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Sample records for miami herald boston

  1. HERALDING A NEW ENLIGHTENMENT

    OpenAIRE

    ANNA-TERESA TYMIENIECKA

    2011-01-01

    The present-day anatomy of disarray we have to cope with bringsout the necessity of a fundamental change in our spiritual attitude and societal conduct, aiming to reassess the value of wisdom in connection with the scientific and technological progress; all, being grounded in the network of the manifestations of the logos of life. This approach highlights the articulations of our very own vision of heralding a New Enlightenment for humankind, throughout a new critique of reason, by framing a ...

  2. HERALDING A NEW ENLIGHTENMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNA-TERESA TYMIENIECKA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The present-day anatomy of disarray we have to cope with bringsout the necessity of a fundamental change in our spiritual attitude and societal conduct, aiming to reassess the value of wisdom in connection with the scientific and technological progress; all, being grounded in the network of the manifestations of the logos of life. This approach highlights the articulations of our very own vision of heralding a New Enlightenment for humankind, throughout a new critique of reason, by framing a new philosophical insight able to lead us to a better understanding of the meaning of life.

  3. Biking to work in Miami. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, O.

    1982-08-01

    The objective of the project was to produce and distribute a guide to commuting by bicycle in the Miami metropolitan area. The area is uniquely suited to bicycling because of its pleasant year-round climate and relatively flat topography. Persuading even a small percentage of automobile commuters to try biking to work could result in substantial energy savings in Miami as in most other major metropolitan areas. Seven of the largest employment centers in the area were selected as major commuter destinations suitable for bicycle commuters. Safe and scenic ways of commuting to these areas by bicycle were mapped and described in a series of short narratives. Additional material on safe riding techniques and the choice of equipment was developed. The resulting 40 page booklet, Biking to Work in Miami, was printed and distributed by the author to local cycling groups, bicycle interests, and others. Copies were also sent to interested parties outside the Miami area. The initial reception has been very encouraging and a number of favorable reply cards have been received with useful comments and suggestions. A revised version aimed at stimulating bikers to avail of the soon-to-be-opened rapid transit system is being considered. A writer for the Miami Herald is interested in using parts of the Guide for a series in the newspaper.

  4. 32 CFR 507.14 - Controlled heraldic items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HERALDIC DESIGNS AND HERALDIC QUALITY CONTROL PROGRAM Heraldic Quality Control Program § 507.14 Controlled..., U.S. Army. (d) U.S. Air Force organizational emblems for other than major commands. (e) Hand...

  5. Miami, Florida: The Magic City

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Phyllis

    2008-01-01

    With its subtropical climate and intimate ties to Latin America, Miami is like no other city in the United States. More than 65 percent of its population is Hispanic, and Spanish is the most commonly heard language. Situated at the southern tip of the 500-mile-long Florida peninsula, Miami is the largest urban area in the southeastern United…

  6. NOAA Miami Regional Library > Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Collections Open Access Resources Research Tools E-resources NOAA S. and NOAA N.E. Library Institutional Repository DIVE INTO About the Library | Collections | Research Tools | Library Services & NOAA Miami Regional Library @ AOML & NHC NOAA Miami Regional Library at National Hurricane

  7. A heralded two-qutrit entangled state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Jaewoo; Sanders, Barry C; Rudolph, Terry

    2009-01-01

    We propose a scheme for building a heralded two-qutrit entangled state from polarized photons. An optical circuit is presented to build the maximally entangled two-qutrit state from two heralded Bell pairs and ideal threshold detectors. Several schemes are discussed for constructing the two Bell pairs. We also show how one can produce an unbalanced two-qutrit state that could be of general purpose use in some protocols. In terms of the applications of the maximally entangled qutrit state, we mainly focus on how to use the state to demonstrate a violation of the Collins-Gisin-Linden-Massar-Popescu inequality under the restriction of measurements which can be performed using linear optical elements and photon counting. Other possible applications of the state, such as for higher dimensional quantum cryptography, teleportation and generation of heralded two-qudit states, are also briefly discussed.

  8. Herald Eelma teosed Soomes / Anne Lõugas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lõugas, Anne, 1951-

    1999-01-01

    10. nov. avati Põhja-Soomes Kuhmo linnas uus 'Kalevala' infokeskus Juminkeko (arhitektid M. Heikkinen, M. Komonen), kus on 6. jaan.-ni 2000 avatud 'Kalevala'-teemaline kunstinäitus. Eksponeeritud Vitali Dobrõnini õlimaalid, Robino Ntila tushijoonistused ja puulõiked, Luong Xuan Doan'i akvarellilaadsed 'Kalevala' interpretatsioonid, Herald Eelma 'Kalevala' 1985. a. eestikeelsele väljaandele tehtud 20 joonistust ja 1999. a. tehtud 20 'Kalevala'-teemalist joonistust

  9. 77 FR 60302 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... received without jeopardizing the safety or security of people, places or vessels. 7. Unfunded Mandates... waters of Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL between Bayfront Park and the Intercontinental-Miami Hotel encompassed... Area. All waters of Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL between Bayfront Park and the Intercontinental-Miami Hotel...

  10. Engineering integrated photonics for heralded quantum gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, Thomas; Biggerstaff, Devon N; Broome, Matthew A; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Delanty, Michael; Steel, M J; Gilchrist, Alexei; Marshall, Graham D; White, Andrew G; Withford, Michael J

    2016-06-10

    Scaling up linear-optics quantum computing will require multi-photon gates which are compact, phase-stable, exhibit excellent quantum interference, and have success heralded by the detection of ancillary photons. We investigate the design, fabrication and characterisation of the optimal known gate scheme which meets these requirements: the Knill controlled-Z gate, implemented in integrated laser-written waveguide arrays. We show device performance to be less sensitive to phase variations in the circuit than to small deviations in the coupler reflectivity, which are expected given the tolerance values of the fabrication method. The mode fidelity is also shown to be less sensitive to reflectivity and phase errors than the process fidelity. Our best device achieves a fidelity of 0.931 ± 0.001 with the ideal 4 × 4 unitary circuit and a process fidelity of 0.680 ± 0.005 with the ideal computational-basis process.

  11. Engineering integrated photonics for heralded quantum gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meany, Thomas; Biggerstaff, Devon N.; Broome, Matthew A.; Fedrizzi, Alessandro; Delanty, Michael; Steel, M. J.; Gilchrist, Alexei; Marshall, Graham D.; White, Andrew G.; Withford, Michael J.

    2016-06-01

    Scaling up linear-optics quantum computing will require multi-photon gates which are compact, phase-stable, exhibit excellent quantum interference, and have success heralded by the detection of ancillary photons. We investigate the design, fabrication and characterisation of the optimal known gate scheme which meets these requirements: the Knill controlled-Z gate, implemented in integrated laser-written waveguide arrays. We show device performance to be less sensitive to phase variations in the circuit than to small deviations in the coupler reflectivity, which are expected given the tolerance values of the fabrication method. The mode fidelity is also shown to be less sensitive to reflectivity and phase errors than the process fidelity. Our best device achieves a fidelity of 0.931 ± 0.001 with the ideal 4 × 4 unitary circuit and a process fidelity of 0.680 ± 0.005 with the ideal computational-basis process.

  12. LANGUAGE APPRAISAL ON ATTITUDINAL SYSTEMS FOR EXPLORING IDEOLOGY IN DEATH PENALTY IN SYDNEY MORNING HERALD AND HERALD SUN EDITORIALS

    OpenAIRE

    Rosyida Ekawati

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the ideology represented by newspaper editorials. It is from the idea that every language use is never neutral and not ideology-free. Language is used to convey meanings in a broad sense. There are meanings related to the opinions through the language as resources of evaluation. Editorial is one practice of language use full of opinions towards a certain issue on people or things. Sydney Morning Herald and Herald Sun are used as both Australian newspaper posit themselv...

  13. Reflections on Jonathan Boston's Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Nesta

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Nesta Devine responds to Jonathan Boston's article "Child Poverty in New Zealand: Why It Matters and How It Can Be Reduced" ("Educational Philosophy and Theory," v46 n9 p995-999, 2014). Devine wishes to consider Boston's position from two angles: one is to rehearse the point that these statistics are an…

  14. Generation of Fourier-transform-limited heralded single photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U'Ren, Alfred B.; Jeronimo-Moreno, Yasser; Garcia-Gracia, Hipolito

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the spectral (temporal) properties of heralded single photon wave packets, triggered by the detection of an idler photon in the process of parametric down conversion. The generated single photons are studied within the framework of the chronocyclic Wigner function, from which the single photon spectral width and temporal duration can be computed. We derive specific conditions on the two-photon joint spectral amplitude which result in both pure and Fourier-transform-limited heralded single photons. Likewise, we present specific source geometries which lead to the fulfillment of these conditions and show that one of these geometries leads, for a given pump bandwidth, to the temporally shortest possible heralded single photon wave packets

  15. 76 FR 24840 - Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Lieutenant Paul A. Steiner, Sector Miami Prevention Department, Coast Guard; telephone 305-535-8724, e-mail Paul.A.Steiner@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing or submitting material to the docket, call... Lieutenant Paul A. Steiner, Sector Miami Prevention Department, Coast Guard; telephone 305-535-8724, e-mail...

  16. 76 FR 37005 - Safety Zone; Fan Pier Yacht Club Fireworks, Boston Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Fan Pier Yacht Club Fireworks, Boston Harbor, Boston, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... Sector Boston Captain of the Port (COTP) Zone for the Fan Pier Yacht Club Fireworks display. This safety... Safety Zone; Fan Pier Yacht Club Fireworks, Boston Harbor, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) General. A...

  17. 'The Music Herald' 1922: A esthetical and ideological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasić Aleksandar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Music Herald was the first music magazine to appear in Belgrade after WWI. It was published monthly, for a year (January - December 1922. Its editor-in-chief was Petar Krstić, a composer. Other members of the editorial staff were Božidar Joksimović, Stevan Hristić, Kosta Manojlović (composers Vladimir R. Đorđević (an ethnomusicologist and Jovan Zorko (a violinist. Over 200 articles were published in the magazine. It dealt with different genres of music writings, such as articles, treatises, documents on the history of Serbian / Yugoslav music, music criticism, polemics, necrologies and bibliographies. Twenty-four compositions by native composers were published in the musical supplement of The Music Herald, among them the works of its editors as well as those of other Yugoslav musicians. The Music Herald dealt with three fields of interest: music historiography, ethnomusicology and the current topics of its epoch. When the magazine started, Serbian musicology was in its initial stage so the editors were trying to foster its development. They published numerous biographies of Serbian 19th century musicians, as well as documents on Serbian music culture during the reign of Prince Miloš Obrenović. Music folklore was also very often the subject of interest in the magazine. The Music Herald was interested in current topics and covered the Yugoslav music school system, opera houses, military music music associations, etc. It was especially interested in choral societies which in the course of the 19th century took up not only an artistic, but also a political and patriotic role in the liberation movement. After WWI choral societies entered a period of crisis. Their political raison d'être was lost, so they were faced with the challenge of achieving higher professional standards. This study deals with two aspects of 'The Music Herald': aesthetic and ideological aspects. In terms of ideology, the magazine was strongly in favor of the

  18. On-chip generation of heralded photon-number states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergyris, Panagiotis; Meany, Thomas; Lunghi, Tommaso; Sauder, Gregory; Downes, James; Steel, M. J.; Withford, Michael J.; Alibart, Olivier; Tanzilli, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Beyond the use of genuine monolithic integrated optical platforms, we report here a hybrid strategy enabling on-chip generation of configurable heralded two-photon states. More specifically, we combine two different fabrication techniques, i.e., non-linear waveguides on lithium niobate for efficient photon-pair generation and femtosecond-laser-direct-written waveguides on glass for photon manipulation. Through real-time device manipulation capabilities, a variety of path-coded heralded two-photon states can be produced, ranging from product to entangled states. Those states are engineered with high levels of purity, assessed by fidelities of 99.5 ± 8% and 95.0 ± 8%, respectively, obtained via quantum interferometric measurements. Our strategy therefore stands as a milestone for further exploiting entanglement-based protocols, relying on engineered quantum states, and enabled by scalable and compatible photonic circuits.

  19. 76 FR 8656 - Safety Zone; Miami International Triathlon, Bayfront Park, Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ...-mail Lieutenant Paul A. Steiner, Sector Miami Prevention Department, Coast Guard; telephone 305-535-8724, e-mail Paul.A.Steiner@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee V...

  20. 78 FR 40079 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... so that your message can be received without jeopardizing the safety or security of people, places or... Bayfront Park and the Intercontinental-Miami Hotel encompassed within the following points: Starting at...

  1. Heralded generation of a micro-macro entangled state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulrik Lund; Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas Schou

    2013-01-01

    Using different optical setups based on squeezed state and photon subtraction we show how optical entanglement between a macroscopic and a microscopic state-the so-called Schro¨dinger cat state or micro-macro state-can be generated. The entangled state is heralded and is thus produced a priori....... Furthermore, we show that the state can be used to map a microscopic qubit onto a macroscopic one thereby linking a qubit processor with a qumode processor....

  2. Miami, FL I-95 express lanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The Miami-Ft. Lauderdale region is creating a 22-mile managed-lane facility, : including HOT lanes on I-95, between I-395 and I-595, with a longer term goal of : providing a network of managed lanes throughout the congested region. Freeflowing : cond...

  3. Death in Miami: AIDS, Gender, and Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddlee

    In "God's Work," an episode of the "Miami Vice" television series in which a gay character comes home to reunite with a childhood friend and ex-lover who is dying of AIDS, the show is at odds with itself over the issue of sexuality and AIDS. At one level, that of the "coming-out" story of the main character, it…

  4. 77 FR 50916 - Safety Zone; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... operation on the navigable waters of Boston Inner Harbor, in the main ship channel near Castle Island. This... operations in support of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers rock removal project. Entering into, transiting... before the start date of the project. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also discussed the rock removal...

  5. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Engman, J.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.; Brence, W.A.

    1994-01-01

    Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River above and below the Fernald sit was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous nine years and to collect samples for uranium analysis in fish filets. This document contains information describing the findings of this program. Topics discussed include: physical and chemical parameters, species richness, species diversity, and water analysis

  6. Interfering Heralded Single Photons from Two Separate Silicon Nanowires Pumped at Different Wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Practical quantum photonic applications require on-demand single photon sources. As one possible solution, active temporal and wavelength multiplexing has been proposed to build an on-demand single photon source. In this scheme, heralded single photons are generated from different pump wavelengths in many temporal modes. However, the indistinguishability of these heralded single photons has not yet been experimentally confirmed. In this work, we achieve 88% ± 8% Hong–Ou–Mandel quantum interference visibility from heralded single photons generated from two separate silicon nanowires pumped at different wavelengths. This demonstrates that active temporal and wavelength multiplexing could generate indistinguishable heralded single photons.

  7. LANGUAGE APPRAISAL ON ATTITUDINAL SYSTEMS FOR EXPLORING IDEOLOGY IN DEATH PENALTY IN SYDNEY MORNING HERALD AND HERALD SUN EDITORIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosyida Ekawati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the ideology represented by newspaper editorials. It is from the idea that every language use is never neutral and not ideology-free. Language is used to convey meanings in a broad sense. There are meanings related to the opinions through the language as resources of evaluation. Editorial is one practice of language use full of opinions towards a certain issue on people or things. Sydney Morning Herald and Herald Sun are used as both Australian newspaper posit themselves as the high-rank newspaper in terms of circulation and online accessed. This article tries to uncover the ideologies represented by both newspaper editorials concerning death penalty of Bali Nine executed in Indonesia. Attitudinal perspective proposed by Martin and White (2005 in term of affect, judgement, and appreciation of language appraisal is used to explore ideology in the newspaper. From appraisal analysis, it is found that Indonesia dominantly appraised in negative There is no positive appreciation for Indonesia in both newspaper editorials. judgement while Australia is portrayed in positive view for the issue of death penalty in Indonesia.

  8. 77 FR 63720 - Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ..., Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. This rule is not an economically significant rule and would not create an environmental risk to health or risk to safety that might... remaining within the regulated area unless authorized by the Captain of the Port Miami or a designated...

  9. 78 FR 57061 - Special Local Regulation; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-17

    ... 13045, Protection of Children from Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks. This rule is not an economically significant rule and does not create an environmental risk to health or risk to safety that may... Port Miami by telephone at (305) 535-4472, or a designated representative via VHF radio on channel 16...

  10. Multi-photon absorption limits to heralded single photon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husko, Chad A.; Clark, Alex S.; Collins, Matthew J.; De Rossi, Alfredo; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaëlle; Rey, Isabella H.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Xiong, Chunle; Eggleton, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Single photons are of paramount importance to future quantum technologies, including quantum communication and computation. Nonlinear photonic devices using parametric processes offer a straightforward route to generating photons, however additional nonlinear processes may come into play and interfere with these sources. Here we analyse spontaneous four-wave mixing (SFWM) sources in the presence of multi-photon processes. We conduct experiments in silicon and gallium indium phosphide photonic crystal waveguides which display inherently different nonlinear absorption processes, namely two-photon (TPA) and three-photon absorption (ThPA), respectively. We develop a novel model capturing these diverse effects which is in excellent quantitative agreement with measurements of brightness, coincidence-to-accidental ratio (CAR) and second-order correlation function g(2)(0), showing that TPA imposes an intrinsic limit on heralded single photon sources. We build on these observations to devise a new metric, the quantum utility (QMU), enabling further optimisation of single photon sources. PMID:24186400

  11. 32 CFR 507.17 - Procurement and wear of heraldic items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... controlled heraldic items, when authorized by local procurement procedures, may forward a sample insignia to... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procurement and wear of heraldic items. 507.17... AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS MANUFACTURE AND SALE OF DECORATIONS, MEDALS, BADGES, INSIGNIA, COMMERCIAL USE...

  12. Late Holocene sea ice conditions in Herald Canyon, Chukchi Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C.; O'Regan, M.; Rattray, J. E.; Hutchinson, D. K.; Cronin, T. M.; Gemery, L.; Barrientos, N.; Coxall, H.; Smittenberg, R.; Semiletov, I. P.; Jakobsson, M.

