domain with the use of head-related transfer functions and simulated enclosed sound fields. The effect of several factors, such as spherical harmonics order, frequency bandwidth, and spatial sampling, are investigated by applying the repertory grid technique to the results of the experiment, forming a clearer relation between sound-field capture with a spherical microphone array and its perception using binaural synthesis regarding space, frequency, and additional artifacts. The experimental study clearly shows that a source will be perceived more spatially sharp and more externalized when represented by a binaural stimuli reconstructed with a higher spherical harmonics order. This effect is apparent from low spherical harmonics orders. Spatial aliasing, as a result of sound field capturing with a finite number of microphones, introduces unpleasant artifacts which increased with the degree of aliasing error.

  12. Data dependent random forest applied to screening for laryngeal disorders through analysis of sustained phonation: acoustic versus contact microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verikas, A; Gelzinis, A; Vaiciukynas, E; Bacauskiene, M; Minelga, J; Hållander, M; Uloza, V; Padervinskis, E

    2015-02-01

    Comprehensive evaluation of results obtained using acoustic and contact microphones in screening for laryngeal disorders through analysis of sustained phonation is the main objective of this study. Aiming to obtain a versatile characterization of voice samples recorded using microphones of both types, 14 different sets of features are extracted and used to build an accurate classifier to distinguish between normal and pathological cases. We propose a new, data dependent random forests-based, way to combine information available from the different feature sets. An approach to exploring data and decisions made by a random forest is also presented. Experimental investigations using a mixed gender database of 273 subjects have shown that the perceptual linear predictive cepstral coefficients (PLPCC) was the best feature set for both microphones. However, the linear predictive coefficients (LPC) and linear predictive cosine transform coefficients (LPCTC) exhibited good performance in the acoustic microphone case only. Models designed using the acoustic microphone data significantly outperformed the ones built using data recorded by the contact microphone. The contact microphone did not bring any additional information useful for the classification. The proposed data dependent random forest significantly outperformed the traditional random forest.

  13. Evaluation of two thermal neutron detection units consisting of ZnS/${}^6$LiF scintillating layers with embedded WLS fibers read out with a SiPM

    CERN Document Server

    Mosset, J -B; Greuter, U; Hildebrandt, M; Schlumpf, N; Van Swygenhoven, H

    2014-01-01

    Two single channel detection units for thermal neutron detection are investigated in a neutron beam. They consist of two ZnS/${}^6$LiF scintillating layers sandwiching an array of WLS fibers. The pattern of this units can be repeated laterally and vertically in order to build up a one dimensional position sensitive multi-channel detector with the needed sensitive surface and with the required neutron absorption probability. The originality of this work arises from the fact that the WLS fibers are read out with SiPMs instead of the traditionally used PMTs or MaPMTs. The signal processing system is based on a photon counting approach. For SiPMs with a dark count rate as high as 0.7 MHz, a trigger efficiency of 80% is achieved together with a system background rate lower than ${10}^{-3}$ Hz and a dead time of 30 $\\mu$s. No change of performance is observed for neutron count rates of up to 3.6 kHz.

  14. A numerical study of the random-incidence and diffuse-field sensitivity of laboratory standard microphones using BEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Henriquez, Vicente Cutanda; Jacobsen, Finn

    2006-01-01

    The difference between the random-incidence sensitivity of a microphone and the diffusefield sensitivity is that according to the definition of the former, plane waves coming from different angles of incidence impinge successively onto the microphone under free-field conditions, whereas according...... to the definition of the latter, a number of plane waves coming from random directions and having random phases impinge simultaneously upon the microphone. The random-incidence sensitivity can be estimated using measurements made in an anechoic chamber, while the diffuse-field sensitivity requires a reverberation...

  15. Resonantly driven micromechanical energy converters; Resonante mikromechanische Energiewandler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehne, Ingo

    2009-07-01

    This work focuses on the investigation of resonantly driven micromechanical energy harvesters. They are based on electromechanically coupled spring-mass-systems, converting mechanical vibrations into electrical energy by employing appropriate physical transduction mechanisms, such as the inductive, the piezoelectric and the capacitive principle. These three approaches are compared to each other, especially with respect to electrical energy density, scaling behaviour and microtechnological fabricability. Theoretical considerations lead to the decision to implement both a capacitive and a piezoelectric micromechanical energy harvester. The capacitive energy transducer essentially consists of a mass suspended by silicon springs. This mass simultaneously serves as a movable electrode. A fixed counter electrode completes the variable capacitor. In order to function properly, the parallel-plate capacitor needs to be biased electrically. In contrast to existing state of the art a new approach is introduced, employing two different electrode materials with a large difference in their work functions. A periodical mechanical excitation leads to a variation of the electrical energy content within the biased capacitor, thus inducing a current flow, which can be used for driving an external electrical load. For the piezoelectric energy harvester, the concept of a piezoelectric diaphragm with a mass attached to the surface was used and devices were implemented. A mechanical excitation leads to a periodic deflection of the diaphragm caused by the stiffly coupled inertial mass and, thus, to a changing mechanical stress distribution within the diaphragm. This, in turn, induces a periodic charge separation within the piezoelectric diaphragm. The energy generated in this way can be consumed by an external electrical load with appropriate impedance matching. Theoretical model descriptions are established for both types of energy harvesters based on systems of state space equations. On

  16. Micromechanics of Seismic Wave Propagation in Granular Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Kurt Toshimi

    1992-09-01

    This thesis investigates the details of seismic wave propagation in granular rocks by examining the micromechanical processes which take place at the grain level. Grain contacts are identified as the primary sites of attenuation in dry and fluid-saturated rocks. In many sedimentary rocks such as sandstones and limestones, the process of diagenesis leaves the grains only partially cemented together. When viewed at the micron scale, grain contacts are non-welded interfaces similar in nature to large scale joints and faults. Using a lumped properties approximation, the macroscopic properties of partially cemented grain contacts are modeled using a displacement-discontinuity boundary condition. This model is used to estimate the magnitude and the frequency dependence of the grain contact scattering attenuation for an idealized grain packing geometry. Ultrasonic P- and S-wave group velocity and attenuation measurements on sintered glass beads, alundum, and Berea sandstones were performed to determine the effects of stress, frequency, and pore fluid properties in granular materials with sintered and partially sintered grain contacts. P - and S-wave attenuation displayed the same overall trends for tests with n-decane, water, silicone oil, and glycerol. The magnitudes of the attenuation coefficients were, in general, higher for S-waves. The experimental measurements reveal that viscosity-dependent attenuation dominates in material with sintered grain contacts. Viscosity-dependent attenuation is also observed in Berea sandstone but only at hydrostatic stresses in excess of 15 MPa where the grain contacts are highly stiffened. Fluid surface chemistry-related attenuation was observed in Berea sandstone loaded uniaxially. These measurements suggest that attenuation in fluid-saturated rocks with partially cemented grain contacts is dependent on both the fluid properties and the state of stress at the grain contacts. A numerical method for simulating seismic wave propagation in

  17. An integrated micromechanical large particle in flow sorter (MILPIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Skommer, Joanna; Friedrich, Timo; Kaslin, Jan; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2015-06-01

    At present, the major hurdle to widespread deployment of zebrafish embryo and larvae in large-scale drug development projects is lack of enabling high-throughput analytical platforms. In order to spearhead drug discovery with the use of zebrafish as a model, platforms need to integrate automated pre-test sorting of organisms (to ensure quality control and standardization) and their in-test positioning (suitable for high-content imaging) with modules for flexible drug delivery. The major obstacle hampering sorting of millimetre sized particles such as zebrafish embryos on chip-based devices is their substantial diameter (above one millimetre), mass (above one milligram), which both lead to rapid gravitational-induced sedimentation and high inertial forces. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present an innovative design of a micromechanical large particle in-flow sorter (MILPIS) capable of analysing, sorting and dispensing living zebrafish embryos for drug discovery applications. The system consisted of a microfluidic network, revolving micromechanical receptacle actuated by robotic servomotor and opto-electronic sensing module. The prototypes were fabricated in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. Elements of MILPIS were also fabricated in an optically transparent VisiJet resin using 3D stereolithography (SLA) processes (ProJet 7000HD, 3D Systems). The device operation was based on a rapidly revolving miniaturized mechanical receptacle. The latter function was to hold and position individual fish embryos for (i) interrogation, (ii) sorting decision-making and (iii) physical sorting..The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers embedded in the system

  18. Micro-mechanical modeling of the cement-bone interface: the effect of friction morphology and material properties on the micromechanical response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dennis; Mann, Kenneth A.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In order to gain insight into the micro-mechanical behavior of the cement–bone interface, the effect of parametric variations of frictional, morphological and material properties on the mechanical response of the cement–bone interface were analyzed using a finite element approach. Finite element

  19. Development of a Microphone Phased Array Capability for the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, William M.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Bahr, Christopher J.; Spalt, Taylor B.; Bartram, Scott M.; Culliton, William G.; Becker, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    A new aeroacoustic measurement capability has been developed for use in open-jet testing in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel (14x22 tunnel). A suite of instruments has been developed to characterize noise source strengths, locations, and directivity for both semi-span and full-span test articles in the facility. The primary instrument of the suite is a fully traversable microphone phased array for identification of noise source locations and strengths on models. The array can be mounted in the ceiling or on either side of the facility test section to accommodate various test article configurations. Complementing the phased array is an ensemble of streamwise traversing microphones that can be placed around the test section at defined locations to conduct noise source directivity studies along both flyover and sideline axes. A customized data acquisition system has been developed for the instrumentation suite that allows for command and control of all aspects of the array and microphone hardware, and is coupled with a comprehensive data reduction system to generate information in near real time. This information includes such items as time histories and spectral data for individual microphones and groups of microphones, contour presentations of noise source locations and strengths, and hemispherical directivity data. The data acquisition system integrates with the 14x22 tunnel data system to allow real time capture of facility parameters during acquisition of microphone data. The design of the phased array system has been vetted via a theoretical performance analysis based on conventional monopole beamforming and DAMAS deconvolution. The performance analysis provides the ability to compute figures of merit for the array as well as characterize factors such as beamwidths, sidelobe levels, and source discrimination for the types of noise sources anticipated in the 14x22 tunnel. The full paper will summarize in detail the design of the instrumentation

  20. High-Fidelity Micromechanics Model Enhanced for Multiphase Particulate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Arnold, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    This 3-year effort involves the development of a comprehensive micromechanics model and a related computer code, capable of accurately estimating both the average response and the local stress and strain fields in the individual phases, assuming both elastic and inelastic behavior. During the first year (fiscal year 2001) of the investigation, a version of the model called the High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells (HFGMC) was successfully completed for the thermo-inelastic response of continuously reinforced multiphased materials with arbitrary periodic microstructures (refs. 1 and 2). The model s excellent predictive capability for both the macroscopic response and the microlevel stress and strain fields was demonstrated through comparison with exact analytical and finite element solutions. This year, HFGMC was further extended in two technologically significant ways. The first enhancement entailed the incorporation of fiber/matrix debonding capability into the two-dimensional version of HFGMC for modeling the response of unidirectionally reinforced composites such as titanium matrix composites, which exhibit poor fiber/matrix bond. Comparison with experimental data validated the model s predictive capability. The second enhancement entailed further generalization of HFGMC to three dimensions to enable modeling the response of particulate-reinforced (discontinuous) composites in the elastic material behavior domain. Next year, the three-dimensional version will be generalized to encompass inelastic effects due to plasticity, viscoplasticity, and damage, as well as coupled electromagnetothermomechanical (including piezoelectric) effects.

  1. Micromechanical Characterization of Polysilicon Films through On-Chip Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mirzazadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available When the dimensions of polycrystalline structures become comparable to the average grain size, some reliability issues can be reported for the moving parts of inertial microelectromechanical systems (MEMS. Not only the overall behavior of the device turns out to be affected by a large scattering, but also the sensitivity to imperfections gets enhanced. In this work, through on-chip tests, we experimentally investigate the behavior of thin polysilicon samples using standard electrostatic actuation/sensing. The discrepancy between the target and actual responses of each sample has then been exploited to identify: (i the overall stiffness of the film and, according to standard continuum elasticity, a morphology-based value of its Young’s modulus; (ii the relevant over-etch induced by the fabrication process. To properly account for the aforementioned stochastic features at the micro-scale, the identification procedure has been based on particle filtering. A simple analytical reduced-order model of the moving structure has been also developed to account for the nonlinearities in the electrical field, up to pull-in. Results are reported for a set of ten film samples of constant slenderness, and the effects of different actuation mechanisms on the identified micromechanical features are thoroughly discussed.

