WorldWideScience

Sample records for mice generated defective

  1. Defective propagation of signals generated by sympathetic nerve stimulation in the liver of connexin32-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, E; Bützler, C; Jung, D; Temme, A; Gabriel, H D; Dahl, U; Traub, O; Stümpel, F; Jungermann, K; Zielasek, J; Toyka, K V; Dermietzel, R; Willecke, K

    1996-09-03

    The gap junctional protein connexin32 is expressed in hepatocytes, exocrine pancreatic cells, Schwann cells, and other cell types. We have inactivated the connexin32 gene by homologous recombination in the mouse genome and have generated homozygous connexin32-deficient mice that were viable and fertile but weighed on the average approximately 17% less than wild-type controls. Electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerves in connexin32-deficient liver triggered a 78% lower amount of glucose mobilization from glycogen stores, when compared with wild-type liver. Thus, connexin32-containing gap junctions are essential in mouse liver for maximal intercellular propagation of the noradrenaline signal from the periportal (upstream) area, where it is received from sympathetic nerve endings, to perivenous (downstream) hepatocytes. In connexin32-defective liver, the amount of connexin26 protein expressed was found to be lower than in wild-type liver, and the total area of gap junction plaques was approximately 1000-fold smaller than in wild-type liver. In contrast to patients with connexin32 defects suffering from X chromosome-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTX) due to demyelination in Schwann cells of peripheral nerves, connexin32-deficient mice did not show neurological abnormalities when analyzed at 3 months of age. It is possible, however, that they may develop neurodegenerative symptoms at older age.

  2. Defective propagation of signals generated by sympathetic nerve stimulation in the liver of connexin32-deficient mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Nelles, E; Bützler, C; Jung, D; Temme, A; Gabriel, H D; Dahl, U; Traub, O; Stümpel, F; Jungermann, K; Zielasek, J; Toyka, K V; Dermietzel, R; Willecke, K

    1996-01-01

    The gap junctional protein connexin32 is expressed in hepatocytes, exocrine pancreatic cells, Schwann cells, and other cell types. We have inactivated the connexin32 gene by homologous recombination in the mouse genome and have generated homozygous connexin32-deficient mice that were viable and fertile but weighed on the average approximately 17% less than wild-type controls. Electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerves in connexin32-deficient liver triggered a 78% lower amount of glucose mob...

  3. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones

  4. Cell-extrinsic defective lymphocyte development in Lmna(-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Hale

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes all A-type lamins, result in a variety of human diseases termed laminopathies. Lmna(-/- mice appear normal at birth but become runted as early as 2 weeks of age and develop multiple tissue defects that mimic some aspects of human laminopathies. Lmna(-/- mice also display smaller spleens and thymuses. In this study, we investigated whether altered lymphoid organ sizes are correlated with specific defects in lymphocyte development.Lmna(-/- mice displayed severe age-dependent defects in T and B cell development which coincided with runting. Lmna(-/- bone marrow reconstituted normal T and B cell development in irradiated wild-type recipients, driving generation of functional and self-MHC restricted CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells. Transplantation of Lmna(-/- neonatal thymus lobes into syngeneic wild-type recipients resulted in good engraftment of thymic tissue and normal thymocyte development.Collectively, these data demonstrate that the severe defects in lymphocyte development that characterize Lmna(-/- mice do not result directly from the loss of A-type lamin function in lymphocytes or thymic stroma. Instead, the immune defects in Lmna(-/- mice likely reflect indirect damage, perhaps resulting from prolonged stress due to the striated muscle dystrophies that occur in these mice.

  5. Mechanical Forces Exacerbate Periodontal Defects in Bsp-null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soenjaya, Y.; Foster, B.L.; Nociti, F.H.; Ao, M.; Holdsworth, D.W.; Hunter, G.K.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is an acidic phosphoprotein with collagen-binding, cell attachment, and hydroxyapatite-nucleating properties. BSP expression in mineralized tissues is upregulated at onset of mineralization. Bsp-null (Bsp-/-) mice exhibit reductions in bone mineral density, bone turnover, osteoclast activation, and impaired bone healing. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice have marked periodontal tissue breakdown, with a lack of acellular cementum leading to periodontal ligament detachment, extensive alveolar bone and tooth root resorption, and incisor malocclusion. We hypothesized that altered mechanical stress from mastication contributes to periodontal destruction observed in Bsp-/- mice. This hypothesis was tested by comparing Bsp-/- and wild-type mice fed with standard hard pellet diet or soft powder diet. Dentoalveolar tissues were analyzed using histology and micro–computed tomography. By 8 wk of age, Bsp-/- mice exhibited molar and incisor malocclusion regardless of diet. Bsp-/- mice with hard pellet diet exhibited high incidence (30%) of severe incisor malocclusion, 10% lower body weight, 3% reduced femur length, and 30% elevated serum alkaline phosphatase activity compared to wild type. Soft powder diet reduced severe incisor malocclusion incidence to 3% in Bsp-/- mice, supporting the hypothesis that occlusal loading contributed to the malocclusion phenotype. Furthermore, Bsp-/- mice in the soft powder diet group featured normal body weight, long bone length, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity, suggesting that tooth dysfunction and malnutrition contribute to growth and skeletal defects reported in Bsp-/- mice. Bsp-/- incisors also erupt at a slower rate, which likely leads to the observed thickened dentin and enhanced mineralization of dentin and enamel toward the apical end. We propose that the decrease in eruption rate is due to a lack of acellular cementum and associated defective periodontal attachment. These data demonstrate the importance of BSP

  6. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in mutator mice confer respiration defects and B-cell lymphoma development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mito

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutator mice are proposed to express premature aging phenotypes including kyphosis and hair loss (alopecia due to their carrying a nuclear-encoded mtDNA polymerase with a defective proofreading function, which causes accelerated accumulation of random mutations in mtDNA, resulting in expression of respiration defects. On the contrary, transmitochondrial mito-miceΔ carrying mtDNA with a large-scale deletion mutation (ΔmtDNA also express respiration defects, but not express premature aging phenotypes. Here, we resolved this discrepancy by generating mtDNA mutator mice sharing the same C57BL/6J (B6J nuclear background with that of mito-miceΔ. Expression patterns of premature aging phenotypes are very close, when we compared between homozygous mtDNA mutator mice carrying a B6J nuclear background and selected mito-miceΔ only carrying predominant amounts of ΔmtDNA, in their expression of significant respiration defects, kyphosis, and a short lifespan, but not the alopecia. Therefore, the apparent discrepancy in the presence and absence of premature aging phenotypes in mtDNA mutator mice and mito-miceΔ, respectively, is partly the result of differences in the nuclear background of mtDNA mutator mice and of the broad range of ΔmtDNA proportions of mito-miceΔ used in previous studies. We also provided direct evidence that mtDNA abnormalities in homozygous mtDNA mutator mice are responsible for respiration defects by demonstrating the co-transfer of mtDNA and respiration defects from mtDNA mutator mice into mtDNA-less (ρ(0 mouse cells. Moreover, heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice had a normal lifespan, but frequently developed B-cell lymphoma, suggesting that the mtDNA abnormalities in heterozygous mutator mice are not sufficient to induce a short lifespan and aging phenotypes, but are able to contribute to the B-cell lymphoma development during their prolonged lifespan.

  7. Enzyme replacement prevents enamel defects in hypophosphatasia mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manisha C.; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Foster, Brian L.; Fong, Hanson; Cory, Esther; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sah, Robert L.; Somerman, Martha; Whyte, Michael P.; Millán, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is the inborn error of metabolism characterized by deficiency of alkaline phosphatase activity leading to rickets or osteomalacia and to dental defects. HPP occurs from loss-of-function mutations within the gene that encodes the tissue-nonspecific isozyme of alkaline phosphatase (TNAP). TNAP knockout (Alpl−/−, a.k.a. Akp2−/−) mice closely phenocopy infantile HPP, including the rickets, vitamin B6-responsive seizures, improper dentin mineralization, and lack of acellular cementum. Here, we report that lack of TNAP in Alpl−/− mice also causes severe enamel defects, which are preventable by enzyme replacement with mineral-targeted TNAP (ENB-0040). Immunohistochemistry was used to map the spatiotemporal expression of TNAP in the tissues of the developing enamel organ of healthy mouse molars and incisors. We found strong, stage-specific expression of TNAP in ameloblasts. In the Alpl−/− mice, histological, μCT, and scanning electron microscopy analysis showed reduced mineralization and disrupted organization of the rods and inter-rod structures in enamel of both the molars and incisors. All of these abnormalities were prevented in mice receiving from birth daily subcutaneous injections of mineral-targeting, human TNAP (sALP-FcD10, a.k.a. ENB-0040) at 8.2 mg/kg/day for up to 44 days. These data reveal an important role for TNAP in enamel mineralization, and demonstrate the efficacy of mineral-targeted TNAP to prevent enamel defects in HPP. PMID:22461224

  8. Automated Diagnosis and Classification of Steam Generator Tube Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Gabe V.

    2004-01-01

    A major cause of failure in nuclear steam generators is tube degradation. Tube defects are divided into seven categories, one of which is intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC). Defects of this type usually begin on the outer surface of the tubes and propagate both inward and laterally. In many cases these defects occur at or near the tube support plates. Several different methods exist for the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear steam generator tubes for defect characterization

  9. Defect generation during solidification of aluminium foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, M.; Garcia-Moreno, F.; Banhart, J.

    2010-01-01

    The reason for the frequent occurrence of cell wall defects in metal foams was investigated. Aluminium foams often expand during solidification, a process which is referred as solidification expansion (SE). The effect of SE on the structure of aluminium foams was studied in situ by X-ray radioscopy and ex situ by X-ray tomography. A direct correlation between the magnitude of SE and the number of cell wall ruptures during SE and finally the number of defects in the solidified foams was found.

  10. How safe is defect specific maintenance of steam generator tubes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorsek, T.; Cizelj, L.

    1995-01-01

    Outside diameter stress corrosion cracking at the tube to tube support plate intersections is assessed in the paper. The impact of defect specific maintenance on steam generator operation safety and reliability was investigated. This was performed by comparing efficiencies of defect specific and traditional maintenance strategy. The efficiency was studied through expected primary-to-secondary leak rate and tube rupture probability in a case of postulated accidental operating conditions, and number of tubes which shall be plugged using both maintenance strategies. In general, the efficiency of specific maintenance is function of particular steam generator and operating cycle. (author)

  11. Generation and characterization of mice carrying a conditional allele of the Wwox tumor suppressor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Ludes-Meyers

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available WWOX, the gene that spans the second most common human chromosomal fragile site, FRA16D, is inactivated in multiple human cancers and behaves as a suppressor of tumor growth. Since we are interested in understanding WWOX function in both normal and cancer tissues we generated mice harboring a conditional Wwox allele by flanking Exon 1 of the Wwox gene with LoxP sites. Wwox knockout (KO mice were developed by breeding with transgenic mice carrying the Cre-recombinase gene under the control of the adenovirus EIIA promoter. We found that Wwox KO mice suffered from severe metabolic defect(s resulting in growth retardation and all mice died by 3 wk of age. All Wwox KO mice displayed significant hypocapnia suggesting a state of metabolic acidosis. This finding and the known high expression of Wwox in kidney tubules suggest a role for Wwox in acid/base balance. Importantly, Wwox KO mice displayed histopathological and hematological signs of impaired hematopoiesis, leukopenia, and splenic atrophy. Impaired hematopoiesis can also be a contributing factor to metabolic acidosis and death. Hypoglycemia and hypocalcemia was also observed affecting the KO mice. In addition, bone metabolic defects were evident in Wwox KO mice. Bones were smaller and thinner having reduced bone volume as a consequence of a defect in mineralization. No evidence of spontaneous neoplasia was observed in Wwox KO mice. We have generated a new mouse model to inactivate the Wwox tumor suppressor gene conditionally. This will greatly facilitate the functional analysis of Wwox in adult mice and will allow investigating neoplastic transformation in specific target tissues.

  12. Biological Background of Kh.DIC Mice and Their Learning and Memory Defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘卫松; 邢东明; 秦川; 孙虹; 高虹; 金文; 杜力军

    2003-01-01

    The learning ability of the Kh.DIC mice, a mutant of the Kunming mice, was studied to analyze its memory development.The mice's brain function was evaluated using a water maze with the amount of monoamines measured by fluorospectrophotometry and enzyme activities detected by ultraviolet spectrophotometry.The mice were found to have spacial learning and memory defects at the age of 1 month in both ordinary animals and in special pathogen free (SPF) animals.At the same time, the amount of monoamines and the activities of monoamine oxidase-B and dopamine-β-hydroxylase differed from those of the Kunming mice.The defects might be related to the differences in the monoamine neurotransmitter system.The results suggest that the DIC mice may be useful economic animal models for the study of brain defects.

  13. Penetrance of eye defects in mice heterozygous for mutation of Gli3 is enhanced by heterozygous mutation of Pax6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price David J

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the consequences of heterozygous mutations of developmentally important genes is important for understanding human genetic disorders. The Gli3 gene encodes a zinc finger transcription factor and homozygous loss-of-function mutations of Gli3 are lethal. Humans heterozygous for mutations in this gene suffer Greig cephalopolysyndactyly or Pallister-Hall syndromes, in which limb defects are prominent, and mice heterozygous for similar mutations have extra digits. Here we examined whether eye development, which is abnormal in mice lacking functional Gli3, is defective in Gli3+/- mice. Results We showed that Gli3 is expressed in the developing eye but that Gli3+/- mice have only very subtle eye defects. We then generated mice compound heterozygous for mutations in both Gli3 and Pax6, which encodes another developmentally important transcription factor known to be crucial for eye development. Pax6+/-; Gli3+/- eyes were compared to the eyes of wild-type, Pax6+/- or Gli3+/- siblings. They exhibited a range of abnormalities of the retina, iris, lens and cornea that was more extensive than in single Gli3+/- or Pax6+/- mutants or than would be predicted by addition of their phenotypes. Conclusion These findings indicate that heterozygous mutations of Gli3 can impact on eye development. The importance of a normal Gli3 gene dosage becomes greater in the absence of a normal Pax6 gene dosage, suggesting that the two genes co-operate during eye morphogenesis.

  14. Defects and defect generation in oxide layer of ion implanted silicon-silicon dioxide structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraban, A P

    2002-01-01

    One studies mechanism of generation of defects in Si-SiO sub 2 structure oxide layer as a result of implantation of argon ions with 130 keV energy and 10 sup 1 sup 3 - 3.2 x 10 sup 1 sup 7 cm sup - sup 2 doses. Si-SiO sub 2 structures are produced by thermal oxidation of silicon under 950 deg C temperature. Investigations were based on electroluminescence technique and on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics. Increase of implantation dose was determined to result in spreading of luminosity centres and in its maximum shifting closer to boundary with silicon. Ion implantation was shown, as well, to result in increase of density of surface states at Si-SiO sub 2 interface. One proposed model of defect generation resulting from Ar ion implantation into Si-SiO sub 2

  15. Generation of ERα-floxed and knockout mice using the Cre/LoxP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonson, P.; Omoto, Y.; Humire, P.; Gustafsson, J.-Å.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ERα floxed and knockout mice were generated. ► Disruption of the ERα gene results in sterility in both male and female mice. ► ERα −/− mice have ovaries with hemorrhagic follicles and hypoplastic uterus. ► Female ERα −/− mice develop obesity. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a nuclear receptor that regulates a range of physiological processes in response to estrogens. In order to study its biological role, we generated a floxed ERα mouse line that can be used to knock out ERα in selected tissues by using the Cre/LoxP system. In this study, we established a new ERα knockout mouse line by crossing the floxed ERα mice with Cre deleter mice. Here we show that genetic disruption of the ERα gene in all tissues results in sterility in both male and female mice. Histological examination of uterus and ovaries revealed a dramatically atrophic uterus and hemorrhagic cysts in the ovary. These results suggest that infertility in female mice is the result of functional defects of the reproductive tract. Moreover, female knockout mice are hyperglycemic, develop obesity and at the age of 4 months the body weight of these mice was more than 20% higher compared to wild type littermates and this difference increased over time. Our results demonstrate that ERα is necessary for reproductive tract development and has important functions as a regulator of metabolism in females.

  16. Deletion of SHP-2 in mesenchymal stem cells causes growth retardation, limb and chest deformity, and calvarial defects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Lapinski

    2013-11-01

    In mice, induced global disruption of the Ptpn11 gene, which encodes the SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase, results in severe skeletal abnormalities. To understand the extent to which skeletal abnormalities can be attributed to perturbation of SHP-2 function in bone-forming osteoblasts and chondrocytes, we generated mice in which disruption of Ptpn11 is restricted to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and their progeny, which include both cell types. MSC-lineage-specific SHP-2 knockout (MSC SHP-2 KO mice exhibited postnatal growth retardation, limb and chest deformity, and calvarial defects. These skeletal abnormalities were associated with an absence of mature osteoblasts and massive chondrodysplasia with a vast increase in the number of terminally differentiated hypertrophic chondrocytes in affected bones. Activation of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs and protein kinase B (PKB; also known as AKT was impaired in bone-forming cells of MSC SHP-2 KO mice, which provides an explanation for the skeletal defects that developed. These findings reveal a cell-autonomous role for SHP-2 in bone-forming cells in mice in the regulation of skeletal development. The results add to our understanding of the pathophysiology of skeletal abnormalities observed in humans with germline mutations in the PTPN11 gene (e.g. Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome.

  17. Defects in ultrasonic vocalization of cadherin-6 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryoko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although some molecules have been identified as responsible for human language disorders, there is still little information about what molecular mechanisms establish the faculty of human language. Since mice, like songbirds, produce complex ultrasonic vocalizations for intraspecific communication in several social contexts, they can be good mammalian models for studying the molecular basis of human language. Having found that cadherins are involved in the vocal development of the Bengalese finch, a songbird, we expected cadherins to also be involved in mouse vocalizations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine whether similar molecular mechanisms underlie the vocalizations of songbirds and mammals, we categorized behavioral deficits including vocalization in cadherin-6 knockout mice. Comparing the ultrasonic vocalizations of cadherin-6 knockout mice with those of wild-type controls, we found that the peak frequency and variations of syllables were differed between the mutant and wild-type mice in both pup-isolation and adult-courtship contexts. Vocalizations during male-male aggression behavior, in contrast, did not differ between mutant and wild-type mice. Open-field tests revealed differences in locomotors activity in both heterozygote and homozygote animals and no difference in anxiety behavior. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that cadherin-6 plays essential roles in locomotor activity and ultrasonic vocalization. These findings also support the idea that different species share some of the molecular mechanisms underlying vocal behavior.

  18. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Ramirez-GarciaLuna

    Full Text Available In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1 mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2 re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3 the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  19. Defective bone repair in mast cell-deficient Cpa3Cre/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-GarciaLuna, Jose Luis; Chan, Daniel; Samberg, Robert; Abou-Rjeili, Mira; Wong, Timothy H; Li, Ailian; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Henderson, Janet E; Martineau, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    In the adult skeleton, cells of the immune system interact with those of the skeleton during all phases of bone repair to influence the outcome. Mast cells are immune cells best known for their pathologic role in allergy, and may be involved in chronic inflammatory and fibrotic disorders. Potential roles for mast cells in tissue homeostasis, vascularization and repair remain enigmatic. Previous studies in combined mast cell- and Kit-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice (KitW-sh) implicated mast cells in bone repair but KitW-sh mice suffer from additional Kit-dependent hematopoietic and non- hematopoietic deficiencies that could have confounded the outcome. The goal of the current study was to compare bone repair in normal wild type (WT) and Cpa3Cre/+ mice, which lack mast cells in the absence of any other hematopoietic or non- hematopoietic deficiencies. Repair of a femoral window defect was characterized using micro CT imaging and histological analyses from the early inflammatory phase, through soft and hard callus formation, and finally the remodeling phase. The data indicate 1) mast cells appear in healing bone of WT mice but not Cpa3Cre/+ mice, beginning 14 days after surgery; 2) re-vascularization of repair tissue and deposition of mineralized bone was delayed and dis-organised in Cpa3Cre/+ mice compared with WT mice; 3) the defects in Cpa3Cre/+ mice were associated with little change in anabolic activity and biphasic alterations in osteoclast and macrophage activity. The outcome at 56 days postoperative was complete bridging of the defect in most WT mice and fibrous mal-union in most Cpa3Cre/+ mice. The results indicate that mast cells promote bone healing, possibly by recruiting vascular endothelial cells during the inflammatory phase and coordinating anabolic and catabolic activity during tissue remodeling. Taken together the data indicate that mast cells have a positive impact on bone repair.

  20. PNPLA1 Deficiency in Mice and Humans Leads to a Defect in the Synthesis of Omega-O-Acylceramides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grond, Susanne; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Dubrac, Sandrine; Kolb, Dagmar; Schmuth, Matthias; Fischer, Judith; Crumrine, Debra; Elias, Peter M.; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Lass, Achim; Radner, Franz P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in PNPLA1 have been identified as causative for autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis in humans and dogs. So far, the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we generated and characterized PNPLA1-deficient mice and found that PNPLA1 is crucial for epidermal sphingolipid synthesis. The absence of functional PNPLA1 in mice impaired the formation of omega-O-acylceramides and led to an accumulation of nonesterified omega-hydroxy-ceramides. As a consequence, PNPLA1-deficient mice lacked a functional corneocyte-bound lipid envelope leading to a severe skin barrier defect and premature death of newborn animals. Functional analyses of differentiated keratinocytes from a patient with mutated PNPLA1 demonstrated an identical defect in omega-O-acylceramide synthesis in human cells, indicating that PNPLA1 function is conserved among mammals and indispensable for normal skin physiology. Notably, topical application of epidermal lipids from wild-type onto Pnpla1-mutant mice promoted rebuilding of the corneocyte-bound lipid envelope, indicating that supplementation of ichthyotic skin with omega-O-acylceramides might be a therapeutic approach for the treatment of skin symptoms in individuals affected by omega-O-acylceramide deficiency. PMID:27751867

  1. Minocycline treatment ameliorates interferon-alpha-induced neurogenic defects and depression-like behaviors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Shun eZheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-alpha (IFN-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that is widely used for the treatment of chronic viral hepatitis and malignancy, because of its immune-activating, antiviral, and antiproliferative properties. However, long-term IFN-α treatment frequently causes depression, which limits its clinical utility. The precise molecular and cellular mechanisms of IFN-α-induced depression are not currently understood. Neural stem cells (NSCs in the hippocampus continuously generate new neurons, and some evidence suggests that decreased neurogenesis plays a role in the neuropathology of depression. We previously reported that IFN-α treatment suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis and induced depression-like behaviors via its receptors in the brain in adult mice. However, it is unclear how systemic IFN-α administration induces IFN-α signaling in the hippocampus. In this study, we analyzed the role of microglia, immune cells in the brain, in mediating the IFN-α-induced neurogenic defects and depressive behaviors. In vitro studies demonstrated that IFN-α treatment induced the secretion of endogenous IFN-α from microglia, which suppressed NSC proliferation. In vivo treatment of adult mice with IFN-α for five weeks increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines, including IFN-α, and reduced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. Both effects were prevented by simultaneous treatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation. Furthermore, minocycline treatment significantly suppressed IFN-α-induced depressive behaviors in mice. These results suggest that microglial activation plays a critical role in the development of IFN-α-induced depression, and that minocycline is a promising drug for the treatment of IFN-α-induced depression in patients, especially those who are low responders to conventional antidepressant treatments.

  2. Functional antigen binding by the defective B cells of CBA/N mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snippe, H; Merchant, B; Lizzio, E F; Inman, J K

    1982-01-01

    CBA/N mice have an X-linked B cell defect which prevents them from responding to nonmitogenic thymic independent (TI-2) antigens such as dinitrophenylated DNP-Ficoll (1,2). The F1 male progeny of CBA/N female mice express the same defect. Spleen cell suspensions from such defective mice (CBA/N X C3H/HeN F1 males) could not respond to DNP-Ficoll following in vitro immunization and subsequent transfer into irradiated, syngeneic, F1 male recipients as expected. In contrast, normal CBA/N X C3H/HeN F1 female spleen cells could respond and effect a "rescue"; they mounted strong plaque-forming cell responses 7 days after in vitro exposure to DNP-Ficoll and subsequent transfer into irradiated F1 male recipients. Defective F1 male spleen cells, however, could bind significant quantities of 125I-DNP-Ficoll after in vitro exposure. Extensive washing of these spleen cells could not reverse this binding. Such DNP-Ficoll-exposed and washed F1 male spleen cells could, after transfer, aid normal untreated F1 female cells in their rescue function. The defective F1 male spleen cells could convey immunogenic quantities of DNP-Ficoll to the "rescuing" F1 female cells. Mitomycin treatment of F1 male cells did not interfere with their conveyor function. Goat anti-mouse mu serum impeded the passive antigen conveyor function of defective F1 male cells as did prior exposure to high concentrations of free DNP hapten. Our data support the view that the B cell defect of CBA/N X C3H/HeN F1 male mice does not relate to antigen binding, but rather to an inability to be effectively triggered by certain cell-bound polymeric antigens.

  3. Generation of mice harbouring a conditional loss-of-function allele of Gata6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Stephen A

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The zinc finger transcription factor GATA6 is believed to have important roles in the development of several organs including the liver, gastrointestinal tract and heart. However, analyses of the contribution of GATA6 toward organogenesis have been hampered because Gata6-/- mice fail to develop beyond gastrulation due to defects in extraembryonic endoderm function. We have therefore generated a mouse line harbouring a conditional loss-of-function allele of Gata6 using Cre/loxP technology. LoxP elements were introduced into introns flanking exon 2 of the Gata6 gene by homologous recombination in ES cells. Mice containing this altered allele were bred to homozygosity and were found to be viable and fertile. To assess the functional integrity of the loxP sites and to confirm that we had generated a Gata6 loss-of-function allele, we bred Gata6 'floxed' mice to EIIa-Cre mice in which Cre is ubiquitously expressed, and to Villin-Cre mice that express Cre in the epithelial cells of the intestine. We conclude that we have generated a line of mice in which GATA6 activity can be ablated in a cell type specific manner by expression of Cre recombinase. This line of mice can be used to establish the role of GATA6 in regulating embryonic development and various aspects of mammalian physiology.

  4. Vapb/Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8 knock-in mice display slowly progressive motor behavior defects accompanying ER stress and autophagic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroquette, Frédérique; Seto, Lesley; Gaub, Perrine L; Kamal, Brishna; Wallis, Deeann; Larivière, Roxanne; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; Tsuda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-15

    Missense mutations (P56S) in Vapb are associated with autosomal dominant motor neuron diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and lower motor neuron disease. Although transgenic mice overexpressing the mutant vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB) protein with neuron-specific promoters have provided some insight into the toxic properties of the mutant proteins, their role in pathogenesis remains unclear. To identify pathological defects in animals expressing the P56S mutant VAPB protein at physiological levels in the appropriate tissues, we have generated Vapb knock-in mice replacing wild-type Vapb gene with P56S mutant Vapb gene and analyzed the resulting pathological phenotypes. Heterozygous P56S Vapb knock-in mice show mild age-dependent defects in motor behaviors as characteristic features of the disease. The homozygous P56S Vapb knock-in mice show more severe defects compared with heterozygous mice reflecting the dominant and dose-dependent effects of P56S mutation. Significantly, the knock-in mice demonstrate accumulation of P56S VAPB protein and ubiquitinated proteins in cytoplasmic inclusions, selectively in motor neurons. The mutant mice demonstrate induction of ER stress and autophagic response in motor neurons before obvious onset of behavioral defects, suggesting that these cellular biological defects might contribute to the initiation of the disease. The P56S Vapb knock-in mice could be a valuable tool to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which the disease arises. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Leukemogenic Ptpn11 allele causes defective erythropoiesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Usenko

    Full Text Available Src homology 2 (SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, regulates signaling networks and cell fate in many tissues. Expression of oncogenic PTPN11 in the hematopoietic compartment causes myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN in humans and mice. However, the stage-specific effect(s of mutant Ptpn11 on erythroid development have remained unknown. We found that expression of an activated, leukemogenic Ptpn11 allele, Ptpn11D61Y, specifically in the erythroid lineage causes dyserythropoiesis in mice. Ptpn11D61Y progenitors produce excess cKIT+ CD71+ Ter119- cells and aberrant numbers of cKITl° CD71+ erythroblasts. Mutant erythroblasts show elevated activation of ERK, AKT and STAT3 in response to EPO stimulation, and MEK inhibitor treatment blocks Ptpn11D61Y-evoked erythroid hyperproliferation in vitro. Thus, the expression of oncogenic Ptpn11 causes dyserythropoiesis in a cell-autonomous manner in vivo.

  6. Lactation Defect in a Widely Used MMTV-Cre Transgenic Line of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Taichang; Wang, Yongping; Pao, Lily; Anderson, Steve M.; Gu, Haihua

    2011-01-01

    Background MMTV-Cre mouse lines have played important roles in our understanding about the functions of numerous genes in mouse mammary epithelial cells during mammary gland development and tumorigenesis. However, numerous studies have not included MMTV-Cre mice as controls, and many investigators have not indicated which of the different MMTV-Cre founder lines were used in their studies. Here, we describe a lactation defect that severely limits the use of one of the most commonly used MMTV-Cre founder lines. Methodology/Principal Findings To explore the role of protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp1 in mammary gland development, mice bearing the floxed Shp1 gene were crossed with MMTV-Cre mice and mammary gland development was examined by histological and biochemical techniques, while lactation competency was assessed by monitoring pup growth. Surprisingly, both the Shp1fl/+;MMTV-Cre and MMTV-Cre female mice displayed a severe lactation defect when compared to the Shp1 fl/+ control mice. Histological and biochemical analyses reveal that female mice expressing the MMTV-Cre transgene, either alone or in combination with floxed genes, exhibit defects in lobuloalveolar expansion, presence of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in luminal alveolar epithelial cells postpartum, and precocious induction of involution. Using a PCR-based genotyping method, the three different founder lines can be distinguished, and we determined that the MMTV-Cre line A, the most widely used MMTV-Cre founder line, exhibits a profound lactation defect that limits its use in studies on mammary gland development. Conclusions/Significance The identification of a lactation defect in the MMTV-Cre line A mice indicates that investigators must use MMTV-Cre alone mice as control in studies that utilize Cre recombinase to excise genes of interest from mammary epithelial cells. Our results also suggest that previous results obtained in studies using the MMTV-Cre line A line should be re-evaluated if the

  7. Activation of multiple signaling pathways causes developmental defects in mice with a Noonan syndrome–associated Sos1 mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng-Chieh; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Conner, David; Araki, Toshiyuki; Yuan, Tao; Roberts, Amy; Seidman, Christine E.; Bronson, Roderick; Neel, Benjamin G.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Kucherlapati, Raju

    2010-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder characterized by short stature, unique facial features, and congenital heart disease. About 10%–15% of individuals with NS have mutations in son of sevenless 1 (SOS1), which encodes a RAS and RAC guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). To understand the role of SOS1 in the pathogenesis of NS, we generated mice with the NS-associated Sos1E846K gain-of-function mutation. Both heterozygous and homozygous mutant mice showed many NS-associated phenotypes, including growth delay, distinctive facial dysmorphia, hematologic abnormalities, and cardiac defects. We found that the Ras/MAPK pathway as well as Rac and Stat3 were activated in the mutant hearts. These data provide in vivo molecular and cellular evidence that Sos1 is a GEF for Rac under physiological conditions and suggest that Rac and Stat3 activation might contribute to NS phenotypes. Furthermore, prenatal administration of a MEK inhibitor ameliorated the embryonic lethality, cardiac defects, and NS features of the homozygous mutant mice, demonstrating that this signaling pathway might represent a promising therapeutic target for NS. PMID:21041952

  8. Reversibility of Defective Hematopoiesis Caused by Telomere Shortening in Telomerase Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Raval

    Full Text Available Telomere shortening is common in bone marrow failure syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita (DC, aplastic anemia (AA and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. However, improved knowledge of the lineage-specific consequences of telomere erosion and restoration of telomere length in hematopoietic progenitors is required to advance therapeutic approaches. We have employed a reversible murine model of telomerase deficiency to compare the dependence of erythroid and myeloid lineage differentiation on telomerase activity. Fifth generation Tert-/- (G5 Tert-/- mice with shortened telomeres have significant anemia, decreased erythroblasts and reduced hematopoietic stem cell (HSC populations associated with neutrophilia and increased myelopoiesis. Intracellular multiparameter analysis by mass cytometry showed significantly reduced cell proliferation and increased sensitivity to activation of DNA damage checkpoints in erythroid progenitors and in erythroid-biased CD150hi HSC, but not in myeloid progenitors. Strikingly, Cre-inducible reactivation of telomerase activity restored hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC proliferation, normalized the DNA damage response, and improved red cell production and hemoglobin levels. These data establish a direct link between the loss of TERT activity, telomere shortening and defective erythropoiesis and suggest that novel strategies to restore telomerase function may have an important role in the treatment of the resulting anemia.

  9. Generation of ER{alpha}-floxed and knockout mice using the Cre/LoxP system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonson, P., E-mail: per.antonson@ki.se [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Omoto, Y.; Humire, P. [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Gustafsson, J.-A. [Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Novum, SE-141 83 Huddinge (Sweden); Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ER{alpha} floxed and knockout mice were generated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the ER{alpha} gene results in sterility in both male and female mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ER{alpha}{sup -/-} mice have ovaries with hemorrhagic follicles and hypoplastic uterus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Female ER{alpha}{sup -/-} mice develop obesity. -- Abstract: Estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) is a nuclear receptor that regulates a range of physiological processes in response to estrogens. In order to study its biological role, we generated a floxed ER{alpha} mouse line that can be used to knock out ER{alpha} in selected tissues by using the Cre/LoxP system. In this study, we established a new ER{alpha} knockout mouse line by crossing the floxed ER{alpha} mice with Cre deleter mice. Here we show that genetic disruption of the ER{alpha} gene in all tissues results in sterility in both male and female mice. Histological examination of uterus and ovaries revealed a dramatically atrophic uterus and hemorrhagic cysts in the ovary. These results suggest that infertility in female mice is the result of functional defects of the reproductive tract. Moreover, female knockout mice are hyperglycemic, develop obesity and at the age of 4 months the body weight of these mice was more than 20% higher compared to wild type littermates and this difference increased over time. Our results demonstrate that ER{alpha} is necessary for reproductive tract development and has important functions as a regulator of metabolism in females.

  10. Dynamic characteristics of steam generator U-tubes with defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Jhung, Myung Jo; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the fluid elastic instability characteristics of steam generator (SG) U-tubes with defect and the safety assessment of the potential for fretting-wear damages caused by foreign object in operating nuclear power plants. To get the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and participation factor, modal analyses are performed for the U-tubes either with axial or circumferential flaw with different sizes. Special emphases are on the effects of flaw orientation and size on the modal and instability characteristics of tubes, which are expressed in terms of the natural frequency, corresponding mode shape and stability ratio. Also, the wear rate of U-tube caused by foreign object is calculated using the Archard formula and the remaining life of the tube is predicted, and discussed in this study is the effect of the flow velocity and vibration of the tube on the remaining life of the tube. In addition, addressed in this study is the effect of the internal pressure on the vibration and fretting-wear characteristics of the tube

  11. Motor coordination defects in mice deficient for the Sam68 RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukong, Kiven E; Richard, Stéphane

    2008-06-03

    The role of RNA-binding proteins in the central nervous system and more specifically their role in motor coordination and learning are poorly understood. We previously reported that ablation of RNA-binding protein Sam68 in mice results in male sterility and delayed mammary gland development and protection against osteoporosis in females. Sam68 however is highly expressed in most regions of the brain especially the cerebellum and thus we investigated the cerebellar-related manifestations in Sam68-null mice. We analyzed the mice for motor function, sensory function, and learning and memory abilities. Herein, we report that Sam68-null mice have motor coordination defects as assessed by beam walking and rotorod performance. Forty-week-old Sam68-null mice (n=12) were compared to their wild-type littermates (n=12). The Sam68-null mice exhibited more hindpaw faults in beam walking tests and fell from the rotating drum at lower speeds and prematurely compared to the wild-type controls. The Sam68-null mice were, however, normal for forelimb strength, tail-hang reflex, balance test, grid walking, the Morris water task, recognition memory, visual discrimination, auditory stimulation and conditional taste aversion. Our findings support a role for Sam68 in the central nervous system in the regulation of motor coordination.

  12. Ectopic expression of Ptf1a induces spinal defects, urogenital defects, and anorectal malformations in Danforth's short tail mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Semba

    Full Text Available Danforth's short tail (Sd is a semidominant mutation on mouse chromosome 2, characterized by spinal defects, urogenital defects, and anorectal malformations. However, the gene responsible for the Sd phenotype was unknown. In this study, we identified the molecular basis of the Sd mutation. By positional cloning, we identified the insertion of an early transposon in the Sd candidate locus approximately 12-kb upstream of Ptf1a. We found that insertion of the transposon caused overexpression of three neighboring genes, Gm13344, Gm13336, and Ptf1a, in Sd mutant embryos and that the Sd phenotype was not caused by disruption of an as-yet-unknown gene in the candidate locus. Using multiple knockout and knock-in mouse models, we demonstrated that misexpression of Ptf1a, but not of Gm13344 or Gm13336, in the notochord, hindgut, cloaca, and mesonephros was sufficient to replicate the Sd phenotype. The ectopic expression of Ptf1a in the caudal embryo resulted in attenuated expression of Cdx2 and its downstream target genes T, Wnt3a, and Cyp26a1; we conclude that this is the molecular basis of the Sd phenotype. Analysis of Sd mutant mice will provide insight into the development of the spinal column, anus, and kidney.

  13. Implications of defect clusters formed in cascades on free defect generation and microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1992-12-01

    A large fraction of the defects produced by irradiation with energetic neutrons or heavy ions originates in cascades. Not only increased recombination of vacancy and interstitial defects but also significant clustering of like defects occur. Both processes reduce the number of point defects available for long range migration. Consequences of defect clustering in cascades will be discussed in a semi-quantitative form with the aid of calculations using a very simplified model: Quasi-steady-state distributions of immobile vacancy and/or interstitial clusters develop which, in turn, can become significant sinks for mobile defects, and, therefore reduce their lifetime. Although cluster sinks will cause segregation and, potentially, precipitation of second phases due to local changes of composition, the finite lifetime of clusters will not lead to lasting, local compositional changes. A transition from highly dense interstitial and vacancy cluster distributions to the void swelling regime occurs when the thermal evaporation of vacancies from small vacancy clusters becomes significant at higher temperatures. Unequal clustering of vacancies and interstitials leads to an imbalance of their fluxes of in the matrix and, hence, to unequal contributions to atom transport by interstitials and by vacancies even in the quasi-steady state approximation

  14. Influence of early stress on social abilities and serotonergic functions across generations in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara B Franklin

    Full Text Available Exposure to adverse environments during early development is a known risk factor for several psychiatric conditions including antisocial behavior and personality disorders. Here, we induced social anxiety and altered social recognition memory in adult mice using unpredictable maternal separation and maternal stress during early postnatal life. We show that these social defects are not only pronounced in the animals directly subjected to stress, but are also transmitted to their offspring across two generations. The defects are associated with impaired serotonergic signaling, in particular, reduced 5HT1A receptor expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus, and increased serotonin level in a dorsal raphe projection area. These findings underscore the susceptibility of social behaviors and serotonergic pathways to early stress, and the persistence of their perturbation across generations.

  15. Transgenic Expression of Dspp Partially Rescued the Long Bone Defects of Dmp1-null Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Priyam H.; Gibson, Monica P.; Liu, Chao; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xiaofang; Lu, Yongbo; Qin, Chunlin

    2016-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) belong to the Small Integrin-Binding Ligand N-linked Glycoprotein (SIBLING) family. In addition to the features common to all SIBLING members, DMP1 and DSPP share several unique similarities in chemical structure, proteolytic activation and tissue localization. Mutations in, or deletion of DMP1, cause autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets along with dental defects; DSPP mutations or its ablation are associated with dentinogenesis imperfecta. While the roles and functional mechanisms of DMP1 in osteogenesis have been extensively studied, those of DSPP in long bones have been studied only to a limited extent. Previous studies by our group revealed that transgenic expression of Dspp completely rescued the dentin defects of Dmp1-null (Dmp1−/−) mice. In this investigation, we assessed the effects of transgenic Dspp on osteogenesis by analyzing the formation and mineralization of the long bones in Dmp1−/− mice that expresses a transgene encoding full-length DSPP driven by a 3.6-kb rat Col1a1 promoter (referred as “Dmp1−/−;Dspp-Tg mice”). We characterized the long bones of the Dmp1−/−;Dspp-Tg mice at different ages and compared them with those from Dmp1−/− and Dmp1+/− (normal control) mice. Our analyses showed that the long bones of Dmp1−/−;Dspp-Tg mice had a significant increase in cortical bone thickness, bone volume and mineral density along with a remarkable restoration of trabecular thickness compared to those of the Dmp1−/− mice. The long bones of Dmp1−/−;Dspp-Tg mice underwent a dramatic reduction in the amount of osteoid, significant improvement of the collagen fibrillar network, and better organization of the lacunocanalicular system, compared to the Dmp1−/− mice. The elevated levels of biglycan, bone sialoprotein and osteopontin in Dmp1−/− mice were also noticeably corrected by the transgenic expression of Dspp. These findings suggest that

  16. Minor cell-death defects but reduced tumor latency in mice lacking the BH3-only proteins Bad and Bmf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, F; Woess, C; Pedit, V; Tzankov, A; Labi, V; Villunger, A

    2013-01-31

    Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members of the Bcl-2 homology (BH)3-only subgroup are critical for the establishment and maintenance of tissue homeostasis and can mediate apoptotic cell death in response to developmental cues or exogenously induced forms of cell stress. On the basis of the biochemical experiments as well as genetic studies in mice, the BH3-only proteins Bad and Bmf have been implicated in different proapoptotic events such as those triggered by glucose- or trophic factor-deprivation, glucocorticoids, or histone deacetylase inhibition, as well as suppression of B-cell lymphomagenesis upon aberrant expression of c-Myc. To address possible redundancies in cell death regulation and tumor suppression, we generated compound mutant mice lacking both genes. Our studies revealed lack of redundancy in most paradigms of lymphocyte apoptosis tested in tissue culture. Only spontaneous cell death of thymocytes kept in low glucose or that of pre-B cells deprived of cytokines was significantly delayed when both genes were lacking. Of note, despite these minor apoptosis defects we observed compromised lymphocyte homeostasis in vivo that affected mainly the B-cell lineage. Long-term follow-up revealed significantly reduced latency to spontaneous tumor formation in aged mice when both genes were lacking. Together our study suggests that Bad and Bmf co-regulate lymphocyte homeostasis and limit spontaneous transformation by mechanisms that may not exclusively be linked to the induction of lymphocyte apoptosis.

  17. Drinking water treatment is not associated with an observed increase in neural tube defects in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Vanessa E.; Johnstone, David W.; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2018-01-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) arise when natural organic matter in source water reacts with disinfectants used in the water treatment process. Studies have suggested an association between DBPs and birth defects. Neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos of untreated control mice were first observed in-house in May 2006 and have continued to date. The source of the NTD-inducing agent was previously determined to be a component of drinking water. Tap water samples from a variety of sources were analyzed for trihalomethanes (THMs) to determine if they were causing the malformations. NTDs were observed in CD-1 mice provided with treated and untreated surface water. Occurrence of NTDs varied by water source and treatment regimens. THMs were detected in tap water derived from surface water but not detected in tap water derived from a groundwater source. THMs were absent in untreated river water and laboratory purified waters, yet the percentage of NTDs in untreated river water were similar to the treated water counterpart. These findings indicate that THMs were not the primary cause of NTDs in the mice since the occurrence of NTDs was unrelated to drinking water disinfection. PMID:24497082

  18. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, An; Lee, Christopher James; Bijkerk, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy

  19. Eddy Current Signature Classification of Steam Generator Tube Defects Using A Learning Vector Quantization Neural Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Gabe V.

    2005-01-01

    A major cause of failure in nuclear steam generators is degradation of their tubes. Although seven primary defect categories exist, one of the principal causes of tube failure is intergranular attack/stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC). This type of defect usually begins on the secondary side surface of the tubes and propagates both inwards and laterally. In many cases this defect is found at or near the tube support plates

  20. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palittiya Sintusek

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome.

  1. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintusek, Palittiya; Catapano, Francesco; Angkathunkayul, Napat; Marrosu, Elena; Parson, Simon H.; Morgan, Jennifer E.; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON) designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome. PMID:27163330

  2. Generation of mice with a conditional Foxp2 null allele

    OpenAIRE

    French, C.; Groszer, M.; Preece, C.; Coupe, A.; Rajewsky, K.; Fisher, S.

    2007-01-01

    Disruptions of the human FOXP2 gene cause problems with articulation of complex speech sounds, accompanied by impairment in many aspects of language ability. The FOXP2/Foxp2 transcription factor is highly similar in humans and mice, and shows a complex conserved expression pattern, with high levels in neuronal subpopulations of the cortex, striatum, thalamus, and cerebellum. In the present study we generated mice in which loxP sites flank exons 12?14 of Foxp2; these exons encode the DNA-bindi...

  3. Defective B cell response to T-dependent immunization in lupus-prone mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Haitao; Sobel, Eric S.; Morel, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Lupus anti-nuclear Abs show the characteristics of Ag-driven T cell-dependent (TD) humoral responses. If autoAgs elicit the same response as exogenous Ags, lupus should enhance humoral responses to immunization. Blunted responses to various immunizations have, however, been reported in a significant portion of lupus patients. In this study, we show that lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (B6.TC) mice produce significantly less Ab in response to TD immunization than congenic controls, while producing significantly more total Ig. This blunted Ab response to TD Ag could be reconstituted with B6.TC B and CD4+ T cells. Multiple defects were found in the B6.TC response to NP-KLH as compared to total Ig, including a smaller percentage of B cells participating to the NP-response, a reduced entry into germinal centers, and highly defective production of NP-specific long-lived plasma cells in the bone marrow. B6.TC plasma cells expressed reduced levels of FcγRIIb, which suggests that reduced apoptosis in resident plasma cells prevents the establishment of newly-formed NP-specific plasma cells in bone marrow niches. Overall, these results show that lupus-prone mice responded differently to auto- and exogenous antigens and suggest that low FcγRIIb, hypergammaglobulinemia and high autoantibody production would be predictive of a poor response to immunization in lupus patients. PMID:18924209

  4. Multiple non-cell-autonomous defects underlie neocortical callosal dysgenesis in Nfib-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunn Nana

    2009-12-01

    results indicate that in addition to regulating the development of midline glial populations, Nfib also regulates the expression of neuropilin 1 within the cingulate cortex. Collectively, these data indicate that defects in midline glia and cingulate cortex neurons are associated with the callosal dysgenesis seen in Nfib-deficient mice, and provide insight into how the development of these cellular populations is controlled at a molecular level.

  5. Failure Pressure Estimates of Steam Generator Tubes Containing Wear-type Defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon-Suk Chang; Jong-Min Kim; Nam-Su Huh; Young-Jin Kim; Seong Sik Hwang; Joung-Soo Kim

    2006-01-01

    It is commonly requested that steam generator tubes with defects exceeding 40% of wall thickness in depth should be plugged to sustain all postulated loads with appropriate margin. The critical defect dimensions have been determined based on the concept of plastic instability. This criterion, however, is known to be too conservative for some locations and types of defects. In this context, the accurate failure estimation for steam generator tubes with a defect draws increasing attention. Although several guidelines have been developed and are used for assessing the integrity of defected tubes, most of these guidelines are related to stress corrosion cracking or wall-thinning phenomena. As some of steam generator tubes are also failed due to fretting and so on, alternative failure estimation schemes for relevant defects are required. In this paper, three-dimensional finite element (FE) analyses are carried out under internal pressure condition to simulate the failure behavior of steam generator tubes with different defect configurations; elliptical wastage type, wear scar type and rectangular wastage type defects. Maximum pressures based on material strengths are obtained from more than a hundred FE results to predict the failure of the steam generator tube. After investigating the effect of key parameters such as wastage depth, wastage length and wrap angle, simplified failure estimation equations are proposed in relation to the equivalent stress at the deepest point in wastage region. Comparison of failure pressures predicted according to the proposed estimation scheme with some corresponding burst test data shows good agreement, which provides a confidence in the use of the proposed equations to assess the integrity of steam generator tubes with wear-type defects. (authors)

  6. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N. Murdoch

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects (NTDs are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  7. Mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 Cause Hydrocephalus, Laterality Defects, and Sinusitis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungshin Ha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have previously described a forward genetic screen in mice for abnormalities of brain development. Characterization of two hydrocephalus mutants by whole-exome sequencing after whole-genome SNP mapping revealed novel recessive mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48. Mouse mutants of these two genes have not been previously reported. The Dnaaf1 mutant carries a mutation at the splice donor site of exon 4, which results in abnormal transcripts. The Lrrc48 mutation is a missense mutation at a highly conserved leucine residue, which is also associated with a decrease in Lrrc48 transcription. Both Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 belong to a leucine-rich repeat-containing protein family and are components of the ciliary axoneme. Their Chlamydomonas orthologs are known to be required for normal ciliary beat frequency or flagellar waveform, respectively. Some Dnaaf1 or Lrrc48 homozygote mutants displayed laterality defects, suggesting a motile cilia defect in the embryonic node. Mucus accumulation and neutrophil infiltration in the maxillary sinuses suggested sinusitis. Dnaaf1 mutants showed postnatal lethality, and none survived to weaning age. Lrrc48 mutants survive to adulthood, but had male infertility. ARL13B immunostaining showed the presence of motile cilia in the mutants, and the distal distribution of DNAH9 in the axoneme of upper airway motile cilia appeared normal. The phenotypic abnormalities suggest that mutations in Dnaaf1 and Lrrc48 cause defects in motile cilia function.

  8. Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier 2 Hypomorphism in Mice Leads to Defects in Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A. Vigueira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Carrier-facilitated pyruvate transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane plays an essential role in anabolic and catabolic intermediary metabolism. Mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 2 (Mpc2 is believed to be a component of the complex that facilitates mitochondrial pyruvate import. Complete MPC2 deficiency resulted in embryonic lethality in mice. However, a second mouse line expressing an N-terminal truncated MPC2 protein (Mpc2Δ16 was viable but exhibited a reduced capacity for mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation. Metabolic studies demonstrated exaggerated blood lactate concentrations after pyruvate, glucose, or insulin challenge in Mpc2Δ16 mice. Additionally, compared with wild-type controls, Mpc2Δ16 mice exhibited normal insulin sensitivity but elevated blood glucose after bolus pyruvate or glucose injection. This was attributable to reduced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and was corrected by sulfonylurea KATP channel inhibitor administration. Collectively, these data are consistent with a role for MPC2 in mitochondrial pyruvate import and suggest that Mpc2 deficiency results in defective pancreatic β cell glucose sensing.

  9. Study of defect generated visible photoluminescence in zinc oxide nano-particles prepared using PVA templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudhia, A. [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Choudhary, A., E-mail: aarti.bhilai@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Sharma, S.; Aggrawal, S. [Department of Physics, Government V.Y.T. PG. Autonomous College, Durg, 491001 C.G. (India); Dhoble, S.J. [RTM University Nagpur, Maharashtra (India)

    2014-10-15

    Intrinsic defect generated photoluminescence (PL) in zinc oxide nanoparticles (NPs) obtained by a PVA template based wet-chemical process has been studied. A good controllability was achieved on the surface defects, structure and the morphology of ZnO NPs through the variation of solvents used in synthesis. The PL emission strongly depended on the defect structure and morphology. SEM, XRD, annealing and PL excitation studies were used to analyze the types of defects involved in the visible emission as well as the defect concentration. The mechanism for the blue, green and yellow emissions was proposed. The spectral content of the visible emission was controlled through generation/removal of defects through the shape transformation or annealing by focusing on defect origins and broad controls. - Highlights: • ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized using poly-vinyl alcohol template in various solvents. • The structure and morphology of ZnO nanoparticles were depended on dielectric constant and boiling point of solvents. • Photoluminescence properties of ZnO nanoparticles were studied. • Maximum optical absorbance and Photoluminescence intensity were found in ethanolic preparation. • ZnO nanoparticles were annealed at different temperatures for detection of defect emission.

  10. Optical spectroscopy of vacancy related defects in silicon carbide generated by proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasper, C.; Sperlich, A.; Simin, D.; Astakhov, G.V. [Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Kraus, H. [Japan Atomic EnergyAgency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Makino, T.; Sato, S.I.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic EnergyAgency, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Dyakonov, V. [Experimental Physics VI, Julius Maximilian University of Wuerzburg (Germany); ZAE Bayern, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Defects in silicon carbide (SiC) received growing attention in recent years, because they are promising candidates for spin based quantum information processing. In this study we examine silicon vacancies in 4H-SiC crystals generated by proton irradiation. By the use of confocal microscopy the implantation depth of Si vacancies for varying proton energies can be verified. An important issue is to ascertain the nature and distribution of the defects. For this purpose, we use the characteristic photoluminescence spectrum of Si vacancies, whose intensity is proportional to the defect density. Using xyz-scans, where the photoluminescence at each mapping point is recorded, one can thus determine the vacancies nature and their distribution in the SiC crystal. Additionally we verify the nature of the examined defects by measuring their uniquely defined zero-field-splitting by using ODMR associated with defect spins.

  11. Enhanced endotoxin sensitivity in fps/fes-null mice with minimal defects in hematopoietic homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirngibl, Ralph A; Senis, Yotis; Greer, Peter A

    2002-04-01

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinase implicated in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling and thought to be essential for the survival and terminal differentiation of myeloid progenitors. Fps/Fes-null mice were healthy and fertile, displayed slightly reduced numbers of bone marrow myeloid progenitors and circulating mature myeloid cells, and were more sensitive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These phenotypes were rescued using a fps/fes transgene. This confirmed that Fps/Fes is involved in, but not required for, myelopoiesis and that it plays a role in regulating the innate immune response. Bone marrow-derived Fps/Fes-null macrophages showed no defects in granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-, interleukin 6 (IL-6)-, or IL-3-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and Stat5A or LPS-induced degradation of I kappa B or activation of p38, Jnk, Erk, or Akt.

  12. How to operate safely steam generators with multiple tube through-wall defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernalsteen, P.

    1993-01-01

    For a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type, the Steam Generator (SG) tube bundle represents the major but also the thinnest part of the primary pressure boundary. To the extent that no tube material has yet been identified to be immune to corrosion, defects may initiate in service and easily propagate through wall. While not a desirable feature, a Through Wall Deep (TWD) defect does not necessarily pose a threat to either the structural integrity or leaktightness and this paper shows how SG can (and indeed, do) operate safely and reliably while having many tubes affected by deep and even TWD defects

  13. Distributed detection and control of defective thermoelectric generation modules using sensor nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min

    2014-01-01

    are described, respectively. Defective and potentially healing conditions are dynamically monitored by a voltage sensor node and a temperature sensor node, both of which can judge the defective TEM and decide the related switching actions in a nearly independent way. The periodical wireless transmission from......To maximize the energy productivity, effective in-field detection and real-time control of defective thermoelectric modules (TEMs) are critical in constituting a thermoelectric generation system (TEGS). In this paper, autonomous and distributed sensor nodes are designed to implement the wireless...... a considerable power improvement is illustrated with the proposed measuring method and setup....

  14. Cell-printing and transfer technology applications for bone defects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugawa, Junichi; Komaki, Motohiro; Yoshida, Tomoko; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Amagasa, Teruo; Morita, Ikuo

    2011-10-01

    Bone regeneration therapy based on the delivery of osteogenic factors and/or cells has received a lot of attention in recent years since the discovery of pluripotent stem cells. We reported previously that the implantation of capillary networks engineered ex vivo by the use of cell-printing technology could improve blood perfusion. Here, we developed a new substrate prepared by coating glass with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to create a non-adhesive surface and subsequent photo-lithography to finely tune the adhesive property for efficient cell transfer. We examined the cell-transfer efficiency onto amniotic membrane and bone regenerative efficiency in murine calvarial bone defect. Cell transfer of KUSA-A1 cells (murine osteoblasts) to amniotic membrane was performed for 1 h using the substrates. Cell transfer using the substrate facilitated cell engraftment onto the amniotic membrane compared to that by direct cell inoculation. KUSA-A1 cells transferred onto the amniotic membrane were applied to critical-sized calvarial bone defects in mice. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis showed rapid and effective bone formation by the cell-equipped amniotic membrane. These results indicate that the cell-printing and transfer technology used to create the cell-equipped amniotic membrane was beneficial for the cell delivery system. Our findings support the development of a biologically stable and effective bone regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Spontaneous neural tube defects in splotch mice supplemented with selected micronutrients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wlodarczyk, Bogdan J.; Tang, Louisa S.; Triplett, Aleata; Aleman, Frank; Finnell, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    Splotch (Sp/Sp) mice homozygous for a mutation in the Pax3 gene inevitably present with neural tube defects (NTDs), along with other associated congenital anomalies. The affected mutant embryos usually die by gestation days (E) 12-13. In the present study, the effect of modifier genes from a new genetic background (CXL-Sp) and periconceptional supplementation with selected micronutrients (folic acid, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate, 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, methionine, myoinositol, thiamine, thymidine, and α-tocopherol) was determined with respect to the incidence of NTDs. In order to explore how different exposure parameters (time, dose, and route of compound administration) modulate the beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation, female mice received either short- or long-term nutrient supplements via enteral or parenteral routes. Embryos were collected on E12.5 and examined for the presence of anterior or posterior NTDs. Additionally, whole mount in situ hybridization studies were conducted in order to reveal/confirm normal expression patterns of the Pax3 gene during neurulation in the wild-type and Sp/Sp homozygous mutant mouse embryos utilized in this study. A strong Pax3 signal was demonstrated in CXL-Sp embryos during neural tube closure (E9.5 to E10.5). The intensity and spatial pattern of expression were similar to other Splotch mutant mice. Of all the micronutrients tested, only supplementation with folic acid or 5-methyltetrahydrofolate rescued the normal phenotype in Sp/Sp embryos. When the folate supplementation dose was increased to 200 mg/kg in the diet, the incidence of rescued splotch homozygotes reached 30%; however, this was accompanied by six-fold increased resorption rate

  16. Telomerase-Deficient Mice Exhibit Bone Loss Owing to Defects in Osteoblasts and Increased Osteoclastogenesis by Inflammatory Microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, H.; Abdallah, B. M.; Ditzel, N.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere shortening owing to telomerase deficiency leads to accelerated senescence of human skeletal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) in vitro, whereas overexpression leads to telomere elongation, extended life span, and enhanced bone formation. To study the role of telomere shortening in vivo, we...... studied the phenotype of telomerase-deficient mice (Terc(-/-)).Terc(-/-) mice exhibited accelerated age-related bone loss starting at 3 months of age and during 12 months of follow-up revealed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometric (DXA) scanning and by micro-computed tomography (mu CT). Bone...... histomorphometry revealed decreased mineralized surface and bone-formation rate as well as increased osteoclast number and size in Terc(-/-) mice. Also, serum total deoxypyridinoline (tDPD) was increased in Terc(-/-) mice. MSCs and osteoprogenitors isolated from Terc(-l-) mice exhibited intrinsic defects...

  17. Dynamic Characteristics of Steam Generator Tubes with Defect due to Wear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangjin; Rhee, Huinam [Sunchon National Univ., Sunchon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Doo Byung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    These defects may affect the dynamic characteristics of tubes, and therefore, the vibrational behavior of the tube due to flow-induced loads can be varied. Change in the vibrational response of a tube may result in different wear characteristics from the design condition, which must be checked for both safety and economic point of view. This paper deals with the study on the effect of wears or cracks on the dynamic characteristics of steam generator tubes using finite element analysis. In this paper the effect of defects on the surface due to wear on the variation of dynamic characteristics of steam generator tubes was studied using the finite element analysis. The changes of natural frequencies and mode shapes can directly affect the flow-induced vibration response characteristics, therefore, they must be evaluated appropriately. The results in this study can be a good basis to estimate the FIV characteristics of the steam generator tubes having defects such as wear or crack.

  18. Inositol- and folate-resistant neural tube defects in mice lacking the epithelial-specific factor Grhl-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Stephen B; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Auden, Alana; Hall, Mark; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim; Parekh, Vishwas; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2003-12-01

    The neural tube defects (NTDs) spina bifida and anencephaly are widely prevalent severe birth defects. The mouse mutant curly tail (ct/ct) has served as a model of NTDs for 50 years, even though the responsible genetic defect remained unrecognized. Here we show by gene targeting, mapping and genetic complementation studies that a mouse homolog of the Drosophila grainyhead (grh) gene, grainyhead-like-3 (Grhl3), is a compelling candidate for the gene underlying the curly tail phenotype. The NTDs in Grhl3-null mice are more severe than those in the curly tail strain, as the Grhl3 alleles in ct/ct mice are hypomorphic. Spina bifida in ct/ct mice is folate resistant, but its incidence can be markedly reduced by maternal inositol supplementation periconceptually. The NTDs in Grhl3-/- embryos are also folate resistant, but unlike those in ct/ct mice, they are resistant to inositol. These findings suggest that residual Grhl3 expression in ct/ct mice may be required for inositol rescue of folate-resistant NTDs.

  19. Modulation of nuclear factor-κB signaling and reduction of neural tube defects by quercetin-3-glucoside in embryos of diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chengyu; Meng, Fantong; Reece, E Albert; Zhao, Zhiyong

    2018-05-04

    Diabetes mellitus in early pregnancy increases the risk of birth defects in infants. Maternal hyperglycemia stimulates the expression of nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2 (NOS2), which can be regulated by transcription factors of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) family. Increases in reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generate intracellular stress conditions, including nitrosative, oxidative, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses, and trigger programmed cell death (or apoptosis) in the neural folds, resulting in neural tube defects (NTDs) in the embryo. Inhibiting NOS2 can reduce NTDs; however, the underlying mechanisms require further delineation. Targeting NOS2 and associated nitrosative stress using naturally occurring phytochemicals is a potential approach to preventing birth defects in diabetic pregnancies. This study aims to investigate the effect of quercetin-3-glucoside (Q3G), a polyphenol flavonoid found in fruit, in reducing maternal diabetes-induced NTDs in an animal model, and to delineate the molecular mechanisms underlying Q3G action in regulating NOS2 expression. Female mice (C57BL/6) were induced to develop diabetes using streptozotocin before pregnancy. Diabetic pregnant mice were administered Q3G (100 mg/kg) daily via gavage feeding, introduction of drug to the stomach directly via a feeding needle, during neurulation from embryonic (E) day 6.5 to E9.5. After treatment, E10.5 embryos were collected and examined for the presence of NTDs and apoptosis in the neural tube. Expression of Nos2 and superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1; an antioxidative enzyme) was quantified using Western blot assay. Nitrosative, oxidative, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions were assessed using specific biomarkers. Expression and posttranslational modification of factors in the NF-κB system were investigated. Treatment with Q3G (suspended in water) significantly decreased NTD rate (24.7%) and apoptosis in the embryos of diabetic mice, compared with those in the water

  20. Generation of mice lacking DUF1220 protein domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keeney, J G; O'Bleness, M S; Anderson, N

    2015-01-01

    associations, a function for these domains has not been described. As a first step in addressing this question, we have developed the first transgenic model of DUF1220 function by removing the single DUF1220 domain (the ancestral form) encoded in the mouse genome. In a hypothesis generating exercise...... function, and potentially suggests a role in developmental metabolism. Finally, the substantially reduced fecundity we observe associated with KO mice argues that the ancestral DUF1220 domain provides an important biological functionthat is critical to survivability and reproductive success....

  1. Towards the generation of B-cell receptor retrogenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Freitag

    Full Text Available Transgenic expression of B- and T-cell receptors (BCRs and TCRs, respectively has been a standard tool to study lymphocyte development and function in vivo. The generation of transgenic mice is time-consuming and, therefore, a faster method to study the biology of defined lymphocyte receptors in vivo would be highly welcome. Using 2A peptide-linked multicistronic retroviral vectors to transduce stem cells, TCRs can be expressed rapidly in mice of any background. We aimed at adopting this retrogenic technology to the in vivo expression of BCRs. Using a well characterised BCR specific for hen egg lysozyme (HEL, we achieved surface expression of the retrogenically encoded BCR in a Rag-deficient pro B-cell line in vitro. In vivo, retrogenic BCRs were detectable only intracellularly but not on the surface of B cells from wild type or Rag2-deficient mice. This data, together with the fact that no BCR retrogenic mouse model has been published in the 7 years since the method was originally published for TCRs, strongly suggests that achieving BCR-expression in vivo with retrogenic technology is highly challenging if not impossible.