    2017-12-01

    Sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has been in steady decline in recent decades and, based on satellite data, the retreat is most pronounced in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. Historical observations suggest that the recent changes were unprecedented during the last 150 years, but for a longer time perspective, we rely on the geological record. For this study, we analyzed sediment samples from two piston cores from Herald Canyon in the Chukchi Sea, collected during the 2014 SWERUS-C3 Arctic Ocean Expedition. The Herald Canyon is a local depression across the Chukchi Shelf, and acts as one of the main pathways for Pacific Water to the Arctic Ocean after entering through the narrow and shallow Bering Strait. The study site lies at the modern-day seasonal sea ice minimum edge, and is thus an ideal location for the reconstruction of past sea ice variability. Both sediment cores contain late Holocene deposits characterized by high sediment accumulation rates (100-300 cm/kyr). Core 2-PC1 from the shallow canyon flank (57 m water depth) is 8 meter long and extends back to 4200 cal yrs BP, while the upper 3 meters of Core 4-PC1 from the central canyon (120 mwd) cover the last 3000 years. The chronologies of the cores are based on radiocarbon dates and the 3.6 ka Aniakchak CFE II tephra, which is used as an absolute age marker to calculate the marine radiocarbon reservoir age. Analysis of biomarkers for sea ice and surface water productivity indicate stable sea ice conditions throughout the entire late Holocene, ending with an abrupt increase of phytoplankton sterols in the very top of both sediment sequences. The shift is accompanied by a sudden increase in coarse sediments (> 125 µm) and a minor change in δ13Corg. We interpret this transition in the top sediments as a community turnover in primary producers from sea ice to open water biota. Most importantly, our results indicate that the ongoing rapid ice retreat in the Chukchi Sea of recent decades was unprecedented during the

  13. Idiopatiske skolioser behandlet med Boston-korset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M O; Andersen, G R; Kruuse, A M

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that Boston bracing may stop progression in many patients with minor curves. One hundred and thirty-eight patients were treated with the Boston brace for idiopathic scoliosis. Age was 14.1 +/- 1.6 years at the time of bracing, and the length of time spent in the brace was 2.6 +/- 1...

  14. Heralded entangling quantum gate via cavity-assisted photon scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Halyne S.; Rossatto, Daniel Z.; Luiz, Fabrício S.; Villas-Boas, Celso J.

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the generation of heralded entanglement between two identical atoms via cavity-assisted photon scattering in two different configurations, namely, either both atoms confined in the same cavity or trapped into locally separated ones. Our protocols are given by a very simple and elegant single-step process, the key mechanism of which is a controlled-phase-flip gate implemented by impinging a single photon on single-sided cavities. In particular, when the atoms are localized in remote cavities, we introduce a single-step parallel quantum circuit instead of the serial process extensively adopted in the literature. We also show that such parallel circuit can be straightforwardly applied to entangle two macroscopic clouds of atoms. Both protocols proposed here predict a high entanglement degree with a success probability close to unity for state-of-the-art parameters. Among other applications, our proposal and its extension to multiple atom-cavity systems step toward a suitable route for quantum networking, in particular for quantum state transfer, quantum teleportation, and nonlocal quantum memory.

  15. High-quality asynchronous heralded single-photon source at telecom wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fasel, Sylvain; Alibart, Olivier; Tanzilli, Sebastien; Baldi, Pascal; Beveratos, Alexios; Gisin, Nicolas; Zbinden, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    We report on the experimental realization and characterization of an asynchronous heralded single-photon source based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion. Photons at 1550 nm are heralded as being inside a single-mode fibre with more than 60% probability, and the multi-photon emission probability is reduced by a factor of up to more than 500 compared to Poissonian light sources. These figures of merit, together with the choice of telecom wavelength for the heralded photons, are compatible with practical applications needing very efficient and robust single-photon sources

  16. The Use of Utility Accounting Software at Miami University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Describes how Miami University successfully developed an accounting software package that tracked and recorded their utility usage, including examples of its graphics and reporting components. Background information examining the decision to pursue an energy management software package is included. (GR)

  17. Miami's Third Sector Alliance for Community Well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Scotney D; Raymond, Catherine; Levine, Daniella

    2014-01-01

    Traditional capacity-building approaches tend to be organizationally focused ignoring the fact that community-based organizations learn and take action in a larger network working to promote positive community change. The specific aim of this paper was to outline a vision for a Third Sector Alliance to build organizational, network, and sector capacity for community well-being in Miami. Building a foundation for social impact requires a strategy for organizational, network, and sector capacity building. Organizational, network, and sector capacity building can best be achieved through a cooperative network approach driven by a solid community-university partnership. Although a Third Sector Alliance for Community Well-being does not yet exist in Miami, Catalyst Miami and the University of Miami (UM) have partnered closely to articulate a vision of what could be and have been working to make that vision a reality.

  18. MHz rate and efficient synchronous heralding of single photons at telecom wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomarico, Enrico; Sanguinetti, Bruno; Guerreiro, Thiago; Thew, Rob; Zbinden, Hugo

    2012-10-08

    We report on the realization of a synchronous source of heralded single photons at telecom wavelengths with MHz heralding rates and high heralding efficiency. This source is based on the generation of photon pairs at 810 and 1550 nm via Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC) in a 1 cm periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal pumped by a 532 nm pulsed laser. As high rates are fundamental for multi-photon experiments, we show that single telecom photons can be announced at 4.4 MHz rate with 45% heralding efficiency. When we focus only on the optimization of the coupling of the heralded photon, the heralding efficiency can be increased up to 80%. Furthermore, we experimentally observe that group velocity mismatch inside long crystals pumped in a pulsed mode affects the spectrum of the emitted photons and their fibre coupling efficiency. The length of the crystal in this source has been chosen as a trade off between high brightness and high coupling efficiency.

  19. Heralded linear optical quantum Fredkin gate based on one auxiliary qubit and one single photon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Chang-Hua; Cao Xin; Quan Dong-Xiao; Pei Chang-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Linear optical quantum Fredkin gate can be applied to quantum computing and quantum multi-user communication networks. In the existing linear optical scheme, two single photon detectors (SPDs) are used to herald the success of the quantum Fredkin gate while they have no photon count. But analysis results show that for non-perfect SPD, the lower the detector efficiency, the higher the heralded success rate by this scheme is. We propose an improved linear optical quantum Fredkin gate by designing a new heralding scheme with an auxiliary qubit and only one SPD, in which the higher the detection efficiency of the heralding detector, the higher the success rate of the gate is. The new heralding scheme can also work efficiently under a non-ideal single photon source. Based on this quantum Fredkin gate, large-scale quantum switching networks can be built. As an example, a quantum Beneš network is shown in which only one SPD is used. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  20. 78 FR 68814 - Foreign-Trade Zone 32-Miami, Florida, Authorization of Production Activity, Brightstar...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-68-2013] Foreign-Trade Zone 32--Miami, Florida, Authorization of Production Activity, Brightstar Corporation (Cell Phone Kitting), Miami, Florida On June 26, 2013, The Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce, grantee of FTZ 32, submitted a notification of proposed...

  1. Primary splenic torsion in a Boston terrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHTA, Hiroshi; TAKAGI, Satoshi; MURAKAMI, Masahiro; SASAKI, Noboru; YOSHIKAWA, Muneyoshi; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; HWANG, Shiang-Jyi; YAMASAKI, Masahiro; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2009-11-01

    A 7-year-old female Boston terrier was referred to Hokkaido University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a history of hemoglobinuria and anemia for several days. Abdominal radiographs showed splenomegaly, and ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic splenic parenchyma with interspersed linear echoes consistent with the ultrasonographic appearance of splenic torsion. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) indicated a C-shaped spleen. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of splenic torsion. A splenectomy was performed, and the dog recovered well without complications. This is the first report of splenic torsion in Boston terriers, and the usefulness of ultrasonographic and CT findings of the splenic torsion was also confirmed.

  2. Primary splenic torsion in a Boston terrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, H.; Takagi, S.; Murakami, M.; Sasaki, N.; Yoshikawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Hwang, S.J.; Yamasaki, M.; Takiguchi, M.

    2009-01-01

    A 7-year-old female Boston terrier was referred to Hokkaido University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a history of hemoglobinuria and anemia for several days. Abdominal radiographs showed splenomegaly, and ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic splenic parenchyma with interspersed linear echoes consistent with the ultrasonographic appearance of splenic torsion. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) indicated a C-shaped spleen. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed the diagnosis of splenic torsion. A splenectomy was performed, and the dog recovered well without complications. This is the first report of splenic torsion in Boston terriers, and the usefulness of ultrasonographic and CT findings of the splenic torsion was also confirmed

  3. Implementing Guided Pathways at Miami Dade College: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Thomas; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Jenkins, Davis

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, working groups from across the eight campuses of Miami Dade College (MDC) conducted a wide-ranging examination of why many students were not completing their programs. These groups identified a number of reasons for student attrition. Students were unclear about how to progress through programs--they had too many course and program…

  4. Rethinking suburbia: a case study of metropolitan Miami

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, J.; Clery, T.

    2015-01-01

    Greater Miami makes an interesting case study of suburbanization because of its recent history, the geographic limits of urban expansion, and its profound ethnic makeover at the time that postwar suburbanization peaked in North America. The city-suburb distinction here does not correspond to

  5. 78 FR 35756 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from...) Bridge across the Charles River, mile 1.0, at Boston, Massachusetts. Under this temporary deviation the... Metropolitan District Commission (Craigie) Bridge, across the Charles River, mile 1.0, at Boston, Massachusetts...

  6. 2009 National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Boston Redevelopment Authority Topographic LiDAR: Boston, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC contracted with Sanborn to provide LiDAR mapping services for the Boston area. Utilizing multi-return systems, Light...

  7. 76 FR 17446 - Wausau Daily Herald Advertising Production Division, a Subsidiary of Gannett Co., Inc.; Wausau...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... Advertising Production Division, a Subsidiary of Gannett Co., Inc.; Wausau, WI; Notice of Affirmative... workers of Wausau Daily Herald, Advertising Production Division, a subsidiary of Gannett Co., Inc., Wausau... Determination will soon be published in the Federal Register. The workers produce newspaper advertisements. The...

  8. Ühest erijoonest Herald Eelma illustraatoritöös / Jüri Hain

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Hain, Jüri, 1941-

    2011-01-01

    Herald Eelma loomingust raamatuillustraatorina, analüüsides algseid kavandeid ja illustratsioone Jaan Krossi luulekogule "Voog ja kolmpii", A.H. Tammsaare saksa keelde tõlgitud romaanile "Ma armastasin sakslast" ja soome eeposele "Kalevala". Ka ilukirjandliku teksti ja illustratsioonide vahelistest mõjutustest

  9. Heralded quantum controlled-phase gates with dissipative dynamics in macroscopically distant resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Wei; Wang, Xin; Miranowicz, Adam; Zhong, Zhirong; Nori, Franco

    2017-07-01

    Heralded near-deterministic multiqubit controlled-phase gates with integrated error detection have recently been proposed by Borregaard et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 110502 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.110502]. This protocol is based on a single four-level atom (a heralding quartit) and N three-level atoms (operational qutrits) coupled to a single-resonator mode acting as a cavity bus. Here we generalize this method for two distant resonators without the cavity bus between the heralding and operational atoms. Specifically, we analyze the two-qubit controlled-Z gate and its multiqubit-controlled generalization (i.e., a Toffoli-like gate) acting on the two-lowest levels of N qutrits inside one resonator, with their successful actions being heralded by an auxiliary microwave-driven quartit inside the other resonator. Moreover, we propose a circuit-quantum-electrodynamics realization of the protocol with flux and phase qudits in linearly coupled transmission-line resonators with dissipation. These methods offer a quadratic fidelity improvement compared to cavity-assisted deterministic gates.

  10. Sources of plutonium to the great Miami River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartelt, G.E.; Kennedy, C.W.; Bobula, C.M. III.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported in the study of 238 Pu, in the Great Miami River watershed the contribution of various sources to the total 238 Pu transported by the river. Periodic discharges of industrial wastewater from Mound Laboratory from 1973 to 1975 have released approximately 20 mCi of 238 Pu each year to the Great Miami River. Changes in the wastewater treatment system in 1976 have reduced the annual discharge to less than 3 mCi/year. However, despite this sevenfold reduction of plutonium in the wastewater discharge, the annual flux of 238 Pu down the river has remained relatively constant and is approximately 10 times greater than can be accounted for by the reported effluent discharges. Therefore, other sources of the 238 Pu in the Great Miami River exist. A second possible source of plutonium is the resuspension of sediments enriched by earlier waste water releases and deposited in the river. However, since there appear to be few areas where large accumulations of sediment could occur, it seems improbable that resuspension of earlier sediment deposits would continue to be a significant contributor to the annual flux of plutonium. A much more likely source is the continuing erosion of soil from a canal and stream system contaminated with approx. 5 Ci of 238 Pu, 7 which connects directly to the river 6.9 km upstream from Franklin. Results from samples analyzed in 1978 show the average concentration of 238 Pu in suspended sediments from the canal to be approximately 10 3 times greater than suspended sediment concentrations in the river and waste water effluent.Thus the main contributor to the total amount of plutonium transported by the Great Miami River appears to be highly enriched sediment from the canal, which is eroded into the river where it is then diluted by uncontaminated sediments

  11. Technical assistance report no. TA-80-105-757 at Lexington Herald-Leader, Lexington, Kentucky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, W.E.; Conover, D.L.; Flesch, J.P.

    1980-10-01

    Exposure to radiation was investigated at the Lexington Herald-Leader newspaper company (SIC-2711) in Lexington, Kentucky, on August 12 and 13, 1980. The evaluation was requested by company management. Thirty-five of 60 to 80 video display terminals (VDT) used by the newspaper were randomly selected and the ionizing and non-ionizing radiation emissions were measured. All VDT radiation measurements were below OSHA standards and, often, below detectable levels. The OSHA ionizing and non-ionizing standards are 2.5 millirems per hour averaged on a daily basis and 1.0 milliwatt per square centimeter averaged over 6 months, respectively. The authors conclude that no radiation hazard exists at the Lexington Herald-Leader

  12. Heralded noiseless amplification for single-photon entangled state with polarization feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan-Dan; Jin, Yu-Yu; Qin, Sheng-Xian; Zu, Hao; Zhou, Lan; Zhong, Wei; Sheng, Yu-Bo

    2018-03-01

    Heralded noiseless amplification is a promising method to overcome the transmission photon loss in practical noisy quantum channel and can effectively lengthen the quantum communication distance. Single-photon entanglement is an important resource in current quantum communications. Here, we construct two single-photon-assisted heralded noiseless amplification protocols for the single-photon two-mode entangled state and single-photon three-mode W state, respectively, where the single-photon qubit has an arbitrary unknown polarization feature. After the amplification, the fidelity of the single-photon entangled state can be increased, while the polarization feature of the single-photon qubit can be well remained. Both the two protocols only require the linear optical elements, so that they can be realized under current experimental condition. Our protocols may be useful in current and future quantum information processing.

  13. Boston Architectural College Urban Sustainability Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Arthur C.

    2013-07-31

    The Boston Architectural College's Urban Sustainability initiative is a demonstration project as defined by the National Energy Technology Laboratory. BAC's proposed project with the U.S. Department of Energy - NETL, is a large part of that overall initiative. The BAC's Urban Sustainability Initiative is a multi-part project with several important goals and objectives that will have a significant impact on the surrounding neighborhood including: energy conservation, reduction of storm water runoff, generation of power through alternative energy sources, elimination/reduction of BAC carbon footprint, and to create a vehicle for ongoing public outreach and education. Education and outreach opportunities will serve to add to the already comprehensive Sustainability Design courses offered at BAC relative to energy savings, performance and conservation in building design. At the finish of these essential capital projects there will be technical materials created for the education of the design, sustainability, engineering, community development and historic preservation communities, to inform a new generation of environmentally-minded designers and practitioners, the city of Boston and the general public. The purpose of the initiative, through our green renovations program, is to develop our green alley projects and energy saving renovations to the BAC physical plant, to serve as a working model for energy efficient design in enclosed 19th century and 20th century urban sites and as an educational laboratory for teaching ecological and sustainable technologies to students and the public while creating jobs. The scope of our project as it relates to the BAC and the U.S. Department of Energy- NETL combined efforts includes: Task I of the project is Phase II (Green Alley). Task I encompasses various renovation activities that will demonstrate the effectiveness of permeable paving and ground water recharge systems. It will aid in the reduction of storm water

  14. 77 FR 63289 - Foreign-Trade Zone 32-Miami, Florida; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative Site...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-51-2012] Foreign-Trade Zone 32--Miami, Florida... submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the Greater Miami Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 32, to amend its application to reorganize FTZ 32 zone under the alternative site framework...

  15. 76 FR 24837 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    .... Steiner, Sector Miami Prevention Department, Coast Guard; telephone 305-535-8724, e-mail Paul.A.Steiner... questions concerning its provisions or options for compliance, please contact Lieutenant Paul A. Steiner, Sector Miami Prevention Department, Coast Guard; telephone 305-535- 8724, e-mail Paul.A.Steiner@uscg.mil...

  16. Unilateral temporal myositis heralding polymyositis: ultrasonographic and elastographic findings. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Laura; Botar Jid, Carolina; Rogojan, Liliana; Dinu, Cristian; Maniu, Alma; Fodor, Daniela; Rednic, Simona; Simon, Siao-Pin

    2016-03-01

    Temporal myositis is a rare inflammatory disease of the temporal muscle. We report a case of unilateral temporal myositis, in which a polymyositis was diagnosed two years thereafter. Although focal myositis may rarely herald polymyositis, isolated temporal myositis preceding inflammatory myopathies has not been described, to our knowledge. In the setting of a temporal pain and swelling, ultrasonography may help in diagnosis, biopsy guidance, disease extension, and progression assessment. Further studies are necessary to establish the role of elastography in differentiating between muscle inflammation and hypertrophy.

  17. 77 FR 59551 - Safety Zone, Changes to Original Rule; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 [Docket No. USCG-2012-0767] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Changes to Original Rule; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor... original provisions of that temporary final rule, but adds two additional safety zones necessary for the...

  18. Túnel bajo el puerto de Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1963-05-01

    Full Text Available The new tunnel under Boston harbour has been constructed because of the insufficient capacity of a similar, earlier, tunnel to cope with the ever increasing road traffic. This tunnel is 1,550 ms long, and 9.50 ms in external diameter. There are two traffic lanes, each 3.20 ms wide. Inside it is faced with ceramic tiles, has fluorescent lighting, and ventilation is maintained by means of two ducts, one at each entrance, where the necessary compressor and other equipment has been situated. The most interesting feature of this important project is the excavation method adopted for its construction: the tunnel crosses a clay layer, which at certain places is sufficiently fluid to allow a pneumatic shield to be forced through it leaving hardly any debris behind. It will be readily appreciated that this procedure shows an obvious advantage over ordinary methods, in which it is necessary to cut out, and transport to the exterior all the excavated material. The metal sheathing was by the Commercial Shearing and Stamping Co., Youngstown, Ohio.Este nuevo túnel, bajo el puerto de Boston, es una consecuencia de la necesidad imperiosa que se hacía sentir dada la insuficiente capacidad del otro túnel similar antiguo y el aumento continuo del tráfico urbano y por carretera. Tiene 1.550 m de longitud, 9,50 m de diámetro exterior y una calzada con dos bandas de circulación de 3,20 m de anchura cada una. Está revestido ccn baldosa cerámica, iluminado con luz fluorescente, y el aire viciado se ventila y renueva por medio de dos torres de ventilación—una en cada portal—, en las que se han instalado el equipo mecánico adecuado de ventilación y compresores. La parte más interesante de esta importante obra estriba en los procedimientos empleados para llevar a cabo la excavación, pues atraviesa un banco de arcilla que, en ciertos tramos, es suficientemente fluida para permitir dejarse empujar y ceder paso a un escudo neumático que avanza sin apenas

  19. Hurricane modification and adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, Kelly; Lin, Ning; Emanuel, Kerry; Morgan, M Granger; Grossmann, Iris

    2012-01-17

    We investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps.