  2. Fibrous tissues growth and remodeling: Evolutionary micro-mechanical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanir, Yoram

    2017-10-01

    Living fibrous tissues are composite materials having the unique ability to adapt their size, shape, structure and mechanical properties in response to external loading. This adaptation, termed growth and remodeling (G&R), occurs throughout life and is achieved via cell-induced turnover of tissue constituents where some are degraded and new ones are produced. Realistic mathematical modeling of G&R provides insight into the basic processes, allows for hypotheses testing, and constitutes an essential tool for establishing clinical thresholds of pathological remodeling and for the production of tissue substitutes aimed to achieve target structure and properties. In this study, a general 3D micro-mechanical multi-scale theory of G&R in fibrous tissue was developed which connects between the evolution of the tissue structure and properties, and the underlying mechano-biological turnover events of its constituents. This structural approach circumvents a fundamental obstacle in modeling growth mechanics since the growth motion is not bijective. The model was realized for a flat tissue under two biaxial external loadings using data-based parameter values. The predictions show close similarity to characteristics of remodeled adult tissue including its structure, anisotropic and non-linear mechanical properties, and the onset of in situ pre-strain and pre-stress. The results suggest that these important features of living fibrous tissues evolve as they grow.

  3. Active microrheology of a model of the nuclear micromechanical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Henry; Kilfoil, Maria

    2014-03-01

    In order to successfully complete the final stages of chromosome segregation, eukaryotic cells require the motor enzyme topoisomerase II, which can resolve topological constraints between entangled strands of duplex DNA. We created an in vitro model of a close approximation of the nuclear micromechanical environment in terms of DNA mass and entanglement density, and investigated the influence of this motor enzyme on the DNA mechanics. Topoisomerase II is a non-processive ATPase which we found significantly increases the motions of embedded microspheres in the DNA network. Because of this activity, we study the mechanical properties of our model system by active microrheology by optical trapping. We test the limits of fluctuation dissipation theorem (FDT) under this type of activity by comparing the active microrheology to passive measurements, where thermal motion alone drives the beads. We can relate any departure from FDT to the timescale of topoisomerase II activity in the DNA network. These experiments provide insight into the physical necessity of this motor enzyme in the cell.

  4. Hybrid circuit cavity quantum electrodynamics with a micromechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkkalainen, J-M; Cho, S U; Li, Jian; Paraoanu, G S; Hakonen, P J; Sillanpää, M A

    2013-02-14

    Hybrid quantum systems with inherently distinct degrees of freedom have a key role in many physical phenomena. Well-known examples include cavity quantum electrodynamics, trapped ions, and electrons and phonons in the solid state. In those systems, strong coupling makes the constituents lose their individual character and form dressed states, which represent a collective form of dynamics. As well as having fundamental importance, hybrid systems also have practical applications, notably in the emerging field of quantum information control. A promising approach is to combine long-lived atomic states with the accessible electrical degrees of freedom in superconducting cavities and quantum bits (qubits). Here we integrate circuit cavity quantum electrodynamics with phonons. Apart from coupling to a microwave cavity, our superconducting transmon qubit, consisting of tunnel junctions and a capacitor, interacts with a phonon mode in a micromechanical resonator, and thus acts like an atom coupled to two different cavities. We measure the phonon Stark shift, as well as the splitting of the qubit spectral line into motional sidebands, which feature transitions between the dressed electromechanical states. In the time domain, we observe coherent conversion of qubit excitation to phonons as sideband Rabi oscillations. This is a model system with potential for a quantum interface, which may allow for storage of quantum information in long-lived phonon states, coupling to optical photons or for investigations of strongly coupled quantum systems near the classical limit.

  5. Micromechanical study of protein-DNA interactions and chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    I will discuss micromechanics experiments that our group has used to analyze protein-DNA interactions and chromosome organization. In single-DNA experiments we have found that a feature of protein-DNA complexes is that their dissociation rates can depend strikingly on bulk solution concentrations of other proteins and DNA segments; I will describe experiments which demonstrate this effect, which can involve tens-fold changes in off-rates with submicromolar changes in solution concentrations. Second, I will discuss experiments aimed at analyzing large-scale human chromosome structure; we isolate metaphase chromosomes, which in their native form behave as remarkably elastic networks of chromatin. Exposure to DNA-cutting restriction enzymes completely eliminates this elasticity, indicating that there is not a mechanically contiguous protein ''scaffold'' from which the chromosome gains its stability. I will show results of siRNA experiments indicating that depletion of condensin proteins leads to destabilization of chromosome mechanics, indicating condensin's role as the major chromatin ''cross-linker'' in metaphase chromosomes. Finally I will discuss similar experiments on human G1 nuclei, where we use genetic and chemical modifications to separate the contributions of the nuclear lamina and chromatin to the mechanical stiffness of the nucleus as a whole. Supported by the NSF (DMR-1206868, MCB-1022117) and the NIH (GM105847, CA193419).

  6. Micromechanical Characterization of Polysilicon Films through On-Chip Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzazadeh, Ramin; Eftekhar Azam, Saeed; Mariani, Stefano

    2016-07-28

    When the dimensions of polycrystalline structures become comparable to the average grain size, some reliability issues can be reported for the moving parts of inertial microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Not only the overall behavior of the device turns out to be affected by a large scattering, but also the sensitivity to imperfections gets enhanced. In this work, through on-chip tests, we experimentally investigate the behavior of thin polysilicon samples using standard electrostatic actuation/sensing. The discrepancy between the target and actual responses of each sample has then been exploited to identify: (i) the overall stiffness of the film and, according to standard continuum elasticity, a morphology-based value of its Young's modulus; (ii) the relevant over-etch induced by the fabrication process. To properly account for the aforementioned stochastic features at the micro-scale, the identification procedure has been based on particle filtering. A simple analytical reduced-order model of the moving structure has been also developed to account for the nonlinearities in the electrical field, up to pull-in. Results are reported for a set of ten film samples of constant slenderness, and the effects of different actuation mechanisms on the identified micromechanical features are thoroughly discussed.

  7. Failure Criterion for Brick Masonry: A Micro-Mechanics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawa Marek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the formulation of failure criterion for an in-plane loaded masonry. Using micro-mechanics approach the strength estimation for masonry microstructure with constituents obeying the Drucker-Prager criterion is determined numerically. The procedure invokes lower bound analysis: for assumed stress fields constructed within masonry periodic cell critical load is obtained as a solution of constrained optimization problem. The analysis is carried out for many different loading conditions at different orientations of bed joints. The performance of the approach is verified against solutions obtained for corresponding layered and block microstructures, which provides the upper and lower strength bounds for masonry microstructure, respectively. Subsequently, a phenomenological anisotropic strength criterion for masonry microstructure is proposed. The criterion has a form of conjunction of Jaeger critical plane condition and Tsai-Wu criterion. The model proposed is identified based on the fitting of numerical results obtained from the microstructural analysis. Identified criterion is then verified against results obtained for different loading orientations. It appears that strength of masonry microstructure can be satisfactorily described by the criterion proposed.

  8. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yue; Wang, Linbing; Wang, Dawei; Guo, Meng; Liu, Pengfei; Yu, Jianxin

    2017-02-21

    Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD) Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance.

  9. Characterization of Bitumen Micro-Mechanical Behaviors Using AFM, Phase Dynamics Theory and MD Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental understanding of micro-mechanical behaviors in bitumen, including phase separation, micro-friction, micro-abrasion, etc., can help the pavement engineers better understand the bitumen mechanical performances at macroscale. Recent researches show that the microstructure evolution in bitumen will directly affect its surface structure and micro-mechanical performance. In this study, the bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behaviors are studied using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM experiments, Phase Dynamics Theory and Molecular Dynamics (MD Simulation. The AFM experiment results show that different phase-structure will occur at the surface of the bitumen samples under certain thermodynamic conditions at microscale. The phenomenon can be explained using the phase dynamics theory, where the effects of stability parameter and temperature on bitumen microstructure and micro-mechanical behavior are studied combined with MD Simulation. Simulation results show that the saturates phase, in contrast to the naphthene aromatics phase, plays a major role in bitumen micro-mechanical behavior. A high stress zone occurs at the interface between the saturates phase and the naphthene aromatics phase, which may form discontinuities that further affect the bitumen frictional performance.

  10. Optimal design of an electret microphone metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor preamplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Donk, A G; Bergveld, P

    1992-04-01

    A theoretical noise analysis of the combination of a capacitive microphone and a preamplifier containing a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) and a high-value resistive bias element is given. It is found that the output signal-to-noise ratio for a source follower and for a common-source circuit is almost the same. It is also shown that the output noise can be reduced by making the microphone capacitance as well as the bias resistor as large as possible, and furthermore by keeping the parasitic gate capacitances as low as possible and finally by using an optimum value for the gate area of the MOSFET. The main noise source is the thermal noise of the gate leakage resistance of the MOSFET. It is also shown that short-channel MOSFETs produce more thermal channel noise than longer channel devices.

  11. Development of microphone leak detection technology in Fugen Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimanskiy, Sergey; Iijima, Takashi; Naoi, Yosuke [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Fugen Nuclear Power Station, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    A method of leak detection, based on high-temperature resistant microphones, was originally developed in JNC to detect leakages with flow rates from 1 m{sup 3}/h to 500 m{sup 3}/h. The development performed in Fugen and reported here focuses on detection of a small leakage at an early stage by the same microphone method. Specifically, for the inlet feeder pipes the leak rate of 0.2 gpm (0.046 m{sup 3}/h) has been chosen as the target detection capability. Evaluation of detection sensitivity and leak localization accuracy was conducted based on various analysis methods in order to check the capability of the method to satisfy this requirement. The possibility of detecting and locating a small leakage has been demonstrated through the research. The probabilistic detection algorithm and multi-channel location-based detection are proposed in order to improve both the detection sensitivity and the localization accuracy. (author)

  12. A Two-Microphone Noise Reduction System for Cochlear Implant Users with Nearby Microphones—Part II: Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Häusler

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Users of cochlear implants (auditory aids, which stimulate the auditory nerve electrically at the inner ear often suffer from poor speech understanding in noise. We evaluate a small (intermicrophone distance 7 mm and computationally inexpensive adaptive noise reduction system suitable for behind-the-ear cochlear implant speech processors. The system is evaluated in simulated and real, anechoic and reverberant environments. Results from simulations show improvements of 3.4 to 9.3 dB in signal to noise ratio for rooms with realistic reverberation and more than 18 dB under anechoic conditions. Speech understanding in noise is measured in 6 adult cochlear implant users in a reverberant room, showing average improvements of 7.9–9.6 dB, when compared to a single omnidirectional microphone or 1.3–5.6 dB, when compared to a simple directional two-microphone device. Subjective evaluation in a cafeteria at lunchtime shows a preference of the cochlear implant users for the evaluated device in terms of speech understanding and sound quality.

  13. Precision Measurements of Wind Turbine Noise using a Large Aperture Microphone Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bradley, Stuart; Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Hünerbein, Sabine Von;

    2016-01-01

    -of-flight at each microphone). An experiment was also run recording the sound from a continuous tone speaker mounted near the tip of a turbine blade, allowing testing of signal processing to correct for the very substantial Doppler shift. These various experiments are targeted at obtaining very high spatial...... and temporal resolution acoustic images of the sound emitted from turbine blades. An overview of some of the first results from this work will be given....