  2. Efficiency of defect specific maintenance od steam generator tubes: the case of ODSCC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizelj, L.; Dvorsek, T.

    1996-01-01

    The outside diameter stress corrosion cracking at tube support plates became the dominating ageing mechanism in steam generators tubes made of Inconel 600. A variety of maintenance approaches were developed and implemented worldwide to deal with this mechanism. Despite different philosophical and physical backgrounds implemented, all of the applied approaches satisfy the relevant regulatory requirements. For our purpose, the maintenance approach consist of: (1) inspection of tubes, (2) accepting or rejecting the defective tube and (3) plugging of rejected tubes. The problem of selecting an optimal maintenance approach is raised in the paper. Consequently, a method comparing the efficiency of applicable maintenance approaches is proposed. The efficiency is defined by three parameters: (a) number of plugged tubes, (b) probability of steam generator tube rupture and (c) predicted accidental leak rates through the defects. An original probabilistic model is proposed to quantify the probability of tube rupture, while procedures available in literature were used to define the accidental leak rates. The numerical example considers the data from Krsko NPP (Westinghouse 632 MWe). The maintenance approaches analyzed include: (i) no repair at all, (ii) traditional defect depth (40%) based maintenance, (iii) alternate plugging criterion (bobbin coil voltage as defined by EPRI and U.S. NRC) and (iv) combined traditional and alternate approach. Advantages of the defect specific approaches (iii) and (iv) over the traditional one (defect depth) are clearly shown. A brief discussion on the optimization of safe life of steam generator is given. (author)

  3. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  4. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zobelli, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  5. Structural defect generation in indium antimonide single crystals during electro-erosion cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravetskij, M.Yu.; Matsas, E.P.; Skorokhod, M.Ya.; Fomin, A.V.; Khromyak, K.Ya.

    1990-01-01

    Using X-ray topography structural defects generating during electro-erosion cutting of InSb single crystals are studied. It is shown that dislocations, are introduced into so cut dislocation-free ingot plates, nucleation centers being located on their surfaces. It is detected that foreign phase inclusions in InSb are efficient sources of dislocations during cutting

  6. In-Situ Photoexcitation-Induced Suppression of Point Defect Generation in Ion Implanted Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, C.R.; Rozgonyi, G.A.; Yarykin, N.; Zuhr, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The formation of vacancy-related defects in n-type silicon has been studied immediately after implantation of He, Si, or Ge ions at 85 K using in-situ DLTS. A-center concentrations in He-implanted samples reach a maximum immediately after implantation, whereas, with Si or Ge ion implanted samples they continuously increase during subsequent anneals. It is proposed that defect clusters, which emit vacancies during anneals, are generated in the collision cascades of Si or Ge ions. An illumination-induced suppression of A-center formation is seen immediately after implantation of He ions at 85 K. This effect is also observed with Si or Ge ions, but only after annealing. The suppression of vacancy complex formation via photoexcitation is believed to occur due to an enhanced recombination of defects during ion implantation, and results in reduced number of vacancies remaining in the defect clusters. In p-type silicon, a reduction in K-center formation and an enhanced migration of defects are concurrently observed in the illuminated sample implanted with Si ions. These observations are consistent with a model where the injection of excess carriers modifies the defect charge state and impacts their diffusion

  7. Accumulation of premutagenic DNA lesions in mice defective in removal of oxidative base damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klungland, Arne; Rosewell, Ian; Hollenbach, Stephan; Larsen, Elisabeth; Daly, Graham; Epe, Bernd; Seeberg, Erling; Lindahl, Tomas; Barnes, Deborah E.

    1999-01-01

    DNA damage generated by oxidant byproducts of cellular metabolism has been proposed as a key factor in cancer and aging. Oxygen free radicals cause predominantly base damage in DNA, and the most frequent mutagenic base lesion is 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). This altered base can pair with A as well as C residues, leading to a greatly increased frequency of spontaneous G·C→T·A transversion mutations in repair-deficient bacterial and yeast cells. Eukaryotic cells use a specific DNA glycosylase, the product of the OGG1 gene, to excise 8-oxoG from DNA. To assess the role of the mammalian enzyme in repair of DNA damage and prevention of carcinogenesis, we have generated homozygous ogg1−/− null mice. These animals are viable but accumulate abnormal levels of 8-oxoG in their genomes. Despite this increase in potentially miscoding DNA lesions, OGG1-deficient mice exhibit only a moderately, but significantly, elevated spontaneous mutation rate in nonproliferative tissues, do not develop malignancies, and show no marked pathological changes. Extracts of ogg1 null mouse tissues cannot excise the damaged base, but there is significant slow removal in vivo from proliferating cells. These findings suggest that in the absence of the DNA glycosylase, and in apparent contrast to bacterial and yeast cells, an alternative repair pathway functions to minimize the effects of an increased load of 8-oxoG in the genome and maintain a low endogenous mutation frequency. PMID:10557315

  8. Disruption of CHTF18 causes defective meiotic recombination in male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Berkowitz

    Full Text Available CHTF18 (chromosome transmission fidelity factor 18 is an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the Replication Factor C-like complex, CTF18-RLC. CHTF18 is necessary for the faithful passage of chromosomes from one daughter cell to the next during mitosis in yeast, and it is crucial for germline development in the fruitfly. Previously, we showed that mouse Chtf18 is expressed throughout the germline, suggesting a role for CHTF18 in mammalian gametogenesis. To determine the role of CHTF18 in mammalian germ cell development, we derived mice carrying null and conditional mutations in the Chtf18 gene. Chtf18-null males exhibit 5-fold decreased sperm concentrations compared to wild-type controls, resulting in subfertility. Loss of Chtf18 results in impaired spermatogenesis; spermatogenic cells display abnormal morphology, and the stereotypical arrangement of cells within seminiferous tubules is perturbed. Meiotic recombination is defective and homologous chromosomes separate prematurely during prophase I. Repair of DNA double-strand breaks is delayed and incomplete; both RAD51 and γH2AX persist in prophase I. In addition, MLH1 foci are decreased in pachynema. These findings demonstrate essential roles for CHTF18 in mammalian spermatogenesis and meiosis, and suggest that CHTF18 may function during the double-strand break repair pathway to promote the formation of crossovers.

  9. Left-right asymmetry defect in the hippocampal circuitry impairs spatial learning and working memory in iv mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Goto

    Full Text Available Although left-right (L-R asymmetry is a fundamental feature of higher-order brain function, little is known about how asymmetry defects of the brain affect animal behavior. Previously, we identified structural and functional asymmetries in the circuitry of the mouse hippocampus resulting from the asymmetrical distribution of NMDA receptor GluR ε2 (NR2B subunits. We further examined the ε2 asymmetry in the inversus viscerum (iv mouse, which has randomized laterality of internal organs, and found that the iv mouse hippocampus exhibits right isomerism (bilateral right-sidedness in the synaptic distribution of the ε2 subunit, irrespective of the laterality of visceral organs. To investigate the effects of hippocampal laterality defects on higher-order brain functions, we examined the capacity of reference and working memories of iv mice using a dry maze and a delayed nonmatching-to-position (DNMTP task, respectively. The iv mice improved dry maze performance more slowly than control mice during acquisition, whereas the asymptotic level of performance was similar between the two groups. In the DNMTP task, the iv mice showed poorer accuracy than control mice as the retention interval became longer. These results suggest that the L-R asymmetry of hippocampal circuitry is critical for the acquisition of reference memory and the retention of working memory.

  10. Diagnostic of corrosion defects in steam generator tubes using advanced signal processing from Eddy current testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formigoni, Andre L.; Lopez, Luiz A.N.M.; Ting, Daniel K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the Brazilian Angra I PWR nuclear power plant went into a programmed shutdown for substitution of its Steam Generator (SG) which life was shortened due to stress corrosion in its tubes. The total cost of investment were around R$724 million. The signals generated during an Eddy-current Testing (ECT) inspection in SG tubes of nuclear plant allows for the localization and dimensioning of defects in the tubes. The defects related with corrosion generate complex signals that are difficult to analyze and are the most common cause in SG replacement in nuclear power plants around the world. The objective of this paper is the development of a methodology that allows for the characterization of corrosion signals by ECT inspections applied in the heat exchangers tubes of SG of a nuclear power plant. In this present work, the aim is to investigate distributed type defects by inducing controlled corrosion in sample tubes of different materials The ECT signals obtained from these samples tubes with corrosion implanted, will be analyzed using Zetec ECT equipment, the MIZ-17ET and its probes. The data acquisition will use a NI PC A/D CARD 700 card and the LabVIEW program. Subsequently, we will apply mathematical tools for signal processing like time windowed Fast Fourier transforms and Wavelets transforms, in MATLAB platform, which will allow effectiveness to remove the noises and to extract representative characteristics for the defect being analyzed. Previously obtained results as well as the proposal for the future work will be presented. (author)

  11. Ultrafast generation of skyrmionic defects with vortex beams: Printing laser profiles on magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    Controlling electric and magnetic properties of matter by laser beams is actively explored in the broad region of condensed matter physics, including spintronics and magneto-optics. Here we theoretically propose an application of optical and electron vortex beams carrying intrinsic orbital angular momentum to chiral ferro- and antiferromagnets. We analyze the time evolution of spins in chiral magnets under irradiation of vortex beams by using the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. We show that beam-driven nonuniform temperature leads to a class of ring-shaped magnetic defects, what we call skyrmion multiplex, as well as conventional skyrmions. We discuss the proper beam parameters and the optimal way of applying the beams for the creation of these topological defects. Our findings provide an ultrafast scheme of generating topological magnetic defects in a way applicable to both metallic and insulating chiral (anti-) ferromagnets.

  12. Experimental studies of free defect generation during irradiation: Implications for reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehn, L.E.; Birtcher, R.C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the past several years, systematic experiments have revealed that irradiations which generate energetically dense cascades are much less effective than light-ion, MeV electron, or thermal neutron irradiations at producing freely-migrating defects. In this paper, the systematic results on freely-migrating defect production from ion irradiation studies are briefly summarized. Difficulties with applying a simple extrapolation of the ion-irradiation results to neutron environments are discussed. This discussion, coupled with our existing knowledge of neutron-induced property changes, indicates that Compton scattering, and the (n,γ), (n,He) and (n,p) nuclear reactions, are considerably more important for producing freely-migrating defects than was previously realized

  13. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma mice lacking mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Dahlia M; Curry, Jennifer M; Roy, Lopamudra D; Tinder, Teresa L; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-07-01

    MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in more than 60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In this study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasis, compared with both KC and KCM. Cell lines derived from KCKO tumors have significantly less tumorigenic capacity compared with cells from KCM tumors. Therefore, mice with KCKO tumors had a significant survival benefit compared with mice with KCM tumors. In vitro, KCKO cells have reduced proliferation and invasion and failed to respond to epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or matrix metalloproteinase 9. Further, significantly less KCKO cells entered the G(2)-M phase of the cell cycle compared with the KCM cells. Proteomics and Western blotting analysis revealed a complete loss of cdc-25c expression, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as well as a significant decrease in nestin and tubulin-α2 chain expression in KCKO cells. Treatment with a MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, abrogated the enhanced proliferation of the KCM cells but had minimal effect on KCKO cells, suggesting that MUC1 is necessary for MAPK activity and oncogenic signaling. This is the first study to utilize a Muc1-null PDA mouse to fully elucidate the oncogenic role of MUC1, both in vivo and in vitro. ©2011 AACR

  14. Generation of transgenic mice producing fungal xylanase in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR TONUKARI NYEROVWO

    express exogenous digestive enzymes, since a single- stomached animal, such as a pig, can secret .... transgenic founder mice; 1 to15 are fifteen wild-type founder mice; M, marke; β-actin, endogenous control. (C) Identification of transgenic mice by ... 61.48±0.34%), gross energy digestibility (WT vs. TG = 68.79±0.51% vs.

  15. Generation and Characterization of a Defective HIV-1 Virus as an Immunogen for a Therapeutic Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, Javier; García, Felipe; Blanco, Julia; Escribà-García, Laura; Gatell, Jose Maria; Alcamí, Jose; Plana, Montserrat; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    Background The generation of new immunogens able to elicit strong specific immune responses remains a major challenge in the attempts to obtain a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV/AIDS. We designed and constructed a defective recombinant virus based on the HIV-1 genome generating infective but non-replicative virions able to elicit broad and strong cellular immune responses in HIV-1 seropositive individuals. Results Viral particles were generated through transient transfection in producer cells (293-T) of a full length HIV-1 DNA carrying a deletion of 892 base pairs (bp) in the pol gene encompassing the sequence that codes for the reverse transcriptase (NL4-3/ΔRT clone). The viral particles generated were able to enter target cells, but due to the absence of reverse transcriptase no replication was detected. The immunogenic capacity of these particles was assessed by ELISPOT to determine γ-interferon production in a cohort of 69 chronic asymptomatic HIV-1 seropositive individuals. Surprisingly, defective particles produced from NL4-3/ΔRT triggered stronger cellular responses than wild-type HIV-1 viruses inactivated with Aldrithiol-2 (AT-2) and in a larger proportion of individuals (55% versus 23% seropositive individuals tested). Electron microscopy showed that NL4-3/ΔRT virions display immature morphology. Interestingly, wild-type viruses treated with Amprenavir (APV) to induce defective core maturation also induced stronger responses than the same viral particles generated in the absence of protease inhibitors. Conclusions We propose that immature HIV-1 virions generated from NL4-3/ΔRT viral clones may represent new prototypes of immunogens with a safer profile and stronger capacity to induce cellular immune responses than wild-type inactivated viral particles. PMID:23144996

  16. Channeling study of laser-induced defect generation in InP and InAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdel', K.K.; Kashkarov, P.K.; Timoshenko, V.Yu.; Chechenin, N.G.

    1992-01-01

    Damage production in InP and InAs single crystals induced by a ruby-laser pulse irradiation with τ p =20 ms in the energy density region W=0.05-1.0 J/cm 2 is studied by the channeling and Rutherford backscattering techniques. The defect generation threshold was determined to be equal to 0.2 J/cm 2 and 0.55 J/cm 2 for InP and InAs crystals, respectively. Stoichiometric defects in InP crystals were observed at W>=0.5 J/cm 2 . The temperature fields in InP and InAs under laser irradiation were calculated. The experimental observations are considered as a result of a selective evaporation of the components from the melt

  17. Over-expression of DSCAM and COL6A2 cooperatively generates congenital heart defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar R Grossman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A significant current challenge in human genetics is the identification of interacting genetic loci mediating complex polygenic disorders. One of the best characterized polygenic diseases is Down syndrome (DS, which results from an extra copy of part or all of chromosome 21. A short interval near the distal tip of chromosome 21 contributes to congenital heart defects (CHD, and a variety of indirect genetic evidence suggests that multiple candidate genes in this region may contribute to this phenotype. We devised a tiered genetic approach to identify interacting CHD candidate genes. We first used the well vetted Drosophila heart as an assay to identify interacting CHD candidate genes by expressing them alone and in all possible pairwise combinations and testing for effects on rhythmicity or heart failure following stress. This comprehensive analysis identified DSCAM and COL6A2 as the most strongly interacting pair of genes. We then over-expressed these two genes alone or in combination in the mouse heart. While over-expression of either gene alone did not affect viability and had little or no effect on heart physiology or morphology, co-expression of the two genes resulted in ≈50% mortality and severe physiological and morphological defects, including atrial septal defects and cardiac hypertrophy. Cooperative interactions between DSCAM and COL6A2 were also observed in the H9C2 cardiac cell line and transcriptional analysis of this interaction points to genes involved in adhesion and cardiac hypertrophy. Our success in defining a cooperative interaction between DSCAM and COL6A2 suggests that the multi-tiered genetic approach we have taken involving human mapping data, comprehensive combinatorial screening in Drosophila, and validation in vivo in mice and in mammalian cells lines should be applicable to identifying specific loci mediating a broad variety of other polygenic disorders.

  18. Bayesian inferences of generation and growth of corrosion defects on energy pipelines based on imperfect inspection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Zhou, W.; Zhang, S.

    2015-01-01

    Stochastic process-based models are developed to characterize the generation and growth of metal-loss corrosion defects on oil and gas steel pipelines. The generation of corrosion defects over time is characterized by the non-homogenous Poisson process, and the growth of depths of individual defects is modeled by the non-homogenous gamma process (NHGP). The defect generation and growth models are formulated in a hierarchical Bayesian framework, whereby the parameters of the models are evaluated from the in-line inspection (ILI) data through the Bayesian updating by accounting for the probability of detection (POD) and measurement errors associated with the ILI data. The Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation in conjunction with the data augmentation (DA) technique is employed to carry out the Bayesian updating. Numerical examples that involve simulated ILI data are used to illustrate and validate the proposed methodology. - Highlights: • Bayesian updating of growth and generation models of defects on energy pipelines. • Non-homogeneous Poisson process for defect generation. • Non-homogeneous gamma process for defect growth. • Updating based on inspection data with detecting and sizing uncertainties. • MCMC in conjunction with data augmentation technique employed for the updating.

  19. Size Effects on Surface Elastic Waves in a Semi-Infinite Medium with Atomic Defect Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzade

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates small-scale effects on the Rayleigh-type surface wave propagation in an isotopic elastic half-space upon laser irradiation. Based on Eringen’s theory of nonlocal continuum mechanics, the basic equations of wave motion and laser-induced atomic defect dynamics are derived. Dispersion equation that governs the Rayleigh surface waves in the considered medium is derived and analyzed. Explicit expressions for phase velocity and attenuation (amplification coefficients which characterize surface waves are obtained. It is shown that if the generation rate is above the critical value, due to concentration-elastic instability, nanometer sized ordered concentration-strain structures on the surface or volume of solids arise. The spatial scale of these structures is proportional to the characteristic length of defect-atom interaction and increases with the increase of the temperature of the medium. The critical value of the pump parameter is directly proportional to recombination rate and inversely proportional to deformational potentials of defects.

  20. Continuous-wave radar to detect defects within heat exchangers and steam generator tubes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nassersharif, Bahram (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Caffey, Thurlow Washburn Howell; Jedlicka, Russell P. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Garcia, Gabe V. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2003-01-01

    A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The experimental program resulted in a completed product development schedule and the design of an experimental apparatus for studying handling of the probe and data acquisition. These tests were completed as far as the prototypical probe performance allowed. The prototype probe design did not have sufficient sensitivity to detect a defect signal using the defined radar technique and did not allow successful completion of all of the project milestones. The best results from the prototype probe could not detect a tube defect using the radar principle. Though a more precision probe may be possible, the cost of design and construction was beyond the scope of the project. This report describes the probe development and the status of the design at the termination of the project.

  1. Role of masking oxide on silicon in processes of defect generation at formation of SIMOX structures

    CERN Document Server

    Askinazi, A Y; Miloglyadova, L V

    2002-01-01

    One investigated into Si-SiO sub 2 structures formed by implantation of oxygen ions into silicon (SIMOX-technology) by means of techniques based on measuring of high-frequency volt-farad characteristics and by means of electroluminescence. One determined existence of electrically active centres and of luminescence centres in the formed oxide layer near boundary with silicon. One clarified the role SiO sub 2 masking layer in silicon in defect generation under formation of the masked oxide layer. One established dependence of concentration of electrically active and luminescence centres on thickness of masking layer

  2. Complex of GRAD programs for analytical calculation of radiation defects generation in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suvorov, A.L.; Zabolotnyj, V.T.; Babaev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    Complex of programms for analytical calculation of generation of radiation defects (GRAD) in solids, and also of their recombination during cascade area relaxation and postradiation annealing, of mass removing by atomic collisions in volume (mixing) and through the surface (sputtering), of structure - phase state and property changes is suggested. The complex volume is less than 10 KBytes and it may be realized by computer of any type. Satisfactional agreement with more wide range of experimental data in comparison with tradition models is obtained. 27 refs.; 2 figs

  3. Localised surface plasmon-like resonance generated by microwave electromagnetic waves in pipe defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobaidi, Wissam M.; Nima, Zeid A.; Sandgren, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Localised surface plasmon (LSP)-like resonance phenomena were simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics™, and the electric field enhancement was evaluated in eight pipe defects using the microwave band from 1.80 to 3.00 GHz and analysed by finite element analysis (FEA). The simulation was carried out, in each defect case, on a pipe that has 762 mm length and 152.4 mm inner diameter, and 12.7 mm pipe wall thickness. Defects were positioned in the middle of the pipe and were named as follows; SD: Square Defect, FCD: fillet corner defect, FD: fillet defect, HCD: half circle defect, TCD: triangle corner defect, TD: triangle defect, ZD: zigzag defect, GD: gear defect. The LSP electric field, and scattering parametric (S21, and S11) waves were evaluated in all cases and found to be strongly dependent on the size and the shape of the defect rather than the pipe and or the medium materials.

  4. Production of knock-in mice in a single generation from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, Hideki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2017-12-01

    The system-level identification and analysis of molecular networks in mammals can be accelerated by 'next-generation' genetics, defined as genetics that does not require crossing of multiple generations of animals in order to achieve the desired genetic makeup. We have established a highly efficient procedure for producing knock-in (KI) mice within a single generation, by optimizing the genome-editing protocol for KI embryonic stem (ES) cells and the protocol for the generation of fully ES-cell-derived mice (ES mice). Using this protocol, the production of chimeric mice is eliminated, and, therefore, there is no requirement for the crossing of chimeric mice to produce mice that carry the KI gene in all cells of the body. Our procedure thus shortens the time required to produce KI ES mice from about a year to ∼3 months. Various kinds of KI ES mice can be produced with a minimized amount of work, facilitating the elucidation of organism-level phenomena using a systems biology approach. In this report, we describe the basic technologies and protocols for this procedure, and discuss the current challenges for next-generation mammalian genetics in organism-level systems biology studies.

  5. Early Retinal Defects in Fmr1−/y Mice: Toward a Critical Role of Visual Dys-Sensitivity in the Fragile X Syndrome Phenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Perche

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X Syndrome (FXS is caused by a deficiency in Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP leading to global sensorial abnormalities, among which visual defects represent a critical part. These visual defects are associated with cerebral neuron immaturity especially in the primary visual cortex. However, we recently demonstrated that retinas of adult Fmr1−/y mice, the FXS murine model, present molecular, cellular and functional alterations. However, no data are currently available on the evolution pattern of such defects. As retinal stimulation through Eye Opening (EO is a crucial signal for the cerebral visual system maturation, we questioned the precocity of molecular and functional retinal phenotype. To answer this question, we studied the retinal molecular phenotype of Fmr1−/y mice before EO until adult age and the consequences of the retinal loss of Fmrp on retinal function in young and adult mice. We showed that retinal molecular defects are present before EO and remain stable at adult age, leading to electrophysiological impairments without any underlying structural changes. We underlined that loss of Fmrp leads to a wide range of defects in the retina, settled even before EO. Our work demonstrates a critical role of the sensorial dysfunction in the Fmr1−/y mice overall phenotype, and provides evidence that altered peripheral perception is a component of the sensory processing defect in FXS conditions.

  6. Early Retinal Defects in Fmr1-/y Mice: Toward a Critical Role of Visual Dys-Sensitivity in the Fragile X Syndrome Phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche, Olivier; Felgerolle, Chloé; Ardourel, Maryvonne; Bazinet, Audrey; Pâris, Arnaud; Rossignol, Rafaëlle; Meyer-Dilhet, Géraldine; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Hébert, Betty; Laurenceau, David; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Menuet, Arnaud; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Pichon, Jacques; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle; Briault, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is caused by a deficiency in Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) leading to global sensorial abnormalities, among which visual defects represent a critical part. These visual defects are associated with cerebral neuron immaturity especially in the primary visual cortex. However, we recently demonstrated that retinas of adult Fmr1 -/y mice, the FXS murine model, present molecular, cellular and functional alterations. However, no data are currently available on the evolution pattern of such defects. As retinal stimulation through Eye Opening (EO) is a crucial signal for the cerebral visual system maturation, we questioned the precocity of molecular and functional retinal phenotype. To answer this question, we studied the retinal molecular phenotype of Fmr1 -/y mice before EO until adult age and the consequences of the retinal loss of Fmrp on retinal function in young and adult mice. We showed that retinal molecular defects are present before EO and remain stable at adult age, leading to electrophysiological impairments without any underlying structural changes. We underlined that loss of Fmrp leads to a wide range of defects in the retina, settled even before EO. Our work demonstrates a critical role of the sensorial dysfunction in the Fmr1 -/y mice overall phenotype, and provides evidence that altered peripheral perception is a component of the sensory processing defect in FXS conditions.

  7. Early Retinal Defects in Fmr1−/y Mice: Toward a Critical Role of Visual Dys-Sensitivity in the Fragile X Syndrome Phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perche, Olivier; Felgerolle, Chloé; Ardourel, Maryvonne; Bazinet, Audrey; Pâris, Arnaud; Rossignol, Rafaëlle; Meyer-Dilhet, Géraldine; Mausset-Bonnefont, Anne-Laure; Hébert, Betty; Laurenceau, David; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Menuet, Arnaud; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Pichon, Jacques; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle; Briault, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is caused by a deficiency in Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) leading to global sensorial abnormalities, among which visual defects represent a critical part. These visual defects are associated with cerebral neuron immaturity especially in the primary visual cortex. However, we recently demonstrated that retinas of adult Fmr1−/y mice, the FXS murine model, present molecular, cellular and functional alterations. However, no data are currently available on the evolution pattern of such defects. As retinal stimulation through Eye Opening (EO) is a crucial signal for the cerebral visual system maturation, we questioned the precocity of molecular and functional retinal phenotype. To answer this question, we studied the retinal molecular phenotype of Fmr1−/y mice before EO until adult age and the consequences of the retinal loss of Fmrp on retinal function in young and adult mice. We showed that retinal molecular defects are present before EO and remain stable at adult age, leading to electrophysiological impairments without any underlying structural changes. We underlined that loss of Fmrp leads to a wide range of defects in the retina, settled even before EO. Our work demonstrates a critical role of the sensorial dysfunction in the Fmr1−/y mice overall phenotype, and provides evidence that altered peripheral perception is a component of the sensory processing defect in FXS conditions. PMID:29681800

  8. Mice Deficient in NF-κB p50 and p52 or RANK Have Defective Growth Plate Formation and Post-natal Dwarfism

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Lianping; Chen, Di; Boyce, Brendan F.

    2013-01-01

    NF-κBp50/p52 double knockout (dKO) and RANK KO mice have no osteoclasts and develop severe osteopetrosis associated with dwarfism. In contrast, Op/Op mice, which form few osteoclasts, and Src KO mice, which have osteoclasts with defective resorptive function, are osteopetrotic, but they are not dwarfed. Here, we compared the morphologic features of long bones from p50/p52 dKO, RANK KO, Op/Op and Src KO mice to attempt to explain the differences in their long bone lengths. We found that growth...

  9. Juvenile spermatogonial depletion (jsd): a genetic defect of germ cell proliferation of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, W G; Cunliffe-Beamer, T L; Shultz, K L; Langley, S H; Roderick, T H

    1988-05-01

    Adult C57BL/6J male mice homozygous for the mutant gene, juvenile spermatogonial depletion (jsd/jsd), show azoosper4ia and testes reduced to one-third normal size, but are otherwise phenotypically normal. In contrast, adult jsd/jsd females are fully fertile. This feature facilitated mapping the jsd gene to the centromeric end of chromosome 1; the gene order is jsd-Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (Idh-1)-Peptidase-3 (Pep-3). Analysis of testicular histology from jsd/jsd mice aged 3-10 wk revealed that these mutant mice experience one wave of spermatogenesis, but fail to continue mitotic proliferation of type A spermatogonial cells at the basement membrane. As a consequence, histological sections of testes from mutant mice aged 8-52 wk showed tubules populated by modest numbers of Sertoli cells, with only an occasional spermatogonial cell. Some sperm with normal morphology and motility were observed in epididymides of 6.5- but not in 8-wk or older mutants. Treatment with retinol failed to alter the loss of spermatogenesis in jsd/jsd mice. Analyses of serum hormones of jsd/jsd males showed that testosterone levels were normal at all ages--a finding corroborated by normal seminal vesicle and vas deferens weights, whereas serum follicle-stimulating hormone levels were significantly elevated in mutant mice from 4 to 20 wk of age. We hypothesize the jsd/jsd male may be deficient in proliferative signals from Sertoli cells that are needed for spermatogenesis.

  10. Defective enamel and bone development in sodium-dependent citrate transporter (NaCT Slc13a5 deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando R Irizarry

    Full Text Available There has been growing recognition of the essential roles of citrate in biomechanical properties of mineralized tissues, including teeth and bone. However, the sources of citrate in these tissues have not been well defined, and the contribution of citrate to the regulation of odontogenesis and osteogenesis has not been examined. Here, tooth and bone phenotypes were examined in sodium-dependent citrate transporter (NaCT Slc13a5 deficient C57BL/6 mice at 13 and 32 weeks of age. Slc13a5 deficiency led to defective tooth development, characterized by absence of mature enamel, formation of aberrant enamel matrix, and dysplasia and hyperplasia of the enamel organ epithelium that progressed with age. These abnormalities were associated with fragile teeth with a possible predisposition to tooth abscesses. The lack of mature enamel was consistent with amelogenesis imperfecta. Furthermore, Slc13a5 deficiency led to decreased bone mineral density and impaired bone formation in 13-week-old mice but not in older mice. The findings revealed the potentially important role of citrate and Slc13a5 in the development and function of teeth and bone.

  11. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chise Tateno

    Full Text Available We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID. We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and

  12. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Chise; Kawase, Yosuke; Tobita, Yoshimi; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Harumi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Shiota, Akira; Kojima, Yuha; Ishida, Yuji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoko A; Tateishi, Hiromi; Sudoh, Masayuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-Ichiro; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Kohara, Michinori

    2015-01-01

    We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID) mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps) replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID). We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb) levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and useful hosts for

  13. Fibulin-5 deficiency causes developmental defect of premaxillary bone in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Kazuo; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Komatsu, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial sutures govern the shape of the craniofacial skeleton during postnatal development. The differentiation of suture mesenchymal cells to osteoblasts is precisely regulated in part by signaling through cell surface receptors that interact with extracellular proteins. Here we report that fibulin-5, a key extracellular matrix protein, is important for craniofacial skeletal development in mice. Fibulin-5 is deposited as a fibrous matrix in cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal tissues, including craniofacial sutures. Fibulin-5-null mice show decreased premaxillary bone outgrowth during postnatal stages. While premaxillo-maxillary suture mesenchymal cells in fibulin-5-null mice were capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, suture cells in mutant mice were less proliferative. Our study provides the first evidence that fibulin-5 is indispensable for the regulation of facial suture mesenchymal cell proliferation required for craniofacial skeletal morphogenesis. - Highlights: • Fibulin-5 is deposited in cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal tissues. • Fibulin-5-null mice show decreased premaxillary bone growth during postnatal stage. • Fibulin-5 is indispensable for facial suture mesenchymal cell proliferation.

  14. Fibulin-5 deficiency causes developmental defect of premaxillary bone in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kazuo, E-mail: knoda@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Nakamura, Tomoyuki [Department of Pharmacology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka 573-1010 (Japan); Komatsu, Yoshihiro [Department of Pediatrics, The University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate Program in Genes and Development, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-10-23

    Craniofacial sutures govern the shape of the craniofacial skeleton during postnatal development. The differentiation of suture mesenchymal cells to osteoblasts is precisely regulated in part by signaling through cell surface receptors that interact with extracellular proteins. Here we report that fibulin-5, a key extracellular matrix protein, is important for craniofacial skeletal development in mice. Fibulin-5 is deposited as a fibrous matrix in cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal tissues, including craniofacial sutures. Fibulin-5-null mice show decreased premaxillary bone outgrowth during postnatal stages. While premaxillo-maxillary suture mesenchymal cells in fibulin-5-null mice were capable of differentiating into osteoblasts, suture cells in mutant mice were less proliferative. Our study provides the first evidence that fibulin-5 is indispensable for the regulation of facial suture mesenchymal cell proliferation required for craniofacial skeletal morphogenesis. - Highlights: • Fibulin-5 is deposited in cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal tissues. • Fibulin-5-null mice show decreased premaxillary bone growth during postnatal stage. • Fibulin-5 is indispensable for facial suture mesenchymal cell proliferation.

  15. Primary biochemical defect in copper metabolism in mice with a recessive X-linked mutation analogous to Menkes' disease in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prins, H.W.; Hamer, C.J.A. van den.

    1979-01-01

    The defect in Menkes' disease in man is identical to that in Brindled mice. The defect manifests itself in a accumulation of copper in some tissues, such as renal, intestinal (mucosa and muscle), pancreatic, osseous, muscular, and dermal. Hence a fatal copper deficiency results in other tissues (e.g., hepatic). The copper transport through the intestine is impaired and copper, which circumvents the block in the copper resorption, is irreversibly trapped in the above-mentioned, copper accumulating tissues where it is bound to a cytoplasmatic protein with molecular weight 10,000 daltons, probably the primary cytoplasmatic copper transporting protein. This protein shows a Cu-S absorption band at 250 nm, and the copper:protein ratio is increased. Such copper rich protein was found neither in the kidneys of the unaffected mica nor in the liver of the mice that do have the defect. Three models of the primary defect in Menkes' disease are proposed

  16. Defective thrombus formation in mice lacking endogenous factor VII activating protease (FSAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Saravanan; Thielmann, Ina; Morowski, Martina; Pragst, Ingo; Sandset, Per Morten; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Etscheid, Michael; Kanse, Sandip M

    2015-04-01

    Factor VII (FVII) activating protease (FSAP) is a circulating protease with a putative function in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. Genetic epidemiological studies have implied a role for FSAP in carotid stenosis, stroke and thrombosis. To date, no in vivo evidence is available to support these claims. We have, for the first time, used FSAP-/- mice to define its role in thrombosis and haemostasis in vivo and to characterise the molecular mechanisms involved. FeCl3-induced arterial thrombosis in carotid and mesenteric artery revealed that the occlusion time was significantly increased in FSAP-/- mice (pendogenous FSAP impaired the formation of stable, occlusive thrombi in mice. The underlying in vivo effect of FSAP is more likely to be related to the modulation of TFPI rather than FVIIa.

  17. Functional motor recovery from motoneuron axotomy is compromised in mice with defective corticospinal projections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuetong Ding

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injury (BPI and experimental spinal root avulsion result in loss of motor function in the affected segments. After root avulsion, significant motoneuron function is restored by re-implantation of the avulsed root. How much this functional recovery depends on corticospinal inputs is not known. Here, we studied that question using Celsr3|Emx1 mice, in which the corticospinal tract (CST is genetically absent. In adult mice, we tore off right C5-C7 motor and sensory roots and re-implanted the right C6 roots. Behavioral studies showed impaired recovery of elbow flexion in Celsr3|Emx1 mice compared to controls. Five months after surgery, a reduced number of small axons, and higher G-ratio of inner to outer diameter of myelin sheaths were observed in mutant versus control mice. At early stages post-surgery, mutant mice displayed lower expression of GAP-43 in spinal cord and of myelin basic protein (MBP in peripheral nerves than control animals. After five months, mutant animals had atrophy of the right biceps brachii, with less newly formed neuromuscular junctions (NMJs and reduced peak-to-peak amplitudes in electromyogram (EMG, than controls. However, quite unexpectedly, a higher motoneuron survival rate was found in mutant than in control mice. Thus, following root avulsion/re-implantation, the absence of the CST is probably an important reason to hamper axonal regeneration and remyelination, as well as target re-innervation and formation of new NMJ, resulting in lower functional recovery, while fostering motoneuron survival. These results indicate that manipulation of corticospinal transmission may help improve functional recovery following BPI.

  18. Ontogeny of thymic independent antibody responses in vitro in normal mice and mice with an x-linked B cell defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosier, D.E.; Mond, J.J.; Goldings, E.A.

    1977-12-01

    The primary in vitro antibody response of neonatal spleen cells to three thymic independent antigens has been examined. The time of onset of responsiveness to TNP-Brucella abortus and TNP-lipopolysaccharide was significantly earlier than the onset of responsiveness to TNP-Ficoll. This ontologic sequence was not affected by T cell depletion or antigen presentation on adult macrophages. In neonatal mice bearing the X-linked CBA/N defect, the response to TNP-Brucella abortus and TNP-lipopolysaccharide was much delayed and no response to TNP-Ficoll developed. We conclude that different thymic independent antigens address different subpopulations of B cells, one of which appears earlier in ontogeny than the other.

  19. Ontogeny of thymic independent antibody responses in vitro in normal mice and mice with an x-linked B cell defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosier, D.E.; Mond, J.J.; Goldings, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    The primary in vitro antibody response of neonatal spleen cells to three thymic independent antigens has been examined. The time of onset of responsiveness to TNP-Brucella abortus and TNP-lipopolysaccharide was significantly earlier than the onset of responsiveness to TNP-Ficoll. This ontologic sequence was not affected by T cell depletion or antigen presentation on adult macrophages. In neonatal mice bearing the X-linked CBA/N defect, the response to TNP-Brucella abortus and TNP-lipopolysaccharide was much delayed and no response to TNP-Ficoll developed. We conclude that different thymic independent antigens address different subpopulations of B cells, one of which appears earlier in ontogeny than the other

  20. Meningeal defects alter the tangential migration of cortical interneurons in Foxc1hith/hith mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarbalis Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tangential migration presents the primary mode of migration of cortical interneurons translocating into the cerebral cortex from subpallial domains. This migration takes place in multiple streams with the most superficial one located in the cortical marginal zone. While a number of forebrain-expressed molecules regulating this process have emerged, it remains unclear to what extent structures outside the brain, like the forebrain meninges, are involved. Results We studied a unique Foxc1 hypomorph mouse model (Foxc1hith/hith with meningeal defects and impaired tangential migration of cortical interneurons. We identified a territorial correlation between meningeal defects and disruption of interneuron migration along the adjacent marginal zone in these animals, suggesting that impaired meningeal integrity might be the primary cause for the observed migration defects. Moreover, we postulate that the meningeal factor regulating tangential migration that is affected in homozygote mutants is the chemokine Cxcl12. In addition, by using chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, we provide evidence that the Cxcl12 gene is a direct transcriptional target of Foxc1 in the meninges. Further, we observe migration defects of a lesser degree in Cajal-Retzius cells migrating within the cortical marginal zone, indicating a less important role for Cxcl12 in their migration. Finally, the developmental migration defects observed in Foxc1hith/hith mutants do not lead to obvious differences in interneuron distribution in the adult if compared to control animals. Conclusions Our results suggest a critical role for the forebrain meninges to promote during development the tangential migration of cortical interneurons along the cortical marginal zone and Cxcl12 as the factor responsible for this property.

  1. Inactivation of Stac3 causes skeletal muscle defects and perinatal death in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Reinholt, Brad Michael

    2012-01-01

    The Src homology 3 domain (SH3) and cysteine rich domain (C1) 3 (Stac3) gene is a novel gene copiously expressed in skeletal muscle. The objective of this research was to determine the role of Stac3 in development, specifically in skeletal muscle. We achieved this objective by evaluating the phenotypic effects of Stac3 gene inactivation on development in mice. At birth homozygous Stac3 null (Stac3-/-) mice died perinatally and remained in fetal position with limp limbs, but possessed otherwis...

  2. Vascular defects in gain-of-function fps/fes transgenic mice correlate with PDGF- and VEGF-induced activation of mutant Fps/Fes kinase in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangrar, W; Mewburn, J D; Vincent, S G; Fisher, J T; Greer, P A

    2004-05-01

    Fps/Fes is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that is abundantly expressed in the myeloid, endothelial, epithelial, neuronal and platelet lineages. Genetic manipulation in mice has uncovered potential roles for this kinase in hematopoiesis, innate immunity, inflammation and angiogenesis. We have utilized a genetic approach to explore the role of Fps/Fes in angiogenesis. A hypervascular line of mice generated by expression of a 'gain-of-function' human fps/fes transgene (fps(MF)) encoding a myristoylated variant of Fps (MFps) was used in these studies. The hypervascular phenotype of this line was extensively characterized by intravital microscopy and biochemical approaches. fps(MF) mice exhibited 1.6-1.7-fold increases in vascularity which was attributable to increases in the number of secondary vessels. Vessels were larger, exhibited varicosities and disorganized patterning, and were found to have defects in histamine-induced permeability. Biochemical characterization of endothelial cell (EC) lines derived from fps(MF) mice revealed that MFps was hypersensitive to activation by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). MFps mediates enhanced sensitization to VEGF and PDGF signaling in ECs. We propose that this hypersensitization contributes to excessive angiogenic signaling and that this underlies the observed hypervascular phenotype of fps(MF) mice. These phenotypes recapitulate important aspects of the vascular defects observed in both VEGF and angiopoietin-1 transgenic mice. The fps/fes proto-oncogene product therefore represents a novel player in the regulation of angiogenesis, and the fps(MF) line of mice constitutes a unique new murine model for the study of this process.

  3. Generating Chimeric Mice by Using Embryos from Nonsuperovulated BALB/c Mice Compared with Superovulated BALB/c and Albino C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmail, Michael Y; Qi, Peimin; Connor, Aurora Burds; Fox, James G; García, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    The reliable generation of high-percentage chimeras from gene-targeted C57BL/6 embryonic stem cells has proven challenging, despite optimization of cell culture and microinjection techniques. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, we compared the generation of chimeras by using 3 different inbred, albino host, embryo-generating protocols: BALB/cAnNTac (BALB/c) donor mice superovulated at 4 wk of age, 12-wk-old BALB/c donor mice without superovulation, and C57BL/6NTac-Tyr(tm1Arte) (albino B6) mice superovulated at 4 wk of age. Key parameters measured included the average number of injectable embryos per donor, the percentage of live pups born from the total number of embryos transferred to recipients, and the number of chimeric pups with high embryonic-stem-cell contribution by coat color. Although albino B6 donors produced significantly more injectable embryos than did BALB/c donors, 12-wk-old BALB/c donor produced high-percentage (at least 70%) chimeras more than 2.5 times as often as did albino B6 mice and 20 times more efficiently than did 4-wk-old BALB/c donors. These findings clearly suggest that 12-wk-old BALB/c mice be used as blastocyst donors to reduce the number of mice used to generate each chimera, reduce the production of low-percentage chimeras, and maximize the generation of high-percentage chimeras from C57BL/6 embryonic stem cells.

  4. Effect of local x-irradiation on mice reproduction in two successive generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'nikova, N.K.; Lisenkova, L.N.

    1978-01-01

    For an experimental assessment of the biologic effectiveness of a single exposure to local irradiation exposure in simulating the conditions of exposure in X ray studies, an experiment was carried out on white mice. Mice of two successive generations were exposed to local X irradiation in the eye region. The radiation was found to bring about changes in the reproductive function (such as sterility, reduced litter size and fertility of females); these changes being dose-dependent in a nonlinear manner. The biologic effect of irradiation was greater in the second-generation mice

  5. Metformin improves defective hematopoiesis and delays tumor formation in Fanconi anemia mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Shuo; Tang, Weiliang; Deater, Matthew; Phan, Ngoc; Marcogliese, Andrea N; Li, Hui; Al-Dhalimy, Muhsen; Major, Angela; Olson, Susan; Monnat, Raymond J; Grompe, Markus

    2016-12-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure disorder associated with a high incidence of leukemia and solid tumors. Bone marrow transplantation is currently the only curative therapy for the hematopoietic complications of this disorder. However, long-term morbidity and mortality remain very high, and new therapeutics are badly needed. Here we show that the widely used diabetes drug metformin improves hematopoiesis and delays tumor formation in Fancd2 -/- mice. Metformin is the first compound reported to improve both of these FA phenotypes. Importantly, the beneficial effects are specific to FA mice and are not seen in the wild-type controls. In this preclinical model of FA, metformin outperformed the current standard of care, oxymetholone, by improving peripheral blood counts in Fancd2 -/- mice significantly faster. Metformin increased the size of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and enhanced quiescence in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. In tumor-prone Fancd2 -/- Trp53 +/- mice, metformin delayed the onset of tumors and significantly extended the tumor-free survival time. In addition, we found that metformin and the structurally related compound aminoguanidine reduced DNA damage and ameliorated spontaneous chromosome breakage and radials in human FA patient-derived cells. Our results also indicate that aldehyde detoxification might be one of the mechanisms by which metformin reduces DNA damage in FA cells. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Defective bile salt biosynthesis and hydroxylation in mice with reduced cytochrome P450 activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunne, Cindy; Acco, Alexandra; Hohenester, Simon; Duijst, Suzanne; de Waart, Dirk R.; Zamanbin, Alaleh; Oude Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2013-01-01

    The difference in bile salt (BS) composition between rodents and humans is mainly caused by formation of muricholate in rodents as well as by efficient rehydroxylation of deoxycholic acid. The aim of this study was to characterize bile formation in a mouse model (Hrn mice) with hepatic disruption of

  7. Mice lacking desmocollin 1 show epidermal fragility accompanied by barrier defects and abnormal differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chidgey, M; Brakebusch, C; Gustafsson, E

    2001-01-01

    epidermis because environmental insults are more stringent and wound healing is less rapid than in neonatal mice. This dermatitis is accompanied by localized hair loss associated with formation of utriculi and dermal cysts, denoting hair follicle degeneration. Possible resemblance of the lesions to human...

  8. The PISC programme on defective steam generator tubes inspection summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.; Comby, R.; Maciga, G.; Zanella, G.; Perez Prat, J.; Estorff, U. von

    1995-01-01

    The PISC III Actions are intended to extend the results and methodologies of the previous PISC exercises, i.e. the validation of the capabilities of the various examination techniques when used on real defects in real components under realistic conditions of inspection. The objective of this action is relatively close to that of the heavy structures programmes: the experimental evaluation of the performance of test procedures used for steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants during in-service or pre-service inspections. The exercise is a capability exercise consisting of Round Robin Tests on individual tubes including calibration, training and blind test tubes. In this paper the main conclusions from the RRT conducted in the framework of Action 5 will be presented and discussed. (author). 7 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  9. Effect of thermal friction on the generation and transport of interstitial defects in irradiated metals

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, S L

    2002-01-01

    Generation of interstitial and vacancy defects under 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation is expected to drive the evolution of microstructure of materials in a future fusion power station. We investigate effects of thermal friction associated with the interaction between mobile clusters of interstitial atoms produced in collision cascades and phonon excitations. Phonons give rise to the random Brownian motion of clusters in the crystal lattice. Phonon excitations are also responsible for the dissipation of energy of rapidly moving clusters formed at the periphery of collision cascades. We investigate how the coefficient of thermal friction depends on the structure of clusters. We also discuss implications of our findings for understanding the origin of higher resistance of bcc metals to irradiation and the connection between this phenomenon and the long-range effect observed in experiments on ion implantation.

  10. Report 10. Cooperative immune responses of different generations of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savtsova, Z.D.; Kovbasyuk, S.A.; Yudina, O.Yu.; Zaritskaya, M.Yu.; Voejkova, I.M.; Orlovskij, A.A.; Indyk, V.M.; Serkiz, Ya.I.

    1991-01-01

    The immune status of mice has been assessed by the whole complex of data. The permanent action of low-level radiation has been shown to suppress considerably the rate of reactions of the delayed-type hypersensitivity and graft-versus host disease, as well as NK and specific cytolytic T-lymphocyte activity. The dynamics of accumulation and the levels of antibodies in the serum, lung and trachea extracts are virtually invariable. The resistance of experimental animals to influenza is lower than that of non-irradiated mice of the same line and age. The data obtained indicate that the immune disturbances revealed are connected not only with the alteration of lymphoid cell populations, but also with the alteration of the immune regulation mechanisms

  11. Bone Abnormalities in Mice with Protein Kinase A (PKA) Defects Reveal a Role of Cyclic AMP Signaling in Bone Stromal Cell-Dependent Tumor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Shapiro, J M; Saloustros, E; Stratakis, C A

    2016-11-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is an important enzyme for all eukaryotic cells. PKA phosphorylates other proteins, thus, it is essential for the regulation of many diverse cellular functions, including cytoplasmic trafficking and signaling, organelle structure and mitochondrial oxidation, nuclear gene expression, the cell cycle, and cellular division. The PKA holoenzyme is composed of 2 regulatory and 2 catalytic subunits. Four regulatory (R1α, R1β, R2α, and R2β) and 4 catalytic subunits (Cα, Cβ, Cγ, and Prkx) have been identified, giving rise to mainly PKA-I (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R1α or R1β), or PKA-II (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R2α or R2β). Mutations in the PKA subunits can lead to altered total PKA activity or abnormal PKA-I to PKA-II ratio, leading to various abnormalities in both humans and mice. These effects can be tissue-specific. We studied the effect of PKA subunit defects on PKA activity and bone morphology of mice that were single or double heterozygous for null alleles of the various PKA subunit genes. Bone lesions including fibrous dysplasia, myxomas, osteo-sarcomas, -chondromas and -chondrosarcomas were found in these mice. Observational and molecular studies showed that these lesions were derived from bone stromal cells (BSCs). We conclude that haploinsufficiency for different PKA subunit genes affected bone lesion formation, new bone generation, organization, and mineralization in variable ways. This work identified a PKA subunit- and activity-dependent pathway of bone lesion formation from BSCs with important implications for understanding how cyclic AMP affects the skeleton and its tumorigenesis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Modeling of excimer laser radiation induced defect generation in fluoride phosphate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natura, U.; Ehrt, D.

    2001-01-01

    Fluoride phosphate (FP) glasses with low phosphate content are high-transparent in the deep ultraviolet (UV) range and attractive candidates for UV-optics. Their optical properties are complementary to fluoride crystals. The anomalous partial dispersion makes them desirable for optical lens designs to reduce the secondary spectrum. Their UV transmission is limited by trace impurities introduced by raw materials and decreases when exposed to UV-radiation (lamps, lasers). The experiments of the paper published previously in this journal were used in order to separate radiation induced absorption bands in the fluoride phosphate glass FP10. In this paper the generation mechanism of the phosphorus-oxygen related hole center POHC 2 is investigated in detail in glasses of various compositions (various phosphate and impurity contents) in order to predict the transmission loss in case of long-time irradiation. Experiments were carried out using ArF- and KrF-excimer lasers (ns-pulses). POHC 2 generation strongly depends on the phosphate content and on the content of Pb 2+ . A model was developed on these terms. Rate equations are formulated, incorporating the influence of the Pb 2+ -content on the defect generation, a two-step creation term including an energy transfer process and a one-photon bleaching term. This results in a set of coupled nonlinear differential equations. Absorption coefficients and lifetimes of the excited states were calculated as well. Experimental results compared well with the numerical analysis of the theoretical rate equations

  13. Modelling ionising radiation induced defect generation in bipolar oxides with gated diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Cirba, C.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Kosier, St.; Fouillat, P.; Montagner, X.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-induced oxide defects that degrade electrical characteristics of bipolar junction transistor (BJTs) can be measured with the use of gated diodes. The buildup of defects and their effect on device radiation response are modeled with computer simulation. (authors)

  14. Developmental and growth defects in mice with combined deficiency of CK2 catalytic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landesman-Bollag, Esther; Belkina, Anna; Hovey, Beth; Connors, Edward; Cox, Charles; Seldin, David C

    2011-10-01

    The CK2 α and α' catalytic gene products have overlapping biochemical activity, but in vivo, their functions are very different. Deletion of both alleles of CK2α leads to mid-gestational embryonic lethality, while deletion of both alleles of CK2α' does not interfere with viability or development of embryos; however, adult CK2α'-/-males are infertile. To further elucidate developmental roles of CK2, and analyze functional overlap between the two catalytic genes, mice with combined knockouts were bred. Mice bearing any two CK2 catalytic alleles were phenotypically normal. However, inheritance of a single CK2α allele, without either CK2α' allele, resulted in partial embryonic lethality. Such mice that survived through embryogenesis were smaller at birth than littermate controls, and weighed less throughout life. However, their cardiac function and lifespan were normal. Fibroblasts derived from CK2α+/-CK2α'-/- embryos grew poorly in culture. These experiments demonstrate that combined loss of one CK2α allele and both CK2α' alleles leads to unique abnormalities of growth and development.

  15. Impaired mastication reduced newly generated neurons at the accessory olfactory bulb and pheromonal responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsugi, Chizuru; Miyazono, Sadaharu; Osada, Kazumi; Matsuda, Mitsuyoshi; Kashiwayanagi, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    A large number of neurons are generated at the subventricular zone (SVZ) even during adulthood. In a previous study, we have shown that a reduced mastication impairs both neurogenesis in the SVZ and olfactory functions. Pheromonal signals, which are received by the vomeronasal organ, provide information about reproductive and social states. Vomeronasal sensory neurons project to the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) located on the dorso-caudal surface of the main olfactory bulb. Newly generated neurons at the SVZ migrate to the AOB and differentiate into granule cells and periglomerular cells. This study aimed to explore the effects of changes in mastication on newly generated neurons and pheromonal responses. Bromodeoxyuridine-immunoreactive (BrdU-ir; a marker of DNA synthesis) and Fos-ir (a marker of neurons excited) structures in sagittal sections of the AOB after exposure to urinary odours were compared between the mice fed soft and hard diets. The density of BrdU-ir cells in the AOB in the soft-diet-fed mice after 1 month was essentially similar to that of the hard-diet-fed mice, while that was lower in the soft-diet-fed mice for 3 or 6 months than in the hard-diet-fed mice. The density of Fos-ir cells in the soft-diet-fed mice after 2 months was essentially similar to that in the hard-diet-fed mice, while that was lower in the soft-diet-fed mice for 4 months than in the hard-diet-fed mice. The present results suggest that impaired mastication reduces newly generated neurons at the AOB, which in turn impairs olfactory function at the AOB. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced coupling of oxidative phosphorylation in vivo precedes electron transport chain defects due to mild oxidative stress in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Siegel

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and mitochondrial function are at the core of many degenerative conditions. However, the interaction between oxidative stress and in vivo mitochondrial function is unclear. We used both pharmacological (2 week paraquat (PQ treatment of wild type mice and transgenic (mice lacking Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1(-/- models to test the effect of oxidative stress on in vivo mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy were used to measure mitochondrial ATP and oxygen fluxes and cell energetic state. In both models of oxidative stress, coupling of oxidative phosphorylation was significantly lower (lower P/O at rest in vivo in skeletal muscle and was dose-dependent in the PQ model. Despite this reduction in efficiency, in vivo mitochondrial phosphorylation capacity (ATPmax was maintained in both models, and ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers was unchanged following PQ treatment. In association with the reduced P/O, PQ treatment led to a dose-dependent reduction in PCr/ATP ratio and increased phosphorylation of AMPK. These results indicate that oxidative stress uncouples oxidative phosphorylation in vivo and results in energetic stress in the absence of defects in the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  17. Epididymis response partly compensates for spermatozoa oxidative defects in snGPx4 and GPx5 double mutant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Noblanc

    Full Text Available We report here that spermatozoa of mice lacking both the sperm nucleus glutathione peroxidase 4 (snGPx4 and the epididymal glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPx5 activities display sperm nucleus structural abnormalities including delayed and defective nuclear compaction, nuclear instability and DNA damage. We show that to counteract the GPx activity losses, the epididymis of the double KO animals mounted an antioxydant response resulting in a strong increase in the global H(2O(2-scavenger activity especially in the cauda epididymis. Quantitative RT-PCR data show that together with the up-regulation of epididymal scavengers (of the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin system as well as glutathione-S-transferases the epididymis of double mutant animals increased the expression of several disulfide isomerases in an attempt to recover normal disulfide-bridging activity. Despite these compensatory mechanisms cauda-stored spermatozoa of double mutant animals show high levels of DNA oxidation, increased fragmentation and greater susceptibility to nuclear decondensation. Nevertheless, the enzymatic epididymal salvage response is sufficient to maintain full fertility of double KO males whatever their age, crossed with young WT female mice.

  18. A computational model for reliability calculation of steam generators from defects in its tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero, Paulo C.M.; Melo, P.F. Frutuoso e

    2000-01-01

    Nowadays, probability approaches are employed for calculating the reliability of steam generators as a function of defects in their tubes without any deterministic association with warranty assurance. Unfortunately, probability models produce large failure values, as opposed to the recommendation of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, that is, failure probabilities must be as small as possible In this paper, we propose the association of the deterministic methodology with the probabilistic one. At first, the failure probability evaluation of steam generators follows a probabilistic methodology: to find the failure probability, critical cracks - obtained from Monte Carlo simulations - are limited to have length's in the interval defined by their lower value and the plugging limit one, so as to obtain a failure probability of at most 1%. The distribution employed for modeling the observed (measured) cracks considers the same interval. Any length outside the mentioned interval is not considered for the probability evaluation: it is approached by the deterministic model. The deterministic approach is to plug the tube when any anomalous crack is detected in it. Such a crack is an observed one placed in the third region on the plot of the logarithmic time derivative of crack lengths versus the mode I stress intensity factor, while for normal cracks the plugging of tubes occurs in the second region of that plot - if they are dangerous, of course, considering their random evolution. A methodology for identifying anomalous cracks is also presented. (author)

  19. Effect of high current density to defect generation of blue LED and its characterization with transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, R.; Sugiarti, E.; Isnaeni; Purawiardi, R. I.; Widodo, H.; Muslimin, A. N.; Yuliasari; Ronaldus, C. E.; Prastomo, N.; Hastuty, S.

    2018-03-01

    The optical, electrical and structural characteristics of InGaN-based blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were investigated to identify the degradation of LED before and after current injection. The sample was injected by high current of 200 A/cm2 for 5 and 20 minutes. It was observed that injection of current shifts light intensity and wavelength characteristics that indicated defect generation. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) characterization was carried out in order to clarify the structure degradation caused by defect in active layer which consisted of 14 quantum well with thickness of about 5 nm and confined with barrier layer with thickness of about 12 nm. TEM results showed pre-existing defect in LED before injection with high current. Furthermore, discontinue and edge defect was found in dark spot region of LED after injection with high current.

  20. Mice deficient in ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation suffer from muscle weakness that reflects a growth defect and energy deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Ruvinsky

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mice, whose ribosomal protein S6 cannot be phosphorylated due to replacement of all five phosphorylatable serine residues by alanines (rpS6(P-/-, are viable and fertile. However, phenotypic characterization of these mice and embryo fibroblasts derived from them, has established the role of these modifications in the regulation of the size of several cell types, as well as pancreatic beta-cell function and glucose homeostasis. A relatively passive behavior of these mice has raised the possibility that they suffer from muscle weakness, which has, indeed, been confirmed by a variety of physical performance tests. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A large variety of experimental methodologies, including morphometric measurements of histological preparations, high throughput proteomic analysis, positron emission tomography (PET and numerous biochemical assays, were used in an attempt to establish the mechanism underlying the relative weakness of rpS6(P-/- muscles. Collectively, these experiments have demonstrated that the physical inferiority appears to result from two defects: a a decrease in total muscle mass that reflects impaired growth, rather than aberrant differentiation of myofibers, as well as a diminished abundance of contractile proteins; and b a reduced content of ATP and phosphocreatine, two readily available energy sources. The abundance of three mitochondrial proteins has been shown to diminish in the knockin mouse. However, the apparent energy deficiency in this genotype does not result from a lower mitochondrial mass or compromised activity of enzymes of the oxidative phosphorylation, nor does it reflect a decline in insulin-dependent glucose uptake, or diminution in storage of glycogen or triacylglycerol (TG in the muscle. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study establishes rpS6 phosphorylation as a determinant of muscle strength through its role in regulation of myofiber growth and energy content. Interestingly, a similar

  1. Generation of narrowband elastic waves with a fiber laser and its application to the imaging of defects in a plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Ishihara, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Pulsed laser equipment can be used to generate elastic waves through the instantaneous reaction of thermal expansion or ablation of the material; however, we cannot control the waveform generated by the laser in the same manner that we can when piezoelectric transducers are used as exciters. This study investigates the generation of narrowband tone-burst waves using a fiber laser of the type that is widely used in laser beam machining. Fiber lasers can emit laser pulses with a high repetition rate on the order of MHz, and the laser pulses can be modulated to a burst train by external signals. As a consequence of the burst laser emission, a narrowband tone-burst elastic wave is generated. We experimentally confirmed that the elastic waves agreed well with the modulation signals in time domain waveforms and their frequency spectra, and that waveforms can be controlled by the generation technique. We also apply the generation technique to defect imaging with a scanning laser source. In the experiments, with small laser emission energy, we were not able to obtain defect images from the signal amplitude due to low signal-to-noise ratio, whereas using frequency spectrum peaks of the tone-burst signals gave clear defect images, which indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio is improved in the frequency domain by using this technique for the generation of narrowband elastic waves. Moreover, even for defect imaging at a single receiving point, defect images were enhanced by taking an average of distributions of frequency spectrum peaks at different frequencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Loss of Apela Peptide in Mice Causes Low Penetrance Embryonic Lethality and Defects in Early Mesodermal Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laina Freyer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Apela (also known as Elabela, Ende, and Toddler is a small signaling peptide that activates the G-protein-coupled receptor Aplnr to stimulate cell migration during zebrafish gastrulation. Here, using CRISPR/Cas9 to generate a null, reporter-expressing allele, we study the role of Apela in the developing mouse embryo. We found that loss of Apela results in low-penetrance cardiovascular defects that manifest after the onset of circulation. Three-dimensional micro-computed tomography revealed a higher penetrance of vascular remodeling defects, from which some mutants recover, and identified extraembryonic anomalies as the earliest morphological distinction in Apela mutant embryos. Transcriptomics at late gastrulation identified aberrant upregulation of erythroid and myeloid markers in mutant embryos prior to the appearance of physical malformations. Double-mutant analyses showed that loss of Apela signaling impacts early Aplnr-expressing mesodermal populations independently of the alternative ligand Apelin, leading to lethal cardiac defects in some Apela null embryos.

  3. Dwarfism and age-associated spinal degeneration of heterozygote cmd mice defective in aggrecan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hideto; Nakata, Ken; Kimata, Koji; Nakanishi, Isao; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    1997-01-01

    Mouse cartilage matrix deficiency (cmd) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a genetic defect of aggrecan, a large chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in cartilage. The homozygotes (−/−) are characterized by cleft palate and short limbs, tail, and snout. They die just after birth because of respiratory failure, and the heterozygotes (+/−) appear normal at birth. Here we report that the heterozygotes show dwarfism and develop spinal misalignment with age. Within 19 months of age, they exhibit spastic gait caused by misalignment of the cervical spine and die because of starvation. Histological examination revealed a high incidence of herniation and degeneration of vertebral discs. Electron microscopy showed a degeneration of disc chondrocytes in the heterozygotes. These findings may facilitate the identification of mutations in humans predisposed to spinal degeneration. PMID:9192671

  4. Defect generation/passivation by low energy hydrogen implant for silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sopori, B.L.; Zhou, T.Q.; Rozgonyi, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Low energy ion implant is shown to produce defects in silicon. These defects include surface damage, hydrogen agglomeration, formation of platelets with (111) habit plane and decoration of dislocations. Hydrogen also produces an inversion type of surface on boron doped silicon. These effects indicate that a preferred approach for passivation is to incorporate hydrogen from the back side of the cell. A backside H + implant technique is described. The results show that degree of passivation differs for various devices. A comparison of the defect structures of hydrogenated devices indicates that the structure and the distribution of defects in the bulk of the material plays a significant role in determining the degree of passivation

  5. Quantitative evaluation of skeletal muscle defects in second harmonic generation images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenhua; Raben, Nina; Ralston, Evelyn

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle pathologies cause irregularities in the normally periodic organization of the myofibrils. Objective grading of muscle morphology is necessary to assess muscle health, compare biopsies, and evaluate treatments and the evolution of disease. To facilitate such quantitation, we have developed a fast, sensitive, automatic imaging analysis software. It detects major and minor morphological changes by combining texture features and Fourier transform (FT) techniques. We apply this tool to second harmonic generation (SHG) images of muscle fibers which visualize the repeating myosin bands. Texture features are then calculated by using a Haralick gray-level cooccurrence matrix in MATLAB. Two scores are retrieved from the texture correlation plot by using FT and curve-fitting methods. The sensitivity of the technique was tested on SHG images of human adult and infant muscle biopsies and of mouse muscle samples. The scores are strongly correlated to muscle fiber condition. We named the software MARS (muscle assessment and rating scores). It is executed automatically and is highly sensitive even to subtle defects. We propose MARS as a powerful and unbiased tool to assess muscle health.