  20. Integrated-optics heralded controlled-NOT gate for polarization-encoded qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuner, Jonas; Sharma, Aditya N.; Tillmann, Max; Heilmann, René; Gräfe, Markus; Moqanaki, Amir; Szameit, Alexander; Walther, Philip

    2018-03-01

    Recent progress in integrated-optics technology has made photonics a promising platform for quantum networks and quantum computation protocols. Integrated optical circuits are characterized by small device footprints and unrivalled intrinsic interferometric stability. Here, we take advantage of femtosecond-laser-written waveguides' ability to process polarization-encoded qubits and present an implementation of a heralded controlled-NOT gate on chip. We evaluate the gate performance in the computational basis and a superposition basis, showing that the gate can create polarization entanglement between two photons. Transmission through the integrated device is optimized using thermally expanded core fibers and adiabatically reduced mode-field diameters at the waveguide facets. This demonstration underlines the feasibility of integrated quantum gates for all-optical quantum networks and quantum repeaters.

  1. Psychiatric presentations heralding Hashimoto's encephalopathy: A systematic review and analysis of cases reported in literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Menon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE may often present initially with psychiatric symptoms. These presentations are often variable in clinical aspects, and there has been no systematic analysis of the numerous psychiatric presentations heralding an eventual diagnosis of HE which will guide clinicians to make a correct diagnosis of HE. This systematic review was done to analyze the demographic characteristics, symptom typology, and clinical and treatment variables associated with such forerunner presentations. Electronic databases such as PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar databases were searched to identify potential case reports that described initial psychiatric presentations of HE in English language peer-reviewed journals. The generated articles were evaluated and relevant data were extracted using a structured tool. We identified a total of forty articles that described 46 cases. More than half of the total samples (54.4% were above the age of 50 years at presentation. The most common psychiatric diagnosis heralding HE was acute psychosis (26.1% followed by depressive disorders (23.9%. Dementia (10.9% and schizophrenia (2.2% were uncommon presentations. Antithyroid peroxidase antibodies were elevated in all patients but not antithyroglobulin antibodies. Preexisting hypothyroidism was absent in majority of cases (60.9%. Steroid doses initiated were 500–1000 mg of intravenous methylprednisolone for majority (52.1% of patients while oral steroid maintenance was required for a significant minority (39.1%. Psychiatric manifestations of HE may be heterogeneous and require a high index of clinical suspicion, especially in older adults. A range of clinical and treatment variables may assist clinicians in making a faster diagnosis and instituting prompt and effective management.

  2. 75 FR 57373 - Amendment to Class D Airspace; Miami Opa Locka Airport, FL, and Hollywood, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ...This action amends Class D airspace at Opa Locka Airport, Miami, FL; and Hollywood, FL, by correcting the geographic coordinates of the airport to aid in the navigation of our National Airspace System.

  3. Miami urban partnership agreement (UPA) Pines Boulevard transit signal priority evaluation .report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The Miami Urban Partnership Agreement included the conversion of high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes on I-95 to high occupancy toll : (HOT) lanes and additional express bus service. It also included funding for the installation of transit signal prior...

  4. 76 FR 46854 - Wausau Daily Herald, Advertising Production Division, a Subsidiary of Gannett Co., Inc.,Wausau...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ..., Advertising Production Division, a Subsidiary of Gannett Co., Inc.,Wausau, WI; Notice of Negative...) applicable to workers and former workers of Wausau Daily Herald, Advertising Production Division, a... the supply of graphic design services for newspaper advertisements. The initial investigation resulted...

  5. Spectrally pure heralded single photons by spontaneous four-wave mixing in a fiber: reducing impact of dispersion fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Jacob Gade; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Christensen, Jesper Bjerge

    2017-01-01

    We model the spectral quantum-mechanical purity of heralded single photons from a photon-pair source based on nondegenerate spontaneous four-wave mixing taking the impact of distributed dispersion fluctuations into account. The considered photon-pair-generation scheme utilizes pump-pulse walk...

  6. Satellite Monitoring of Boston Harbor Water Quality: Initial Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, P.; Chen, R. F.; Schaaf, C.; Pahlevan, N.; Lee, Z.

    2016-02-01

    The transformation of Boston Harbor from the "dirtiest in America" to a National Park Area is one of the most remarkable estuarine recoveries in the world. A long-term water quality dataset from 1991 to present exists in Boston Harbor due to a $3. 8 billion lawsuit requiring the harbor clean-up. This project uses discrete water sampling and underway transects with a towed vehicle coordinated with Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 to create surface maps of chlorophyll a (Chl a), dissolved organic matter (CDOM and DOC), total suspended solids (TSS), diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd_490), and photic depth in Boston Harbor. In addition, 3 buoys have been designed, constructed, and deployed in Boston Harbor that measure Chl a and CDOM fluorescence, optical backscatter, salinity, temperature, and meteorological parameters. We are initially using summer and fall of 2015 to develop atmospheric corrections for conditions in Boston Harbor and develop algorithms for Landsat 8 data to estimate in water photic depth, TSS, Chl a, Kd_490, and CDOM. We will report on initial buoy and cruise data and show 2015 Landsat-derived distributions of water quality parameters. It is our hope that once algorithms for present Landsat imagery can be developed, historical maps of water quality can be constructed using in water data back to 1991.

  7. The Boston Marathon versus the World Marathon Majors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip B Maffetone

    Full Text Available To compare finish times across WMM races for Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago and New York Marathons.Race times of the top 10 male and 10 female finishers were analyzed from 2005 to 2014 using the high-performance mixed linear model procedure in the Statistical Analysis System. Venue-to-venue comparisons, as well as comparisons between Boston and other WMM races, with and without factors of temperature, humidity and altitude change were examined.Performance from 2005 to 2014 in the WMM races was found to improve at a rate of ~1% each 7 years. Despite its higher variability, comparison between Boston's estimated mean finishing time and all other venues revealed moderate positive differences, indicating the Boston event to be typically slower than other venues.Across the 10-year study period, performance times improved ~1% each 7 years for both genders for the WMM, with the Boston Marathon being slower on average than other WMM venues. Weather rather than course metrics appeared to impact performance times most.

  8. Disinfection Pilot Trial for Little Miami WWTP | Science ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a serious interest growing nationally towards the use of PAA at various stages of public waste water treatment facilities; one of such use is secondary waste water treatment. MSDGC is currently interested in improving efficiency and economic aspects of waste water treatment. MSDGC requested for ORD’s support to evaluate alternative cost-effective disinfectants. This report herein is based on the data generated from the field pilot test conducted at the Little Miami Wastewater Treatment Plant. Chlorine assisted disinfection of wastewaters created the concern regarding the formation of high levels of toxic halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) detrimental to aquatic life and public health. Peracetic acid is emerging as a green alternative to chlorine and claimed to have economic and social benefits. In addition, it is a relatively simple retrofit to the existing chlorine treated wastewater treatment facilities. PAA is appealed to possess a much lower aquatic toxicity profile than chlorine and decays rapidly in the environment, even if overdosed. As a result, PAA generally does not need a quenching step, such as dechlorination, reducing process complexity, sodium pollution and cost. PAA treatment does not result in the formation of chlorinated disinfection by-products such as trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids and other byproducts such as cyanide and n-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA).

  9. Heralded creation of photonic qudits from parametric down-conversion using linear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Jun-ichi; Bergmann, Marcel; van Loock, Peter; Fuwa, Maria; Okada, Masanori; Takase, Kan; Toyama, Takeshi; Makino, Kenzo; Takeda, Shuntaro; Furusawa, Akira

    2018-05-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to generate, in a heralded fashion, arbitrary quantum superpositions of two-mode optical states with a fixed total photon number n based on weakly squeezed two-mode squeezed state resources (obtained via weak parametric down-conversion), linear optics, and photon detection. Arbitrary d -level (qudit) states can be created this way where d =n +1 . Furthermore, we experimentally demonstrate our scheme for n =2 . The resulting qutrit states are characterized via optical homodyne tomography. We also discuss possible extensions to more than two modes concluding that, in general, our approach ceases to work in this case. For illustration and with regards to possible applications, we explicitly calculate a few examples such as NOON states and logical qubit states for quantum error correction. In particular, our approach enables one to construct bosonic qubit error-correction codes against amplitude damping (photon loss) with a typical suppression of √{n }-1 losses and spanned by two logical codewords that each correspond to an n -photon superposition for two bosonic modes.

  10. Entanglement with negative Wigner function of almost 3,000 atoms heralded by one photon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Robert; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Jiazhong; Ćuk, Senka; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-03-26

    Quantum-mechanically correlated (entangled) states of many particles are of interest in quantum information, quantum computing and quantum metrology. Metrologically useful entangled states of large atomic ensembles have been experimentally realized, but these states display Gaussian spin distribution functions with a non-negative Wigner quasiprobability distribution function. Non-Gaussian entangled states have been produced in small ensembles of ions, and very recently in large atomic ensembles. Here we generate entanglement in a large atomic ensemble via an interaction with a very weak laser pulse; remarkably, the detection of a single photon prepares several thousand atoms in an entangled state. We reconstruct a negative-valued Wigner function--an important hallmark of non-classicality--and verify an entanglement depth (the minimum number of mutually entangled atoms) of 2,910 ± 190 out of 3,100 atoms. Attaining such a negative Wigner function and the mutual entanglement of virtually all atoms is unprecedented for an ensemble containing more than a few particles. Although the achieved purity of the state is slightly below the threshold for entanglement-induced metrological gain, further technical improvement should allow the generation of states that surpass this threshold, and of more complex Schrödinger cat states for quantum metrology and information processing. More generally, our results demonstrate the power of heralded methods for entanglement generation, and illustrate how the information contained in a single photon can drastically alter the quantum state of a large system.

  11. Heralded wave packet manipulation and storage of a frequency-converted pair photon at telecom wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroh, Tim; Ahlrichs, Andreas; Sprenger, Benjamin; Benson, Oliver

    2017-09-01

    Future quantum networks require a hybrid platform of dissimilar quantum systems. Within the platform, joint quantum states have to be mediated either by single photons, photon pairs or entangled photon pairs. The photon wavelength has to lie within the telecommunication band to enable long-distance fibre transmission. In addition, the temporal shape of the photons needs to be tailored to efficiently match the involved quantum systems. Altogether, this requires the efficient coherent wavelength-conversion of arbitrarily shaped single-photon wave packets. Here, we demonstrate the heralded temporal filtering of single photons as well as the synchronisation of state manipulation and detection as key elements in a typical experiment, besides of delaying a photon in a long fibre. All three are realised by utilising commercial telecommunication fibre-optical components which will permit the transition of quantum networks from the lab to real-world applications. The combination of these renders a temporally filtering single-photon storage in a fast switchable fibre loop possible.

  12. Frederick Law Olmsted y el "Emerald Necklace" de Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Austrich

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available En 1879, Frederick Law Olmsted, el creador del Central Park en Nueva York, Prospect Park en Brooklyn, inventor de la profesión de paisajismo (Landscape Architecture en los EE.UU., arriba a Boston agotado y exhausto. Acaba de renunciar el cargo de paisajista de Central Park, sintiéndose defraudado por las intrigas políticas de la comisión de parques de Nueva York, viajaba a Boston a descansar y pasar un rato con sus amigos en las cercanías de Boston, en Cambridge y Brookline. Su gran amigo, Henry Hobson Richardson, el reconocido arquitecto de la época, vivía y trabajaba en Brookline, y sirve como su anfitrión, tanto como sus amigos en Cambridge.

  13. Enhancing the performance of the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded pair-coherent sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Feng; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Liu, Ai-Ping [Institute of Signal Processing Transmission, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210003 (China); Key Lab of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network Technology, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210003 (China); Wang, Qin, E-mail: qinw@njupt.edu.cn [Institute of Signal Processing Transmission, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210003 (China); Key Lab of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network Technology, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210003 (China); Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose to implement the heralded pair-coherent source into the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution. By comparing its performance with other existing schemes, we demonstrate that our new scheme can overcome many shortcomings existing in current schemes, and show excellent behavior in the quantum key distribution. Moreover, even when taking the statistical fluctuation into account, we can still obtain quite high key generation rate at very long transmission distance by using our new scheme. - Highlights: • Implement the heralded pair-coherent source into the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution. • Overcome many shortcomings existing in current schemes and show excellent behavior. • Obtain quite high key generation rate even when taking statistical fluctuation into account.

  14. Urban Evapotranspiration and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Miami - Dade, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, T.; Hopper, W.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide (CO2) concentrations are leading indicators of secular climate change. With increasing awareness of the consequences of climate change, methods for monitoring this change are becoming more important daily. Of particular interest is the carbon dioxide exchange between natural and urban landscapes and the correlation of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Monitoring Evapotranspiration (ET) is important for assessments of water availability for growing populations. ET is surprisingly understudied in the hydrologic cycle considering ET removes as much as 80 to over 100% of precipitation back into the atmosphere as water vapor. Lack of understanding in spatial and temporal ET estimates can limit the credibility of hydrologic water budgets designed to promote sustainable water use and resolve water-use conflicts. Eddy covariance (EC) methods are commonly used to estimate ET and CO2 fluxes. The EC platform consist of a (CSAT) 3-D Sonic Anemometer and a Li-Cor Open Path CO2/ H2O Analyzer. Measurements collected at 10 Hz create a very large data sets. A EC flux tower located in the Snapper Creek Well Field as part of a study to estimate ET for the Miami Dade County Water and Sewer project. Data has been collected from December 17, 2009 to August 30, 2010. QA/QC is performed with the EdiRe data processing software according to Ameri-flux protocols. ET estimates along with other data--latent-heat flux, sensible-heat flux, rainfall, air temperature, wind speed and direction, solar irradiance, net radiation, soil-heat flux and relative humidity--can be used to aid in the development of water management policies and regulations. Currently, many financial institutions have adopted an understanding about baseline environmental monitoring. The “Equator Principle” is an example of a voluntary standard for managing social and environmental risk in project financing and has changed the way in which projects are financed.

  15. MIAMI: Microscope and ion accelerator for materials investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinks, J. A.; Berg, J. A. van den; Donnelly, S. E.

    2011-01-01

    A transmission electron microscope (TEM) with in situ ion irradiation has been built at the University of Salford, U.K. The system consists of a Colutron G-2 ion source connected to a JEOL JEM-2000FX TEM via an in-house designed and constructed ion beam transport system. The ion source can deliver ion energies from 0.5 to 10 keV for singly charged ions and can be floated up to 100 kV to allow acceleration to higher energies. Ion species from H to Xe can be produced for the full range of energies allowing the investigation of implantation with light ions such as helium as well as the effects of displacing irradiation with heavy inert or self-ions. The ability to implant light ions at energies low enough such that they come to rest within the thickness of a TEM sample and to also irradiate with heavier species at energies sufficient to cause large numbers of atomic displacements makes this facility ideally suited to the study of materials for use in nuclear environments. TEM allows the internal microstructure of a sample to be imaged at the nanoscale. By irradiating in situ it is possible to observe the dynamic evolution of radiation damage which can occur during irradiation as a result of competing processes within the system being studied. Furthermore, experimental variables such as temperature can be controlled and maintained throughout both irradiation and observation. This combination of capabilities enables an understanding of the underlying atomistic processes to be gained and thus gives invaluable insights into the fundamental physics governing the response of materials to irradiation. Details of the design and specifications of the MIAMI facility are given along with examples of initial experimental results in silicon and silicon carbide.

  16. 77 FR 43048 - Foreign-Trade Zone 32-Miami, FL; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative Site Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board [B-51-2012] Foreign-Trade Zone 32--Miami, FL... Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board (the Board) by the Greater Miami Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of FTZ 32, requesting authority to reorganize the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by...

  17. 77 FR 11140 - Availability of the Draft Supplementary Risk Assessment for the Boston University (BU) National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... analysis include the Boston University Medical Campus (BUMC) BioSquare Research Park, Boston, where the... construction grant to Boston University Medical Campus to partly fund the design and construction of one of two..., bioethics, biodefense, biosafety, and infectious disease modeling. The NIH has also sought guidance from the...

  18. The Center for Social Innovation at Boston College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzin, Stephanie Cosner; Dearing, Tiziana; Mathews, Olivia; Choi, Yeon Jin; Pitt-Catsouphes, Marcie

    2018-01-01

    Established in 2011, the Center for Social Innovation at Boston College has focused on fostering "effective, sustainable social innovations that enhance social justice." the Center is committed to building research evidence that is used for changing practice and works to disseminate findings through a three-channel approach: traditional research publications, convening of practitioners, and through use of media outlets.

  19. 33 CFR 110.30 - Boston Harbor, Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Yacht Club, South Boston. Northerly of a line bearing 96° from the stack of the heating plant of the... Yacht Club property. (b) Dorchester Bay, in vicinity of Savin Hill Yacht Club. Northerly of a line... vicinity of Dorchester Yacht Club. Eastward of a line bearing 21° from the stack located a short distance...

  20. The Closing of the Classified Catalog at Boston University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Margaret Hindle

    1974-01-01

    Although the classified catalog at Boston University libraries has been a useful research tool, it has proven too expensive to keep current. The library has converted to a traditional alphabetic subject catalog and will recieve catalog cards from the Ohio College Library Center through the New England Library Network. (Author/LS)

  1. Early weaning might reduce the psychological strain of Boston bracing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Ø; Andersen, Gert Rahbek; Thomsen, Karsten

    2002-01-01

    From 1983 to 1990 a total of 136 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were treated with the Boston brace. With the aim of examining the social and psychological impact of the brace treatment all patients received a questionnaire at an average of 3.5 years after termination of the treatment...