  14. Assessment of Operational Progress of NASA Langley Developed Windshield and Microphone for Infrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    polyurethane foam windshields. Some researchers suggest that closed-cell foam windshields, at infrasound frequencies, sound should pass through the...very large, so the two most popular approaches are radial lengths of porous soaker hose dispersed on the ground or large grids of pipe arrays...from reaching the microphone. The closed-cell polyurethane foam used in Shams et al. (2) had a density of 128.1 kg/m3, which is commercially

  15. Microphone Handling Noise: Measurements of Perceptual Threshold and Effects on Audio Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Kendrick

    Full Text Available A psychoacoustic experiment was carried out to test the effects of microphone handling noise on perceived audio quality. Handling noise is a problem affecting both amateurs using their smartphones and cameras, as well as professionals using separate microphones and digital recorders. The noises used for the tests were measured from a variety of devices, including smartphones, laptops and handheld microphones. The signal features that characterise these noises are analysed and presented. The sounds include various types of transient, impact noises created by tapping or knocking devices, as well as more sustained sounds caused by rubbing. During the perceptual tests, listeners auditioned speech podcasts and were asked to rate the degradation of any unwanted sounds they heard. A representative design test methodology was developed that tried to encourage everyday rather than analytical listening. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR of the handling noise events was shown to be the best predictor of quality degradation. Other factors such as noise type or background noise in the listening environment did not significantly affect quality ratings. Podcast, microphone type and reproduction equipment were found to be significant but only to a small extent. A model allowing the prediction of degradation from the SNR is presented. The SNR threshold at which 50% of subjects noticed handling noise was found to be 4.2 ± 0.6 dBA. The results from this work are important for the understanding of our perception of impact sound and resonant noises in recordings, and will inform the future development of an automated predictor of quality for handling noise.

  16. Microphonics detuning compensation in 3.9 GHZ superconducting RF cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruben Carcagno et al.

    2003-10-20

    Mechanical vibrations can detune superconducting radio frequency (SCRF) cavities unless a tuning mechanism counteracting the vibrations is present. Due to their narrow operating bandwidth and demanding mechanical structure, the 13-cell 3.9GHz SCRF cavities for the Charged Kaons at Main Injector (CKM) experiment at Fermilab are especially susceptible to this microphonic phenomena. We present early results correlating RF frequency detuning with cavity vibration measurements for CKM cavities; initial detuning compensation results with piezoelectric actuators are also presented.

  17. A dynamic multi-channel speech enhancement system for distributed microphones in a car environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheja, Timo; Buck, Markus; Fingscheidt, Tim

    2013-12-01

    Supporting multiple active speakers in automotive hands-free or speech dialog applications is an interesting issue not least due to comfort reasons. Therefore, a multi-channel system for enhancement of speech signals captured by distributed distant microphones in a car environment is presented. Each of the potential speakers in the car has a dedicated directional microphone close to his position that captures the corresponding speech signal. The aim of the resulting overall system is twofold: On the one hand, a combination of an arbitrary pre-defined subset of speakers' signals can be performed, e.g., to create an output signal in a hands-free telephone conference call for a far-end communication partner. On the other hand, annoying cross-talk components from interfering sound sources occurring in multiple different mixed output signals are to be eliminated, motivated by the possibility of other hands-free applications being active in parallel. The system includes several signal processing stages. A dedicated signal processing block for interfering speaker cancellation attenuates the cross-talk components of undesired speech. Further signal enhancement comprises the reduction of residual cross-talk and background noise. Subsequently, a dynamic signal combination stage merges the processed single-microphone signals to obtain appropriate mixed signals at the system output that may be passed to applications such as telephony or a speech dialog system. Based on signal power ratios between the particular microphone signals, an appropriate speaker activity detection and therewith a robust control mechanism of the whole system is presented. The proposed system may be dynamically configured and has been evaluated for a car setup with four speakers sitting in the car cabin disturbed in various noise conditions.

  18. Identifying Microphone from Noisy Recordings by Using Representative Instance One Class-Classification Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Huy Quan Vu; Shaowu Liu; Xinghua Yang; Zhi Li; Yongli Ren

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth of technical developments has created huge challenges for microphone forensics - a sub-category of audio forensic science, because of the availability of numerous digital recording devices and massive amount of recording data. Demand for fast and efficient methods to assure integrity and authenticity of information is becoming more and more important in criminal investigation nowadays. Machine learning has emerged as an important technique to support audio analysis processes of m...

  19. Dual-microphone and binaural noise reduction techniques for improved speech intelligibility by hearing aid users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefian Jazi, Nima

    Spatial filtering and directional discrimination has been shown to be an effective pre-processing approach for noise reduction in microphone array systems. In dual-microphone hearing aids, fixed and adaptive beamforming techniques are the most common solutions for enhancing the desired speech and rejecting unwanted signals captured by the microphones. In fact, beamformers are widely utilized in systems where spatial properties of target source (usually in front of the listener) is assumed to be known. In this dissertation, some dual-microphone coherence-based speech enhancement techniques applicable to hearing aids are proposed. All proposed algorithms operate in the frequency domain and (like traditional beamforming techniques) are purely based on the spatial properties of the desired speech source and does not require any knowledge of noise statistics for calculating the noise reduction filter. This benefit gives our algorithms the ability to address adverse noise conditions, such as situations where interfering talker(s) speaks simultaneously with the target speaker. In such cases, the (adaptive) beamformers lose their effectiveness in suppressing interference, since the noise channel (reference) cannot be built and updated accordingly. This difference is the main advantage of the proposed techniques in the dissertation over traditional adaptive beamformers. Furthermore, since the suggested algorithms are independent of noise estimation, they offer significant improvement in scenarios that the power level of interfering sources are much more than that of target speech. The dissertation also shows the premise behind the proposed algorithms can be extended and employed to binaural hearing aids. The main purpose of the investigated techniques is to enhance the intelligibility level of speech, measured through subjective listening tests with normal hearing and cochlear implant listeners. However, the improvement in quality of the output speech achieved by the

  20. Microphone Handling Noise: Measurements of Perceptual Threshold and Effects on Audio Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, Paul; Jackson, Iain R; Fazenda, Bruno M; Cox, Trevor J; Li, Francis F

    2015-01-01

    A psychoacoustic experiment was carried out to test the effects of microphone handling noise on perceived audio quality. Handling noise is a problem affecting both amateurs using their smartphones and cameras, as well as professionals using separate microphones and digital recorders. The noises used for the tests were measured from a variety of devices, including smartphones, laptops and handheld microphones. The signal features that characterise these noises are analysed and presented. The sounds include various types of transient, impact noises created by tapping or knocking devices, as well as more sustained sounds caused by rubbing. During the perceptual tests, listeners auditioned speech podcasts and were asked to rate the degradation of any unwanted sounds they heard. A representative design test methodology was developed that tried to encourage everyday rather than analytical listening. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the handling noise events was shown to be the best predictor of quality degradation. Other factors such as noise type or background noise in the listening environment did not significantly affect quality ratings. Podcast, microphone type and reproduction equipment were found to be significant but only to a small extent. A model allowing the prediction of degradation from the SNR is presented. The SNR threshold at which 50% of subjects noticed handling noise was found to be 4.2 ± 0.6 dBA. The results from this work are important for the understanding of our perception of impact sound and resonant noises in recordings, and will inform the future development of an automated predictor of quality for handling noise.

  1. Optimization of Fixed Microphone Array in High Speed Train Noises Identification Based on Far-Field Acoustic Holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujia Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustical holography has been widely applied for noise sources location and sound field measurement. Performance of the microphones array directly determines the sound source recognition method. Therefore, research is very important to the performance of the microphone array, its array of applications, selection, and how to design instructive. In this paper, based on acoustic holography moving sound source identification theory, the optimization method is applied in design of the microphone array, we select the main side lobe ratio and the main lobe area as the optimization objective function and then put the optimization method use in the sound source identification based on holography, and finally we designed this paper to optimize microphone array and compare the original array of equally spaced array with optimization results; by analyzing the optimization results and objectives, we get that the array can be achieved which is optimized not only to reduce the microphone but also to change objective function results, while improving the far-field acoustic holography resolving effect. Validation experiments have showed that the optimization method is suitable for high speed trains sound source identification microphone array optimization.

  2. Identification of impact force acting on composite laminated plates using the radiated sound measured with microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atobe, Satoshi; Nonami, Shunsuke; Hu, Ning; Fukunaga, Hisao

    2017-09-01

    Foreign object impact events are serious threats to composite laminates because impact damage leads to significant degradation of the mechanical properties of the structure. Identification of the location and force history of the impact that was applied to the structure can provide useful information for assessing the structural integrity. This study proposes a method for identifying impact forces acting on CFRP (carbon fiber reinforced plastic) laminated plates on the basis of the sound radiated from the impacted structure. Identification of the impact location and force history is performed using the sound pressure measured with microphones. To devise a method for identifying the impact location from the difference in the arrival times of the sound wave detected with the microphones, the propagation path of the sound wave from the impacted point to the sensor is examined. For the identification of the force history, an experimentally constructed transfer matrix is employed to relate the force history to the corresponding sound pressure. To verify the validity of the proposed method, impact tests are conducted by using a CFRP cross-ply laminate as the specimen, and an impulse hammer as the impactor. The experimental results confirm the validity of the present method for identifying the impact location from the arrival time of the sound wave detected with the microphones. Moreover, the results of force history identification show the feasibility of identifying the force history accurately from the measured sound pressure using the experimental transfer matrix.

  3. Speech Recognition for Environmental Control: Effect of Microphone Type, Dysarthria, and Severity on Recognition Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fager, Susan Koch; Burnfield, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the use of commercially available automatic speech recognition (ASR) across microphone options as access to environmental control for individuals with and without dysarthria. A study of two groups of speakers (typical speech and dysarthria), was conducted to understand their performance using ASR and various microphones for environmental control. Specifically, dependent variables examined included attempts per command, recognition accuracy, frequency of error type, and perceived workload. A further sub-analysis of the group of participants with dysarthria examined the impact of severity. Results indicated a significantly larger number of attempts were required (P = 0.007), and significantly lower recognition accuracies were achieved by the dysarthric participants (P = 0.010). A sub-analysis examining severity demonstrated no significant differences between the typical speakers and participants with mild dysarthria. However, significant differences were evident (P = 0.007, P = 0.008) between mild and moderate-severe dysarthric participants. No significant differences existed across microphones. A higher frequency of threshold errors occurred for typical participants and no response errors for moderate-severe dysarthrics. There were no significant differences on the NASA Task Load Index.

  4. Comparisons of spectral characteristics of wind noise between omnidirectional and directional microphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, King

    2012-06-01

    Wind noise reduction is a topic of ongoing research and development for hearing aids and cochlear implants. The purposes of this study were to examine spectral characteristics of wind noise generated by directional (DIR) and omnidirectional (OMNI) microphones on different styles of hearing aids and to derive wind noise reduction strategies. Three digital hearing aids (BTE, ITE, and ITC) were fitted to Knowles Electronic Manikin for Acoustic Research. They were programmed to have linear amplification and matching frequency responses between the DIR and OMNI modes. Flow noise recordings were made from 0° to 360° azimuths at flow velocities of 4.5, 9.0, and 13.5 m/s in a quiet wind tunnel. Noise levels were analyzed in one-third octave bands from 100 to 8000 Hz. Comparison of wind noise revealed that DIR generally produced higher noise levels than OMNI for all hearing aids, but it could result in lower levels than OMNI at some frequencies and head angles. Wind noise reduction algorithms can be designed to detect noise levels of DIR and OMNI outputs in each frequency channel, remove the constraint to switch to OMNI in low-frequency channel(s) only, and adopt the microphone mode with lower noise levels to take advantage of the microphone differences.

  5. Analytical modeling of squeeze air film damping of biomimetic MEMS directional microphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishfaque, Asif; Kim, Byungki

    2016-08-01

    Squeeze air film damping is introduced in microelectromechanical systems due to the motion of the fluid between two closely spaced oscillating micro-structures. The literature is abundant with different analytical models to address the squeeze air film damping effects, however, there is a lack of work in modeling the practical sensors like directional microphones. Here, we derive an analytical model of squeeze air film damping of first two fundamental vibration modes, namely, rocking and bending modes, of a directional microphone inspired from the fly Ormia ochracea's ear anatomy. A modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects is used in the analysis. Pressure distribution under the vibrating diaphragm is derived by using Green's function. From mathematical modeling of the fly's inspired mechanical model, we infer that bringing the damping ratios of both modes in the critical damping range enhance the directional sensitivity cues. The microphone parameters are varied in derived damping formulas to bring the damping ratios in the vicinity of critical damping, and to show the usefulness of the analytical model in tuning the damping ratios of both modes. The accuracy of analytical damping results are also verified by finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS. The FEM results are in full compliance with the analytical results.