  6. Functional memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells are generated after a single Plasmodium chabaudi infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Maina Ndungu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have long been shown to play a critical role in naturally acquired immunity to malaria, but it has been suggested that Plasmodium-specific antibodies in humans may not be long lived. The cellular mechanisms underlying B cell and antibody responses are difficult to study in human infections; therefore, we have investigated the kinetics, duration and characteristics of the Plasmodium-specific memory B cell response in an infection of P. chabaudi in mice. Memory B cells and plasma cells specific for the C-terminal region of Merozoite Surface Protein 1 were detectable for more than eight months following primary infection. Furthermore, a classical memory response comprised predominantly of the T-cell dependent isotypes IgG2c, IgG2b and IgG1 was elicited upon rechallenge with the homologous parasite, confirming the generation of functional memory B cells. Using cyclophosphamide treatment to discriminate between long-lived and short-lived plasma cells, we demonstrated long-lived cells secreting Plasmodium-specific IgG in both bone marrow and in spleens of infected mice. The presence of these long-lived cells was independent of the presence of chronic infection, as removal of parasites with anti-malarial drugs had no impact on their numbers. Thus, in this model of malaria, both functional Plasmodium-specific memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells can be generated, suggesting that defects in generating these cell populations may not be the reason for generating short-lived antibody responses.

  7. Surgical membranes as directional delivery devices to generate tissue: testing in an ovine critical sized defect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa L Knothe Tate

    Full Text Available Pluripotent cells residing in the periosteum, a bi-layered membrane enveloping all bones, exhibit a remarkable regenerative capacity to fill in critical sized defects of the ovine femur within two weeks of treatment. Harnessing the regenerative power of the periosteum appears to be limited only by the amount of healthy periosteum available. Here we use a substitute periosteum, a delivery device cum implant, to test the hypothesis that directional delivery of endogenous periosteal factors enhances bone defect healing.Newly adapted surgical protocols were used to create critical sized, middiaphyseal femur defects in four groups of five skeletally mature Swiss alpine sheep. Each group was treated using a periosteum substitute for the controlled addition of periosteal factors including the presence of collagen in the periosteum (Group 1, periosteum derived cells (Group 2, and autogenic periosteal strips (Group 3. Control group animals were treated with an isotropic elastomer membrane alone. We hypothesized that periosteal substitute membranes incorporating the most periosteal factors would show superior defect infilling compared to substitute membranes integrating fewer factors (i.e. Group 3>Group 2>Group 1>Control.Based on micro-computed tomography data, bone defects enveloped by substitute periosteum enabling directional delivery of periosteal factors exhibit superior bony bridging compared to those sheathed with isotropic membrane controls (Group 3>Group 2>Group 1, Control. Quantitative histological analysis shows significantly increased de novo tissue generation with delivery of periosteal factors, compared to the substitute periosteum containing a collagen membrane alone (Group 1 as well as compared to the isotropic control membrane. Greatest tissue generation and maximal defect bridging was observed when autologous periosteal transplant strips were included in the periosteum substitute.Periosteum-derived cells as well as other factors

  8. Statistical relation between particle contaminations in ultra pure water and defects generated by process tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wali, F.; Knotter, D. Martin; Wortelboer, Ronald; Mud, Auke

    2007-01-01

    Ultra pure water supplied inside the Fab is used in different tools at different stages of processing. Data of the particles measured in ultra pure water was compared with the defect density on wafers processed on these tools and a statistical relation is found Keywords— Yield, defect density,

  9. Generation of genetically modified mice using CRISPR/Cas9 and haploid embryonic stem cell systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Fang JIN

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available With the development of high-throughput sequencing technology in the post-genomic era, researchers have concentrated their efforts on elucidating the relationships between genes and their corresponding functions. Recently, important progress has been achieved in the generation of genetically modified mice based on CRISPR/Cas9 and haploid embryonic stem cell (haESC approaches, which provide new platforms for gene function analysis, human disease modeling, and gene therapy. Here, we review the CRISPR/Cas9 and haESC technology for the generation of genetically modified mice and discuss the key challenges in the application of these approaches.

  10. Chemical rescue of cleft palate and midline defects in conditional GSK-3beta mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Karen J; Arron, Joseph R; Stankunas, Kryn; Crabtree, Gerald R; Longaker, Michael T

    2007-03-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) has integral roles in a variety of biological processes, including development, diabetes, and the progression of Alzheimer's disease. As such, a thorough understanding of GSK-3beta function will have a broad impact on human biology and therapeutics. Because GSK-3beta interacts with many different pathways, its specific developmental roles remain unclear. We have discovered a genetic requirement for GSK-3beta in midline development. Homozygous null mice display cleft palate, incomplete fusion of the ribs at the midline and bifid sternum as well as delayed sternal ossification. Using a chemically regulated allele of GSK-3beta (ref. 6), we have defined requirements for GSK-3beta activity during discrete temporal windows in palatogenesis and skeletogenesis. The rapamycin-dependent allele of GSK-3beta produces GSK-3beta fused to a tag, FRB* (FKBP/rapamycin binding), resulting in a rapidly destabilized chimaeric protein. In the absence of drug, GSK-3beta(FRB)*(/FRB)* mutants appear phenotypically identical to GSK-3beta-/- mutants. In the presence of drug, GSK-3betaFRB* is rapidly stabilized, restoring protein levels and activity. Using this system, mutant phenotypes were rescued by restoring endogenous GSK-3beta activity during two distinct periods in gestation. This technology provides a powerful tool for defining windows of protein function during development.

  11. Birth defects and aplastic anemia: differences in polycyclic hydrocarbon toxicity associated with the Ah locus. [Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebert, D.W.; Levitt, R.C.; Jensen, N.M.; Lambert, G.H.; Felton, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    The balance between cytochrome(s) P/sub 1/-450 and other forms of P-450 in the liver, and probably many nonhepatic tissues as well, appears to be important in the toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and teratogenicity of numerous compounds. Thus, allelic differences in a single gene--the Ah locus-- can have profound effects on the susceptibility of mice to drug toxicity and cancer. There is evidence for the Ah lous in the human. Striking increases in the incidence of stillborns, reorptions,and malformations caused by 3-methylcholanthrene or 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene were observed in the aromatic hydrocarbon responsive C57BL/6N,C3H/HeN, and BALB/cAnN inbred strains, compared with the genetically nonresponsive AKR/N. These data suggest that an association exists between the Ah locus and teratogenesis. Although numerous teratogenic differences among inbred mouse strains have been previously reported, this study is unique in that the genetic differences in teratogenicity observed were predicted in advance, on the basis of known differences in polycyclic hydrocarbon metabolism regulated by the Ah locus.

  12. Compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis in transgenic mice results in defective protein lipoylation and energy disequilibrium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Smith

    Full Text Available A mouse model with compromised mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis has been engineered in order to assess the role of this pathway in mitochondrial function and overall health. Reduction in the expression of mitochondrial malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase, a key enzyme in the pathway encoded by the nuclear Mcat gene, was achieved to varying extents in all examined tissues employing tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox technology. Although affected mice consumed more food than control animals, they failed to gain weight, were less physically active, suffered from loss of white adipose tissue, reduced muscle strength, kyphosis, alopecia, hypothermia and shortened lifespan. The Mcat-deficient phenotype is attributed primarily to reduced synthesis, in several tissues, of the octanoyl precursors required for the posttranslational lipoylation of pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complexes, resulting in diminished capacity of the citric acid cycle and disruption of energy metabolism. The presence of an alternative lipoylation pathway that utilizes exogenous free lipoate appears restricted to liver and alone is insufficient for preservation of normal energy metabolism. Thus, de novo synthesis of precursors for the protein lipoylation pathway plays a vital role in maintenance of mitochondrial function and overall vigor.

  13. The effects of in utero bisphenol A exposure on reproductive capacity in several generations of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet, E-mail: zivgal1@illinois.edu; Wang, Wei, E-mail: weiwang2@illinois.edu; Zhou, Changqing, E-mail: czhou27@illinois.edu; Flaws, Jodi A., E-mail: jflaws@illinois.edu

    2015-05-01

    In utero bisphenol A (BPA) exposure affects reproductive function in the first generation (F1) of mice; however, not many studies have examined the reproductive effects of BPA exposure on subsequent generations. In this study, pregnant mice (F0) were orally dosed with vehicle, BPA (0.5, 20, and 50 μg/kg/day) or diethylstilbestrol (DES; 0.05 μg/kg/day) daily from gestation day 11 until birth. F1 females were used to generate the F2 generation, and F2 females were used to generate the F3 generation. Breeding studies at the ages of 3, 6, and 9 months were conducted to evaluate reproductive capacity over time. Further, studies were conducted to evaluate pubertal onset, litter size, and percentage of dead pups; and to calculate pregnancy rate, and mating, fertility, and gestational indices. The results indicate that BPA exposure (0.5 and 50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at vaginal opening in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. Both DES (0.05 μg/kg/day) and BPA (50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at first estrus in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. BPA exposure reduced gestational index in the F1 and F2 generations compared to control. Further, BPA exposure (0.5 μg/kg/day) compromised the fertility index in the F3 generation compared to control. Finally, in utero BPA exposure reduced the ability of female mice to maintain pregnancies as they aged. Collectively, these data suggest that BPA exposure affects reproductive function in female mice and that some effects may be transgenerational in nature. - Highlights: • In utero BPA delayed vaginal opening in the F3 generation compared to control. • In utero BPA delayed estrus in the F3 generation compared to control. • In utero BPA reduced the ability of F1 and F2 female mice to maintain pregnancies. • In utero BPA compromised the ability of F3 female mice to become pregnant. • Some effects of in utero BPA may be transgenerational in nature.

  14. The effects of in utero bisphenol A exposure on reproductive capacity in several generations of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Changqing; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2015-01-01

    In utero bisphenol A (BPA) exposure affects reproductive function in the first generation (F1) of mice; however, not many studies have examined the reproductive effects of BPA exposure on subsequent generations. In this study, pregnant mice (F0) were orally dosed with vehicle, BPA (0.5, 20, and 50 μg/kg/day) or diethylstilbestrol (DES; 0.05 μg/kg/day) daily from gestation day 11 until birth. F1 females were used to generate the F2 generation, and F2 females were used to generate the F3 generation. Breeding studies at the ages of 3, 6, and 9 months were conducted to evaluate reproductive capacity over time. Further, studies were conducted to evaluate pubertal onset, litter size, and percentage of dead pups; and to calculate pregnancy rate, and mating, fertility, and gestational indices. The results indicate that BPA exposure (0.5 and 50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at vaginal opening in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. Both DES (0.05 μg/kg/day) and BPA (50 μg/kg/day) significantly delayed the age at first estrus in the F3 generation compared to vehicle control. BPA exposure reduced gestational index in the F1 and F2 generations compared to control. Further, BPA exposure (0.5 μg/kg/day) compromised the fertility index in the F3 generation compared to control. Finally, in utero BPA exposure reduced the ability of female mice to maintain pregnancies as they aged. Collectively, these data suggest that BPA exposure affects reproductive function in female mice and that some effects may be transgenerational in nature. - Highlights: • In utero BPA delayed vaginal opening in the F3 generation compared to control. • In utero BPA delayed estrus in the F3 generation compared to control. • In utero BPA reduced the ability of F1 and F2 female mice to maintain pregnancies. • In utero BPA compromised the ability of F3 female mice to become pregnant. • Some effects of in utero BPA may be transgenerational in nature

  15. Defect generation and activation processes in HfO{sub 2} thin films: Contributions to stress-induced leakage currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oettking, Rolf; Leitsmann, Roman; Lazarevic, Florian; Plaenitz, Philipp [AQcomputare, Business Unit MATcalc, Chemnitz (Germany); Kupke, Steve; Roll, Guntrade; Slesazeck, Stefan [NaMLab gGmbH, Dresden (Germany); Nadimi, Ebrahim [AQcomputare, Business Unit MATcalc, Chemnitz (Germany); K.N. Toosi University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Trentzsch, Martin [Globalfoundries Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Mikolajick, Thomas [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Fakultaet Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik, Institut fuer Halbleiter- und Mikrosystemtechnik, Dresden (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    An important source of degradation in thin dielectric material layers is the generation and migration of oxygen vacancies. We investigated the formation of Frenkel pairs (FPs) in HfO{sub 2} as the first structural step for the creation of new defects as well as the migration of preexisting and newly built oxygen vacancies by nudged elastic band (NEB) calculations and stress induced leakage current (SILC) experiments. The analysis indicates, that for neutral systems no stable intimate FPs are built, whereas for the charge states q = ± 2 FPs are formed at threefold and at fourfold coordinated oxygen lattice sites. Their generation and annihilation rate are in equilibrium according to the Boltzmann statistics. Distant FPs (stable defects) are unlikely to build due to high formation energies and therefore cannot be accounted for the measured gate leakage current increase of nMOSFETs under constant voltage stress. The negatively charged oxygen vacancies were found to be very immobile in contrast to positively charged V{sub 0}'s with a low migration barrier that coincides well with the experimentally obtained activation energy. We show that rather the activation of preexisting defects and migration towards the interface than the defect generation are the cause for the gate oxide degradation. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes; Revised September 3, 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochau, Gary E.; Caffey, Thurlow W.H.; Bahram Nassersharif; Garcia, Gabe V.; Jedlicka, Russell P.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B204 Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003. A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The technique is 100% volumetric, and may find smaller defects, more rapidly, and less expensively than present methods. The project described in this report was a joint development effort between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) funded by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the project was to research, design, and develop a new concept utilizing a continuous wave radar to detect defects inside metallic tubes and in particular nuclear plant steam generator tubing. The project was divided into four parallel tracks: computational modeling, experimental prototyping, thermo-mechanical design, and signal detection and analysis

  17. Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary E. Rochau and Thurlow W.H. Caffey, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0740; Bahram Nassersharif and Gabe V. Garcia, Department of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001; Russell P. Jedlicka, Klipsch School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001

    2003-05-01

    OAK B204 Continuous-Wave Radar to Detect Defects Within Heat Exchangers and Steam Generator Tubes ; Revised September 3, 2003. A major cause of failures in heat exchangers and steam generators in nuclear power plants is degradation of the tubes within them. The tube failure is often caused by the development of cracks that begin on the outer surface of the tube and propagate both inwards and laterally. A new technique was researched for detection of defects using a continuous-wave radar method within metal tubing. The technique is 100% volumetric, and may find smaller defects, more rapidly, and less expensively than present methods. The project described in this report was a joint development effort between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and New Mexico State University (NMSU) funded by the US Department of Energy. The goal of the project was to research, design, and develop a new concept utilizing a continuous wave radar to detect defects inside metallic tubes and in particular nuclear plant steam generator tubing. The project was divided into four parallel tracks: computational modeling, experimental prototyping, thermo-mechanical design, and signal detection and analysis.

  18. Phenomenological model of photoluminescence degradation and photoinduced defect formation in silicon nanocrystal ensembles under singlet oxygen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongalsky, Maxim B., E-mail: mgongalsky@gmail.com; Timoshenko, Victor Yu. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State M.V. Lomonosov University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-28

    We propose a phenomenological model to explain photoluminescence degradation of silicon nanocrystals under singlet oxygen generation in gaseous and liquid systems. The model considers coupled rate equations, which take into account the exciton radiative recombination in silicon nanocrystals, photosensitization of singlet oxygen generation, defect formation on the surface of silicon nanocrystals as well as quenching processes for both excitons and singlet oxygen molecules. The model describes well the experimentally observed power law dependences of the photoluminescence intensity, singlet oxygen concentration, and lifetime versus photoexcitation time. The defect concentration in silicon nanocrystals increases by power law with a fractional exponent, which depends on the singlet oxygen concentration and ambient conditions. The obtained results are discussed in a view of optimization of the photosensitized singlet oxygen generation for biomedical applications.

  19. Defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent mucosal host response to Candida albicans determines susceptibility to oral candidiasis in mice expressing the HIV-1 transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupil, Mathieu; Cousineau-Côté, Vincent; Aumont, Francine; Sénéchal, Serge; Gaboury, Louis; Hanna, Zaher; Jolicoeur, Paul; de Repentigny, Louis

    2014-10-26

    The tissue-signaling cytokines IL-17 and IL-22 are critical to host defense against oral Candida albicans infection, by their induction of oral antimicrobial peptide expression and recruitment of neutrophils. Mucosal Th17 cells which produce these cytokines are preferentially depleted in HIV-infected patients. Here, we tested the hypothesis that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent host responses to C. albicans determine the phenotype of susceptibility to oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) in transgenic (Tg) mice expressing HIV-1. Naïve CD4+ T-cells and the differentiated Th1, Th2, Th17, Th1Th17 and Treg lineages were all profoundly depleted in cervical lymph nodes (CLNs) of these Tg mice. However, naive CD4+ cells from Tg mice maintained the capacity to differentiate into these lineages in response to polarizing cytokines in vitro. Expression of Il17, Il22, S100a8 and Ccl20 was enhanced in oral mucosal tissue of non-Tg, but not of Tg mice, after oral infection with C. albicans. Treatment of infected Tg mice with the combination of IL-17 and IL-22, but not IL-17 or Il-22 alone, significantly reduced oral burdens of C. albicans and abundance of Candida hyphae in the epithelium of tongues of infected Tg mice, and restored the ability of the Tg mice to up-regulate expression of S100a8 and Ccl20 in response to C. albicans infection. These findings demonstrate that defective IL-17- and IL-22-dependent induction of innate mucosal immunity to C. albicans is central to the phenotype of susceptibility to OPC in these HIV transgenic mice.

  20. Kharon1 null mutants of Leishmania mexicana are avirulent in mice and exhibit a cytokinesis defect within macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoa D Tran

    Full Text Available In a variety of eukaryotes, flagella play important roles both in motility and as sensory organelles that monitor the extracellular environment. In the parasitic protozoan Leishmania mexicana, one glucose transporter isoform, LmxGT1, is targeted selectively to the flagellar membrane where it appears to play a role in glucose sensing. Trafficking of LmxGT1 to the flagellar membrane is dependent upon interaction with the KHARON1 protein that is located at the base of the flagellar axoneme. Remarkably, while Δkharon1 null mutants are viable as insect stage promastigotes, they are unable to survive as amastigotes inside host macrophages. Although Δkharon1 promastigotes enter macrophages and transform into amastigotes, these intracellular parasites are unable to execute cytokinesis and form multinucleate cells before dying. Notably, extracellular axenic amastigotes of Δkharon1 mutants replicate and divide normally, indicating a defect in the mutants that is only exhibited in the intra-macrophage environment. Although the flagella of Δkharon1 amastigotes adhere to the phagolysomal membrane of host macrophages, the morphology of the mutant flagella is often distorted. Additionally, these null mutants are completely avirulent following injection into BALB/c mice, underscoring the critical role of the KHARON1 protein for viability of intracellular amastigotes and disease in the animal model of leishmaniasis.

  1. Recql4 haploinsufficiency in mice leads to defects in osteoblast progenitors: Implications for low bone mass phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jieping; Murthy, Sreemala; Winata, Therry; Werner, Sean; Abe, Masumi; Prahalad, Agasanur K.; Hock, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie skeletal abnormalities in defective Recql4-related syndromes are poorly understood. Our objective in this study was to explore the function of Recql4 in osteoblast biology both in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry on adult mouse bone showed Recql4 protein localization in active osteoblasts around growth plate, but not in fully differentiated osteocytes. Consistent with this finding, Recql4 gene expression was high in proliferating mouse osteoblastic MC3T3.E1 cells and decreased as cells progressively lost their proliferation activity during differentiation. Recql4 overexpression in osteoblastic cells exhibited higher proliferation activity, while its depletion impeded cell growth. In addition, bone marrow stromal cells from male Recql4+/- mice had fewer progenitor cells, including osteoprogenitors, indicated by reduced total fibroblast colony forming units (CFU-f) and alkaline phosphatase-positive CFU-f colonies concomitant with reduced bone mass. These findings provide evidence that Recql4 functions as a regulatory protein during osteoprogenitor proliferation, a critical cellular event during skeleton development

  2. Nonlinear elastic longitudinal strain-wave propagation in a plate with nonequilibrium laser-generated point defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzade, Fikret Kh.

    2005-01-01

    The propagation of longitudinal strain wave in a plate with quadratic nonlinearity of elastic continuum was studied in the context of a model that takes into account the joint dynamics of elastic displacements in the medium and the concentration of the nonequilibrium laser-induced point defects. The input equations of the problem are reformulated in terms of only the total displacements of the medium points. In this case, the presence of structural defects manifests itself in the emergence of a delayed response of the system to the propagation of the strain-related perturbations, which is characteristic of media with relaxation or memory. The model equations describing the nonlinear displacement wave were derived with allowance made for the values of the relaxation parameter. The influence of the generation and relaxation of lattice defects on the propagation of this wave was analyzed. It is shown that, for short relaxation times of defects, the strain can propagate in the form of shock fronts. In the case of longer relaxation times, shock waves do not form and the strain wave propagates only in the form of solitary waves or a train of solitons. The contributions of the finiteness of the defect-recombination rate to linear and nonlinear elastic modulus, and spatial dispersion are determined

  3. Evaluation of hematopoietic potential generated by transplantation of muscle-derived stem cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, Francoise; Prestoz, Laetitita; Badaoui, Sabrina; Guillier, Martine; Haond, Celine; Opolon, Paule; Thomas, Jean-Leon; Zalc, Bernard; Vainchenker, William; Turhan, Ali G

    2004-02-01

    Muscle tissue of adult mice has been shown to contain stem cells with hematopoietic repopulation ability in vivo. To determine the functional characteristics of stem cells giving rise to this hematopoietic activity, we have performed hematopoietic reconstitution experiments by the use of muscle versus marrow transplantation in lethally irradiated mice and followed the fate of transplanted cells by Y-chimerism using PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. We report here that transplantation of murine muscle generate a major hematopoietic chimerism at the level of CFU-C, CFU-S, and terminally-differentiated cells in three generations of lethally irradiated mice followed up to 1 year after transplantation. This potential is totally abolished when muscle grafts were performed by the use of muscle from previously irradiated mice. As compared to marrow transplantation, muscle transplants were able to generate similar potencies to give rise to myeloid, T, B, and natural killer (NK) cells. Interestingly, marrow stem cells that have been generated in primary and then in secondary recipients were able to contribute efficiently to myofibers in the muscle tissue of tertiary recipients. Altogether, our data demonstrate that muscle-derived stem cells present a major hematopoietic repopulating ability with evidence of self-replication in vivo. They are radiation-sensitive and similar to marrow-derived stem cells in terms of their ability to generate multilineage hematopoiesis. Finally, our data demonstrate that muscle-derived hematopoietic stem cells do not lose their ability to contribute to myofiber generation after at least two rounds of serial transplantation, suggesting a potential that is probably equivalent to that generated by marrow transplantation.

  4. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDA) mice lacking Mucin 1 have a profound defect in tumor growth and metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmer, Dahlia M.; Curry, Jennifer M.; Roy, Lopamudra D.; Tinder, Teresa L.; Sahraei, Mahnaz; Schettini, Jorge; Hwang, Sun-Il; Lee, Yong Y.; Gendler, Sandra J.; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is over expressed and aberrantly glycosolated in >60% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. The functional role of MUC1 in pancreatic cancer has yet to be fully elucidated due to a dearth of appropriate models. In the present study, we have generated mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (KC), which are either Muc1-null (KCKO) or express human MUC1 (KCM). We show that KCKO mice have significantly slower tumor progression and rates of secondary metastasis, compared to both KC and KCM. Cell lines derived from KCKO tumors have significantly lower tumorigenic capacity compared to cells from KCM tumors. Therefore, mice with KCKO tumors had a significant survival benefit compared to mice with KCM tumors. In vitro, KCKO cells have reduced proliferation and invasion and failed to respond to epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), or matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9). Further, significantly fewer KCKO cells entered the G2M phase of the cell cycle compared to the KCM cells. Proteomics and western blotting analysis revealed a complete loss of cdc-25c expression, phosphorylation of MAPK, as well as a significant decrease in Nestin and Tubulin α-2 chain expression in KCKO cells. Treatment with a MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, abrogated the enhanced proliferation of the KCM cells but had minimal effect on KCKO cells, suggesting that MUC1 is necessary for MAPK activity and oncogenic signaling. This is the first study to utilize a Muc1-null PDA mouse in order to fully elucidate the oncogenic role of MUC1, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:21558393

  5. Generation and evaluation of 3D digital casts of maxillary defects based on multisource data registration: A pilot clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hongqiang; Ma, Qijun; Hou, Yuezhong; Li, Man; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2017-12-01

    Digital techniques are not clinically applied for 1-piece maxillary prostheses containing an obturator and removable partial denture retained by the remaining teeth because of the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently accurate 3-dimensional (3D) images. The purpose of this pilot clinical study was to generate 3D digital casts of maxillary defects, including the defective region and the maxillary dentition, based on multisource data registration and to evaluate their effectiveness. Twelve participants with maxillary defects were selected. The maxillofacial region was scanned with spiral computer tomography (CT), and the maxillary arch and palate were scanned using an intraoral optical scanner. The 3D images from the CT and intraoral scanner were registered and merged to form a 3D digital cast of the maxillary defect containing the anatomic structures needed for the maxillary prosthesis. This included the defect cavity, maxillary dentition, and palate. Traditional silicone impressions were also made, and stone casts were poured. The accuracy of the digital cast in comparison with that of the stone cast was evaluated by measuring the distance between 4 anatomic landmarks. Differences and consistencies were assessed using paired Student t tests and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In 3 participants, physical resin casts were produced by rapid prototyping from digital casts. Based on the resin casts, maxillary prostheses were fabricated by using conventional methods and then evaluated in the participants to assess the clinical applicability of the digital casts. Digital casts of the maxillary defects were generated and contained all the anatomic details needed for the maxillary prosthesis. Comparing the digital and stone casts, a paired Student t test indicated that differences in the linear distances between landmarks were not statistically significant (P>.05). High ICC values (0.977 to 0.998) for the interlandmark distances further indicated the high

  6. Mice Deficient in NF-κB p50 and p52 or RANK Have Defective Growth Plate Formation and Post-natal Dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lianping; Chen, Di; Boyce, Brendan F

    2013-12-01

    NF-κBp50/p52 double knockout (dKO) and RANK KO mice have no osteoclasts and develop severe osteopetrosis associated with dwarfism. In contrast, Op/Op mice, which form few osteoclasts, and Src KO mice, which have osteoclasts with defective resorptive function, are osteopetrotic, but they are not dwarfed. Here, we compared the morphologic features of long bones from p50/p52 dKO, RANK KO, Op/Op and Src KO mice to attempt to explain the differences in their long bone lengths. We found that growth plates in p50/p52 dKO and RANK KO mice are significantly thicker than those in WT mice due to a 2-3-fold increase in the hypertrophic chondrocyte zone associated with normal a proliferative chondrocyte zone. This growth plate abnormality disappears when animals become older, but their dwarfism persists. Op/Op or Src KO mice have relatively normal growth plate morphology. In-situ hybridization study of long bones from p50/p52 dKO mice showed marked thickening of the growth plate region containing type 10 collagen-expressing chondrocytes. Treatment of micro-mass chondrocyte cultures with RANKL did not affect expression levels of type 2 collagen and Sox9, markers for proliferative chondrocytes, but RANKL reduced the number of type 10 collagen-expressing hypertrophic chondrocytes. Thus, RANK/NF-κB signaling plays a regulatory role in post-natal endochondral ossification that maintains hypertrophic conversion and prevents dwarfism in normal mice.

  7. ER stress and basement membrane defects combine to cause glomerular and tubular renal disease resulting from Col4a1 mutations in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances E. Jones

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Collagen IV is a major component of basement membranes, and mutations in COL4A1, which encodes collagen IV alpha chain 1, cause a multisystemic disease encompassing cerebrovascular, eye and kidney defects. However, COL4A1 renal disease remains poorly characterized and its pathomolecular mechanisms are unknown. We show that Col4a1 mutations in mice cause hypotension and renal disease, including proteinuria and defects in Bowman's capsule and the glomerular basement membrane, indicating a role for Col4a1 in glomerular filtration. Impaired sodium reabsorption in the loop of Henle and distal nephron despite elevated aldosterone levels indicates that tubular defects contribute to the hypotension, highlighting a novel role for the basement membrane in vascular homeostasis by modulation of the tubular response to aldosterone. Col4a1 mutations also cause diabetes insipidus, whereby the tubular defects lead to polyuria associated with medullary atrophy and a subsequent reduction in the ability to upregulate aquaporin 2 and concentrate urine. Moreover, haematuria, haemorrhage and vascular basement membrane defects confirm an important vascular component. Interestingly, although structural and compositional basement membrane defects occurred in the glomerulus and Bowman's capsule, no tubular basement membrane defects were detected. By contrast, medullary atrophy was associated with chronic ER stress, providing evidence for cell-type-dependent molecular mechanisms of Col4a1 mutations. These data show that both basement membrane defects and ER stress contribute to Col4a1 renal disease, which has important implications for the development of treatment strategies for collagenopathies.

  8. The roles of testicular nuclear receptor 4 (TR4 in male fertility-priapism and sexual behavior defects in TR4 knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Bo-Ying

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Successful reproductive efforts require the establishment of a situation favorable for reproduction that requires integration of both behavior and internal physiological events. TR4 nuclear receptor is known to be involved in male fertility via controlling spermatogenesis, yet its roles in regulating other biological events related to reproduction have not been completely revealed. Methods Male TR4 knockout (TR4-/- and wild type mice were used for the sexual behavior and penile dysfunction studies. Mice were sacrificed for histological examination and corresponding genes profiles were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Reporter gene assays were performed. Results We describe an unexpected finding of priapism in TR4-/- mice. As a transcriptional factor, we demonstrated that TR4 transcriptionally modulates a key enzyme regulating penis erection and neuronal nitric oxide synthese NOS (nNOS. Thereby, elimination of TR4 results in nNOS reduction in both mRNA and protein levels, consequently may lead to erectile dysfunction. In addition, male TR4-/- mice display defects in sexual and social behavior, with increased fear or anxiety, as well as reduced mounting, intromission, and ejaculation. Reduction of ER alpha, ER beta, and oxytocin in the hypothalamus may contribute to defects in sexual behavior and stress response. Conclusions Together, these results provide in vivo evidence of important TR4 roles in penile physiology, as well as in male sexual behavior. In conjunction with previous finding, TR4 represents a key factor that controls male fertility via regulating behavior and internal physiological events.

  9. Natural cytolytic activity in mice with natural or induced cellular defects. I. Differential ability of in vitro interleukin-2 addition to augment natural cytolytic function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ades, E.W.; Hinson, A.; Butler, L.D.

    1986-01-01

    The ability of in vitro addition of recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) to differentially enhance natural cytotoxicity was assessed using cells from mice with natural and induced cellular defects. In vivo treatment with most immunosuppressive or cytoreductive agents, anti-asialo-GM1 antibody, or gamma irradiation dramatically reduced in vitro cytotoxicity against natural killer (NK) sensitive targets by direct reduction in either percentage specific lysis or lytic units per spleen. In most cases, in vitro addition of rIL-2 (at concentrations causing augmented NK function in cells from naive Balb/C mice) enhanced cytotoxic activity of cells from treatment groups to a normal value but not within the rIL-2-enhanced range of nontreated animals. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of cells from animals treated with certain drugs or gamma irradiation could be augmented by rIL-2 when measured by percentage lysis but not lytic units per spleen. In vivo treatment with cyclosporin A did not affect natural cytotoxic activity and addition of rIL-2 augmented the NK activity in a similar fashion to the profile of naive cells. In experiments using cells from beige (C57Bl/6-bg) mice which have a natural defect in NK activity against YAC-1 targets, addition of rIL-2 (at concentrations causing augmented natural cytotoxic function in cells from C57Bl/6 mice) could not effectively enhance in vitro natural cytotoxic function

  10. Natural cytolytic activity in mice with natural or induced cellular defects. I. Differential ability of in vitro interleukin-2 addition to augment natural cytolytic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ades, E.W.; Hinson, A.; Butler, L.D.

    1986-08-01

    The ability of in vitro addition of recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) to differentially enhance natural cytotoxicity was assessed using cells from mice with natural and induced cellular defects. In vivo treatment with most immunosuppressive or cytoreductive agents, anti-asialo-GM1 antibody, or gamma irradiation dramatically reduced in vitro cytotoxicity against natural killer (NK) sensitive targets by direct reduction in either percentage specific lysis or lytic units per spleen. In most cases, in vitro addition of rIL-2 (at concentrations causing augmented NK function in cells from naive Balb/C mice) enhanced cytotoxic activity of cells from treatment groups to a normal value but not within the rIL-2-enhanced range of nontreated animals. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of cells from animals treated with certain drugs or gamma irradiation could be augmented by rIL-2 when measured by percentage lysis but not lytic units per spleen. In vivo treatment with cyclosporin A did not affect natural cytotoxic activity and addition of rIL-2 augmented the NK activity in a similar fashion to the profile of naive cells. In experiments using cells from beige (C57Bl/6-bg) mice which have a natural defect in NK activity against YAC-1 targets, addition of rIL-2 (at concentrations causing augmented natural cytotoxic function in cells from C57Bl/6 mice) could not effectively enhance in vitro natural cytotoxic function.

  11. Folic acid and pantothenic acid protection against valproic acid-induced neural tube defects in CD-1 mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Jennifer E [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and School of Environmental Studies, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Raymond, Angela M [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and School of Environmental Studies, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Winn, Louise M [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology and School of Environmental Studies, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2006-03-01

    In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). Although the mechanism by which VPA mediates these effects is unknown, VPA-initiated changes in embryonic protein levels have been implicated. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of in utero VPA exposure on embryonic protein levels of p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, Bax, and Bcl-2 in the CD-1 mouse. We also evaluated the protective effects of folic acid and pantothenic acid on VPA-induced NTDs and VPA-induced embryonic protein changes in this model. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered a teratogenic dose of VPA prior to neural tube closure and embryonic protein levels were analyzed. In our study, VPA (400 mg/kg)-induced NTDs (24%) and VPA-exposed embryos with an NTD showed a 2-fold increase in p53, and 4-fold decreases in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb protein levels compared to their phenotypically normal littermates (P < 0.05). Additionally, VPA increased the ratio of embryonic Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels (P < 0.05). Pretreatment of pregnant dams with either folic acid or pantothenic acid prior to VPA significantly protected against VPA-induced NTDs (P < 0.05). Folic acid also reduced VPA-induced alterations in p53, NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, c-Myb, and Bax/Bcl-2 protein levels, while pantothenic acid prevented VPA-induced alterations in NF-{kappa}B, Pim-1, and c-Myb. We hypothesize that folic acid and pantothenic acid protect CD-1 embryos from VPA-induced NTDs by independent, but not mutually exclusive mechanisms, both of which may be mediated by the prevention of VPA-induced alterations in proteins involved in neurulation.

  12. Characterization of the effect generated by the preformed and formed processes applied to drainage catheters of Quadrathane"T"M, in the blistered defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Forero, Diana Catalina

    2014-01-01

    The effect generated by preformed and formed processes on drainage catheters is characterized in the blistered defect. The potential root causes generated from the blistered defect are identified by the experimental design of one factor at a time. The experimental phases performed on the blistered defect have been: chemical interaction, humidity, mechanical stress, parameters RO Bonding, parameters of temperature and time of retention in the forming process. The application of quality control process methodology is recommended to obtain robust information about the defect and the process in general. Polymeric extrusions and construction of drainage catheters processes are described. The processes of preformed, formed and blistered defect are explained. The incidence of blistered defect and the yields of each batch produced of catheters should be controlled by means of weekly records to avoid further complications at the level of yield or quality [es

  13. Intrinsic functional defects of type 2 innate lymphoid cells impair innate allergic inflammation in promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoef, Philip A; Constantinides, Michael G; McDonald, Benjamin D; Urban, Joseph F; Sperling, Anne I; Bendelac, Albert

    2016-02-01

    The transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF) is transiently expressed during development of type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) but is not present at the mature stage. We hypothesized that PLZF-deficient ILC2s have functional defects in the innate allergic response and represent a tool for studying innate immunity in a mouse with a functional adaptive immune response. We determined the consequences of PLZF deficiency on ILC2 function in response to innate and adaptive immune stimuli by using PLZF(-/-) mice and mixed wild-type:PLZF(-/-) bone marrow chimeras. PLZF(-/-) mice, wild-type littermates, or mixed bone marrow chimeras were treated with the protease allergen papain or the cytokines IL-25 and IL-33 or infected with the helminth Nippostrongylus brasiliensis to induce innate type 2 allergic responses. Mice were sensitized with intraperitoneal ovalbumin-alum, followed by intranasal challenge with ovalbumin alone, to induce adaptive TH2 responses. Lungs were analyzed for immune cell subsets, and alveolar lavage fluid was analyzed for ILC2-derived cytokines. In addition, ILC2s were stimulated ex vivo for their capacity to release type 2 cytokines. PLZF-deficient lung ILC2s exhibit a cell-intrinsic defect in the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 in response to innate stimuli, resulting in defective recruitment of eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia. In contrast, the adaptive allergic inflammatory response to ovalbumin and alum was unimpaired. PLZF expression at the innate lymphoid cell precursor stage has a long-range effect on the functional properties of mature ILC2s and highlights the importance of these cells for innate allergic responses in otherwise immunocompetent mice. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zagozdzon, Agnieszka M

    2012-05-30

    AbstractBackgroundNumerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study.ResultsA new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice) expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal.ConclusionsWe have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and\\/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  15. Generation of a new bioluminescent model for visualisation of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zagozdzon Agnieszka M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous transgenic models have been generated to study breast cancer. However, despite many advantages, traditional transgenic models for breast cancer are also burdened with difficulties in early detection and longitudinal observation of transgene-induced tumours, which in most cases are randomly located and occur at various time points. Methods such as palpation followed by mechanical measurement of the tumours are of limited value in transgenic models. There is a crucial need for making these previously generated models suitable for modern methods of tumour visualisation and monitoring, e.g. by bioluminescence-based techniques. This approach was successfully used in the current study. Results A new mouse strain (MMTV-Luc2 mice expressing Luc2 luciferase primarily in mammary tissue in females, with low-level background expression in internal organs, was generated and bred to homozygosity. After these mice were intercrossed with MMTV-PyVT mice, all double transgenic females developed mammary tumours by the age of 10 weeks, the localisation and progression of which could be effectively monitored using the luminescence-based in vivo imaging. Luminescence-based readout allowed for early visualisation of the locally overgrown mammary tissue and for longitudinal evaluation of local progression of the tumours. When sampled ex vivo at the age of 10 weeks, all tumours derived from MMTV-Luc2PyVT females displayed robust bioluminescent signal. Conclusions We have created a novel transgenic strain for visualisation and longitudinal monitoring of mammary tumour development in transgenic mice as an addition and/or a new and more advanced alternative to manual methods. Generation of this mouse strain is vital for making many of the existing mammary tumour transgenic models applicable for in vivo imaging techniques.

  16. Can we simulate the development of ODSCC defects in steam generator tubes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cizelj, L.; Kovac, M.; Dvorsek, T.

    1999-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative aspects of degradation mechanism causing early retirement of SG tubing are not yet explained to the level allowing for accurate predictions of future behavior. On the other hand, a large amount of data related to tube degradation, inspection, repair, and plant operation have been collected during recent years. It allows for reasonably accurate quantitative predictions, based on statistical analysis of past events and assumption of reasonably constant operating conditions. A computational algorithm was developed to simulate life cycle of ODSCC defects: initiation, growth, measurement, and repair. The main feature of the algorithm is the possibility to address some important changes in the operating parameters, especially those related to the conditions during the plant shutdown. The algorithm can be used to get better insight into the background of SG aging and to predict the future populations of defects, as shown in a realistic numerical example.(author)

  17. Generating chimeric mice from embryonic stem cells via vial coculturing or hypertonic microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    The generation of a fertile embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived or F0 (100 % coat color chimerism) mice is the final criterion in proving that the ESC is truly pluripotent. Many methods have been developed to produce chimeric mice. To date, the most popular methods for generating chimeric embryos is well sandwich aggregation between zona pellucida (ZP) removed (denuded) 2.5-day post-coitum (dpc) embryos and ESC clumps, or direct microinjection of ESCs into the cavity (blastocoel) of 3.5-dpc blastocysts. However, due to systemic limitations and the disadvantages of conventional microinjection, aggregation, and coculturing, two novel methods (vial coculturing and hypertonic microinjection) were developed in recent years at my laboratory.Coculturing 2.5-dpc denuded embryos with ESCs in 1.7-mL vials for ~3 h generates chimeras that have significantly high levels of chimerism (including 100 % coat color chimerism) and germline transmission. This method has significantly fewer instrumental and technological limitations than existing methods, and is an efficient, simple, inexpensive, and reproducible method for "mass production" of chimeric embryos. For laboratories without a microinjection system, this is the method of choice for generating chimeric embryos. Microinjecting ESCs into a subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos can generate germline-transmitted chimeras including 100 % coat color chimerism. However, this method is adopted rarely due to the very small and tight space between ZP and blastomeres. Using a laser pulse or Piezo-driven instrument/device to help introduce ESCs into the subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos demonstrates the superior efficiency in generating ESC-derived (F0) chimeras. Unfortunately, due to the need for an expensive instrument/device and extra fine skill, not many studies have used either method. Recently, ESCs injected into the large subzonal space of 2.5-dpc embryos in an injection medium containing 0.2-0.3 M sucrose very efficiently generated

  18. Effects of tartrazine on exploratory behavior in a three-generation toxicity study in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toyohito; Takahashi, Osamu; Oishi, Shinshi; Ogata, Akio

    2008-10-01

    Tartrazine was given to mice in the diet at levels of 0 (control), 0.05%, 0.15%, and 0.45% from 5 weeks of age of the F(0) generation to 9 weeks of age of the F(2) generation, and selected reproductive and neurobehavioral parameters were measured. In the F(1) generation, the development of swimming direction at postnatal day (PND) 7 was accelerated significantly in male offspring in a dose-related manner. Surface righting at PND 7 was affected significantly in female offspring in dose-related manner. Several variables in exploratory behavior showed significant tendencies to be affected in the treatment groups in male offspring at 3 weeks of age. In the F(2) generation, the development of swimming direction at PND 7 was accelerated significantly in the high-dosed group in male offspring. Time taken of olfactory orientation at PND 14 was accelerated significantly in male offspring in a dose-related manner. Several variables in exploratory behavior showed significant tendencies to be affected in the treatment groups in male offspring at 3 weeks of age, and in males at 8 weeks of age. The dose levels of tartrazine in the present study produced a few adverse effects on neurobehavioral parameters throughout generations in mice.

  19. Process and device for locating a defective tube, particularly in the tube bundle of a steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    A process is described for locating a defective tube, particularly in the tube bundle of a steam generator of the reversed U tube kind with the ends connected to a tube plate, marking with the bottom of the generator casing a space separated into two adjacent collectors, respectively for the inlet and outlet of a primary fluid flowing inside the tubes of the bundle, these being externally washed by a secondary vaporizing fluid. In this process a television camera that can be inserted into the casing is used. This process consists in transmitting to a display system outside the generator an image of the tube plate in each collector by means of a directional television camera and then to place over this image a luminous marker to locate the end or the faulty tube [fr

  20. Bypass of lethality with mosaic mice generated by Cre-loxP-mediated recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, U A; Vosshenrich, C A; Rajewsky, K; Müller, W

    1996-10-01

    The analysis of gene function based on the generation of mutant mice by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells is limited if gene disruption results in embryonic lethality. Mosaic mice, which contain a certain proportion of mutant cells in all organs, allow lethality to be circumvented and the potential of mutant cells to contribute to different cell lineages to be analyzed. To generate mosaic animals, we used the bacteriophage P1-derived Cre-loxP recombination system, which allows gene alteration by Cre-mediated deletion of loxP-flanked gene segments. We generated nestin-cre transgenic mouse lines, which expressed the Cre recombinase under the control of the rat nestin promoter and its second intron enhancer. In crosses to animals carrying a loxP-flanked target gene, partial deletion of the loxP-flanked allele occurred before day 10.5 post coitum and was detectable in all adult organs examined, including germ-line cells. Using this approach, we generated mosaic mice containing cells deficient in the gamma-chain of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R gamma); in these animals, the IL-2R gamma-deficient cells were underrepresented in the thymus and spleen. Because mice deficient in DNA polymerase beta die perinatally, we studied the effects of DNA polymerase beta deficiency in mosaic animals. We found that some of the mosaic polymerase beta-deficient animals were viable, but were often reduced in size and weight. The fraction of DNA polymerase beta-deficient cells in mosaic embryos decreased during embryonic development, presumably because wild-type cells had a competitive advantage. The nestin-cre transgenic mice can be used to generate mosaic animals in which target genes are mutated by Cre-mediated recombination of loxP-flanked target genes. By using mosaic animals, embryonic lethality can be bypassed and cell lineages for whose development a given target gene is critical can be identified. In the case of DNA polymerase beta, deficient cells are already

  1. Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and birth defects and infant mortality in nearby communities 1971-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.C.; Rouleau, J.

    1991-10-01

    This study was commissioned to examine whether there were elevated rates of stillbirth, birth defects, or death in the first year of life between 1971 and 1988 among offspring of residents of communities within a 25-kilometre radius of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The study was also to investigate whether there were any statistical associations between the monthly airborne or waterborne tritium emissions from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and the rates of these reproductive outcomes. Overall analysis did not support a hypothesis of increased rates of stillbirths, neonatal mortality or infant mortality near the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, or a hypothesis of increased birth prevalence of birth defects for 21 of 22 diagnostic categories. The prevalence of Down Syndrome was elevated in both Pickering and Ajax; however, there was no consistent pattern between tritium release levels and Down Syndrome prevalence, chance could not be ruled out for the associations between Down Syndrome and tritium releases or ground-monitored concentrations, the association was detected in an analysis where multiple testing was done which may turn up significant associations by change, and maternal residence at birth and early in pregnancy needs to be verified. The association between Down Syndrome and low-level radiation remains indeterminate when existing evidence from epidemiological studies is summed. The estimated radiation exposure from the nuclear plant for residents of Pickering and Ajax is lower by a factor of 100 than the normal natural background radiation. Further study is recommended. (21 tabs., 29 figs., 5 maps, 37 refs.)

  2. Massively parallel E-beam inspection: enabling next-generation patterned defect inspection for wafer and mask manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Wurm, Stefan; Mukhtar, Maseeh; Quoi, Kathy; Kemen, Thomas; Zeidler, Dirk; Eberle, Anna Lena; Garbowski, Tomasz; Dellemann, Gregor; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    SEMATECH aims to identify and enable disruptive technologies to meet the ever-increasing demands of semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM). As such, a program was initiated in 2012 focused on high-speed e-beam defect inspection as a complement, and eventual successor, to bright field optical patterned defect inspection [1]. The primary goal is to enable a new technology to overcome the key gaps that are limiting modern day inspection in the fab; primarily, throughput and sensitivity to detect ultra-small critical defects. The program specifically targets revolutionary solutions based on massively parallel e-beam technologies, as opposed to incremental improvements to existing e-beam and optical inspection platforms. Wafer inspection is the primary target, but attention is also being paid to next generation mask inspection. During the first phase of the multi-year program multiple technologies were reviewed, a down-selection was made to the top candidates, and evaluations began on proof of concept systems. A champion technology has been selected and as of late 2014 the program has begun to move into the core technology maturation phase in order to enable eventual commercialization of an HVM system. Performance data from early proof of concept systems will be shown along with roadmaps to achieving HVM performance. SEMATECH's vision for moving from early-stage development to commercialization will be shown, including plans for development with industry leading technology providers.

  3. Deletion of ETS-1, a gene in the Jacobsen syndrome critical region, causes ventricular septal defects and abnormal ventricular morphology in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Maoqing; Coldren, Chris; Liang, Xingqun; Mattina, Teresa; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Benson, D. Woodrow; Ivy, Dunbar; Perryman, M.B.; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Grossfeld, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Congenital heart defects comprise the most common form of major birth defects, affecting 0.7% of all newborn infants. Jacobsen syndrome (11q-) is a rare chromosomal disorder caused by deletions in distal 11q. We have previously determined that a wide spectrum of the most common congenital heart defects occur in 11q-, including an unprecedented high frequency of hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). We identified an ∼7 Mb ‘cardiac critical region’ in distal 11q that contains a putative causative gene(s) for congenital heart disease. In this study, we utilized chromosomal microarray mapping to characterize three patients with 11q- and congenital heart defects that carry interstitial deletions overlapping the 7 Mb cardiac critical region. We propose that this 1.2 Mb region of overlap harbors a gene(s) that causes at least a subset of the congenital heart defects that occur in 11q-. We demonstrate that one gene in this region, ETS-1 (a member of the ETS family of transcription factors), is expressed in the endocardium and neural crest during early mouse heart development. Gene-targeted deletion of ETS-1 in mice in a C57/B6 background causes, with high penetrance, large membranous ventricular septal defects and a bifid cardiac apex, and less frequently a non-apex-forming left ventricle (one of the hallmarks of HLHS). Our results implicate an important role for the ETS-1 transcription factor in mammalian heart development and should provide important insights into some of the most common forms of congenital heart disease. PMID:19942620

  4. Experimental evidence for an associated defect model for the neutron generated As/sub Ga/ center in gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golzene, A.; Meyer, B.; Schwab, C.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal dependence of EPR spectra of fast neutron irradiated n-type GaAs over the whole 4.2 to 300 K temperature range has been studied using the decomposition of spectra into a quadruplet of four identical Gaussian lines and a Lorentzian singlet. Quadruplet and singlet spectra as well as their proper parameters (inverse of paramagnetic susceptibility, hyperfine constants) could be determined separately. Experiments give evidence that the neutron generated anionic antisites As/sub Ga/ in GaAs are constituting associated defect centers, most likely of intrinsic nature

  5. Deletion of the pluripotency-associated Tex19.1 gene causes activation of endogenous retroviruses and defective spermatogenesis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollinger, Rupert; Childs, Andrew J; Burgess, Hannah M

    2008-01-01

    . During male spermatogenesis, Tex19.1 expression is highest in mitotic spermatogonia and diminishes as these cells differentiate and progress through meiosis. In pluripotent stem cells, Tex19.1 expression is also downregulated upon differentiation. However, it is not clear whether Tex19.1 has an essential...... spermatogenesis. Immunostaining and histological analysis revealed defects in meiotic chromosome synapsis, the persistence of DNA double-strand breaks during meiosis, and a loss of post-meiotic germ cells in the testis. Furthermore, expression of a class of endogenous retroviruses is upregulated during meiosis...... in the Tex19.1(-/-) testes. Increased transposition of endogenous retroviruses in the germline of Tex19.1(-/-) mutant mice, and the concomitant increase in DNA damage, may be sufficient to disrupt the normal processes of recombination and chromosome synapsis during meiosis and cause defects...

  6. Exome sequencing and CRISPR/Cas genome editing identify mutations of ZAK as a cause of limb defects in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spielmann, M.; Kakar, N.; Tayebi, N.; Leettola, C.; Nurnberg, G.; Sowada, N.; Lupianez, D.G.; Harabula, I.; Flottmann, R.; Horn, D.; Chan, W.L.; Wittler, L.; Yilmaz, R.; Altmuller, J.; Thiele, H.; Bokhoven, H. van; Schwartz, C.E.; Nurnberg, P.; Bowie, J.U.; Ahmad, J.; Kubisch, C.; Mundlos, S.; Borck, G.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology enables targeted genome editing and the rapid generation of transgenic animal models for the study of human genetic disorders. Here we describe an autosomal recessive human disease in two unrelated families characterized by a split-foot defect, nail abnormalities of the

  7. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mice by reprogramming of a mature NKT cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yue; Dashtsoodol, Nyambayar; Watarai, Hiroshi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Quan, Chengshi; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2014-10-01

    NKT cells are characterized by their expression of an NKT-cell-specific invariant antigen-receptor α chain encoded by Vα14Jα18 gene segments. These NKT cells bridge the innate and acquired immune systems to mediate effective and augmented responses; however, the limited number of NKT cells in vivo hampers their analysis. Here, two lines of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mice (NKT-iPSC-derived mice) were generated by reprogramming of mature NKT cells, where one harbors both rearranged Vα14Jα18 and Vβ7 genes and the other carries rearranged Vα14Jα18 on both alleles but germline Vβ loci. The analysis of NKT-iPSC-derived mice showed a significant increase in NKT cell numbers with relatively normal frequencies of functional subsets, but significantly enhanced in some cases, and acquired functional NKT cell maturation in peripheral lymphoid organs. NKT-iPSC-derived mice also showed normal development of other immune cells except for the absence of γδT cells and disturbed development of conventional CD4 αβT cells. These results suggest that the NKT-iPSC-derived mice are a better model for NKT cell development and function study rather than transgenic mouse models reported previously and also that the presence of a pre-rearranged Vα14Jα18 in the natural chromosomal context favors the developmental fate of NKT cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society for Immunology.

  8. Generation and Characterization of Mice Expressing a Conditional Allele of the Interleukin-1 Receptor Type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Robson

    Full Text Available The cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β exert powerful pro-inflammatory actions throughout the body, mediated primarily by the intracellular signaling capacity of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1. Although Il1r1 knockout mice have been informative with respect to a requirement for IL-1R1 signaling in inflammatory events, the constitutive nature of gene elimination has limited their utility in the assessment of temporal and spatial patterns of cytokine action. To pursue such questions, we have generated C57Bl/6J mice containing a floxed Il1r1 gene (Il1r1loxP/loxP, with loxP sites positioned to flank exons 3 and 4 and thereby the ability to spatially and temporally eliminate Il1r1 expression and signaling. We found that Il1r1loxP/loxP mice breed normally and exhibit no gross physical or behavioral phenotypes. Moreover, Il1r1loxP/loxP mice exhibit normal IL-1R1 receptor expression in brain and spleen, as well as normal IL-1R1-dependent increases in serum IL-6 following IL-1α injections. Breeding of Il1r1loxP/loxP mice to animals expressing a cytomegalovirus (CMV-driven Cre recombinase afforded efficient excision at the Il1r1 locus. The Il1r1loxP/loxP line should be a valuable tool for the assessment of contributions made by IL-1R1 signaling in diverse cell types across development.

  9. Effects of maternal clothianidin exposure on behavioral development in F₁ generation mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toyohito

    2012-09-01

    Female mice were exposed maternally to clothianidin through diet at levels of 0% (control), 0.002%, 0.006%, and 0.018% during gestation and lactation periods. Selected reproductive and neurobehavioral parameters were measured in F₁ generation. There was no adverse effect of clothianidin on litter size, litter weight, or sex ratio at birth. The average body weight of male and female offspring was increased significantly in a dose-related manner during the lactation period. With respect to behavioral developmental parameters, surface righting at postnatal day 7 of female offspring was accelerated significantly in a dose-related manner (p clothianidin in the present study produced several adverse effects in the neurobehavioral parameters in mice.

  10. Moderate folic acid supplementation and MTHFD1-synthetase deficiency in mice, a model for the R653Q variant, result in embryonic defects and abnormal placental development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Karen E; Hou, Wenyang; Bahous, Renata H; Deng, Liyuan; Malysheva, Olga V; Arning, Erland; Bottiglieri, Teodoro; Caudill, Marie A; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Rozen, Rima

    2016-11-01

    Moderately high folic acid intake in pregnant women has led to concerns about deleterious effects on the mother and fetus. Common polymorphisms in folate genes, such as methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-methenyltetrahydrofolate cyclohydrolase-formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase (MTHFD1) R653Q, may modulate the effects of elevated folic acid intake. We investigated the effects of moderate folic acid supplementation on reproductive outcomes and assessed the potential interaction of the supplemented diet with MTHFD1-synthetase (Mthfd1S) deficiency in mice, which is a model for the R653Q variant. Female Mthfd1S +/+ and Mthfd1S +/- mice were fed a folic acid-supplemented diet (FASD) (5-fold higher than recommended) or control diets before mating and during pregnancy. Embryos and placentas were assessed for developmental defects at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5). Maternal folate and choline metabolites and gene expression in folate-related pathways were examined. The combination of FASD and maternal MTHFD1-synthetase deficiency led to a greater incidence of defects in E10.5 embryos (diet × maternal genotype, P = 0.0016; diet × embryonic genotype, P = 0.054). The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) protein and methylation potential [ratio of S-adenosylmethionine (major methyl donor):S-adenosylhomocysteine) were reduced in maternal liver. Although 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (methylTHF) was higher in maternal circulation, the methylation potential was lower in embryos. The presence of developmental delays and defects in Mthfd1S +/- embryos was associated with placental defects (P = 0.003). The labyrinth layer failed to form properly in the majority of abnormal placentas, which compromised the integration of the maternal and fetal circulation and presumably the transfer of methylTHF and other nutrients. Moderately higher folate intake and MTHFD1-synthetase deficiency in pregnant mice result in a lower methylation potential in maternal liver and embryos and a greater

  11. A link between thrifty phenotype and maternal care across two generations of intercrossed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Sauce

    Full Text Available Maternal effects are causal influences from mother to offspring beyond genetic information, and have lifelong consequences for multiple traits. Previously, we reported that mice whose mothers did not nurse properly had low birth weight followed by rapid fat accumulation and disturbed development of some organs. That pattern resembles metabolic syndromes known collectively as the thrifty phenotype, which is believed to be an adaptation to a stressful environment which prepares offspring for reduced nutrient supply. The potential link between maternal care, stress reactivity, and the thrifty phenotype, however, has been poorly explored in the human and animal literature: only a couple of studies even mention (much less, test these concepts under a cohesive framework. Here, we explored this link using mice of the parental inbred strains SM/J and LG/J-who differ dramatically in their maternal care-and the intercrossed generations F1 and F2. We measured individual differences in 15 phenotypes and used structural equation modeling to test our hypotheses. We found a remarkable relationship between thrifty phenotype and lower quality of maternal behaviors, including nest building, pup retrieval, grooming/licking, and nursing. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show, in any mammal, a clear connection between the natural variation in thrifty phenotype and maternal care. Both traits in the mother also had a substantial effect on survival rate in the F3 offspring. To our surprise, however, stress reactivity seemed to play no role in our models. Furthermore, the strain of maternal grandmother, but not of paternal grandmother, affected the variation of maternal care in F2 mice, and this effect was mediated by thrifty phenotype in F2. Since F1 animals were all genetically identical, this finding suggests that maternal effects pass down both maternal care and thrifty phenotype in these mice across generations via epigenetic transmission.

  12. Generation of healthy mice from gene-corrected disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Wu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the murine model of tyrosinemia type 1 (fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase [FAH] deficiency; FAH⁻/⁻ mice as a paradigm for orphan disorders, such as hereditary metabolic liver diseases, we evaluated fibroblast-derived FAH⁻/⁻-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells as targets for gene correction in combination with the tetraploid embryo complementation method. First, after characterizing the FAH⁻/⁻ iPS cell lines, we aggregated FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cells with tetraploid embryos and obtained entirely FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cell-derived mice that were viable and exhibited the phenotype of the founding FAH⁻/⁻ mice. Then, we transduced FAH cDNA into the FAH⁻/⁻-iPS cells using a third-generation lentiviral vector to generate gene-corrected iPS cells. We could not detect any chromosomal alterations in these cells by high-resolution array CGH analysis, and after their aggregation with tetraploid embryos, we obtained fully iPS cell-derived healthy mice with an astonishing high efficiency for full-term development of up to 63.3%. The gene correction was validated functionally by the long-term survival and expansion of FAH-positive cells of these mice after withdrawal of the rescuing drug NTBC (2-(2-nitro-4-fluoromethylbenzoyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that both a liver-specific promoter (transthyretin, TTR-driven FAH transgene and a strong viral promoter (from spleen focus-forming virus, SFFV-driven FAH transgene rescued the FAH-deficiency phenotypes in the mice derived from the respective gene-corrected iPS cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that a lentiviral gene repair strategy does not abrogate the full pluripotent potential of fibroblast-derived iPS cells, and genetic manipulation of iPS cells in combination with tetraploid embryo aggregation provides a practical and rapid approach to evaluate the efficacy of gene correction of human diseases in mouse models.

  13. Simulating Interface Growth and Defect Generation in CZT – Simulation State of the Art and Known Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henager, Charles H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gao, Fei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bylaska, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zabaras, Nicholas [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2012-11-01

    This one-year, study topic project will survey and investigate the known state-of-the-art of modeling and simulation methods suitable for performing fine-scale, fully 3-D modeling, of the growth of CZT crystals at the melt-solid interface, and correlating physical growth and post-growth conditions with generation and incorporation of defects into the solid CZT crystal. In the course of this study, this project will also identify the critical gaps in our knowledge of modeling and simulation techniques in terms of what would be needed to be developed in order to perform accurate physical simulations of defect generation in melt-grown CZT. The transformational nature of this study will be, for the first time, an investigation of modeling and simulation methods for describing microstructural evolution during crystal growth and the identification of the critical gaps in our knowledge of such methods, which is recognized as having tremendous scientific impacts for future model developments in a wide variety of materials science areas.

  14. Round robin tests of the PISC III programme on defective steam generators tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birac, C.; Herkenrath, H.; Crutzen, S.; Miyake, Y.; Maciga, G.

    1991-11-01

    The PISC III actions are intended to extend the results and methodologies of the previous PISC exercises, i.e. the assessment of the capabilities of the various examination techniques when used on real or realistic flaws in real components under real conditions of inspection. Being aware of the industrial problems that the degradation of steam generator tubes can create, the PISC III management board decided to include in the PISC III programme a special action on steam generator tubes testing (SGT). (author)

  15. Generation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated bicistronic knock-in ins1-cre driver mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Hoshino, Yoshikazu; Ibrahim, Abdelaziz E; Kato, Kanako; Daitoku, Yoko; Tanimoto, Yoko; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Oishi, Hisashi; Takahashi, Satoru; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Yagami, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Hiroyoshi; Mizuno, Seiya; Sugiyama, Fumihiro

    2016-07-29

    In the present study, we generated novel cre driver mice for gene manipulation in pancreatic β cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, stop codon sequences of Ins1 were targeted for insertion of cre, including 2A sequences. A founder of C57BL/6J-Ins1(em1 (cre) Utr) strain was produced from an oocyte injected with pX330 containing the sequences encoding gRNA and Cas9 and a DNA donor plasmid carrying 2A-cre. (R26GRR x C57BL/6J-Ins1(em1 (cre) Utr)) F1 mice were histologically characterized for cre-loxP recombination in the embryonic and adult stages; cre-loxP recombination was observed in all pancreatic islets examined in which almost all insulin-positive cells showed tdsRed fluorescence, suggesting β cell-specific recombination. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in results of glucose tolerance test among genotypes (homo/hetero/wild). Taken together, these observations indicated that C57BL/6J-Ins1(em1 (cre) Utr) is useful for studies of glucose metabolism and the strategy of bicistronic cre knock-in using the CRISPR/Cas9 system could be useful for production of cre driver mice.

  16. Failures of fine tubes of steam generators and the essential defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Shinji; Ebisawa, Toru; Sato, Susumu.

    1976-01-01

    Light water reactors were sold to Japan as their economy and safety have been established, but the average availability of 11 reactors in Japan during 7 year operation is only 53%, and it is being proved that there are questions in the safety and economy. In this report, the failures of fine tubes of steam generators are discussed from the standpoint of the corrosion of materials. First, the functions and construction of the fine tubes of steam generators in PWRs are explained. The failures of the fine tubes of steam generators became frequent since the beginning of 1970s as large capacity nuclear power stations have started the operation. When the fine tubes are pierced with holes during operation and the radioactivity in primary coolant leaks into secondary coolant, it is detected with radioactivity monitors. In order to find out the broken tubes, eddy current flaw detectors are used, and the tubes on which flaws were detected we plugged by explosion welding. In these works, many manual operations are included, and the radiation exposure of workers and the difficulties in the operations are the problems. The cases of the tube failures in Japan and foreign countries, the causes and the countermeasures are described. Chemical corrosion, thermal stress cycle, shaving off due to eddy flow, and stress corrosion are the probable causes. The safety of steam generators is essentially in extremely poor state. The seriousness of the tube failures in steam generators is emphasized. (Kako, I.)