  2. The Emerald Necklace: Boston's Green Connection. Teaching with Historic Places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Lisa; Snow, Pamela

    In 1870, Boston, Massachusetts, was an overcrowded, noisy, and dirty city. Concerned with the health and happiness of Bostonians restricted to these unhealthy surroundings, the city hired Frederick Law Olmsted to design a park system. The series of parks he designed over the next several years is known as the Emerald Necklace. From lovely…

  3. Charter, Private, and Public Schools Work Together in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Diana

    2014-01-01

    A public, Catholic, and charter school in Boston all work together to share their strengths and learn from each other in an effort to deliver the best education for all of their students. The arrangement is called the School Performance Partnership, and it is a grantee of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

  4. Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation (7th). Allowances. Major Topical Summary (MTS) 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Company Amway ARCO IBM (USA) Arthur Andersen & Co. Industrial Risk Insurers Associated Press Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue Bank of America Bank of Boston...Kraft, Inc. Baxter Healthcare Corporation Bayer AG McDonald’s Corporation Best Products Company, Inc. Miami Herald BMW of North America Michelin Tire...using implicit price inflators for the gross national product (GNP).3 Thus, to find the average annual cost of care for beneficiaries who received

  5. Taking Stock: Five Years of Structural Change in Boston's Public Schools. A Boston Indicators Project Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnroe, Ted

    2014-01-01

    While structural reform has certainly inspired change in Boston's public schools, its true value is best measured by examining the impact those changes have had on students. Seen through the lens of student performance over the past five years there is ample suggestion that these structural changes have been more than just window dressing--they…

  6. The Path Forward: School Autonomy and Its Implications for the Future of Boston's Public Schools. Understanding Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dan; Hawley Miles, Karen; Nathan, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Boston Public Schools is at a crossroads. Nearly one-third of the system's schools operate under one of several "autonomy" structures, where school leaders have increased flexibility regarding staffing and other resources, and choice data indicate parents are far more likely to prefer these schools over so-called "traditional"…

  7. Toward a Miami University Model for Internet-Intensive Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher R.; Crider, Linda; Mayer, Larry; McBride, Mark; Sherman, Richard; Vogel, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Describes principles underlying an emerging model for Internet-intensive undergraduate instruction at Miami University (Ohio) in which students learn by creating online materials themselves; faculty facilitate active learning; student intellectual exchanges are enriched; and the seminar sensibility is extended. Four applications are examined: a…

  8. Higher Education's Influence on the Confessional Practices of Roman Catholic Laity in the Greater Miami Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological study of 20 Roman Catholic laypersons in the Greater Miami area investigated the phenomenon of transformation of confessional practice as a result of the undergraduate educational experience. By searching for meaning in each individual's story, two themes or factors and six sub themes emerged. The themes were…

  9. Earthquake Impact on Miami Haitian Americans: The Role of Family/Social Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrea; Marcelin, Louis Herns; Schmitz, Susan; Hausmann, Vicky; Shultz, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals who are indirectly exposed to disasters may be affected psychologically. The impact of the 2010 Haiti earthquake reverberated throughout the Haitian American community in Miami, Florida. Many within the community held strong transnational family and friendship bonds to their homeland. We examined associations between indicators of…

  10. 78 FR 6155 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... virtually impossible for any exchange to identify, and thus assess fees such as an ORF on, each executing... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-68711; File No. SR-MIAX-2013-01] Self-Regulatory Organizations; Miami International Securities Exchange LLC; Notice of Filing and Immediate...

  11. 78 FR 54670 - Miami Tribe of Oklahoma-Liquor Control Ordinance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... operations on Miami Tribe of Oklahoma Trust Land. The enactment of a tribal ordinance governing liquor and... continued operation and strengthening of the tribal government and the delivery of tribal government... dining rooms of hotels, restaurants, theaters, gaming facilities, entertainment centers, stores, garages...

  12. Processes influencing the transport and fate of contaminated sediments in the coastal ocean: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P. Soupy; Baldwin, Sandra M.; Blackwood, Dann S.; Borden, Jonathan; Casso, Michael A.; Crusius, John; Goudreau, Joanne; Kalnejais, Linda H.; Lamothe, Paul J.; Martin, William R.; Martini, Marinna A.; Rendigs, Richard R.; Sayles, Frederick L.; Signell, Richard P.; Valentine, Page C.; Warner, John C.; Bothner, Michael H.; Butman, Bradford

    2007-01-01

    Most of the major urban centers of the United States including Boston, New York, Washington, Chicago, New Orleans, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle—are on a coast (fig. 1.1). All of these cities discharge treated sewage effluent into adjacent waters. In 2000, 74 percent of the U.S. population lived within 200 kilometers (km) of the coast. Between 1980 and 2002, the population density in coastal communities increased approximately 4.5 times faster than in noncoastal areas of the U.S. (Perkins, 2004). More people generate larger volumes of wastes, increase the demands on wastewater treatment, expand the area of impervious land surfaces, and use more vehicles that contribute contaminants to street runoff. According to the National Coastal Condition Report II (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2005a), on the basis of coastal habitat, water and sediment quality, benthic index, and fish tissue, the overall national coastal condition is only poor to fair and the overall coastal condition in the highly populated Northeast is poor. Scientific information helps managers to prioritize and regulate coastal-ocean uses that include recreation, commercial fishing, transportation, waste disposal, and critical habitat for marine organisms. These uses are often in conflict with each other and with environmental concerns. Developing a strategy for managing competing uses while maintaining sustainability of coastal resources requires scientific understanding of how the coastal ocean system behaves and how it responds to anthropogenic influences. This report provides a summary of a multidisciplinary research program designed to improve our understanding of the transport and fate of contaminants in Massachusetts coastal waters. Massachusetts Bay and Boston Harbor have been a focus of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research because they provide a diverse geographic setting for developing a scientific understanding of the geology, geochemistry, and oceanography of

  13. Active Bodies, Active Minds: A Case Study on Physical Activity and Academic Success in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Understanding Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacheck, Jennifer; Wright, Catherine; Chomitz, Virginia; Chui, Kenneth; Economos, Christina; Schultz, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This case study addresses two major priorities of the Boston Foundation--health and education. Since the 2007 publication of the "Understanding Boston" report "The Boston Paradox: Lots of Health Care, Not Enough Health," the Boston Foundation has worked to draw attention to the epidemic of preventable chronic disease that not…

  14. Future Nuisance Flooding at Boston Caused by Astronomical Tides Alone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Foster, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Sea level rise necessarily triggers more occurrences of minor, or nuisance, flooding events along coastlines, a fact well documented in recent studies. At some locations nuisance flooding can be brought about merely by high spring tides, independent of storms, winds, or other atmospheric conditions. Analysis of observed water levels at Boston indicates that tidal flooding began to occur there in 2011 and will become more frequent in subsequent years. A compilation of all predicted nuisance-flooding events, induced by astronomical tides alone, is presented through year 2050. The accuracy of the tide prediction is improved when several unusual properties of Gulf of Maine tides, including secular changes, are properly accounted for. Future mean sea-level rise at Boston cannot be predicted with comparable confidence, so two very different climate scenarios are adopted; both predict a large increase in the frequency and the magnitude of tidal flooding events.

  15. Statistical pattern analysis of surficial karst in the Pleistocene Miami oolite of South Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Paul (Mitch); Purkis, Sam; Reyes, Bella

    2018-05-01

    A robust airborne light detection and ranging digital terrain model (LiDAR DTM) and select outcrops are used to examine the extent and characteristics of the surficial karst overprint of the late Pleistocene Miami oolite in South Florida. Subaerial exposure of the Miami oolite barrier bar and shoals to a meteoric diagenetic environment, lasting ca. 120 kyr from the end of the last interglacial highstand MIS 5e until today, has resulted in diagenetic alteration including surface and shallow subsurface dissolution producing extensive dolines and a few small stratiform caves. Analysis of the LiDAR DTM suggests that >50% of the dolines in the Miami oolite have been obscured/lost to urbanization, though a large number of depressions remain apparent and can be examined for trends and spatial patterns. The verified dolines are analyzed for their size and depth, their lateral distribution and relation to depositional topography, and the separation distance between them. Statistical pattern analysis shows that the average separation distance and average density of dolines on the strike-oriented barrier bar versus dip-oriented shoals is statistically inseparable. Doline distribution on the barrier bar is clustered because of the control exerted on dissolution by the depositional topography of the shoal system, whereas patterning of dolines in the more platform-ward lower-relief shoals is statistically indistinguishable from random. The areal extent and depth of dissolution of the dolines are well described by simple mathematical functions, and the depth of the dolines increases as a function of their size. The separation and density results from the Miami oolite are compared to results from other carbonate terrains. Near-surface, stratiform caves in the Miami oolite occur in sites where the largest and deepest dolines are present, and sit at, or near, the top of the present water table.

  16. 78 FR 9730 - Boston Harbor Islands Advisory Council Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    .... The agenda includes a presentation by Sally Snowman, 70th keeper of Boston Light, the election of officers, and a park update. Date/Time: March 6, 2013, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. (Eastern). Location: Wilmer... information--may be made publicly available at any time. While you can ask us in your comment to withhold your...

  17. Mapping urban pipeline leaks: Methane leaks across Boston

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Nathan G.; Ackley, Robert; Crosson, Eric R.; Down, Adrian; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Brondfield, Max; Karr, Jonathan D.; Zhao Kaiguang; Jackson, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Natural gas is the largest source of anthropogenic emissions of methane (CH 4 ) in the United States. To assess pipeline emissions across a major city, we mapped CH 4 leaks across all 785 road miles in the city of Boston using a cavity-ring-down mobile CH 4 analyzer. We identified 3356 CH 4 leaks with concentrations exceeding up to 15 times the global background level. Separately, we measured δ 13 CH 4 isotopic signatures from a subset of these leaks. The δ 13 CH 4 signatures (mean = −42.8‰ ± 1.3‰ s.e.; n = 32) strongly indicate a fossil fuel source rather than a biogenic source for most of the leaks; natural gas sampled across the city had average δ 13 CH 4 values of −36.8‰ (±0.7‰ s.e., n = 10), whereas CH 4 collected from landfill sites, wetlands, and sewer systems had δ 13 CH 4 signatures ∼20‰ lighter (μ = −57.8‰, ±1.6‰ s.e., n = 8). Repairing leaky natural gas distribution systems will reduce greenhouse gas emissions, increase consumer health and safety, and save money. Highlights: ► We mapped 3356 methane leaks in Boston. ► Methane leaks in Boston carry an isotopic signature of pipeline natural gas. ► Replacing failing gas pipelines will provide safety, environmental, and economic benefits. - We identified 3356 methane leaks in Boston, with isotopic characteristics consistent with pipeline natural gas.

  18. Personal Hygiene Practices among Urban Homeless Persons in Boston, MA

    OpenAIRE

    Leibler, Jessica H.; Nguyen, Daniel D.; Le?n, Casey; Gaeta, Jessie M.; Perez, Debora

    2017-01-01

    Persons experiencing homelessness in the United States experience significant barriers to self-care and personal hygiene, including limited access to clean showers, laundry and hand washing facilities. While the obstacles to personal hygiene associated with homelessness may increase risk of infectious disease, hygiene-related behaviors among people experiencing homelessness has received limited attention. We conducted a cross-sectional study of individuals experiencing homelessness in Boston,...

  19. Do foreclosures affect Boston public school student academic performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Bradbury, Katharine L.; Burke, Mary A.; Triest, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Foreclosures have well-documented adverse consequences for families living in or owning properties undergoing foreclosure and on surrounding neighborhoods, but they may also have other costs. This policy brief summarizes our research on the impact of mortgage foreclosures on academic performance among Boston public school students. The data show that students who live at an address that experiences a foreclosure tend to score substantially lower on standardized tests (math and English) and al...

  20. From Boston to the Balkans: Olmsted’s Emerald Legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Luke

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the legacy of landscape architect Fredrick Law Olmsted on modern cultural tourism policies. The author explains the involvement of Olmsted in the founding of Yosemite National Park, and describes the influence of this experience on his later work on the Emerald Necklace parks project in Boston. This became a model for natural and cultural corridors worldwide, including those in the Balkans and Turkey.

  1. Boston's balloon dilatation for treatment of cardiac achalasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Jianguo; Song Jinwen; Yang Yan; Liu Xiaohong; Fu Zhiming; Zhang Yaqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To review and summarize effectiveness and method of the Boston's balloon dilation in cardiac achalasia. Methods: The intensified guide wire was inserted into stomach through mouth cavity under TV control. The Boston's balloon was inserted to the cardiac stricture through the guide wire and dilatated with 15% contrast medium with to a maximum diameter for five minutes and then the balloon was dilatated again for 3-5 minutes, all together for 3-4 times. The severe stricture must be pre-dilatated with 20-25 mm diameter balloon. Results: The balloon insertion was technically successful in all 26 patients. The once success of balloon dilation was achieved in 24 patients and twice in other 2. Follow-up time was from 2 weeks to 31 months (mean 10.6 months). Recurrent stenosis had not occurred in all patients. Remission rate of dysphagia was 100%. Esophageal reflux occurred in 3 patients. Conclusions: The Boston's balloon dilatation is simple and effective for treatment of cardiac achalasia. The method sometimes may replace surgical procedure

  2. Public-private partnership from theory to practice: Walgreens and the Boston Public Health Commission supporting each other before and after the Boston bombings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Atyia; Williams, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the public health and medical services continuity of operations, response and recovery efforts in the aftermath of the Boston bombings. Countless public and private organisations and agencies came together to support the community and the survivors. The efforts of these organisations define what it means to be Boston Strong.

  3. Completing the results of the 2013 Boston marathon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorit Hammerling

    Full Text Available The 2013 Boston marathon was disrupted by two bombs placed near the finish line. The bombs resulted in three deaths and several hundred injuries. Of lesser concern, in the immediate aftermath, was the fact that nearly 6,000 runners failed to finish the race. We were approached by the marathon's organizers, the Boston Athletic Association (BAA, and asked to recommend a procedure for projecting finish times for the runners who could not complete the race. With assistance from the BAA, we created a dataset consisting of all the runners in the 2013 race who reached the halfway point but failed to finish, as well as all runners from the 2010 and 2011 Boston marathons. The data consist of split times from each of the 5 km sections of the course, as well as the final 2.2 km (from 40 km to the finish. The statistical objective is to predict the missing split times for the runners who failed to finish in 2013. We set this problem in the context of the matrix completion problem, examples of which include imputing missing data in DNA microarray experiments, and the Netflix prize problem. We propose five prediction methods and create a validation dataset to measure their performance by mean squared error and other measures. The best method used local regression based on a K-nearest-neighbors algorithm (KNN method, though several other methods produced results of similar quality. We show how the results were used to create projected times for the 2013 runners and discuss potential for future application of the same methodology. We present the whole project as an example of reproducible research, in that we are able to make the full data and all the algorithms we have used publicly available, which may facilitate future research extending the methods or proposing completely different approaches.

  4. Completing the results of the 2013 Boston marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerling, Dorit; Cefalu, Matthew; Cisewski, Jessi; Dominici, Francesca; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Paulson, Charles; Smith, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 Boston marathon was disrupted by two bombs placed near the finish line. The bombs resulted in three deaths and several hundred injuries. Of lesser concern, in the immediate aftermath, was the fact that nearly 6,000 runners failed to finish the race. We were approached by the marathon's organizers, the Boston Athletic Association (BAA), and asked to recommend a procedure for projecting finish times for the runners who could not complete the race. With assistance from the BAA, we created a dataset consisting of all the runners in the 2013 race who reached the halfway point but failed to finish, as well as all runners from the 2010 and 2011 Boston marathons. The data consist of split times from each of the 5 km sections of the course, as well as the final 2.2 km (from 40 km to the finish). The statistical objective is to predict the missing split times for the runners who failed to finish in 2013. We set this problem in the context of the matrix completion problem, examples of which include imputing missing data in DNA microarray experiments, and the Netflix prize problem. We propose five prediction methods and create a validation dataset to measure their performance by mean squared error and other measures. The best method used local regression based on a K-nearest-neighbors algorithm (KNN method), though several other methods produced results of similar quality. We show how the results were used to create projected times for the 2013 runners and discuss potential for future application of the same methodology. We present the whole project as an example of reproducible research, in that we are able to make the full data and all the algorithms we have used publicly available, which may facilitate future research extending the methods or proposing completely different approaches.

  5. A Danish adaptation of the Boston Naming Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper; Johannsen, Peter; Vogel, Asmus

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to develop a Danish adaptation of the Boston Naming Test (BNT) including a shortened 30-item version of the BNT for routine clinical use and two parallel 15-item versions for screening purposes. Method: The Danish adaptation of the BNT was based...... on ranking of items according to difficulty in a sample of older non-patients (n = 99). By selecting those items with the largest discrepancy in difficulty for non-patients compared to a mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) sample (n = 53), the shortened versions of the BNT were developed. Using an overlapping...

  6. Boston Community Information System 1986 Experimental Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    addicted partiipat.’ - 1031 ’Questions concerning application and cost’ - 1032 Of would like to have different background/foreground colors .... I am getting...admit I am an ’info junkie.’ I am addicted to Boston CommlnS. It has become so much apart of my dafl routine that the isses of the other 14 magazines and...8217Sports, Financial* - 106 eSports , Racing’ -1101 -Sports- - 1107 aStocks, sportas - 1109 aStocks’ - 1110 OFinascial, commercials - 1111 *sports

  7. Validation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Yusupova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available International scales and questionnaires have become widespread in Russian neurology. Validation is a procedure of top priority necessary before applying this kind of diagnostic instrument in Russian-speaking population. In this article, validation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ intended for patients with this disease is described. Use of validated Russian version would allow to objectively evaluate severity of clinical manifestations of carpal tunnel syndrome and follow patient dynamics. We present the official BCTQ version recommended for use in Russia, as well as data that showed high sensitivity and reliability of this instrument for clinical evaluation of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  8. Characterization and evaluation of five jaboticaba accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit of five Jaboticaba (Myrciaria caulifloria) cultivars ‘MC-05-06’, ‘MC-05-14’, ‘MC-05-12’, ‘MC-06-15,’ and ‘MC-06-14’ were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clona...

  9. Tourism and the Hispanicization of race in Jim Crow Miami, 1945-1965.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chanelle N

    2012-01-01

    This article examines how Miami's significant presence of Anglo Caribbean blacks and Spanish-speaking tourists critically influenced the evolution of race relations before and after the watershed 1959 Cuban Revolution. The convergence of people from the American South and North, the Caribbean, and Latin America created a border culture in a city where the influx of Bahamian blacks and Spanish-speakers, especially tourists, had begun to alter the racial landscape. To be sure, Miami had many parallels with other parts of the South in regard to how blackness was understood and enforced by whites during the first half of the twentieth century. However, I argue that the city's post-WWII meteoric tourist growth, along with its emergence as a burgeoning Pan-American metropolis, complicated the traditional southern black-white dichotomy. The purchasing power of Spanish-speaking visitors during the postwar era transformed a tourist economy that had traditionally catered to primarily wealthy white transplanted Northerners. This significant change to the city's tourist industry significantly influenced white civic leaders' decision to occasionally modify Jim Crow practices for Latin American vacationers. In effect, Miami's early Latinization had a profound impact on the established racial order as speaking Spanish became a form of currency that benefited Spanish-speaking tourists—even those of African descent. Paradoxically, this ostensibly peculiar racial climate aided the local struggle by highlighting the idiosyncrasies of Jim Crow while perpetuating the second-class status of native-born blacks.

  10. Informal Education and Climate Change: An Example From The Miami Science Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaughter, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Miami Science Museum recently took part in the National Conversation on Climate Action, held on October 4, 2007. This nationwide event encouraged members of the general public to explore local climate policy options. It provided an opportunity for citizens to discuss the issues and science of climate change with experts and policy makers, as well as neighbors and friends. During the day, the Miami Science Museum hosted a variety of events with something for everyone. Local school groups played DECIDE games and competed to find the most "treasure" in trash. Members and visitors were encouraged to leave their mark by posting comments and ideas about climate change. A "Gates of Change" exhibit provided dramatic visual indication of the effects of climate change and sea level rise. And a special "Meet the scientists" forum allowed the general public to discuss the facts and fictions of climate change with experts from Miami University's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. This activity was part of the Association of Science and Technology Centers' (ASTC) International action on Global Warming (IGLO) program. ASTC is the largest association of public science venues, and has 540 member institutions in 40 countries.