  6. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  7. Micromechanics of rock deformation and failure (Louis Néel Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teng-Fong

    2010-05-01

    Naturally deformed rocks and their microstructures provide some of the most useful data for the reconstruction of tectonic evolution. A physically based inference of the operative deformation mechanism and failure mode from such data hinges upon a fundamental understanding of the microstructures induced in samples deformed in the laboratory under controlled conditions. As a field of mechanics that explicitly takes into account the microstructure of a material, micromechanics is linked dynamically to advances in imaging technology, that continues to refine the quantitative characterization of geometric attributes of microstructure and to elucidate the micromechanics of damage evolution. For a porous rock, such imaging techniques together with acoustic emission observations can now provide a fairly comprehensive description of the geometry of the pore space, as well as the density and connectivity of microcracks and equant pores. These microstructural data provide critical constraints on models that strive to capture the micromechanical processes and thus arrive at constitutive relations that describe the inelastic and failure behaviors as observed in the laboratory. Based on concepts of elasticity, plasticity and fracture mechanics, a number of micromechanical models (such as the sliding wing crack, Hertzian fracture, plastic and cataclastic pore collapse) help identify the key microstructural parameters involved and provide important insights into the deformation and failure mechanisms associated with a number of processes related to the development of brittle faulting, shear localization, cataclastic flow and compaction localization. These micromechanical processes typically involve damage evolution that is spatially heterogeneous, the complexity of which can potentially be probed in some details now by numerical simulation. Furthermore, these micromechanical models can provide useful constraints on the evolutions of porosity and permeability, which are often

  8. A MICROMECHANICAL MODEL FOR γ-TiAl BASE PST CRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.L. Su; G.K. Hu

    2005-01-01

    An analytical micromechanical method is proposed to examine the dependence of plastic deformation on the microstructure for a PST crystal. The sub-domain rnicrostructure of the γ phase and the effect of the α2 phase are taken into account by a proper micromechanical formulation,the dislocation slip and twinning deformation mechanisms are considered in the context of crystal plasticity. The model can well predict the dependence of stress-strain relations on loading angle with respect to the microstructure. The influence of the twinning and lamellar spacing on the deformation behavior and biaxial yield surfaces for PST crystals are also examined.

  9. Micromechanical Models of Mechanical Response of High Performance Fibre Reinforced Cement Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, V. C.; Mihashi, H.; Alwan, J.;

    1996-01-01

    generation of FRC with high performance and economical viability, is in sight. However, utilization of micromechanical models for a more comprehensive set of important HPFRCC properties awaits further investigations into fundamental mechanisms governing composite properties, as well as intergrative efforts......The state-of-the-art in micromechanical modeling of the mechanical response of HPFRCC is reviewed. Much advances in modeling has been made over the last decade to the point that certain properties of composites can be carefully designed using the models as analytic tools. As a result, a new...

  10. A micromechanical study of porous composites under longitudinal shear and transverse normal loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashouri Vajari, Danial

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical response of porous unidirectional composites under transverse normal and longitudinal shear loading is studied using the finite element analysis. The 3D model includes discrete and random distribution of fibers and voids. The micromechanical failure mechanisms are taken into account...... by considering the mixed-mode interfacial debonding and pressure-dependent yielding of the matrix using the modified Drucker-Prager plasticity model. The effect of the micromechanical features on the overall response of composite is discussed with a focus on the effect of microvoids and interfacial toughness...

  11. Using Micromechanical Resonators to Measure Rheological Properties and Alcohol Content of Model Solutions and Commercial Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W. Hoogenboom

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Micromechanic resonators provide a small-volume and potentially high-throughput method to determine rheological properties of fluids. Here we explore the accuracy in measuring mass density and viscosity of ethanol-water and glycerol-water model solutions, using a simple and easily implemented model to deduce the hydrodynamic effects on resonating cantilevers of various length-to-width aspect ratios. We next show that these measurements can be extended to determine the alcohol percentage of both model solutions and commercial beverages such as beer, wine and liquor. This demonstrates how micromechanical resonators can be used for quality control of every-day drinks.

  12. Using micromechanical resonators to measure rheological properties and alcohol content of model solutions and commercial beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxman, Rosemary; Stinson, Jake; Dejardin, Anna; McKendry, Rachel A; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2012-01-01

    Micromechanic resonators provide a small-volume and potentially high-throughput method to determine rheological properties of fluids. Here we explore the accuracy in measuring mass density and viscosity of ethanol-water and glycerol-water model solutions, using a simple and easily implemented model to deduce the hydrodynamic effects on resonating cantilevers of various length-to-width aspect ratios. We next show that these measurements can be extended to determine the alcohol percentage of both model solutions and commercial beverages such as beer, wine and liquor. This demonstrates how micromechanical resonators can be used for quality control of every-day drinks.

  13. Highly sensitive devices for primary signal processing of the micromechanical capacitive transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, B.; Ryndin, E.; Lysenko, I.; Denisenko, M.; Isaeva, A.

    2016-12-01

    A method of signal processing devices design for micromechanical accelerometers with capacitive transducers is proposed. This method provides the complex solution of the sensibility increasing and noise immunity problems by finding of the difference frequency of signals, which are formed by two identical generators with micromechanical capacitive transducers in frequency control circuits. In this study the analog and digital versions of the highly sensitive signal processing devices circuits with frequency output were developed. The breadboards of these devices are fabricated and studied and the project of their integral realization is designed.

  14. Experimental Characterization and Micromechanical Modelling of Anisotropic Slates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Feng; Wei, Kai; Liu, Wu; Hu, Shao-Hua; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-09-01

    Laboratory tests were performed in this study to examine the anisotropic physical and mechanical properties of the well-foliated Jiujiang slate. The P-wave velocity and the apparent Young's modulus were found to increase remarkably with the foliation angle θ, and the compressive strength at any confining pressure varies in a typical U-shaped trend, with the maximum strength consistently attained at θ = 90° and the minimum strength at θ = 45°. The slate samples failed in three typical patterns relevant to the foliation angle, i.e. shear failure across foliation planes for θ ≤ 15°, sliding along foliation planes for 30° ≤ θ ≤ 60° and axial splitting along foliation planes for θ = 90°. The stress-strain curves at any given foliation angle and confining pressure display an initial nonlinear phase, a linear elastic phase, a crack initiation and growth phase, as well as a rapid stress drop phase and a residual stress phase. Based on the experimental evidences, a micromechanical damage-friction model was proposed for the foliated slate by simply modelling the foliation planes as a family of elastic interfaces and by characterizing the interaction between the foliation planes and the rock matrix with a nonlinear damage evolution law associated with the inclination angle. The proposed model was applied to predict the deformational and strength behaviours of the foliated slate under triaxial compressive conditions using the material parameters calibrated with the uniaxial and/or triaxial test data, with good agreement between the model predictions and the laboratory measurements.

  15. Micro-mechanisms of residual oil mobilization by viscoelastic fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lijuan; Yue Xiang'an; Guo Fenqiao

    2008-01-01

    Four typical types of residual oil, residual oil trapped in dead ends, oil ganglia in pore throats,oil at pore comers and oil film adhered to pore walls, were studied. According to main pore structure characteristics and the fundamental morphological features of residual oil, four displacement models for residual oil were proposed, in which pore-scale flow behavior of viscoelastic fluid was analyzed by a numerical method and micro-mechanisms for mobilization of residual oil were discussed. Calculated results indicate that the viscoelastic effect enhances micro displacement efficiency and increases swept volume. For residual oil trapped in dead ends, the flow field of viscoelastic fluid is developed in dead ends more deeply, resulting in more contact with oil by the displacing fluid, and consequently increasing swept volume. In addition, intense viscoelastic vortex has great stress, under which residual oil becomes small oil ganglia, and finally be carried into main channels. For residual oil at pore throats, its displacement mechanisms are similar to the oil trapped in dead ends. Vortices are developed in the depths of the throats and oil ganglia become smaller. Besides, viscoelastic fluid causes higher pressure drop on oil ganglia, as a driving force, which can overcome capillary force, consequently, flow direction can be changed and the displacing fluid enter smaller throats. For oil at pore comers, viscoelastic fluid can enhance displacement efficiency as a result of greater velocity and stress near the comers. For residual oil adhered to pore wall,viscoelastic fluid can provide a greater displacing force on the interface between viscoelastic fluid and oil,thus, making it easier to exceed the minimum interfacial tension for mobilizing the oil film.

  16. Micromechanical design of hierarchical composites using global load sharing theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    Hierarchical composites, embodied by natural materials ranging from bone to bamboo, may offer combinations of material properties inaccessible to conventional composites. Using global load sharing (GLS) theory, a well-established micromechanics model for composites, we develop accurate numerical and analytical predictions for the strength and toughness of hierarchical composites with arbitrary fiber geometries, fiber strengths, interface properties, and number of hierarchical levels, N. The model demonstrates that two key material properties at each hierarchical level-a characteristic strength and a characteristic fiber length-control the scalings of composite properties. One crucial finding is that short- and long-fiber composites behave radically differently. Long-fiber composites are significantly stronger than short-fiber composites, by a factor of 2N or more; they are also significantly tougher because their fiber breaks are bridged by smaller-scale fibers that dissipate additional energy. Indeed, an "infinite" fiber length appears to be optimal in hierarchical composites. However, at the highest level of the composite, long fibers localize on planes of pre-existing damage, and thus short fibers must be employed instead to achieve notch sensitivity and damage tolerance. We conclude by providing simple guidelines for microstructural design of hierarchical composites, including the selection of N, the fiber lengths, the ratio of length scales at successive hierarchical levels, the fiber volume fractions, and the desired properties of the smallest-scale reinforcement. Our model enables superior hierarchical composites to be designed in a rational way, without resorting either to numerical simulation or trial-and-error-based experimentation.

  17. Strains at the myotendinous junction predicted by a micromechanical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Bahar; Ames, Elizabeth G; Holmes, Jeffrey W; Blemker, Silvia S

    2011-11-10

    The goal of this work was to create a finite element micromechanical model of the myotendinous junction (MTJ) to examine how the structure and mechanics of the MTJ affect the local micro-scale strains experienced by muscle fibers. We validated the model through comparisons with histological longitudinal sections of muscles fixed in slack and stretched positions. The model predicted deformations of the A-bands within the fiber near the MTJ that were similar to those measured from the histological sections. We then used the model to predict the dependence of local fiber strains on activation and the mechanical properties of the endomysium. The model predicted that peak micro-scale strains increase with activation and as the compliance of the endomysium decreases. Analysis of the models revealed that, in passive stretch, local fiber strains are governed by the difference of the mechanical properties between the fibers and the endomysium. In active stretch, strain distributions are governed by the difference in cross-sectional area along the length of the tapered region of the fiber near the MTJ. The endomysium provides passive resistance that balances the active forces and prevents the tapered region of the fiber from undergoing excessive strain. These model predictions lead to the following hypotheses: (i) the increased likelihood of injury during active lengthening of muscle fibers may be due to the increase in peak strain with activation and (ii) endomysium may play a role in protecting fibers from injury by reducing the strains within the fiber at the MTJ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring the feasibility of smart phone microphone for measurement of acoustic voice parameters and voice pathology screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uloza, Virgilijus; Padervinskis, Evaldas; Vegiene, Aurelija; Pribuisiene, Ruta; Saferis, Viktoras; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Verikas, Antanas

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the reliability of acoustic voice parameters obtained using smart phone (SP) microphones and investigate the utility of use of SP voice recordings for voice screening. Voice samples of sustained vowel/a/obtained from 118 subjects (34 normal and 84 pathological voices) were recorded simultaneously through two microphones: oral AKG Perception 220 microphone and SP Samsung Galaxy Note3 microphone. Acoustic voice signal data were measured for fundamental frequency, jitter and shimmer, normalized noise energy (NNE), signal to noise ratio and harmonic to noise ratio using Dr. Speech software. Discriminant analysis-based Correct Classification Rate (CCR) and Random Forest Classifier (RFC) based Equal Error Rate (EER) were used to evaluate the feasibility of acoustic voice parameters classifying normal and pathological voice classes. Lithuanian version of Glottal Function Index (LT_GFI) questionnaire was utilized for self-assessment of the severity of voice disorder. The correlations of acoustic voice parameters obtained with two types of microphones were statistically significant and strong (r = 0.73-1.0) for the entire measurements. When classifying into normal/pathological voice classes, the Oral-NNE revealed the CCR of 73.7% and the pair of SP-NNE and SP-shimmer parameters revealed CCR of 79.5%. However, fusion of the results obtained from SP voice recordings and GFI data provided the CCR of 84.60% and RFC revealed the EER of 7.9%, respectively. In conclusion, measurements of acoustic voice parameters using SP microphone were shown to be reliable in clinical settings demonstrating high CCR and low EER when distinguishing normal and pathological voice classes, and validated the suitability of the SP microphone signal for the task of automatic voice analysis and screening.