  17. IL-23 p19 knockout mice exhibit minimal defects in responses to primary and secondary infection with Francisella tularensis LVS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L Kurtz

    Full Text Available Our laboratory's investigations into mechanisms of protective immunity against Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS have uncovered mediators important in host defense against primary infection, as well as those correlated with successful vaccination. One such potential correlate was IL-12p40, a pleiotropic cytokine that promotes Th1 T cell function as part of IL-12p70. LVS-infected IL-12p40 deficient knockout (KO mice maintain a chronic infection, but IL-12p35 KO mice clear LVS infection; thus the role that IL-12p40 plays in immunity to LVS is independent of the IL-12p70 heterodimer. IL-12p40 can also partner with IL-23p19 to create the heterodimeric cytokine IL-23. Here, we directly tested the role of IL-23 in LVS resistance, and found IL-23 to be largely dispensable for immunity to LVS following intradermal or intranasal infection. IL-23p19 KO splenocytes were fully competent in controlling intramacrophage LVS replication in an in vitro overlay assay. Further, antibody responses in IL-23p19 KO mice were similar to those of normal wild type mice after LVS infection. IL-23p19 KO mice or normal wild type mice that survived primary LVS infection survived maximal doses of LVS secondary challenge. Thus p40 has a novel role in clearance of LVS infection that is unrelated to either IL-12 or IL-23.

  18. Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide ameliorates ROS generation and apoptosis in spleen and thymus of immunosuppressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Juan; Li, Lu; Zhen, Weng-Ya; Wang, Le-Feng; Pan, Meng; Lv, Jia-Qian; Wang, Fan; Yao, Yu-Fei; Nie, Shao-Ping; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) is a bioactive compound with antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PSG-1 on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in spleen and thymus of cyclophosphamide (CTX)-induced immunosuppressed mice. The results showed that PSG-1 protected mice against CTX-mediated immunosuppression, as evidenced by enhancing the ratios of thymus and spleen weights to body weight, promoting T cell and B cell survival, and increasing levels of TNF-α and IL-2. Apoptosis, ROS generation and lipid peroxidation in the immune organs of the immunosuppressed animals were ameliorated by PSG-1. The immune benefits of PSG-1 were associated with the enhancement of the activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in the immune organs, implying that antioxidant activities of PSG-1 may play an important role in PSG-1-evoked immune protection. Taken together, these findings have demonstrated that PSG-1 may ameliorate CTX-induced immunosuppression through reducing apoptosis and oxidative damage in immunological system. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Anisotropic frictional heating and defect generation in cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine molecular crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Pankaj; Mishra, Ankit; Sheng, Chunyang; Tiwari, Subodh; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2018-05-01

    Anisotropic frictional response and corresponding heating in cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine molecular crystals are studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The nature of damage and temperature rise due to frictional forces is monitored along different sliding directions on the primary slip plane, (010), and on non-slip planes, (100) and (001). Correlations between the friction coefficient, deformation, and frictional heating are established. We find that the friction coefficients on slip planes are smaller than those on non-slip planes. In response to sliding on a slip plane, the crystal deforms easily via dislocation generation and shows less heating. On non-slip planes, due to the inability of the crystal to deform via dislocation generation, a large damage zone is formed just below the contact area, accompanied by the change in the molecular ring conformation from chair to boat/half-boat. This in turn leads to a large temperature rise below the contact area.

  20. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubin Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1, which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  1. Disruption of PC1/3 expression in mice causes dwarfism and multiple neuroendocrine peptide processing defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaorong; Zhou, An; Dey, Arunangsu

    2002-01-01

    vertebrates and invertebrates. Disruption of the gene-encoding mouse PC1/3 has now been accomplished and results in a syndrome of severe postnatal growth impairment and multiple defects in processing many hormone precursors, including hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), pituitary...

  2. Use of self-organizing maps for classification of defects in the tubes from the steam generator of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Roberto Navarro de

    2002-01-01

    This thesis obtains a new classification method for different steam generator tube defects in nuclear power plants using Eddy Current Test signals. The method uses self-organizing maps to compare different signal characteristics efficiency to identify and classify these defects. A multiple inference system is proposed which composes the different extracted characteristic trained maps classification to infer the final defect type. The feature extraction methods used are the Wavelet zero-crossings representation, the linear predictive coding (LPC), and other basic signal representations on time like module and phase. Many characteristic vectors are obtained with combinations of these extracted characteristics. These vectors are tested to classify the defects and the best ones are applied to the multiple inference system. A systematic study of pre-processing, calibration and analysis methods for the steam generator tube defect signals in nuclear power plants is done. The method efficiency is demonstrated and characteristic maps with the main prototypes are obtained for each steam generator tube defect type. (author)

  3. Mice lacking the synaptic adhesion molecule Neph2/Kirrel3 display moderate hyperactivity and defective novel object preference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yeon eChoi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate diverse aspects of neuronal synapse development, including synapse specificity, formation, and maturation. Neph2, also known as Kirrel3, is an immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule implicated in intellectual disability, neurocognitive delay associated with Jacobsen syndrome, and autism spectrum disorders. We here report mice lacking Neph2 (Neph2–/– mice display moderate hyperactivity in a familiar but not novel environment and novel object recognition deficit with normal performances in Morris water maze spatial learning and memory, contextual fear conditioning and extinction, and pattern separation tests. These mice show normal levels of anxiety-like behaviors, social interaction, and repetitive behaviors. At the synapse level, Neph2–/– dentate gyrus granule cells exhibit unaltered dendritic spine density and spontaneous excitatory synaptic transmission. These results suggest that Neph2 is important for normal locomotor activity and object recognition memory.

  4. Cumulative genetic effects from exposure of male mice to tritium for ten generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mewissen, D.J.; Ugarte, A.S.

    1979-01-01

    Three sublines of C57 Black/6M mice were propagated from three sibling pairs from the same litter. All breeders were weaned at 28+-2 days of age. At each generation in experimental lines weaned male breeders aged 35 days either received a single injection of tritiated thymidine (1 μCi/g of body weight) or were exposed for 5 weeks to tritiated drinking water (10 μCi/ml). At 10 weeks of age all breeders were sibling-mated. The time of delivery, the litter size and sex ratio was recorded. At each generation the offspring in the three lines were sibling-mated in the same sequence as their parents. At the 6th generation total offspring in the sibling line receiving tritiated thymidine numbered 108 versus 336 in the sibling line exposed to tritiated water, in contrast with 721 in the control sibling line. The 6th generation couples (20 in either subline) generated at the 9th generation 624 animals in the control subline versus 386 and 476 in the subline exposed to tritium. The data suggest a trend toward reduction in the subpopulation of offspring propagated from male parents exposed to tritiated water or tritiated thymidine. At the 9th generation 50 couples were assigned to a special study on reproductive fitness. The litter size was decreased and infant mortality was increased in experimental sublines (chi-square test, P<0.05). In control, as well as in experimental lines, at 70 days of age males were sibling-mated with their sisters. All animals received tap water and were not exposed at any time to tritiated thymidine or tritiated water. Preimplantation loss values were significantly increased in experimental versus control sublines (chi-square test, P<0.01). The dose to male sperm over a 35-day period was estimated at 3.7 rads from tritiated water and at 3.9 rads from tritiated thymidine under our experimental conditions

  5. Role of plasma-induced defects in the generation of 1/f noise in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Alessandro; Callegaro, Luca; Marzano, Martina; Ortolano, Massimo; Amato, Giampiero

    2018-02-01

    It has already been reported that 1/f noise in graphene can be dominated by fluctuations of charge carrier mobility. We show here that the increasing damage induced by oxygen plasma on graphene samples result in two trends: at low doses, the magnitude of the 1/f noise increases with the dose; and at high doses, it decreases with the dose. This behaviour is interpreted in the framework of 1/f noise generated by carrier mobility fluctuations where the concentration of mobility fluctuation centers and the mean free path of the carriers are competing factors.

  6. Defective bone formation and anabolic response to exogenous estrogen in mice with targeted disruption of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, K E; Armour, K J; Gallagher, M E; Gödecke, A; Helfrich, M H; Reid, D M; Ralston, S H

    2001-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a pleiotropic signaling molecule that is produced by bone cells constitutively and in response to diverse stimuli such as proinflammatory cytokines, mechanical strain, and sex hormones. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is the predominant NOS isoform expressed in bone, but its physiological role in regulating bone metabolism remains unclear. Here we studied various aspects of bone metabolism in female mice with targeted disruption of the eNOS gene. Mice with eNOS deficiency (eNOS KO) had reduced bone mineral density, and cortical thinning when compared with WT controls and histomorphometric analysis of bone revealed profound abnormalities of bone formation, with reduced osteoblast numbers, surfaces and mineral apposition rate. Studies in vitro showed that osteoblasts derived from eNOS KO mice had reduced rates of growth when compared with WT and were less well differentiated as reflected by lower levels of alkaline phosphatase activity. Mice with eNOS deficiency lost bone normally following ovariectomy but exhibited a significantly blunted anabolic response to high dose exogenous estrogen. We conclude that the eNOS pathway plays an essential role in regulating bone mass and bone turnover by modulating osteoblast function.

  7. Mice with a Mutation in the Mdm2 Gene That Interferes with MDM2/Ribosomal Protein Binding Develop a Defect in Erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kamio

    Full Text Available MDM2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is an important negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53. In turn the Mdm2 gene is a transcriptional target of p53, forming a negative feedback loop that is important in cell cycle control. It has recently become apparent that the ubiquitination of p53 by MDM2 can be inhibited when certain ribosomal proteins, including RPL5 and RPL11, bind to MDM2. This inhibition, and the resulting increase in p53 levels has been proposed to be responsible for the red cell aplasia seen in Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA and in 5q- myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. DBA and 5q- MDS are associated with inherited (DBA or acquired (5q- MDS haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins. A mutation in Mdm2 causing a C305F amino acid substitution blocks the binding of ribosomal proteins. Mice harboring this mutation (Mdm2C305F, retain a normal p53 response to DNA damage, but lack the p53 response to perturbations in ribosome biogenesis. While studying the interaction between RP haploinsufficiency and the Mdm2C305F mutation we noticed that Mdm2C305F homozygous mice had altered hematopoiesis. These mice developed a mild macrocytic anemia with reticulocytosis. In the bone marrow (BM, these mice showed a significant decrease in Ter119hi cells compared to wild type (WT littermates, while no decrease in the number of mature erythroid cells (Ter119hiCD71low was found in the spleen, which showed compensated bone marrow hematopoiesis. In methylcellulose cultures, BFU-E colonies from the mutant mice were slightly reduced in number and there was a significant reduction in CFU-E colony numbers in mutant mice compared with WT controls (p < 0.01. This erythropoietic defect was abrogated by concomitant p53 deficiency (Trp53ko/ko. Further investigation revealed that in Mdm2C305F animals, there was a decrease in Lin-Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK cells, accompanied by significant decreases in multipotent progenitor (MPP cells (p < 0.01. Competitive BM repopulation experiments

  8. Solute softening and defect generation during prismatic slip in magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Peng; Cammarata, Robert C.; Falk, Michael L.

    2017-12-01

    Temperature and solute effects on prismatic slip of 〈a〉 dislocations in Mg are studied using molecular dynamics simulation. Prismatic slip is controlled by the low mobility screw dislocation. The screw dislocation glides on the prismatic plane through alternating cross-slip between the basal plane and the prismatic plane. In doing so, it exhibits a locking-unlocking mechanism at low temperatures and a more continuous wavy propagation at high temperatures. The dislocation dissociates into partials on the basal plane and the constriction formation of the partials is identified to be the rate-limiting process for unlocking. In addition, the diffusion of partials on the basal plane enables the formation of jogs and superjogs for prismatic slip, which lead to the generation of vacancies and dislocation loops. Solute softening in Mg alloys was observed in the presence of both Al and Y solute. The softening in prismatic slip is found to be due to solute pinning on the basal plane, instead of the relative energy change of the screw dislocation on the basal and prismatic planes, as has been hypothesized.

  9. Characterization of plastic strains and crystallographic properties surrounding defects in steam generator tubes by orientation imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehockey, E.M.; Brennenstuhl, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) has become a valuable technique for characterizing grain boundary structure, texture, and grain size distribution, which govern material susceptibility to degenerative effects (e.g. IGSCC). Methods recently developed, by Kinectrics, have extended OIM capabilities toward mapping and quantifying residual plastic strains in materials. OIM is applied in the present work to characterize the distribution of plastic strains, that accumulate in CANDU steam generator tubing during installation and service potentially undermining the performance, reliability, and fitness-for-service of these components. Plastic strain that evolves in response to roller-expansion was characterized in simulated roll joints constructed from Alloy 600 tubing. Results underscore the effect of over-rolling in generating intense gradients with broad variations in strain that extend significant distances through the wall thickness. Of greater relevance is the orientation of these gradients in the transverse direction, relative to the tube axis and potential for the development of abnormal grain growth during post-expansion heat treatments. The magnitude and distribution of strain measured by OIM are remarkably consistent with Finite Element Analysis (FEA) predictions offering compelling evidence as to the reliability of the OIM technique. OIM offers superior resolution than can be practically achieved with FEA having particular relevance in identifying highly localized concentrations of strain surrounding metallurgical defects that can serve as precursors to stress-related degenerative effects (e.g. IGSCC). The spatial distribution of residual plastic strain was also characterized within the context of localized texture, and grain size morphology surrounding (OD) 'pits' and indentations found in ex-service Monel 400 and Alloy 800 SG tubes, respectively. An absence of strain surrounding these surface defects suggests their propensity for promoting more deleterious

  10. Generation of mice lacking DUF1220 protein domains: effects on fecundity and hyperactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, JG; O’Bleness, MS; Anderson, N; Davis, JM; Arevalo, N; Busquet, N; Chick, W; Rozman, J; Hölter, SM; Garrett, L; Horsch, M; Beckers, J; Wurst, W; Klingenspor, M; Restrepo, D

    2014-01-01

    Sequences encoding DUF1220 protein domains show the most extreme human lineage-specific copy number increase of any coding region in the genome and have been linked to human brain evolution. In addition, DUF1220 copy number (dosage) has been implicated in influencing brain size within the human species, both in normal populations and in individuals associated with brain size pathologies (1q21-associated microcephaly and macrocephaly). More recently, increasing dosage of a subtype of DUF1220 has been linked with increasing severity of the primary symptoms of autism. Despite these intriguing associations, a function for these domains has not been described. As a first step in addressing this question we have developed the first transgenic model of DUF1220 function by removing the single DUF1220 domain (the ancestral form) encoded in the mouse genome. In a hypothesis generating exercise, these mice were evaluated by 197 different phenotype measurements. While resulting DUF1220-minus (KO) mice show no obvious anatomical peculiarities, they exhibit a significantly reduced fecundity (χ2= 19.1, df = 2, p = 7.0 × 10−5). Further extensive phenotypic analyses suggest hyperactivity (p < 0.05) of DUF1220 mice and changes in gene expression levels of brain associated with distinct neurological functions and disease. Other changes that met statistical significance include an increase in plasma glucose concentration (as measured by Area Under the Curve, AUC 0-30 and AUC 30-120) in male mutants, fasting glucose levels, reduce sodium levels in male mutants, increased levels of the liver functional indicator ALAT/GPT in males, levels of alkaline phosphatase (also an indicator of liver function), mean R and SR amplitude by electrocardiography, elevated IgG3 levels, a reduced ratio of CD4:CD8 cells, and a reduced frequency of T cells; though it should be noted that many of these differences are quite small and require further examination. The linking of DUF1220 loss to a

  11. Generation of mice lacking DUF1220 protein domains: effects on fecundity and hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, J G; O'Bleness, M S; Anderson, N; Davis, J M; Arevalo, N; Busquet, N; Chick, W; Rozman, J; Hölter, S M; Garrett, L; Horsch, M; Beckers, J; Wurst, W; Klingenspor, M; Restrepo, D; de Angelis, M Hrabě; Sikela, J M

    2015-02-01

    Sequences encoding DUF1220 protein domains show the most extreme human lineage-specific copy number increase of any coding region in the genome and have been linked to human brain evolution. In addition, DUF1220 copy number (dosage) has been implicated in influencing brain size within the human species, both in normal populations and in individuals associated with brain size pathologies (1q21-associated microcephaly and macrocephaly). More recently, increasing dosage of a subtype of DUF1220 has been linked with increasing severity of the primary symptoms of autism. Despite these intriguing associations, a function for these domains has not been described. As a first step in addressing this question, we have developed the first transgenic model of DUF1220 function by removing the single DUF1220 domain (the ancestral form) encoded in the mouse genome. In a hypothesis generating exercise, these mice were evaluated by 197 different phenotype measurements. While resulting DUF1220-minus (KO) mice show no obvious anatomical peculiarities, they exhibit a significantly reduced fecundity (χ(2) = 19.1, df = 2, p = 7.0 × 10(-5)). Further extensive phenotypic analyses suggest hyperactivity (p < 0.05) of DUF1220 mice and changes in gene expression levels of brain associated with distinct neurological functions and disease. Other changes that met statistical significance include an increase in plasma glucose concentration (as measured by area under the curve, AUC 0-30 and AUC 30-120) in male mutants, fasting glucose levels, reduce sodium levels in male mutants, increased levels of the liver functional indicator ALAT/GPT in males, levels of alkaline phosphatase (also an indicator of liver function), mean R and SR amplitude by electrocardiography, elevated IgG3 levels, a reduced ratio of CD4:CD8 cells, and a reduced frequency of T cells; though it should be noted that many of these differences are quite small and require further examination. The linking of DUF1220 loss to a

  12. Generation and characterization of epoxide hydrolase 3 (EPHX3-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha L Hoopes

    Full Text Available Cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenases metabolize arachidonic acid into epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs, which play an important role in blood pressure regulation, protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury, angiogenesis, and inflammation. Epoxide hydrolases metabolize EETs to their corresponding diols (dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids; DHETs which are biologically less active. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1, mEH and soluble epoxide hydrolase (EPHX2, sEH were identified >30 years ago and are capable of hydrolyzing EETs to DHETs. A novel epoxide hydrolase, EPHX3, was recently identified by sequence homology and also exhibits epoxide hydrolase activity in vitro with a substrate preference for 9,10-epoxyoctadecamonoenoic acid (EpOME and 11,12-EET. EPHX3 is highly expressed in the skin, lung, stomach, esophagus, and tongue; however, its endogenous function is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the impact of genetic disruption of Ephx3 on fatty acid epoxide hydrolysis and EET-related physiology in mice. Ephx3-/- mice were generated by excising the promoter and first four exons of the Ephx3 gene using Cre-LoxP methodology. LC-MS/MS analysis of Ephx3-/- heart, lung, and skin lysates revealed no differences in endogenous epoxide:diol ratios compared to wild type (WT. Ephx3-/- mice also exhibited no change in plasma levels of fatty acid epoxides and diols relative to WT. Incubations of cytosolic and microsomal fractions prepared from Ephx3-/- and WT stomach, lung, and skin with synthetic 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 9,10-EpOME revealed no significant differences in rates of fatty acid diol formation between the genotypes. Ephx3-/- hearts had similar functional recovery compared to WT hearts following ischemia/reperfusion injury. Following intranasal lipopolysaccharide (LPS exposure, Ephx3-/- mice were not different from WT in terms of lung histology, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cell counts, or fatty acid epoxide and diol levels. We conclude that genetic

  13. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih Ping Yao

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal antibody (mAb C, is reactive to a surface antigen on sperm of all tested species including pig, mouse, chicken, cow, goat, sheep, and human. mAb C is a basic protein that binds to DNA through ionic interaction allowing exogenous DNA to be linked specifically to sperm. After fertilization of the egg, the DNA is shown to be successfully integrated into the genome of viable pig and mouse offspring with germ-line transfer to the F1 generation at a highly efficient rate: 37.5% of pigs and 33% of mice. The integration is demonstrated again by FISH analysis and F2 transmission in pigs. Furthermore, expression of the transgene is demonstrated in 61% (35/57 of transgenic pigs (F0 generation. Conclusions Our data suggests that LB-SMGT could be used to generate transgenic animals efficiently in many different species.

  14. Impaired Autophagy and Defective T Cell Homeostasis in Mice with T Cell-Specific Deletion of Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihua Qiu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy plays a central role in maintaining T cell homeostasis. Our previous study has shown that hepatocyte-specific deficiency of receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1 leads to lipid accumulation in the liver, accompanied by impaired autophagy, but its in vivo role in T cells remains unclear. Here, we report that mice with T cell-specific deletion of RACK1 exhibit normal intrathymic development of conventional T cells and regulatory T (Treg cells but reduced numbers of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Such defects are cell intrinsic with impaired mitochondrial clearance, increased sensitivity to cell death, and decreased proliferation that could be explained by impaired autophagy. Furthermore, RACK1 is essential for invariant natural T cell development. In vivo, T cell-specific loss of RACK1 dampens concanavalin A-induced acute liver injury. Our data suggest that RACK1 is a key regulator of T cell homeostasis.

  15. Photoluminescence and TEM evaluations of defects generated during SiGe-on-insulator virtual substrate fabrication: Temperature ramping process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Ii, S.; Ikeda, K.; Nakashima, H.; Matsumoto, K.; Nakamae, M.; Nakashima, H.

    2006-01-01

    Crystal qualities were evaluated by photoluminescence (PL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for cap-Si/SiGe/Si-on-insulater (SOI) structure, which is the typical structure for SiGe-on-insulator virtual substrate fabrication using the Ge condensation by dry oxidation. The thicknesses of cap-Si, SOI and BOX layers are 10, 70, and 140 nm, respectively. We have three kinds of wafers with SiGe thicknesses of 74, 154 and 234 nm. All of the wafers were heated from 200 deg.C to a target temperature (T t ) in the range of 820-1200 deg. C with a ramping rate of 5 deg. C/min, and maintained at T t for 10 min. The air in the furnace was a mixture of O 2 and N 2 . The PL measurements were carried out using a 325 nm UV line of a continuous-wave HeCd laser. Free exciton peaks were clearly observed for the as-grown wafers and decreased with an increase in the annealing temperature. For the selected wafers, cross-sectional and plan-view TEM measurements show clear generation and variation of dislocations at the interface of SiGe/SOI according to the T t . Defect-related PL signals were observed at around 0.82, 0.88, 0.95 and 1.0 eV, which also varied according to the T t and the SiGe thickness. They were identified to dislocation-related and stacking-fault-related defects by TEM

  16. Chronic cladribine administration increases amyloid beta peptide generation and plaque burden in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal D Hayes

    Full Text Available The clinical uses of 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (2-CDA or cladribine which was initially prescribed to patients with hematological and lymphoid cancers is now extended to treat patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Previous data has shown that 2-CDA has high affinity to the brain and readily passes through the blood brain barrier reaching CSF concentrations 25% of that found in plasma. However, whether long-term administration of 2-CDA can lead to any adverse effects in patients or animal models is not yet clearly known.Here we show that exposure of 2-CDA to CHO cells stably expressing wild-type APP751 increased generation and secretion of amyloid β peptide (Aβ in to the conditioned medium. Interestingly, increased Aβ levels were noticed even at non-toxic concentrations of 2-CDA. Remarkably, chronic treatment of APdE9 mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease with 2-CDA for 60 days increased amyloid plaque burden by more than 1-fold. Increased Aβ generation appears to result from increased turnover of APP as revealed by cycloheximide-chase experiments. Additionally, surface labeling of APP with biotin and immunoprecipitation of surface labeled proteins with anti-biotin antibody also indicated increased APP at the cell surface in 2-CDA treated cells compared to controls. Increased turnover of APP by 2-CDA in turn might be a consequence of decreased protein levels of PIN 1, which is known to regulate cis-trans isomerization and phosphorylation of APP. Most importantly, like many other oncology drugs, 2-CDA administration led to significant delay in acquiring a reward-based learning task in a T maze paradigm.Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence for the first time that chronic 2-CDA administration can increase amyloidogenic processing of APP leading to robustly increased plaque burden which may be responsible for the observed deficits in learning skills. Thus chronic treatment of mice with 2-CDA can have deleterious effects in vivo.

  17. Stable Skin-specific Overexpression of Human CTLA4-Ig in Transgenic Mice through Seven Generations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong WANG; Yong NI; Hong WEI; Feng-Chao WANG; Liang-Peng GE; Xiang GAO

    2006-01-01

    Skin graft rejection is a typical cellular immune response, mainly mediated by T cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen 4-immunoglobin (CTLA4-Ig) extends graft survival by blocking the T cell co-stimulation pathway and inhibiting T cell activation. To investigate the efficacy of CTLA4-Ig in prolonging skin graft survival, human CTLA4-Ig (hCTLA4-Ig) was engineered to overexpress in mouse skin by transgenesis using the K14 promoter. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot assay indicated that the expression of CTLA4-Ig remained skin-specific and relatively constant compared to the internal control protein, AKT, through seven generations. The presence and concentration of the hCTLA4-Ig protein in transgenic mouse sera was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the results indicated that the serum CTLA4-Ig concentration also remained constant through generations. Survival of transgenic mouse skins grafted onto rat wounds was remarkably prolonged compared to that of wild-type skins from the same mouse strain, and remained comparable among all seven generations. This suggested that the bioactive hCTLA4-Ig protein was stably expressed in transgenical mice through at least seven generations, which was consistent with the stable skin-specific CTLA4-Ig expression.The results demonstrated that the transgenic expression of hCTLA4-Ig in skin driven by the K14 promoter remained constant through generations, and a transgenic line can be established to provide transgenic skin with extended survival reproducibly.

  18. The effect of continuous exposure to electromagnetic fïeld on four successive generations of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oentoeng Soeradi

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to know the biobgical effects of  electromagnetic field treatment on four successive generations of mice. Fourty eight male and female mice of Swiss Webster Strain, 3 months of old, and 35 - 40 g body weight, were kept in a controlled environment and fed a standard diet. Mice were divided into 6 groups of four couples each. The first group was exposed to electromagnetic field of I kV/10 cm, the second group to 2 kV/10 cm, and the third group to 3 kV/10 cm. The remaining 3 groups were served as untreated controls of the first, second, and third group, respectively. Each couple of mice was placed in a cage (26x20x11 cm with wire metal cage tops. The cages of experimental groups with mice inside, were then put on the negative terminal plate of a pair of parallel aluminium plate electrodes. These cages were  perpendicular to the positive electrode plate at a distance of I0 cm. Subsequently, the electrodes were connected to stepup transformer as an alternating current power supply. All mice belonging to experimental and untreated control groups were allowed to mate, gastate, and deliver the first up to fourth generations, During investigation, all generations of experimental groups were continuously treated to electromagnetic field, while generations of untreated control groups received no treatment to electromagnetic field, During the study, all mice were housed in a room having a temperature of 26ᵒ C and a light - dark cycle of 12:12 hours. The results of this study showed that exposure of mice to electromagnitic field results in reduced fertility with no change in sex ratio of the offspring. Exposure to electromagnetic field, however, were effective in inducing congenital anomalies, such as micropthalmy, white eyes, short hind legs, dwarf mice, and tumors in both sexes of the offspring which caused of death after 3 - 4 months of old. A large mortality rate were found, especially in the third and fourth

  19. ATM loss leads to synthetic lethality in BRCA1 BRCT mutant mice associated with exacerbated defects in homology-directed repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chin; Kass, Elizabeth M; Yen, Wei-Feng; Ludwig, Thomas; Moynahan, Mary Ellen; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Jasin, Maria

    2017-07-18

    BRCA1 is essential for homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA double-strand breaks in part through antagonism of the nonhomologous end-joining factor 53BP1. The ATM kinase is involved in various aspects of DNA damage signaling and repair, but how ATM participates in HDR and genetically interacts with BRCA1 in this process is unclear. To investigate this question, we used the Brca1 S1598F mouse model carrying a mutation in the BRCA1 C-terminal domain of BRCA1. Whereas ATM loss leads to a mild HDR defect in adult somatic cells, we find that ATM inhibition leads to severely reduced HDR in Brca1 S1598F cells. Consistent with a critical role for ATM in HDR in this background, loss of ATM leads to synthetic lethality of Brca1 S1598F mice. Whereas both ATM and BRCA1 promote end resection, which can be regulated by 53BP1, 53bp1 deletion does not rescue the HDR defects of Atm mutant cells, in contrast to Brca1 mutant cells. These results demonstrate that ATM has a role in HDR independent of the BRCA1-53BP1 antagonism and that its HDR function can become critical in certain contexts.

  20. Development of severe skeletal defects in induced SHP-2-deficient adult mice: a model of skeletal malformation in humans with SHP-2 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Bauler

    2011-03-01

    SHP-2 (encoded by PTPN11 is a ubiquitously expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase required for signal transduction by multiple different cell surface receptors. Humans with germline SHP-2 mutations develop Noonan syndrome or LEOPARD syndrome, which are characterized by cardiovascular, neurological and skeletal abnormalities. To study how SHP-2 regulates tissue homeostasis in normal adults, we used a conditional SHP-2 mouse mutant in which loss of expression of SHP-2 was induced in multiple tissues in response to drug administration. Induced deletion of SHP-2 resulted in impaired hematopoiesis, weight loss and lethality. Most strikingly, induced SHP-2-deficient mice developed severe skeletal abnormalities, including kyphoses and scolioses of the spine. Skeletal malformations were associated with alterations in cartilage and a marked increase in trabecular bone mass. Osteoclasts were essentially absent from the bones of SHP-2-deficient mice, thus accounting for the osteopetrotic phenotype. Studies in vitro revealed that osteoclastogenesis that was stimulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL was defective in SHP-2-deficient mice. At least in part, this was explained by a requirement for SHP-2 in M-CSF-induced activation of the pro-survival protein kinase AKT in hematopoietic precursor cells. These findings illustrate an essential role for SHP-2 in skeletal growth and remodeling in adults, and reveal some of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved. The model is predicted to be of further use in understanding how SHP-2 regulates skeletal morphogenesis, which could lead to the development of novel therapies for the treatment of skeletal malformations in human patients with SHP-2 mutations.

  1. Intraperitoneal Infection of Wild-Type Mice with Synthetically Generated Mammalian Prion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhe Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The prion hypothesis postulates that the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs is an unorthodox protein conformation based agent. Recent successes in generating mammalian prions in vitro with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein provide strong support for the hypothesis. However, whether the pathogenic properties of synthetically generated prion (rec-Prion recapitulate those of naturally occurring prions remains unresolved. Using end-point titration assay, we showed that the in vitro prepared rec-Prions have infectious titers of around 104 LD50/μg. In addition, intraperitoneal (i.p. inoculation of wild-type mice with rec-Prion caused prion disease with an average survival time of 210-220 days post inoculation. Detailed pathological analyses revealed that the nature of rec-Prion induced lesions, including spongiform change, disease specific prion protein accumulation (PrP-d and the PrP-d dissemination amongst lymphoid and peripheral nervous system tissues, the route and mechanisms of neuroinvasion were all typical of classical rodent prions. Our results revealed that, similar to naturally occurring prions, the rec-Prion has a titratable infectivity and is capable of causing prion disease via routes other than direct intra-cerebral challenge. More importantly, our results established that the rec-Prion caused disease is pathogenically and pathologically identical to naturally occurring contagious TSEs, supporting the concept that a conformationally altered protein agent is responsible for the infectivity in TSEs.

  2. The generation of knock-in mice expressing fluorescently tagged galanin receptors 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Niall; Holmes, Fiona E.; Hobson, Sally-Ann; Vanderplank, Penny; Leard, Alan; Balthasar, Nina; Wynick, David

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide galanin has diverse roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, by activating the G protein-coupled receptors Gal1, Gal2 and the less studied Gal3 (GalR1–3 gene products). There is a wealth of data on expression of Gal1–3 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level due to the lack of specificity of currently available antibodies. Here we report the generation of knock-in mice expressing Gal1 or Gal2 receptor fluorescently tagged at the C-terminus with, respectively, mCherry or hrGFP (humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein). In dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons expressing the highest levels of Gal1-mCherry, localization to the somatic cell membrane was detected by live-cell fluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and that fluorescence decreased upon addition of galanin. In spinal cord, abundant Gal1-mCherry immunoreactive processes were detected in the superficial layers of the dorsal horn, and highly expressing intrinsic neurons of the lamina III/IV border showed both somatic cell membrane localization and outward transport of receptor from the cell body, detected as puncta within cell processes. In brain, high levels of Gal1-mCherry immunofluorescence were detected within thalamus, hypothalamus and amygdala, with a high density of nerve endings in the external zone of the median eminence, and regions with lesser immunoreactivity included the dorsal raphe nucleus. Gal2-hrGFP mRNA was detected in DRG, but live-cell fluorescence was at the limits of detection, drawing attention to both the much lower mRNA expression than to Gal1 in mice and the previously unrecognized potential for translational control by upstream open reading frames (uORFs). PMID:26292267

  3. Mitochondrial complex III defects contribute to inefficient respiration and ATP synthesis in the myocardium of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a thorough analysis of mitochondrial bioenergetic function as well as the biochemical and molecular factors that are deregulated and contribute to compromised adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in the myocardium during Trypanosoma cruzi infection. We show that ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration and ATP synthesis supported by pyruvate/malate (provides electrons to complex I) and succinate (provides electrons to complex II) substrates were significantly decreased in left ventricular tissue and isolated cardiac mitochondria of infected mice. The decreased mitochondrial ATP synthesis in infected murine hearts was not a result of uncoupling between the electron-transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation and decreased availability of the intermediary metabolites (e.g., NADH). The observed decline in the activities of complex-I, -IV, and -V was not physiologically relevant and did not contribute to compromised respiration and ATP synthesis in infected myocardium. Instead, complex III activity was decreased above the threshold level and contributed to respiratory-chain inefficiency and the resulting decline in mitochondrial ATP synthesis in infected myocardium. The loss in complex III activity occurred as a consequence of cytochrome b depletion. Treatment of infected mice with phenyl-alpha-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN, antioxidant) was beneficial in preserving the mtDNA-encoded cytochrome b expression, and subsequently resulted in improved complex III activity, mitochondrial respiration, and ATP production in infected myocardium. Overall, we provide novel data on the mechanism(s) involved in cardiac bioenergetic inefficiency during T. cruzi infection.

  4. Quantitative analysis of lentiviral transgene expression in mice over seven generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Song, Yong-tao; Liu, Qin; Liu, Cang'e; Wang, Lu-lu; Liu, Yu; Zhou, Xiao-yang; Wu, Jun; Wei, Hong

    2010-10-01

    Lentiviral transgenesis is now recognized as an extremely efficient and cost-effective method to produce transgenic animals. Transgenes delivered by lentiviral vectors exhibited inheritable expression in many species including those which are refractory to genetic modification such as non-human primates. However, epigenetic modification was frequently observed in lentiviral integrants, and transgene expression found to be inversely correlated with methylation density. Recent data showed that about one-third lentiviral integrants exhibited hypermethylation and low expression, but did not demonstrate whether those integrants with high expression could remain constant expression and hypomethylated during long term germline transmission. In this study, using lentiviral eGFP transgenic mice as the experimental animals, lentiviral eGFP expression levels and its integrant numbers in genome were quantitatively analyzed by fluorescent quantitative polymerase-chain reaction (FQ-PCR), using the house-keeping gene ribosomal protein S18 (Rps18) and the single copy gene fatty acid binding protein of the intestine (Fabpi) as the internal controls respectively. The methylation densities of the integrants were quantitatively analyzed by bisulfite sequencing. We found that the lentiviral integrants with high expression exhibited a relative constant expression level per integrant over at least seven generations. Besides, the individuals containing these integrants exhibited eGFP expression levels which were positively and almost linearly correlated with the integrant numbers in their genomes, suggesting that no remarkable position effect on transgene expression of the integrants analyzed was observed. In addition, over seven generations the methylation density of these integrants did not increase, but rather decreased remarkably, indicating that these high expressing integrants were not subjected to de novo methylation during at least seven generations of germline transmission. Taken

  5. Many-Body Theory of Proton-Generated Point Defects for Losses of Electron Energy and Photons in Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gao, Fei; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, D. A.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of point defects on the loss of either energies of ballistic electron beams or incident photons are studied by using a many-body theory in a multi-quantum-well system. This theory includes the defect-induced vertex correction to a bare polarization function of electrons within the ladder approximation, and the intralayer and interlayer screening of defect-electron interactions is also taken into account in the random-phase approximation. The numerical results of defect effects on both energy-loss and optical-absorption spectra are presented and analyzed for various defect densities, numbers of quantum wells, and wave vectors. The diffusion-reaction equation is employed for calculating distributions of point defects in a layered structure. For completeness, the production rate for Frenkel-pair defects and their initial concentration are obtained based on atomic-level molecular-dynamics simulations. By combining the defect-effect, diffusion-reaction, and molecular-dynamics models with an available space-weather-forecast model, it will be possible in the future to enable specific designing for electronic and optoelectronic quantum devices that will be operated in space with radiation-hardening protection and, therefore, effectively extend the lifetime of these satellite onboard electronic and optoelectronic devices. Specifically, this theory can lead to a better characterization of quantum-well photodetectors not only for high quantum efficiency and low dark current density but also for radiation tolerance or mitigating the effects of the radiation.

  6. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generated from P0-Cre;Z/EG Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Eto, Akira; Miyake, Chisato; Tsuchida, Nana; Miyake, Haruka; Takaku, Yasuhiro; Hagiwara, Hiroaki; Oishi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are a migratory, multipotent cell population that arises at the neural plate border, and migrate from the dorsal neural tube to their target tissues, where they differentiate into various cell types. Abnormal development of NC cells can result in severe congenital birth defects. Because only a limited number of cells can be obtained from an embryo, mechanistic studies are difficult to perform with directly isolated NC cells. Protein zero (P0) is expressed by migrating NC cells during the early embryonic period. In the P0-Cre;Z/EG transgenic mouse, transient activation of the P0 promoter induces Cre-mediated recombination, indelibly tagging NC-derived cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology offers new opportunities for both mechanistic studies and development of stem cell-based therapies. Here, we report the generation of iPSCs from the P0-Cre;Z/EG mouse. P0-Cre;Z/EG mouse-derived iPSCs (P/G-iPSCs) exhibited pluripotent stem cell properties. In lineage-directed differentiation studies, P/G-iPSCs were efficiently differentiated along the neural lineage while expressing EGFP. These results suggest that P/G-iPSCs are useful to study NC development and NC-associated diseases.

  7. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Generated from P0-Cre;Z/EG Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    Full Text Available Neural crest (NC cells are a migratory, multipotent cell population that arises at the neural plate border, and migrate from the dorsal neural tube to their target tissues, where they differentiate into various cell types. Abnormal development of NC cells can result in severe congenital birth defects. Because only a limited number of cells can be obtained from an embryo, mechanistic studies are difficult to perform with directly isolated NC cells. Protein zero (P0 is expressed by migrating NC cells during the early embryonic period. In the P0-Cre;Z/EG transgenic mouse, transient activation of the P0 promoter induces Cre-mediated recombination, indelibly tagging NC-derived cells with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology offers new opportunities for both mechanistic studies and development of stem cell-based therapies. Here, we report the generation of iPSCs from the P0-Cre;Z/EG mouse. P0-Cre;Z/EG mouse-derived iPSCs (P/G-iPSCs exhibited pluripotent stem cell properties. In lineage-directed differentiation studies, P/G-iPSCs were efficiently differentiated along the neural lineage while expressing EGFP. These results suggest that P/G-iPSCs are useful to study NC development and NC-associated diseases.

  8. Disrupted fat distribution and composition due to medium-chain triglycerides in mice with a β-oxidation defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Sara; Flögel, Ulrich; Sturm, Marga; Borsch, Elena; Spiekerkoetter, Ute

    2011-08-01

    Because of the enhanced recognition of inherited long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders by worldwide newborn screening programs, an increasing number of asymptomatic patients receive medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) supplements to prevent the development of cardiomyopathy and myopathy. MCT supplementation has been recognized as a safe dietary intervention, but long-term observations into later adulthood are still not available. We investigated the consequences of a prolonged MCT diet on abdominal fat distribution and composition and on liver fat. Mice with very-long-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCAD(-/-)) were supplemented for 1 y with a diet in which MCTs replaced long-chain triglycerides without increasing the total fat content. The dietary effects on abdominal fat accumulation and composition were analyzed by in vivo (1)H- and (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (9.4 Tesla). After 1 y of MCT supplementation, VLCAD(-/-) mice accumulated massive visceral fat and had a dramatic increase in the concentration of serum free fatty acids. Furthermore, we observed a profound shift in body triglyceride composition, ie, concentrations of physiologically important polyunsaturated fatty acids dramatically decreased. (1)H-Magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis and histologic evaluation of the liver also showed pronounced fat accumulation and marked oxidative stress. Although the MCT-supplemented diet has been reported to prevent the development of cardiomyopathy and skeletal myopathy in fatty acid oxidation disorders, our data show that long-term MCT supplementation results in a severe clinical phenotype similar to that of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and the metabolic syndrome.

  9. Spontaneous Ag-Nanoparticle Growth at Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Defect Sites: A Tool for In Situ Generation of SERS Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Maley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles were spontaneously formed on pristine and oxidized single-wall nanotubes. Nanoparticles were observed on carbon nanotubes with AFM, and the presence of Ag nanoparticles were confirmed by ESR experiments. Raman spectroscopy of the Ag-treated carbon nanotubes had a 4–10X enhancement of intensity compared to untreated carbon nanotubes. Ag nanoparticles formed at defect sites on the CNT surface, where free electrons located at the defect sites reduced Ag+ to Ag. A mechanism for the propagation of the nanoparticles is through a continual negative charge generation on the nanoparticle by electron transfer from doublet oxygen (O2−.

  10. Generation of NSE-MerCreMer transgenic mice with tamoxifen inducible Cre activity in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy Ka Man Kam

    Full Text Available To establish a genetic tool for conditional deletion or expression of gene in neurons in a temporally controlled manner, we generated a transgenic mouse (NSE-MerCreMer, which expressed a tamoxifen inducible type of Cre recombinase specifically in neurons. The tamoxifen inducible Cre recombinase (MerCreMer is a fusion protein containing Cre recombinase with two modified estrogen receptor ligand binding domains at both ends, and is driven by the neural-specific rat neural specific enolase (NSE promoter. A total of two transgenic lines were established, and expression of MerCreMer in neurons of the central and enteric nervous systems was confirmed. Transcript of MerCreMer was detected in several non-neural tissues such as heart, liver, and kidney in these lines. In the background of the Cre reporter mouse strain Rosa26R, Cre recombinase activity was inducible in neurons of adult NSE-MerCreMer mice treated with tamoxifen by intragastric gavage, but not in those fed with corn oil only. We conclude that NSE-MerCreMer lines will be useful for studying gene functions in neurons for the conditions that Cre-mediated recombination resulting in embryonic lethality, which precludes investigation of gene functions in neurons through later stages of development and in adult.

  11. Generation of skeletal muscle from transplanted embryonic stem cells in dystrophic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagavati, Satyakam; Xu Weimin

    2005-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have great therapeutic potential because of their capacity to proliferate extensively and to form any fully differentiated cell of the body, including skeletal muscle cells. Successful generation of skeletal muscle in vivo, however, requires selective induction of the skeletal muscle lineage in cultures of ES cells and following transplantation, integration of appropriately differentiated skeletal muscle cells with recipient muscle. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a severe progressive muscle wasting disease due to a mutation in the dystrophin gene and the mdx mouse, an animal model for DMD, are characterized by the absence of the muscle membrane associated protein, dystrophin. Here, we show that co-culturing mouse ES cells with a preparation from mouse muscle enriched for myogenic stem and precursor cells, followed by injection into mdx mice, results occasionally in the formation of normal, vascularized skeletal muscle derived from the transplanted ES cells. Study of this phenomenon should provide valuable insights into skeletal muscle development in vivo from transplanted ES cells

  12. The intramammary efficacy of first generation cephalosporins against Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demon, Dieter; Ludwig, Carolin; Breyne, Koen; Guédé, David; Dörner, Julia-Charlotte; Froyman, Robrecht; Meyer, Evelyne

    2012-11-09

    Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in cattle causes important financial losses in the dairy industry due to lower yield and bad milk quality. Although S. aureus is susceptible to many antimicrobials in vitro, treatment often fails to cure the infected udder. Hence, comprehensive evaluation of antimicrobials against S. aureus mastitis is desirable to direct treatment strategies. The mouse mastitis model is an elegant tool to evaluate antimicrobials in vivo while circumventing the high costs associated with bovine experiments. An evaluation of the antimicrobial efficacy of the intramammary (imam) applied first generation cephalosporins cefalexin, cefalonium, cefapirin and cefazolin, was performed using the S. aureus mouse mastitis model. In vivo determination of the effective dose 2log(10) (ED(2log10)), ED(4log10), protective dose 50 (PD(50)) and PD(100) in mouse mastitis studies, support that in vitro MIC data of the cephalosporins did not fully concur with the in vivo clinical outcome. Cefazolin was shown to be the most efficacious first generation cephalosporin to treat S. aureus mastitis whereas the MIC data indicate that cefalonium and cefapirin were more active in vitro. Changing the excipient for imam application from mineral oil to miglyol 812 further improved the antimicrobial efficacy of cefazolin, confirming that the excipient can influence the in vivo efficacy. Additionally, statistical analysis of the variation of S. aureus-infected, excipient-treated mice from fourteen studies emphasizes the strength of the mouse mastitis model as a fast, cost-effective and highly reproducible screening tool to assess the efficacy of antimicrobial compounds against intramammary S. aureus infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Impaired terminal differentiation of hippocampal granule neurons and defective contextual memory in PC3/Tis21 knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Farioli-Vecchioli

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus has been implicated in neural plasticity and memory, but the molecular mechanisms controlling the proliferation and differentiation of newborn neurons and their integration into the synaptic circuitry are still largely unknown. To investigate this issue, we have analyzed the adult hippocampal neurogenesis in a PC3/Tis21-null mouse model. PC3/Tis21 is a transcriptional co-factor endowed with antiproliferative and prodifferentiative properties; indeed, its upregulation in neural progenitors has been shown to induce exit from cell cycle and differentiation. We demonstrate here that the deletion of PC3/Tis21 causes an increased proliferation of progenitor cells in the adult dentate gyrus and an arrest of their terminal differentiation. In fact, in the PC3/Tis21-null hippocampus postmitotic undifferentiated neurons accumulated, while the number of terminally differentiated neurons decreased of 40%. As a result, PC3/Tis21-null mice displayed a deficit of contextual memory. Notably, we observed that PC3/Tis21 can associate to the promoter of Id3, an inhibitor of proneural gene activity, and negatively regulates its expression, indicating that PC3/Tis21 acts upstream of Id3. Our results identify PC3/Tis21 as a gene required in the control of proliferation and terminal differentiation of newborn neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis and suggest its involvement in the formation of contextual memories.

  14. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Baze, Wallace B; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K; Lawrence, William S; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E; Andersson, Jourdan A; Kozlova, Elena V; Tiner, Bethany L; Peterson, Johnny W; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Characterisation of innate lymphoid cell populations at different sites in mice with defective T cell immunity [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma E. Dutton

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs have now been identified within most tissues of the body and current evidence indicates that this family of cells play a fundamental role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. However, few studies have compared the ILC populations between several tissues. Methods: We sought to generate a comprehensive characterisation of the ILC populations in different tissues of C57BL/6 WT and genetically modified mice targeting costimulatory pathways, using transcription factor expression to define specific groups. Results: Consistent with studies individually describing the ILC composition in different tissues, our analysis revealed different ILC groups dominate the ILC population in different tissues. Additionally, we observed a population of  IL-7Rα+Id2+ cells lacking expression of lineage markers but also lacking expression of GATA-3, RORgt or T-bet. This population was most evident in ear skin where it outnumbered the defined ILC groups, however, further experiments demonstrated that detection of these cells was influenced by how the tissue was digested, raising concerns as to its real nature. Since both ILC2 and ILC3 express ICOS, we then investigated the requirement for ICOS:ICOSL interactions in the homeostasis of ILC populations at these sites. Surprisingly, no significant differences were detected in the number of ILC1, ILC2 or ILC3 between WT and ICOSL-/- mice in any tissue, indicating that this pathway is not required for ILC homeostasis at these sites. These data were compared with CD80-/-CD86-/- mice given evidence of CD28 expression by some ILC and ILC crosstalk with activated T cells. Notably, the absence of CD28 ligands resulted in a significant increase in ILC2 and ILC3 numbers in the intestine. Conclusions: Together, these data provide new insight into ILC composition in different tissues in both WT and genetically modified mice where key costimulatory pathways are genetically deleted, providing a

  16. Generation of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre Mice for Gene Expression in an Oxytocin Receptor Specific Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidema, Shizu; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Hayashi, Ryotaro; Otsuka, Ayano; Suzuki, Shingo; Miyazaki, Shinji; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    The neurohypophysial hormone oxytocin (OXT) and its receptor (OXTR) have critical roles in the regulation of pro-social behaviors, including social recognition, pair bonding, parental behavior, and stress-related responses. Supporting this hypothesis, a portion of patients suffering from autism spectrum disorder have mutations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications in their OXTR gene. We previously reported that OXTR-deficient mice exhibit pervasive social deficits, indicating the critical role of OXTR in social behaviors. In the present study, we generated Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice, expressing both OXTR and Cre recombinase under the control of the endogenous Oxtr promoter. Knock-in cassette of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre consisted of Oxtr cDNA tagged with the hemagglutinin epitope at the 3' end (Oxtr cDNA(HA)), internal ribosomal entry site (Ires), and Cre. Cre was expressed in the uterus, mammary gland, kidney, and brain of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice. Furthermore, the distribution of Cre in the brain was similar to that observed in Oxtr-Venus fluorescent protein expressing mice (Oxtr-Venus), another animal model previously generated by our group. Social behavior of Oxtr cDNA(HA)-Ires-Cre knock-in mice was similar to that of wild-type animals. We demonstrated that this construct is expressed in OXTR-expressing neurons specifically after an infection with the recombinant adeno-associated virus carrying the flip-excision switch vector. Using this system, we showed the transport of the wheat-germ agglutinin tracing molecule from the OXTR-expressing neurons to the innervated neurons in knock-in mice. This study might contribute to the monosynaptic analysis of neuronal circuits and to the optogenetic analysis of neurons expressing OXTR. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. 5-HT(2C) serotonin receptor blockade prevents tau protein hyperphosphorylation and corrects the defect in hippocampal synaptic plasticity caused by a combination of environmental stressors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busceti, Carla Letizia; Di Pietro, Paola; Riozzi, Barbara; Traficante, Anna; Biagioni, Francesca; Nisticò, Robert; Fornai, Francesco; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Bruno, Valeria

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to multimodal sensory stressors is an everyday occurrence and sometimes becomes very intense, such as during rave parties or other recreational events. A growing body of evidence suggests that strong environmental stressors might cause neuronal dysfunction on their own in addition to their synergistic action with illicit drugs. Mice were exposed to a combination of physical and sensory stressors that are reminiscent of those encountered in a rave party. However, this is not a model of rave because it lacks the rewarding properties of rave. A 14-h exposure to environmental stressors caused an impairment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and spatial memory, and an enhanced phosphorylation of tau protein in the CA1 and CA3 regions. These effects were transient and critically depended on the activation of 5-HT2C serotonin receptors, which are highly expressed in the CA1 region. Acute systemic injection of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist, RS-102,221 (2 mg/kg, i.p., 2 min prior the onset of stress), prevented tau hyperphosphorylation and also corrected the defects in hippocampal LTP and spatial memory. These findings suggest that passive exposure to a combination of physical and sensory stressors causes a reversible hippocampal dysfunction, which might compromise mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and spatial memory for a few days. Drugs that block 5-HT2C receptors might protect the hippocampus against the detrimental effect of environmental stressors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Generation of Human Immunosuppressive Myeloid Cell Populations in Human Interleukin-6 Transgenic NOG Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asami Hanazawa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment contains unique immune cells, termed myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs that suppress host anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Although these cells are considered a key target of cancer immune therapy, in vivo animal models allowing differentiation of human immunosuppressive myeloid cells have yet to be established, hampering the development of novel cancer therapies. In this study, we established a novel humanized transgenic (Tg mouse strain, human interleukin (hIL-6-expressing NOG mice (NOG-hIL-6 transgenic mice. After transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, the HSC-transplanted NOG-hIL-6 Tg mice (HSC-NOG-hIL-6 Tg mice showed enhanced human monocyte/macrophage differentiation. A significant number of human monocytes were negative for HLA-DR expression and resembled immature myeloid cells in the spleen and peripheral blood from HSC-NOG-hIL-6 Tg mice, but not from HSC-NOG non-Tg mice. Engraftment of HSC4 cells, a human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma-derived cell line producing various factors including IL-6, IL-1β, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, into HSC-NOG-hIL-6 Tg mice induced a significant number of TAM-like cells, but few were induced in HSC-NOG non-Tg mice. The tumor-infiltrating macrophages in HSC-NOG-hIL-6 Tg mice expressed a high level of CD163, a marker of immunoregulatory myeloid cells, and produced immunosuppressive molecules such as arginase-1 (Arg-1, IL-10, and VEGF. Such cells from HSC-NOG-hIL-6 Tg mice, but not HSC-NOG non-Tg mice, suppressed human T cell proliferation in response to antigen stimulation in in vitro cultures. These results suggest that functional human TAMs can be developed in NOG-hIL-6 Tg mice. This mouse model will contribute to the development of novel cancer immune therapies targeting immunoregulatory

  19. Generation of an allelic series of knock-in mice using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roebroek, Anton J M; Van Gool, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Molecular genetic strategies applying embryonic stem cell (ES cell) technologies to study the function of a gene in mice or to generate a mouse model for a human disease are continuously under development. Next to (conditional) inactivation of genes the application and importance of approaches to generate knock-in mutations are increasing. In this chapter the principle and application of recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) are discussed as being a new emerging knock-in strategy, which enables easy generation of a series of different knock-in mutations within one gene. An RMCE protocol, which was used to generate a series of different knock-in mutations in the Lrp1 gene of ES cells, is described in detail as an example of how RMCE can be used to generate highly efficiently an allelic series of differently modified ES cell clones from a parental modified ES cell clone. Subsequently the differently modified ES cell clones can be used to generate an allelic series of mutant knock-in mice.

  20. Generation of electrical defects in ion beam assisted deposition of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachmann, H.; Puttnins, S.; Daume, F.; Rahm, A.; Otte, K.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) absorber layers for thin film solar cells have been manufactured on polyimide foil in a low temperature, ion beam assisted co-evaporation process. In the present work a set of CIGS thin films was produced with varying selenium ion energy. Solar cell devices have been manufactured from the films and characterized via admittance spectroscopy and capacitance-voltage profiling to determine the influence of the selenium ion energy on the electric parameters of the solar cells. It is shown that the impact of energetic selenium ions in the CIGS deposition process leads to a change in the activation energy and defect density and also in the spatial distribution of electrically active defects. For the interpretation of the results two defect models are taken into account.

  1. Elastase-2, a Tissue Alternative Pathway for Angiotensin II Generation, Plays a Role in Circulatory Sympathovagal Balance in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becari, Christiane; Durand, Marina T; Guimaraes, Alessander O; Lataro, Renata M; Prado, Cibele M; de Oliveira, Mauro; Candido, Sarai C O; Pais, Paloma; Ribeiro, Mauricio S; Bader, Michael; Pesquero, Joao B; Salgado, Maria C O; Salgado, Helio C

    2017-01-01

    In vitro and ex vivo experiments indicate that elastase-2 (ELA-2), a chymotrypsin-serine protease elastase family member 2A, is an alternative pathway for angiotensin II (Ang II) generation. However, the role played by ELA-2 in vivo is unclear. We examined ELA-2 knockout (ELA-2KO) mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice and determined whether ELA-2 played a role in hemodynamics [arterial pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR)], cardiocirculatory sympathovagal balance and baroreflex sensitivity. The variability of systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and pulse interval (PI) for evaluating autonomic modulation was examined for time and frequency domains (spectral analysis), whereas a symbolic analysis was also used to evaluate PI variability. In addition, baroreflex sensitivity was examined using the sequence method. Cardiac function was evaluated echocardiographically under anesthesia. The AP was normal whereas the HR was reduced in ELA-2KO mice (425 ± 17 vs. 512 ± 13 bpm from WT). SAP variability and baroreflex sensitivity were similar in both strains. The LF power from the PI spectrum (33.6 ± 5 vs. 51.8 ± 4.8 nu from WT) and the LF/HF ratio (0.60 ± 0.1 vs. 1.45 ± 0.3 from WT) were reduced, whereas the HF power was increased (66.4 ± 5 vs. 48.2 ± 4.8 nu from WT) in ELA-2KO mice, indicating a shift toward parasympathetic modulation of HR. Echocardiographic examination showed normal fractional shortening and an ejection fraction in ELA-2KO mice; however, the cardiac output, stroke volume, and ventricular size were reduced. These findings provide the first evidence that ELA-2 acts on the sympathovagal balance of the heart, as expressed by the reduced sympathetic modulation of HR in ELA-2KO mice.

  2. Generation and analysis of knock-in mice carrying pseudohypoaldosteronism type II-causing mutations in the cullin 3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Yuya; Rai, Tatemitsu; Sohara, Eisei; Mori, Takayasu; Inoue, Yuichi; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Kikuchi, Eriko; Ohta, Akihito; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2015-10-21

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary hypertensive disease caused by mutations in four different genes: with-no-lysine kinases (WNK) 1 and 4, Kelch-like family member 3 (KLHL3), and cullin 3 (Cul3). Cul3 and KLHL3 form an E3 ligase complex that ubiquitinates and reduces the expression level of WNK4. PHAII-causing mutations in WNK4 and KLHL3 impair WNK4 ubiquitination. However, the molecular pathogenesis of PHAII caused by Cul3 mutations is unclear. In cultured cells and human leukocytes, PHAII-causing Cul3 mutations result in the skipping of exon 9, producing mutant Cul3 protein lacking 57 amino acids. However, whether this phenomenon occurs in the kidneys and is responsible for the pathogenesis of PHAII in vivo is unknown. We generated knock-in mice carrying a mutation in the C-terminus of intron 8 of Cul3, c.1207-1G>A, which corresponds to a PHAII-causing mutation in the human Cul3 gene. Heterozygous Cul3(G(-1)A/+) knock-in mice did not exhibit PHAII phenotypes, and the skipping of exon 9 was not evident in their kidneys. However, the level of Cul3 mRNA expression in the kidneys of heterozygous knock-in mice was approximately half that of wild-type mice. Furthermore, homozygous knock-in mice were nonviable. It suggested that the mutant allele behaved like a knockout allele and did not produce Cul3 mRNA lacking exon 9. A reduction in Cul3 expression alone was not sufficient to develop PHAII in the knock-in mice. Our findings highlighted the pathogenic role of mutant Cul3 protein and provided insight to explain why PHAII-causing mutations in Cul3 cause kidney-predominant PHAII phenotypes. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. The aspects regarding plugging the defective tubes of the steam generator using plastic deformation of the plug wall by conventional or unconventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyongyosi, Tiberiu

    2006-01-01

    After a brief introduction the advantages and disadvantages of two plugging methods of the defective tubes from steam generator by plastic deformation of the wall of the plug, deformation performed by mechanical rolling (conventional technique) and by electrohydraulic shock (unconventional technique), respectively, are showed. The paper gives the results of the experimental tests to install the plugs at the end of the tube having the same geometry with those of the steam generator, the performance reached in this stage and some conclusions in the end

  4. Reproducibility of polar map generation and assessment of defect severity and extent assessment in myocardial perfusion imaging using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekolla, S.G.; Miethaner, C.; Nguyen, N.; Ziegler, S.I.; Schwaiger, M.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of new software developed for the analysis of cardiac tomographic data. The algorithm delineates the long axis and defines the basal plane and subsequently generates polar maps to quantitatively and reproducibly assess the size and severity of perfusion defects. The developed technique requires an initial manual estimate of the left ventricular long axis and calculates the volumetric maximum myocardial activity distribution. This surface is used to map three-dimensional tracer accumulation onto a two-dimensional representation (polar map), which is the basis for further processing. The spatial information is used to compute geometrical and mechanical properties of a solid model of the left ventricle including the left heart chamber. A new estimate of the axis is determined from this model, and the previously outlined procedure is repeated together with an automated definition of the valve plane until differences between the polar maps can be neglected. This quantitative analysis software was validated in phantom studies with defects of known masses and in ten data sets from normals and patients with coronary artery disease of various severity. We investigated the reproducibility of the maps with the introduction of a similarity criterion where the ratio of two corresponding polar map elements lies within a 10% interval. The maps were also used to measure intra-and interobserver variability in respect of defect size and severity. In the phantom studies, it was possible to reliably assess mass information over a wide range of defects from 5 to 60 g (slope: 1.02, offset -0.68, r = 0.972). Patient studies revealed a statistically significant increase in the reproducibility of the automatic technique compared with the manual approach: 54%±19% (manual) compared with 88%±9% (automatic) for observer 1 and 61%±20% vs 82%±5% for observer 2, respectively. The intervariability analysis showed a significant

  5. Autologously generated tissue-engineered bone flaps for reconstruction of large mandibular defects in an ovine model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tatara, A.M.; Kretlow, J.D.; Spicer, P.P.; Lu, S.; Lam, J.; Liu, W.; Cao, Y.; Liu, G.; Jackson, J.D.; Yoo, J.J.; Atala, A.; Beucken, J.J.J.P van den; Jansen, J.A.; Kasper, F.K.; Ho, T.; Demian, N.; Miller, M.J.; Wong, M.E.; Mikos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of large craniofacial defects remains a significant clinical challenge. The complex geometry of facial bone and the lack of suitable donor tissue often hinders successful repair. One strategy to address both of these difficulties is the development of an in vivo bioreactor, where

  6. SJL mice infected with Acanthamoeba castellanii develop central nervous system autoimmunity through the generation of cross-reactive T cells for myelin antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Rocha-Azevedo, Bruno da

    2014-01-01

    ) in SJL mice reminiscent of the diseases induced with their corresponding cognate peptides. We now demonstrate that mice infected with ACA also show the generation of cross-reactive T cells, predominantly for PLP 139-151, as evaluated by T cell proliferation and IAs/dextramer staining. We verified...

  7. Antibodies directed against monomorphic and evolutionary conserved self epitopes may be generated in 'knock-out' mice. Development of monoclonal antibodies directed against monomorphic MHC class I determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Endel, B; Ulrik, J

    1994-01-01

    Beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2m) gene 'knock-out' mice (C1D) were primed with purified H-2Kb and H-2Db molecules and spleen cells from immunized mice were used to generate monoclonal antibody secreting B-cell hybridomas. Approximately 0.2% of the Ig-secreting primary microcultures contained H-2b...

  8. Synthetic Defects for Vibrothermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Jeremy; Holland, Stephen D.; Thompson, R. Bruce; Eisenmann, David J.

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic defects are an important tool used for characterizing the performance of nondestructive evaluation techniques. Viscous material-filled synthetic defects were developed for use in vibrothermography (also known as sonic IR) as a tool to improve inspection accuracy and reliability. This paper describes how the heat-generation response of these VMF synthetic defects is similar to the response of real defects. It also shows how VMF defects can be applied to improve inspection accuracy for complex industrial parts and presents a study of their application in an aircraft engine stator vane.

  9. Strong morphological defects in conditional Arabidopsis abp1 knock-down mutants generated in absence of functional ABP1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalko, Jaroslav; Glanc, Matouš; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    The Auxin Binding Protein 1 (ABP1) is one of the most studied proteins in plants. Since decades ago, it has been the prime receptor candidate for the plant hormone auxin with a plethora of described functions in auxin signaling and development. The developmental importance of ABP1 has recently been questioned by identification of Arabidopsis thaliana abp1 knock-out alleles that show no obvious phenotypes under normal growth conditions. In this study, we examined the contradiction between the normal growth and development of the abp1 knock-outs and the strong morphological defects observed in three different ethanol-inducible abp1 knock-down mutants ( abp1-AS, SS12K, SS12S). By analyzing segregating populations of abp1 knock-out vs. abp1 knock-down crosses we show that the strong morphological defects that were believed to be the result of conditional down-regulation of ABP1 can be reproduced also in the absence of the functional ABP1 protein. This data suggests that the phenotypes in  abp1 knock-down lines are due to the off-target effects and asks for further reflections on the biological function of ABP1 or alternative explanations for the missing phenotypic defects in the abp1 loss-of-function alleles.