  11. Faunal and vegetation monitoring in response to harbor dredging in the Port of Miami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Andre; Stevenson, Rachael; Smith, Erin; Robblee, Michael

    2018-04-11

    Seagrasses are highly productive ecosystems. A before-after-control-impact (BACI) design was used to examine effects of dredging on seagrasses and the animals that inhabit them. The control site North Biscayne Bay and the affected site Port of Miami had seagrass densities decrease during both the before, Fish and Invertebrate Assessment Network 2006-2011, and after, Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging 2014-2016, studies. Turbidity levels increased at North Biscayne Bay and Port of Miami basins during the Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging study, especially in 2016. Animal populations decreased significantly in North Biscayne Bay and Port of Miami in the Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging study compared to the Fish and Invertebrate Assessment Network study. Predictive modeling shows that numbers of animal populations will likely continue to decrease if the negative trends in seagrass densities continue unabated. There could be effects on several fisheries vital to the south Florida economy. Additional research could determine if animal populations and seagrass densities have rebounded or continued to decrease.

  12. International Civic Engagement: From Development Studies and Service-Learning, to Miami University-Dominica Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the past four years, faculty, students, and staff from Miami University have been cultivating civic engagement relationships with citizens of the Commonwealth of Dominica, in the Eastern Caribbean. For members of the Miami University community, this has been an effort to create opportunities for learning and scholarship through partnerships with people in the Global South who are working for community empowerment, progressive change, and sustainable development. For our Dominican counterparts, benefits include financial inputs, manual labor, relevant research projects, and an outside interest in contributing positively to ameliorating their community challenges. We work to base the Miami University-Dominica relationships on trust, long-term commitment, and mutuality, so that the benefits go back and forth in myriad ways. The result has been a set of relationships across international borders and cultural differences that is more fulfilling for both sides than typical study abroad, research, or ecotourism encounters in the Global South. This paper describes the conceptual underpinnings of this international civic engagement, and recounts three examples of the kinds of community groups and activities that the partnerships involve. We also note where the project has encountered constraints and limitations, and our next steps in the effort. We hope this example can serve as a template and motivation for other university groups to commit to cultivating civic engagement relationships with people and communities in the Global South. KEYWORDScivic engagement; community engagement; community partnerships; sustainability

  13. Obtaining better performance in the measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xing-Yu; Zhang, Chun-Hui; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Wang, Qin

    2017-11-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) has been widely investigated due to its remarkable advantages on the achievable transmission distance and practical security. However, the relative low key generation rate limits its real-life implementations. In this work, we adopt the newly proposed four-intensity decoy-state scheme [Phys. Rev. A 93, 042324 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.042324] to study the performance of MDI-QKD with heralded single-photon sources (HSPS). Corresponding simulation results demonstrate that the four-intensity decoy-state scheme combining HSPS can drastically improve both the key generation rate and transmission distance in MDI-QKD, which may be very promising in future MDI-QKD systems.

  14. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Zhang, Mei; Ai, Qing; Yang, Guo-Jian [Department of Physics, Applied Optics Beijing Area Major Laboratory, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hobiny, Aatef [NAAM-Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Deng, Fu-Guo, E-mail: fgdeng@bnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Applied Optics Beijing Area Major Laboratory, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); NAAM-Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-03-15

    We propose a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We show the details by implementing nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification modules with atoms in waveguides, and discuss the feasibility of the repeater with currently achievable technology. In our scheme, the faulty events can be discarded by detecting the polarization of the photons. That is, our protocols are accomplished with a fidelity of 100% in principle, which is advantageous for implementing realistic long-distance quantum communication. Moreover, additional atomic qubits are not required, but only a single-photon medium. Our scheme is scalable and attractive since it can be realized in solid-state quantum systems. With the great progress on controlling atom-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in quantum information processing in the future.

  15. Bluff evolution along coastal drumlins: Boston Harbor Islands, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstoss, E.A.; FitzGerald, D.M.; Rosen, P.S.; Allen, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A series of partially drowned drumlins forms the backbone of the inner islands within Boston Harbor. The shoreline of these rounded glacial deposits is composed of actively retreating bluffs formed by continual wave attack. Comparisons of bluffs reveal variability in their height and lateral extent, as well as in the dominant mechanism causing their retreat. Two processes are responsible for bluff erosion and yield distinct bluff morphologies: (1) wave attack undercuts the bluff and causes episodic slumping, yielding planar bluff slopes, and (2) subaerial processes such as rainfall create irregular slopes characterized by rills and gullies. We propose a model of drumlin bluff evolution that is based on processes of erosion and physical characteristics such as bluff height, slope morphology, and the orientation of the bluff with respect to the long axis of the drumlin and its topographic crest. The four phases of drumlin bluff evolution consist of (1) initial formation of bluff, with retreat dominated by wave notching and slumping processes; (2) rill and gully development as bluff heights exceed 10 m and slumped sediment at bluff base inhibits wave attack; (3) return of wave notching and slumping as bluff heights decrease; and (4) final development of boulder retreat lag as last remnants of drumlin are eroded by wave action. These phases capture the important physical processes of drumlin evolution in Boston Harbor and could apply to other eroding coastal drumlin deposits.

  16. BUSEFL: The Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contos, A.R.; Sanchez, L.A.; Jorgensen, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    BUSEFL (Boston University Space Environment Forecast Laboratory) is a comprehensive, integrated project to address the issues and implications of space weather forecasting. An important goal of the BUSEFL mission is to serve as a testing ground for space weather algorithms and operational procedures. One such algorithm is the Magnetospheric Specification and Forecast Model (MSFM), which may be implemented in possible future space weather prediction centers. Boston University Student-satellite for Applications and Training (BUSAT), the satellite component of BUSEFL, will incorporate four experiments designed to measure (1) the earth close-quote s magnetic field, (2) distribution of energetic electrons trapped in the earth close-quote s radiation belts, (3) the mass and charge composition of the ion fluxes along the magnetic field lines and (4) the auroral forms at the foot of the field line in the auroral zones. Data from these experiments will be integrated into a ground system to evaluate space weather prediction codes. Data from the BUSEFL mission will be available to the scientific community and the public through media such as the World Wide Web (WWW). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Cohort profile: the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Rebecca S; Araujo, Andre B; Pearce, Neil; McKinlay, John B

    2014-02-01

    The Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey is a community-based, random sample, epidemiologic cohort of n = 5502 Boston (MA) residents. The baseline BACH Survey (2002-05) was designed to explore the mechanisms conferring increased health risks on minority populations with a particular focus on urologic signs/symptoms and type 2 diabetes. To this end, the cohort was designed to include adequate numbers of US racial/ethnic minorities (Black, Hispanic, White), both men and women, across a broad age of distribution. Follow-up surveys were conducted ∼5 (BACH II, 2008) and 7 (BACH III, 2010) years later, which allows for both within- and between-person comparisons over time. The BACH Survey's measures were designed to cover the following seven broad categories: socio-demographics, health care access/utilization, lifestyles, psychosocial factors, health status, physical measures and biochemical parameters. The breadth of measures has allowed BACH researchers to identify disparities and quantify contributions to social disparities in a number of health conditions including urologic conditions (e.g. nocturia, lower urinary tract symptoms, prostatitis), type 2 diabetes, obesity, bone mineral content and density, and physical function. BACH I data are available through the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) Central Repositories (www.niddkrepository.org). Further inquiries can be made through the New England Research Institutes Inc. website (www.neriscience.com/epidemiology).

  18. MIAMI cells embedded within a biologically-inspired construct promote recovery in a mouse model of peripheral vascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Monge, Cristina; Delcroix, Gaëtan J.-R; Bonnin-Marquez, Andrea; Valdes, Mike; Awadallah, Ead Lewis Mazen; Quevedo, Daniel F.; Armour, Maxime R.; Montero, Ramon B.; Schiller, Paul C.; Andreopoulos, Fotios M.; D’Ippolito, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral vascular disease is one of the major vascular complications in individuals suffering from diabetes and in the elderly that is associated with significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. Stem cell therapy is being tested as an attractive alternative to traditional surgery to prevent and treat this disorder. The goal of this study was to enhance the protective and reparative potential of marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells by incorporating them within a bio-inspired construct (BIC) made of 2 layers of gelatin B electrospun nanofibers. We hypothesized that the BIC would enhance MIAMI cell survival and engraftment, ultimately leading to a better functional recovery of the injured limb in our mouse model of critical limb ischemia compared to MIAMI cells used alone. Our study demonstrated that MIAMI cell-seeded BIC resulted in a wide range of positive outcomes with an almost full recovery of blood flow in the injured limb, thereby limiting the extent of ischemia and necrosis. Functional recovery was also the greatest when MIAMI cells were combined with BICs, compared to MIAMI cells alone or BICs in the absence of cells. Histology was performed 28 days after grafting the animals to explore the mechanisms at the source of these positive outcomes. We observed that our critical limb ischemia model induces an extensive loss of muscular fibers that are replaced by intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT), together with a highly disorganized vascular structure. The use of MIAMI cells-seeded BIC prevented IMAT infiltration with some clear evidence of muscular fibers regeneration. PMID:28211362

  19. 40 CFR 81.19 - Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Region. 81.19 Section 81.19 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Air Quality Control Regions § 81.19 Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Metropolitan Boston Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Massachusetts) consists of the territorial area...

  20. 76 FR 42048 - Safety Zones; Swimming Events in Captain of the Port Boston Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-18

    ...-AA00 Safety Zones; Swimming Events in Captain of the Port Boston Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... events within the Captain of the Port (COTP) Boston Zone for swimming events. This action is necessary to... property on navigable waters from the hazardous nature of swimming events such as large numbers of swimmers...

  1. 78 FR 67028 - Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port Boston Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information On November 9, 2011, the Coast Guard enacted the current... around the Hull Youth Football Carnival Fireworks, the Boston Harbor Triathlon, and the Boston Harbor.... These new safety zones will be listed in 33 CFR 165.118 as (6.5) Hull Youth Football Carnival Fireworks...

  2. The biosphere: Problems and solutions; Proceedings of the Miami International Symposium on the Biosphere, Miami Beach, FL, April 23, 24, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veziroglu, T. N.

    The objective of the Miami International Symposium on the Biosphere was to provide a forum for the presentation of the latest research findings on the environmental effects of human activities. The topics discussed are related to biosphere reserves, environmental aspects of hydrocarbon fuels, radioactivity and nuclear waste, land management, acid rains, water quality, water resources, coastal resources management, the pollution of rivers, industrial waste, economic development and the environment, health hazards and solutions, endangered species, environmentally compatible systems, space pollution, and global considerations. Attention is given to questions regarding global security and sustainable development, environethics as a global strategy for environmental quality, a gestalt approach to the environment, potential indicators for monitoring biosphere reserves, a review of regional impacts associated with the development of U.S. synthetic fuel resources, water resources in the Soviet Union, and pollution-free pesticides.

  3. An update on the Boston Marathon as a research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panza, Gregory A; Taylor, Beth A; Zaleski, Amanda L; Thompson, Paul D

    2015-07-01

    The Boston Athletic Association's annual marathon, also referred to as BAA in this article, continues to be a source of subjects for exercise and endurance performance research. We performed a systematic literature review of BAA studies published in the 7 years since our prior report. We identified 20 articles published from January 2008 to February 2015. Nine were related to cardiology; six were related to exercise physiology; four were related to metabolism; and one was related to marathon qualifying times. As in our prior, report cardiovascular studies remained the dominant topic, but with risk factors for atherosclerosis and thrombosis as the present focus. Cardiac issues remain the largest subject area for BAA studies, but with more emphasis on the effect of prolonged exercise on atherosclerotic and thrombotic risk factors. This shift is associated with an increase in marathon participation by older, recreational runners at increased risk of cardiac complications due to exercise.

  4. Research in particle physics. [Dept. of Physics, Boston Univ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, Scott J.

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron[endash]positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  5. The classical and a modified Boston brace: description and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Theodoros B; Kaspiris, Angelos

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is characterized by the lateral deviation of the spine and constitutes a three-dimensional distortion that leads to geometric and morphological lesions in the spine and thoracic cage. The most widespread method of conservative management is to use spinal orthoses or body braces. These are usually recommended in patients with skeletal immaturity with a Risser sign 2 or less and with curves ranging from 25° to 45°. Of these, perhaps one of the most popular in recent years is the Boston Brace. It was developed in the early 1970s, and its design is based on symmetry, consisting of extensions and pads, with each of them exerting corrective forces and has a specific role depending on the type of scoliosis. It is important that the treatment group, the patient, and the family environment should work as a team consistently and be well trained to achieve the best result. Various studies published in international literature have observed beneficial effects from the use of the Boston system. Nevertheless, there are still issues that need further investigation regarding its effectiveness depending on the type of curves, the duration of application, the gender, and BMI of patients to whom it is applied. However, without question, if all these factors are taken into account and with the compliance of the therapy group with the instructions, the main goal can be achieved, which is the stability of the spine, and the ultimate result of clinical-radiological and aesthetic improvement, which is directly linked to the psychological satisfaction of the patient.

  6. Infectious endophthalmitis in Boston keratoprosthesis: incidence and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlau, Irmgard; Martin, Kathryn V; Martin, Jacqueline N; Naumova, Elena N; Cadorette, James J; Sforza, J Tammy; Pineda, Roberto; Dohlman, Claes H

    2014-11-01

    To determine the cumulative worldwide incidence of infectious endophthalmitis and associated vision loss after Boston keratoprosthesis (B-KPro) Type I/II implantation and to propose both safe and inexpensive prophylactic antibiotic regimens. Two retrospective methods were used to determine the incidence, visual outcomes and aetiologies of infectious endophthalmitis associated with the B-KPro divided per decade: (i) systematic review of the literature from 1990 through January 2013 and (ii) a surveillance survey sent to all surgeons who implanted B-KPros through 2010 with 1-year minimum follow-up. In addition, a single-Boston surgeon 20-year experience was examined. From 1990 through 2010, there were 4729 B-KPros implanted worldwide by 209 U.S. surgeons and 159 international surgeons. The endophthalmitis cumulative mean incidence declined from 12% during its first decade of use to about 3% during its second decade in the Unites States and about 5% internationally during the second decade. There remains a large incidence range both in the United States (1-12.5%) and internationally (up to 17%). Poor compliance with daily topical antibiotics is an important risk factor. While Gram-positive organisms remained dominant, fungal infections emerged during the second decade. Daily prophylactic topical antibiotics have dramatically reduced the endophthalmitis incidence. Although Gram-positive organisms are the most common aetiology, antimicrobials must be inclusive of Gram-negative organisms. Selection of prophylactic regimens should be tailored to local antibiotic susceptibility patterns, be cost-effective, and should not promote the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. An example of a broad-spectrum, low-cost prophylactic option for non-autoimmune patients includes trimethoprim/polymyxinB once daily. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Banco de Reserva Federal Boston - Massachusetts - EE.UU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stubbing, Hugh

    1979-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite its being located in a heavily built-up downtown area of Boston, the new Federal Reserve Bank Building enjoys privileged surroundings, in the middle of ponds and landscaped areas with trees, etc. It was designed taking the maximum advantage of the particular conditions of the property, while reinforcing and increasing prestige attributes of this part of the city, called for, in the urban development plans, to be the centre of community and business activities. The project includes an office tower overlooking the harbour and a low building containing ail public banking functions. The design was based on specific research of the different aspects of banking activities, from the most minute details of furniture and fixtures, through the fenestration work, up to the highly sophisticated security systems.

    Pese a estar situado en un área céntrica de Boston, en una zona densamente urbanizada, el nuevo edificio del Banco Federal goza de un entorno privilegiado, circundado por estanques y jardines con árboles. Su arquitectura procura sacar partido de las particulares características de la parcela, fortaleciendo y elevando la categoría de esa parte de ciudad a la que los planes urbanísticos asignan el papel de centro de actividades comunitarias y comerciales. La construcción cuenta con una torre de oficinas, con amplias vistas sobre el puerto, y un bloque bajo dedicado a actividades bancarias públicas. Para su realización se utilizaron los resultados de investigaciones específicas sobre los diversos aspectos de la actividad bancaria, comprendiendo desde los más pequeños detalles del mobiliario y de la carpintería exterior, hasta los más modernos y complejos sistemas de seguridad.

  8. Mapping saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne Aquifer, Miami-Dade County, Florida using transient electromagnetic sounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitterman, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Saltwater intrusion in southern Florida poses a potential threat to the public drinking-water supply that is typically monitored using water samples and electromagnetic induction logs collected from a network of wells. Transient electromagnetic (TEM) soundings are a complementary addition to the monitoring program because of their ease of use, low cost, and ability to fill in data gaps between wells. TEM soundings have been used to map saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer over a large part of south Florida including eastern Miami-Dade County and the Everglades. These two areas are very different with one being urban and the other undeveloped. Each poses different conditions that affect data collection and data quality. In the developed areas, finding sites large enough to make soundings is difficult. The presence of underground pipes further restricts useable locations. Electromagnetic noise, which reduces data quality, is also an issue. In the Everglades, access to field sites is difficult and working in water-covered terrain is challenging. Nonetheless, TEM soundings are an effective tool for mapping saltwater intrusion. Direct estimates of water quality can be obtained from the inverted TEM data using a formation factor determined for the Biscayne aquifer. This formation factor is remarkably constant over Miami-Dade County owing to the uniformity of the aquifer and the absence of clay. Thirty-six TEM soundings were collected in the Model Land area of southeast Miami-Dade County to aid in calibration of a helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) survey. The soundings and HEM survey revealed an area of saltwater intrusion aligned with canals and drainage ditches along U.S. Highway 1 and the Card Sound Road. These canals and ditches likely reduced freshwater levels through unregulated drainage and provided pathways for seawater to flow at least 12.4 km inland.

  9. Presence of Alcohol and Drugs in Hispanic Versus Non-Hispanic Youth Suicide Victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Daniel; Kosoy, Jennifer Ellyn; Ayllon, Karla Diaz; Acuna, Juan

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the association between the presence of drugs and alcohol at time of suicide in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic youth suicide victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Medical Examiner's records of 435 persons aged 24 years or younger classified as suicides in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from 1990 to 2011 were reviewed. Hispanic youth in Miami-Dade County, Florida were 1.62 times more likely than non-Hispanic youth to have used drugs and alcohol at time of suicide (OR 1.62; 95 % CI 1.07-2.04; p = 0.049). Firearm use was significantly associated with drug and alcohol use at time of death. Use of drugs and alcohol at the time of death are important risk factors for suicide in Hispanic youth.

  10. Levels for Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number Using Procedural Content Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Alexander Brown

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Procedural Content Generation is the automatic process for generating game content in order to allow for a decrease in developer resources while adding to the replayability of a digital game. It has been found to be highly effective as a method when utilized in rougelike games, of which Hotline Miami 2: Wrong Number shares a number of factors. Search based procedural content, in this case, a genetic algorithm, allows for the creation of levels which meet with a number of designer set requirements. The generator proposed provides for an automatic creation of game content for a commercially available game: the level design, object placement, and enemy placement.

  11. Dispersal of plutonium from an effluent pulse in the Great Miami River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprugel, D.G.; Muller, R.N.; Bartelt, G.E.; Wayman, C.W.; Bobula, C.M.