  19. Kinematic and static assumptions for homogenization in micromechanics of granular materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, N.P.; Rothenburg, L.

    2004-01-01

    A study is made of kinematic and static assumptions for homogenization in micromechanics of granular materials for two cases. The first case considered deals with the elastic behaviour of isotropic, two-dimensional assemblies with bonded contacts. Using a minimum potential energy principle and estim

  20. Design and Fabrication of Micromechanical Optical Switches Based on the Low Applied Voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A micromechanical optical switch driven by electrostatic was fabricated with (100) silicon and tilted 2.5° (111) silicon. The pull-in voltage is 13.2V, the insertion loss is less than 1.4dB, the crosstalk is less than -50 dB.

  1. Study of multiple cracks in airplane fuselage by micromechanics and complex variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Mitsunori; Dong, Y. F.

    1994-01-01

    Innovative numerical techniques for two dimensional elastic and elastic-plastic multiple crack problems are presented using micromechanics concepts and complex variables. The simplicity and the accuracy of the proposed method will enable us to carry out the multiple-site fatigue crack propagation analyses for airplane fuselage by incorporating such features as the curvilinear crack path, plastic deformation, coalescence of cracks, etc.

  2. On Micromechanisms of Hydrogen Plastification and Embrittlement of Some Technological Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Nechaev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Some fundamental problems of revealing micromechanisms of hydrogen plastification, superplasticity, embrittlement, cracking, blistering and delayed fracture of some technologically important industrial metallic materials are formulated. The ways are considered of these problems' solution and optimizing the technological processes and materials, particularly in the hydrogen and gas-petroleum industries, some aircraft, aerospace and automobile systems.

  3. Mini-Symposium on Micromechanics at the CSME Mechanical Engineering Forum

    CERN Document Server

    Muschik, W

    1991-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at the mini-symposium on "Micromechanics" held in conjunction with the CSME Mechanical Engineer­ ing Forum 1990 between the 3rd and 8th June, 1990 at the University of Toronto, Canada. The expressed purpose of this symposium was to discuss some recent developments in the Micromechanics of Materials and how ad­ vances in this field now relate to the solution of practical engineer­ ing problems. Due to the time limit set for this section of the Engineer­ ing Forum as well as the restriction on the number of papers to be pre­ sented, it was not possible to cover a much wider range of topics. How­ ever, an attempt was made to include the most important advances asso­ ciated with the progress made in micromechanics in its application to material science and engineering over the past decade. Thus, the topics are concerned with: the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamics of structured solids (part I), - the micromechanical behaviour of alloys (part II), - the mod...

  4. Ultrasensitive thermometer for atmospheric pressure operation based on a micromechanical resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto; Pini, V.; Tamayo, J.

    2014-01-01

    For highly integrated systems for bio and chemical analysis a precise and integrated measurement of temperature is of fundamental importance. We have developed an ultrasensitive thermometer based on a micromechanical resonator for operation in air. The high quality factor and the strong temperatu...

  5. Thermal base drive for micromechanical resonators employing deep-diffusion bases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwstra, Siebe; Rooijen, van Jeroen; Tilmans, Harrie A.C.; Selvakumar, Arjun; Najafi, Khahl

    1993-01-01

    A novel approach of thermal excitation is presented, where thin micromechanical structures are suspended by deep-diffusion bases. Cantilevers and microbridges are fabricated, modeled and tested. Resonance frequencies are solely determined by the thin parts of the structures, and are independent of m

  6. Design considerations for micromechanical sensors using encapsulated built-in resonant strain gauges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilmans, Harrie A.C.; Bouwstra, Siebe; Fluitman, Jan H.J; Spence, Scott L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the various design aspects for micromechanical sensors consisting of a structure with encapsulated built-in resonant strain gauges. Analytical models are used to investigate the effect of device parameters on the behaviour of a pressure sensor and a force sensor. The analyses in

  7. Composite materials for wind energy applications: micromechanical modeling and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2012-01-01

    The strength and reliability of wind turbine blades depend on the properties, mechanical behavior and strengths of the material components (glass or carbon fibers and polymer matrix), and the interaction between them under loading. In this paper, ideas, methods and concepts of micromechanical...

  8. Micromechanical modelling of partially molten and sand reinforced polycrystalline ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelnau, O.; Duval, P.

    2009-12-01

    The viscoplastic behaviour of polycrystalline ice is strongly affected by the very strong anisotropy of ice crystals. Indeed, in the dislocations creep regime relevant for ice sheet flow, dislocation glide on the basal plane of ice single crystals leads to strain-rates ~6 order of magnitude larger than strain-rates that might be obtain if only non-basal glide is activated. At the polycrystal scale, this behaviour is responsible for a strong mechanical interaction between grains in the secondary (stationary) creep regime, and strain-rate is essentially partitioned between soft grains well-oriented for basal glide and hard grains exhibiting an unfavourable orientation for basal slip. As a consequence, the macroscopic flow stress at the polycrystal scale essentially depends on the resistance of the hardest slip systems or on the associated accommodation processes such as climb of basal dislocation on non-basal planes. Creep experiments performed on polycrystalline ices containing a small amount (less than 10% volume fraction) of liquid water show a dramatic increase of strain-rate, by more than one order of magnitude, compared to solid ice when deformed under similar thermo-mechanical conditions. Similarly, a strong hardening is observed when polycrystalline ice is reinforced by sand (which can be considered as a rigid phase here). This behaviour can be explained by micromechanical models, which aims at estimating the mechanical interactions between grains. For example, the presence of water releases stress concentrations at grain boundaries and therefore favours the inactivation of non-basal systems. To estimate such effect and to reach quantitative comparison with experimental data, we make use of the recent Second-Order homogenization mean-field approach of Ponte-Castaneda, based on self-consistent scheme. The advantage of this approach, which has been shown to provide excellent results when applied to many different non-linear composite materials, comes from the

  9. A transmission-line model of back-cavity dynamics for in-plane pressure-differential microphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghwan; Kuntzman, Michael L; Hall, Neal A

    2014-11-01

    Pressure-differential microphones inspired by the hearing mechanism of a special parasitoid fly have been described previously. The designs employ a beam structure that rotates about two pivots over an enclosed back volume. The back volume is only partially enclosed due to open slits around the perimeter of the beam. The open slits enable incoming sound waves to affect the pressure profile in the microphone's back volume. The goal of this work is to study the net moment applied to pressure-differential microphones by an incoming sound wave, which in-turn requires modeling the acoustic pressure distribution within the back volume. A lumped-element distributed transmission-line model of the back volume is introduced for this purpose. It is discovered that the net applied moment follows a low-pass filter behavior such that, at frequencies below a corner frequency depending on geometrical parameters of the design, the applied moment is unaffected by the open slits. This is in contrast to the high-pass filter behavior introduced by barometric pressure vents in conventional omnidirectional microphones. The model accurately predicts observed curvature in the frequency response of a prototype pressure-differential microphone 2 mm × 1 mm × 0.5 mm in size and employing piezoelectric readout.

  10. High frequency microphone measurements for transition detection on airfoils. NACA-0015 appendix report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Mads

    Time series of pressure fluctuations has been obtained using high frequency microphones distributed over the surface of airfoils undergoing wind tunnel tests in the LM Windtunnel, owned by ’LM Glasfiber’, Denmark. The present report describes the dataanalysis, with special attention given...... pressure) and Tollmien-Schlichting frequencies. The tests were made at Reynolds and Mach numbers corresponding to the operating conditions of a typical horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The Risø B1-18, Risø C2-18 and NACA0015 profiles were tested and the measured transition points are reported....

  11. Recognition of Devoiced Vowels Using Optical Microphone Made of Multipled POF-Type Moisture Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisawa, Masayuki; Natori, Yoichi; Taki, Tomohito; Muto, Shinzo

    A novel optical fiber microphone system for recognizing devoiced vowels has been studied. This system consists of the optical detection of moisture pattern formed by devoiced breath and its recognization process using a modified DP-matching. To detect moisture pattern of devoiced vowels, five plastic optical fiber moisture sensors with fast response were developed and used. Using this system, high discernment rate over 93% was obtained for the devoiced vowels. This system will be used for verbally handicapped people to create sounds with a small effort in the near future.

  12. Temperature compensated, humidity insensitive, high-Tg TOPAS FBGs for accelerometers and microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, W.; Markos, C.;

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest work on Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) in microstructured polymer optical fibers (mPOFs) and their application as strain sensing transducers in devices, such as accelerometers and microphones. We demonstrate how the cross-sensitivity of the FBG to temperature...... is eliminated by using dual-FBG technology and how mPOFs fabricated from different grades of TOPAS with glass transition temperatures around 135 degrees C potentially allow high-temperature humidity insensitive operation. The results bring the mPOF FBG closer to being a viable technology for commercial...

  13. Detection and Separation of Speech Events in Meeting Recordings Using a Microphone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Miichi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available When applying automatic speech recognition (ASR to meeting recordings including spontaneous speech, the performance of ASR is greatly reduced by the overlap of speech events. In this paper, a method of separating the overlapping speech events by using an adaptive beamforming (ABF framework is proposed. The main feature of this method is that all the information necessary for the adaptation of ABF, including microphone calibration, is obtained from meeting recordings based on the results of speech-event detection. The performance of the separation is evaluated via ASR using real meeting recordings.

  14. Assessment of Microphone Phased Array for Measuring Launch Vehicle Lift-off Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The specific purpose of the present work was to demonstrate the suitability of a microphone phased array for launch acoustics applications via participation in selected firings of the Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustics Test is a part of the discontinued Constellation Program Ares I Project, but the basic understanding gained from this test is expected to help development of the Space Launch System vehicles. Correct identification of sources not only improves the predictive ability, but provides guidance for a quieter design of the launch pad and optimization of the water suppression system. This document contains the results of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center assessment.

  15. Detection and Separation of Speech Events in Meeting Recordings Using a Microphone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futoshi Asano

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available When applying automatic speech recognition (ASR to meeting recordings including spontaneous speech, the performance of ASR is greatly reduced by the overlap of speech events. In this paper, a method of separating the overlapping speech events by using an adaptive beamforming (ABF framework is proposed. The main feature of this method is that all the information necessary for the adaptation of ABF, including microphone calibration, is obtained from meeting recordings based on the results of speech-event detection. The performance of the separation is evaluated via ASR using real meeting recordings.

  16. Real-time dual-microphone noise classification for environment-adaptive pipelines of cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzahasanloo, Taher; Kehtarnavaz, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an improved noise classification in environment-adaptive speech processing pipelines of cochlear implants. This improvement is achieved by using a dual-microphone and by using a computationally efficient feature-level combination approach to achieve real-time operation. A new measure named Suppression Advantage is also defined in order to quantify the noise suppression improvement of an entire pipeline due to noise classification. The noise classification and suppression improvement results are presented for four commonly encountered noise environments.

  17. Comparison of Multiple-Microphone and Single-Loudspeaker Adaptive Feedback/Echo Cancellation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Meng; Elmedyb, Thomas Bo; Jensen, Søren Holdt;

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we introduced a frequency domain measure - the power transfer function - to predict the convergence rate, system stability bound and the steady-state behavior across time and frequency of a least mean square based feedback/echo cancellation algorithm in a general multiple......-microphone and single-loudspeaker system. In this work, we extend the theoretical analysis to the normalized least mean square and recursive least squares algorithms. Furthermore, we compare and discuss the system behaviors in terms of the power transfer function for all three adaptive algorithms....

  18. Reconstruction of arbitrary sound fields with a rigid-sphere microphone array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years, several studies have examined the potential of using rigid-sphere microphone arrays for reconstructing sound fields with near-field acoustic holography (NAH). The existing methods provide a reconstruction of the sound field based on a spherical harmonic expansion. However...... on an equivalent source model is proposed, where a combination of point sources is used to describe the incident sound field on the array. This method makes it possible to reconstruct the entire sound field at any point of the source-free domain without being restricted to a spherical surface. Additionally...