  10. Generation of human iPSC line from a patient with laterality defects and associated congenital heart anomalies carrying a DAND5 missense alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cristo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A human iPSC line was generated from exfoliated renal epithelial (ERE cells of a patient affected with Congenital Heart Disease (CHD and Laterality Defects carrying tshe variant p.R152H in the DAND5 gene. The transgene-free iPSCs were generated with the human OSKM transcription factor using the Sendai-virus reprogramming system. The established iPSC line had the specific heterozygous alteration, a stable karyotype, expressed pluripotency markers and generated embryoid bodies that can differentiate towards the three germ layers in vitro. This iPSC line offers a useful resource to study the molecular mechanisms of cardiomyocyte proliferation, as well as for drug testing.

  11. Effects of tritiated water ingestion on mice: II. Damage at cellular vis-a-vis subcellular level monitored up to four generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.N.; Sharan, R.N.; Pozzi, L.

    1983-01-01

    Damage at cellular level is measured using colony forming units in spleen (CFU-S) technique while that at subcellular level by DNA unwinding technique. The damage is monitored up to four generations in Swiss albino mice. The results show drastically reduced colony forming ability in mice bone marrow cells (BMC). On plotting survival fractions (percent of control) for BMC against generations of mice, the plateau is found around 50% survival. The role of DNA in colony forming ability of BMC is tested. The results indicate that, at least, initial impairment of colony ability is not DNA dependent but related to some other factor(s)

  12. Defective IL-10 signaling in hyper-IgE syndrome results in impaired generation of tolerogenic dendritic cells and induced regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masako; Nagasawa, Masayuki; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Yamada, Masafumi; Kawamura, Nobuaki; Ariga, Tadashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Karasuyama, Hajime

    2011-01-01

    Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent staphylococcal infections and atopic dermatitis associated with elevated serum IgE levels. Although defective differentiation of IL-17–producing CD4+ T cells (Th17) partly accounts for the susceptibility to staphylococcal skin abscesses and pneumonia, the pathogenesis of atopic manifestations in HIES still remains an enigma. In this study, we examined the differentiation and function of Th1, Th2, regulatory T cells (Treg cells), and dendritic cells (DCs) in HIES patients carrying either STAT3 or TYK2 mutations. Although the in vitro differentiation of Th1 and Th2 cells and the number and function of Treg cells in the peripheral blood were normal in HIES patients with STAT3 mutations, primary and monocyte-derived DCs showed defective responses to IL-10 and thus failed to become tolerogenic. When treated with IL-10, patient DCs showed impaired up-regulation of inhibitory molecules on their surface, including PD-L1 and ILT-4, compared with control DCs. Moreover, IL-10–treated DCs from patients displayed impaired ability to induce the differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells to FOXP3+ induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). These results suggest that the defective generation of IL-10–induced tolerogenic DCs and iTreg cells may contribute to inflammatory changes in HIES. PMID:21300911

  13. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza-Lopez, Martha; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo; Morales-Ramirez, Pedro; Piedras-Ross, Josefa; Murphy-Stack, Eduardo; Hernandez-Oviedo, Omar

    2004-01-01

    Multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies have been treated by myeloablative radiotherapy/chemotherapy and subsequent stem cell transplantation. [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) forms a stable in vivo generator system with selective skeletal uptake in mice; therefore, it could work as a potential and improved agent for marrow ablation. Induced bone marrow cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are determined by the reduction of reticulocytes (RET) and elevation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) in peripheral blood and ablation by bone marrow histological studies. The aim of this study was to determine the bone marrow cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice and to evaluate by histopathology its myeloablative potential. Enriched 166 Dy 2 O 3 was irradiated and [ 166 Dy]DyCl 3 was added to EDTMP in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in a molar ratio of 1:1.75. QC was determined by TLC. Dy-EDTMP complex was prepared the same way with nonirradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control animals were injected with the cold complex and with 0.9% sodium chloride, respectively. A blood sample was taken at the beginning of the experiments and every 48 h for 12 days postinjection. The animals were sacrificed, organs of interest taken out and the radioactivity determined. The femur was used for histological studies. Flow cytometry analysis was used to quantify the frequency of RET and MN-RET in the blood samples. The MCNP4B Monte Carlo computer code was used for dosimetry calculations. Radiochemical purity was 99% and the mean specific activity was 1.3 MBq/mg. The RET and MN-RET frequency were statistically different in the treatment at the end of the 12-day period demonstrating cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the in vivo generator system. The histology studies show that there was

  14. Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    A birth defect is a problem that happens while a baby is developing in the mother's body. Most birth defects happen during the first 3 months of ... in the United States is born with a birth defect. A birth defect may affect how the ...

  15. Generation and alteration of the defects induced by particle irradiation and electromagnetic radiation in alkali halogen compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions between electron beams, CO 2 - laser radiation and alkali halogen compound have led to interesting results: 1. The development of two types of F-centre respectively in normal lattice or near the dislocations. 2. The beginning of metal colloids development process at low temperature when a thermal treatment is applied. 3. An experimental confirmation of the Pooley-Hersh model for crystal defects has been brought up. 4. The surface penetration is an explosive process. 5. Surface polygonizations were also investigated. A model has been proposed to describe the destructive channels development within alkali halogen crystals with molecular anions impurities of less than 10 ppm. KCl monocrystals of advanced purity level was prepared for building up passive optical components of strong CO 2 lasers. (author)

  16. New Analysis of Solute Drag in AA5754 by Precise Determination of Point Defect Generation and the Orowan Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, Brad J.; Penlington, Alex; Saimoto, Shig

    Serrated deformation in Al-Mg alloys creates problems that affect consumer product acceptability. This effect is usually attributed to the Portevin-LeChâtelier effect. In this study the inverse PLC effect due to solute drag on moving dislocations is examined in AA5754. The drag mechanism is dependent on the diffusivity of the solute which is in-turn dependent on the point defect evolution during deformation. Experimental determination of the parabolic James-Barnett drag profile by strain rate change experiments indicates the peak stress is centered at 1.5×10-9m/s, which requires a mechanical formation energy for vacancies of 0.4eV/at. A new slip-based constitutive relation was used to determine the evolution of vacancy volume fraction with deformation with strain, which is greater than the volume fraction of vacancies predicted by the solute drag profile.

  17. Osterix-Cre transgene causes craniofacial bone development defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Fei

    2015-01-01

    The Cre/loxP system has been widely used to generate tissue-specific gene knockout mice. Inducible (Tet-off) Osx-GFP::Cre (Osx-Cre) mouse line that targets osteoblasts is widely used in the bone research field. In this study, we investigated the effect of Osx-Cre on craniofacial bone development. We found that newborn Osx-Cre mice showed severe hypomineralization in parietal, frontal, and nasal bones as well as the coronal sutural area when compared to control mice. As the mice matured the intramembranous bone hypomineralization phenotype became less severe. The major hypomineralization defect in parietal, frontal, and nasal bones had mostly disappeared by postnatal day 21, but the defect in sutural areas persisted. Importantly, Doxycycline treatment eliminated cranial bone defects at birth which indicates that Cre expression may be responsible for the phenotype. In addition, we showed that the primary calvarial osteoblasts isolated from neonatal Osx-Cre mice had comparable differentiation ability compared to their littermate controls. This study reinforces the idea that Cre positive litter mates are indispensable controls in studies using conditional gene deletion. PMID:25550101

  18. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular signals in development, physiology, homeostasis and disease often act by regulating transcription. Herein we describe a general method and specific resources for determining where and when such signaling occurs in live animals and for systematically comparing the timing and extent...... extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can...

  19. First and second harmonic generation of the XAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4} (X=Zn,Cd,Hg) defect chalcopyrite compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouahrani, Tarik, E-mail: tarik_ouahrani@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Tlemcen, B.P.230,13000 Tlemcen (Algeria); Ecole Preparatoire en Sciences et Techniques, Depertement de Physique EPST-T, Tlemcen 13000 (Algeria); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique (LPQ3M), Universite de Mascara, 29000 Mascara (Algeria); Lasri, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Universite de Tlemcen, B.P.230,13000 Tlemcen (Algeria); Universite Dr Tahar Moulay de Saida, B.P. 138, Cite el Nasr, Saida 20000 (Algeria); Reshak, Ali H. [School of Complex systems, FFPW- South Bohemia University, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, Malaysia University of Perlis, P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Bouhemadou, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Setif, 19000 Setif (Algeria); Bin-Omran, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-09-15

    The chemical bonding of the ZnAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4}, CdAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and HgAl{sub 2}Se{sub 4} defect chalcopyrites has been studied in the framework of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The GW quasi-particle approximation is used to correct the DFT-underestimation of energy gap, and as a consequence the linear and nonlinear optical properties are significantly enhanced. The second harmonic generation (SHG) displays certain dependence with the ionicity degree decrease through the dependency of the SHG on the band gap. The occurrence of the AIM saddle point is characterized and some clarifying features in relationship with the density topology are exposed, which enable to understand the relation with the second harmonic generation effect.

  20. Screening strategy to generate cell specific recombination: a case report with the RIP-Cre mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Valeria; Martin, Céline; Dorchies, Emilie; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Dehondt, Hélène; Trabelsi, Mohamed-Sami; Tailleux, Anne; Caron, Sandrine; Staels, Bart

    2015-10-01

    Conditional gene knockout technology is a powerful tool to study the function of a gene in a specific tissue, organ or cell lineage. The most commonly used procedure applies the Cre-LoxP strategy, where the choice of the Cre driver promoter is critical to determine the efficiency and specificity of the system. However, a considered choice of an appropriate promoter does not always protect against the risk of unwanted recombination and the consequent deletion of the gene in other tissues than the desired one(s), due to phenomena of non-specific activation of the Cre transgene. Furthermore, the causes of these phenomena are not completely understood and this can potentially affect every strain of Cre-mice. In our study on the deletion of a same gene in two different tissues, we show that the incidence rate of non-specific recombination in unwanted tissues depends on the Cre driver strain, ranging from 100%, rendering it useless (aP2-Cre strain), to ~5%, which is still compatible with their use (RIP-Cre strain). The use of a simple PCR strategy conceived to detect this occurrence is indispensable when producing a tissue-specific knockout mouse. Therefore, when choosing the Cre-driver promoter, researchers not only have to be careful about its tissue-specificity and timing of activation, but should also include a systematical screening in order to exclude mice in which atypical recombination has occurred and to limit the unnecessary use of laboratory animals in uninterpretable experiments.

  1. A technique for the deconvolution of the pulse shape of acoustic emission signals back to the generating defect source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, J.R.; Packman, P.F.; Townsend, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    Acoustic emission signals recorded after passage through the instrumentation system can be deconvoluted to produce signal traces indicative of those at the generating source, and these traces can be used to identify characteristics of the source

  2. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Palle; Gustavsen, Carsten; Klein, Tino; Potter, Leah A.; Lin, Robert; Mullapudi, Nandita; Wandzioch, Ewa; Hines, Angela; Davis, Ashley; Bruun, Christine; Engberg, Nina; Petersen, Dorthe R.; Peterslund, Janny M. L.; MacDonald, Raymond J.; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Magnuson, Mark A.; Zaret, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Extracellular signals in development, physiology, homeostasis and disease often act by regulating transcription. Herein we describe a general method and specific resources for determining where and when such signaling occurs in live animals and for systematically comparing the timing and extent of different signals in different cellular contexts. We used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) to test the effect of successively deleting conserved genomic regions of the ubiquitously active Rosa26 promoter and substituting the deleted regions for regulatory sequences that respond to diverse extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can be adapted to any pathway that acts via DNA elements. PMID:22888097

  3. Partial promoter substitutions generating transcriptional sentinels of diverse signaling pathways in embryonic stem cells and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle Serup

    2012-11-01

    Extracellular signals in development, physiology, homeostasis and disease often act by regulating transcription. Herein we describe a general method and specific resources for determining where and when such signaling occurs in live animals and for systematically comparing the timing and extent of different signals in different cellular contexts. We used recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE to test the effect of successively deleting conserved genomic regions of the ubiquitously active Rosa26 promoter and substituting the deleted regions for regulatory sequences that respond to diverse extracellular signals. We thereby created an allelic series of embryonic stem cells and mice, each containing a signal-responsive sentinel with different fluorescent reporters that respond with sensitivity and specificity to retinoic acids, bone morphogenic proteins, activin A, Wnts or Notch, and that can be adapted to any pathway that acts via DNA elements.

  4. Disturbance of endogenous hydrogen sulfide generation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in hippocampus are involved in homocysteine-induced defect in learning and memory of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man-Hong; Tang, Ji-Ping; Zhang, Ping; Li, Xiang; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wei, Hai-Jun; Yang, Xue-Feng; Zou, Wei; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as an endogenous neuromodulator and neuroprotectant. It has been shown that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathological mechanisms of the learning and memory dysfunctions and that H2S exerts its neuroprotective role via suppressing ER stress. In the present work, we explored the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of Hcy on the formation of learning and memory, the generation of endogenous H2S, and the expression of ER stress in the hippocampus of rats. We found that intracerebroventricular injection of Hcy in rats leads to learning and memory dysfunctions in the Morris water maze and novel of object recognition test and decreases in the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous H2S generation, and the generation of endogenous H2S in the hippocampus of rats. We also showed that exposure of Hcy could up-regulate the expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CHOP, and cleaved caspase-12, which are the major mark proteins of ER stress, in the hippocampus of rats. Taken together, these results suggest that the disturbance of hippocampal endogenous H2S generation and the increase in ER stress in the hippocampus are related to Hcy-induced defect in learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Endurance performance and energy metabolism during exercise in mice with a muscle-specific defect in the control of branched-chain amino acid catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minjun; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Ishikawa, Takuya; Kadota, Yoshihiro; Terai, Chihaya; Shindo, Daichi; Morioka, Takashi; Ota, Miki; Morishita, Yukako; Ishihara, Kengo; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2017-01-01

    It is known that the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in skeletal muscle is suppressed under normal and sedentary conditions but is promoted by exercise. BCAA catabolism in muscle tissues is regulated by the branched-chain α-keto acid (BCKA) dehydrogenase complex, which is inactivated by phosphorylation by BCKA dehydrogenase kinase (BDK). In the present study, we used muscle-specific BDK deficient mice (BDK-mKO mice) to examine the effect of uncontrolled BCAA catabolism on endurance exercise performance and skeletal muscle energy metabolism. Untrained control and BDK-mKO mice showed the same performance; however, the endurance performance enhanced by 2 weeks of running training was somewhat, but significantly less in BDK-mKO mice than in control mice. Skeletal muscle of BDK-mKO mice had low levels of glycogen. Metabolome analysis showed that BCAA catabolism was greatly enhanced in the muscle of BDK-mKO mice and produced branched-chain acyl-carnitine, which induced perturbation of energy metabolism in the muscle. These results suggest that the tight regulation of BCAA catabolism in muscles is important for homeostasis of muscle energy metabolism and, at least in part, for adaptation to exercise training.

  6. Endurance performance and energy metabolism during exercise in mice with a muscle-specific defect in the control of branched-chain amino acid catabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjun Xu

    Full Text Available It is known that the catabolism of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs in skeletal muscle is suppressed under normal and sedentary conditions but is promoted by exercise. BCAA catabolism in muscle tissues is regulated by the branched-chain α-keto acid (BCKA dehydrogenase complex, which is inactivated by phosphorylation by BCKA dehydrogenase kinase (BDK. In the present study, we used muscle-specific BDK deficient mice (BDK-mKO mice to examine the effect of uncontrolled BCAA catabolism on endurance exercise performance and skeletal muscle energy metabolism. Untrained control and BDK-mKO mice showed the same performance; however, the endurance performance enhanced by 2 weeks of running training was somewhat, but significantly less in BDK-mKO mice than in control mice. Skeletal muscle of BDK-mKO mice had low levels of glycogen. Metabolome analysis showed that BCAA catabolism was greatly enhanced in the muscle of BDK-mKO mice and produced branched-chain acyl-carnitine, which induced perturbation of energy metabolism in the muscle. These results suggest that the tight regulation of BCAA catabolism in muscles is important for homeostasis of muscle energy metabolism and, at least in part, for adaptation to exercise training.

  7. Effect of maternal dietary cow’s milk on the immune response to beta-lactoglobulin in the offspring: A four generation study in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Brix; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Barkholt, Vibeke

    2005-01-01

    deviated from the response observed in the F0 and F2/F3 generations. Importantly, trace amounts of BLG detected in the commercial milk-free diet did not induce oral tolerance. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that breeding mice on an antigen-free diet for at least two generations is required to attain animals......Evaluation of immune responses to food proteins in animal models requires that the animals are not already sensitized or orally tolerized against the proteins in question. Since maternal transfer of specific immune responses has been observed, breeding of animals on an antigen-free diet for several...... generations may be necessary to obtain immunologically naive animals. METHODS: To determine the most appropriate breeding conditions of mice to be used in immunological studies on food proteins, we examined immune responses towards beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) in mice bred on a milk-containing diet (F0...

  8. Twenty-three generations of mice bidirectionally selected for open-field thigmotaxis: selection response and repeated exposure to the open field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Pia K; Ravaja, N; Ewalds-Kvist, S B M

    2006-03-01

    We examined: (a) the response to bidirectional selection for open-field (OF) thigmotaxis in mice for 23 generations and (b) the effects of repeated exposure (during 5 days) on different OF behaviors in the selectively bred high OF thigmotaxis (HOFT) and low OF thigmotaxis (LOFT) mice. A total of 2049 mice were used in the study. Prior to the testing in the selection experiment, the mice were exposed to the OF apparatus for approximately 2 min on each of 4 consecutive days. Thus, the selection was based on the scores registered on the 5th day after the four habituation periods. The HOFT mice were more thigmotactic than the LOFT mice in almost each generation. The HOFT mice also tended to rear less than the LOFT mice, which was explained by the inverse relationship between emotionality and exploratory tendencies. The lines did not generally differ in ambulation. Sex differences were found in thigmotaxis, ambulation, and rearing. In the repeated exposure experiment, the development of nine different OF behaviors across the 5 days of testing was addressed. Both lines ambulated, explored, and reared most on the 1st, 4th, and 5th days. Grooming and radial latency decreased and thigmotaxis increased linearly across the testing days. Line differences were found in ambulation, exploration, grooming, and rearing, while sex differences were manifested in ambulation and exploration. The line difference in thigmotaxis was evident only on the 5th day. Temporal changes were partially at variance with the general assumptions. OF thigmotaxis was found to be a powerful characteristic for producing two diverging lines of mice.

  9. Generation of an ABCG2GFPn-puro transgenic line - A tool to study ABCG2 expression in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orford, Michael; Mean, Richard; Lapathitis, George; Genethliou, Nicholas; Panayiotou, Elena; Panayi, Helen; Malas, Stavros

    2009-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter 2 (ABCG2) is expressed by stem cells in many organs and in stem cells of solid tumors. These cells are isolated based on the side population (SP) phenotype, a Hoechst 3342 dye efflux property believed to be conferred by ABCG2. Because of the limitations of this approach we generated transgenic mice that express Nuclear GFP (GFPn) coupled to the Puromycin-resistance gene, under the control of ABCG2 promoter/enhancer sequences. We show that ABCG2 is expressed in neural progenitors of the developing forebrain and spinal cord and in embryonic and adult endothelial cells of the brain. Using the neurosphere assay, we isolated tripotent ABCG2-expressing neural stem cells from embryonic mouse brain. This transgenic line is a powerful tool for studying the expression of ABCG2 in many tissues and for performing functional studies in different experimental settings.

  10. Generation of an ABCG2{sup GFPn-puro} transgenic line - A tool to study ABCG2 expression in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orford, Michael; Mean, Richard; Lapathitis, George; Genethliou, Nicholas; Panayiotou, Elena; Panayi, Helen [The Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Airport Avenue, No. 6, Agios Dometios 2370, Nicosia (Cyprus); Malas, Stavros, E-mail: smalas@cing.ac.cy [The Cyprus Institute of Neurology and Genetics, Airport Avenue, No. 6, Agios Dometios 2370, Nicosia (Cyprus); Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2009-06-26

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter 2 (ABCG2) is expressed by stem cells in many organs and in stem cells of solid tumors. These cells are isolated based on the side population (SP) phenotype, a Hoechst 3342 dye efflux property believed to be conferred by ABCG2. Because of the limitations of this approach we generated transgenic mice that express Nuclear GFP (GFPn) coupled to the Puromycin-resistance gene, under the control of ABCG2 promoter/enhancer sequences. We show that ABCG2 is expressed in neural progenitors of the developing forebrain and spinal cord and in embryonic and adult endothelial cells of the brain. Using the neurosphere assay, we isolated tripotent ABCG2-expressing neural stem cells from embryonic mouse brain. This transgenic line is a powerful tool for studying the expression of ABCG2 in many tissues and for performing functional studies in different experimental settings.

  11. Genotoxic effects of N-nitrosodimethylamine in somatic and generative cells of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Lovinskaya

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA was shown to have genotoxic properties in acute and subacute studies on laboratory mice. The organ-specificity of the genotoxic effect of NDMA was revealed using the Comet assay. The most sensitive organs to the action of NDMA were kidneys and liver. DNA damage in liver cells of NDMA-treated animals at doses of 4.0 and 8.0 mg/kg, increased compared to control in 6.9 and 12.5 (р < 0.001, and in kidney cells – in 8.1 and 14.2 times (р < 0.001, respectively. NDMA also showed genotoxic activity in the reproductive cells of experimental animals, causing structural disorders of synaptonemal complexes in spermatocyte. In NDMA-treated animals at a dose of 2.0 mg/kg in acute and subacute studies, the level of spermatocytes with damaged synaptonemal complexes increased statistically significantly compared to control in 6.0 and 7.0 (р < 0.05 times, respectively.

  12. Methamphetamine generates peroxynitrite and produces dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice: protective effects of peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, S Z; Crow, J P; Newport, G D; Islam, F; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    1999-08-07

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is believed to be produced by oxidative stress and free radical generation. The present study was undertaken to investigate if METH generates peroxynitrite and produces dopaminergic neurotoxicity. We also investigated if this generation of peroxynitrite can be blocked by a selective peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, 5, 10,15, 20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4'-pyridyl)porphyrinato iron III (FeTMPyP) and protect against METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Administration of METH resulted in the significant formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), an in vivo marker of peroxynitrite generation, in the striatum and also caused a significant increase in the body temperature. METH injection also caused a significant decrease in the concentration of dopamine (DA), 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) by 76%, 53% and 40%, respectively, in the striatum compared with the control group. Treatment with FeTMPyP blocked the formation of 3-NT by 66% when compared with the METH group. FeTMPyP treatment also provided significant protection against the METH-induced hyperthermia and depletion of DA, DOPAC and HVA. Administration of FeTMPyP alone neither resulted in 3-NT formation nor had any significant effect on DA or its metabolite concentrations. These findings indicate that peroxynitrite plays a role in METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity and also suggests that peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts may be beneficial for the management of psychostimulant abuse. Copyright 1999 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  13. Three-photon excited PL spectroscopy and photo-generated Frenkel defects in wide-bandgap layered CdI2 semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    We performed a three-photon excitation nonlinear photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy in single crystals of wide-bandgap semiconductors (WBSs). The crystal temperature (T L )-dependent PL emission intensity (I PL ) excited with different excitation power density (P) was measured. The PL emissions showed characteristics I PL with their maxima at around 520 nm. The I PL might be due to the presence of the photo-generated Frenkel defects (FDs) in WBSs. A detailed analysis of the PL spectra showed a third-order power law dependence of the maximum I PL on P for all the crystal temperature T L . The I PL was found to increase with decreasing T L . The results demonstrated the existence of the self-trapped excitons resulting from the presence of the FDs in the crystals.

  14. Three-photon excited PL spectroscopy and photo-generated Frenkel defects in wide-bandgap layered CdI{sub 2} semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Qeensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)] [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-12-14

    We performed a three-photon excitation nonlinear photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy in single crystals of wide-bandgap semiconductors (WBSs). The crystal temperature (T{sub L})-dependent PL emission intensity (I{sub PL}) excited with different excitation power density (P) was measured. The PL emissions showed characteristics I{sub PL} with their maxima at around 520 nm. The I{sub PL} might be due to the presence of the photo-generated Frenkel defects (FDs) in WBSs. A detailed analysis of the PL spectra showed a third-order power law dependence of the maximum I{sub PL} on P for all the crystal temperature T{sub L}. The I{sub PL} was found to increase with decreasing T{sub L}. The results demonstrated the existence of the self-trapped excitons resulting from the presence of the FDs in the crystals.

  15. Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation enhances adaptability to exercise training of mice with a muscle-specific defect in the control of BCAA catabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minjun; Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Shindo, Daichi; Shimomura, Yoshiharu

    2018-03-01

    Branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) kinase (BDK) suppresses the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) catabolism by inactivation of the BCKDH complex. The muscle-specific BDK-deficient (BDK-mKO) mice showed accelerated BCAA oxidation in muscle and decreased endurance capacity after training (Xu et al. PLoS One. 12 (2017) e0180989). We here report that BCAA supplementation overcompensated endurance capacity in BDK-mKO mice after training.

  16. Music exposure induced prolongation of cardiac allograft survival and generated regulatory CD4⁺ cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, M; Jin, X; Zhang, Q; Amano, A; Watanabe, T; Niimi, M

    2012-05-01

    In clinical practice, music has been used to decrease stress, heart rate, and blood pressure and to provide a distraction from disease symptoms. We investigated sound effects on alloimmune responses in murine heart transplantation. Naïve and eardrum-ruptured CBA/N (CBA, H2(K)) underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6, H2(b)) heart and were exposed to 1 of 3 types of music-opera (La Traviata), classical (Mozart), and New Age (Enya)-or 1 of 6 different single sound frequencies for 7 days. An adoptive transfer study was performed to determine whether regulatory cells were generated in allograft recipients. Cell-proliferation, cytokine, and flow cytometry assessments were also performed. CBA recipients of a B6 graft exposed to opera and classical music had significantly prolonged allograft survival (median survival times [MSTs], 26.5 and 20 days, respectively), whereas those exposed to 6 single sound frequencies and New Age did not (MSTs, 7, 8, 9, 8, 8, 8, and 11 days, respectively). Untreated and eardrum-ruptured CBA rejected B6 grafts acutely (MSTs, 7 and 8.5 days, respectively). Adoptive transfer of whole splenocytes, CD4(+) cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+) cells from opera-exposed primary recipients resulted in significantly prolonged allograft survival in naive secondary recipients (MSTs, 36, 68, and >50 days, respectively). Cell-proliferation, interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon-γ were suppressed in opera-exposed mice, whereas IL-4 and IL-10 from opera-exposed recipients were up-regulated. Flow cytometry studies showed an increased CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cell population in splenocytes from opera-exposed mice. In conclusion, exposure to some types of music may induce prolonged survival of fully allogeneic cardiac allografts and generate CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Defect modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norgett, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    Calculations, drawing principally on developments at AERE Harwell, of the relaxation about lattice defects are reviewed with emphasis on the techniques required for such calculations. The principles of defect modelling are outlined and various programs developed for defect simulations are discussed. Particular calculations for metals, ionic crystals and oxides, are considered. (UK)

  18. Use of self-organizing maps for classification of defects in the tubes from the steam generator of nuclear power plants; Classificacao de defeitos em tubos de gerador de vapor de plantas nucleares utilizando mapas auto-organizaveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Roberto Navarro de

    2002-07-01

    This thesis obtains a new classification method for different steam generator tube defects in nuclear power plants using Eddy Current Test signals. The method uses self-organizing maps to compare different signal characteristics efficiency to identify and classify these defects. A multiple inference system is proposed which composes the different extracted characteristic trained maps classification to infer the final defect type. The feature extraction methods used are the Wavelet zero-crossings representation, the linear predictive coding (LPC), and other basic signal representations on time like module and phase. Many characteristic vectors are obtained with combinations of these extracted characteristics. These vectors are tested to classify the defects and the best ones are applied to the multiple inference system. A systematic study of pre-processing, calibration and analysis methods for the steam generator tube defect signals in nuclear power plants is done. The method efficiency is demonstrated and characteristic maps with the main prototypes are obtained for each steam generator tube defect type. (author)

  19. Histopathological changes of renal tissue following sodium fluoride administration in two consecutive generations of mice. Correlation with the urinary elimination of fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimcevici Poesina, Nicoleta; Bălălău, Cristian; Nimigean, Vanda Roxana; Nimigean, Victor; Ion, Ion; Baconi, Daniela; Bârcă, Maria; Băran Poesina, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the toxic effects (evaluated as histopathological changes) of sodium fluoride on the kidney in two consecutive generations of NMRI mice. An attempt to correlate the toxicity with the urinary elimination of fluoride has been made, as urinary fluoride excretion has been widely used as an indicator of fluoride intake and exposure. Six mixed (males and females) animal groups have been constituted by dividing the populations of mice derived from pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.5 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.5 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage and pregnant females (named "mothers" 0.25 mg sodium fluoride) treated with 0.25 mg sodium fluoride by daily gavage; three types of sodium fluoride treatments were administrated: homeopathic, allopathic-homeopathic and allopathic. When the animals reached the adulthood, by randomization, they were selected in pairs for giving birth to the second generation of mice. No treatments were administrated to the second generation of mice; thus, the urinary elimination of fluoride in the second generation is attributed to exposure at sodium fluoride before birth. The administration of sodium fluoride to the first generation (F1) is realized until the mice reached the adulthood. For the first generation, the urine was collected at three times, every three weeks: at the age of four weeks, seven weeks and 11 weeks; single sampling urine, at the age of four weeks, has been conducted for the second generation. The urine samples have been analyzed using the ion selective electrode method for fluoride. For the histopathological examination, the animals were killed by cervical dislocation; the kidneys were collected in a 10% formalin solution. The preparation of samples for optical microscopy was realized with Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The results indicate that the elimination of fluoride was similar (at the second evaluation, at 7-week-old of the first generation) for the both generations

  20. Lupus-prone NZBWF1/J mice, defective in cytokine signaling, are resistant to fumonisin hepatotoxicity despite accumulation of liver sphinganine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Raghubir P [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7389 (United States); Quanren, He [Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-7389 (United States); Riley, Ronald T [Toxicology and Mycotoxin Research Unit, USDA-ARS, Athens, GA 30604 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Fumonisin B{sub 1} (FB{sub 1}) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides, commonly present in corn and other cereals. Exposure to FB{sub 1} causes organ-specific diseases in various species, e.g., equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary edema; in mice the response is hepatotoxicity. We earlier reported that ceramide synthase inhibition by FB{sub 1}, the initial biochemical effect of this mycotoxin, results in modulation of cytokine network in response to accumulated free sphingoid bases. In the current study we used NZB/NZW-F1 (NZBW) mice that have modified cytokine expression and develop lupus beginning at 5 months of age. The NZBW and C57BL/6J (CBL) mice (appropriate control) were given five daily subcutaneous injections of either saline or 2.25 mg FB{sub 1}/kg/day and euthanized 24 h after the last treatment. Peripheral leukocyte counts were higher after exposure to FB{sub 1} in CBL but not in NZBW. FB{sub 1} treatment caused increases of plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity in CBL mice indicating hepatotoxicity; no elevation of circulating liver enzymes was recorded in NZBW mice. Hepatotoxic responses were confirmed by microscopic evaluation of apoptotic cells. The FB{sub 1}-induced proliferation of cells observed in CBL strain was abolished in NZBW animals. The sphinganine accumulation in liver after FB{sub 1} was equal in both strains of mice. The NZBW strain lacked the FB{sub 1}-induced increases in the expression of liver tumor necrosis factor {alpha}, interferon {gamma}, receptor interacting protein (RIP), and tumor necrosis factor {alpha}-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), observed in CBL. Results confirmed our hypothesis that initial altered sphingolipid metabolism caused by FB{sub 1} leads to perturbation of liver cytokine network and ultimate cellular injury; the mice deficient in cytokine signaling are refractory to FB{sub 1} hepatotoxicity.

  1. Lupus-prone NZBWF1/J mice, defective in cytokine signaling, are resistant to fumonisin hepatotoxicity despite accumulation of liver sphinganine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Raghubir P.; He Quanren; Riley, Ronald T.

    2005-01-01

    Fumonisin B 1 (FB 1 ) is a mycotoxin produced by Fusarium verticillioides, commonly present in corn and other cereals. Exposure to FB 1 causes organ-specific diseases in various species, e.g., equine leukoencephalomalacia and porcine pulmonary edema; in mice the response is hepatotoxicity. We earlier reported that ceramide synthase inhibition by FB 1 , the initial biochemical effect of this mycotoxin, results in modulation of cytokine network in response to accumulated free sphingoid bases. In the current study we used NZB/NZW-F1 (NZBW) mice that have modified cytokine expression and develop lupus beginning at 5 months of age. The NZBW and C57BL/6J (CBL) mice (appropriate control) were given five daily subcutaneous injections of either saline or 2.25 mg FB 1 /kg/day and euthanized 24 h after the last treatment. Peripheral leukocyte counts were higher after exposure to FB 1 in CBL but not in NZBW. FB 1 treatment caused increases of plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity in CBL mice indicating hepatotoxicity; no elevation of circulating liver enzymes was recorded in NZBW mice. Hepatotoxic responses were confirmed by microscopic evaluation of apoptotic cells. The FB 1 -induced proliferation of cells observed in CBL strain was abolished in NZBW animals. The sphinganine accumulation in liver after FB 1 was equal in both strains of mice. The NZBW strain lacked the FB 1 -induced increases in the expression of liver tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, receptor interacting protein (RIP), and tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), observed in CBL. Results confirmed our hypothesis that initial altered sphingolipid metabolism caused by FB 1 leads to perturbation of liver cytokine network and ultimate cellular injury; the mice deficient in cytokine signaling are refractory to FB 1 hepatotoxicity

  2. Live vaccinia-rabies virus recombinants, but not an inactivated rabies virus cell culture vaccine, protect B-lymphocyte-deficient A/WySnJ mice against rabies: considerations of recombinant defective poxviruses for rabies immunization of immunocompromised individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodmell, Donald L; Esposito, Joseph J; Ewalt, Larry C

    2004-09-03

    Presently, commercially available cell culture rabies vaccines for humans and animals consist of the five inactivated rabies virus proteins. The vaccines elicit a CD4+ helper T-cell response and a humoral B-cell response against the viral glycoprotein (G) resulting in the production of virus neutralizing antibody. Antibody against the viral nucleoprotein (N) is also present, but the mechanism(s) of its protection is unclear. HIV-infected individuals with low CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and individuals undergoing treatment with immunosuppressive drugs have an impaired neutralizing antibody response after pre- and post-exposure immunization with rabies cell culture vaccines. Here we show the efficacy of live vaccinia-rabies virus recombinants, but not a cell culture vaccine consisting of inactivated rabies virus, to elicit elevated levels of neutralizing antibody in B-lymphocyte deficient A/WySnJ mice. The cell culture vaccine also failed to protect the mice, whereas a single immunization of a vaccinia recombinant expressing the rabies virus G or co-expressing G and N equally protected the mice up to 18 months after vaccination. The data suggest that recombinant poxviruses expressing the rabies virus G, in particular replication defective poxviruses such as canarypox or MVA vaccinia virus that undergo abortive replication in non-avian cells, or the attenuated vaccinia virus NYVAC, should be evaluated as rabies vaccines in immunocompromised individuals.

  3. Islet-like cell aggregates generated from human adipose tissue derived stem cells ameliorate experimental diabetes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikash Chandra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus is caused by auto immune destruction of insulin producing beta cells in the pancreas. Currently available treatments include transplantation of isolated islets from donor pancreas to the patient. However, this method is limited by inadequate means of immuno-suppression to prevent islet rejection and importantly, limited supply of islets for transplantation. Autologous adult stem cells are now considered for cell replacement therapy in diabetes as it has the potential to generate neo-islets which are genetically part of the treated individual. Adopting methods of islet encapsulation in immuno-isolatory devices would eliminate the need for immuno-suppressants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we explore the potential of human adipose tissue derived adult stem cells (h-ASCs to differentiate into functional islet like cell aggregates (ICAs. Our stage specific differentiation protocol permit the conversion of mesodermic h-ASCs to definitive endoderm (Hnf3β, TCF2 and Sox17 and to PDX1, Ngn3, NeuroD, Pax4 positive pancreatic endoderm which further matures in vitro to secrete insulin. These ICAs are shown to produce human C-peptide in a glucose dependent manner exhibiting in-vitro functionality. Transplantation of mature ICAs, packed in immuno-isolatory biocompatible capsules to STZ induced diabetic mice restored near normoglycemia within 3-4 weeks. The detection of human C-peptide, 1155±165 pM in blood serum of experimental mice demonstrate the efficacy of our differentiation approach. CONCLUSIONS: h-ASC is an ideal population of personal stem cells for cell replacement therapy, given that they are abundant, easily available and autologous in origin. Our findings present evidence that h-ASCs could be induced to differentiate into physiologically competent functional islet like cell aggregates, which may provide as a source of alternative islets for cell replacement therapy in type 1 diabetes.

  4. Effect of BaSi2 template growth duration on the generation of defects and performance of p-BaSi2/n-Si heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachi, Suguru; Takabe, Ryota; Deng, Tianguo; Toko, Kaoru; Suemasu, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the effect of BaSi2 template growth duration (t RDE = 0-20 min) on the defect generation and performance of p-BaSi2/n-Si heterojunction solar cells. The p-BaSi2 layer grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) was 15 nm thick with a hole concentration of 2 × 1018 cm-3. The conversion efficiency η increased for films grown at long t RDE, owing to improvements of the open-circuit voltage (V OC) and fill factor (FF), reaching a maximum of η = 8.9% at t RDE = 7.5 min. However, η decreased at longer and shorter t RDE owing to lower V OC and FF. Using deep-level transient spectroscopy, we detected a hole trap level 190 meV above the valence band maximum for the sample grown without the template (t RDE = 0 min). An electron trap level 106 meV below the conduction band minimum was detected for a sample grown with t RDE = 20 min. The trap densities for both films were (1-2) × 1013 cm-3. The former originated from the diffusion of Ba into the n-Si region; the latter originated from defects in the template layer. The crystalline qualities of the template and MBE-grown layers were discussed. The root-mean-square surface roughness of the template reached a minimum of 0.51 nm at t RDE = 7.5 min. The a-axis orientation of p-BaSi2 thin films degraded as t RDE exceeded 10 min. In terms of p-BaSi2 crystalline quality and solar cell performance, the optimum t RDE was determined to be 7.5 min, corresponding to approximately 4 nm in thickness.

  5. Disruption of the regulatory beta subunit of protein kinase CK2 in mice leads to a cell-autonomous defect and early embryonic lethality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchou, Thierry; Vernet, Muriel; Blond, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    in mice leads to postimplantation lethality. Mutant embryos were reduced in size at embryonic day 6.5 (E6.5). They did not exhibit signs of apoptosis but did show reduced cell proliferation. Mutant embryos were resorbed at E7.5. In vitro, CK2beta(-/-) morula development stopped after the blastocyst stage...

  6. Defective insulin signaling pathway and increased glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in the brain of diabetic mice: parallels with Alzheimer's disease and correction by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolivalt, C G; Lee, C A; Beiswenger, K K; Smith, J L; Orlov, M; Torrance, M A; Masliah, E

    2008-11-15

    We have evaluated the effect of peripheral insulin deficiency on brain insulin pathway activity in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes, the parallels with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the effect of treatment with insulin. Nine weeks of insulin-deficient diabetes significantly impaired the learning capacity of mice, significantly reduced insulin-degrading enzyme protein expression, and significantly reduced phosphorylation of the insulin-receptor and AKT. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) was also significantly decreased, indicating increased GSK3 activity. This evidence of reduced insulin signaling was associated with a concomitant increase in tau phosphorylation and amyloid beta protein levels. Changes in phosphorylation levels of insulin receptor, GSK3, and tau were not observed in the brain of db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes, after a similar duration (8 weeks) of diabetes. Treatment with insulin from onset of diabetes partially restored the phosphorylation of insulin receptor and of GSK3, partially reduced the level of phosphorylated tau in the brain, and partially improved learning ability in insulin-deficient diabetic mice. Our data indicate that mice with systemic insulin deficiency display evidence of reduced insulin signaling pathway activity in the brain that is associated with biochemical and behavioral features of AD and that it can be corrected by insulin treatment.

  7. Dioxin-induced retardation of development through a reduction in the expression of pituitary hormones and possible involvement of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor in this defect: A comparative study using two strains of mice with different sensitivities to dioxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Tomoki; Taura, Junki; Hattori, Yukiko; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    We have previously revealed that treating pregnant rats with 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) reduces the expression of gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) in the fetal and neonatal pituitary. A change in gonadotropin expression impairs the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in perinatal pups, and imprint defects in sexual behavior after reaching maturity. In this study, we examined whether TCDD also affects the expression of gonadotropin and GH in mice using C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains which express the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) exhibiting a different affinity for TCDD. When pregnant C57BL/6J mice at gestational day (GD) 12 were given oral TCDD (0.2–20 μg/kg), all doses significantly attenuated the pituitary expression of gonadotropin mRNAs in fetuses at GD18. On the other hand, in DBA/2J mice, a much higher dose of TCDD (20 μg/kg) was needed to produce a significant attenuation. Such reduction in the C57BL/6J strain continued until at least postnatal day (PND) 4. In agreement with this, TCDD reduced the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in C57BL/6J neonates at PND2 and 4, although the same did not occur in the fetal testis and ovary. Furthermore, TCDD reduced the perinatal expression of GH, litter size and the body weight of newborn pups only in the C57BL/6J strain. These results suggest that 1) also in mice, maternal exposure to TCDD attenuates gonadotropin-regulated steroidogenesis and GH expression leading to the impairment of pup development and sexual immaturity; and 2) Ahr activation during the late fetal and early postnatal stages is required for these defects. - Highlights: • The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on mouse growth was studied. • TCDD reduced the levels of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone in perinatal pups. • Maternal exposure to TCDD also attenuated testicular steroidogenesis in pups. • The above effects of TCDD were more pronounced in C57BL/6J than in DBA/2J

  8. Dioxin-induced retardation of development through a reduction in the expression of pituitary hormones and possible involvement of an aryl hydrocarbon receptor in this defect: A comparative study using two strains of mice with different sensitivities to dioxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Tomoki; Taura, Junki; Hattori, Yukiko; Ishii, Yuji; Yamada, Hideyuki, E-mail: hyamada@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2014-08-01

    We have previously revealed that treating pregnant rats with 2,3,7,8-tetracholorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) reduces the expression of gonadotropins and growth hormone (GH) in the fetal and neonatal pituitary. A change in gonadotropin expression impairs the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in perinatal pups, and imprint defects in sexual behavior after reaching maturity. In this study, we examined whether TCDD also affects the expression of gonadotropin and GH in mice using C57BL/6J and DBA/2J strains which express the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) exhibiting a different affinity for TCDD. When pregnant C57BL/6J mice at gestational day (GD) 12 were given oral TCDD (0.2–20 μg/kg), all doses significantly attenuated the pituitary expression of gonadotropin mRNAs in fetuses at GD18. On the other hand, in DBA/2J mice, a much higher dose of TCDD (20 μg/kg) was needed to produce a significant attenuation. Such reduction in the C57BL/6J strain continued until at least postnatal day (PND) 4. In agreement with this, TCDD reduced the testicular expression of steroidogenic proteins in C57BL/6J neonates at PND2 and 4, although the same did not occur in the fetal testis and ovary. Furthermore, TCDD reduced the perinatal expression of GH, litter size and the body weight of newborn pups only in the C57BL/6J strain. These results suggest that 1) also in mice, maternal exposure to TCDD attenuates gonadotropin-regulated steroidogenesis and GH expression leading to the impairment of pup development and sexual immaturity; and 2) Ahr activation during the late fetal and early postnatal stages is required for these defects. - Highlights: • The effect of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) on mouse growth was studied. • TCDD reduced the levels of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone in perinatal pups. • Maternal exposure to TCDD also attenuated testicular steroidogenesis in pups. • The above effects of TCDD were more pronounced in C57BL/6J than in DBA/2J

  9. Influence of radiofrequency-electromagnetic waves from 3rd-generation cellular phones on fertilization and embryo development in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Okutsu, Miho; Suganuma, Ryota; Komiya, Hiromi; Nakatani-Enomoto, Setsu; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Ugawa, Yoshikazu; Tateno, Hiroyuki; Fujimori, Keiya

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 3rd-generation (3G) cellular phone radiofrequency-electromagnetic wave (RF-EMW) exposure on fertilization and embryogenesis in mice. Oocytes and spermatozoa were exposed to 3G cellular phone RF-EMWs, 1.95 GHz wideband code division multiple access, at a specific absorption rate of 2 mW/g for 60 min, or to sham exposure. After RF-EMW exposure, in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection were performed. Rates of fertilization, embryogenesis (8-cell embryo, blastocyst), and chromosome aberration were compared between the combined spermatozoa and oocyte groups: both exposed, both non-exposed, one exposed, and the other non-exposed. Rates of fertilization, embryogenesis, and blastocyst formation did not change significantly across the four groups. Considering that the degree of exposure in the present study was ≥100 times greater than daily exposure of human spermatozoa and even greater than daily exposure of oocytes, the present results indicate safety of RF-EMW exposure in humans. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:466-473, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hydroxysteroid (17β)-dehydrogenase 1-deficient female mice present with normal puberty onset but are severely subfertile due to a defect in luteinization and progesterone production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Janne; Jokela, Heli; Pakarinen, Pirjo; Heikelä, Hanna; Kätkänaho, Laura; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Ohlsson, Claes; Zhang, Fu-Ping; Poutanen, Matti

    2015-09-01

    Hydroxysteroid (17β)-dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD17B1) catalyzes the conversion of low active 17-ketosteroids, androstenedione (A-dione) and estrone (E1) to highly active 17-hydroxysteroids, testosterone (T) and E2, respectively. In this study, the importance of HSD17B1 in ovarian estrogen production was determined using Hsd17b1 knockout (HSD17B1KO) mice. In these mice, the ovarian HSD17B enzyme activity was markedly reduced, indicating a central role of HSD17B1 in ovarian physiology. The lack of Hsd17b activity resulted in increased ovarian E1:E2 and A-dione:T ratios, but we also observed reduced progesterone concentration in HSD17B1KO ovaries. Accordingly with the altered steroid production, altered expression of Star, Cyp11a1, Lhcgr, Hsd17b7, and especially Cyp17a1 was observed. The ovaries of HSD17B1KO mice presented with all stages of folliculogenesis, while the corpus luteum structure was less defined and number reduced. Surprisingly, bundles of large granular cells of unknown origin appeared in the stroma of the KO ovaries. The HSD17B1KO mice presented with severe subfertility and failed to initiate pseudopregnancy. However, the HSD17B1KO females presented with normal estrous cycle defined by vaginal smears and normal puberty appearance. This study indicates that HSD17B1 is a key enzyme in ovarian steroidogenesis and has a novel function in initiation and stabilization of pregnancy. © FASEB.

  11. Anxiety and depression with neurogenesis defects in exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2-deficient mice are ameliorated by a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, Prozac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L; Ma, S L; Yeung, P K K; Wong, Y H; Tsim, K W K; So, K F; Lam, L C W; Chung, S K

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular cAMP and serotonin are important modulators of anxiety and depression. Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) also known as Prozac, is widely used against depression, potentially by activating cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through protein kinase A (PKA). However, the role of Epac1 and Epac2 (Rap guanine nucleotide exchange factors, RAPGEF3 and RAPGEF4, respectively) as potential downstream targets of SSRI/cAMP in mood regulations is not yet clear. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of Epac1 (Epac1−/−) or Epac2 (Epac2−/−) knockout mice by comparing them with their wild-type counterparts. Surprisingly, Epac2−/− mice exhibited a wide range of mood disorders, including anxiety and depression with learning and memory deficits in contextual and cued fear-conditioning tests without affecting Epac1 expression or PKA activity. Interestingly, rs17746510, one of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in RAPGEF4 associated with cognitive decline in Chinese Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, was significantly correlated with apathy and mood disturbance, whereas no significant association was observed between RAPGEF3 SNPs and the risk of AD or neuropsychiatric inventory scores. To further determine the detailed role of Epac2 in SSRI/serotonin/cAMP-involved mood disorders, we treated Epac2−/− mice with a SSRI, Prozac. The alteration in open field behavior and impaired hippocampal cell proliferation in Epac2−/− mice were alleviated by Prozac. Taken together, Epac2 gene polymorphism is a putative risk factor for mood disorders in AD patients in part by affecting the hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:27598965

  12. Defect induced intermittency in the transit time dynamics generates 1/f noise in a trimer described by the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pando L, C.L.; Doedel, E.J.

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the nonlinear dynamics in a trimer, described by the one-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation (DNLSE), with periodic boundary conditions in the presence of a single on-site defect. We make use of numerical continuation to study different families of stationary and periodic solutions, which allows us to consider suitable perturbations. Taking into account a Poincare section, we are able to study the dynamics in both a thin stochastic layer solution and a global stochasticity solution. We find that the time series of the transit times, the time intervals to traverse some suitable sets in phase space, generate 1/f noise for both stochastic solutions. In the case of the thin stochastic layer solution, we find that transport between two almost invariant sets along with intermittency in small and large time scales are relevant features of the dynamics. These results are reflected in the behaviour of the standard map with suitable parameters. In both chaotic solutions, the distribution of transit times has a maximum and a tail with exponential decay in spite of the presence of long-range correlations in the time series. We motivate our study by considering a ring of weakly-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) with attractive interactions, where inversion of populations between two spatially symmetric sites and phase locking take place in both chaotic solutions. (author)

  13. Anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice: evidence for induced structural and functional sperm defects after short-, but not long-, term exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Smith

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 nanoparticles (TNPs are widely used commercially and exist in a variety of products. To determine if anatase TNPs (ATNPs in doses smaller than previously used reach the scrotum after entry in the body at a distant location and induce sperm defects, 100% ATNP (2.5 or 5 mg kg−1 body weight was administered intraperitoneally to adult males for three consecutive days, followed by sacrifice 1, 2, 3, or 5 weeks later (long- or 24, 48 or 120 h (short-term exposure. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of ANTP in scrotal adipose tissues collected 120 h postinjection when cytokine evaluation showed an inflammatory response in epididymal tissues and fluid. At 120 h and up to 3 weeks postinjection, testicular histology revealed enlarged interstitial spaces. Significantly increased numbers of terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive (apoptotic germ (P = 0.002 and interstitial space cells (P = 0.04 were detected in treated males. Caudal epididymal sperm from the short-term, but not a long-term, arm showed significantly (P < 0.001 increased frequencies of flagellar abnormalities, excess residual cytoplasm (ERC, and unreacted acrosomes in treated versus controls (dose-response relationship. A novel correlation between ERC and unreacted acrosomes was uncovered. At 120 h, there were significant decreases in hyperactivated motility (P < 0.001 and mitochondrial membrane potential (P < 0.05, and increased reactive oxygen species levels (P < 0.00001 in treated versus control sperm. These results indicate that at 4-8 days postinjection, ANTP induce structural and functional sperm defects associated with infertility, and DNA damage via oxidative stress. Sperm defects were transient as they were not detected 10 days to 5 weeks postinjection.

  14. Anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice: evidence for induced structural and functional sperm defects after short-, but not long-, term exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle A; Michael, Rowan; Aravindan, Rolands G; Dash, Soma; Shah, Syed I; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (TNPs) are widely used commercially and exist in a variety of products. To determine if anatase TNPs (ATNPs) in doses smaller than previously used reach the scrotum after entry in the body at a distant location and induce sperm defects, 100% ATNP (2.5 or 5 mg kg−1 body weight) was administered intraperitoneally to adult males for three consecutive days, followed by sacrifice 1, 2, 3, or 5 weeks later (long-) or 24, 48 or 120 h (short-term exposure). Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of ANTP in scrotal adipose tissues collected 120 h postinjection when cytokine evaluation showed an inflammatory response in epididymal tissues and fluid. At 120 h and up to 3 weeks postinjection, testicular histology revealed enlarged interstitial spaces. Significantly increased numbers of terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive (apoptotic) germ (P = 0.002) and interstitial space cells (P = 0.04) were detected in treated males. Caudal epididymal sperm from the short-term, but not a long-term, arm showed significantly (P < 0.001) increased frequencies of flagellar abnormalities, excess residual cytoplasm (ERC), and unreacted acrosomes in treated versus controls (dose-response relationship). A novel correlation between ERC and unreacted acrosomes was uncovered. At 120 h, there were significant decreases in hyperactivated motility (P < 0.001) and mitochondrial membrane potential (P < 0.05), and increased reactive oxygen species levels (P < 0.00001) in treated versus control sperm. These results indicate that at 4–8 days postinjection, ANTP induce structural and functional sperm defects associated with infertility, and DNA damage via oxidative stress. Sperm defects were transient as they were not detected 10 days to 5 weeks postinjection. PMID:25370207

  15. Defective cancellous bone structure and abnormal response to PTH in cortical bone of mice lacking Cx43 cytoplasmic C-terminus domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Davis, Hannah M.; Sorenson, Chad; Hon, Mary C.; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D.; Allen, Matthew R.; Bellido, Teresita; Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2015-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) forms gap junction channels and hemichannels that allow the communication among osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Cx43 carboxy-terminal (CT) domain regulates channel opening and intracellular signaling by acting as a scaffold for structural and signaling proteins. To determine the role of Cx43 CT domain in bone, mice in which one allele of full length Cx43 was replaced by a mutant lacking the CT domain (Cx43ΔCT/fl) were studied. Cx43ΔCT/fl mice exhibit lower cancellous bone volume but higher cortical thickness than Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating that the CT domain is involved in normal cancellous bone gain but opposes cortical bone acquisition. Further, Cx43ΔCT is able to exert the functions of full length osteocytic Cx43 on cortical bone geometry and mechanical properties, demonstrating that domains other than the CT are responsible for Cx43 function in cortical bone. In addition, parathyroid hormone (PTH) failed to increase endocortical bone formation or energy to failure, a mechanical property that indicates resistance to fracture, in cortical bone in Cx43ΔCT mice with or without osteocytic full length Cx43. On the other hand, bone mass and bone formation markers were increased by the hormone in all mouse models, regardless of whether full length or Cx43ΔCT were or not expressed. We conclude that Cx43 CT domain is involved in proper bone acquisition; and that Cx43 expression in osteocytes is dispensable for some but not all PTH anabolic actions. PMID:26409319

  16. Spontaneous generation of rapidly transmissible prions in transgenic mice expressing wild-type bank vole prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Stöhr, Jan; Oehler, Abby; Bhardwaj, Sumita; Grillo, Sunny K; Patel, Smita; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2012-02-28

    Currently, there are no animal models of the most common human prion disorder, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), in which prions are formed spontaneously from wild-type (WT) prion protein (PrP). Interestingly, bank voles (BV) exhibit an unprecedented promiscuity for diverse prion isolates, arguing that bank vole PrP (BVPrP) may be inherently prone to adopting misfolded conformations. Therefore, we constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing WT BVPrP. Tg(BVPrP) mice developed spontaneous CNS dysfunction between 108 and 340 d of age and recapitulated the hallmarks of prion disease, including spongiform degeneration, pronounced astrogliosis, and deposition of alternatively folded PrP in the brain. Brain homogenates of ill Tg(BVPrP) mice transmitted disease to Tg(BVPrP) mice in ∼35 d, to Tg mice overexpressing mouse PrP in under 100 d, and to WT mice in ∼185 d. Our studies demonstrate experimentally that WT PrP can spontaneously form infectious prions in vivo. Thus, Tg(BVPrP) mice may be useful for studying the spontaneous formation of prions, and thus may provide insight into the etiology of sporadic CJD.

  17. Prostaglandin F2alpha- and FAS-activating antibody-induced regression of the corpus luteum involves caspase-8 and is defective in caspase-3 deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavell Richard A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We recently demonstrated that caspase-3 is important for apoptosis during spontaneous involution of the corpus luteum (CL. These studies tested if prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α or FAS regulated luteal regression, utilize a caspase-3 dependent pathway to execute luteal cell apoptosis, and if the two receptors work via independent or potentially shared intracellular signaling components/pathways to activate caspase-3. Wild-type (WT or caspase-3 deficient female mice, 25–26 days old, were given 10 IU equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG intraperitoneally (IP followed by 10 IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG IP 46 h later to synchronize ovulation. The animals were then injected with IgG (2 micrograms, i.v., the FAS-activating antibody Jo2 (2 micrograms, i.v., or PGF2α (10 micrograms, i.p. at 24 or 48 h post-ovulation. Ovaries from each group were collected 8 h later for assessment of active caspase-3 enzyme and apoptosis (measured by the TUNEL assay in the CL. Regardless of genotype or treatment, CL in ovaries collected from mice injected 24 h after ovulation showed no evidence of active caspase-3 or apoptosis. However, PGF2α or Jo2 at 48 h post-ovulation and collected 8 h later induced caspase-3 activation in 13.2 ± 1.8% and 13.7 ± 2.2 % of the cells, respectively and resulted in 16.35 ± 0.7% (PGF2α and 14.3 ± 2.5% TUNEL-positive cells when compared to 1.48 ± 0.8% of cells CL in IgG treated controls. In contrast, CL in ovaries collected from caspase-3 deficient mice whether treated with PGF2α , Jo2, or control IgG at 48 h post-ovulation showed little evidence of active caspase-3 or apoptosis. CL of WT mice treated with Jo2 at 48 h post-ovulation had an 8-fold increase in the activity of caspase-8, an activator of caspase-3 that is coupled to the FAS death receptor. Somewhat unexpectedly, however, treatment of WT mice with PGF2α at 48 h post-ovulation resulted in a 22-fold increase in caspase-8 activity in the CL, despite the fact

  18. Combining the 3D model generated from point clouds and thermography to identify the defects presented on the facades of a building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yishuo; Chiang, Chih-Hung; Hsu, Keng-Tsang

    2018-03-01

    Defects presented on the facades of a building do have profound impacts on extending the life cycle of the building. How to identify the defects is a crucial issue; destructive and non-destructive methods are usually employed to identify the defects presented on a building. Destructive methods always cause the permanent damages for the examined objects; on the other hand, non-destructive testing (NDT) methods have been widely applied to detect those defects presented on exterior layers of a building. However, NDT methods cannot provide efficient and reliable information for identifying the defects because of the huge examination areas. Infrared thermography is often applied to quantitative energy performance measurements for building envelopes. Defects on the exterior layer of buildings may be caused by several factors: ventilation losses, conduction losses, thermal bridging, defective services, moisture condensation, moisture ingress, and structure defects. Analyzing the collected thermal images can be quite difficult when the spatial variations of surface temperature are small. In this paper the authors employ image segmentation to cluster those pixels with similar surface temperatures such that the processed thermal images can be composed of limited groups. The surface temperature distribution in each segmented group is homogenous. In doing so, the regional boundaries of the segmented regions can be identified and extracted. A terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is widely used to collect the point clouds of a building, and those point clouds are applied to reconstruct the 3D model of the building. A mapping model is constructed such that the segmented thermal images can be projected onto the 2D image of the specified 3D building. In this paper, the administrative building in Chaoyang University campus is used as an example. The experimental results not only provide the defect information but also offer their corresponding spatial locations in the 3D model.

  19. Comparative efficacy and immunogenicity of replication-defective, recombinant glycoprotein, and DNA vaccines for herpes simplex virus 2 infections in mice and guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Yo; Dalai, Sarat K; Wang, Kening; Pesnicak, Lesley; Lau, Tsz Y; Knipe, David M; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Straus, Stephen E

    2005-01-01

    Many candidate vaccines are effective in animal models of genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infection. Among them, clinical trials showed moderate protection from genital disease with recombinant HSV-2 glycoprotein D (gD2) in alum-monophosphoryl lipid A adjuvant only in HSV women seronegative for both HSV-1 and HSV-2, encouraging development of additional vaccine options. Therefore, we undertook direct comparative studies of the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacies and immunogenicities of three different classes of candidate vaccines given in four regimens to two species of animals: recombinant gD2, a plasmid expressing gD2, and dl5-29, a replication-defective strain of HSV-2 with the essential genes UL5 and UL29 deleted. Both dl5-29 and gD2 were highly effective in attenuating acute and recurrent disease and reducing latent viral load, and both were superior to the plasmid vaccine alone or the plasmid vaccine followed by one dose of dl5-29. dl5-29 was also effective in treating established infections. Moreover, latent dl5-29 virus could not be detected by PCR in sacral ganglia from guinea pigs vaccinated intravaginally. Finally, dl5-29 was superior to gD2 in inducing higher neutralizing antibody titers and the more rapid accumulation of HSV-2-specific CD8+ T cells in trigeminal ganglia after challenge with wild-type virus. Given its efficacy, its defectiveness for latency, and its ability to induce rapid, virus-specific CD8(+)-T-cell responses, the dl5-29 vaccine may be a good candidate for early-phase human trials.

  20. Mutation of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC2 in mice is associated with severe polyuria and a urea-selective concentrating defect without hyperreninemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemter, Elisabeth; Rathkolb, Birgit; Bankir, Lise; Schrewe, Anja; Hans, Wolfgang; Landbrecht, Christina; Klaften, Matthias; Ivandic, Boris; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Ruediger; Aigner, Bernhard

    2010-06-01

    The bumetanide-sensitive Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC2, located in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop, plays a critical role in the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. In humans, loss-of-function mutations of the solute carrier family 12 member 1 gene (SLC12A1), coding for NKCC2, cause type I Bartter syndrome, which is characterized by prenatal onset of a severe polyuria, salt-wasting tubulopathy, and hyperreninemia. In this study, we describe a novel chemically induced, recessive mutant mouse line termed Slc12a1(I299F) exhibiting late-onset manifestation of type I Bartter syndrome. Homozygous mutant mice are viable and exhibit severe polyuria, metabolic alkalosis, marked increase in plasma urea but close to normal creatininemia, hypermagnesemia, hyperprostaglandinuria, hypotension,, and osteopenia. Fractional excretion of urea is markedly decreased. In addition, calcium and magnesium excretions are more than doubled compared with wild-type mice, while uric acid excretion is twofold lower. In contrast to hyperreninemia present in human disease, plasma renin concentration in homozygotes is not increased. The polyuria observed in homozygotes may be due to the combination of two additive factors, a decrease in activity of mutant NKCC2 and an increase in medullary blood flow, due to prostaglandin-induced vasodilation, that impairs countercurrent exchange of urea in the medulla. In conclusion, this novel viable mouse line with a missense Slc12a1 mutation exhibits most of the features of type I Bartter syndrome and may represent a new model for the study of this human disease.

  1. Defects and defect processes in nonmetallic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, W

    2004-01-01

    This extensive survey covers defects in nonmetals, emphasizing point defects and point-defect processes. It encompasses electronic, vibrational, and optical properties of defective solids, plus dislocations and grain boundaries. 1985 edition.