    1975-01-01

    The concentration of soluble 238 Pu was found to be proportional to the concentration of the Rhodamine WT dye released from Mound Laboratory to the Great Miami River in an effluent pulse. This correlation permitted the integration of the area under the curves obtained from the dye monitoring to be equated to the total soluble 238 Pu present in the pulse. Investigations of the uptake of pulse-associated 238 Pu by organisms in the river proved inconclusive. It does appear, however, that organisms including the alga, Cladophora, which is known to concentrate plutonium, do not exhibit rapid changes in uptake coincident with the passage of the pulse

  12. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) presenting with an unusually prolonged period of marked polyuria heralded by an abrupt oliguric phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramoutar, Virin; Landa, Cristian; James, Leighton R

    2014-08-22

    A 50-year-old African-American man presented with acute tubular necrosis (ATN) secondary to hypotension from non-typhoid Salmonella gastroenteritis and bacteraemia. The oliguric phase lasted only 24 h followed by prolonged polyuria for 20 days, with urine output in excess of 16 L/day at maximum. As indexed in PubMed this is only the second published case of this nature since 1974, in which an abrupt oliguric phase of 24 h or less heralded prolonged polyuria in ATN. The diagnosis is challenging as fractional excretion of sodium early in the clinical course and rapid normalisation of serum creatinine with intravenous fluids (IVF) may point towards prerenal azotaemia resulting in a premature discharge from hospital. Patients with an abrupt oliguric phase may suffer a secondary renal insult from the profound fluid loss that is to follow and may need inpatient monitoring with supplemental IVF to prevent deleterious outcomes. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Media’s role in broadcasting acute stress following the Boston Marathon bombings

    OpenAIRE

    Holman, E. Alison; Garfin, Dana Rose; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2013-01-01

    We compared the impact of media vs. direct exposure on acute stress response to collective trauma. We conducted an Internet-based survey following the Boston Marathon bombings between April 29 and May 13, 2013, with representative samples of residents from Boston (n = 846), New York City (n = 941), and the remainder of the United States (n = 2,888). Acute stress symptom scores were comparable in Boston and New York [regression coefficient (b) = 0.43; SE = 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), -...

  14. Focused risk assessment: Mound Plant, Miami-Erie Canal Operable Unit 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, D.R.; Dunning, D.F.

    1994-01-01

    In 1969, an underground waste line at Mound Plant ruptured and released plutonium-238 in a dilute nitric acid solution to the surrounding soils. Most of the acid was neutralized by the native soils. The plutonium, which in a neutral solution is tightly sorbed onto clay particles, remained within the spill area. During remediation, a severe storm eroded some of the contaminated soil. Fine grained plutonium-contaminated clay particles were carried away through the natural drainage courses to the remnants of the Miami-Erie Canal adjacent to Mound Plant, and then into the Great Miami River. This focused risk assessment considers exposure pathways relevant to site conditions, including incidental ingestion of contaminated soils, ingestion of drinking water and fish, and inhalation of resuspended soils and sediments. For each potential exposure pathway, a simplified conceptual model and exposure scenarios have been used to develop conservative estimates of potential radiation dose equivalents and health risks. The conservatism of the dose and risk estimates provides a substantive margin of safety in assuring that the public health is protected

  15. Threat perception after the Boston Marathon bombings: The effects of personal relevance and conceptual framing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormwood, Jolie Baumann; Lynn, Spencer K; Feldman Barrett, Lisa; Quigley, Karen S

    2016-01-01

    We examined how the Boston Marathon bombings affected threat perception in the Boston community. In a threat perception task, participants attempted to "shoot" armed targets and avoid shooting unarmed targets. Participants viewing images of the bombings accompanied by affectively negative music and text (e.g., "Terror Strikes Boston") made more false alarms (i.e., more errors "shooting" unarmed targets) compared to participants viewing the same images accompanied by affectively positive music and text (e.g., "Boston Strong") and participants who did not view bombing images. This difference appears to be driven by decreased sensitivity (i.e., decreased ability to distinguish guns from non-guns) as opposed to a more liberal bias (i.e., favouring the "shoot" response). Additionally, the more strongly affected the participant was by the bombings, the more their sensitivity was reduced in the negatively framed condition, suggesting that this framing was particularly detrimental to the most vulnerable individuals in the affected community.

  16. The New England Drought Study: Water Resources Planning Metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joyce, Charles

    1994-01-01

    .... The drought of the 1960s precipitated a debate between the operators of the metropolitan Boston water system and interested citizens and citizens' groups, who were opposed to a structural solution...

  17. The New England Drought Study: Water Resources Planning Metropolitan Boston, Massachusetts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Joyce, Charles

    1994-01-01

    The study has traced the water resources planning experience for the metropolitan Boston area from the 17th century to the present in order to investigate how current planning has evolved from seeking...

  18. ASIC design and data communications for the Boston retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Douglas B; Ellersick, William; Kelly, Shawn K; Doyle, Patrick; Priplata, Attila; Drohan, William; Mendoza, Oscar; Gingerich, Marcus; McKee, Bruce; Wyatt, John L; Rizzo, Joseph F

    2012-01-01

    We report on the design and testing of a custom application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) that has been developed as a key component of the Boston retinal prosthesis. This device has been designed for patients who are blind due to age-related macular degeneration or retinitis pigmentosa. Key safety and communication features of the low-power ASIC are described, as are the highly configurable neural stimulation current waveforms that are delivered to its greater than 256 output electrodes. The ASIC was created using an 0.18 micron Si fabrication process utilizing standard 1.8 volt CMOS transistors as well as 20 volt lightly doped drain FETs. The communication system receives frequency-shift keyed inputs at 6.78 MHz from an implanted secondary coil, and transmits data back to the control unit through a lower-bandwidth channel that employs load-shift keying. The design's safety is ensured by on-board electrode voltage monitoring, stimulus charge limits, error checking of data transmitted to the implant, and comprehensive self-test and performance monitoring features. Each stimulus cycle is initiated by a transmitted word with a full 32-bit error check code. Taken together, these features allow researchers to safely and wirelessly tailor retinal stimulation and vision recovery for each patient.

  19. Characterization of retrokeratoprosthetic membranes in the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Rebecca C; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Michaud, Norman A; Dohlman, Claes H; Colby, Kathryn A

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate retroprosthetic membranes that can occur in 25% to 65% of patients with the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis (KPro). Two patients with Peter anomaly and 2 with neurotrophic scarred corneas underwent revisions of their type 1 KPros because of visually compromising retroprosthetic membranes. The excised membranes were studied by light microscopy with hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and toluidine blue stains. Immunohistochemical and transmission electron microscopic examination were also used. Light microscopic examination revealed that the retro-KPro fibrous membranes originated from the host's corneal stroma. These mildly to moderately vascularized membranes grew through gaps in the Descemet membrane to reach behind the KPro back plate and adhere to the anterior iris surface, which had undergone partial lysis. In 2 cases, the fibrous membranes merged at the pupil with matrical portions of metaplastic lens epithelium, forming a bilayered structure that crossed the optical axis. Retro-KPro membranes stained positively for α-smooth muscle actin but negatively for pancytokeratin. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of actin filaments within myofibroblasts and small surviving clusters of metaplastic lens epithelial cells. Stromal downgrowth, rather than epithelial downgrowth, was the major element of the retro-KPro membranes in this series. Metaplastic lens epithelium also contributed to opacification of the visual axis. Florid membranous inflammation was not a prominent finding and thus probably not a requisite stimulus for membrane development. Further advances in prosthetic design and newer antifibroproliferative agents may reduce membrane formation.

  20. Personal Hygiene Practices among Urban Homeless Persons in Boston, MA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibler, Jessica H; Nguyen, Daniel D; León, Casey; Gaeta, Jessie M; Perez, Debora

    2017-08-18

    Persons experiencing homelessness in the United States experience significant barriers to self-care and personal hygiene, including limited access to clean showers, laundry and hand washing facilities. While the obstacles to personal hygiene associated with homelessness may increase risk of infectious disease, hygiene-related behaviors among people experiencing homelessness has received limited attention. We conducted a cross-sectional study of individuals experiencing homelessness in Boston, MA ( n = 194) to identify hygiene-related self-care practices and risk factors for reduced hygiene in this population. Most participants (72%) reported taking a daily shower. More than 60% reported hand washing with soap five or more times each day, and use of hand sanitizer was widespread (89% reported using sanitizer in the last week). A majority (86%) used a laundromat or laundry machine to wash clothing, while 14% reported washing clothing in the sink. Heavy drinking, injection drug use, and sleeping outdoors were identified as significant risk factors for reduced hygiene practices. People experiencing homelessness who also engage in these activities may be among the most difficult to reach for intervention, yet targeted efforts may decrease illness risk associated with reduced hygiene. Housed friends and family play a critical role in assisting homeless individuals maintain hygiene by providing showers and laundry facilities.

  1. Morphological and physio-chemical characterization of five Canistel accessions at the subtropical horticulture research station in Miami Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit of five canistel cultivars, 'Fairchild','E11', 'Keisau', 'TREC#3' and 'TREC 3680' were evaluated and characterized at the National Germplasm Repository, Subtropical horticulture Research Station (SHRS) Miami, Florida. Thirty fruits were harvested from clonal accessions during July and August, ...

  2. Photography and Oral History as a Means of Chronicling the Homeless in Miami: The "StreetWays" Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzo, Eugene F.; Ameen, Edward; Bengochea, Alain; Doorn, Kristen; Pontier, Ryan; Sembiante, Sabrina

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of Photography and Oral History research methods as part of a collaborative research project on homelessness in Miami. Issues involving the use of documentary photography and oral history as a means of creating greater social awareness in the general public are explored, as well as broader issues of Social Justice.…

  3. Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA (Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the availability of the final report,Classification of High Spatial Resolution, Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery of the Little Miami River Watershed in Southwest Ohio, USA . This report and associated land use/land cover (LULC) coverage is the result o...

  4. Wild Coastline Birds as Reservoirs of Broad-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Miami Beach, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potron, Anaïs; De La Cuesta, Carolina; Cleary, Timothy; Nordmann, Patrice; Munoz-Price, L. Silvia

    2012-01-01

    A high rate of broad-spectrum-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates was identified from seagull and pelican feces collected in the Miami Beach, Florida, area. The most commonly identified resistance determinants were CMY-2 and CTX-M-15. Those wild birds might be therefore considered vehicles for wide dissemination of multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the United States. PMID:22314536

  5. Rebel with a Cause: A School Board Member Calls for Reform in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This case describes the experience of a new school board member in Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Marta Perez, as she discovers a wide range of ethical and management problems in the school district and attempts to deal with them. Layered throughout the case are challenges pertaining to the school board's roles and responsibilities,…

  6. 77 FR 20947 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing of the Miami Blue Butterfly as Endangered...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... from historical collections. Taxonomy The Miami blue belongs to the family Lycaenidae (Leach... sources (see Taxonomy). We note that several Web sites (e.g., Butterflies of America, Catalog of the... collection, vandalism, disturbance, fire, and other harm from humans. One commenter, who agreed with our...

  7. Transcription of Gail Jefferson, Boston University Conference on Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis, 9 June 1977

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevile, Maurice Richard

    2015-01-01

    This is a CLAN transcription of the film recording of a conference talk by Gail Jefferson in Boston in 1977. The film recording was generously made available by George Psathas, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Prof Doug Maynard (University of Wisconsin) arranged for the origi...... paralleling the talk’s content, under the heading ‘The Boston talk (as it never was)’ (p.2) - this would therefore seem to be adapted from Hopper’s transcription. So in my transcription I aim to give a clearer sense of the Boston talk as it actually was.......This is a CLAN transcription of the film recording of a conference talk by Gail Jefferson in Boston in 1977. The film recording was generously made available by George Psathas, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Boston University. Prof Doug Maynard (University of Wisconsin) arranged...... for the original film recording to be digitised. Jefferson later developed elements of her 1977 talk into the paper ‘On the poetics of ordinary talk’ (Jefferson. G. 1996, in Text and Performance Quarterly, 16,1:1-61). An indication of the significance of the talk is given in that paper’s abstract, where Jefferson...

  8. Alcohol advertising at Boston subway stations: an assessment of exposure by race and socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Elisabeth; Poirier, Katie; Wilkinson, Tiana; Nhean, Siphannay; Nyborn, Justin; Siegel, Michael

    2011-10-01

    We investigated the frequency of alcohol ads at all 113 subway and streetcar stations in Boston and the patterns of community exposure stratified by race, socioeconomic status, and age. We assessed the extent of alcohol advertising at each station in May 2009. We measured gross impressions and gross rating points (GRPs) for the entire Greater Boston population and for Boston public school student commuters. We compared the frequency of alcohol advertising between neighborhoods with differing demographics. For the Greater Boston population, alcohol advertising at subway stations generated 109 GRPs on a typical day. For Boston public school students in grades 5 to 12, alcohol advertising at stations generated 134 GRPs. Advertising at stations in low-poverty neighborhoods generated 14.1 GRPs and at stations in high-poverty areas, 63.6 GRPs. Alcohol ads reach the equivalent of every adult in the Greater Boston region and the equivalent of every 5th- to 12th-grade public school student each day. More alcohol ads were displayed in stations in neighborhoods with high poverty rates than in stations in neighborhoods with low poverty rates.

  9. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui

    2007-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr ∼ 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1∼9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI

  10. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr {approx} 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1{approx}9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI.

  11. Predictors of visual outcomes following Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sumayya; Akpek, Esen K; Gehlbach, Peter L; Dunlap, Karen; Ramulu, Pradeep Y

    2015-04-01

    To identify predictors of visual outcomes following Boston type 1 Keratoprosthesis (KPro) implantation. Retrospective chart review. Data regarding preoperative clinical and demographic characteristics and postoperative course were collected. Fifty-nine eyes of 59 adult patients who underwent KPro implantation between January 2006 and March 2012 at a single tertiary care center. Preoperative factors associated with all-cause and glaucoma-related loss of visual acuity from the best postoperative visual acuity noted. Fifty-two of 59 eyes (88%) achieved improved vision post implantation, with 7 eyes failing to gain vision as a result of pre-existing glaucoma (n = 4) or retino-choroidal disease (n = 3). Twenty-one eyes (21/52, 40%) maintained their best-ever visual acuity at last visit (mean follow-up period was 37.8 months). The likelihood of maintaining best-ever vision was 71% at 1 year, 59% at 2 years, and 48% at 3 years. Primary KPro implantation was associated with a higher likelihood of losing best-ever vision as compared to KPro implantation as a repeat corneal procedure (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.06; P = 006). The main reasons for postimplantation vision loss was glaucoma (12/31, 39%), and the risk of glaucomatous visual acuity loss was 15% at 2 years and 27% at 3 years. Prior trabeculectomy was associated with a higher rate of vision loss from glaucoma (HR = 3.25, P = .04). Glaucoma is the primary reason for loss of visual acuity after KPro implantation. Conditions necessitating primary KPro surgery are associated with more frequent all-cause vision loss. Prospective trials are necessary to better determine which clinical features best predict KPro success. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Uranium contamination in the Great Miami Aquifer at the Fernald Environmental Management Project, Fernald, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidle, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water investigations at a former US Department of Energy nuclear weapons complex near Fernald, in southwestern Ohio, included the delineation of uranium contamination above the USEPA proposed drinking water standard of 20 microg/l. Contamination occurs in a buried valley and has migrated >1.5 km south-southeast of the facility boundary. Flooring of the plume(s) appears to be ≅ 32 m below the water table of the Great Miami Aquifer. U 6+ predominates in the modeled U-O 2 -CO 2 -H 2 O system and U retardation decreases at depth. U 234 /U 238 disequilibria analyses complement hydrogeologic studies which suggest that U leakage through the clayey till cap is less significant than the predominant transport pathway of infiltration via drainage channels incised into the aquifer

  13. Impacts of the 2010 Haitian earthquake in the diaspora: findings from Little Haiti, Miami, FL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobetz, Erin; Menard, Janelle; Kish, Jonathan; Bishop, Ian; Hazan, Gabrielle; Nicolas, Guerda

    2013-04-01

    In January 2010, a massive earthquake struck Haiti resulting in unprecedented damage. Little attention, however, has focused on the earthquake's mental health impact in the Haitian diaspora community. As part of an established community-based participatory research initiative in Little Haiti, the predominately Haitian neighborhood in Miami, FL, USA, community health workers conducted surveys with neighborhood residents about earthquake-related losses, coping strategies, and depressive/traumatic symptomology. Findings reveal the earthquake strongly impacted the diaspora community and highlights prominent coping strategies. Following the earthquake, only a small percentage of participants self-reported engaging in any negative health behaviors. Instead, a majority relied on their social networks for support. This study contributes to the discourse on designing culturally-responsive mental health initiatives for the Haitian diaspora and the ability of existing community-academic partnerships to rapidly adapt to community needs.

  14. Behavior and transport of industrially derived plutonium in the Great Miami River, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, R N; Sprugel, D G; Wayman, C W; Bartelt, G E; Bobula, C M [Argonne National Lab., Ill. (USA)

    1977-11-01

    Periodic discharges of industrial waste water containing small amounts of plutonium (/sup 238/Pu) into the Great Miami River of southwestern Ohio were studied to characterize the behavior of industrially derived plutonium in a flowing aquatic system. After entering this river, the plutonium rapidly separates into two components, one smaller than 0.45..mu..m (filterable) and one associated with larger suspended sediments (non-filterable). At any point downstream during the passage of a pulse, the ratio of filterable to non-filterable plutonium is about 1.0, while between pulses this ratio is in the range of 0.05-0.35. Mass balance calculations for one of these pulses showed that at moderate flow conditions (approximately 1000cf/s) about 60% of the effluent plutonium is lost through sedimentation within 9.7 km of the discharge point, but that continual resuspension of riverbed sediment results in a consistently high background plutonium flux between pulses.

  15. Blood Lead Levels in Children and Environmental Lead Contamination in Miami Inner City, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theophile Niyonsenga

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the environmental conditions of the home are important predictors of health, especially in low-income communities. Understanding the relationship between the environment and health is crucial in the management of certain diseases. One health outcome related to the home environment among urban, minority, and low-income children is childhood lead poisoning. The most common sources of lead exposure for children are lead paint in older, dilapidated housing and contaminated dust and soil produced by accumulated residue of leaded gasoline. Blood lead levels (BLL as low as 10 μg/dL in children are associated with impaired cognitive function, behavior difficulties, and reduced intelligence. Recently, it is suggested that the standard for intervention be lowered to BLL of 5 μg /dl. The objectives of our report were to assess the prevalence of lead poisoning among children under six years of age and to quantify and test the correlations between BLL in children and lead exposure levels in their environment. This cross-sectional analysis was restricted to 75 children under six years of age who lived in 6 zip code areas of inner city Miami. These locations exhibited unacceptably high levels of lead dust and soil in areas where children live and play. Using the 5 μg/dL as the cutoff point, the prevalence of lead poisoning among the study sample was 13.33%. The study revealed that lead levels in floor dust and window sill samples were positively and significantly correlated with BLL among children (p < 0.05. However, the correlations between BLL and the soil, air, and water samples were not significant. Based on this pilot study, a more comprehensive environmental study in surrounding inner city areas is warranted. Parental education on proper housecleaning techniques may also benefit those living in the high lead-exposed communities of inner city Miami.