  19. A 540-μW digital pre-amplifier with 88-dB dynamic range for electret microphones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yan; Hua Siliang; Wang Donghui; Hou Chaohuan

    2009-01-01

    We design a digital pre-amplifier which can be directly connected to an electret microphone. The amplifier can convert analog signals into digital signals, has a wide voltage swing and low power consumption, as is required in portable applications. Measurement results show that the dynamic range of the digital pre-amplifier reaches 88 dB, the equivalent input referred noise is 5 μVrms, the typical power consumption is 540 μW, and in standby mode the current does not exceed 10 μA. Compared with an analog microphone, an electret microphone with digital pre-amplifier offers a better SNR, higher integration, lower power consumption, and higher immunity to system noise.

  20. Adaptation to New Microphones Using Artificial Neural Networks With Trainable Activation Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Sabato Marco; Salerno, Valerio Mario

    2016-04-14

    Model adaptation is a key technique that enables a modern automatic speech recognition (ASR) system to adjust its parameters, using a small amount of enrolment data, to the nuances in the speech spectrum due to microphone mismatch in the training and test data. In this brief, we investigate four different adaptation schemes for connectionist (also known as hybrid) ASR systems that learn microphone-specific hidden unit contributions, given some adaptation material. This solution is made possible adopting one of the following schemes: 1) the use of Hermite activation functions; 2) the introduction of bias and slope parameters in the sigmoid activation functions; 3) the injection of an amplitude parameter specific for each sigmoid unit; or 4) the combination of 2) and 3). Such a simple yet effective solution allows the adapted model to be stored in a small-sized storage space, a highly desirable property of adaptation algorithms for deep neural networks that are suitable for large-scale online deployment. Experimental results indicate that the investigated approaches reduce word error rates on the standard Spoke 6 task of the Wall Street Journal corpus compared with unadapted ASR systems. Moreover, the proposed adaptation schemes all perform better than simple multicondition training and comparable favorably against conventional linear regression-based approaches while using up to 15 orders of magnitude fewer parameters. The proposed adaptation strategies are also effective when a single adaptation sentence is available.

  1. A Fully On-Chip Gm-Opamp-RC Based Preamplifier for Electret Condenser Microphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Huy-Binh; Ryu, Seung-Tak; Lee, Sang-Gug

    An on-chip CMOS preamplifier for direct signal readout from an electret capacitor microphone has been designed with high immunity to common-mode and supply noise. The Gm-Opamp-RC based high impedance preamplifier helps to remove all disadvantages of the conventional JFET based amplifier and can drive a following switched-capacitor sigma-delta modulator in order to realize a compact digital electret microphone. The proposed chip is designed based on 0.18µm CMOS technology, and the simulation results show 86dB of dynamic range with 4.5µVrms of input-referred noise for an audio bandwidth of 20kHz and a total harmonic distortion (THD) of 1% at 90mVrms input. Power supply rejection ratio (PSRR) and common-mode rejection ration (CMRR) are more than 95dB at 1kHz. The proposed design dissipates 125µA and can operate over a wide supply voltage range of 1.6V to 3.3V.

  2. Kalman filter-based microphone array signal processing using the equivalent source model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Mingsian R.; Chen, Ching-Cheng

    2012-10-01

    This paper demonstrates that microphone array signal processing can be implemented by using adaptive model-based filtering approaches. Nearfield and farfield sound propagation models are formulated into state-space forms in light of the Equivalent Source Method (ESM). In the model, the unknown source amplitudes of the virtual sources are adaptively estimated by using Kalman filters (KFs). The nearfield array aimed at noise source identification is based on a Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output (MIMO) state-space model with minimal realization, whereas the farfield array technique aimed at speech quality enhancement is based on a Single-Input-Multiple-Output (SIMO) state-space model. Performance of the nearfield array is evaluated in terms of relative error of the velocity reconstructed on the actual source surface. Numerical simulations for the nearfield array were conducted with a baffled planar piston source. From the error metric, the proposed KF algorithm proved effective in identifying noise sources. Objective simulations and subjective experiments are undertaken to validate the proposed farfield arrays in comparison with two conventional methods. The results of objective tests indicated that the farfield arrays significantly enhanced the speech quality and word recognition rate. The results of subjective tests post-processed with the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a post-hoc Fisher's least significant difference (LSD) test have shown great promise in the KF-based microphone array signal processing techniques.

  3. Lamb-wave (X, Y) giant tap screen panel with built-in microphone and loudspeaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolovski, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a passive (X, Y) giant tap screen panel (GTP). Based on the time difference of arrival principle (TDOA), the device localizes low-energy impacts of around 1 mJ generated by fingernail taps. Selective detection of A0 Lamb waves generated in the upper frequency spectrum, around 100 kHz, makes it possible to detect light to strong impacts with equal resolution or precision, close to 1 cm and 2 mm, respectively, for a 10-mm-thick and 1-m(2) glass plate. Additionally, with glass, symmetrical beveling of the edges is used to create a tsunami effect that reduces the minimum impacting speed for light taps by a factor of three. Response time is less than 1 ms. Maximum panel size is of the order of 10 m(2). A rugged integrated flat design with embedded transducers in an electrically shielding frame features waterproof and sticker/ tag proof operation. Sophisticated electronics with floating amplification maintains the panel at its maximum possible sensitivity according to the surrounding noise. Amplification and filtering turns the panel into a microphone and loudspeaker featuring 50 mV/Pa as a microphone and up to 80 dBlin between 500 Hz and 8 kHz as a loudspeaker.

  4. Wavenumber-frequency deconvolution of aeroacoustic microphone phased array data of arbitrary coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2016-11-01

    Deconvolution of aeroacoustic data acquired with microphone phased arrays is a computationally challenging task for distributed sources with arbitrary coherence. A new technique for performing such deconvolution is proposed. This technique relies on analysis of the array data in the wavenumber-frequency domain, allowing for fast convolution and reduced storage requirements when compared to traditional coherent deconvolution. A positive semidefinite constraint for the iterative deconvolution procedure is implemented and shows improved behavior in terms of quantifiable convergence metrics when compared to a standalone covariance inequality constraint. A series of simulations validates the method's ability to resolve coherence and phase angle relationships between partially coherent sources, as well as determines convergence criteria for deconvolution analysis. Simulations for point sources near the microphone phased array show potential for handling such data in the wavenumber-frequency domain. In particular, a physics-based integration boundary calculation is described, and can successfully isolate sources and track the appropriate integration bounds with and without the presence of flow. Magnitude and phase relationships between multiple sources are successfully extracted. Limitations of the deconvolution technique are determined from the simulations, particularly in the context of a simulated acoustic field in a closed test section wind tunnel with strong boundary layer contamination. A final application to a trailing edge noise experiment conducted in an open-jet wind tunnel matches best estimates of acoustic levels from traditional calculation methods and qualitatively assesses the coherence characteristics of the trailing edge noise source.

  5. Improvement of plastic optical fiber microphone based on moisture pattern sensing in devoiced breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Tomohito; Honma, Satoshi; Morisawa, Masayuki; Muto, Shinzo

    2008-03-01

    Conversation is the most practical and common form in communication. However, people with a verbal handicap feel a difficulty to produce words due to variations in vocal chords. This research leads to develop a new devoiced microphone system based on distinguishes between the moisture patterns for each devoiced breaths, using a plastic optical fiber (POF) moisture sensor. In the experiment, five POF-type moisture sensors with fast response were fabricated by coating swell polymer with a slightly larger refractive index than that of fiber core and were set in front of mouth. When these sensors are exposed into humid air produced by devoiced breath, refractive index in cladding layer decreases by swelling and then the POF sensor heads change to guided type. Based on the above operation principle, the output light intensities from the five sensors set in front of mouth change each other. Using above mentioned output light intensity patterns, discernment of devoiced vowels in Japanese (a,i,u,e,o) was tried by means of DynamicProgramming-Matching (DP-matching) method. As the result, distinction rate over 90% was obtained to Japanese devoiced vowels. Therefore, using this system and a voice synthesizer, development of new microphone for the person with a functional disorder in the vocal chords seems to be possible.

  6. Analysis and active compensation of microphonics in continuous wave narrow-bandwidth superconducting cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Kugeler, O.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-08-01

    Many proposals for next generation light sources based on single pass free electron lasers or energy recovery linac facilities require a continuous wave (cw) driven superconducting linac. The effective beam loading in such machines is very small and in principle the cavities can be operated at a bandwidth of a few Hz and with less than a few kW of rf power. However, a power reserve is required to ensure field stability. A major error source is the mechanical microphonics detuning of the niobium cavities. To understand the influence of cavity detuning on longitudinal beam stability, a measurement program has been started at the horizontal cavity test facility HoBiCaT at HZB to study TESLA-type cavities. The microphonics detuning spectral content, peak detuning values, and the driving terms for these mechanical oscillations have been analyzed. In combination with the characterization of cw-adapted fast tuning systems based on the piezoelectric effect this information has been used to design a detuning compensation algorithm. It has been shown that a compensation factor between 2-7 is achievable, reducing the typical detuning of 2-3 Hz rms to below 0.5 Hz rms. These results were included in rf-control simulations of the cavities, and it was demonstrated that a phase stability below 0.02° can be achieved.

  7. Estimation of Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Wearable Microphone-Sensor-Based System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Xiangdong; Long, Zhou; Yuan, Jing; Qian, Yueliang; Li, Jintao

    2016-12-17

    Most existing wearable gait analysis methods focus on the analysis of data obtained from inertial sensors. This paper proposes a novel, low-cost, wireless and wearable gait analysis system which uses microphone sensors to collect footstep sound signals during walking. This is the first time a microphone sensor is used as a wearable gait analysis device as far as we know. Based on this system, a gait analysis algorithm for estimating the temporal parameters of gait is presented. The algorithm fully uses the fusion of two feet footstep sound signals and includes three stages: footstep detection, heel-strike event and toe-on event detection, and calculation of gait temporal parameters. Experimental results show that with a total of 240 data sequences and 1732 steps collected using three different gait data collection strategies from 15 healthy subjects, the proposed system achieves an average 0.955 F1-measure for footstep detection, an average 94.52% accuracy rate for heel-strike detection and 94.25% accuracy rate for toe-on detection. Using these detection results, nine temporal related gait parameters are calculated and these parameters are consistent with their corresponding normal gait temporal parameters and labeled data calculation results. The results verify the effectiveness of our proposed system and algorithm for temporal gait parameter estimation.

  8. Estimation of Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Wearable Microphone-Sensor-Based System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most existing wearable gait analysis methods focus on the analysis of data obtained from inertial sensors. This paper proposes a novel, low-cost, wireless and wearable gait analysis system which uses microphone sensors to collect footstep sound signals during walking. This is the first time a microphone sensor is used as a wearable gait analysis device as far as we know. Based on this system, a gait analysis algorithm for estimating the temporal parameters of gait is presented. The algorithm fully uses the fusion of two feet footstep sound signals and includes three stages: footstep detection, heel-strike event and toe-on event detection, and calculation of gait temporal parameters. Experimental results show that with a total of 240 data sequences and 1732 steps collected using three different gait data collection strategies from 15 healthy subjects, the proposed system achieves an average 0.955 F1-measure for footstep detection, an average 94.52% accuracy rate for heel-strike detection and 94.25% accuracy rate for toe-on detection. Using these detection results, nine temporal related gait parameters are calculated and these parameters are consistent with their corresponding normal gait temporal parameters and labeled data calculation results. The results verify the effectiveness of our proposed system and algorithm for temporal gait parameter estimation.