  2. Prevention of vascular dysfunction and arterial hypertension in mice generated by assisted reproductive technologies by addition of melatonin to culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexhaj, Emrush; Pireva, Agim; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Allemann, Yves; Cerny, David; Dessen, Pierre; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs; Rimoldi, Stefano F

    2015-10-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) induce vascular dysfunction in humans and mice. In mice, ART-induced vascular dysfunction is related to epigenetic alteration of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) gene, resulting in decreased vascular eNOS expression and nitrite/nitrate synthesis. Melatonin is involved in epigenetic regulation, and its administration to sterile women improves the success rate of ART. We hypothesized that addition of melatonin to culture media may prevent ART-induced epigenetic and cardiovascular alterations in mice. We, therefore, assessed mesenteric-artery responses to acetylcholine and arterial blood pressure, together with DNA methylation of the eNOS gene promoter in vascular tissue and nitric oxide plasma concentration in 12-wk-old ART mice generated with and without addition of melatonin to culture media and in control mice. As expected, acetylcholine-induced mesenteric-artery dilation was impaired (P = 0.008 vs. control) and mean arterial blood pressure increased (109.5 ± 3.8 vs. 104.0 ± 4.7 mmHg, P = 0.002, ART vs. control) in ART compared with control mice. These alterations were associated with altered DNA methylation of the eNOS gene promoter (P culture media prevented eNOS dysmethylation (P = 0.005, vs. ART + vehicle), normalized nitric oxide plasma concentration (23.1 ± 14.6 μM, P = 0.002 vs. ART + vehicle) and mesentery-artery responsiveness to acetylcholine (P culture media prevents ART-induced vascular dysfunction. We speculate that this approach will also allow preventing ART-induced premature atherosclerosis in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Injectable Shear-Thinning CaSO4/FGF-18-Incorporated Chitin-PLGA Hydrogel Enhances Bone Regeneration in Mice Cranial Bone Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivashanmugam, A; Charoenlarp, Pornkawee; Deepthi, S; Rajendran, Arunkumar; Nair, Shantikumar V; Iseki, Sachiko; Jayakumar, R

    2017-12-13

    For craniofacial bone regeneration, shear-thinning injectable hydrogels are favored over conventional scaffolds because of their improved defect margin adaptability, easier handling, and ability to be injected manually into deeper tissues. The most accepted method, after autografting, is the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2); however, complications such as interindividual variations, edema, and poor cost-efficiency in supraphysiological doses have been reported. The endogenous synthesis of BMP-2 is desirable, and a molecule which induces this is fibroblast growth factor-18 (FGF-18) because it can upregulate the BMP-2 expression  by supressing noggin. We developed a chitin-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) composite hydrogel by regeneration chemistry and then incorporated CaSO 4 and FGF-18 for this purpose. Rheologically, a 7-fold increase in the elastic modulus was observed in the CaSO 4 -incorporated chitin-PLGA hydrogels as compared to the chitin-PLGA hydrogel. Shear-thinning Herschel-Bulkley fluid nature was observed for both hydrogels. Chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 gel showed sustained release of FGF-18. In vitro osteogenic differentiation showed an enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression in the FGF-18-containing chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 gel when compared to cells alone. Further, it was confirmed by studying the expression of osteogenic genes [RUNX2, ALP, BMP-2, osteocalcin (OCN), and osteopontin (OPN)], immunofluorescence staining of BMP-2, OCN, and OPN, and alizarin red S staining. Incorporation of FGF-18 in the hydrogel increased the endothelial cell migration. Further, the regeneration potential of the prepared hydrogels was tested in vivo, and longitudinal live animal μ-CT was performed. FGF-18-loaded chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 showed early and almost complete bone healing in comparison with chitin-PLGA/CaSO 4 , chitin-PLGA/FGF-18, chitin-PLGA, and sham control systems, as confirmed by hematoxylin and eosin and osteoid tetrachrome stainings

  4. Formation of intestinal atresias in the Fgfr2IIIb-/- mice is not associated with defects in notochord development or alterations in Shh expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, Amy L; Botham, Robert A; Franco, Marta; Zaremba, Krzysztof M; Nichol, Peter F

    2012-09-01

    The etiology of intestinal atresia remains elusive but has been ascribed to a number of possible events including in utero vascular accidents, failure of recanalization of the intestinal lumen, and mechanical compression. Another such event that has been postulated to be a cause in atresia formation is disruption in notochord development. This hypothesis arose from clinical observations of notochord abnormalities in patients with intestinal atresias as well as abnormal notochord development observed in a pharmacologic animal model of intestinal atresia. Atresias in this model result from in utero exposure to Adriamycin, wherein notochord defects were noted in up to 80% of embryos that manifested intestinal atresias. Embryos with notochord abnormalities were observed to have ectopic expression of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh), which in turn was postulated to be causative in atresia formation. We were interested in determining whether disruptions in notochord development or Shh expression occurred in an established genetic model of intestinal atresia and used the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2IIIb homozygous mutant (Fgfr2IIIb-/-) mouse model. These embryos develop colonic atresias (100% penetrance) and duodenal atresias (42% penetrance). Wild-type and Fgfr2IIIb-/- mouse embryos were harvested at embryonic day (E) 10.5, E11.5, E12.5, and E13.5. Whole-mount in situ hybridization was performed on E10.5 embryos for Shh. Embryos at each time point were harvested and sectioned for hematoxylin-eosin staining. Sections were photographed specifically for the notochord and resulting images reconstructed in 3-D using Amira software. Colons were isolated from wild-type and Fgfr2IIIb-/- embryos at E10.5, then cultured for 48 hours in Matrigel with FGF10 in the presence or absence of exogenous Shh protein. Explants were harvested, fixed in formalin, and photographed. Fgfr2IIIb-/- mouse embryos exhibit no disruptions in Shh expression at E10.5, when the first events in atresia

  5. Antitumor immunity is defective in T cell-specific microRNA-155-deficient mice and is rescued by immune checkpoint blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, Thomas B; Lee, Soh-Hyun; Tang, William W; Wallace, Jared A; Alexander, Margaret; Runtsch, Marah C; Larsen, Dane K; Thompson, Jacob; Ramstead, Andrew G; Voth, Warren P; Hu, Ruozhen; Round, June L; Williams, Matthew A; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2017-11-10

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) regulates antitumor immune responses. However, its specific functions within distinct immune cell types have not been delineated in conditional KO mouse models. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-155 specifically within T cells during the immune response to syngeneic tumors. We found that miR-155 expression within T cells is required to limit syngeneic tumor growth and promote IFNγ production by T cells within the tumor microenvironment. Consequently, we found that miR-155 expression by T cells is necessary for proper tumor-associated macrophage expression of IFNγ-inducible genes. We also found that immune checkpoint-blocking (ICB) antibodies against programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-1/PD-L1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) restored antitumor immunity in miR-155 T cell-conditional KO mice. We noted that these ICB antibodies rescued the levels of IFNγ-expressing T cells, expression of multiple activation and effector genes expressed by tumor-infiltrating CD8 + and CD4 + T cells, and tumor-associated macrophage activation. Moreover, the ICB approach partially restored expression of several derepressed miR-155 targets in tumor-infiltrating, miR-155-deficient CD8 + T cells, suggesting that miR-155 and ICB regulate overlapping pathways to promote antitumor immunity. Taken together, our findings highlight the multifaceted role of miR-155 in T cells, in which it promotes antitumor immunity. These results suggest that the augmentation of miR-155 expression could be used to improve anticancer immunotherapies. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Topical Prostaglandin E Analog Restores Defective Dendritic Cell–Mediated Th17 Host Defense Against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in the Skin of Diabetic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dejani, Naiara N.; Brandt, Stephanie L.; Piñeros, Annie; Glosson-Byers, Nicole L.; Wang, Sue; Son, Young Min; Medeiros, Alexandra I.; Serezani, C. Henrique

    2016-01-01

    People with diabetes are more prone to Staphylococcus aureus skin infection than healthy individuals. Control of S. aureus infection depends on dendritic cell (DC)–induced T-helper 17 (Th17)–mediated neutrophil recruitment and bacterial clearance. DC ingestion of infected apoptotic cells (IACs) drive prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion to generate Th17 cells. We speculated that hyperglycemia inhibits skin DC migration to the lymph nodes and impairs the Th17 differentiation that accounts for poo...

  7. Generation of Novel Traj18-Deficient Mice Lacking Vα14 Natural Killer T Cells with an Undisturbed T Cell Receptor α-Chain Repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyambayar Dashtsoodol

    Full Text Available Invariant Vα14 natural killer T (NKT cells, characterized by the expression of a single invariant T cell receptor (TCR α chain encoded by rearranged Trav11 (Vα14-Traj18 (Jα18 gene segments in mice, and TRAV10 (Vα24-TRAJ18 (Jα18 in humans, mediate adjuvant effects to activate various effector cell types in both innate and adaptive immune systems that facilitates the potent antitumor effects. It was recently reported that the Jα18-deficient mouse described by our group in 1997 harbors perturbed TCRα repertoire, which raised concerns regarding the validity of some of the experimental conclusions that have been made using this mouse line. To resolve this concern, we generated a novel Traj18-deficient mouse line by specifically targeting the Traj18 gene segment using Cre-Lox approach. Here we showed the newly generated Traj18-deficient mouse has, apart from the absence of Traj18, an undisturbed TCRα chain repertoire by using next generation sequencing and by detecting normal generation of Vα19Jα33 expressing mucosal associated invariant T cells, whose development was abrogated in the originally described Jα18-KO mice. We also demonstrated here the definitive requirement for NKT cells in the protection against tumors and their potent adjuvant effects on antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

  8. Action potential generation in the small intestine of W mutant mice that lack interstitial cells of Cajal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malysz, J; Thuneberg, L; Mikkelsen, Hanne Birte

    1996-01-01

    significantly changed. Neither FLC nor MLC were part of a network nor did they form specialized junctions with neighboring cells as ICC do. Hence no cell type had replaced ICC at their normal morphological position associated with Auerbach's plexus. ICC were present in W/Wv mice at the deep muscular plexus...

  9. Double transduction of a Cre/LoxP lentiviral vector: a simple method to generate kidney cell-specific knockdown mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Bo Young; Kim, Dong Ki; Park, Jung Tak; Kang, Hye-Young; Paeng, Jisun; Kim, Seonghun; Park, Jimin; Um, Jae Eun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2015-12-15

    In a lentivirus-based gene delivery system, the incorporated gene is continuously expressed for a long time. In this study, we devised a simple way to knock down a specific gene in a kidney cell-specific pattern in adult mice by lentivirus-assisted transfer of short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Kidney collecting duct (CD)-specific aquaporin-3 (AQP3)-knockdown mice were generated by consecutive injection of Hoxb7-Cre-expressing lentivirus (LV-Hoxb7 Cre) and loxP-AQP3 shRNA-expressing lentivirus (LV-loxP shAQP3) in adult C57BL6/J mice. LV-Hoxb7 Cre was designed to express mCherry, while LV-loxP shAQP3 was designed with a floxed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged stop sequence, and thus EGFP would be expressed only in the absence of Cre recombination. In mice treated with LV-Hoxb7 Cre alone, mCherry protein expression, which indicates the presence of Cre recombinase, occurred only in CD cells. However, LV-loxP shAQP3 injection alone resulted in an increase in EGFP expression in all kidney cells, indicating the transcription of the floxed region. When LV-Hoxb7 Cre and LV-loxP shAQP3 were sequentially transduced, EGFP expression was attenuated while mCherry expression was sustained in CD cells, demonstrating a CD cell-specific recombination of the floxed region. AQP3 expression in mice injected with LV-Hoxb7 Cre or LV-loxP shAQP3 alone did not differ, but consecutive injection of LV-Hoxb7 Cre and LV-loxP shAQP3 significantly reduced AQP3 expression in CD cells. However, the expression levels of AQP3 were not altered in other cell types. Double transduction of Cre- and loxP-based lentivirus can easily generate kidney cell-specific knockdown mice, and this method might be applicable to other species. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. The NS1 glycoprotein can generate dramatic antibody-enhanced dengue viral replication in normal out-bred mice resulting in lethal multi-organ disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew K I Falconar

    Full Text Available Antibody-enhanced replication (AER of dengue type-2 virus (DENV-2 strains and production of antibody-enhanced disease (AED was tested in out-bred mice. Polyclonal antibodies (PAbs generated against the nonstructural-1 (NS1 glycoprotein candidate vaccine of the New Guinea-C (NG-C or NSx strains reacted strongly and weakly with these antigens, respectively. These PAbs contained the IgG2a subclass, which cross-reacted with the virion-associated envelope (E glycoprotein of the DENV-2 NSx strain, suggesting that they could generate its AER via all mouse Fcγ-receptor classes. Indeed, when these mice were challenged with a low dose (<0.5 LD₅₀ of the DENV-2 NSx strain, but not the NG-C strain, they all generated dramatic and lethal DENV-2 AER/AED. These AER/AED mice developed life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, displayed by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD resulting from i dramatic interstitial alveolar septa-thickening with mononuclear cells, ii some hyperplasia of alveolar type-II pneumocytes, iii copious intra-alveolar protein secretion, iv some hyaline membrane-covered alveolar walls, and v DENV-2 antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These mice also developed meningo-encephalitis, with greater than 90,000-fold DENV-2 AER titers in microglial cells located throughout their brain parenchyma, some of which formed nodules around dead neurons. Their spleens contained infiltrated megakaryocytes with DENV-2 antigen-positive red-pulp macrophages, while their livers displayed extensive necrosis, apoptosis and macro- and micro-steatosis, with DENV-2 antigen-positive Kuppfer cells and hepatocytes. Their infections were confirmed by DENV-2 isolations from their lungs, spleens and livers. These findings accord with those reported in fatal human "severe dengue" cases. This DENV-2 AER/AED was blocked by high concentrations of only the NG-C NS1 glycoprotein. These results imply a potential hazard of DENV NS1 glycoprotein-based vaccines

  11. Primary cellular meningeal defects cause neocortical dysplasia and dyslamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Jonathan H.; Siegenthaler, Julie A.; Patterson, Katelin P.; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cortical malformations are important causes of neurological morbidity, but in many cases their etiology is poorly understood. Mice with Foxc1 mutations have cellular defects in meningeal development. We use hypomorphic and null alleles of Foxc1 to study the effect of meningeal defects on neocortical organization. Methods Embryos with loss of Foxc1 activity were generated using the hypomorphic Foxc1hith allele and the null Foxc1lacZ allele. Immunohistologic analysis was used to assess cerebral basement membrane integrity, marginal zone heterotopia formation, neuronal overmigration, meningeal defects, and changes in basement membrane composition. Dysplasia severity was quantified using two measures. Results Cortical dysplasia resembling cobblestone cortex, with basement membrane breakdown and lamination defects, is seen in Foxc1 mutants. As Foxc1 activity was reduced, abnormalities in basement membrane integrity, heterotopia formation, neuronal overmigration, and meningeal development appeared earlier in gestation and were more severe. Surprisingly, the basement membrane appeared intact at early stages of development in the face of severe deficits in meningeal development. Prominent defects in basement membrane integrity appeared as development proceeded. Molecular analysis of basement membrane laminin subunits demonstrated that loss of the meninges led to changes in basement membrane composition. Interpretation Cortical dysplasia can be caused by cellular defects in the meninges. The meninges are not required for basement membrane establishment but are needed for remodeling as the brain expands. Specific changes in basement membrane composition may contribute to subsequent breakdown. Our study raises the possibility that primary meningeal defects may cortical dysplasia in some cases. PMID:20976766

  12. EGFRvIII mCAR-modified T-cell therapy cures mice with established intracerebral glioma and generates host immunity against tumor-antigen loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, John H; Choi, Bryan D; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Suryadevara, Carter M; Snyder, David J; Flores, Catherine T; Schmittling, Robert J; Nair, Smita K; Reap, Elizabeth A; Norberg, Pamela K; Herndon, James E; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Morgan, Richard A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Johnson, Laura A

    2014-02-15

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) transduced T cells represent a promising immune therapy that has been shown to successfully treat cancers in mice and humans. However, CARs targeting antigens expressed in both tumors and normal tissues have led to significant toxicity. Preclinical studies have been limited by the use of xenograft models that do not adequately recapitulate the immune system of a clinically relevant host. A constitutively activated mutant of the naturally occurring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) is antigenically identical in both human and mouse glioma, but is also completely absent from any normal tissues. We developed a third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific murine CAR (mCAR), and performed tests to determine its efficacy in a fully immunocompetent mouse model of malignant glioma. At elevated doses, infusion with EGFRvIII mCAR T cells led to cures in all mice with brain tumors. In addition, antitumor efficacy was found to be dependent on lymphodepletive host conditioning. Selective blockade with EGFRvIII soluble peptide significantly abrogated the activity of EGFRvIII mCAR T cells in vitro and in vivo, and may offer a novel strategy to enhance the safety profile for CAR-based therapy. Finally, mCAR-treated, cured mice were resistant to rechallenge with EGFRvIII(NEG) tumors, suggesting generation of host immunity against additional tumor antigens. All together, these data support that third-generation, EGFRvIII-specific mCARs are effective against gliomas in the brain and highlight the importance of syngeneic, immunocompetent models in the preclinical evaluation of tumor immunotherapies. ©2013 AACR

  13. Embedded defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriola, M.; Vachaspati, T.; Bucher, M.

    1994-01-01

    We give a prescription for embedding classical solutions and, in particular, topological defects in field theories which are invariant under symmetry groups that are not necessarily simple. After providing examples of embedded defects in field theories based on simple groups, we consider the electroweak model and show that it contains the Z string and a one-parameter family of strings called the W(α) string. It is argued that although the members of this family are gauge equivalent when considered in isolation, each member becomes physically distinct when multistring configurations are considered. We then turn to the issue of stability of embedded defects and demonstrate the instability of a large class of such solutions in the absence of bound states or condensates. The Z string is shown to be unstable for all values of the Higgs boson mass when θ W =π/4. W strings are also shown to be unstable for a large range of parameters. Embedded monopoles suffer from the Brandt-Neri-Coleman instability. Finally, we connect the electroweak string solutions to the sphaleron

  14. The utility of the new generation of humanized mice to study HIV-1 infection: transmission, prevention, pathogenesis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowan Mark R

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Substantial improvements have been made in recent years in the ability to engraft human cells and tissues into immunodeficient mice. The use of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs leads to multi-lineage human hematopoiesis accompanied by production of a variety of human immune cell types. Population of murine primary and secondary lymphoid organs with human cells occurs, and long-term engraftment has been achieved. Engrafted cells are capable of producing human innate and adaptive immune responses, making these models the most physiologically relevant humanized animal models to date. New models have been successfully infected by a variety of strains of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1, accompanied by virus replication in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs, including the gut-associated lymphoid tissue, the male and female reproductive tracts, and the brain. Multiple forms of virus-induced pathogenesis are present, and human T cell and antibody responses to HIV-1 are detected. These humanized mice are susceptible to a high rate of rectal and vaginal transmission of HIV-1 across an intact epithelium, indicating the potential to study vaccines and microbicides. Antiviral drugs, siRNAs, and hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy strategies have all been shown to be effective at reducing viral load and preventing or reversing helper T cell loss in humanized mice, indicating that they will serve as an important preclinical model to study new therapeutic modalities. HIV-1 has also been shown to evolve in response to selective pressures in humanized mice, thus showing that the model will be useful to study and/or predict viral evolution in response to drug or immune pressures. The purpose of this review is to summarize the findings reported to date on all new humanized mouse models (those transplanted with human HSCs in regards to HIV-1 sexual transmission, pathogenesis, anti-HIV-1 immune responses, viral evolution, pre- and post

  15. Experimental sheep BSE prions generate the vCJD phenotype when serially passaged in transgenic mice expressing human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Susan; Asante, Emmanuel A; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brock, Lara; Brandner, Sebastian; Bellworthy, Susan J; Simmons, Marion M; Hope, James; Collinge, John; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F

    2018-03-15

    The epizootic prion disease of cattle, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), causes variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans following dietary exposure. While it is assumed that all cases of vCJD attributed to a dietary aetiology are related to cattle BSE, sheep and goats are susceptible to experimental oral challenge with cattle BSE prions and farmed animals in the UK were undoubtedly exposed to BSE-contaminated meat and bone meal during the late 1980s and early 1990s. Although no natural field cases of sheep BSE have been identified, it cannot be excluded that some BSE-infected sheep might have entered the European human food chain. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of sheep BSE prions has been addressed by examining the transmission properties of experimental brain isolates in transgenic mice that express human prion protein, however to-date there have been relatively few studies. Here we report that serial passage of experimental sheep BSE prions in transgenic mice expressing human prion protein with methionine at residue 129 produces the vCJD phenotype that mirrors that seen when the same mice are challenged with vCJD prions from patient brain. These findings are congruent with those reported previously by another laboratory, and thereby strongly reinforce the view that sheep BSE prions could have acted as a causal agent of vCJD within Europe. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Deletion of exon 20 of the Familial Dysautonomia gene Ikbkap in mice causes developmental delay, cardiovascular defects, and early embryonic lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Dietrich

    Full Text Available Familial Dysautonomia (FD is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects 1/3,600 live births in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, and leads to death before the age of 40. The disease is characterized by abnormal development and progressive degeneration of the sensory and autonomic nervous system. A single base pair substitution in intron 20 of the Ikbkap gene accounts for 98% of FD cases, and results in the expression of low levels of the full-length mRNA with simultaneous expression of an aberrantly spliced mRNA in which exon 20 is missing. To date, there is no animal model for the disease, and the essential cellular functions of IKAP--the protein encoded by Ikbkap--remain unknown. To better understand the normal function of IKAP and in an effort to generate a mouse model for FD, we have targeted the mouse Ikbkap gene by homologous recombination. We created two distinct alleles that result in either loss of Ikbkap expression, or expression of an mRNA lacking only exon 20. Homozygosity for either mutation leads to developmental delay, cardiovascular and brain malformations, accompanied with early embryonic lethality. Our analyses indicate that IKAP is essential for expression of specific genes involved in cardiac morphogenesis, and that cardiac failure is the likely cause of abnormal vascular development and embryonic lethality. Our results also indicate that deletion of exon 20 abolishes gene function. This implies that the truncated IKAP protein expressed in FD patients does not retain any significant biological function.

  17. Generation of a Novel T Cell Specific Interleukin-1 Receptor Type 1 Conditional Knock Out Mouse Reveals Intrinsic Defects in Survival, Expansion and Cytokine Production of CD4 T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgiz A Mufazalov

    Full Text Available Interleukin-1 (IL-1 plays a crucial role in numerous inflammatory diseases via action on its only known signaling IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1. To investigate the role of IL-1 signaling in selected cell types, we generated a new mouse strain in which exon 5 of the Il1r1 gene is flanked by loxP sites. Crossing of these mice with CD4-Cre transgenic mice resulted in IL-1R1 loss of function specifically in T cells. These mice, termed IL-1R1ΔT, displayed normal development under steady state conditions. Importantly, isolated CD4 positive T cells retained their capacity to differentiate toward Th1 or Th17 cell lineages in vitro, and strongly proliferated in cultures supplemented with either anti-CD3/CD28 or Concanavalin A, but, as predicted, were completely unresponsive to IL-1β administration. Furthermore, IL-1R1ΔT mice were protected from gut inflammation in the anti-CD3 treatment model, due to dramatically reduced frequencies and absolute numbers of IL-17A and interferon (IFN-γ producing cells. Taken together, our data shows the necessity of intact IL-1 signaling for survival and expansion of CD4 T cells that were developed in an otherwise IL-1 sufficient environment.

  18. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza-Lopez, Martha [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico); Ferro-Flores, Guillermina [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, CP 52045 (Mexico); Arteaga de Murphy, Consuelo [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico)]. E-mail: consuelo_murphy@yahoo.com.mx; Morales-Ramirez, Pedro [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico, CP 52045 (Mexico); Piedras-Ross, Josefa [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran, Delegacion Tlalpan, Mexico DF 14000 (Mexico); Murphy-Stack, Eduardo [Hospital Santaelena, Mexico DF (Mexico); Hernandez-Oviedo, Omar [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2004-11-01

    Multiple myeloma and other hematological malignancies have been treated by myeloablative radiotherapy/chemotherapy and subsequent stem cell transplantation. [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonate (EDTMP) forms a stable in vivo generator system with selective skeletal uptake in mice; therefore, it could work as a potential and improved agent for marrow ablation. Induced bone marrow cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are determined by the reduction of reticulocytes (RET) and elevation of micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) in peripheral blood and ablation by bone marrow histological studies. The aim of this study was to determine the bone marrow cytotoxic and genotoxic effect of the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP in vivo generator system in mice and to evaluate by histopathology its myeloablative potential. Enriched {sup 166}Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} was irradiated and [{sup 166}Dy]DyCl{sub 3} was added to EDTMP in phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) in a molar ratio of 1:1.75. QC was determined by TLC. Dy-EDTMP complex was prepared the same way with nonirradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control animals were injected with the cold complex and with 0.9% sodium chloride, respectively. A blood sample was taken at the beginning of the experiments and every 48 h for 12 days postinjection. The animals were sacrificed, organs of interest taken out and the radioactivity determined. The femur was used for histological studies. Flow cytometry analysis was used to quantify the frequency of RET and MN-RET in the blood samples. The MCNP4B Monte Carlo computer code was used for dosimetry calculations. Radiochemical purity was 99% and the mean specific activity was 1.3 MBq/mg. The RET and MN-RET frequency were statistically different in the treatment at the end of the 12-day period demonstrating cytotoxicity and genotoxicity induced by the in vivo generator system. The

  19. Breviscapine ameliorates CCl4‑induced liver injury in mice through inhibiting inflammatory apoptotic response and ROS generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Wen, Pei-Hao; Zhang, Xin-Xue; Dai, Yang; He, Qiang

    2018-05-02

    Acute liver injury is characterized by fibrosis, inflammation and apoptosis, leading to liver failure, cirrhosis or cancer and affecting the clinical outcome in the long term. However, no effective therapeutic strategy is currently available. Breviscapine, a mixture of flavonoid glycosides, has been reported to have multiple biological functions. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of breviscapine on acute liver injury induced by CCl4 in mice. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to intraperitoneal injection with CCl4 for 8 weeks with or without breviscapine (15 or 30 mg/kg). Mice treated with CCl4 developed acute liver injury, as evidenced by histological analysis, Masson trichrome and Sirius Red staining, accompanied with elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase. Furthermore, increases in pro‑inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and apoptotic factors, including caspase‑3 and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase‑2 (PARP‑2), were observed. Breviscapine treatment significantly and dose‑dependently reduced collagen deposition and the fibrotic area. Inflammatory cytokines were downregulated by breviscapine through inactivating Toll‑like receptor 4/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways. In addition, co‑administration of breviscapine with CCl4 decreased the apoptotic response by enhancing B‑cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl‑2) levels, while reducing Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, apoptotic protease activating factor 1, caspase‑3 and PARP activity. Furthermore, CCl4‑induced oxidative stress was blocked by breviscapine through improving anti‑oxidants and impeding mitogen‑activated protein kinase pathways. The present study highlighted that breviscapine exhibited liver‑protective effects against acute hepatic injury induced by CCl4 via suppressing inflammation and apoptosis.

  20. Characterization of point defects in monolayer arsenene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiongyi; Ng, Siu-Pang; Ding, Ning; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2018-06-01

    Topological defects that are inevitably found in 2D materials can dramatically affect their properties. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method, the structural, thermodynamic, electronic and magnetic properties of six types of typical point defects in arsenene, i.e. the Stone-Wales defect, single and double vacancies and adatoms, were systemically studied. It was found that these defects were all more easily generated in arsenene with lower formation energies than those with graphene and silicene. Stone-Wales defects can be transformed from pristine arsenene by overcoming a barrier of 2.19 eV and single vacancy defects tend to coalesce into double vacancy defects by diffusion. However, a type of adatom defect does not exhibit kinetic stability at room temperature. In addition, SV defects and another type of adatom defect can remarkably affect the electronic and magnetic properties of arsenene, e.g. they can introduce localized states near the Fermi level, as well as a strongly local magnetic moment due to dangling bond and unpaired electron. Furthermore, the simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and Raman spectroscopy were computed and the types of point defects can be fully characterized by correlating the STM images and Raman spectra to the defective atomistic structures. The results provide significant insights to the effect of defects in arsenene for potential applications, as well as identifications of two helpful tools (STM and Raman spectroscopy) to distinguish the type of defects in arsenene for future experiments.

  1. Case history of a 94 MVA turbo-generator retired after 190.000 hours of service by defects revealed by boresonic in-service inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porro, F.; Santoro, M.

    1990-01-01

    The case-history of a turbogenerator manufactured by Ansaldo on 1957 and turned on operation on 1958 then retired after 30 years of operation, with a total of 190.000 hours of service, by defects revealed trough boresonic inspections, will be presented. The rotor was inspected a first time after 130.000 hours of service and was overbored in order to allow further service operations. After other 60.000 hours of service operation the rotor underwent to a new in-service inspection that showed an unacceptable condition. The rotor, retired from service, has been destined to destructive tests in order to verify non-destructive predictions

  2. One-Step Cartilage Repair Technique as a Next Generation of Cell Therapy for Cartilage Defects: Biological Characteristics, Preclinical Application, Surgical Techniques, and Clinical Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Cai, You-Zhi; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-07-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of the basic science rationale, surgical technique, and clinical outcomes of 1-step cartilage repair technique used as a treatment strategy for cartilage defects. A systematic review was performed in the main medical databases to evaluate the several studies concerning 1-step procedures for cartilage repair. The characteristics of cell-seed scaffolds, behavior of cells seeded into scaffolds, and surgical techniques were also discussed. Clinical outcomes and quality of repaired tissue were assessed using several standardized outcome assessment tools, magnetic resonance imaging scans, and biopsy histology. One-step cartilage repair could be divided into 2 types: chondrocyte-matrix complex (CMC) and autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC), both of which allow a simplified surgical approach. Studies with Level IV evidence have shown that 1-step cartilage repair techniques could significantly relieve symptoms and improve functional assessment (P studies clearly showed hyaline-like cartilage tissue in biopsy tissues by second-look arthroscopy. The 1-step cartilage repair technique, with its potential for effective, homogeneous distribution of chondrocytes and multipotent stem cells on the surface of the cartilage defect, is able to regenerate hyaline-like cartilage tissue, and it could be applied to cartilage repair by arthroscopy. Level IV, systematic review of Level II and IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cross-generational impact of a male murine pheromone 2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole in female mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Sachiko; Soini, Helena A.; Wager-Miller, James; Alley, William R.; Pizzo, Matthew J.; Rodda, Cathleen; Alberts, Jeffrey; Crystal, Jonathon D.; Lai, Cary; Foley, John; Novotny, Milos V.

    2015-01-01

    The current understanding of the activity of mammalian pheromones is that endocrine and behavioural effects are limited to the exposed individuals. Here, we demonstrate that the nasal exposure of female mice to a male murine pheromone stimulates expansion of mammary glands, leading to prolonged nursing of pups. Subsequent behavioural testing of the pups from pheromone-exposed dams exhibited enhanced learning. Sialic acid components in the milk are known to be involved in brain development. We hypothesized that the offspring might have received more of this key nutrient that promotes brain development. The mRNA for polysialyltransferase, which produces polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules related to brain development, was increased in the brain of offspring of pheromone-exposed dams at post-natal day 10, while it was not different at embryonic stages, indicating possible differential brain development during early post-natal life. PMID:26136453

  4. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale O Starkie

    Full Text Available Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive. These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking

  5. Effects of in-cascade defect clustering on near-term defect evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The effects of in-cascade defect clustering on the nature of the subsequent defect population are being studied using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the simulations illustrates the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent defect evolution. The large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades have been shown to be significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution. In recent work, the effects of initial cluster sizes appear to be extremely important.

  6. Generation of brain tumours in mice by Cre-mediated recombination of neural progenitors in situ with the tamoxifen metabolite endoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedykcinska, Anna; Ferreira, Andreia; Lau, Joanne; Broni, Jessica; Richard-Loendt, Angela; Henriquez, Nico V; Brandner, Sebastian

    2016-02-01

    Targeted cell- or region-specific gene recombination is widely used in the functional analysis of genes implicated in development and disease. In the brain, targeted gene recombination has become a mainstream approach to study neurodegeneration or tumorigenesis. The use of the Cre-loxP system to study tumorigenesis in the adult central nervous system (CNS) can be limited, when the promoter (such as GFAP) is also transiently expressed during development, which can result in the recombination of progenies of different lineages. Engineering of transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutant of the human oestrogen receptor (ER) allows the circumvention of transient developmental Cre expression by inducing recombination in the adult organism. The recombination of loxP sequences occurs only in the presence of tamoxifen. Systemic administration of tamoxifen can, however, exhibit toxicity and might also recombine unwanted cell populations if the promoter driving Cre expression is active at the time of tamoxifen administration. Here, we report that a single site-specific injection of an active derivative of tamoxifen successfully activates Cre recombinase and selectively recombines tumour suppressor genes in neural progenitor cells of the subventricular zone in mice, and we demonstrate its application in a model for the generation of intrinsic brain tumours. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Generation of brain tumours in mice by Cre-mediated recombination of neural progenitors in situ with the tamoxifen metabolite endoxifen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Benedykcinska

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted cell- or region-specific gene recombination is widely used in the functional analysis of genes implicated in development and disease. In the brain, targeted gene recombination has become a mainstream approach to study neurodegeneration or tumorigenesis. The use of the Cre-loxP system to study tumorigenesis in the adult central nervous system (CNS can be limited, when the promoter (such as GFAP is also transiently expressed during development, which can result in the recombination of progenies of different lineages. Engineering of transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase fused to a mutant of the human oestrogen receptor (ER allows the circumvention of transient developmental Cre expression by inducing recombination in the adult organism. The recombination of loxP sequences occurs only in the presence of tamoxifen. Systemic administration of tamoxifen can, however, exhibit toxicity and might also recombine unwanted cell populations if the promoter driving Cre expression is active at the time of tamoxifen administration. Here, we report that a single site-specific injection of an active derivative of tamoxifen successfully activates Cre recombinase and selectively recombines tumour suppressor genes in neural progenitor cells of the subventricular zone in mice, and we demonstrate its application in a model for the generation of intrinsic brain tumours.

  8. Exposure to traffic-generated air pollutants mediates alterations in brain microvascular integrity in wildtype mice on a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwannasual, Usa; Lucero, JoAnn; McDonald, Jacob D; Lund, Amie K

    2018-01-01

    Air pollution-exposure is associated with detrimental outcomes in the central nervous system (CNS) such as cerebrovascular disorders, including stroke, and neurodegenerative diseases. While the mechanisms of these CNS-related outcomes involved have not been fully elucidated, exposure to traffic-generated air pollutants has been associated with altered blood brain barrier (BBB) integrity and permeability. The current study investigated whether inhalation exposure to mixed vehicle emissions (MVE) alters cerebral microvascular integrity in healthy 3 mo old C57BL/6 mice, as well as whether exposure-mediated effects were exacerbated by a high-fat (HF) vs. low-fat (LF) diet. Mice on each diet were randomly assigned to be exposed to either filtered air (FA) or MVE [100PM/m 3 vehicle emissions mixture: 30µg PM/m 3 gasoline engine + 70µg PM/m 3 diesel engine emissions; median size ~ 60nm; particle mass size distribution median of ~ 1µm (range: diet, results in altered BBB integrity and increased ox-LDL signaling in the cerebral vasculature in a wildtype animal model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Biological properties and response to x-rays of first-generation transplants of spontaneous mammary carcinomas in C3H mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J F; Sheldon, P W; Begg, A C; Hill, S A; Smith, A M

    1975-05-01

    First-generation transplants of spontaneous mouse mammary carcinomas have been used extensively for radiobiological investigations of fractionated irradiation schedules, r.b.e. of fast neutrons and effectiveness of radiosensitizers, as reported elsewhere. The present work investigates the growth characteristics of the tumours; the criteria for the choice of end-points used in the definition of 'local control' of irradiated tumours; the reason for a decrease of 30 per cent in X-ray dose required to control tumours in females as compared with male mice; the proportion of hypoxic cells and its variation with time (reoxygenation) after a single dose of 1500 rad of X-rays; and the repair capacity of tumour cells within 24 hours after a substantial first dose of X-rays. Evidence is presented that the male-female difference was due to a higher proportion of hypoxic cells in tumours in male than in female mice. The repair of sub-lethal injury in tumour cells made hypoxic was slightly less than in skin made hypoxic but not significantly so. In the two-dose experiments on clamped tumours, no evidence of induced synchrony was found.

  10. The hominoid-specific gene TBC1D3 promotes generation of basal neural progenitors and induces cortical folding in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiang-Chun; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Wu, Kong-Yan; Zhou, Yang; Jin, Ying; Wen, Tieqiao; Yang, Zhengang; Wang, Xiaoqun; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2016-01-01

    Cortical expansion and folding are often linked to the evolution of higher intelligence, but molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying cortical folding remain poorly understood. The hominoid-specific gene TBC1D3 undergoes segmental duplications during hominoid evolution, but its role in brain development has not been explored. Here, we found that expression of TBC1D3 in ventricular cortical progenitors of mice via in utero electroporation caused delamination of ventricular radial glia cells (vRGs) and promoted generation of self-renewing basal progenitors with typical morphology of outer radial glia (oRG), which are most abundant in primates. Furthermore, down-regulation of TBC1D3 in cultured human brain slices decreased generation of oRGs. Interestingly, localized oRG proliferation resulting from either in utero electroporation or transgenic expression of TBC1D3, was often found to underlie cortical regions exhibiting folding. Thus, we have identified a hominoid gene that is required for oRG generation in regulating the cortical expansion and folding. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18197.001 PMID:27504805

  11. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  12. Facts about Birth Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... label> Information For… Media Policy Makers Facts about Birth Defects Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... having a baby born without a birth defect. Birth Defects Are Common Every 4 ½ minutes, a ...

  13. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  14. Association of mesenchymal stem cells with platelet rich plasma on the repair of critical calvarial defects in mice Associação de células-tronco mesenquimais com plasma rico em plaquetas na reparação de defeitos críticos em calvária de camundongos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betânia Souza Monteiro

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC from eight mice C57BL/6 gfp+ bone marrows expanded in cultures associated with platelets rich plasma (PRP deriving from another eight mice, in the repair of critical defects in calvarial bone produced in twenty-four adult isogenic mice C57BL/6. METHODS: The animals were submitted to a cranial defect of 6.0mm in diameter and divided into two equal experimental groups. Control group did not receive treatment and the treated group received a MSC pellet containing 1.0 x 10(7 cells/mL associated with 50.0µL of plasma gel containing 1.0 x 10(9 autologous platelets within the defect. RESULTS: In the treated group was observed process of angiogenesis and bone repair better than control group. CONCLUSION: Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow of C57BL/6 gfp+ mice associated with PRP gel applied in bone critical defects produced in calvarial contributes positively to the process of bone repair.OBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos da associação das células-tronco mesenquimais (MSC oriundas da medula óssea de oito camundongos jovens C57BL/6 gfp+ e expandidas em culturas, com Plasma Rico em Plaquetas (PRP provenientes de outros oito camundongos, na reparação de defeitos críticos confeccionados em calvária de 24 camundongos adultos C57BL/6. MÉTODOS: Os animais foram submetidos a um defeito craniano de 6,0mm de diâmetro e separados em dois grupos experimentais iguais. O grupo controle não recebeu tratamento e no grupo tratado foi administrado, no interior do defeito, pellet de MSC contendo 1,0 x 10(7 células/mL associado com 50,0µL de plasma em gel autólogo contendo 1,0 x 10(9 plaquetas. RESULTADOS: No grupo tratado verificou-se processo de angiogênese e reparação óssea superior ao grupo controle. CONCLUSÃO: A associação das células-tronco mesenquimais (MSC derivadas da medula óssea de camundongos C57BL/6 gfp+ com gel de PRP aplicadas em defeitos ósseos cr

  15. Defective TFH Cell Function and Increased TFR Cells Contribute to Defective Antibody Production in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Peter T; Tan, Catherine L; Freeman, Gordon J; Haigis, Marcia; Sharpe, Arlene H

    2015-07-14

    Defective antibody production in aging is broadly attributed to immunosenescence. However, the precise immunological mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate an increase in the ratio of inhibitory T follicular regulatory (TFR) cells to stimulatory T follicular helper (TFH) cells in aged mice. Aged TFH and TFR cells are phenotypically distinct from those in young mice, exhibiting increased programmed cell death protein-1 expression but decreased ICOS expression. Aged TFH cells exhibit defective antigen-specific responses, and programmed cell death protein-ligand 1 blockade can partially rescue TFH cell function. In contrast, young and aged TFR cells have similar suppressive capacity on a per-cell basis in vitro and in vivo. Together, these studies reveal mechanisms contributing to defective humoral immunity in aging: an increase in suppressive TFR cells combined with impaired function of aged TFH cells results in reduced T-cell-dependent antibody responses in aged mice. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional ultrashort echo time MRI and Short T2 images generated from subtraction for determination of tumor burden in lung cancer: Preclinical investigation in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Jagoda, Philippe; Fries, Peter; Gräber, Stefan; Bals, Robert; Buecker, Arno; Jungnickel, Christopher; Beisswenger, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the potential of 3D ultrashort echo time MRI and short T 2 images generated by subtraction for determination of total tumor burden in lung cancer. As an animal model of spontaneously developing non-small cell lung cancer, the K-rasLA1 transgenic mouse was used. Three-dimensional MR imaging was performed with radial k-space acquisition and echo times of 20 µs and 1 ms. For investigation of the short T 2 component in the recorded signal, subtraction images were generated from these data sets and used for consensus identification of tumors. Next, manual segmentation was performed on all MR images by two independent investigators. MRI data were compared with the results from histologic investigations and among the investigators. Tumor number and total tumor burden from imaging experiments correlated strongly with the results of histologic investigations. Intra- and interuser comparison showed highest correlations between the individual measurements for ultra-short TE MRI. Three-dimensional MRI protocols facilitate accurate tumor identification in mice harboring lung tumors. Ultrashort TE MRI is the superior imaging strategy when investigating lung tumors of miscellaneous size with 3D MR imaging strategies. Magn Reson Med 79:1052-1060, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Cortical Divergent Projections in Mice Originate from Two Sequentially Generated, Distinct Populations of Excitatory Cortical Neurons with Different Initial Axonal Outgrowth Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Yumiko; Namikawa, Tomohiro; Yamauchi, Kenta; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-05-01

    Excitatory cortical neurons project to various subcortical and intracortical regions, and exhibit diversity in their axonal connections. Although this diversity may develop from primary axons, how many types of axons initially occur remains unknown. Using a sparse-labeling in utero electroporation method, we investigated the axonal outgrowth of these neurons in mice and correlated the data with axonal projections in adults. Examination of lateral cortex neurons labeled during the main period of cortical neurogenesis (E11.5-E15.5) indicated that axonal outgrowth commonly occurs in the intermediate zone. Conversely, the axonal direction varied; neurons labeled before E12.5 and the earliest cortical plate neurons labeled at E12.5 projected laterally, whereas neurons labeled thereafter projected medially. The expression of Ctip2 and Satb2 and the layer destinations of these neurons support the view that lateral and medial projection neurons are groups of prospective subcortical and callosal projection neurons, respectively. Consistently, birthdating experiments demonstrated that presumptive lateral projection neurons were generated earlier than medial projection neurons, even within the same layer. These results suggest that the divergent axonal connections of excitatory cortical neurons begin from two types of primary axons, which originate from two sequentially generated distinct subpopulations: early-born lateral (subcortical) and later-born medial (callosal) projection neuron groups. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Generation of knock-in mice that express nuclear enhanced green fluorescent protein and tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase in the notochord from Foxa2 and T loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imuta, Yu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Jang, Chuan-Wei; Behringer, Richard R; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    The node and the notochord are important embryonic signaling centers that control embryonic pattern formation. Notochord progenitor cells present in the node and later in the posterior end of the notochord move anteriorly to generate the notochord. To understand the dynamics of cell movement during notochord development and the molecular mechanisms controlling this event, analyses of cell movements using time-lapse imaging and conditional manipulation of gene activities are required. To achieve this goal, we generated two knock-in mouse lines that simultaneously express nuclear enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and tamoxifen-inducible Cre, CreER(T2) , from two notochord gene loci, Foxa2 and T (Brachury). In Foxa2(nEGFP-CreERT2/+) and T(nEGFP-CreERT2/+) embryos, nuclei of the Foxa2 or T-expressing cells, which include the node, notochord, and endoderm (Foxa2) or wide range of posterior mesoderm (T), were labeled with EGFP at intensities that can be used for live imaging. Cre activity was also induced in cells expressing Foxa2 and T 1 day after tamoxifen administration. These mice are expected to be useful tools for analyzing the mechanisms of notochord development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. PLGA nanoparticles modified with a BBB-penetrating peptide co-delivering Aβ generation inhibitor and curcumin attenuate memory deficits and neuropathology in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Na; Lu, Shuai; Liu, Xiao-Ge; Zhu, Jie; Wang, Yu-Jiong; Liu, Rui-Tian

    2017-10-06

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by the formation of extracellular senile plaques and neuronal loss caused by amyloid β (Aβ) aggregates in the brains of AD patients. Conventional strategies failed to treat AD in clinical trials, partly due to the poor solubility, low bioavailability and ineffectiveness of the tested drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, AD is a complex, multifactorial neurodegenerative disease; one-target strategies may be insufficient to prevent the processes of AD. Here, we designed novel kind of poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by loading with Aβ generation inhibitor S1 (PQVGHL peptide) and curcumin to target the detrimental factors in AD development and by conjugating with brain targeting peptide CRT (cyclic CRTIGPSVC peptide), an iron-mimic peptide that targets transferrin receptor (TfR), to improve BBB penetration. The average particle size of drug-loaded PLGA nanoparticles and CRT-conjugated PLGA nanoparticles were 128.6 nm and 139.8 nm, respectively. The results of Y-maze and new object recognition test demonstrated that our PLGA nanoparticles significantly improved the spatial memory and recognition in transgenic AD mice. Moreover, PLGA nanoparticles remarkably decreased the level of Aβ, reactive oxygen species (ROS), TNF-α and IL-6, and enhanced the activities of super oxide dismutase (SOD) and synapse numbers in the AD mouse brains. Compared with other PLGA nanoparticles, CRT peptide modified-PLGA nanoparticles co-delivering S1 and curcumin exhibited most beneficial effect on the treatment of AD mice, suggesting that conjugated CRT peptide, and encapsulated S1 and curcumin exerted their corresponding functions for the treatment.

  20. Efficient generation of Rosa26 knock-in mice using CRISPR/Cas9 in C57BL/6 zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Van Trung; Weber, Timm; Graf, Robin; Sommermann, Thomas; Petsch, Kerstin; Sack, Ulrike; Volchkov, Pavel; Rajewsky, Klaus; Kühn, Ralf

    2016-01-16

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is increasingly used for gene inactivation in mouse zygotes, but homology-directed mutagenesis and use of inbred embryos are less established. In particular, Rosa26 knock-in alleles for the insertion of transgenes in a genomic 'safe harbor' site, have not been produced. Here we applied CRISPR/Cas9 for the knock-in of 8-11 kb inserts into Rosa26 of C57BL/6 zygotes. We found that 10-20 % of live pups derived from microinjected zygotes were founder mutants, without apparent off-target effects, and up to 50 % knock-in embryos were recovered upon coinjection of Cas9 mRNA and protein. Using this approach, we established a new mouse line for the Cre/loxP-dependent expression of Cas9. Altogether, our protocols and resources support the fast and direct generation of new Rosa26 knock-in alleles and of Cas9-mediated in vivo gene editing in the widely used C57BL/6 inbred strain.

  1. Fibulin-4 E57K Knock-in Mice Recapitulate Cutaneous, Vascular and Skeletal Defects of Recessive Cutis Laxa 1B with both Elastic Fiber and Collagen Fibril Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali; Halabi, Carmen M; Adams, Sheila M; Stoilov, Ivan; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Donahue, Adele; Mecham, Robert P; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2015-08-28

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix protein essential for elastic fiber formation. Frameshift and missense mutations in the fibulin-4 gene (EFEMP2/FBLN4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) 1B, characterized by loose skin, aortic aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, lung emphysema, and skeletal abnormalities. Homozygous missense mutations in FBLN4 are a prevalent cause of ARCL 1B. Here we generated a knock-in mouse strain bearing a recurrent fibulin-4 E57K homozygous missense mutation. The mutant mice survived into adulthood and displayed abnormalities in multiple organ systems, including loose skin, bent forelimb, aortic aneurysm, tortuous artery, and pulmonary emphysema. Biochemical studies of dermal fibroblasts showed that fibulin-4 E57K mutant protein was produced but was prone to dimer formation and inefficiently secreted, thereby triggering an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Immunohistochemistry detected a low level of fibulin-4 E57K protein in the knock-in skin along with altered expression of selected elastic fiber components. Processing of a precursor to mature lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking of elastin and collagen, was compromised. The knock-in skin had a reduced level of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, and ultrastructurally abnormal elastic fibers. Surprisingly, structurally aberrant collagen fibrils and altered organization into fibers were characteristics of the knock-in dermis and forelimb tendons. Type I collagen extracted from the knock-in skin had decreased amounts of covalent intermolecular cross-links, which could contribute to the collagen fibril abnormalities. Our studies provide the first evidence that fibulin-4 plays a role in regulating collagen fibril assembly and offer a preclinical platform for developing treatments for ARCL 1B. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Novel mutants of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora defective in the production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes generated by Mu transpososome-mediated insertion mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laasik, Eve; Ojarand, Merli; Pajunen, Maria; Savilahti, Harri; Mäe, Andres

    2005-02-01

    As in Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora the regulation details of the main virulence factors, encoding extracellular enzymes that degrade the plant cell wall, is only rudimentally understood, we performed a genetic screen to identify novel candidate genes involved in the process. Initially, we used Mu transpososome-mediated mutagenesis approach to generate a comprehensive transposon insertion mutant library of ca. 10000 clones and screened the clones for the loss of extracellular enzyme production. Extracellular enzymes production was abolished by mutations in the chromosomal helEcc, trkAEcc yheLEcc, glsEcc, igaAEcc and cysQEcc genes. The findings reported here demonstrate that we have isolated six new representatives that belong to the pool of genes modulating the production of virulence factors in E. carotovora.

  3. Delayed Hepatic Adaptation to Weaning in ACBP(-/-) Mice Is Caused by Disruption of the Epidermal Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neess, Ditte; Bek, Signe; Bloksgaard, Maria

    2013-01-01

    in the skin rather than in the liver. Similarly to ACBP(-/-) mice, K14-ACBP(-/-) mice exhibit an increased transepidermal water loss, and we show that the hepatic phenotype is caused specifically by the epidermal barrier defect, which leads to increased lipolysis in white adipose tissue. Our data demonstrate......We previously reported that mice deficient in acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) display a delayed metabolic adaptation to weaning. This includes a delayed activation of the hepatic lipogenic gene program, which may result from hepatic accumulation of triacylglycerol and/or cholesteryl esters...... in the late suckling period. To further investigate the basis for this phenotype, we generated mice deficient in ACBP in hepatocytes (Alb-ACBP(-/-)) and keratinocytes (K14-ACBP(-/-)). Surprisingly, the delayed adaptation to weaning, including hepatic lipid accumulation, is caused by ACBP deficiency...

  4. Requirement for CD4 T Cell Help in Generating Functional CD8 T Cell Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Shen, Hao

    2003-04-01

    Although primary CD8 responses to acute infections are independent of CD4 help, it is unknown whether a similar situation applies to secondary responses. We show that depletion of CD4 cells during the recall response has minimal effect, whereas depletion during the priming phase leads to reduced responses by memory CD8 cells to reinfection. Memory CD8 cells generated in CD4+/+ mice responded normally when transferred into CD4-/- hosts, whereas memory CD8 cells generated in CD4-/- mice mounted defective recall responses in CD4+/+ adoptive hosts. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in the development of functional CD8 memory.

  5. Thymectomized, irradiated, and bone marrow-reconstituted chimeras have normal cytolytic T lymphocyte precursors but a defect in lymphokine production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duprez, V.; Maziarz, R.; Weinberger, O.; Burakoff, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    A model system has been developed to study extrathymic T cell differentiation; mice have been thymectomized, lethally irradiated, and reconstituted with bone marrow cells depleted of Thy-1 + cells. After 8 wk, the spleen cells of these athymic, bone marrow-reconstituted chimeras contain Thy-1 + precytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) that are able to respond to antigen only if supernatant from Con A-activated T cells is added to culture. The phenotype of these pre-CTL is similar to that of thymocytes, suggesting that they may be immature T cells. Initial evaluation of the CTL repertoire of these athymic mice demonstrated that the CTL generated to trinitrophenyl-modified syngeneic cells are H-2-restricted, and that the CTL generated to alloantigens have many of the cross-reactivities observed in normal mice but not in nude mice. In this report, the authors demonstrate a helper T cell defect in these thymectomized chimeras. These chimeras lack an Ly-1 + helper cell required for thymocytes to differentiate to CTL. Further studies revealed that when spleen cells from these thymectomized chimeras were stimulated with Con A, they produced normal levels of interleukin 2. However, these splenocytes were defective in the production of another factor needed for CTL differentiation

  6. Genetic control of a central pattern generator: rhythmic oromotor movement in mice is controlled by a major locus near Atp1a2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Boughter

    Full Text Available Fluid licking in mice is a rhythmic behavior that is controlled by a central pattern generator (CPG located in a complex of brainstem nuclei. C57BL/6J (B6 and DBA/2J (D2 strains differ significantly in water-restricted licking, with a highly heritable difference in rates (h(2≥0.62 and a corresponding 20% difference in interlick interval (mean ± SEM = 116.3±1 vs 95.4±1.1 ms. We systematically quantified motor output in these strains, their F(1 hybrids, and a set of 64 BXD progeny strains. The mean primary interlick interval (MPI varied continuously among progeny strains. We detected a significant quantitative trait locus (QTL for a CPG controlling lick rate on Chr 1 (Lick1, and a suggestive locus on Chr 10 (Lick10. Linkage was verified by testing of B6.D2-1D congenic stock in which a segment of Chr 1 of the D2 strain was introgressed onto the B6 parent. The Lick1 interval on distal Chr 1 contains several strong candidate genes. One of these is a sodium/potassium pump subunit (Atp1a2 with widespread expression in astrocytes, as well as in a restricted population of neurons. Both this subunit and the entire Na(+/K(+-ATPase molecule have been implicated in rhythmogenesis for respiration and locomotion. Sequence variants in or near Apt1a2 strongly modulate expression of the cognate mRNA in multiple brain regions. This gene region has recently been sequenced exhaustively and we have cataloged over 300 non-coding and synonymous mutations segregating among BXD strains, one or more of which is likely to contribute to differences in central pattern generator tempo.

  7. Primordial inhomogeneities from massive defects during inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Karami, Asieh; Rostami, Tahereh, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: karami@ipm.ir, E-mail: t.rostami@ipm.ir [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    We consider the imprints of local massive defects, such as a black hole or a massive monopole, during inflation. The massive defect breaks the background homogeneity. We consider the limit that the physical Schwarzschild radius of the defect is much smaller than the inflationary Hubble radius so a perturbative analysis is allowed. The inhomogeneities induced in scalar and gravitational wave power spectrum are calculated. We obtain the amplitudes of dipole, quadrupole and octupole anisotropies in curvature perturbation power spectrum and identify the relative configuration of the defect to CMB sphere in which large observable dipole asymmetry can be generated. We observe a curious reflection symmetry in which the configuration where the defect is inside the CMB comoving sphere has the same inhomogeneous variance as its mirror configuration where the defect is outside the CMB sphere.

  8. Cytoskeletal defects in Bmpr2-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer A; Hemnes, Anna R; Perrien, Daniel S; Schuster, Manfred; Robinson, Linda J; Gladson, Santhi; Loibner, Hans; Bai, Susan; Blackwell, Tom R; Tada, Yuji; Harral, Julie W; Talati, Megha; Lane, Kirk B; Fagan, Karen A; West, James

    2012-03-01

    The heritable form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is typically caused by a mutation in bone morphogenic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2), and mice expressing Bmpr2 mutations develop PAH with features similar to human disease. BMPR2 is known to interact with the cytoskeleton, and human array studies in PAH patients confirm alterations in cytoskeletal pathways. The goal of this study was to evaluate cytoskeletal defects in BMPR2-associated PAH. Expression arrays on our Bmpr2 mutant mouse lungs revealed cytoskeletal defects as a prominent molecular consequence of universal expression of a Bmpr2 mutation (Rosa26-Bmpr2(R899X)). Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells cultured from these mice have histological and functional cytoskeletal defects. Stable transfection of different BMPR2 mutations into pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells revealed that cytoskeletal defects are common to multiple BMPR2 mutations and are associated with activation of the Rho GTPase, Rac1. Rac1 defects are corrected in cell culture and in vivo through administration of exogenous recombinant human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (rhACE2). rhACE2 reverses 77% of gene expression changes in Rosa26-Bmpr2(R899X) transgenic mice, in particular, correcting defects in cytoskeletal function. Administration of rhACE2 to Rosa26-Bmpr2(R899X) mice with established PAH normalizes pulmonary pressures. Together, these findings suggest that cytoskeletal function is central to the development of BMPR2-associated PAH and that intervention against cytoskeletal defects may reverse established disease.

  9. Mice lacking Ras-GRF1 show contextual fear conditioning but not spatial memory impairments: convergent evidence from two independently generated mouse mutant lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele ed'Isa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ras-GRF1 is a neuronal specific guanine exchange factor that, once activated by both ionotropic and metabotropic neurotransmitter receptors, can stimulate Ras proteins, leading to long-term phosphorylation of downstream signaling. The two available reports on the behavior of two independently generated Ras-GRF1 deficient mouse lines provide contrasting evidence on the role of Ras-GRF1 in spatial memory and contextual fear conditioning. These discrepancies may be due to the distinct alterations introduced in the mouse genome by gene targeting in the two lines that could differentially affect expression of nearby genes located in the imprinted region containing the Ras-grf1 locus. In order to determine the real contribution of Ras-GRF1 to spatial memory we compared in Morris Water Maze learning the Brambilla’s mice with a third mouse line (GENA53 in which a nonsense mutation was introduced in the Ras-GRF1 coding region without additional changes in the genome and we found that memory in this task is normal. Also, we measured both contextual and cued fear conditioning, which were previously reported to be affected in the Brambilla’s mice, and we confirmed that contextual learning but not cued conditioning is impaired in both mouse lines. In addition, we also tested both lines for the first time in conditioned place aversion in the Intellicage, an ecological and remotely controlled behavioral test, and we observed normal learning. Finally, based on previous reports of other mutant lines suggesting that Ras-GRF1 may control body weight, we also measured this non-cognitive phenotype and we confirmed that both Ras-GRF1 deficient mutants are smaller than their control littermates. In conclusion, we demonstrate that Ras-GRF1 has no unique role in spatial memory while its function in contextual fear conditioning is likely to be due not only to its involvement in amygdalar functions but possibly to some distinct hippocampal connections specific to

  10. The R21C Mutation in Cardiac Troponin I Imposes Differences in Contractile Force Generation between the Left and Right Ventricles of Knock-In Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingsheng Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-linked R21C (arginine to cysteine mutation in human cardiac troponin I (cTnI on the contractile properties and myofilament protein phosphorylation in papillary muscle preparations from left (LV and right (RV ventricles of homozygous R21C+/+ knock-in mice. The maximal steady-state force was significantly reduced in skinned papillary muscle strips from the LV compared to RV, with the latter displaying the level of force observed in LV or RV from wild-type (WT mice. There were no differences in the Ca2+ sensitivity between the RV and LV of R21C+/+ mice; however, the Ca2+ sensitivity of force was higher in RV-R21C+/+ compared with RV-WT and lower in LV- R21C+/+ compared with LV-WT. We also observed partial loss of Ca2+ regulation at low [Ca2+]. In addition, R21C+/+-KI hearts showed no Ser23/24-cTnI phosphorylation compared to LV or RV of WT mice. However, phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC was significantly higher in the RV versus LV of R21C+/+ mice and versus LV and RV of WT mice. The difference in RLC phosphorylation between the ventricles of R21C+/+ mice likely contributes to observed differences in contractile force and the lower tension monitored in the LV of HCM mice.

  11. BMP9 ameliorates amyloidosis and the cholinergic defect in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Rebecca M; Norman, Timothy A; Haydar, Tarik F; Slack, Barbara E; Leeman, Susan E; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Mellott, Tiffany J

    2013-11-26

    Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) promotes the acquisition of the cholinergic phenotype in basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCN) during development and protects these neurons from cholinergic dedifferentiation following axotomy when administered in vivo. A decline in BFCN function occurs in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and contributes to the AD-associated memory deficits. We infused BMP9 intracerebroventricularly for 7 d in transgenic AD model mice expressing green fluorescent protein specifically in cholinergic neurons (APP.PS1/CHGFP) and in wild-type littermate controls (WT/CHGFP). We used 5-mo-old mice, an age when the AD transgenics display early amyloid deposition and few cholinergic defects, and 10-mo-old mice, by which time these mice exhibit established disease. BMP9 infusion reduced the number of Aβ42-positive amyloid plaques in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of 5- and 10-mo-old APP.PS1/CHGFP mice and reversed the reductions in choline acetyltransferase protein levels in the hippocampus of 10-mo-old APP.PS1/CHGFP mice. The treatment increased cholinergic fiber density in the hippocampus of both WT/CHGFP and APP.PS1/CHGFP mice at both ages. BMP9 infusion also increased hippocampal levels of neurotrophin 3, insulin-like growth factor 1, and nerve growth factor and of the nerve growth factor receptors, tyrosine kinase receptor A and p75/NGFR, irrespective of the genotype of the mice. These data show that BMP9 administration is effective in reducing the Aβ42 amyloid plaque burden, reversing cholinergic neuron abnormalities, and generating a neurotrophic milieu for BFCN in a mouse model of AD and provide evidence that the BMP9-signaling pathway may constitute a therapeutic target for AD.

  12. Periodontal Defects in the A116T Knock-in Murine Model of Odontohypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B L; Sheen, C R; Hatch, N E; Liu, J; Cory, E; Narisawa, S; Kiffer-Moreira, T; Sah, R L; Whyte, M P; Somerman, M J; Millán, J L

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in ALPL result in hypophosphatasia (HPP), a disease causing defective skeletal mineralization. ALPL encodes tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an enzyme that promotes mineralization by reducing inorganic pyrophosphate, a mineralization inhibitor. In addition to skeletal defects, HPP causes dental defects, and a mild clinical form of HPP, odontohypophosphatasia, features only a dental phenotype. The Alpl knockout (Alpl (-/-)) mouse phenocopies severe infantile HPP, including profound skeletal and dental defects. However, the severity of disease in Alpl (-/-) mice prevents analysis at advanced ages, including studies to target rescue of dental tissues. We aimed to generate a knock-in mouse model of odontohypophosphatasia with a primarily dental phenotype, based on a mutation (c.346G>A) identified in a human kindred with autosomal dominant odontohypophosphatasia. Biochemical, skeletal, and dental analyses were performed on the resulting Alpl(+/A116T) mice to validate this model. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured 50% reduction in plasma ALP activity compared with wild-type controls. No differences in litter size, survival, or body weight were observed in Alpl(+/A116T) versus wild-type mice. The postcranial skeleton of Alpl(+/A116T) mice was normal by radiography, with no differences in femur length, cortical/trabecular structure or mineral density, or mechanical properties. Parietal bone trabecular compartment was mildly altered. Alpl(+/A116T) mice featured alterations in the alveolar bone, including radiolucencies and resorptive lesions, osteoid accumulation on the alveolar bone crest, and significant differences in several bone properties measured by micro-computed tomography. Nonsignificant changes in acellular cementum did not appear to affect periodontal attachment or function, although circulating ALP activity was correlated significantly with incisor cementum thickness. The Alpl(+/A116T) mouse is the first model of odontohypophosphatasia

  13. Decreased thyroidal response to thyrotropin in diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagchi, N.; Brown, T.R.; Shivers, B.; Lucas, S.; Mack, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of diabetes mellitus on the synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormone ws investigated in mice with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Thyroid glands were labeled in vivo with 131I for 2 h. In control animals, TSH stimulated the synthesis of PB127I and 131I-labeled iodothyronines and simultaneously decreased the proportion of 131I-. These effects of TSH were not observed in diabetic animals but were demonstrable in diabetic animals treated with insulin. For studies of hormone secretion, labeled thyroid glands were cultured in vitro in medium containing 1 mM mononitrotyrosine. The rate of the hydrolysis of labeled thyroglobulin was measured as the proportion of 131I-labeled iodotyrosines and 131I-labeled iodothyronines recovered at the end of culture and was used as an index of thyroid secretion. TSH in vivo stimulated the rate of thyroglobulin hydrolysis for 6 h, with a peak occurring after 2 h. The diabetic mice had a diminished response to TSH, which improved on treatment with insulin. The addition of TSH and insulin to the culture medium significantly increased the rate of thyroglobulin hydrolysis in glands of diabetic mice over that resulting from the addition of dibutyryl cAMP alone. The generation of thyroidal cAMP in response to TSH was higher in diabetic mice than in controls. The rise in plasma T4 and T3 2 h after the administration of TSH was less in diabetic mice than in control mice or diabetic mice treated with insulin. Our studies, therefore, indicate that the thyroidal response to TSH is decreased in diabetes mellitus. The defect appears to be at a step beyond the generation of cAMP

  14. Green tea polyphenols rescue of brain defects induced by overexpression of DYRK1A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayçal Guedj

    Full Text Available Individuals with partial HSA21 trisomies and mice with partial MMU16 trisomies containing an extra copy of the DYRK1A gene present various alterations in brain morphogenesis. They present also learning impairments modeling those encountered in Down syndrome. Previous MRI and histological analyses of a transgenic mice generated using a human YAC construct that contains five genes including DYRK1A reveal that DYRK1A is involved, during development, in the control of brain volume and cell density of specific brain regions. Gene dosage correction induces a rescue of the brain volume alterations. DYRK1A is also involved in the control of synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. Increased gene dosage results in brain morphogenesis defects, low BDNF levels and mnemonic deficits in these mice. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG - a member of a natural polyphenols family, found in great amount in green tea leaves - is a specific and safe DYRK1A inhibitor. We maintained control and transgenic mice overexpressing DYRK1A on two different polyphenol-based diets, from gestation to adulthood. The major features of the transgenic phenotype were rescued in these mice.