  16. Household-level disparities in cancer risks from vehicular air pollution in Miami

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Timothy W; Grineski, Sara E; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2015-01-01

    Environmental justice (EJ) research has relied on ecological analyses of socio-demographic data from areal units to determine if particular populations are disproportionately burdened by toxic risks. This article advances quantitative EJ research by (a) examining whether statistical associations found for geographic units translate to relationships at the household level; (b) testing alternative explanations for distributional injustices never before investigated; and (c) applying a novel statistical technique appropriate for geographically-clustered data. Our study makes these advances by using generalized estimating equations to examine distributive environmental inequities in the Miami (Florida) metropolitan area, based on primary household-level survey data and census block-level cancer risk estimates of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) exposure from on-road mobile emission sources. In addition to modeling determinants of on-road HAP cancer risk among all survey participants, two subgroup models are estimated to examine whether determinants of risk differ based on disadvantaged minority (Hispanic and non-Hispanic Black) versus non-Hispanic white racial/ethnic status. Results reveal multiple determinants of risk exposure disparities. In the model including all survey participants, renter-occupancy, Hispanic and non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity, the desire to live close to work/urban services or public transportation, and higher risk perception are associated with greater on-road HAP cancer risk; the desire to live in an amenity-rich environment is associated with less risk. Divergent subgroup model results shed light on the previously unexamined role of racial/ethnic status in shaping determinants of risk exposures. While lower socioeconomic status and higher risk perception predict significantly greater on-road HAP cancer risk among disadvantaged minorities, the desire to live near work/urban services or public transport predict significantly greater risk among

  17. The economic impact of vocal attrition in public school teachers in Miami-Dade County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosow, David E; Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Saint-Victor, Sandra; Gerhard, Julia D; DuPont, Carl; Lo, Kaming

    2016-03-01

    Teachers are a known at-risk population for voice disorders. The prevalence and risk factors for voice disorders have been well studied in this population, but little is known about the associated economic cost. The purpose of this study is to assess the economic impact of voice dysfunction in teachers and understand the difference between the cost of absenteeism and presenteeism as a direct result of voice dysfunction. Cross-sectional analysis via self-administered online questionnaire. A total of 14,256 public school teachers from Miami-Dade County, Florida, were asked to participate. Questions were formatted based on the previously validated Work Productivity and Activity Impairment: Specific Health Problem questionnaire adapted for hoarseness and voice disorders. Additional demographic questions were included in the questionnaire. A total of 961 questionnaire responses were received. The demographic characteristics of respondents closely matched known statistics for public school teachers in Miami-Dade County. Economic calculations were performed for each questionnaire respondent and summed for all respondents to avoid bias. Per week, absenteeism-related costs were $25,000, whereas presenteeism-related costs were approximately $300,000. These figures were used to extrapolate annual cost. Per year, absenteeism-related costs were $1 million, whereas presenteeism-related costs were approximately $12 million. The economic impact of voice dysfunction on the teaching profession is enormous. With the above calculations only including lost wages and decreased productivity, the actual figures may in fact be larger (cost of substitute teachers, impact on nonwork activities, etc.). Research investigating preventative measures for voice dysfunction in teachers is necessary to reduce this costly issue. 2C. Laryngoscope, 126:665-671, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Environmental Setting and Effects on Water Quality in the Great and Little Miami River Basins, Ohio and Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debrewer, Linda M.; Rowe, Gary L.; Reutter, David C.; Moore, Rhett C.; Hambrook, Julie A.; Baker, Nancy T.

    2000-01-01

    The Great and Little Miami River Basins drain approximately 7,354 square miles in southwestern Ohio and southeastern Indiana and are included in the more than 50 major river basins and aquifer systems selected for water-quality assessment as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. Principal streams include the Great and Little Miami Rivers in Ohio and the Whitewater River in Indiana. The Great and Little Miami River Basins are almost entirely within the Till Plains section of the Central Lowland physiographic province and have a humid continental climate, characterized by well-defined summer and winter seasons. With the exception of a few areas near the Ohio River, Pleistocene glacial deposits, which are predominantly till, overlie lower Paleozoic limestone, dolomite, and shale bedrock. The principal aquifer is a complex buried-valley system of sand and gravel aquifers capable of supporting sustained well yields exceeding 1,000 gallons per min-ute. Designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a sole-source aquifer, the Buried-Valley Aquifer System is the principal source of drinking water for 1.6 million people in the basins and is the dominant source of water for southwestern Ohio. Water use in the Great and Little Miami River Basins averaged 745 million gallons per day in 1995. Of this amount, 48 percent was supplied by surface water (including the Ohio River) and 52 percent was supplied by ground water. Land-use and waste-management practices influence the quality of water found in streams and aquifers in the Great and Little Miami River Basins. Land use is approximately 79 percent agriculture, 13 percent urban (residential, industrial, and commercial), and 7 percent forest. An estimated 2.8 million people live in the Great and Little Miami River Basins; major urban areas include Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio. Fertilizers and pesticides associated with agricultural activity, discharges from municipal and

  19. Pedestrian safety engineering and intelligent transportation system-based countermeasures program for reduced pedestrian fatalities, injuries, conflicts and other surrogate measures : Miami-Dade site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-25

    This report presents the methods and key findings from the Miami-Dade comprehensive pedestrian safety planning and engineering project. It is one of three such projects in the nation funded by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to evaluate: In...

  20. The Boston Methane Project: Mapping Surface Emissions to Inform Atmospheric Estimation of Urban Methane Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, N.; Crosson, E.; Down, A.; Hutyra, L.; Jackson, R. B.; McKain, K.; Rella, C.; Raciti, S. M.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Lost and unaccounted natural gas can amount to over 6% of Massachusetts' total annual greenhouse gas inventory (expressed as equivalent CO2 tonnage). An unknown portion of this loss is due to natural gas leaks in pipeline distribution systems. The objective of the Boston Methane Project is to estimate the overall leak rate from natural gas systems in metropolitan Boston, and to compare this flux with fluxes from the other primary methane emissions sources. Companion talks at this meeting describe the atmospheric measurement and modeling framework, and chemical and isotopic tracers that can partition total atmospheric methane flux into natural gas and non-natural gas components. This talk focuses on estimation of surface emissions that inform the atmospheric modeling and partitioning. These surface emissions include over 3,300 pipeline natural gas leaks in Boston. For the state of Massachusetts as a whole, the amount of natural gas reported as lost and unaccounted for by utility companies was greater than estimated landfill emissions by an order of magnitude. Moreover, these landfill emissions were overwhelmingly located outside of metro Boston, while gas leaks are concentrated in exactly the opposite pattern, increasing from suburban Boston toward the urban core. Work is in progress to estimate spatial distribution of methane emissions from wetlands and sewer systems. We conclude with a description of how these spatial data sets will be combined and represented for application in atmospheric modeling.

  1. In search of the Boston Strangler: genetic evidence from the exhumation of Mary Sullivan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, David R; Starrs, James E

    2004-01-01

    The Boston Strangler was one of the United States' most notorious serial killers, raping and strangling with decorative ligatures thirteen woman in Boston during the early 1960s. Albert DeSalvo, never a suspect in the slayings, confessed in prison (where he was later murdered) to being the Boston Strangler, and the investigation largely ended. Mary Sullivan was the last victim of the Boston Strangler, found sexually assaulted and strangled in her Boston apartment in 1964. Recently, a team of forensic scientists undertook the exhumation and subsequent scientific analysis of Mary Sullivan's remains, in hope of finding consistencies or inconsistencies between DeSalvo's confessed description of the murder and any evidence left behind. Included in these analyses was extensive DNA testing of all UV fluorescent material associated with the body. The large majority of results were negative, however, fluorescent material located on the underwear and entwined in her pubic hair generated two human mitochondrial DNA sequences. Neither of these matched the victim nor members of the forensic team who worked on the evidence. Most importantly, neither DNA sequence could have originated from Albert DeSalvo.

  2. Miami's Tequesta Site: Could It Be a Native American Study Site For Natural Periodicities Associated With Tornados, Hurricanes, or Earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Dougall, Jean S.; Mc Leod, David M.; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2002-10-01

    Florida invested in preserving the Tequesta Indians' "Stonehenge-like" site along the Miami River. Direct observation, and telecast reports, show that a strong association exists between this area and Native American place names, hurricanes, tornados, a waterspout, and other nearby phenomena. Electromagnetic stimulation of human nervous systems in areas like these, discernable by appropriately sensitive individuals when these types of events occur, could plausibly account for some correct "predictions" of events like earthquakes. Various sensory modalities may be activated there. It may be important to understand other historic aspects associated with cultural artifacts like Miami's Tequesta remains. If it also generates instrumentally detectable signals that correlate with visual, "auditory," or nerve ending "tinglings" like those cited by the psychiatrist Arthur Guirdham in books like his Obsessions, applied physicists could partly vindicate the investment and also provide a net return. Society and comparative religious study may benefit.

  3. A comparison of acute hemorrhagic stroke outcomes in 2 populations: the Crete-Boston study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaganas, Ioannis; Halpin, Amy P; Oleinik, Alexandra; Alegakis, Athanasios; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Zafiris, Spiros; Chlapoutaki, Chryssanthi; Tsimoulis, Dimitris; Giannakoudakis, Emmanouil; Chochlidakis, Nikolaos; Ntailiani, Aikaterini; Valatsou, Christina; Papadaki, Efrosini; Vakis, Antonios; Furie, Karen L; Greenberg, Steven M; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Although corticosteroid use in acute hemorrhagic stroke is not widely adopted, management with intravenous dexamethasone has been standard of care at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete with observed outcomes superior to those reported in the literature. To explore this further, we conducted a retrospective, multivariable-adjusted 2-center study. We studied 391 acute hemorrhagic stroke cases admitted to the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete between January 1997 and July 2010 and compared them with 510 acute hemorrhagic stroke cases admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, from January 2003 to September 2009. Of the Cretan cases, 340 received a tapering scheme of intravenous dexamethasone, starting with 16 to 32 mg/day, whereas the Boston patients were managed without steroids. The 2 cohorts had comparable demographics and stroke severity on admission, although anticoagulation was more frequent in Boston. The in-hospital mortality was significantly lower on Crete (23.8%, n=340) than in Boston (38.0%, n=510; Pmortality (Crete: 25.4%, n=307; Boston: 39.4%, n=510; Pmortality: Crete 20.8%; n=259; Boston 37.0%; n=359; Phemorrhages. After adjusting for acute hemorrhagic stroke volume/location, Glasgow Coma Scale, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, coronary artery disease and statin, antiplatelet, and anticoagulant use, intravenous dexamethasone treatment was associated with better functional outcomes and significantly lower risk of death at 30 days (OR, 0.357; 95% CI, 0.174-0.732). This study suggests that intravenous dexamethasone improves outcome in acute hemorrhagic stroke and supports a randomized clinical trial using this approach.

  4. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Winston-Salem, NC, 1/15/2009) Weight Loss Surgery Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery (University of Miami Hospital ... Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Weight Loss Surgery Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery (University of Miami Hospital ...

  5. Homeland Security in Absentia: Policing Miami in the Era of the New U.S.- Cuba Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    beyond.”80 It also gave Miami “human skills and hemispheric connections” to allow the new arrivals to succeed.81 The political influence also...skyrocketed, as “the result of an admixture of the entrepreneurial and professional skills of early Cuban emigres, access to capital, hard work, and a...trade opportunities) • Capacity building (to strengthen governance).166 164 Heather Helper

  6. Unknowable Protagonists and Narrative Delirium in American Psycho and Hotline Miami: A Case Study in Character Engagement Across the Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caracciolo Marco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Empathetic perspective-taking is one of the main psychological mechanisms behind audiences’ engagement with narrative (Coplan 2004; Eder 2006. What happens, however, when a story confronts with a character whose emotions, motivations, and beliefs we fail to understand? This paper examines the phenomenon of “unreadable minds” (Abbott 2008 from a transmedial perspective: how do audiences relate to a character who defies all attempts at making sense of his or her identity despite being the main focus of a narrative? My case studies - the novel American Psycho (1991 by Bret Easton Ellis and the video game Hotline Miami (Dennaton Games 2012 - foreground two such characters: by calling attention to the opaqueness of their protagonists, they heighten the audiences’ interest in - and puzzlement at - their identity. In my comparative analysis I explore two dimensions that contribute to audiences’ sense of unknowability of the protagonists: the hallucinations and delusions experienced by both characters (an instance of what Bernaerts [2009] calls “narrative delirium”; and their extreme violence, which raises unanswered ethical questions. While bringing out the continuities between American Psycho and Hotline Miami, I also highlight how the interactivity of Hotline Miami makes the central paradox of relating to an unknowable character even more salient for the audience. In this way, I show that the video game medium has reached a level of interpretive complexity that can stand the comparison with literary fiction.

  7. Assessing Climate Vulnerabilities of Food Distribution Center Sites in Greater Boston and Their Regional Implications: Climate Adaptation Planning in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teferra, A.; Watson, C.; Douglas, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Metro Boston region, an area whose civic leaders have been at the forefront of climate resilience initiatives in recent years, is finalizing a flood vulnerability assessment of food distribution center sites located north of Boston, with the support of the University of Massachusetts Boston and the American Geophysical Union's Thriving Earth Exchange program. The community-scientist collaboration emerged because of the need for more local analyses of the area to inform climate resiliency policy and planning actions for the region. A significant amount of the metro region's food supply passes through two major distribution centers in the cities of Everett and Chelsea, just north of the Mystic River. The Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC), on behalf of the Metro Boston Climate Preparedness Taskforce, is working with Chris Watson and Ellen Douglas of UMass Boston to build on existing analyses of the region's food system and climate vulnerabilities and to develop a report identifying flood risk exposure to the sites. The analysis brings in dynamic modeling techniques that incorporate storm surge and sea level rise projections under different climate scenarios, and aims to align methodologies with those of other regional analyses, such as Climate Ready Boston and the City of Cambridge's Vulnerability Assessment. The study is helping to inform MAPC's and the Metro Boston Climate Preparedness Taskforce's understanding of this critical food distribution infrastructure, illustrate the larger regional implications of climate impacts on food distribution in the Greater Boston area, and guide the development of site-specific strategies for addressing identified vulnerabilities.

  8. Detecting sedimentation impacts to coral reefs resulting from dredging the Port of Miami, Florida USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margaret W; Karazsia, Jocelyn; Groves, Carolyn E; Griffin, Sean; Moore, Tom; Wilber, Pace; Gregg, Kurtis

    2016-01-01

    The federal channel at Port of Miami, Florida, USA, was dredged between late 2013 and early 2015 to widen and deepen the channel. Due to the limited spatial extent of impact-assessment monitoring associated with the project, the extent of the dredging impacts on surrounding coral reefs has not been well quantified. Previously published remote sensing analyses, as well as agency and anecdotal reports suggest the most severe and largest area of sedimentation occurred on a coral reef feature referred to as the Inner Reef, particularly in the sector north of the channel. A confounding regional warm-water mass bleaching event followed by a coral disease outbreak during this same time frame made the assessment of dredging-related impacts to coral reefs adjacent to the federal channel difficult but still feasible. The current study sought to better understand the sedimentation impacts that occurred in the coral reef environment surrounding Port of Miami, to distinguish those impacts from other regional events or disturbances, and provide supplemental information on impact assessment that will inform discussions on compensatory mitigation requirements. To this end, in-water field assessments conducted after the completion of dredging and a time series analysis of tagged corals photographed pre-, during, and post-dredging, are used to discern dredging-related sedimentation impacts for the Inner Reef north. Results indicate increased sediment accumulation, severe in certain times and places, and an associated biological response (e.g., higher prevalence of partial mortality of corals) extended up to 700 m from the channel, whereas project-associated monitoring was limited to 50 m from the channel. These results can contribute to more realistic prediction of areas of indirect effect from dredging projects needed to accurately evaluate proposed projects and design appropriate compliance monitoring. Dredging projects near valuable and sensitive habitats subject to local and

  9. Detecting sedimentation impacts to coral reefs resulting from dredging the Port of Miami, Florida USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret W. Miller

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The federal channel at Port of Miami, Florida, USA, was dredged between late 2013 and early 2015 to widen and deepen the channel. Due to the limited spatial extent of impact-assessment monitoring associated with the project, the extent of the dredging impacts on surrounding coral reefs has not been well quantified. Previously published remote sensing analyses, as well as agency and anecdotal reports suggest the most severe and largest area of sedimentation occurred on a coral reef feature referred to as the Inner Reef, particularly in the sector north of the channel. A confounding regional warm-water mass bleaching event followed by a coral disease outbreak during this same time frame made the assessment of dredging-related impacts to coral reefs adjacent to the federal channel difficult but still feasible. The current study sought to better understand the sedimentation impacts that occurred in the coral reef environment surrounding Port of Miami, to distinguish those impacts from other regional events or disturbances, and provide supplemental information on impact assessment that will inform discussions on compensatory mitigation requirements. To this end, in-water field assessments conducted after the completion of dredging and a time series analysis of tagged corals photographed pre-, during, and post-dredging, are used to discern dredging-related sedimentation impacts for the Inner Reef north. Results indicate increased sediment accumulation, severe in certain times and places, and an associated biological response (e.g., higher prevalence of partial mortality of corals extended up to 700 m from the channel, whereas project-associated monitoring was limited to 50 m from the channel. These results can contribute to more realistic prediction of areas of indirect effect from dredging projects needed to accurately evaluate proposed projects and design appropriate compliance monitoring. Dredging projects near valuable and sensitive habitats

  10. Earth Sciences at Boston University: Reorientation and Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R. W.; Simpson, C.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning in 1994 with the renaming of its Department of Geology as the Department of Earth Sciences, Boston University has invested much effort into developing a modern, energetic department that excels in its dual research and teaching mission. These changes required strong leadership at the departmental and senior administrative level, but they have resulted in a moderately sized program (9.5 full time faculty) that is competing with "Top Ten" institutions for graduate students and faculty, and which is also placing its undergraduates in the leading graduate programs. Most of the revitalization was achieved over a 5-year period in which across the board changes occurred in our undergraduate curriculum and during which we recruited junior and mid-level faculty on the basis of their scholarly abilities and for their belief in the culture of our new mission and program. The undergraduate curriculum, which had been oriented towards traditional geologic offerings, was greatly increased in rigor (requiring a full year each of calculus, physics, and chemistry) and redesigned to expand flexibility in the broad field of earth sciences. During the evolution of the curriculum, it was extremely important not to confuse "tradition" with "rigor". Undergraduates became more critically involved with our research mission through senior theses, a formal Undergraduate Research Opportunities program, and by work-study participation in the laboratories. By making the program more challenging, over the period of 3 years we doubled the number of majors and minors and increased the average GPA by 0.5 units. Now, after 8 years, we have nearly tripled our overall number of students, with further improvements in quality and intellectual diversity. The opportunity to replace departing senior faculty was achieved through effectively arguing to the central administration that modern earth sciences are an essential component of any leading institution of higher education. By persuading the

  11. Understanding Transitions Toward Sustainable Urban Water Management: Miami, Las Vegas, Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, M. E.; Manago, K. F.; Treuer, G.; Deslatte, A.; Koebele, E.; Ernst, K.