  9. Test-Retest Reliability of the Dual-Microphone Voice Range Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printz, Trine; Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Godballe, Christian; Grøntved, Ågot Møller

    2017-05-16

    The voice range profile (VRP) measures vocal intensity and fundamental frequency. Phonosurgical and logopedic treatment outcome studies using the VRP report voice improvements of 3-6 semitones (ST) in ST range and 4-7 decibels (dB) in sound pressure level range after treatment. These small improvements stress the importance of reliable measurements. The aim was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the dual-microphone computerized VRP on participants with healthy voices. This is a prospective test-retest reliability study. Dual-microphone VRPs were repeated twice on healthy participants (n = 37) with an interval of 6-37 days. Voice frequency and intensity (minimum, maximum, and ranges) were assessed in combination with the area of the VRP. Correlations between VRP parameters were high (r > 0.60). However, in the retest, a statistically significant increase in voice frequency range (1.4 ST [95% confidence interval {CI}: 0.8-2.1 ST], P VRP (148 cells [95% CI: 87-210 cells], P VRP is well below the differences seen after surgical or logopedic intervention, even when measuring in non-sound-treated rooms. There is a need for studies regarding inter-examiner reliability with a longer interval between test and retest before the assessment is fully reliable for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison measurement of nonlinear ultrasonic waves in tubes by a microphone and by an optical interferometric probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slegrová, Zuzana; Bálek, Rudolf

    2005-03-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of ultrasonic fields inside waveguides generated by ultrasonic waves of high amplitude. These waves behave nonlinearly, so it is not possible to use standard linear equations to describe their behaviour. Therefore, we started with an experimental determination of the acoustic pressure of air in glass tubes. We chose two methods of measurement--by a microphone and by an optical interferometric probe. The conventional method by a microphone creates numerous problems, which can be avoided by using an optical method, a heterodyne laser interferometer.

  11. Light Dependent Resistance as a Sensor in Spectroscopy Setups Using Pulsed Light and Compared with Electret Microphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Acosta-Avalos

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Light-dependent resistances (LDR are cheap light sensors. A less known lightdetector is the electret microphone, whose electret membrane functions as a perfectabsorber, but only detects pulsed light. The aim of this study was to analyze the use of aLDR and an electret microphone as a light sensor in an optical spectroscopy system usingpulsed light. A photoacoustic spectroscopy setup was used, substituting the photoacousticchamber by the light sensor proposed. The absorption spectra of two different liquids wereanalyzed. The results obtained allow the recommendation of the LDR as the first choice inthe construction of cheap homemade pulsed light spectroscopy systems.

  12. DFT-domain based single-microphone noise reduction for speech enhancement a survey of the state of the art

    CERN Document Server

    Hendriks, Richard C; Jensen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    As speech processing devices like mobile phones, voice controlled devices, and hearing aids have increased in popularity, people expect them to work anywhere and at any time without user intervention. However, the presence of acoustical disturbances limits the use of these applications, degrades their performance, or causes the user difficulties in understanding the conversation or appreciating the device. A common way to reduce the effects of such disturbances is through the use of single-microphone noise reduction algorithms for speech enhancement.The field of single-microphone noise reducti

  13. Validation of the Read Out Electronics for the CMS Muon Drift Chambers at Tests Beam in CERN/GIF; Validacion en el Test Beam del CERN/GIF de la electronica de Lectura de las Camaras de Muones del Experimento CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, C.; Fouz, M. c.; Marin, J.; Oller, J. C.; Willmott, C.; Amigo, L. J.

    2002-07-01

    Part of the readout system for the CMS muon drift chambers has been tested in test beams at CERN/GIF. Read Out Board (ROB) and HPTD have been validated with signals from a real muon beam, with an structure and flux similar to LHC operating conditions and using one of the chambers produced in CIEMAT already located in the test beam area under normal gas and voltage conditions. (Author) 5 refs.

  14. In-Situ Micromechanical Testing in Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupinacci, Amanda Sofia

    In order to design engineering applications that can withstand extreme environments, we must first understand the underlying deformation mechanisms that can hinder material performance. It is not enough to characterize the mechanical properties alone, we must also characterize the microstructural changes as well so that we can understand the origin of material degradation. This dissertation focuses on two different extreme environments. The first environment is the cryogenic environment, where we focus on the deformation behavior of solder below the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The second environment is the irradiated environment, where we focus on the effects that ion beam irradiation has on both the mechanical properties and microstructure of 304 stainless steel. Both classes of materials and testing environments utilize novel in situ micromechanical testing techniques inside a scanning electron microscope which enhances our ability to link the observed deformation behavior with its associated mechanical response. Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the DBTT is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at -142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity while at -142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (100) orientation and a non-symmetric (45¯1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations. This approach was also extended to a more complex solder alloy that is commonly used in industry, Sn96. In the case of the solder alloy more complex geometries

  15. EDITORIAL: The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008) The 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2009-07-01

    This special issue of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering is devoted to the 19th MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME 08), which took place at the RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany, from 28-30 September, 2008. The workshop is a well recognized and established European event in the field of micro system technology using thin-film technologies for creating micro components, micro sensors, micro actuators, and micro systems. The first MME Workshop was held 1989 in Enschede (The Netherlands) and continued 1990 in Berlin (Germany), 1992 in Leuven (Belgium), and then was held annually in Neuchâtel (Switzerland), Pisa (Italy), Copenhagen (Denmark), Barcelona (Spain), Southampton (UK), Ulvik in Hardanger (Norway), Gif-sur-Yvette (France), Uppsala (Sweden), Cork (Ireland), Sinaia (Romania), Delft (The Netherlands), Leuven (Belgium), Göteborg (Sweden), Southampton (UK), and in Guimarães (Portugal). The two day workshop was attended by 180 delegates from 26 countries all over Europe and from Armenia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Cuba, Iran, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Turkey, and the United States of America. A total of 97 papers were accepted for presentation and there were a further five keynote presentations. I am proud to present 22 high-quality papers from MME 2008 selected for their novelty and relevance to Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. All the papers went through the regular reviewing procedure of IOP Publishing. I am eternally grateful to all the referees for their excellent work. I would also like to extend my thanks to the members of the Programme Committee of MME 2008, Dr Reinoud Wolffenbuttel, Professor José Higino Correia, and Dr Patrick Pons for pre-selection of the papers as well as to Professor Robert Puers for advice on the final selection of papers. My thanks also go to Dr Ian Forbes of IOP Publishing for managing the entire process and to the editorial staff of Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. I

  16. An extended micromechanics method for probing interphase properties in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeliang; Moore, John A.; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-10-01

    Inclusions comprised on filler particles and interphase regions commonly form complex morphologies in polymer nanocomposites. Addressing these morphologies as systems of overlapping simple shapes allows for the study of dilute particles, clustered particles, and interacting interphases all in one general modeling framework. To account for the material properties in these overlapping geometries, weighted-mean and additive overlapping conditions are introduced and the corresponding inclusion-wise integral equations are formulated. An extended micromechanics method based on these overlapping conditions for linear elastic and viscoelastic heterogeneous material is then developed. An important feature of the proposed approach is that the effect of both the geometric overlapping (clustered particles) and physical overlapping (interacting interphases) on the effective properties can be distinguished. We apply the extended micromechanics method to a viscoelastic polymer nanocomposite with interphase regions, and estimate the properties and thickness of the interphase region based on experimental data for carbon-black filled styrene butadiene rubbers.

  17. Concrete Failure Modeling Based on Micromechanical Approach Subjected to Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Wahyuni

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a micromechanical model based on the Mori-Tanaka method and the spring-layer model is developed to study the stress-strain behavior of concrete. The concrete is modeled as a two-phase composite. And the failure of concrete is categorized as mortar failure and interface failure. The research presents a method for estimating the modulus of concrete under its whole loading process. The proposed micromechanical model owns the good capabilities for predicting the entire response of concrete under uniaxial compression. It is suitable that tensile strain is as the criterion of concrete failure and the prediction of crack direction also fits with experimental phenomenon.

  18. Micromechanics analysis of thermal expansion and thermal pressurization of a hardened cement paste

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2011-01-01

    The results of a macro-scale experimental study of the effect of heating on a fluid-saturated hardened cement paste are analysed using a multi-scale homogenization model. The analysis of the experimental results revealed that the thermal expansion coefficient of the cement paste pore fluid is anomalously higher than the one of pure bulk water. The micromechanics model is calibrated using the results of drained and undrained heating tests and permits the extrapolation of the experimentally evaluated thermal expansion and thermal pressurization parameters to cement pastes with different water-to-cement ratios. It permits also to calculate the pore volume thermal expansion coefficient f a which is difficult to evaluate experimentally. The anomalous pore fluid thermal expansion is also analysed using the micromechanics model.

  19. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin [Industrial Technology Research Institute-South, Tainan 709, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Jin-Chen, E-mail: fengchiahsu@itri.org.t, E-mail: hsujc@yuntech.edu.t [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliou, Yunlin 64002, Taiwan (China)

    2011-09-21

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  20. Micromechanics-Based Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Laminates Using Different Constituent Failure Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncada, Albert M.; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting failure in a composite can be done with ply level mechanisms and/or micro level mechanisms. This paper uses the Generalized Method of Cells and High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells micromechanics theories, coupled with classical lamination theory, as implemented within NASA's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells. The code is able to implement different failure theories on the level of both the fiber and the matrix constituents within a laminate. A comparison is made among maximum stress, maximum strain, Tsai-Hill, and Tsai-Wu failure theories. To verify the failure theories the Worldwide Failure Exercise (WWFE) experiments have been used. The WWFE is a comprehensive study that covers a wide range of polymer matrix composite laminates. The numerical results indicate good correlation with the experimental results for most of the composite layups, but also point to the need for more accurate resin damage progression models.

  1. Ascertaining the micromechanical damage parameters using the small scale test specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N.N. (HBNI, RSD, BARC, Trombay (India)), e-mail: naveenm@barc.gov.in; Durgaprasad, P.V.; Dutta, B.K. (Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Trombay (India)); Dey, G.K. (Material Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Trombay (India))

    2009-07-01

    Objective of the study is to ascertain the damage parameters and stress strain behaviour of material under irradiated condition. To achieve this goal, following methodology is employed; a) Elastic-plastic and micro-mechanical analysis of small punch test is carried out. From the elastic plastic analysis, friction factor between the ball and specimen is found. From micro mechanical analysis, Gurson damage parameters are calibrated by comparing simulation results with experimental result of unirradiated material; b) load-displacement behaviour of small punch tests are obtained by assuming the damage parameters are unchanged due to irradiation and with approximate shift in the stress strain curve; c) Comparing the above small punch results with experimental load displacement data of irradiated sample, the stress-strain data of irradiated samples is obtained. At the next stage, the fracture properties like J-R curve can be evaluated for standard CT specimens by employing the calibrated micromechanical damage parameters and stress strain data

  2. Reducing support loss in micromechanical ring resonators using phononic band-gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Feng-Chia; Hsu, Jin-Chen; Huang, Tsun-Che; Wang, Chin-Hung; Chang, Pin

    2011-09-01

    In micromechanical resonators, energy loss via supports into the substrates may lead to a low quality factor. To eliminate the support loss, in this paper a phononic band-gap structure is employed. We demonstrate a design of phononic-crystal (PC) strips used to support extensional wine-glass mode ring resonators to increase the quality factor. The PC strips are introduced to stop elastic-wave propagation by the band-gap and deaf-band effects. Analyses of resonant characteristics of the ring resonators and the dispersion relations, eigenmodes, and transmission properties of the PC strips are presented. With the proposed resonator architecture, the finite-element simulations show that the leaky power is effectively reduced and the stored energy inside the resonators is enhanced simultaneously as the operating frequencies of the resonators are within the band gap or deaf bands. Realization of a high quality factor micromechanical ring resonator with minimized support loss is expected.

  3. Fatigue crack tip damaging micromechanisms in a ferritic-pearlitic ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Iacoviello

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the peculiar graphite elements shape, obtained by means of a chemical composition control (mainly small addition of elements like Mg, Ca or Ce, Ductile Cast Irons (DCIs are able to offer the good castability of gray irons with the high mechanical properties of irons (first of all, toughness. This interesting properties combination can be improved both by means of the chemical composition control and by means of different heat treatments(e.g. annealing, normalizing, quenching, austempering etc. In this work, fatigue crack tip damaging micromechanisms in a ferritic-pearlitic DCI were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope observations performed on a lateral surface of Compact Type (CT specimens during the fatigue crack propagation test (step by step procedure, performed according to the “load shedding procedure”. On the basis of the experimental results, different fatigue damaging micromechanisms were identified, both in the graphite nodules and in the ferritic – pearlitic matrix.