  15. Craniotomy Frontal Bone Defect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... Defect reconstruction and fixation of the graft: The defect of ... where all loose fragments of fractured frontal bone was removed via the ... Mandible. • Ilium. • Allograft ... pediatric patients owing to skull growth. Thus, autologous ...

  16. Congenital platelet function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... Congenital platelet function defects are bleeding disorders that cause reduced platelet function. Most of the time, people with these disorders have ...

  17. Defect of the Eyelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guanning Nina; Pelton, Ron W; Humphrey, Clinton D; Kriet, John David

    2017-08-01

    Eyelid defects disrupt the complex natural form and function of the eyelids and present a surgical challenge. Detailed knowledge of eyelid anatomy is essential in evaluating a defect and composing a reconstructive plan. Numerous reconstructive techniques have been described, including primary closure, grafting, and a variety of local flaps. This article describes an updated reconstructive ladder for eyelid defects that can be used in various permutations to solve most eyelid defects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Recombinant polymorphic membrane protein D in combination with a novel, second-generation lipid adjuvant protects against intra-vaginal Chlamydia trachomatis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Wayne; Brown, Naj; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Coler, Rhea; Reed, Steve; Carter, Darrick; Bland, Martin; Kaye, Paul M; Lacey, Charles J N

    2016-07-29

    The development of a chlamydial vaccine that elicits protective mucosal immunity is of paramount importance in combatting the global spread of sexually transmitted Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) infections. While the identification and prioritization of chlamydial antigens is a crucial prerequisite for efficacious vaccine design, it is likely that novel adjuvant development and selection will also play a pivotal role in the translational potential of preclinical Ct vaccines. Although the molecular nature of the immuno-modulatory component is of primary importance, adjuvant formulation and delivery systems may also govern vaccine efficacy and potency. Our study provides the first preclinical evaluation of recombinant Ct polymorphic membrane protein D (rPmpD) in combination with three different formulations of a novel second-generation lipid adjuvant (SLA). SLA was rationally designed in silico by modification of glucopyranosyl lipid adjuvant (GLA), a TLR4 agonistic precursor molecule currently in Phase II clinical development. We demonstrate robust protection against intra-vaginal Ct challenge in mice, evidenced by significantly enhanced resistance to infection and reduction in mean bacterial load. Strikingly, protection was found to correlate with the presence of robust anti-rPmpD serum and cervico-vaginal IgG titres, even in the absence of adjuvant-induced Th1-type cellular immune responses elicited by each SLA formulation, and we further show that anti-rPmpD antibodies recognize Ct EBs. These findings highlight the utility of SLA and rational molecular design of adjuvants in preclinical Ct vaccine development, but also suggest an important role for anti-rPmpD antibodies in protection against urogenital Ct infection. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Knockdown of Pnpla6 protein results in motor neuron defects in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Song

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 6 (PNPLA6, also known as neuropathy target esterase (NTE or SPG39, cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. Although studies on animal models, including mice and Drosophila, have extended our understanding of PNPLA6, its roles in neural development and in HSP are not clearly understood. Here, we describe the generation of a vertebrate model of PNPLA6 insufficiency using morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown in zebrafish (Danio rerio. Pnpla6 knockdown resulted in developmental abnormalities and motor neuron defects, including axon truncation and branching. The phenotypes in pnpla6 knockdown morphants were rescued by the introduction of wild-type, but not mutant, human PNPLA6 mRNA. Our results also revealed the involvement of BMP signaling in pnpla6 knockdown phenotypes. Taken together, these results demonstrate an important role of PNPLA6 in motor neuron development and implicate overexpression of BMP signaling as a possible mechanism underlying the developmental defects in pnpla6 morphants.

  20. Point defects in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The principal properties of point defects are studied: thermodynamics, electronic structure, interactions with etended defects, production by irradiation. Some measuring methods are presented: atomic diffusion, spectroscopic methods, diffuse scattering of neutron and X rays, positron annihilation, molecular dynamics. Then points defects in various materials are investigated: ionic crystals, oxides, semiconductor materials, metals, intermetallic compounds, carbides, nitrides [fr

  1. Fibrous metaphyseal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschl, P.; Hajek, P.C.; Pechmann, U.

    1989-01-01

    Sixteen patients with fibrous metaphyseal defects were examined with both plain radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Depending on the age of the fibrous metaphyseal defects, characteristic radiomorphologic changes were found which correlated well with MR images. Following intravenous Gadolinium-DTPA injection, fibrous metaphyseal defects invariably exhibited a hyperintense border and signal enhancement. (orig./GDG)

  2. Birth Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Defects KidsHealth / For Parents / Birth Defects What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Anomalías congénitas What Are Birth Defects? While still in the womb, some babies ...

  3. Molecular-dynamics simulation of defect formation energy in boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, W.H.; Hwang, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the defect formation energy of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using molecular dynamics simulation. Although the defect with tetragon-octagon pairs (TOP) is favored in the flat BNNTs cap, BN clusters, and the growth of BNNTs, the formation energy of the TOP defect is significantly higher than that of the pentagon-heptagon pairs (PHP) defect in BNNTs. The PHP defect reduces the effect of the structural distortion caused by the TOP defect, in spite of homoelemental bonds. The instability of the TOP defect generates the structural transformation into BNNTs with no defect at about 1500 K. This mechanism shows that the TOP defect is less favored in case of BNNTs

  4. The generation and characterization of novel Col1a1FRT-Cre-ER-T2-FRT and Col1a1FRT-STOP-FRT-Cre-ER-T2 mice for sequential mutagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minsi; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Novel genetically engineered mouse models using the Cre-loxP or the Flp-FRT systems have generated useful reagents to manipulate the mouse genome in a temporally-regulated and tissue-specific manner. By incorporating a constitutive Cre driver line into a mouse model in which FRT-regulated genes in other cell types are regulated by Flp-FRT recombinase, gene expression can be manipulated simultaneously in separate tissue compartments. This application of dual recombinase technology can be used to dissect the role of stromal cells in tumor development and cancer therapy. Generating mice in which Cre-ERT2 is expressed under Flp-FRT-mediated regulation would enable step-wise manipulation of the mouse genome using dual recombinase technology. Such next-generation mouse models would enable sequential mutagenesis to better model cancer and define genes required for tumor maintenance. Here, we generated novel genetically engineered mice that activate or delete Cre-ERT2 in response to Flp recombinase. To potentially utilize the large number of Cre-loxP-regulated transgenic alleles that have already been targeted into the Rosa26 locus, such as different reporters and mutant genes, we targeted the two novel Cre-ERT2 alleles into the endogenous Col1a1 locus for ubiquitous expression. In the Col1a1FRT-Cre-ER-T2-FRT mice, Flp deletes Cre-ERT2, so that Cre-ERT2 is only expressed in cells that have never expressed Flp. In contrast, in the Col1a1FRT-STOP-FRT-Cre-ER-T2 mice, Flp removes the STOP cassette to allow Cre-ERT2 expression so that Cre-ERT2 is only expressed in cells that previously expressed Flp. These two new novel mouse strains will be complementary to each other and will enable the exploration of complex biological questions in development, normal tissue homeostasis and cancer. PMID:26183214

  5. The generation and characterization of novel Col1a1FRT-Cre-ER-T2-FRT and Col1a1FRT-STOP-FRT-Cre-ER-T2 mice for sequential mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsi Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Novel genetically engineered mouse models using the Cre-loxP or the Flp-FRT systems have generated useful reagents to manipulate the mouse genome in a temporally-regulated and tissue-specific manner. By incorporating a constitutive Cre driver line into a mouse model in which FRT-regulated genes in other cell types are regulated by Flp-FRT recombinase, gene expression can be manipulated simultaneously in separate tissue compartments. This application of dual recombinase technology can be used to dissect the role of stromal cells in tumor development and cancer therapy. Generating mice in which Cre-ERT2 is expressed under Flp-FRT-mediated regulation would enable step-wise manipulation of the mouse genome using dual recombinase technology. Such next-generation mouse models would enable sequential mutagenesis to better model cancer and define genes required for tumor maintenance. Here, we generated novel genetically engineered mice that activate or delete Cre-ERT2 in response to Flp recombinase. To potentially utilize the large number of Cre-loxP-regulated transgenic alleles that have already been targeted into the Rosa26 locus, such as different reporters and mutant genes, we targeted the two novel Cre-ERT2 alleles into the endogenous Col1a1 locus for ubiquitous expression. In the Col1a1FRT-Cre-ER-T2-FRT mice, Flp deletes Cre-ERT2, so that Cre-ERT2 is only expressed in cells that have never expressed Flp. In contrast, in the Col1a1FRT-STOP-FRT-Cre-ER-T2 mice, Flp removes the STOP cassette to allow Cre-ERT2 expression so that Cre-ERT2 is only expressed in cells that previously expressed Flp. These two new novel mouse strains will be complementary to each other and will enable the exploration of complex biological questions in development, normal tissue homeostasis and cancer.

  6. Phonons, defects and optical damage in crystalline acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosic, Thomas J.; Hill, Jeffrey R.; Dlott, Dana D.

    1986-04-01

    Intense picosecond pulses cause accumulated optical damage in acetanilide crystals at low temperature. Catastrophic damage to the irradiated volume occurs after an incubation period where defects accumulate. The optical damage is monitored with subanosecond time resolution. The generation of defects is studied with damage-detected picosecond spectroscopy. The accumulation of defects is studied by time-resolved coherent Raman scattering, which is used to measure optical phonon scattering from the accumulating defects.

  7. Dirichlet topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, S.M.; Trodden, M.

    1998-01-01

    We propose a class of field theories featuring solitonic solutions in which topological defects can end when they intersect other defects of equal or higher dimensionality. Such configurations may be termed open-quotes Dirichlet topological defects,close quotes in analogy with the D-branes of string theory. Our discussion focuses on defects in scalar field theories with either gauge or global symmetries, in 3+1 dimensions; the types of defects considered include walls ending on walls, strings on walls, and strings on strings. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  8. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  9. On holographic defect entropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, John; Jensen, Kristan; O’Bannon, Andy; Tsatis, Efstratios; Wrase, Timm

    2014-01-01

    We study a number of (3+1)- and (2+1)-dimensional defect and boundary conformal field theories holographically dual to supergravity theories. In all cases the defects or boundaries are planar, and the defects are codimension-one. Using holography, we compute the entanglement entropy of a (hemi-)spherical region centered on the defect (boundary). We define defect and boundary entropies from the entanglement entropy by an appropriate background subtraction. For some (3+1)-dimensional theories we find evidence that the defect/boundary entropy changes monotonically under certain renormalization group flows triggered by operators localized at the defect or boundary. This provides evidence that the g-theorem of (1+1)-dimensional field theories generalizes to higher dimensions

  10. Deficient CD4+ T cell priming and regression of CD8+ T cell functionality in virus-infected mice lacking a normal B cell compartment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2003-01-01

    of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells was markedly impaired in B(-/-) mice infected with either virus strain. Thus, our results indicate that B cells play an important role in antiviral immunity not only as Ab producers, but also in promoting an optimal and sustained T cell response. The T cell defects......In this study, we investigate the state of T cell-mediated immunity in B cell-deficient (B(-/-)) mice infected with two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus known to differ markedly in their capacity to persist. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the more persisting virus, virus......-specific CD8(+) T cells are initially generated that are qualitatively similar to those in wild-type mice. However, although cell numbers are well sustained over time, the capacity to produce cytokines is rapidly impaired. In similarly infected B(-/-) BALB/c mice, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are completely...

  11. Genital and Urinary Tract Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions > Genital and urinary tract defects Genital and urinary tract defects E-mail to a friend Please fill ... and extra fluids. What problems can genital and urinary tract defects cause? Genital and urinary tract defects affect ...

  12. Tritium releases, birth defects and infant deaths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The AECB has published a report 'Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and Birth Defects and Infant Mortality in Nearby Communities 1971-1988' (report number INFO-0401). This presents the results of a detailed analysis of deaths and birth defects occurring in infants born to mothers living in the area (25 Km radius) of the Pickering nuclear power plant, over an 18-year period. The analysis looked at the frequency of these defects and deaths in comparison to the general rate for Ontario, and also in relation to airborne and waterborne releases of tritium from the power plant. The overall conclusion was that the rates of infant death and birth defects were generally not higher in the study population than in all of Ontario. There was no prevalent relationship between these deaths and defects and tritium releases measured either at the power plant or by ground monitoring stations t some distance from the facility

  13. Cloning Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Atsuo

    2017-08-01

    Viable and fertile mice can be generated by somatic nuclear transfer into enucleated oocytes, presumably because the transplanted somatic cell genome becomes reprogrammed by factors in the oocyte. The first somatic cloned offspring of mice were obtained by directly injecting donor nuclei into recipient enucleated oocytes. When this method is used (the so-called Honolulu method of somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]), the donor nuclei readily and completely condense within the enucleated metaphase II-arrested oocytes, which contain high levels of M-phase-promoting factor (MPF). It is believed that the condensation of the donor chromosomes promotes complete reprogramming of the donor genome within the mouse oocytes. Another key to the success of mouse cloning is the use of blunt micropipettes attached to a piezo impact-driving micromanipulation device. This system saves a significant amount of time during the micromanipulation of oocytes and thus minimizes the loss of oocyte viability in vitro. For example, a group of 20 oocytes can be enucleated within 10 min by an experienced operator. This protocol is composed of seven parts: (1) preparing micropipettes, (2) setting up the enucleation and injection micropipettes, (3) collecting and enucleating oocytes, (4) preparing nucleus donor cells, (5) injecting donor nuclei, (6) activating embryos and culturing, and (7) transferring cloned embryos. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. EUV actinic defect inspection and defect printability at the sub-32 nm half pitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Sungmin; Kearney, Patrick; Wurm, Stefan; Goodwin, Frank; Han, Hakseung; Goldberg, Kenneth; Mochi, Iacopp; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2009-08-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask blanks with embedded phase defects were inspected with a reticle actinic inspection tool (AIT) and the Lasertec M7360. The Lasertec M7360, operated at SEMA TECH's Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) in Albany, NY, has a sensitivity to multilayer defects down to 40-45 nm, which is not likely sufficient for mask blank development below the 32 nm half-pitch node. Phase defect printability was simulated to calculate the required defect sensitivity for a next generation blank inspection tool to support reticle development for the sub-32 nm half-pitch technology node. Defect mitigation technology is proposed to take advantage of mask blanks with some defects. This technology will reduce the cost of ownership of EUV mask blanks. This paper will also discuss the kind of infrastructure that will be required for the development and mass production stages.

  15. Contribuição do plasma rico em plaquetas na reparação óssea de defeitos críticos criados em crânios de camundongos Platelet-rich plasma contribute to the process of bone repair of critical defects created in the calvaria of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betânia Souza Monteiro

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo, foram avaliados, de forma macro e microscópica, os resultados da aplicação do PRP em defeitos ósseos críticos de 6,0mm de diâmetro confeccionados em calvária de 24 camundongos isogênicos C57BL/6 jovens, separados em dois grupos experimentais. O grupo controle não recebeu tratamento, e no grupo tratado foram depositados, no interior do defeito, 50,0µL plasma em gel contendo 1,0x10(9 plaquetas. Constatou-se que o gel de PRP autólogo depositado em defeitos críticos contribuiu positivamente para o processo de reparação óssea, mormente na fase inicial.This study aimed to evaluate macro and microscopic results after PRP application in bone critical defects of 6.0mm in diameter realized in cavarial of twenty-four young isogenic mice C57BL/6. Control group didn't receive treatment and in the treated group it was deposited 50.0µL of plasma gel containing 1.0x10(9 platelets in the defects. It was found that autologous PRP gel contributed positively to the bone repair process, especially in initial phase.

  16. Intramuscular Immunization of Mice with the Live-Attenuated Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Vaccine Strain VC2 Expressing Equine Herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) Glycoprotein D Generates Anti-EHV-1 Immune Responses in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiliang A; Stanfield, Brent A; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Naidu, Shan; Langohr, Ingeborg; Del Piero, Fabio; Ferracone, Jacqueline; Roy, Alma A; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2017-06-15

    Vaccination remains the best option to combat equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) infection, and several different strategies of vaccination have been investigated and developed over the past few decades. Herein, we report that the live-attenuated herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) VC2 vaccine strain, which has been shown to be unable to enter into neurons and establish latency in mice, can be utilized as a vector for the heterologous expression of EHV-1 glycoprotein D (gD) and that the intramuscular immunization of mice results in strong antiviral humoral and cellular immune responses. The VC2-EHV-1-gD recombinant virus was constructed by inserting an EHV-1 gD expression cassette under the control of the cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter into the VC2 vector in place of the HSV-1 thymidine kinase (UL23) gene. The vaccines were introduced into mice through intramuscular injection. Vaccination with both the VC2-EHV-1-gD vaccine and the commercially available vaccine Vetera EHV XP 1/4 (Vetera; Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica) resulted in the production of neutralizing antibodies, the levels of which were significantly higher in comparison to those in VC2- and mock-vaccinated animals ( P < 0.01 or P < 0.001). Analysis of EHV-1-reactive IgG subtypes demonstrated that vaccination with the VC2-EHV-1-gD vaccine stimulated robust IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies after three vaccinations ( P < 0.001). Interestingly, Vetera-vaccinated mice produced significantly higher levels of IgM than mice in the other groups before and after challenge ( P < 0.01 or P < 0.05). Vaccination with VC2-EHV-1-gD stimulated strong cellular immune responses, characterized by the upregulation of both interferon- and tumor necrosis factor-positive CD4 + T cells and CD8 + T cells. Overall, the data suggest that the HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain may be used as a viral vector for the vaccination of horses as well as, potentially, for the vaccination of other economically important animals. IMPORTANCE A novel virus

  17. The role of CD80/CD86 in generation and maintenance of functional virus-specific CD8+ T cells in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grujic, Mirjana; Bartholdy, Christina; Remy, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-specific CD8(+) T cell responses are considered to be independent of CD28-B7 costimulation. However, the LCMV-specific response has never been evaluated in B7.1/B7.2(-/-) mice. For this reason, we decided to study the T cell response in B7.1/B7.2(-/-) mice......, but no chronic infection. Taken together, these results indicate that B7 costimulation is required for induction and maintenance of LCMV-specific CD8(+) T cell memory, irrespective of the LCMV strain used for priming. However, the erosion of CD8(+) T cell memory in B7.1/B7.2(-/-) mice was more pronounced...

  18. Opposite effects of catalase and MnSOD ectopic expression on stress induced defects and mortality in the desmin deficient cardiomyopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapti, Kleopatra; Diokmetzidou, Antigoni; Kloukina, Ismini; Milner, Derek J; Varela, Aimilia; Davos, Constantinos H; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative stress has been linked strongly to cell death and cardiac remodeling processes, all hallmarks of heart failure. Mice deficient for desmin (des-/-), the major muscle specific intermediate filament protein, develop dilated cardiomyopathy and heart failure characterized by mitochondrial defects and cardiomyocyte death. The cellular and biochemical alterations in the hearts of these mice strongly suggest that oxidative stress is one of the mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of the phenotype. Recently, we showed that indeed the desmin deficient cardiomyocytes are under increased oxidative stress. In order to verify these findings in vivo, we generated transgenic animals overexpressing SOD2 (MnSOD) and/or catalase in the heart and crossed them with des-/- mice, thus allowing us to evaluate the contribution of oxidative injury in inherited cardiomyopathies, as well as the therapeutic potential of antioxidant strategies. Moderate MnSOD and/or catalase overexpression in des-/- hearts leads to a marked decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), ameliorates mitochondrial and other ultrastructural defects, minimizes myocardial degeneration and leads to a significant improvement of cardiac function. Importantly, catalase overexpression increased the 50% survival rate of des-/- mice in an obligatory exercise to 100%. In contrast, MnSOD overexpression enhanced the lethality of des-/- mice, underscoring the importance of a fine balanced cellular redox status. Overall, the present study supports the contribution of oxidative stress in the development of des-/- cardiomyopathy and points to a well-considered antioxidant treatment as therapeutic for cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Defects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Romano, Lucia; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2015-01-01

    This volume, number 91 in the Semiconductor and Semimetals series, focuses on defects in semiconductors. Defects in semiconductors help to explain several phenomena, from diffusion to getter, and to draw theories on materials' behavior in response to electrical or mechanical fields. The volume includes chapters focusing specifically on electron and proton irradiation of silicon, point defects in zinc oxide and gallium nitride, ion implantation defects and shallow junctions in silicon and germanium, and much more. It will help support students and scientists in their experimental and theoret

  20. Driving down defect density in composite EUV patterning film stacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, Luciana; Petrillo, Karen; De Silva, Anuja; Arnold, John; Felix, Nelson; Johnson, Richard; Murray, Cody; Hubbard, Alex; Durrant, Danielle; Hontake, Koichi; Huli, Lior; Lemley, Corey; Hetzer, Dave; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Matsunaga, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) technology is one of the leading candidates for enabling the next generation devices, for 7nm node and beyond. As the technology matures, further improvement is required in the area of blanket film defectivity, pattern defectivity, CD uniformity, and LWR/LER. As EUV pitch scaling approaches sub 20 nm, new techniques and methods must be developed to reduce the overall defectivity, mitigate pattern collapse and eliminate film related defect. IBM Corporation and Tokyo Electron Limited (TELTM) are continuously collaborating to develop manufacturing quality processes for EUVL. In this paper, we review key defectivity learning required to enable 7nm node and beyond technology. We will describe ongoing progress in addressing these challenges through track-based processes (coating, developer, baking), highlighting the limitations of common defect detection strategies and outlining methodologies necessary for accurate characterization and mitigation of blanket defectivity in EUV patterning stacks. We will further discuss defects related to pattern collapse and thinning of underlayer films.

  1. ILT based defect simulation of inspection images accurately predicts mask defect printability on wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Prakash; Paninjath, Sankaranarayanan; Pereira, Mark; Buck, Peter

    2016-05-01

    printability of defects at wafer level and automates the process of defect dispositioning from images captured using high resolution inspection machine. It first eliminates false defects due to registration, focus errors, image capture errors and random noise caused during inspection. For the remaining real defects, actual mask-like contours are generated using the Calibre® ILT solution [1][2], which is enhanced to predict the actual mask contours from high resolution defect images. It enables accurate prediction of defect contours, which is not possible from images captured using inspection machine because some information is already lost due to optical effects. Calibre's simulation engine is used to generate images at wafer level using scanner optical conditions and mask-like contours as input. The tool then analyses simulated images and predicts defect printability. It automatically calculates maximum CD variation and decides which defects are severe to affect patterns on wafer. In this paper, we assess the printability of defects for the mask of advanced technology nodes. In particular, we will compare the recovered mask contours with contours extracted from SEM image of the mask and compare simulation results with AIMSTM for a variety of defects and patterns. The results of printability assessment and the accuracy of comparison are presented in this paper. We also suggest how this method can be extended to predict printability of defects identified on EUV photomasks.

  2. MER5101, a novel Aβ1-15:DT conjugate vaccine, generates a robust anti-Aβ antibody response and attenuates Aβ pathology and cognitive deficits in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Frost, Jeffrey L; Sun, Jing; Fu, Hongjun; Grimes, Stephen; Blackburn, Peter; Lemere, Cynthia A

    2013-04-17

    Active amyloid-β (Aβ) immunotherapy is under investigation to prevent or treat early Alzheimer's disease (AD). In 2002, a Phase II clinical trial (AN1792) was halted due to meningoencephalitis in ∼6% of the AD patients, possibly caused by a T-cell-mediated immunological response. Thus, generating a vaccine that safely generates high anti-Aβ antibody levels in the elderly is required. In this study, MER5101, a novel conjugate of Aβ1-15 peptide (a B-cell epitope fragment) conjugated to an immunogenic carrier protein, diphtheria toxoid (DT), and formulated in a nanoparticular emulsion-based adjuvant, was administered to 10-month-old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic (Tg) and wild-type (Wt) mice. High anti-Aβ antibody levels were observed in both vaccinated APPswe/PS1ΔE9 Tg and Wt mice. Antibody isotypes were mainly IgG1 and IgG2b, suggesting a Th2-biased response. Restimulation of splenocytes with the Aβ1-15:DT conjugate resulted in a strong proliferative response, whereas proliferation was absent after restimulation with Aβ1-15 or Aβ1-40/42 peptides, indicating a cellular immune response against DT while avoiding an Aβ-specific T-cell response. Moreover, significant reductions in cerebral Aβ plaque burden, accompanied by attenuated microglial activation and increased synaptic density, were observed in MER5101-vaccinated APPswe/PS1ΔE9 Tg mice compared with Tg adjuvant controls. Last, MER5101-immunized APPswe/PS1ΔE9 Tg mice showed improvement of cognitive deficits in both contextual fear conditioning and the Morris water maze. Our novel, highly immunogenic Aβ conjugate vaccine, MER5101, shows promise for improving Aβ vaccine safety and efficacy and therefore, may be useful for preventing and/or treating early AD.

  3. Generation of Scaffoldless Hyaline Cartilaginous Tissue from Human iPSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Yamashita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs. We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects.

  4. Generation of scaffoldless hyaline cartilaginous tissue from human iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Akihiro; Morioka, Miho; Yahara, Yasuhito; Okada, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tomohito; Kuriyama, Shinichi; Matsuda, Shuichi; Tsumaki, Noriyuki

    2015-03-10

    Defects in articular cartilage ultimately result in loss of joint function. Repairing cartilage defects requires cell sources. We developed an approach to generate scaffoldless hyaline cartilage from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). We initially generated an hiPSC line that specifically expressed GFP in cartilage when teratoma was formed. We optimized the culture conditions and found BMP2, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and GDF5 critical for GFP expression and thus chondrogenic differentiation of the hiPSCs. The subsequent use of scaffoldless suspension culture contributed to purification, producing homogenous cartilaginous particles. Subcutaneous transplantation of the hiPSC-derived particles generated hyaline cartilage that expressed type II collagen, but not type I collagen, in immunodeficiency mice. Transplantation of the particles into joint surface defects in immunodeficiency rats and immunosuppressed mini-pigs indicated that neocartilage survived and had potential for integration into native cartilage. The immunodeficiency mice and rats suffered from neither tumors nor ectopic tissue formation. The hiPSC-derived cartilaginous particles constitute a viable cell source for regenerating cartilage defects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Wafer plane inspection for advanced reticle defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Rajesh; Ghadiali, Firoz; Kim, Jun; Huang, Tracy; Pang, Song

    2008-05-01

    Readiness of new mask defect inspection technology is one of the key enablers for insertion & transition of the next generation technology from development into production. High volume production in mask shops and wafer fabs demands a reticle inspection system with superior sensitivity complemented by a low false defect rate to ensure fast turnaround of reticle repair and defect disposition (W. Chou et al 2007). Wafer Plane Inspection (WPI) is a novel approach to mask defect inspection, complementing the high resolution inspection capabilities of the TeraScanHR defect inspection system. WPI is accomplished by using the high resolution mask images to construct a physical mask model (D. Pettibone et al 1999). This mask model is then used to create the mask image in the wafer aerial plane. A threshold model is applied to enhance the inspectability of printing defects. WPI can eliminate the mask restrictions imposed on OPC solutions by inspection tool limitations in the past. Historically, minimum image restrictions were required to avoid nuisance inspection stops and/or subsequent loss of sensitivity to defects. WPI has the potential to eliminate these limitations by moving the mask defect inspections to the wafer plane. This paper outlines Wafer Plane Inspection technology, and explores the application of this technology to advanced reticle inspection. A total of twelve representative critical layers were inspected using WPI die-to-die mode. The results from scanning these advanced reticles have shown that applying WPI with a pixel size of 90nm (WPI P90) captures all the defects of interest (DOI) with low false defect detection rates. In validating CD predictions, the delta CDs from WPI are compared against Aerial Imaging Measurement System (AIMS), where a good correlation is established between WPI and AIMSTM.

  6. Running rescues defective adult neurogenesis by shortening the length of the cell cycle of neural stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Mattera, Andrea; Micheli, Laura; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Leonardi, Luca; Saraulli, Daniele; Costanzi, Marco; Cestari, Vincenzo; Rouault, Jean-Pierre; Tirone, Felice

    2014-07-01

    Physical exercise increases the generation of new neurons in adult neurogenesis. However, only few studies have investigated the beneficial effects of physical exercise in paradigms of impaired neurogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that running fully reverses the deficient adult neurogenesis within the hippocampus and subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, observed in mice lacking the antiproliferative gene Btg1. We also evaluated for the first time how running influences the cell cycle kinetics of stem and precursor subpopulations of wild-type and Btg1-null mice, using a new method to determine the cell cycle length. Our data show that in wild-type mice running leads to a cell cycle shortening only of NeuroD1-positive progenitor cells. In contrast, in Btg1-null mice, physical exercise fully reactivates the defective hippocampal neurogenesis, by shortening the S-phase length and the overall cell cycle duration of both neural stem (glial fibrillary acidic protein(+) and Sox2(+)) and progenitor (NeuroD1(+)) cells. These events are sufficient and necessary to reactivate the hyperproliferation observed in Btg1-null early-postnatal mice and to expand the pool of adult neural stem and progenitor cells. Such a sustained increase of cell proliferation in Btg1-null mice after running provides a long-lasting increment of proliferation, differentiation, and production of newborn neurons, which rescues the impaired pattern separation previously identified in Btg1-null mice. This study shows that running positively affects the cell cycle kinetics of specific subpopulations of newly generated neurons and suggests that the plasticity of neural stem cells without cell cycle inhibitory control is reactivated by running, with implications for the long-term modulation of neurogenesis. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  7. Metallography of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, E.A.; Bochvar, G.A.; Brun, M.Ya.

    1980-01-01

    Different types of defects of metallurgical, technological and exploitation origin in intermediate and final products of titanium alloys, are considered. The examples of metallic and nonmetallic inclusions, chemical homogeneity, different grains, bands, cracks, places of searing, porosity are given; methods of detecting the above defects are described. The methods of metallography, X-ray spectral analysis, measuring microhardness are used

  8. Beating Birth Defects

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Each year in the U.S., one in 33 babies is affected by a major birth defect. Women can greatly improve their chances of giving birth to a healthy baby by avoiding some of the risk factors for birth defects before and during pregnancy. In this podcast, Dr. Stuart Shapira discusses ways to improve the chances of giving birth to a healthy baby.

  9. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  10. Defects in dilute nitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.M.; Buyanova, I.A.; Tu, C.W.; Yonezu, H.

    2005-01-01

    We provide a brief review our recent results from optically detected magnetic resonance studies of grown-in non-radiative defects in dilute nitrides, i.e. Ga(In)NAs and Ga(Al,In)NP. Defect complexes involving intrinsic defects such as As Ga antisites and Ga i self interstitials were positively identified.Effects of growth conditions, chemical compositions and post-growth treatments on formation of the defects are closely examined. These grown-in defects are shown to play an important role in non-radiative carrier recombination and thus in degrading optical quality of the alloys, harmful to performance of potential optoelectronic and photonic devices based on these dilute nitrides. (author)

  11. Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 controls both platelet generation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Delesque-Touchard

    Full Text Available RGS18 is a myeloerythroid lineage-specific regulator of G-protein signaling, highly expressed in megakaryocytes (MKs and platelets. In the present study, we describe the first generation of a RGS18 knockout mouse model (RGS18-/-. Interesting phenotypic differences between RGS18-/- and wild-type (WT mice were identified, and show that RGS18 plays a significant role in both platelet generation and function. RGS18 deficiency produced a gain of function phenotype in platelets. In resting platelets, the level of CD62P expression was increased in RGS18-/- mice. This increase correlated with a higher level of plasmatic serotonin concentration. RGS18-/- platelets displayed a higher sensitivity to activation in vitro. RGS18 deficiency markedly increased thrombus formation in vivo. In addition, RGS18-/- mice presented a mild thrombocytopenia, accompanied with a marked deficit in MK number in the bone marrow. Analysis of MK maturation in vitro and in vivo revealed a defective megakaryopoiesis in RGS18-/- mice, with a lower bone marrow content of only the most committed MK precursors. Finally, RGS18 deficiency was correlated to a defect of platelet recovery in vivo under acute conditions of thrombocytopenia. Thus, we highlight a role for RGS18 in platelet generation and function, and provide additional insights into the physiology of RGS18.

  12. Investigation of UFO defect on DUV CAR and BARC process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yet, Siew Ing; Ko, Bong Sang; Lee, Soo Man; May, Mike

    2004-05-01

    Photo process defect reduction is one of the most important factors to improve the process stability and yield in sub-0.18um DUV process. In this paper, a new approach to minimize the Deep-UV (DUV) Chemically Amplified Resist (CAR) and Bottom Anti-Reflective Coating (BARC) induced defect known as UFO (UnidentiFied Object) defect will be introduced. These defects have mild surface topography difference on BARC; it only exists on the wide exposed area where there is no photoresist pattern. In this test, Nikon KrF Stepper & Scanner and TEL Clean track were used. Investigation was carried out on the defect formulation on both Acetal and ESCAP type of photoresist while elemental analysis was done by Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) & Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES). Result indicated that both BARC and photoresist induce this UFO defect; total defect quantity is related with Post Exposure Bake (PEB) condition. Based on the elemental analysis and process-split test, we can conclude that this defect is caused by lack of acid amount and low diffusivity which is related to PAG (Photo Acid Generator) and TAG (Thermal Acid Generator) in KrF photoresist and BARC material. By optimizing photoresist bake condition, this UFO defect as well as other related defect such as Satellite defect could be eliminated.

  13. Assessment of chimeric mice with humanized livers in new drug development: generation of pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity data for selecting the final candidate compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    1. Chimeric mice with humanized livers are expected to be a novel tool for new drug development. This review discusses four applications where these animals can be used efficiently to collect supportive data for selecting the best compound in the final stage of drug discovery. 2. The first application is selection of the final compound based on estimated pharmacokinetic parameters in humans. Since chimeric mouse livers are highly repopulated with human hepatocytes, hepatic clearance values in vivo could be used preferentially to estimate pharmacokinetic profiles for humans. 3. The second is prediction of human-specific or disproportionate metabolites. Chimeric mice reproduce human-specific metabolites of drugs under development to conform to ICH guidance M3(R2), except for compounds that were extensively eliminated by co-existing mouse hepatocytes. 4. The third is identifying metabolites with distinct pharmacokinetic profiles in humans. Slow metabolite elimination specifically in humans increases its exposure level, but if its elimination is faster in laboratory animals, the animal exposure level might not satisfy ICH guidance M3(R2). 5. Finally, two examples of reproducing acute liver toxicity in chimeric mice are introduced. Integrated pharmacokinetics, metabolism and toxicity information are expected to assist pharmaceutical scientists in selecting the best candidate compound in new drug development.

  14. Topical application of dimethylbenz[a]anthracene results in the generation of multiple melanocytic nevi in C3H/HeN mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmets, Craig A.; Yusuf, Nabiha; Hamza, Sate; Iranikakh, Nasser; Smith, Jeffrey; Volk, Andrea L.; Skelton, Henry; Smith, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Melanocytic nevi are a common dermatological problem for which there are few in vivo models. It has been postulated that environmental factors contribute to their development. Experiments were therefore conducted to determine whether application of dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to the skin of mice would result in the development of melanocytic nevi. One hundred microliters of a 0.1%, 0.5%, or 1.0% solution of DMBA was applied to the dorsal skin of C3H/HeN mice. The mice were then observed for the appearance of pigmented lesions. Histological examination revealed perifollicular accumulations of nevus cells, which were S-100-protein and HMB-45-positive, confirming their melanocytic origin. Pigmented lesions did not occur in animals treated with vehicle alone. Dose response studies revealed both greater numbers of nevi and lesions with larger diameters as the dose of DMBA was increased from 0.1% to 0.5%. In no instance was an invasive melanoma observed even after 40 weeks. The fact that melanocytic nevi can be produced by topical application of DMBA suggests that xenobiotics may play a previously unrecognized role in the development of this common benign neoplasm. Because this is one of the only animal models for melanocytic nevi, further examination of this model may facilitate identification of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that lead to the development of pigmented nevi and the factors that promote their evolution into invasive melanomas

  15. Defect networks and supersymmetric loop operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullimore, Mathew [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

    2015-02-10

    We consider topological defect networks with junctions in A{sub N−1} Toda CFT and the connection to supersymmetric loop operators in N=2 theories of class S on a four-sphere. Correlation functions in the presence of topological defect networks are computed by exploiting the monodromy of conformal blocks, generalising the notion of a Verlinde operator. Concentrating on a class of topological defects in A{sub 2} Toda theory, we find that the Verlinde operators generate an algebra whose structure is determined by a set of generalised skein relations that encode the representation theory of a quantum group. In the second half of the paper, we explore the dictionary between topological defect networks and supersymmetric loop operators in the N=2{sup ∗} theory by comparing to exact localisation computations. In this context, the the generalised skein relations are related to the operator product expansion of loop operators.

  16. Formation of topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachaspati, T.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the formation of point and line topological defects (monopoles and strings) from a general point of view by allowing the probability of formation of a defect to vary. To investigate the statistical properties of the defects at formation we give qualitative arguments that are independent of any particular model in which such defects occur. These arguments are substantiated by numerical results in the case of strings and for monopoles in two dimensions. We find that the network of strings at formation undergoes a transition at a certain critical density below which there are no infinite strings and the closed-string (loop) distribution is exponentially suppressed at large lengths. The results are contrasted with the results of statistical arguments applied to a box of strings in dynamical equilibrium. We argue that if point defects were to form with smaller probability, the distance between monopoles and antimonopoles would decrease while the monopole-to-monopole distance would increase. We find that monopoles are always paired with antimonopoles but the pairing becomes clean only when the number density of defects is small. A similar reasoning would also apply to other defects

  17. Deletion of Lkb1 in Pro-Opiomelanocortin Neurons Impairs Peripheral Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Smith, Mark A.; Knauf, Claude; Al-Qassab, Hind; Woods, Angela; Heslegrave, Amanda; Piipari, Kaisa; Emmanuel, Julian J.; Colom, André; Valet, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D.; Begum, Ghazala; White, Anne; Mucket, Phillip; Peters, Marco; Mizuno, Keiko; Batterham, Rachel L.; Giese, K. Peter; Ashworth, Alan; Burcelin, Remy; Ashford, Michael L.; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling acts as a sensor of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus, thereby regulating whole-body energy homeostasis. Deletion of Ampkα2 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons causes obesity and defective neuronal glucose sensing. LKB1, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome gene product, and Ca2+-calmodulin–dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) are key upstream activators of AMPK. This study aimed to determine their role in POMC neurons upon energy and glucose homeostasis regulation. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mice lacking either Camkkβ or Lkb1 in POMC neurons were generated, and physiological, electrophysiological, and molecular biology studies were performed. RESULTS Deletion of Camkkβ in POMC neurons does not alter energy homeostasis or glucose metabolism. In contrast, female mice lacking Lkb1 in POMC neurons (PomcLkb1KO) display glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired suppression of hepatic glucose production, and altered expression of hepatic metabolic genes. The underlying cellular defect in PomcLkb1KO mice involves a reduction in melanocortin tone caused by decreased α-melanocyte–stimulating hormone secretion. However, Lkb1-deficient POMC neurons showed normal glucose sensing, and body weight was unchanged in PomcLkb1KO mice. CONCLUSIONS Our findings demonstrate that LKB1 in hypothalamic POMC neurons plays a key role in the central regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism but not body-weight control. This phenotype contrasts with that seen in mice lacking AMPK in POMC neurons with defects in body-weight regulation but not glucose homeostasis, which suggests that LKB1 plays additional functions distinct from activating AMPK in POMC neurons. PMID:21266325

  18. Deletion of Lkb1 in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons impairs peripheral glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, Marc; Smith, Mark A; Knauf, Claude; Al-Qassab, Hind; Woods, Angela; Heslegrave, Amanda; Piipari, Kaisa; Emmanuel, Julian J; Colom, André; Valet, Philippe; Cani, Patrice D; Begum, Ghazala; White, Anne; Mucket, Phillip; Peters, Marco; Mizuno, Keiko; Batterham, Rachel L; Giese, K Peter; Ashworth, Alan; Burcelin, Remy; Ashford, Michael L; Carling, David; Withers, Dominic J

    2011-03-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling acts as a sensor of nutrients and hormones in the hypothalamus, thereby regulating whole-body energy homeostasis. Deletion of Ampkα2 in pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons causes obesity and defective neuronal glucose sensing. LKB1, the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome gene product, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) are key upstream activators of AMPK. This study aimed to determine their role in POMC neurons upon energy and glucose homeostasis regulation. Mice lacking either Camkkβ or Lkb1 in POMC neurons were generated, and physiological, electrophysiological, and molecular biology studies were performed. Deletion of Camkkβ in POMC neurons does not alter energy homeostasis or glucose metabolism. In contrast, female mice lacking Lkb1 in POMC neurons (PomcLkb1KO) display glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired suppression of hepatic glucose production, and altered expression of hepatic metabolic genes. The underlying cellular defect in PomcLkb1KO mice involves a reduction in melanocortin tone caused by decreased α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone secretion. However, Lkb1-deficient POMC neurons showed normal glucose sensing, and body weight was unchanged in PomcLkb1KO mice. Our findings demonstrate that LKB1 in hypothalamic POMC neurons plays a key role in the central regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism but not body-weight control. This phenotype contrasts with that seen in mice lacking AMPK in POMC neurons with defects in body-weight regulation but not glucose homeostasis, which suggests that LKB1 plays additional functions distinct from activating AMPK in POMC neurons.

  19. The Success of Thread-embedding Therapy in Generating Hair Re-growth in Mice Points to Its Possibly Having a Similar Effect in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Jong Shin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Recently, thread-embedding therapy (TET has been widely applied in Korean medicine for cosmetic purposes such as reducing skin wrinkles. An inserted thread was reported to have induced continuous stimulation, followed by support for connective tissue regeneration. However, the potential role of TET in hairgrowth has not yet been reported. Methods: We designed this study to evaluate whether TET has a hair-growth-promoting effect. C57 black 6 (C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups: normal saline-treated, minoxidil-treated, and thread-embedded groups. Normal saline or 5% minoxidil was topically sprayed on the dorsal skin of the mice once a day for 16 days. Medical threads were embedded into the dorsal skin of the mice in a single application. Hair growth activity was evaluated by using dermoscopic and microscopic observations. Sections of the dorsal skin were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Expressions of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7, and fibroblast growth factor-5 (FGF-5 were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis was adopted to measure the messenger RNA (mRNA expressions of FGF-7 and FGF-5. Results: TET enhanced anagen development in the hair follicles of C57BL/6 mice. The expressions of BrdU and PCNA, both of which imply active cellular proliferation, were increased by using TET. Moreover, TET increased the expression of FGF-7, an anagen-inducing growth factor, while decreasing the expression of FGF-5, an anagen-cessation growth factor, both at the protein and the mRNA levels. Conclusion: TET enhanced hair re-growth in C57BL/6 mice. TET regulated the expressions of anagen-associated growth factors and activated the proliferation of hair follicular cells in depilated skin lesions. Considering its long-lasting effect, TET may be a good alternative therapeutic for the treatment of

  20. Melatonin protects against maternal obesity-associated oxidative stress and meiotic defects in oocytes via the SIRT3-SOD2-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Longsen; Wang, Haichao; Li, Ling; Li, Xiaoyan; Ge, Juan; Reiter, Russel J; Wang, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Maternal obesity in humans is associated with poor outcomes across the reproductive spectrum. Emerging evidence indicates that these defects are likely attributed to factors within the oocyte. Although various molecules and pathways may contribute to impaired oocyte quality, prevention of fertility issues associated with maternal obesity is a challenge. Using mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) as an obesity model, we document spindle disorganization, chromosome misalignment, and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in oocytes from obese mice. Oral administration of melatonin to HFD mice not only reduces ROS generation, but also prevents spindle/chromosome anomalies in oocytes, consequently promoting the developmental potential of early embryos. Consistent with this finding, we find that melatonin supplement during in vitro maturation also markedly attenuates oxidative stress and meiotic defects in HFD oocytes. Finally, by performing morpholino knockdown and acetylation-mimetic mutant overexpression assays, we reveal that melatonin ameliorates maternal obesity-induced defective phenotypes in oocytes through the SIRT3-SOD2-dependent mechanism. In sum, our data uncover the marked beneficial effects of melatonin on oocyte quality from obese females; this opens a new area for optimizing culture system as well as fertility management. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Comparison of male chimeric mice generated from microinjection of JM8.N4 embryonic stem cells into C57BL/6J and C57BL/6NTac blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Thomas J; Yi, Charles S; Masumi, Juliet; Waymire, Katrina G; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Wang, Shuling; Shi, Kai-Xuan; Wallace, Douglas C; MacGregor, Grant R

    2012-12-01

    To identify ways to improve the efficiency of generating chimeric mice via microinjection of blastocysts with ES cells, we compared production and performance of ES-cell derived chimeric mice using blastocysts from two closely related and commonly used sub-strains of C57BL/6. Chimeras were produced by injection of the same JM8.N4 (C57BL/6NTac) derived ES cell line into blastocysts of mixed sex from either C57BL/6J (B6J) or C57BL/6NTac (B6NTac) mice. Similar efficiency of production and sex-conversion of chimeric animals was observed with each strain of blastocyst. However, B6J chimeric males had fewer developmental abnormalities involving urogenital and reproductive tissues (1/12, 8%) compared with B6NTac chimeric males (7/9, 78%). The low sample size did not permit determination of statistical significance for many parameters. However, in each category analyzed the B6J-derived chimeric males performed as well, or better, than their B6NTac counterparts. Twelve of 14 (86%) B6J male chimeras were fertile compared with 6 of 11 (55%) B6NTac male chimeras. Ten of 12 (83%) B6J chimeric males sired more than 1 litter compared with only 3 of 6 (50%) B6NTac chimeras. B6J male chimeras produced more litters per productive mating (3.42 ± 1.73, n = 12) compared to B6NTac chimeras (2.17 ± 1.33, n = 6). Finally, a greater ratio of germline transmitting chimeric males was obtained using B6J blastocysts (9/14; 64%) compared with chimeras produced using B6NTac blastocysts (4/11; 36%). Use of B6J host blastocysts for microinjection of ES cells may offer improvements over blastocysts from B6NTac and possibly other sub-strains of C57BL/6 mice.

  2. Bone tissue ultrastructural defects in a mouse model for osteogenesis imperfecta: a Raman spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsoching; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.

    2004-07-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is genetic defect in which the genes that code for the α1(I) or α2(I) chains of type I collagen are defective. The defects often result in substitution of a bulky amino acid for glycine, causing formation of collagen that can not form the normal triple helix. Depending on the details of the defects, the outcomes range from controllable to lethal. This study focuses on OI type IV, a more common and moderately severe form of the disease. People with the disease have a substantial increase in the risk and rate of fracture. We examine the spectroscopic consequences of these defects, using a mouse model (BRTL) that mimics OI type IV. We compare Raman images from tibial cortical tissue of wild-type mice and BRTL mice with single copy of mutation and show that both mineral to matrix ratios and collagen inter-fibril cross-links are different in wild-type and mutant mice.

  3. Salt-Sensitive Hypertension and Cardiac Hypertrophy in Transgenic Mice Expressing a Corin Variant Identified in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Cui, Yujie; Shen, Jianzhong; Jiang, Jingjing; Chen, Shenghan; Peng, Jianhao; Wu, Qingyu

    2012-01-01

    African Americans represent a high risk population for salt-sensitive hypertension and heart disease but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Corin is a cardiac protease that regulates blood pressure by activating natriuretic peptides. A corin gene variant (T555I/Q568P) was identified in African Americans with hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. In this study, we test the hypothesis that the corin variant contributes to the hypertensive and cardiac hypertrophic phenotype in vivo. Transgenic mice were generated to express wild-type or T555I/Q568P variant corin in the heart under the control of α-myosin heavy chain promoter. The mice were crossed into a corin knockout background to create KO/TgWT and KO/TgV mice that expressed WT or variant corin, respectively, in the heart. Functional studies showed that KO/TgV mice had significantly higher levels of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide in the heart compared with that in control KO/TgWT mice, indicating that the corin variant was defective in processing natriuretic peptides in vivo. By radiotelemetry, corin KO/TgV mice were found to have hypertension that was sensitive to dietary salt loading. The mice also developed cardiac hypertrophy at 12–14 months of age when fed a normal salt diet or at a younger age when fed a high salt diet. The phenotype of salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in KO/TgV mice closely resembles the pathological findings in African Americans who carry the corin variant. The results indicate that corin defects may represent an important mechanism in salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy in African Americans. PMID:22987923

  4. fps/fes knockout mice display a lactation defect and the fps/fes tyrosine kinase is a component of E-cadherin-based adherens junctions in breast epithelial cells during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truesdell, Peter F; Zirngibl, Ralph A; Francis, Sarah; Sangrar, Waheed; Greer, Peter A

    2009-10-15

    The fps/fes proto-oncogene encodes a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase implicated in vesicular trafficking and cytokine and growth factor signaling in hematopoietic, neuronal, vascular endothelial and epithelial lineages. Genetic evidence has suggested a tumor suppressor role for Fps/Fes in breast and colon. Here we used fps/fes knockout mice to investigate potential roles for this kinase in development and function of the mammary gland. Fps/Fes expression was induced during pregnancy and lactation, and its kinase activity was dramatically enhanced. Milk protein and fat composition from nursing fps/fes-null mothers was normal; however, pups reared by them gained weight more slowly than pups reared by wild-type mothers. Fps/Fes displayed a predominantly dispersed punctate intracellular distribution which was consistent with vesicles within the luminal epithelial cells of lactating breast, while a small fraction co-localized with beta-catenin and E-cadherin on their basolateral surfaces. Fps/Fes was found to be a component of the E-cadherin adherens junction (AJ) complex; however, the phosphotyrosine status of beta-catenin and core AJ components in fps/fes-null breast tissue was unaltered, and epithelial cell AJs and gland morphology were intact. We conclude that Fps/Fes is not essential for the maintenance of epithelial cell AJs in the lactating breast but may instead play important roles in vesicular trafficking and milk secretion.

  5. Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Call your doctor if your baby or child: Tires easily when eating or playing Is not gaining ... heart procedures. Risk factors Ventricular septal defects may run in families and sometimes may occur with other ...

  6. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  7. Endocardial cushion defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 426. Kouchoukos NT, Blackstone EH, Hanley FL, Kirklin JK. Atrioventricular septal defect. In: Kouchoukos NT, Blackstone EH, Hanley FL, Kirklin JK, eds. Kirklin/Barratt- ...

  8. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E.; Crisp, R.W.; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E.; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We

  9. Point defects in platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piercy, G.R.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation was made of the mobility and types of point defect introduced in platinum by deformation in liquid nitrogen, quenching into water from 1600 o C, or reactor irradiation at 50 o C. In all cases the activation energy for motion of the defect was determined from measurements of electrical resistivity. Measurements of density, hardness, and x-ray line broadening were also made there applicable. These experiments indicated that the principal defects remaining in platinum after irradiation were single vacant lattice sites and after quenching were pairs of vacant lattice sites. Those present after deformation In liquid nitrogen were single vacant lattice sites and another type of defect, perhaps interstitial atoms. (author)

  10. Aquaglyceroporin-null trypanosomes display glycerol transport defects and respiratory-inhibitor sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jeacock

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aquaglyceroporins (AQPs transport water and glycerol and play important roles in drug-uptake in pathogenic trypanosomatids. For example, AQP2 in the human-infectious African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, is responsible for melarsoprol and pentamidine-uptake, and melarsoprol treatment-failure has been found to be due to AQP2-defects in these parasites. To further probe the roles of these transporters, we assembled a T. b. brucei strain lacking all three AQP-genes. Triple-null aqp1-2-3 T. b. brucei displayed only a very moderate growth defect in vitro, established infections in mice and recovered effectively from hypotonic-shock. The aqp1-2-3 trypanosomes did, however, display glycerol uptake and efflux defects. They failed to accumulate glycerol or to utilise glycerol as a carbon-source and displayed increased sensitivity to salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM, octyl gallate or propyl gallate; these inhibitors of trypanosome alternative oxidase (TAO can increase intracellular glycerol to toxic levels. Notably, disruption of AQP2 alone generated cells with glycerol transport defects. Consistent with these findings, AQP2-defective, melarsoprol-resistant clinical isolates were sensitive to the TAO inhibitors, SHAM, propyl gallate and ascofuranone, relative to melarsoprol-sensitive reference strains. We conclude that African trypanosome AQPs are dispensable for viability and osmoregulation but they make important contributions to drug-uptake, glycerol-transport and respiratory-inhibitor sensitivity. We also discuss how the AQP-dependent inverse sensitivity to melarsoprol and respiratory inhibitors described here might be exploited.

  11. Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Is Essential for Male Fertility in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Wittmann

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids and the derived gangliosides have critical functions in spermatogenesis, thus mutations in genes involved in sphingolipid biogenesis are often associated with male infertility. We have generated a transgenic mouse line carrying an insertion in the sphingomyelin synthase gene Sms1, the enzyme which generates sphingomyelin species in the Golgi apparatus. We describe the spermatogenesis defect of Sms1-/- mice, which is characterized by sloughing of spermatocytes and spermatids, causing progressive infertility of male homozygotes. Lipid profiling revealed a reduction in several long chain unsaturated phosphatidylcholins, lysophosphatidylcholins and sphingolipids in the testes of mutants. Multi-Spectral Optoacoustic Tomography indicated blood-testis barrier dysfunction. A supplementary diet of the essential omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid diminished germ cell sloughing from the seminiferous epithelium and restored spermatogenesis and fertility in 50% of previously infertile mutants. Our findings indicate that SMS1 has a wider than anticipated role in testis polyunsaturated fatty acid homeostasis and for male fertility.

  12. Genetic analysis of autoimmune gld mice. I. Identification of a restriction fragment length polymorphism closely linked to the gld mutation within a conserved linkage group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A linkage map of distal mouse chromosome 1 was generated using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of DNA prepared from 95 [C3H-gld/gld X Mus spretus)F1 X C3H-gld/gld] backcross mice. The gene order was: (centromere) C4bp, Ren-1,2, Ly-5, [At-3/gld], Apoa-2/Ly-17, Spna-1 (telomere). All mice expressing the phenotype of gld homozygotes were homozygous for the At-3 RFLP characteristic of C3H mice and none of the mice heterozygous for At-3 RFLPs had characteristics of gld homozygotes, demonstrating close linkage between these genes. The identification of an RFLP closely linked to the gld gene provides a starting point for the identification of a genetic defect that results in abnormal T cells and autoimmune disease. PMID:2894402

  13. Liver-specific Aquaporin 11 knockout mice show rapid vacuolization of the rough endoplasmic reticulum in periportal hepatocytes after amino acid feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojek, Aleksandra; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Füchtbauer, Annette C.

    2013-01-01

    -specific Aqp11 KO mice, allowing us to study the role of AQP11 protein in liver of mice with normal kidney function. The unchallenged liver-specific Aqp11 KO mice have normal longevity, their livers appeared normal, and the plasma biochemistries revealed only a minor defect in lipid handling. Fasting......Aquaporin 11 (AQP11) is a protein channel expressed intracellularly in multiple organs, yet its physiological function is unclear. Aqp11 knockout (KO) mice die early due to malfunction of the kidney, a result of hydropic degeneration of proximal tubule cells. Here we report the generation of liver...... protein or larger doses of various amino acids. The fasting/refeeding challenge is associated with increased expression of markers of ER stress Grp78 and GADD153 and decreased glutathione levels, suggesting that ER stress may play role in the development of vacuoles in the AQP11-deficient hepatocytes. NMR...

  14. Comparative analysis of immune effects in mice model: Clonorchis sinensis cysteine protease generated from recombinant Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhanshuai; Tang, Zeli; Shang, Mei; Zhao, Lu; Zhou, Lina; Kong, Xiangzhan; Lin, Zhipeng; Sun, Hengchang; Chen, Tingjin; Xu, Jin; Li, Xuerong; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2017-07-01

    Clonorchiasis remains a nonnegligible public health problem in endemic areas. Cysteine protease of Clonorchis sinensis (CsCP) plays indispensable roles in the parasitic physiology and pathology, and has been exploited as a promising drug and vaccine candidate. In recent years, development of spore-based vaccines against multiple pathogens has attracted many investigators' interest. In previous studies, the recombinant Escherichia coli (BL21) and Bacillus subtilis spores expressing CsCP have been successfully constructed, respectively. In this study, the immune effects of CsCP protein purified from recombinant BL21 (rCsCP) and B. subtilis spores presenting CsCP (B.s-CsCP) in Balb/c mice model were conducted with comparative analysis. Levels of specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were significantly increased in sera from both rCsCP and B.s-CsCP intraperitoneally immunized mice. Additionally, recombinant spores expressing abundant fusion CsCP (0.03125 pg/spore) could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of CsCP with significantly higher levels of IgG and isotypes. Compared with rCsCP alone, intraperitoneal administration of mice with spores expressing CsCP achieved a better effect of fighting against C. sinensis infection by slowing down the process of fibrosis. Our results demonstrated that a combination of Th1/Th2 immune responses could be elicited by rCsCP, while spores displaying CsCP prominently induced Th1-biased specific immune responses, and the complex cytokine network maybe mediates protective immune responses against C. sinensis. This work further confirmed that the usage of B. subtilis spores displaying CsCP is an effective way to against C. sinensis.

  15. Synthetic bovine proline-rich-polypeptides generate hydroxyl radicals and fail to protect dopaminergic neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaryan, Varduhi H; Samantaray, Supriti; Varghese, Merina; Srinivasan, Ambika; Galoyan, Armen A; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2006-08-01

    Proline-rich-polypeptides (PRPs) isolated from bovine hypothalamus have been shown to render protection against neuronal injury of the brain and spinal cord. We examined two PRPs containing 15 and 10 amino acid residues (PRP-1 and PRP-4 synthetic polypeptide) for their effect, if any, on dopaminergic neuronal damage caused by the parkinsonian neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Effects of these PRPs on hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) generation in a Fenton-like reaction as well as from isolated mitochondria were monitored, employing a sensitive salicylate hydroxylation procedure. Balb/c mice treated (i.p., twice, 16 h apart) with MPTP (30 mg/kg) or PRP-1 (1.6 mg/kg), but not PRP-4 (1.6 mg/kg) showed significant loss of striatal dopamine and norepinephrine as assayed by an HPLC-electrochemical procedure. Pretreatment with the PRPs, 30 min prior to the neurotoxin administration failed to attenuate MPTP-induced striatal dopamine or norepinephrine depletion, but significantly attenuated the MPTP-induced decrease in dopamine turnover. A significant increase in the generation of (*)OH by the PRPs in a Fenton-like reaction or from isolated mitochondria suggests their pro-oxidant action, and explains their failure to protect against MPTP-induced parkinsonism in mice.

  16. Quantitative analysis by next generation sequencing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (LSK and of splenic B cells transcriptomes from wild-type and Usp3-knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Lancini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data described here provide genome-wide expression profiles of murine primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (LSK and of B cell populations, obtained by high throughput sequencing. Cells are derived from wild-type mice and from mice deficient for the ubiquitin-specific protease 3 (USP3; Usp3Δ/Δ. Modification of histone proteins by ubiquitin plays a crucial role in the cellular response to DNA damage (DDR (Jackson and Durocher, 2013 [1]. USP3 is a histone H2A deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB that regulates ubiquitin-dependent DDR in response to DNA double-strand breaks (Nicassio et al., 2007; Doil et al., 2008 [2,3]. Deletion of USP3 in mice increases the incidence of spontaneous tumors and affects hematopoiesis [4]. In particular, Usp3-knockout mice show progressive loss of B and T cells and decreased functional potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during aging. USP3-deficient cells, including HSCs, display enhanced histone ubiquitination, accumulate spontaneous DNA damage and are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation (Lancini et al., 2014 [4]. To address whether USP3 loss leads to deregulation of specific molecular pathways relevant to HSC homeostasis and/or B cell development, we have employed the RNA-sequencing technology and investigated transcriptional differences between wild-type and Usp3Δ/Δ LSK, naïve B cells or in vitro activated B cells. The data relate to the research article “Tight regulation of ubiquitin-mediated DNA damage response by USP3 preserves the functional integrity of hematopoietic stem cells” (Lancini et al., 2014 [4]. The RNA-sequencing and analysis data sets have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus (Edgar et al., 2002 [5] and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE58495 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE58495. With this article, we present validation of the RNA-seq data set through quantitative real-time PCR and comparative analysis. Keywords: B

  17. Quantitative analysis by next generation sequencing of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (LSK) and of splenic B cells transcriptomes from wild-type and Usp3-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancini, Cesare; Gargiulo, Gaetano; van den Berk, Paul C M; Citterio, Elisabetta

    2016-03-01

    The data described here provide genome-wide expression profiles of murine primitive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (LSK) and of B cell populations, obtained by high throughput sequencing. Cells are derived from wild-type mice and from mice deficient for the ubiquitin-specific protease 3 (USP3; Usp3Δ/Δ). Modification of histone proteins by ubiquitin plays a crucial role in the cellular response to DNA damage (DDR) (Jackson and Durocher, 2013) [1]. USP3 is a histone H2A deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB) that regulates ubiquitin-dependent DDR in response to DNA double-strand breaks (Nicassio et al., 2007; Doil et al., 2008) [2], [3]. Deletion of USP3 in mice increases the incidence of spontaneous tumors and affects hematopoiesis [4]. In particular, Usp3-knockout mice show progressive loss of B and T cells and decreased functional potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during aging. USP3-deficient cells, including HSCs, display enhanced histone ubiquitination, accumulate spontaneous DNA damage and are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation (Lancini et al., 2014) [4]. To address whether USP3 loss leads to deregulation of specific molecular pathways relevant to HSC homeostasis and/or B cell development, we have employed the RNA-sequencing technology and investigated transcriptional differences between wild-type and Usp3Δ/Δ LSK, naïve B cells or in vitro activated B cells. The data relate to the research article "Tight regulation of ubiquitin-mediated DNA damage response by USP3 preserves the functional integrity of hematopoietic stem cells" (Lancini et al., 2014) [4]. The RNA-sequencing and analysis data sets have been deposited in NCBI׳s Gene Expression Omnibus (Edgar et al., 2002) [5] and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE58495 (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/query/acc.cgi?acc=GSE58495). With this article, we present validation of the RNA-seq data set through quantitative real-time PCR and comparative analysis.