  4. Sediment Micromechanics in Sheet Flows Induced by Asymmetric Waves: A CFD-DEM Study

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the sediment transport in oscillatory flows is essential to the investigation of the overall sediment budget for coastal regions. This overall budget is crucial for the prediction of the morphological change of the coastline in engineering applications. Since the sediment transport in oscillatory flows is dense particle-laden flow, appropriate modeling of the particle interaction is critical. Although traditional two-fluid approaches have been applied to the study of sediment transport in oscillatory flows, the approaches do not resolve the interaction of the particles. Particle-resolved modeling of sediment transport in oscillatory flows and the study of micromechanics of sediment particles are still lacking. In this work, a parallel CFD-DEM solver SediFoam that can resolve the inter-particle collision is applied to study the granular micromechanics of sediment particles in oscillatory flows. The results obtained from SediFoam are validated by the experimental data of coarse and medium sands. T...

  5. Modeling of multi-inclusion composites with interfacial imperfections:Micromechanical and numerical simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A micromechanical approach based on a two-layer built-in model and a numerical simulation based on boundary element method are proposed to predict the effective properties of the multi-inclusion composite with imperfect interfaces.The spring model is introduced to simulate the interface imperfection.These two methods are compared with each other,and good agreement is achieved.The effects of interface spring stiffness,volume ratio and stiffness of inclusions on the micro-and macro-mechanical behaviors of fiber-reinforced composites are investigated.It is shown that the developed micromechanical method is very comprehensive and efficient for fast prediction of effective properties of composites,while the numerical method is very accurate in detailed modeling of the mechanical behavior of composites with multiple inclusions.

  6. Analysis of metal-matrix composite structures. I - Micromechanics constitutive theory. II - Laminate analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenburg, R. T.; Reddy, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    The micromechanical constitutive theory is used to examine the nonlinear behavior of continuous-fiber-reinforced metal-matrix composite structures. Effective lamina constitutive relations based on the Abouli micromechanics theory are presented. The inelastic matrix behavior is modeled by the unified viscoplasticity theory of Bodner and Partom. The laminate constitutive relations are incorporated into a first-order deformation plate theory. The resulting boundary value problem is solved by utilizing the finite element method. Attention is also given to computational aspects of the numerical solution, including the temporal integration of the inelastic strains and the spatial integration of bending moments. Numerical results the nonlinear response of metal matrix composites subjected to extensional and bending loads are presented.

  7. Micromechanical modelling of nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained metals: A short overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    An overview of micromechanical models of strength and deformation behaviour of nanostructured and ultrafine grained metallic materials is presented. Composite models of nanomaterials, polycrystal plasticity based models, grain boundary sliding, the effect of non-equilibrium grain boundaries...... and nanoscale properties are discussed and compared. The examples of incorporation of peculiar nanocrystalline effects (like large content of amorphous or semi-amorphous grain boundary phase, partial dislocation GB emission/glide/GB absorption based deformation mechanism, diffusion deformation, etc.......) into the continuum mechanical approach are given. The possibilities of using micromechanical models to explore the ways of the improving the properties of nanocrystalline materials by modifying their structures (e.g., dispersion strengthening, creating non-equilibrium grain boundaries, varying the grain size...

  8. Practically Efficient Blind Speech Separation Using Frequency Band Selection Based on Magnitude Squared Coherence and a Small Dodecahedral Microphone Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunobu Kondo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small agglomerative microphone array systems have been proposed for use with speech communication and recognition systems. Blind source separation methods based on frequency domain independent component analysis have shown significant separation performance, and the microphone arrays are small enough to make them portable. However, the level of computational complexity involved is very high because the conventional signal collection and processing method uses 60 microphones. In this paper, we propose a band selection method based on magnitude squared coherence. Frequency bands are selected based on the spatial and geometric characteristics of the microphone array device which is strongly related to the dodecahedral shape, and the selected bands are nonuniformly spaced. The estimated reduction in the computational complexity is 90% with a 68% reduction in the number of frequency bands. Separation performance achieved during our experimental evaluation was 7.45 (dB (signal-to-noise ratio and 2.30 (dB (cepstral distortion. These results show improvement in performance compared to the use of uniformly spaced frequency band.

  9. Motherboards, Microphones and Metaphors: Re-Examining New Literacies and Black Feminist Thought through Technologies of Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Tisha Lewis; Kirkland, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how two African American females composed counter-selves using a computer motherboard and a stand-alone microphone as critical identity texts. Situated within sociocultural and critical traditions in new literacy studies and black feminist thought, the authors extend conceptions of language, literacy and black femininity via…

  10. Motherboards, Microphones and Metaphors: Re-Examining New Literacies and Black Feminist Thought through Technologies of Self

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Tisha Lewis; Kirkland, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how two African American females composed counter-selves using a computer motherboard and a stand-alone microphone as critical identity texts. Situated within sociocultural and critical traditions in new literacy studies and black feminist thought, the authors extend conceptions of language, literacy and black femininity via…

  11. Speech recognition in noise using bilateral open-fit hearing aids: the limited benefit of directional microphones and noise reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Lennart; Claesson, Ann; Persson, Maria; Tengstrand, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    To investigate speech recognition performance in noise with bilateral open-fit hearing aids and as reference also with closed earmolds, in omnidirectional mode, directional mode, and directional mode in conjunction with noise reduction. A within-subject design with repeated measures across conditions was used. Speech recognition thresholds in noise were obtained for the different conditions. Twenty adults without prior experience with hearing aids. All had symmetric sensorineural mild hearing loss in the lower frequencies and moderate to severe hearing loss in the higher frequencies. Speech recognition performance in noise was not significantly better with an omnidirectional microphone compared to unaided, whereas performance was significantly better with a directional microphone (1.6 dB with open fitting and 4.4 dB with closed earmold) compared to unaided. With open fitting, no significant additional advantage was obtained by combining the directional microphone with a noise reduction algorithm, but with closed earmolds a significant additional advantage of 0.8 dB was obtained. The significant, though limited, advantage of directional microphones and the absence of additional significant improvement by a noise reduction algorithm should be considered when fitting open-fit hearing aids.

  12. FILTWAM - A Framework for Online Game-based Communication Skills Training - Using Webcams and Microphones for Enhancing Learner Support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahreini, Kiavash; Nadolski, Rob; Qi, Wen; Westera, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Bahreini, K., Nadolski, R., Qi, W., & Westera, W. (2012). FILTWAM - A Framework for Online Game-based Communication Skills Training - Using Webcams and Microphones for Enhancing Learner Support. In P. Felicia (Ed.), The 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning - ECGBL 2012 (pp. 39-48). Cork,

  13. Application of a circular 2D hard-sphere microphone array for higher-order Ambisonics auralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weller, Tobias; Favrot, Sylvain Emmanuel; Buchholz, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    A circular microphone array mounted on a rigid sphere was realized and its application to higherorder Ambisonics (HOA) auralization was analysed. Besides the 2D Ambisonics application this array design provides a promising basis for the development of a mixed-order Ambisonics recording system...

  14. Polydimethylsiloxane, a photocurable rubberelastic polymer used as spring material in micromechanical sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Lötters, Joost Conrad; Lotters, Joost Conrad; Olthuis, Wouter; Veltink, Petrus H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1997-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a commercially available physically and chemically stable photocurable silicone rubber which has a unique flexibility (G≈250 kPa) at room temperature. Further properties of PDMS are a low elasticity change versus temperature (1.1 kPa/°C), no elasticity change versus frequency and a high compressibility. PDMS is an interesting polymer to be used as spring material in micromechanical sensors such as accelerometers. The spring constant of the PDMS structures was th...

  15. Micromechanics analysis of thermal expansion and thermal pressurization of a hardened cement paste

    OpenAIRE

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The results of a macro-scale experimental study of the effect of heating on a fluid-saturated hardened cement paste are analysed using a multi-scale homogenization model. The analysis of the experimental results revealed that the thermal expansion coefficient of the cement paste pore fluid is anomalously higher than the one of pure bulk water. The micromechanics model is calibrated using the results of drained and undrained heating tests and permits the extrapolation o...

  16. Micromechanical modelling of nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained metals: A short overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Levashov, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    An overview of micromechanical models of strength and deformation behaviour of nanostructured and ultrafine grained metallic materials is presented. Composite models of nanomaterials, polycrystal plasticity based models, grain boundary sliding, the effect of non-equilibrium grain boundaries...... and nanoscale properties are discussed and compared. The examples of incorporation of peculiar nanocrystalline effects (like large content of amorphous or semi-amorphous grain boundary phase, partial dislocation GB emission/glide/GB absorption based deformation mechanism, diffusion deformation, etc...

  17. Design and fabrication of compliant micromechanisms and structures with negative Poisson's ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik Darling; Sigmund, Ole; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a new way to design and fabricate compliant micromechanisms and material structures with negative Poisson's ratio (NPR). The design of compliant mechanisms and material structures is accomplished in an automated way using a numerical topology optimization method, The procedure......, all in one two-step reactive ion etching (RIE) process. The components are tested using a probe placed on an x-y stage. This fast prototyping allows newly developed topologies to be fabricated and tested within the same day...

  18. Activation barrier scaling and crossover for noise-induced switching in micromechanical parametric oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H B; Stambaugh, C

    2007-08-10

    We explore fluctuation-induced switching in parametrically driven micromechanical torsional oscillators. The oscillators possess one, two, or three stable attractors depending on the modulation frequency. Noise induces transitions between the coexisting attractors. Near the bifurcation points, the activation barriers are found to have a power law dependence on frequency detuning with critical exponents that are in agreement with predicted universal scaling relationships. At large detuning, we observe a crossover to a different power law dependence with an exponent that is device specific.

  19. Micromechanics Analysis Code With Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC): User Guide. Version 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S. M.; Bednarcyk, B. A.; Wilt, T. E.; Trowbridge, D.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to accurately predict the thermomechanical deformation response of advanced composite materials continues to play an important role in the development of these strategic materials. Analytical models that predict the effective behavior of composites are used not only by engineers performing structural analysis of large-scale composite components but also by material scientists in developing new material systems. For an analytical model to fulfill these two distinct functions it must be based on a micromechanics approach which utilizes physically based deformation and life constitutive models and allows one to generate the average (macro) response of a composite material given the properties of the individual constituents and their geometric arrangement. Here the user guide for the recently developed, computationally efficient and comprehensive micromechanics analysis code, MAC, who's predictive capability rests entirely upon the fully analytical generalized method of cells, GMC, micromechanics model is described. MAC/ GMC is a versatile form of research software that "drives" the double or triply periodic micromechanics constitutive models based upon GMC. MAC/GMC enhances the basic capabilities of GMC by providing a modular framework wherein 1) various thermal, mechanical (stress or strain control) and thermomechanical load histories can be imposed, 2) different integration algorithms may be selected, 3) a variety of material constitutive models (both deformation and life) may be utilized and/or implemented, and 4) a variety of fiber architectures (both unidirectional, laminate and woven) may be easily accessed through their corresponding representative volume elements contained within the supplied library of RVEs or input directly by the user, and 5) graphical post processing of the macro and/or micro field quantities is made available.

  20. Micromechanics model for predicting anisotropic electrical conductivity of carbon fiber composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Mohammad Faisal; Haider, Md. Mushfique; Yasmeen, Farzana

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneous materials, such as composites consist of clearly distinguishable constituents (or phases) that show different electrical properties. Multifunctional composites have anisotropic electrical properties that can be tailored for a particular application. The effective anisotropic electrical conductivity of composites is strongly affected by many parameters including volume fractions, distributions, and orientations of constituents. Given the electrical properties of the constituents, one important goal of micromechanics of materials consists of predicting electrical response of the heterogeneous material on the basis of the geometries and properties of the individual phases, a task known as homogenization. The benefit of homogenization is that the behavior of a heterogeneous material can be determined without resorting or testing it. Furthermore, continuum micromechanics can predict the full multi-axial properties and responses of inhomogeneous materials, which are anisotropic in nature. Effective electrical conductivity estimation is performed by using classical micromechanics techniques (composite cylinder assemblage method) that investigates the effect of the fiber/matrix electrical properties and their volume fractions on the micro scale composite response. The composite cylinder assemblage method (CCM) is an analytical theory that is based on the assumption that composites are in a state of periodic structure. The CCM was developed to extend capabilities variable fiber shape/array availability with same volume fraction, interphase analysis, etc. The CCM is a continuum-based micromechanics model that provides closed form expressions for upper level length scales such as macro-scale composite responses in terms of the properties, shapes, orientations and constituent distributions at lower length levels such as the micro-scale.