  18. Defects in the medial entorhinal cortex and dentate gyrus in the mouse model of Sanfilippo syndrome type B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ohmi

    Full Text Available Sanfilippo syndrome type B (MPS IIIB is characterized by profound mental retardation in childhood, dementia and death in late adolescence; it is caused by deficiency of α-N-acetylglucosaminidase and resulting lysosomal storage of heparan sulfate. A mouse model, generated by homologous recombination of the Naglu gene, was used to study pathological changes in the brain. We found earlier that neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC and the dentate gyrus showed a number of secondary defects, including the presence of hyperphosphorylated tau (Ptau detected with antibodies raised against Ptau in Alzheimer disease brain. By further use of immunohistochemistry, we now show staining in neurons of the same area for beta amyloid, extending the resemblance to Alzheimer disease. Ptau inclusions in the dentate gyrus of MPS IIIB mice were reduced in number when the mice were administered LiCl, a specific inhibitor of Gsk3β. Additional proteins found elevated in MEC include proteins involved in autophagy and the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, glypicans 1 and 5, the latter closely related to the primary defect. The level of secondary accumulations was associated with elevation of glypican, as seen by comparing brains of mice at different ages or with different mucopolysaccharide storage diseases. The MEC of an MPS IIIA mouse had the same intense immunostaining for glypican 1 and other markers as MPS IIIB, while MEC of MPS I and MPS II mice had weak staining, and MEC of an MPS VI mouse had no staining at all for the same proteins. A considerable amount of glypican was found in MEC of MPS IIIB mice outside of lysosomes. We propose that it is the extralysosomal glypican that would be harmful to neurons, because its heparan sulfate branches could potentiate the formation of Ptau and beta amyloid aggregates, which would be toxic as well as difficult to degrade.

  19. The ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy are defective in the taurine-deficient heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2015-12-01

    Taurine depletion leads to impaired mitochondrial function, as characterized by reduced ATP production and elevated superoxide generation. These defects can fundamentally alter cardiomyocyte function and if left unchanged can result in cell death. To protect against these stresses, cardiomyocytes possess quality control processes, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, which can rejuvenate cells through the degradation of damaged proteins and organelles. Hence, the present study tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species generated by damaged mitochondria initiates UPS and autophagy in the taurine-deficient heart. Using transgenic mice lacking the taurine transporter (TauTKO) as a model of taurine deficiency, it was shown that the levels of ubiquitinated protein were elevated, an effect associated with a decrease in ATP-dependent 26S β5 proteasome activity. Treating the TauTKO mouse with the mitochondria-specific antioxidant, mitoTEMPO, largely abolished the increase in ubiquitinated protein content. The TauTKO heart was also associated with impaired autophagy, characterized by an increase in the initiator, Beclin-1, and autophagosome content, but a defect in the generation of active autophagolysosomes. Although mitoTEMPO treatment only restores the oxidative balance within the mitochondria, it appeared to completely disrupt the crosstalk between the damaged mitochondria and the quality control processes. Thus, mitochondrial oxidative stress is the main trigger initiating the quality control systems in the taurine-deficient heart. We conclude that the activation of the UPS and autophagy is another fundamental function of mitochondria.

  20. Mice lacking the p43 mitochondrial T3 receptor become glucose intolerant and insulin resistant during aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christelle Bertrand

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones (TH play an important regulatory role in energy expenditure regulation and are key regulators of mitochondrial activity. We have previously identified a mitochondrial triiodothyronine (T3 receptor (p43 which acts as a mitochondrial transcription factor of the organelle genome, which leads in vitro and in vivo, to a stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Recently, we generated mice carrying a specific p43 invalidation. At 2 months of age, we reported that p43 depletion in mice induced a major defect in insulin secretion both in vivo and in isolated pancreatic islets, and a loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The present study was designed to determine whether p43 invalidation influences life expectancy and modulates blood glucose and insulin levels as well as glucose tolerance or insulin sensitivity during aging. We report that from 4 months old onwards, mice lacking p43 are leaner than wild-type mice. p43-/- mice also have a moderate reduction of life expectancy compared to wild type. We found no difference in blood glucose levels, excepted at 24 months old where p43-/- mice showed a strong hyperglycemia in fasting conditions compared to controls animals. However, the loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was maintained whatever the age of mice lacking p43. If up to 12 months old, glucose tolerance remained unchanged, beyond this age p43-/- mice became increasingly glucose intolerant. In addition, if up to 12 months old p43 deficient animals were more sensitive to insulin, after this age we observed a loss of this capacity, culminating in 24 months old mice with a decreased sensitivity to the hormone. In conclusion, we demonstrated that during aging the depletion of the mitochondrial T3 receptor p43 in mice progressively induced an increased glycemia in the fasted state, glucose intolerance and an insulin-resistance several features of type-2 diabetes.

  1. Norwegian Pitched Roof Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Gullbrekken

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The building constructions investigated in this work are pitched wooden roofs with exterior vertical drainpipes and wooden load-bearing system. The aim of this research is to further investigate the building defects of pitched wooden roofs and obtain an overview of typical roof defects. The work involves an analysis of the building defect archive from the research institute SINTEF Building and Infrastructure. The findings from the SINTEF archive show that moisture is a dominant exposure factor, especially in roof constructions. In pitched wooden roofs, more than half of the defects are caused by deficiencies in design, materials, or workmanship, where these deficiencies allow moisture from precipitation or indoor moisture into the structure. Hence, it is important to increase the focus on robust and durable solutions to avoid defects both from exterior and interior moisture sources in pitched wooden roofs. Proper design of interior ventilation and vapour retarders seem to be the main ways to control entry from interior moisture sources into attic and roof spaces.

  2. The effect of X-irradiation on the fertility and on the induction of meiotic chromosome rearrangements in mice and their first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savkovic, N.; Pecevski, J.; Maric, N.; Radivojevic, D.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of whole-body or local irradiation with X-rays at a dose of 600 R on the induction of chromosomal translocations in the diakinesis metaphase I of the meiosis in treated and F 1 males has been examined along with their fertility. Our results show the high percentage of mortality in whole-body irradiated mice. The percentage of the fertility was 25% in whole-body, and 93.7% in locally irradiated males. The testis weight was also reduced. The percentage of chromosomal translocations in diakinesis, metaphase I, of the meiosis was higher after whole-body irradiation than after local irradiation. In F 1 males both types of irradiation induced chromosomal translocations. (orig.) [de

  3. The effect of X-irradiation on the fertility and the induction of meiotic chromosome rearrangements in mice and their first generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savkovic, N.; Pecevski, J.; Maric, N.; Radivojevic, D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of whole-body and local irradiation with a dose of 600 X-rays on the induction of chromosomal translocations in Diakinesis-Metaphase I of meiosis in treated and F 1 males and their fertility have been examined. Our results showed the high percentage of mortality in whole-body irradiated mice. The percentage of fertility was 25% in whole-body, and 93,7% in locally irradiated males. The testis weight was also reduced. The percentage of chromosomal translocations in Diakinesis-Metaphase I of meiosis was greater after whole-body than after local irradiation. In F 1 males both types of irradiation induced chromosomal translocations. (orig.) [de

  4. Repairing Nanoparticle Surface Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Emanuele; Kodger, Thomas E; Crisp, Ryan W; Timmerman, Dolf; MacArthur, Katherine E; Heggen, Marc; Schall, Peter

    2017-10-23

    Solar devices based on semiconductor nanoparticles require the use of conductive ligands; however, replacing the native, insulating ligands with conductive metal chalcogenide complexes introduces structural defects within the crystalline nanostructure that act as traps for charge carriers. We utilized atomically thin semiconductor nanoplatelets as a convenient platform for studying, both microscopically and spectroscopically, the development of defects during ligand exchange with the conductive ligands Na 4 SnS 4 and (NH 4 ) 4 Sn 2 S 6 . These defects can be repaired via mild chemical or thermal routes, through the addition of L-type ligands or wet annealing, respectively. This results in a higher-quality, conductive, colloidally stable nanomaterial that may be used as the active film in optoelectronic devices. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  5. Defect identification using positrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beling, C.D.; Fung, S.

    2001-01-01

    The current use of the lifetime and Doppler broadening techniques in defect identification is demonstrated with two studies, the first being the identification of carbon vacancy in n-6H SiC through lifetime spectroscopy, and the second the production of de-hydrogenated voids in α-Si:H through light soaking. Some less conventional ideas are presented for more specific defect identification, namely (i) the amalgamation of lifetime and Doppler techniques with conventional deep level transient spectroscopy in what may be called ''positron-deep level transient spectroscopy'', and (ii) the extraction of more spatial information on vacancy defects by means of what may be called ''Fourier transform Doppler broadening of annihilation radiation spectroscopy'' (orig.)

  6. Col4a1 mutations cause progressive retinal neovascular defects and retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Marcel V; Mao, Mao; Pawlikowski, Bradley T; Kvezereli, Manana; Duncan, Jacque L; Libby, Richard T; John, Simon W M; Gould, Douglas B

    2016-01-27

    Mutations in collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1), a major component of basement membranes, cause multisystem disorders in humans and mice. In the eye, these include anterior segment dysgenesis, optic nerve hypoplasia and retinal vascular tortuosity. Here we investigate the retinal pathology in mice carrying dominant-negative Col4a1 mutations. To this end, we examined retinas longitudinally in vivo using fluorescein angiography, funduscopy and optical coherence tomography. We assessed retinal function by electroretinography and studied the retinal ultrastructural pathology. Retinal examinations revealed serous chorioretinopathy, retinal hemorrhages, fibrosis or signs of pathogenic angiogenesis with chorioretinal anastomosis in up to approximately 90% of Col4a1 mutant eyes depending on age and the specific mutation. To identify the cell-type responsible for pathogenesis we generated a conditional Col4a1 mutation and determined that primary vascular defects underlie Col4a1-associated retinopathy. We also found focal activation of Müller cells and increased expression of pro-angiogenic factors in retinas from Col4a1(+/Δex41)mice. Together, our findings suggest that patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations may be at elevated risk of retinal hemorrhages and that retinal examinations may be useful for identifying patients with COL4A1 and COL4A2 mutations who are also at elevated risk of hemorrhagic strokes.

  7. Constitutively active ezrin increases membrane tension, slows migration, and impedes endothelial transmigration of lymphocytes in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Belkina, Natalya V; Park, Chung; Nambiar, Raj; Loughhead, Scott M; Patino-Lopez, Genaro; Ben-Aissa, Khadija; Hao, Jian-Jiang; Kruhlak, Michael J; Qi, Hai; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Kehrl, John H; Tyska, Matthew J; Shaw, Stephen

    2012-01-12

    ERM (ezrin, radixin moesin) proteins in lymphocytes link cortical actin to plasma membrane, which is regulated in part by ERM protein phosphorylation. To assess whether phosphorylation of ERM proteins regulates lymphocyte migration and membrane tension, we generated transgenic mice whose T-lymphocytes express low levels of ezrin phosphomimetic protein (T567E). In these mice, T-cell number in lymph nodes was reduced by 27%. Lymphocyte migration rate in vitro and in vivo in lymph nodes decreased by 18% to 47%. Lymphocyte membrane tension increased by 71%. Investigations of other possible underlying mechanisms revealed impaired chemokine-induced shape change/lamellipod extension and increased integrin-mediated adhesion. Notably, lymphocyte homing to lymph nodes was decreased by 30%. Unlike most described homing defects, there was not impaired rolling or sticking to lymph node vascular endothelium but rather decreased migration across that endothelium. Moreover, decreased numbers of transgenic T cells in efferent lymph suggested defective egress. These studies confirm the critical role of ERM dephosphorylation in regulating lymphocyte migration and transmigration. Of particular note, they identify phospho-ERM as the first described regulator of lymphocyte membrane tension, whose increase probably contributes to the multiple defects observed in the ezrin T567E transgenic mice.

  8. Quantum computing with defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Joel

    2011-03-01

    The development of a quantum computer is contingent upon the identification and design of systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information. One of the most promising candidates consists of a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV-1) center, since it is an individually-addressable quantum system that can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. While the success of the NV-1 stems from its nature as a localized ``deep-center'' point defect, no systematic effort has been made to identify other defects that might behave in a similar way. We provide guidelines for identifying other defect centers with similar properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate systems. To elucidate these points, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV-1 center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). Using hybrid functionals, we report formation energies, configuration-coordinate diagrams, and defect-level diagrams to compare and contrast the properties of these defects. We find that the NC VSi - 1 center in SiC, a structural analog of the NV-1 center in diamond, may be a suitable center with very different optical transition energies. We also discuss how the proposed criteria can be translated into guidelines to discover NV analogs in other tetrahedrally coordinated materials. This work was performed in collaboration with J. R. Weber, W. F. Koehl, B. B. Buckley, A. Janotti, C. G. Van de Walle, and D. D. Awschalom. This work was supported by ARO, AFOSR, and NSF.

  9. A Mutation in the Dmp1 Gene Alters Phosphate Responsiveness in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard-O'Riley, Rita L.; Acton, Dena; McQueen, Amie K.; Strobel, Isabel E.; Witcher, Phillip C.; Feng, Jian Q.; Econs, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) gene cause autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). Hypophosphatemia in ARHR results from increased circulating levels of the phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Similarly, elevated FGF23, caused by mutations in the PHEX gene, is responsible for the hypophosphatemia in X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH). Previously, we demonstrated that a Phex mutation in mice creates a lower set point for extracellular phosphate, where an increment in phosphorus further stimulates Fgf23 production to maintain low serum phosphorus levels. To test the presence of the similar set point defect in ARHR, we generated 4- and 12-week-old Dmp1/Galnt3 double knockout mice and controls, including Dmp1 knockout mice (a murine model of ARHR), Galnt3 knockout mice (a murine model of familial tumoral calcinosis), and phenotypically normal double heterozygous mice. Galnt3 knockout mice had increased proteolytic cleavage of Fgf23, leading to low circulating intact Fgf23 levels with consequent hyperphosphatemia. In contrast, Dmp1 knockout mice had little Fgf23 cleavage and increased femoral Fgf23 expression, resulting in hypophosphatemia and low femoral bone mineral density (BMD). However, introduction of the Galnt3 null allele to Dmp1 knockout mice resulted in a significant increase in serum phosphorus and normalization of BMD. This increased serum phosphorus was accompanied by markedly elevated Fgf23 expression and circulating Fgf23 levels, an attempt to reduce serum phosphorus in the face of improving phosphorus levels. These data indicate that a Dmp1 mutation creates a lower set point for extracellular phosphate and maintains it through the regulation of Fgf23 cleavage and expression. PMID:28005411

  10. A computational framework for automation of point defect calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Anuj; Gorai, Prashun; Peng, Haowei

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a complete and rigorously validated open-source Python framework to automate point defect calculations using density functional theory. Furthermore, the framework provides an effective and efficient method for defect structure generation, and creation of simple yet customizable workflows to analyze defect calculations. This package provides the capability to compute widely-accepted correction schemes to overcome finite-size effects, including (1) potential alignment, (2) image-charge correction, and (3) band filling correction to shallow defects. Using Si, ZnO and In2O3 as test examples, we demonstrate the package capabilities and validate the methodology.

  11. Defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pimentel, C.A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Some problems openned in the study of defects in semiconductors are presented. In particular, a review is made of the more important problems in Si monocrystals of basic and technological interest: microdefects and the presence of oxigen and carbon. The techniques usually utilized in the semiconductor material characterization are emphatized according its potentialities. Some applications of x-ray techniques in the epitaxial shell characterization in heterostructures, importants in electronic optics, are shown. The increase in the efficiency of these defect analysis methods in semiconductor materials with the use of synchrotron x-ray sources is shown. (L.C.) [pt

  12. Graphene defects induced by ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlik, Grzegorz; Ciepielewski, Paweł; Baranowski, Jacek; Jagielski, Jacek

    2017-10-01

    The CVD graphene deposited on the glass substrate was bombarded by molecular carbon ions C3+ C6+ hydrocarbon ions C3H4+ and atomic ions He+, C+, N+, Ar+, Kr+ Yb+. Size and density of ion induced defects were estimated from evolution of relative intensities of Raman lines D (∼1350 1/cm), G (∼1600 1/cm), and D‧ (∼1620 1/cm) with ion fluence. The efficiency of defect generation by atomic ions depend on ion mass and energy similarly as vacancy generation directly by ion predicted by SRIM simulations. However, efficiency of defect generation in graphene by molecular carbon ions is essentially higher than summarized efficiency of similar group of separate atomic carbon ions of the same energy that each carbon ion in a cluster. The evolution of the D/D‧ ratio of Raman lines intensities with ion fluence was observed. This effect may indicate evolution of defect nature from sp3-like at low fluence to a vacancy-like at high fluence. Observed ion graphene interactions suggest that the molecular ion interacts with graphene as single integrated object and should not be considered as a group of atomic ions with partial energy.

  13. Radiation carcinogenesis in scid mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Hiroko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Kobayashi, Shigeru; Tsuji, Hideo; Shimada, Yoshiya; Ogiu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Fumio; Sado, Toshihiko

    1999-06-01

    Scid mice which have the defect of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalitic subunit, exhibit the limited activities of repair from DNA double strand breaks, and are sensitive to ionizing radiation. In order to study the relationship between repair capacity for DNA double strand breaks and carcinogenesis, the effects of ionizing radiation were studied using scid homozygotes (scid/scid), scid heterozygotes (scid/+) and CB-17 (+/+) mice. Both the Scid bone marrow cells and fibroblast cell lines from Scid embryos were highly sensitivity to acute effects of ionizing radiation. Carcinogenesis experiments showed the high incidence of thymic lymphomas (80 to 90%) in 1 to 3 Gy {sup 137}Cs-{gamma}-ray-irradiated Scid mice. (author)

  14. Micro-bridge defects: characterization and root cause analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Gaetano; Van den Heuvel, Dieter; Braggin, Jennifer; Rosslee, Craig; Leray, Philippe J.; Cheng, Shaunee; Jehoul, Christiane; Schreutelkamp, Robert; Hillel, Noam

    2010-03-01

    Defect review of advanced lithography processes is becoming more and more challenging as feature sizes decrease. Previous studies using a defect review SEM on immersion lithography generated wafers have resulted in a defect classification scheme which, among others, includes a category for micro-bridges. Micro-bridges are small connections between two adjacent lines in photo-resist and are considered device killing defects. Micro-bridge rates also tend to increase as feature sizes decrease, making them even more important for the next technology nodes. Especially because micro-bridge defects can originate from different root causes, the need to further refine and split up the classification of this type of defect into sub groups may become a necessity. This paper focuses on finding the correlation of the different types of micro-bridge defects to a particular root cause based on a full characterization and root cause analysis of this class of defects, by using advanced SEM review capabilities like high quality imaging in very low FOV, Multi Perspective SEM Imaging (MPSI), tilted column and rotated stage (Tilt&Rotation) imaging and Focused Ion Beam (FIB) cross sectioning. Immersion lithography material has been mainly used to generate the set of data presented in this work even though, in the last part of the results, some EUV lithography data will be presented as part of the continuing effort to extend the micro-bridge defect characterization to the EUV technology on 40 nm technology node and beyond.

  15. Defect detection module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernwein, R.; Westermann, G.

    1986-01-01

    The ''defect detector'' module is aimed at exceptional event or state recording. Foreseen for voltage presence monitoring on high supply voltage module of drift chambers, its characteristics can also show up the vanishing of supply voltage and take in account transitory fast signals [fr

  16. Quantum computing with defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  17. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori. PMID:25789225

  18. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ezzatifar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori.

  19. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Kazemi, Tohid; Aghebati Maleki, Ali; Sineh sepehr, Koushan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. 5 ml ascitic fluid was harvested from each mouse in two times. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. The ascitic fluid was examined for class and subclasses by ELISA mouse mAb isotyping Kit. mAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose. Purity of monoclonal antibody was monitored by SDS -PAGE and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD34 by hybridoma technology were prepared. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was kappa. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could be a useful tool for isolation, purification and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:24312838

  20. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushan Sineh sepehr

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. 5 ml ascitic fluid was harvested from each mouse in two times. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. The ascitic fluid was examined for class and subclasses by ELISA mouse mAb isotyping Kit. mAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose. Purity of monoclonal antibody was monitored by SDS -PAGE and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD34 by hybridoma technology were prepared. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was kappa. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could be a useful tool for isolation, purification and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  1. 2-Phenylethylamine, a constituent of chocolate and wine, causes mitochondrial complex-I inhibition, generation of hydroxyl radicals and depletion of striatal biogenic amines leading to psycho-motor dysfunctions in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, T; Mohanakumar, K P

    2010-11-01

    Behavioral and neurochemical effects of chronic administration of high doses of 2-phenylethylamine (PEA; 25-75 mg/kg, i.p. for up to 7 days) have been investigated in Balb/c mice. Depression and anxiety, as demonstrated respectively by increased floating time in forced swim test, and reduction in number of entries and the time spent in the open arms in an elevated plus maze were observed in these animals. General motor disabilities in terms of akinesia, catalepsy and decreased swimming ability were also observed in these animals. Acute and sub-acute administration of PEA caused significant, dose-dependent depletion of striatal dopamine, and its metabolites levels. PEA caused dose-dependent generation of hydroxyl radicals in vitro in Fenton's reaction in test tubes, in isolated mitochondrial fraction, and in vivo in the striatum of mice. A significant inhibition of NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex-I; EC: 1.6.5.3) activity suggests the inhibition in oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria resulting in hydroxyl radical generation. Nissl staining and TH immnunohistochemistry in brain sections failed to show any morphological aberrations in dopaminergic neurons or nerve terminals. Long-term over-consumption of PEA containing food items could be a neurological risk factor having significant pathological relevance to disease conditions such as depression or motor dysfunction. However, per-oral administration of higher doses of PEA (75-125 mg/kg; 7 days) failed to cause such overt neurochemical effects in rats, which suggested safe consumption of food items rich in this trace amine by normal population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Accurate defect die placement and nuisance defect reduction for reticle die-to-die inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Vincent; Huang, L. R.; Lin, C. J.; Tseng, Y. N.; Huang, W. H.; Tuo, Laurent C.; Wylie, Mark; Chen, Ellison; Wang, Elvik; Glasser, Joshua; Kelkar, Amrish; Wu, David

    2015-10-01

    Die-to-die reticle inspections are among the simplest and most sensitive reticle inspections because of the use of an identical-design neighboring-die for the reference image. However, this inspection mode can have two key disadvantages: (1) The location of the defect is indeterminate because it is unclear to the inspector whether the test or reference image is defective; and (2) nuisance and false defects from mask manufacturing noise and tool optical variation can limit the usable sensitivity. The use of a new sequencing approach for a die-to-die inspection can resolve these issues without any additional scan time, without sacrifice in sensitivity requirement, and with a manageable increase in computation load. In this paper we explore another approach for die-to-die inspections using a new method of defect processing and sequencing. Utilizing die-to-die double arbitration during defect detection has been proven through extensive testing to generate accurate placement of the defect in the correct die to ensure efficient defect disposition at the AIMS step. The use of this method maintained the required inspection sensitivity for mask quality as verified with programmed-defectmask qualification and then further validated with production masks comparing the current inspection approach to the new method. Furthermore, this approach can significantly reduce the total number of defects that need to be reviewed by essentially eliminating the nuisance and false defects that can result from a die-to-die inspection. This "double-win" will significantly reduce the effort in classifying a die-to-die inspection result and will lead to improved cycle times.

  3. Protection of mice against Giardia muris infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Thomson, I C; Mitchell, G F

    1979-01-01

    Strains of mice showing relatively rapid (BALB/c) and defective (C3H/He) spontaneous elimination of Giardia muris displayed marked differences in the degree of resistance to infection induced by prior injection of trophozoites in Freund complete adjuvant. PMID:468385

  4. Computed tomography on a defective CANDU fuel pencil end cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupton, L.R.

    1985-09-01

    Five tomographic slices through a defective end cap from a CANDU fuel pencil have been generated using a Co-60 source and a first generation translate-rotate tomography scanner. An anomaly in the density distribution that is believed to have resulted from the defect has been observed. However, with the 0.30 mm spatial resolution used, it has not been possible to state unequivocally whether the change in density is caused by a defect in the weld or a statistical anomaly in the data. It is concluded that a microtomography system, with a spatial resolution in the range of 0.1 mm, could detect the flaw

  5. Compensatory eye movements in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Alphen (Arjan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis will address the generation of compensatory eye movements in naturally mutated or genetically modified mice. The reason for generating compensatory eye movements is solely related to the requirements for good vision. In a subject moving through its environment the projection

  6. Tissue-specific expression of transgenic secreted ACE in vasculature can restore normal kidney functions, but not blood pressure, of Ace-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Chattopadhyay

    Full Text Available Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE regulates normal blood pressure and fluid homeostasis through its action in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS. Ace-/- mice are smaller in size, have low blood pressure and defective kidney structure and functions. All of these defects are cured by transgenic expression of somatic ACE (sACE in vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice. sACE is expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells and undergoes a natural cleavage secretion process to generate a soluble form in the body fluids. Both the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE are enzymatically active, and generate the vasoactive octapeptide Angiotensin II (Ang II with equal efficiency. To assess the relative physiological roles of the secreted and the cell-bound forms of ACE, we expressed, in the vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice, the ectodomain of sACE, which corresponded to only the secreted form of ACE. Our results demonstrated that the secreted form of ACE could normalize kidney functions and RAS integrity, growth and development of Ace-/- mice, but not their blood pressure. This study clearly demonstrates that the secreted form of ACE cannot replace the tissue-bound ACE for maintaining normal blood pressure; a suitable balance between the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE is essential for maintaining all physiological functions of ACE.

  7. Tissue-specific expression of transgenic secreted ACE in vasculature can restore normal kidney functions, but not blood pressure, of Ace-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Kessler, Sean P; Colucci, Juliana Almada; Yamashita, Michifumi; Senanayake, Preenie deS; Sen, Ganes C

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) regulates normal blood pressure and fluid homeostasis through its action in the renin-angiotensin-system (RAS). Ace-/- mice are smaller in size, have low blood pressure and defective kidney structure and functions. All of these defects are cured by transgenic expression of somatic ACE (sACE) in vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice. sACE is expressed on the surface of vascular endothelial cells and undergoes a natural cleavage secretion process to generate a soluble form in the body fluids. Both the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE are enzymatically active, and generate the vasoactive octapeptide Angiotensin II (Ang II) with equal efficiency. To assess the relative physiological roles of the secreted and the cell-bound forms of ACE, we expressed, in the vascular endothelial cells of Ace-/- mice, the ectodomain of sACE, which corresponded to only the secreted form of ACE. Our results demonstrated that the secreted form of ACE could normalize kidney functions and RAS integrity, growth and development of Ace-/- mice, but not their blood pressure. This study clearly demonstrates that the secreted form of ACE cannot replace the tissue-bound ACE for maintaining normal blood pressure; a suitable balance between the tissue-bound and the soluble forms of ACE is essential for maintaining all physiological functions of ACE.

  8. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be associated with genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome . But the cause of most congenital heart defects isn't known. While they can't be prevented, many treatments are available for the defects and related health ...

  9. Antigravity from a spacetime defect

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkhamer, F. R.; Queiruga, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We argue that there may exist spacetime defects embedded in Minkowski spacetime, which have negative active gravitational mass. One such spacetime defect then repels a test particle, corresponding to what may be called "antigravity."

  10. Distorted leukocyte migration, angiogenesis, wound repair and metastasis in Tspan8 and Tspan8/CD151 double knockout mice indicate complementary activities of Tspan8 and CD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Erb, Ulrike; Hackert, Thilo; Zöller, Margot; Yue, Shijing

    2018-02-01

    The tetraspanin Tspan8 supports via associated integrins and proteases tumor progression and angiogenesis. To shed light on its activities in non-transformed cells, we generated a Tspan8 knockout (ko) mouse, comparing leukocyte migration, angiogenesis, wound healing and tumor growth with wild type, CD151ko and Tspan8/CD151ko (dbko) mice. CD151ko mice were included as CD151 activities resemble that of Tspan8, and dbko mice to exclude mutual substitution. Tspan8ko and dbko mice show no pathological phenotype. However, delayed type hypersensitivity reactions are mitigated in Tspan8ko mice, angiogenesis is severely impaired in Tspan8ko, CD151ko and dbko mice, with Tspan8 mostly affecting lymphangiogenesis. Distinct contributions of CD151 and Tspan8 to skin wound healing rely on preferentially CD151 anchoring basal keratinocytes and Tspan8 promoting motility. Proliferation of wounded skin keratinocytes is not affected. Metastasis formation of a melanoma and a Tspan8-expressing pancreatic cancer line was impaired in Tspan8ko and dbko mice, pointing towards a contribution of host Tspan8 to tumor progression. In line with the importance of tetraspanins in exosome-mediated intercellular communication, defects became mitigated by Tspan8/CD151-competent serum exosomes, which offers a most promising therapeutic option for chronic wounds and arteriosclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Studies of defects and defect agglomerates by positron annihilation spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Singh, B.N.

    1997-01-01

    A brief introduction to positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), and in particular lo its use for defect studies in metals is given. Positrons injected into a metal may become trapped in defects such as vacancies, vacancy clusters, voids, bubbles and dislocations and subsequently annihilate from...... the trapped state iri the defect. The annihilation characteristics (e.g., the lifetime of the positron) can be measured and provide information about the nature of the defect (e.g., size, density, morphology). The technique is sensitive to both defect size (in the range from monovacancies up to cavities...

  12. Generation of Two Noradrenergic-Specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase-FLPo Knock-In Mice Using CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Targeting in Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny J Sun

    Full Text Available CRISPR/Cas9 mediated DNA double strand cutting is emerging as a powerful approach to increase rates of homologous recombination of large targeting vectors, but the optimization of parameters, equipment and expertise required remain barriers to successful mouse generation by single-step zygote injection. Here, we sought to apply CRISPR/Cas9 methods to traditional embryonic stem (ES cell targeting followed by blastocyst injection to overcome the common issues of difficult vector construction and low targeting efficiency. To facilitate the study of noradrenergic function, which is implicated in myriad behavioral and physiological processes, we generated two different mouse lines that express FLPo recombinase under control of the noradrenergic-specific Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH gene. We found that by co-electroporating a circular vector expressing Cas9 and a locus-specific sgRNA, we could target FLPo to the DBH locus in ES cells with shortened 1 kb homology arms. Two different sites in the DBH gene were targeted; the translational start codon with 6-8% targeting efficiency, and the translational stop codon with 75% targeting efficiency. Using this approach, we established two mouse lines with DBH-specific expression of FLPo in brainstem catecholaminergic populations that are publically available on MMRRC (MMRRC_041575-UCD and MMRRC_041577-UCD. Altogether, this study supports simplified, high-efficiency Cas9/CRISPR-mediated targeting in embryonic stem cells for production of knock-in mouse lines in a wider variety of contexts than zygote injection alone.

  13. Congenital Heart Defects and CCHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Congenital heart defects and ... in congenital heart defects. You have a family history of congenital heart ... syndrome or VCF. After birth Your baby may be tested for CCHD as ...

  14. Study on surface defects in milling Inconel 718 super alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Liu; Chengzu, Ren; Guofeng, Wang; Yinwei, Yang; Lu, Zhang [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2015-04-15

    Nickel-based alloys have been extensively used as critical components in aerospace industry, especially in the key section of aero engine. In general, these sections are manufactured by milling process because most of them have complex forms. However, surface defects appear frequently in milling due to periodic impact force, which leads to the deterioration of the fatigue life. We conducted milling experiments under different cutting conditions and found that four kinds of defects, i.e., tear, cavity, build up edge (BUE) and groove, commonly appear on the machined surface. Based on the observed results, the morphology and generation regime of these defects are analyzed and the carbide particle cracking is discussed to explain the appearance of the nickel alloy defects. To study the effect of the cutting parameters on the severity of these surface defects, two qualitative indicators, which are named as average number of the defects per field and average area ratio of the defects per field, are presented and the influence laws are summarized based on the results correspondingly. This study is helpful for understanding the generation mechanism of the surface defects during milling process of nickel based super alloy.

  15. Immobile defects in ferroelastic walls: Wall nucleation at defect sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X.; Salje, E. K. H.; Ding, X.; Sun, J.

    2018-02-01

    Randomly distributed, static defects are enriched in ferroelastic domain walls. The relative concentration of defects in walls, Nd, follows a power law distribution as a function of the total defect concentration C: N d ˜ C α with α = 0.4 . The enrichment Nd/C ranges from ˜50 times when C = 10 ppm to ˜3 times when C = 1000 ppm. The resulting enrichment is due to nucleation at defect sites as observed in large scale MD simulations. The dynamics of domain nucleation and switching is dependent on the defect concentration. Their energy distribution follows the power law with exponents during yield between ɛ ˜ 1.82 and 2.0 when the defect concentration increases. The power law exponent is ɛ ≈ 2.7 in the plastic regime, independent of the defect concentration.

  16. Benign gastric filling defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y.

    1979-01-01

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  17. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Cho, O. K.; Park, C. Y. [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  18. Benign gastric filling defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, K K; Lee, Y H; Cho, O K; Park, C Y [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-06-15

    The gastric lesion is a common source of complaints to Orientals, however, evaluation of gastric symptoms and laboratory examination offer little specific aid in the diagnosis of gastric diseases. Thus roentgenography of gastrointestinal tract is one of the most reliable method for detail diagnosis. On double contract study of stomach, gastric filling defect is mostly caused by malignant gastric cancer, however, other benign lesions can cause similar pictures which can be successfully treated by surgery. 66 cases of benign causes of gastric filling defect were analyzed at this point of view, which was verified pathologically by endoscope or surgery during recent 7 years in Yensei University College of Medicine, Severance Hospital. The characteristic radiological picture of each disease was discussed for precise radiologic diagnosis. 1. Of total 66 cases, there were 52 cases of benign gastric tumor 10 cases of gastric varices, 5 cases of gastric bezoar, 5 cases of corrosive gastritis, 3 cases of granulomatous disease and one case of gastric hematoma. 2. The most frequent causes of benign tumors were adenomatous polyp (35/42) and the next was leiomyoma (4/42). Others were one of case of carcinoid, neurofibroma and cyst. 3. Characteristic of benign adenomatous polyp were relatively small in size, smooth surface and were observed that large size, benign polyp was frequently type IV lesion with a stalk. 4. Submucosal tumors such as leiomyoma needed differential diagnosis with polypoid malignant cancer. However, the characteristic points of differentiation was well circumscribed smooth margined filling defect without definite mucosal destruction on surface. 5. Gastric varices showed multiple lobulated filling defected especially on gastric fundus that changed its size and shape by respiration and posture of patients. Same varices lesions on esophagus and history of liver disease were helpful for easier diagnosis. 6. Gastric bezoar showed well defined movable mass

  19. Point defects in lines in single crystalline phosphorene: directional migration and tunable band gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuling; Ma, Liang; Wang, Dayong; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wu, Xiaojun; Yang, Jinlong

    2016-10-20

    Extended line defects in two-dimensional (2D) materials can play an important role in modulating their electronic properties. During the experimental synthesis of 2D materials, line defects are commonly generated at grain boundaries between domains of different orientations. In this work, twelve types of line-defect structures in single crystalline phosphorene are examined by using first-principles calculations. These line defects are typically formed via migration and aggregation of intrinsic point defects, including the Stone-Wales (SW), single or double vacancy (SV or DV) defects. Our calculated results demonstrate that the migration of point defects in phosphorene is anisotropic, for instance, the lowest migration energy barriers are 1.39 (or 0.40) and 2.58 (or 0.49) eV for SW (or SV) defects in zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. The aggregation of point defects into lines is energetically favorable compared with the separated point defects in phosphorene. In particular, the axis of line defects in phosphorene is direction-selective, depending on the composed point defects. The presence of line defects effectively modulates the electronic properties of phosphorene, rendering the defect-containing phosphorene either metallic or semiconducting with a tunable band gap. Of particular interest is the fact that the SV-based line defect can behave as a metallic wire, suggesting a possibility to fabricate a circuit with subnanometer widths in the semiconducting phosphorene for nanoscale electronic application.

  20. Potential Therapeutic Use of Relaxin in Healing Cranial Bone Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    to measure circulating concentrations of relaxin during the infusion by ELISA ; 3. sacrifice the mice at 10-12 days after cranial defect; 4. fix the...osmotic pump for 10-12 days, and to measure circulating concentrations of relaxin during the infusion by ELISA . Values of 0.35, 0.69, 1.61, 0.66, 1.99...vehicle-infused mice, because in our previous work, none was detected. This makes sense, because the ELISA we use does not detect mouse relaxin

  1. Nonhomologous recombination between defective poliovirus and coxsackievirus genomes suggests a new model of genetic plasticity for picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmblat, Barbara; Jégouic, Sophie; Muslin, Claire; Blondel, Bruno; Joffret, Marie-Line; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2014-08-05

    Most of the circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in Madagascar have been shown to be recombinants between the type 2 poliovirus (PV) strain of the oral polio vaccine (Sabin 2) and another species C human enterovirus (HEV-C), such as type 17 coxsackie A virus (CA17) in particular. We studied intertypic genetic exchanges between PV and non-PV HEV-C by developing a recombination model, making it possible to rescue defective type 2 PV RNA genomes with a short deletion at the 3' end by the cotransfection of cells with defective or infectious CA17 RNAs. We isolated over 200 different PV/CA17 recombinants, using murine cells expressing the human PV receptor (PVR) and selecting viruses with PV capsids. We found some homologous (H) recombinants and, mostly, nonhomologous (NH) recombinants presenting duplications of parental sequences preferentially located in the regions encoding proteins 2A, 2B, and 3A. Short duplications appeared to be stable, whereas longer duplications were excised during passaging in cultured cells or after multiplication in PVR-transgenic mice, generating H recombinants with diverse sites of recombination. This suggests that NH recombination events may be a transient, intermediate step in the generation and selection of the fittest H recombinants. In addition to the classical copy-choice mechanism of recombination thought to generate mostly H recombinants, there may also be a modular mechanism of recombination, involving NH recombinant precursors, shaping the genomes of recombinant enteroviruses and other picornaviruses. Importance: The multiplication of circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs) in poorly immunized human populations can render these viruses pathogenic, causing poliomyelitis outbreaks. Most cVDPVs are intertypic recombinants between a poliovirus (PV) strain and another human enterovirus, such as type 17 coxsackie A viruses (CA17). For further studies of the genetic exchanges

  2. Surface defects and chiral algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Córdova, Clay [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Dr, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Gaiotto, Davide [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline St N, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Shao, Shu-Heng [School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,1 Einstein Dr, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2017-05-26

    We investigate superconformal surface defects in four-dimensional N=2 superconformal theories. Each such defect gives rise to a module of the associated chiral algebra and the surface defect Schur index is the character of this module. Various natural chiral algebra operations such as Drinfeld-Sokolov reduction and spectral flow can be interpreted as constructions involving four-dimensional surface defects. We compute the index of these defects in the free hypermultiplet theory and Argyres-Douglas theories, using both infrared techniques involving BPS states, as well as renormalization group flows onto Higgs branches. In each case we find perfect agreement with the predicted characters.

  3. Defective myoblasts identified in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    OpenAIRE

    Blau, H M; Webster, C; Pavlath, G K

    1983-01-01

    A defect in the proliferative capacity of satellite cells, mononucleated precursors of mature muscle fibers, was found in clonal analyses of cells cultured from Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. The total yield of myoblasts per gram of muscle biopsy was decreased to 5% of normal. Of the DMD myoblast clones obtained, a large proportion contained a morphological class of flat distended cells that had an increased generation time and ceased to proliferate beyond 100-1,000 cells but cou...

  4. Point defects in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretto, P.

    1969-01-01

    The defects in electron irradiated nickel (20 deg. K) or neutron irradiated nickel (28 deg. K) are studied by simultaneous analysis using the magnetic after-effect, electron microscopy and electrical resistivity recovery. We use zone refined nickel (99.999 per cent) which, for some experiments, is alloyed with a small amount of iron (for example 0.1 per cent Fe). The temperature dependant electrical recovery may be divided in four stages. The sub-stages I B (31 deg. K), I C (42 deg. K), I D (from to 57 deg. K) and I E (62 deg. K) of stage I are due to the disappearance of single interstitials into vacancies. The interstitial defect has a split configuration with a migration energy of about 0.15 eV. In the close pair which disappears in stage I B the interstitial is found to be in a 3. neighbour position whilst in stage I D it is near the direction from the vacancy. In stage I E there is no longer any interaction between the interstitial and the vacancy. The stage II is due to more complicated interstitial defects: di-interstitials for stage II B (84 deg. K) and larger and larger interstitial loops for the following sub-stages. The loops may be seen by electron microscopy. Impurities can play the role of nucleation centers for the loops. Stages III A (370 deg. K) and III B (376 deg. K) are due to two types of di-vacancies. During stage IV (410 deg. K) the single vacancies migrate. Vacancy type loops and interstitial type loops grow concurrently and disappear at about 800 deg. K as observed by electron microscopy. (author) [fr

  5. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, B.; Turkmen, N.; Fedakar, R.; Cetin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  6. Defect creation in solids by a decay of electronic excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinger, M.I.; Lushchik, Ch.B.; Mashovets, T.V.; Kholodar', G.A.; Shejnkman, M.K.; Ehlango, M.A.; Kievskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Poluprovodnikov)

    1985-01-01

    A new type of radiationless transitions in nonmetallic solids accompanied by neither the extraction of a heat nor the luminescence, but by a large (in comparison with the interatomic distance) displacements of a small number of atoms is discussed. A classification is given of the instabilities (electrostatic, electron-vibrational, structural) leading to a creation of the defects in crystalline and glassy solids. The processes of the defect creation, due to both the decay of self-trapped excitions in ionic crystals and the multiple ionization of atoms near the pre-existing charged centres in semiconductor are described. The mechanisms of the complex defects reconstruction in semiconductors by nonequilibrium charge carriers and by an electron-hole recombination are discussed. The role of charge carriers in a thermal defect generation is considered. A mechanism of the peculiar defect creation in glassy semiconductors is discussed

  7. A criterion and mechanism for power ramp defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garlick, A.; Gravenor, J.G.

    1978-02-01

    The problem of power ramp defects in water reactor fuel pins is discussed in relation to results recently obtained from ramp experiments in the Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor. Cladding cracks in the defected fuel pins were similar, both macro- and micro structurally, to those in unirradiated Zircaloy exposed to iodine stress-corrosion cracking (scc) conditions. Furthermore, when the measured stress levels for scc in short-term tests were taken as a criterion for ramp defects, UK fuel modelling codes were found to give a useful indication of defect probability under reactor service conditions. The likelihood of sticking between fuel and cladding is discussed and evidence presented which suggests that even at power a degree of adhesion may be expected in some fuel pins. The ramp defect mechanism is discussed in terms of fission product scc, initiation being by intergranular penetration and propagation by cleavage when suitably orientated grains are exposed to large dilatational stresses ahead of the main crack. (author)

  8. Defects and Disorder in the Drosophila Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Carthew, Richard; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    Cell division and differentiation tightly control the regular pattern in the normal eye of the Drosophila fruit fly while certain genetic mutations introduce disorder in the form of topological defects. Analyzing data from pupal retinas, we develop a model based on Voronoi construction that explains the defect statistics as a consequence of area variation of individual facets (ommatidia). The analysis reveals a previously unknown systematic long-range area variation that spans the entire eye, with distinct effects on topological disorder compared to local fluctuations. The internal structure of the ommatidia and the stiffness of their interior cells also plays a crucial role in the defect generation. Accurate predictions of the correlation between the area variation and the defect density in both normal and mutant animals are obtained without free parameters. This approach can potentially be applied to cellular systems in many other contexts to identify size-topology correlations near the onset of symmetry breaking. This work has been supported by the NIH (GM098077) and the NSF (Grant No. 1504301).

  9. Defect detection using transient thermography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Zaki Umar; Ibrahim Ahmad; Ab Razak Hamzah; Wan Saffiey Wan Abdullah

    2008-08-01

    An experimental research had been carried out to study the potential of transient thermography in detecting sub-surface defect of non-metal material. In this research, eight pieces of bakelite material were used as samples. Each samples had a sub-surface defect in the circular shape with different diameters and depths. Experiment was conducted using one-sided Pulsed Thermal technique. Heating of samples were done using 30 kWatt adjustable quartz lamp while infra red (IR) images of samples were recorded using THV 550 IR camera. These IR images were then analysed with ThermofitTMPro software to obtain the Maximum Absolute Differential Temperature Signal value, ΔΤ m ax and the time of its appearance, τ m ax (ΔΤ). Result showed that all defects were able to be detected even for the smallest and deepest defect (diameter = 5 mm and depth = 4 mm). However the highest value of Differential Temperature Signal (ΔΤ m ax), were obtained at defect with the largest diameter, 20 mm and at the shallowest depth, 1 mm. As a conclusion, the sensitivity of the pulsed thermography technique to detect sub-surface defects of bakelite material is proportionately related with the size of defect diameter if the defects are at the same depth. On the contrary, the sensitivity of the pulsed thermography technique inversely related with the depth of defect if the defects have similar diameter size. (Author)

  10. Dipole defects in beryl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holanda, B A; Cordeiro, R C; Blak, A R

    2010-01-01

    Dipole defects in gamma irradiated and thermally treated beryl (Be 3 Al 2 Si 6 O 18 ) samples have been studied using the Thermally Stimulated Depolarization Currents (TSDC) technique. TSDC experiments were performed in pink (morganite), green (emerald), blue (aquamarine) and colourless (goshenite) natural beryl. TSDC spectra present dipole peaks at 190K, 220K, 280K and 310K that change after gamma irradiation and thermal treatments. In morganite samples, for thermal treatments between 700K and 1100K, the 280K peak increase in intensity and the band at 220K disappears. An increase of the 280K peak and a decrease of the 190K peak were observed in the TSDC spectra of morganite after a gamma irradiation of 25kGy performed after the thermal treatments. In the case of emerald samples, thermal treatments enhanced the 280K peak and gamma irradiation partially destroyed this band. The goshenite TSDC spectra present only one band at 280K that is not affected either by thermal treatments or by gamma irradiation. All the observed peaks are of dipolar origin because the intensity of the bands is linearly dependent on the polarization field, behaviour of dipole defects. The systematic study, by means of TSDC measurements, of ionizing irradiation effects and thermal treatments in these crystals makes possible a better understanding of the role played by the impurities in beryl crystals.

  11. Therapeutic cloning in individual parkinsonian mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabar, Viviane; Tomishima, Mark; Panagiotakos, Georgia; Wakayama, Sayaka; Menon, Jayanthi; Chan, Bill; Mizutani, Eiji; Al-Shamy, George; Ohta, Hiroshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Studer, Lorenz

    2009-01-01

    Cell transplantation with embryonic stem (ES) cell progeny requires immunological compatibility with host tissue. ‘Therapeutic cloning’ is a strategy to overcome this limitation by generating nuclear transfer (nt)ES cells that are genetically matched to an individual. Here we establish the feasibility of treating individual mice via therapeutic cloning. Derivation of 187 ntES cell lines from 24 parkinsonian mice, dopaminergic differentiation, and transplantation into individually matched host mice showed therapeutic efficacy and lack of immunological response. PMID:18376409

  12. Porous decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage as a scaffold for large bone defect healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunniffe, Gráinne M; Vinardell, Tatiana; Murphy, J Mary; Thompson, Emmet M; Matsiko, Amos; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Clinical translation of tissue engineered therapeutics is hampered by the significant logistical and regulatory challenges associated with such products, prompting increased interest in the use of decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM) to enhance endogenous regeneration. Most bones develop and heal by endochondral ossification, the replacement of a hypertrophic cartilaginous intermediary with bone. The hypothesis of this study is that a porous scaffold derived from decellularized tissue engineered hypertrophic cartilage will retain the necessary signals to instruct host cells to accelerate endogenous bone regeneration. Cartilage tissue (CT) and hypertrophic cartilage tissue (HT) were engineered using human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, decellularized and the remaining ECM was freeze-dried to generate porous scaffolds. When implanted subcutaneously in nude mice, only the decellularized HT-derived scaffolds were found to induce vascularization and de novo mineral accumulation. Furthermore, when implanted into critically-sized femoral defects, full bridging was observed in half of the defects treated with HT scaffolds, while no evidence of such bridging was found in empty controls. Host cells which had migrated throughout the scaffold were capable of producing new bone tissue, in contrast to fibrous tissue formation within empty controls. These results demonstrate the capacity of decellularized engineered tissues as 'off-the-shelf' implants to promote tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of hemopoietic microenvironment on splenic suppressor macrophages in congenitally anemic mice of genotype Sl/Sld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Y.; Volkman, A.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying mononuclear phagocyte specialization are being probed by studying suppressor macrophages (M phi) as a reference population in mouse models with impaired blood monocyte formation. Splenic suppressor M phi, defined by PGE-mediated inhibition of Con A-induced T lymphocyte proliferation are induced by the i.p. administration of Corynebacterium parvum (CP). Mice severely depleted of bone marrow and blood monocytes by treatment with 89Sr fail to show this suppressor M phi response to CP, although M phi-forming stem cells, assessed as splenic M-CFC in vitro, are increased 20-fold. These observations suggest that radiosensitive bone marrow stem cells are necessary for the generation of both suppressor M phi and monocytes and that one such stem cell may be common to both types of mononuclear phagocytes. This notion was explored further by employing congenitally anemic mice of the genotype S1/S1d in which the hemopoietic microenvironment is genetically defective and thus unable to support the proliferation, differentiation, and function of stem cells. The congenital defect was found to be additionally expressed in the S1/S1d mouse by a monocytopenia of less than 10% of the values in normal congenic littermate controls and by the failure of splenic M-CFC to increase in response to CP. PGE-producing suppressor M phi expressing Fc gamma 2b receptors, however, were induced by CP in S1/S1d mice with no significant diminution of suppressor activity. These data establish the fact that significant impairment of the formation of monocytes is part of the overall hemopoietic defect in S1/S1d mice. PGE-producing suppressor M phi, however, were inducible at normal functional levels in the presence of a profound monocytopenia, and therefore appear to be independent of the mechanisms that regulate blood monocyte formation

  14. Dwarfism and early death in mice lacking C-type natriuretic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusho, Hideki; Tamura, Naohisa; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Yasoda, Akihiro; Suda, Michio; Miyazawa, Takashi; Nakamura, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuki; Kurihara, Tatsuya; Komatsu, Yasato; Itoh, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Katsuki, Motoya; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2001-01-01

    Longitudinal bone growth is determined by endochondral ossification that occurs as chondrocytes in the cartilaginous growth plate undergo proliferation, hypertrophy, cell death, and osteoblastic replacement. The natriuretic peptide family consists of three structurally related endogenous ligands, atrial, brain, and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP, and CNP), and is thought to be involved in a variety of homeostatic processes. To investigate the physiological significance of CNP in vivo, we generated mice with targeted disruption of CNP (Nppc−/− mice). The Nppc−/− mice show severe dwarfism as a result of impaired endochondral ossification. They are all viable perinatally, but less than half can survive during postnatal development. The skeletal phenotypes are histologically similar to those seen in patients with achondroplasia, the most common genetic form of human dwarfism. Targeted expression of CNP in the growth plate chondrocytes can rescue the skeletal defect of Nppc−/− mice and allow their prolonged survival. This study demonstrates that CNP acts locally as a positive regulator of endochondral ossification in vivo and suggests its pathophysiological and therapeutic implication in some forms of skeletal dysplasia. PMID:11259675

  15. Neurexin Dysfunction in Adult Neurons Results in Autistic-like Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G. Rabaneda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs comprise a group of clinical phenotypes characterized by repetitive behavior and social and communication deficits. Autism is generally viewed as a neurodevelopmental disorder where insults during embryonic or early postnatal periods result in aberrant wiring and function of neuronal circuits. Neurexins are synaptic proteins associated with autism. Here, we generated transgenic βNrx1ΔC mice in which neurexin function is selectively impaired during late postnatal stages. Whole-cell recordings in cortical neurons show an impairment of glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the βNrx1ΔC mice. Importantly, mutant mice exhibit autism-related symptoms, such as increased self-grooming, deficits in social interactions, and altered interaction for nonsocial olfactory cues. The autistic-like phenotype of βNrx1ΔC mice can be reversed after removing the mutant protein in aged animals. The defects resulting from disruption of neurexin function after the completion of embryonic and early postnatal development suggest that functional impairment of mature circuits can trigger autism-related phenotypes.

  16. Varying stiffness and load distributions in defective ball bearings: Analytical formulation and application to defect size estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Dick; Howard, Carl; Prime, Zebb

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an analytical formulation of the load distribution and varying effective stiffness of a ball bearing assembly with a raceway defect of varying size, subjected to static loading in the radial, axial and rotational degrees of freedom. The analytical formulation is used to study the effect of the size of the defect on the load distribution and varying stiffness of the bearing assembly. The study considers a square-shaped outer raceway defect centered in the load zone and the bearing is loaded in the radial and axial directions while the moment loads are zero. Analysis of the load distributions shows that as the defect size increases, defect-free raceway sections are subjected to increased static loading when one or more balls completely or partly destress when positioned in the defect zone. The stiffness variations that occur when balls pass through the defect zone are significantly larger and change more rapidly at the defect entrance and exit than the stiffness variations that occur for the defect-free bearing case. These larger, more rapid stiffness variations generate parametric excitations which produce the low frequency defect entrance and exit events typically observed in the vibration response of a bearing with a square-shaped raceway defect. Analysis of the stiffness variations further shows that as the defect size increases, the mean radial stiffness decreases in the loaded radial and axial directions and increases in the unloaded radial direction. The effects of such stiffness changes on the low frequency entrance and exit events in the vibration response are simulated with a multi-body nonlinear dynamic model. Previous work used the time difference between the low frequency entrance event and the high frequency exit event to estimate the size of the defect. However, these previous defect size estimation techniques cannot distinguish between defects that differ in size by an integer number of the ball angular spacing, and a third feature

  17. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion in mouse liver leads to defect β-oxidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshan Zhou

    Full Text Available Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2 deficiency in humans causes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion syndrome. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and search for treatment options, we previously generated and described a TK2 deficient mouse strain (TK2(-/- that progressively loses its mtDNA. The TK2(-/- mouse model displays symptoms similar to humans harboring TK2 deficient infantile fatal encephalomyopathy. Here, we have studied the TK2(-/- mouse model to clarify the pathological role of progressive mtDNA depletion in liver for the severe outcome of TK2 deficiency. We observed that a gradual depletion of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/- mice was accompanied by increasingly hypertrophic mitochondria and accumulation of fat vesicles in the liver cells. The levels of cholesterol and nonesterified fatty acids were elevated and there was accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines in plasma of the TK2(-/- mice. In mice with hepatic mtDNA levels below 20%, the blood sugar and the ketone levels dropped. These mice also exhibited reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation due to decreased transport of long chain acylcarnitines into the mitochondria. The gradual loss of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/- mice causes impaired mitochondrial function that leads to defect β-oxidation and, as a result, insufficient production of ketone bodies and glucose. This study provides insight into the mechanism of encephalomyopathy caused by TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion that may be used to explore novel therapeutic strategies.

  18. Thymidine kinase 2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion in mouse liver leads to defect β-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoshan; Kannisto, Kristina; Curbo, Sophie; von Döbeln, Ulrika; Hultenby, Kjell; Isetun, Sindra; Gåfvels, Mats; Karlsson, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) deficiency in humans causes mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease and search for treatment options, we previously generated and described a TK2 deficient mouse strain (TK2(-/-)) that progressively loses its mtDNA. The TK2(-/-) mouse model displays symptoms similar to humans harboring TK2 deficient infantile fatal encephalomyopathy. Here, we have studied the TK2(-/-) mouse model to clarify the pathological role of progressive mtDNA depletion in liver for the severe outcome of TK2 deficiency. We observed that a gradual depletion of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/-) mice was accompanied by increasingly hypertrophic mitochondria and accumulation of fat vesicles in the liver cells. The levels of cholesterol and nonesterified fatty acids were elevated and there was accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines in plasma of the TK2(-/-) mice. In mice with hepatic mtDNA levels below 20%, the blood sugar and the ketone levels dropped. These mice also exhibited reduced mitochondrial β-oxidation due to decreased transport of long chain acylcarnitines into the mitochondria. The gradual loss of mtDNA in the liver of the TK2(-/-) mice causes impaired mitochondrial function that leads to defect β-oxidation and, as a result, insufficient production of ketone bodies and glucose. This study provides insight into the mechanism of encephalomyopathy caused by TK2 deficiency-induced mtDNA depletion that may be used to explore novel therapeutic strategies.

  19. Accumulation of pathogenic ΔmtDNA induced deafness but not diabetic phenotypes in mito-mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Kazuto; Sato, Akitsugu; Sone, Hideyuki; Kasahara, Atsuko; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Kagawa, Yasuo; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2004-01-01

    Mito-mice carrying various proportions of deletion mutant mtDNA (ΔmtDNA) were generated by introduction of the ΔmtDNA from cultured cells into fertilized eggs of C57BL/6J (B6) strain mice. Great advantages of mito-mice are that they share exactly the same nuclear-genome background, and that their genetic variations are restricted to proportions of pathogenic ΔmtDNA. Since accumulation of ΔmtDNA to more than 75% induced respiration defects, the disease phenotypes observed exclusively in mito-mice carrying more than 75% ΔmtDNA should be due to accumulated ΔmtDNA. In this study, we focused on the expressions of hearing loss and diabetic phenotypes, since these common age-associated abnormalities have sometimes been reported to be inherited maternally and to be associated with pathogenic mutant mtDNAs. The results showed that accumulation of exogenously introduced ΔmtDNA was responsible for hearing loss, but not for expression of diabetic phenotypes in mito-mice

  20. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Trimborn

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome. The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608 containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  1. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimborn, Marc; Ghani, Mahdi; Walther, Diego J; Dopatka, Monika; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Busche, Andreas; Meyer, Franziska; Nowak, Stefanie; Nowak, Jean; Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim; Esquitino, Veronica; Garshasbi, Masoud; Kuss, Andreas W; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Mueller, Susanne; Poehlmann, Charlotte; Gavvovidis, Ioannis; Schindler, Detlev; Sperling, Karl; Neitzel, Heidemarie

    2010-02-16

    Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome). The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608) containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation) appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt) mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt) animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  2. Computer simulation of defect cluster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuramoto, Eiichi [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1996-04-01

    In order to elucidate individual element process of various defects and defect clusters of used materials under irradiation environments, interatomic potential with reliability was investigated. And for comparison with experimental results, it is often required to adopt the temperature effect and to investigate in details mechanism of one dimensional motion of micro conversion loop and so forth using the molecular dynamic (MD) method. Furthermore, temperature effect is also supposed for stable structure of defects and defect clusters, and many problems relating to alloy element are also remained. And, simulation on photon life at the defects and defect clusters thought to be important under comparison with equipment can also be supposed an improvement of effectiveness due to relation to theses products. In this paper, some topics in such flow was extracted to explain them. In particular, future important problems will be potential preparation of alloy, structure, dynamic behavior and limited temperature of intralattice atomic cluster. (G.K.)

  3. Imaging techniques for visualizing and phenotyping congenital heart defects in murine models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Tobita, Kimimasa; Francis, Richard J B; Lo, Cecilia W

    2013-06-01

    Mouse model is ideal for investigating the genetic and developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. However, cardiovascular phenotyping for the precise diagnosis of structural heart defects in mice remain challenging. With rapid advances in imaging techniques, there are now high throughput phenotyping tools available for the diagnosis of structural heart defects. In this review, we discuss the efficacy of four different imaging modalities for congenital heart disease diagnosis in fetal/neonatal mice, including noninvasive fetal echocardiography, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), micro-magnetic resonance imaging (micro-MRI), and episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC) histopathology. The experience we have gained in the use of these imaging modalities in a large-scale mouse mutagenesis screen have validated their efficacy for congenital heart defect diagnosis in the tiny hearts of fetal and newborn mice. These cutting edge phenotyping tools will be invaluable for furthering our understanding of the developmental etiology of congenital heart disease. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Chicago Univ., IL; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-04-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings. 18 refs

  5. Defects in new protective aprons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaze, S.; LeBlanc, A.D.; Bushong, S.C.

    1984-01-01

    Upon careful examination, several defects have been detected in new protective aprons. The nature of the defects is identified and described. Although the occurrence of such defects has not exceeded 5%, they are significant enough to warrant return of the lead apron to the supplier. It is recommended that the integrity of all new protective aprons be verified upon receipt as well as at yearly intervals

  6. Topological defects in extended inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, E.J.; Kolb, E.W.; Liddle, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    We consider the production of topological defects, especially cosmic strings, in extended-inflation models. In extended inflation, the Universe passes through a first-order phase transition via bubble percolation, which naturally allows defects to form at the end of inflation. The correlation length, which determines the number density of the defects, is related to the mean size of the bubbles when they collide. This mechanism allows a natural combination of inflation and large-scale structure via cosmic strings

  7. The skeletal phenotype of achondrogenesis type 1A is caused exclusively by cartilage defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Ian M; Kim, Susie H; Schweppe, Devin K; Caetano-Lopes, Joana; Robling, Alexander G; Charles, Julia F; Gygi, Steven P; Warman, Matthew L; Smits, Patrick J

    2018-01-08

    Inactivating mutations in the ubiquitously expressed membrane trafficking component GMAP-210 (encoded by Trip11 ) cause achondrogenesis type 1A (ACG1A). ACG1A is surprisingly tissue specific, mainly affecting cartilage development. Bone development is also abnormal, but as chondrogenesis and osteogenesis are closely coupled, this could be a secondary consequence of the cartilage defect. A possible explanation for the tissue specificity of ACG1A is that cartilage and bone are highly secretory tissues with a high use of the membrane trafficking machinery. The perinatal lethality of ACG1A prevents investigating this hypothesis. We therefore generated mice with conditional Trip11 knockout alleles and inactivated Trip11 in chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteoclasts and pancreas acinar cells, all highly secretory cell types. We discovered that the ACG1A skeletal phenotype is solely due to absence of GMAP-210 in chondrocytes. Mice lacking GMAP-210 in osteoblasts, osteoclasts and acinar cells were normal. When we inactivated Trip11 in primary chondrocyte cultures, GMAP-210 deficiency affected trafficking of a subset of chondrocyte-expressed proteins rather than globally impairing membrane trafficking. Thus, GMAP-210 is essential for trafficking specific cargoes in chondrocytes but is dispensable in other highly secretory cells. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Zika virus infection in immunocompetent pregnant mice causes fetal damage and placental pathology in the absence of fetal infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Lawrence W.; Lanthier, Paula; Kim, In-Jeong; Kuki, Atsuo; Thomas, Stephen J.

    2018-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during human pregnancy may cause diverse and serious congenital defects in the developing fetus. Previous efforts to generate animal models of human ZIKV infection and clinical symptoms often involved manipulating mice to impair their Type I interferon (IFN) signaling, thereby allowing enhanced infection and vertical transmission of virus to the embryo. Here, we show that even pregnant mice competent to generate Type I IFN responses that can limit ZIKV infection nonetheless develop profound placental pathology and high frequency of fetal demise. We consistently found that maternal ZIKV exposure led to placental pathology and that ZIKV RNA levels measured in maternal, placental or embryonic tissues were not predictive of the pathological effects seen in the embryos. Placental pathology included trophoblast hyperplasia in the labyrinth, trophoblast giant cell necrosis in the junctional zone, and loss of embryonic vessels. Our findings suggest that, in this context of limited infection, placental pathology rather than embryonic/fetal viral infection may be a stronger contributor to adverse pregnancy outcomes in mice. Our finding demonstrates that in immunocompetent mice, direct viral infection of the embryo is not essential for fetal demise. Our immunologically unmanipulated pregnancy mouse model provides a consistent and easily measurable congenital abnormality readout to assess fetal outcome, and may serve as an additional model to test prophylactic and therapeutic interventions to protect the fetus during pregnancy, and for studying the mechanisms of ZIKV congenital immunopathogenesis. PMID:29634758

  9. On the influence of extrinsic point defects on irradiation-induced point-defect distributions in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhellemont, J.; Romano-Rodriguez, A.

    1994-01-01

    A semi-quantitative model describing the influence of interfaces and stress fields on {113}-defect generation in silicon during 1-MeV electron irradiation, is further developed to take into account also the role of extrinsic point defects. It is shown that the observed distribution of {113}-defects in high-flux electron-irradiated silicon and its dependence on irradiation temperature and dopant concentration can be understood by taking into account not only the influence of the surfaces and interfaces as sinks for intrinsic point defects but also the thermal stability of the bulk sinks for intrinsic point defects. In heavily doped silicon the bulk sinks are related with pairing reactions of the dopant atoms with the generated intrinsic point defects or related with enhanced recombination of vacancies and self-interstitials at extrinsic point defects. The obtained theoretical results are correlated with pu