    2016-12-01

    Cities in the United States face numerous threats to their long-term water supplies including preserving ecosystems, competing uses, and climate change. Yet, it is unclear why only some cities have transitioned toward more sustainable water management. These transitions include strategies such as water conservation, water supply portfolio diversification, long-term planning, and integrated resource management. While the circumstances that motivate or moderate transition may vary greatly across cities' physical and institutional contexts, identifying common factors associated with transition can help resource managers capitalize on windows of opportunity for change. To begin the process of identifying such factors, we ask two questions: 1) what combinations of conditions are associated with water management transitions?, and 2) what are the outcomes of these transitions? We examine three cases of utility-level water management in Miami, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles to create data-driven narratives detailing each city's transition. These narratives systematically synthesize multiple data sources to enable cross-case comparison and provide insights into how and why cities transition. Using the foundational concepts from the exposure-based theory of urban change, we focus our analysis on three broad categories of variables that influence urban water management transition: biophysical, political, and regulatory exposures. First, we compare these factors across time and across cities using metrics that standardize diverse data sources. Next, we incorporate qualitative factors that capture a city's unique conditions by integrating these metrics with salient contextual information. Then, through cross-city comparison, we identify factors associated with transition.

  12. Results of time-domain electromagnetic soundings in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitterman, David V.; Prinos, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) soundings were made in Miami-Dade and southern Broward Counties to aid in mapping the landward extent of saltwater in the Biscayne aquifer. A total of 79 soundings were collected in settings ranging from urban to undeveloped land, with some of the former posing problems of land access and interference from anthropogenic features. TEM soundings combined with monitoring-well data were used to determine if the saltwater front had moved since the last time it was mapped, to provide additional spatial coverage where existing monitoring wells were insufficient, and to help interpret a previously collected helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) survey flown in the southernmost portion of the study area. TEM soundings were interpreted as layered resistivity-depth models. Using information from well logs and water-quality data, the resistivity of the freshwater saturated Biscayne aquifer is expected to be above 30 ohm-meters, and the saltwater-saturated aquifer will have resistivities of less than 10 ohm-meters allowing determination of water quality from the TEM interpretations. TEM models from 29 soundings were compared to electromagnetic induction logs collected in nearby monitoring wells. In general, the agreement of these results was very good, giving confidence in the use of the TEM data for mapping saltwater encroachment.

  13. Water conservation quantities vs customer opinion and satisfaction with water efficient appliances in Miami, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mengshan; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-10-15

    During 2006-2007, Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA, provided incentives for low income and senior residents in single family homes for retrofitting with high efficiency fixtures. The participating residences were retrofitted with high-efficiency toilets, showerheads, and aerators. In 2012, a telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the satisfaction of the participants and the associated effects on water conservation practices. This study evaluates the attitudes and opinions of the participants relative to water use efficiency measures and the actual reduction in water consumption characteristics of the participating households. The participant characteristics were analyzed to identify correlations between the socio-demographic factors, program satisfaction and actual water savings. Approximately 65.5% of the survey respondents reported changes in their water use habits and 76.6% reported noticeable reduction in their water bills. The analyses showed that the satisfaction levels of the participants were closely correlated with the actual water savings. The results also showed that satisfaction level along with water saving potential (i.e., implementation of water efficiency devices) or change of water use habits has provided positive synergistic effect on actual water savings. The majority of the participants surveyed (81.3-89.1%) reported positive attitudes for water conservation incentive program and the benefits of the high efficiency fixtures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiological characterization survey results for Gaskill Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (OXO015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. Because it was suspected that uranium may have been used in the past in the immediate vicinity of Alba Craft in a Miami University building a team from ORNL, performed a radiological characterization survey of that structure in January 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE as a precautionary measure to ensure that no radioactive residuals were present at levels exceeding guidelines. The survey included the determination of directly measured radiation levels and the collection of smear samples to detect possible removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. Results of the survey showed that all measurements were below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE

  15. Geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks of the Biscayne aquifer in central Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Williams, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluations of the lithostratigraphy, lithofacies, paleontology, ichnology, depositional environments, and cyclostratigraphy from 11 test coreholes were linked to geophysical interpretations, and to results of hydraulic slug tests of six test coreholes at the Snapper Creek Well Field (SCWF), to construct geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks for the study area in central Miami-Dade County, Florida. The resulting geologic and hydrogeologic frameworks are consistent with those recently described for the Biscayne aquifer in the nearby Lake Belt area in Miami-Dade County and link the Lake Belt area frameworks with those developed for the SCWF study area. The hydrogeologic framework is characterized by a triple-porosity pore system of (1) matrix porosity (mainly mesoporous interparticle porosity, moldic porosity, and mesoporous to megaporous separate vugs), which under dynamic conditions, produces limited flow; (2) megaporous, touching-vug porosity that commonly forms stratiform groundwater passageways; and (3) conduit porosity, including bedding-plane vugs, decimeter-scale diameter vertical solution pipes, and meter-scale cavernous vugs. The various pore types and associated permeabilities generally have a predictable vertical spatial distribution related to the cyclostratigraphy. The Biscayne aquifer within the study area can be described as two major flow units separated by a single middle semiconfining unit. The upper Biscayne aquifer flow unit is present mainly within the Miami Limestone at the top of the aquifer and has the greatest hydraulic conductivity values, with a mean of 8,200 feet per day. The middle semiconfining unit, mainly within the upper Fort Thompson Formation, comprises continuous to discontinuous zones with (1) matrix porosity; (2) leaky, low permeability layers that may have up to centimeter-scale vuggy porosity with higher vertical permeability than horizontal permeability; and (3) stratiform flow zones composed of fossil moldic porosity, burrow

  16. Stability of plutonium contaminated sediments in the Miami--Erie Canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, B.M.; Carfagno, D.G.

    1978-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the stability of plutonium-contaminated sediment in the Miami-Erie Canal. Correlations were sought to relate concentrations at air sampling stations to plutonium-238 concentrations in air and stack emissions, wind direction, particulate loading, rainfall, and construction activities. There appears to be some impact on airborne concentrations at air sampling stations 122 and 123 from the contaminated sediment in the canal and ponds area. For purposes of this evaluation, it was assumed that the plutonium-238 found in the air samples came from the contaminated sediment in the canal/ponds area. To complete the evaluation of the inhalation pathway, dose calculations were performed using actual airborne concentrations of plutonium-238 measured at sampler 123. The dose equivalent to an individual in that area was calculated for 1 yr and 70 yr. Dose calculations were also performed on potential uptake of contaminated vegetation from that area for 1 yr and 70 yr. This study indicates that, although the contaminated sediments in the canal and pond area appear to contribute to airborne plutonium-238, the observed maximum monthly concentration of plutonium-238 in air is a small fraction of the DOE Radioactivity Concentration Guide (RCG) and the nine-month average concentration of plutonium-238 in air observed thus far during 1977 is less than 1% of the RCG. Dose equivalents, conservatively calculated from these actual data, are well within existing DOE standards and proposed EPA guidance

  17. Les stratégies spatiales de la population haïtienne à Miami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Audebert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Le schéma migratoire haïtien s’est traduit par la genèse d’un champ migratoire international entre le pays d’origine et Miami, où la population d’origine haïtienne a enregistré une croissance rapide. Dans une métropole floridienne marquée par une forte ségrégation « ethno-raciale » et socio-économique, les nouveaux venus se sont installés à l’origine dans les quartiers noirs centraux paupérisés. Les incidences de la politique migratoire fédérale sont apparues contrastées, occasionnant le repli sur soi des immigrants à Little Haiti lorsqu’elle était défavorable ou rendant possible la mobilité résidentielle dans une conjoncture d’assouplissement de la législation. Ultérieurement, la complexité croissante de l’espace de l’immigration haïtienne, caractérisé par une évolution rapide de son étendue et de ses formes, s’est manifestée par une dichotomie marquée entre l’« enclave » traditionnelle et les nouveaux espaces d’installation en banlieue. Résultat d’une dynamique d’agrégation autant choisie que contrainte, la concentration spatiale des Haïtiens à Miami s’est traduite par la genèse de secteurs d’implantation privilégiée, terrains favorables à la mise en place de processus de territorialisation complexes. L’apprentissage mental et fonctionnel de l’espace vise à faire sienne la terre d’immigration et à la doter de sens, et apparaît comme le préalable à la mise en place de stratégies collectives de territorialisation. La « prise de possession » d’une portion de l’aire métropolitaine et son affectation à des activités sociales, commerciales et de représentation politique visent à assurer la pérennité du lien communautaire haïtien en créant de la cohésion, de la solidarité et de la socialité.Haitian emigration has evolved within the growing dependency of Haiti from the United States throughout the XXth century. The Haitian migratory pattern

  18. Climate gentrification: from theory to empiricism in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Jesse M.; Hill, Thomas; Gumber, Anurag

    2018-05-01

    This article provides a conceptual model for the pathways by which climate change could operate to impact geographies and property markets whose inferior or superior qualities for supporting the built environment are subject to a descriptive theory known as ‘Climate Gentrification.’ The article utilizes Miami-Dade County, Florida (MDC) as a case study to explore the market mechanisms that speak to the operations and processes inherent in the theory. This article tests the hypothesis that the rate of price appreciation of single-family properties in MDC is positively related to and correlated with incremental measures of higher elevation (the ‘Elevation Hypothesis’). As a reflection of an increase in observed nuisance flooding and relative SLR, the second hypothesis is that the rates of price appreciation in lowest the elevation cohorts have not kept up with the rates of appreciation of higher elevation cohorts since approximately 2000 (the ‘Nuisance Hypothesis’). The findings support a validation of both hypotheses and suggest the potential existence of consumer preferences that are based, in part, on perceptions of flood risk and/or observations of flooding. These preferences and perceptions are anticipated to be amplified by climate change in a manner that reinforces the proposition that climate change impacts will affect the marketability and valuation of property with varying degrees of environmental exposure and resilience functionality. Uncovering these empirical relationships is a critical first step for understanding the occurrence and parameters of Climate Gentrification.

  19. Cumulative exposure to prior collective trauma and acute stress responses to the Boston marathon bombings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfin, Dana Rose; Holman, E Alison; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2015-06-01

    The role of repeated exposure to collective trauma in explaining response to subsequent community-wide trauma is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between acute stress response to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and prior direct and indirect media-based exposure to three collective traumatic events: the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Representative samples of residents of metropolitan Boston (n = 846) and New York City (n = 941) completed Internet-based surveys shortly after the Boston Marathon bombings. Cumulative direct exposure and indirect exposure to prior community trauma and acute stress symptoms were assessed. Acute stress levels did not differ between Boston and New York metropolitan residents. Cumulative direct and indirect, live-media-based exposure to 9/11, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook shooting were positively associated with acute stress responses in the covariate-adjusted model. People who experience multiple community-based traumas may be sensitized to the negative impact of subsequent events, especially in communities previously exposed to similar disasters. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Development of a Short Form of the Boston Naming Test for Individuals with Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Toro, Christina M.; Bislick, Lauren P.; Comer, Matthew; Velozo, Craig; Romero, Sergio; Rothi, Leslie J. Gonzalez; Kendall, Diane L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a short form of the Boston Naming Test (BNT; Kaplan, Goodglass, & Weintraub, 2001) for individuals with aphasia and compare it with 2 existing short forms originally analyzed with responses from people with dementia and neurologically healthy adults. Method: Development of the new BNT-Aphasia Short…

  1. Association between BDNF-rs6265 and obesity in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study is to examine a functional variant (rs6265) in the BDNF gene interacting with dietary intake modulate obesity traits in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study population. BDNF rs6265 was genotyped in 1147 Puerto Ricans (aged 45-75 years), and examined for association with o...

  2. The Past Is Never Dead—Measles Epidemic, Boston, Massachusetts, 1713

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-04

    Dr. David Morens reads excerpts from his essay about Cotton Mather’s diary, which details the experience and tragedy of the measles outbreak in Boston, Massachusetts in 1713.  Created: 8/4/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/4/2015.

  3. 76 FR 55161 - Boston and Maine Corporation-Abandonment Exemption-Middlesex County, Mass.; Springfield Terminal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ...\\ Docket No. AB 355; Sub-No. 39X] Boston and Maine Corporation--Abandonment Exemption--Middlesex County, Mass.; Springfield Terminal Railway Company; Discontinuance of Service Exemption; Middlesex County, MA... Middlesex County, Mass. The line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Codes 02471 and 02138...

  4. Do Foreclosures Affect Boston Public School Student Academic Performance? Public Policy Brief No. 13-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Katharine; Burke, Mary A.; Triest, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Foreclosures have well-documented adverse consequences for families living in or owning properties undergoing foreclosure and on surrounding neighborhoods, but they may also have other costs. This policy brief summarizes our research on the impact of mortgage foreclosures on academic performance among Boston public school students. The data show…

  5. Gun Carrying by High School Students in Boston, MA: Does Overestimation of Peer Gun Carrying Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemenway, David; Vriniotis, Mary; Johnson, Renee M.; Miller, Matthew; Azrael, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates: (1) whether high school students overestimate gun carrying by their peers, and (2) whether those students who overestimate peer gun carrying are more likely to carry firearms. Data come from a randomly sampled survey conducted in 2008 of over 1700 high school students in Boston, MA. Over 5% of students reported carrying a…

  6. The Lowells of Boston and the Founding of University Extension at Harvard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagel, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author uses the occasion of the centennial of University Extension at Harvard to document how this unique educational institution came into being and why it became associated with Harvard University. He traces the prominent role played by the Lowell family in establishing the Lowell Institute of Boston in the late 1830s and…

  7. 75 FR 21367 - Advanced Electronics, Inc.; Boston, MA; Notice of Negative Determination on Remand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-59,517] Advanced Electronics, Inc... Employees of Advanced Electronics, Inc. v. United States Secretary of Labor (Court No. 06-00337). On July 18... former workers of Advanced Electronics, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts (subject firm). The Department's...

  8. Progresses in neuroproteomics of neurodegenerative diseases--18th HUPO BPP workshop: September 12, 2012, Boston, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröttrup, Bernd; May, Caroline; Meyer, Helmut E; Grinberg, Lea T; Park, Young Mok

    2013-01-01

    The HUPO Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) held its 18(th) workshop in Boston, USA, September 12(th) 2012 during the HUPO 11th Annual Word Congress. The focus was on the progress on the Human Brain Proteome Atlas as well as ideas, strategies and methodological aspects. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The Boston Study: Analysis of a Major Metropolitan Business- and Technical-Communication Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a year-long study of the duties, skills, and knowledge required of business- and technical-communication professionals in Boston, Massachusetts. Focuses on six categories of practice: technical communication, publishing, public relations, marketing, development, and training. Suggests that in the next decade communication practitioners…

  10. A DETERMINISTIC GEOMETRIC REPRESENTATION OF TEMPORAL RAINFALL: SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR A STORM IN BOSTON. (R824780)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an earlier study, Puente and Obregón [Water Resour. Res. 32(1996)2825] reported on the usage of a deterministic fractal–multifractal (FM) methodology to faithfully describe an 8.3 h high-resolution rainfall time series in Boston, gathered every 15 s ...

  11. 75 FR 62469 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA, Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA, Maintenance AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... Craigie Bridge across the Charles River at mile 1.0, has a vertical clearance of 10.25 feet at normal pool... temporary deviation from the regulation governing the operation of the Craigie Bridge across the Charles...

  12. 75 FR 38411 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA, Public Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA, Public Event AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of..., telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Craigie Bridge, across the Charles River at mile 1.0... elevation above the Charles River Dam. The existing drawbridge operation regulations are listed at 33 CFR...

  13. Immigration, Suicidal Ideation and Deliberate Self-Injury in the Boston Youth Survey 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Guilherme; Azrael, Deborah; Almeida, Joanna; Johnson, Renee M.; Molnar, Beth E.; Hemenway, David; Miller, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and immigration-related correlates of deliberate self-injury (DSI) and suicidal ideation (SI) were estimated in a sample of Boston public high school students in 2006. Compared with U.S.-born youth, immigrant youth were not at increased risk for DSI or SI, even if they had experienced discrimination due to their ancestry. By…

  14. Impacts of the Boston Prekindergarten Program on the School Readiness of Young Children with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Theory and empirical work suggest inclusion preschool improves the school readiness of young children with special needs, but only 2 studies of the model have used rigorous designs that could identify causality. The present study examined the impacts of the Boston Public prekindergarten program-which combined proven language, literacy, and…

  15. GreenTalks at Boston Green Academy: Student Reflections on Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriacose, Christina

    2017-01-01

    In spring 2017, for the third year running, 10th graders at Boston Green Academy (BGA) presented GreenTalks, a showcase of research on food justice issues. The day Christina Kuriacose visited the school, students were presenting the PowerPoints they had put together. All of them included a map plotting out the proximity of their neighborhood or…

  16. 33 CFR 165.116 - Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones; Salem..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.116 Safety and Security Zones; Salem and Boston Harbors, Massachusetts. (a) Location. The...

  17. 33 CFR 165.114 - Safety and Security Zones: Escorted Vessels-Boston Harbor, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zones... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION... Guard District § 165.114 Safety and Security Zones: Escorted Vessels—Boston Harbor, Massachusetts. (a...

  18. 78 FR 35790 - Safety Zones; Recurring Events in Captain of the Port Boston Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ..., Program Manager, Docket Operations, telephone 202-366-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms... three new permanent safety zones; (6.5) Hull Youth Football Carnival Fireworks, (8.8) The Boston....1' W. 42[deg]15.4' N, 070[deg]47.9' W. 42[deg]15.4' N, 070[deg]47.8' W. 6.5 Hull Youth Football...

  19. A District-Wide Approach to Culturally and Linguistically Sustaining Practices in the Boston Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Colin; Issa, Mwalimu Donkor

    2018-01-01

    Boston Public Schools' system-wide professional development on culturally and linguistically sustaining practices (CLSP) creates consistent expectations for educators to address their biases, build relationships with students and parents, and improve instruction--and gives them the tools to do so. In this article, the authors touch on changes at…

  20. Personal benefits of public open space: a case study in Boston's Arnold Arboretum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas A. More; John Blackwell

    1998-01-01

    Managers of urban parks need to document the benefits that their parks produce. Use level is a typical measure of such benefits, but simple use statistics can mask the rich diversity of people and activities that the parks serve. This study examined the uses and users of Boston's Arnold Arboretum during late summer in 1992. On 25 sample days, we recorded...

  1. Boston College Sees a Sharp Drop in Applications after Adding an Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Boston College saw a 26-percent decrease in applications this year, a drop officials largely attribute to a new essay requirement. Last year the private Jesuit institution received a record 34,051 applications for 2,250 spots in its freshman class. This year approximately 25,000 students applied, and all of them had to do one thing their…

  2. Outcomes with the Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis at Instituto de Microcirugía Ocular IMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Jose L; Arcos, Edilio; Gris, Oscar; Aristizabal, Diego; Pacheco, Miguel; Sanchez, Claudia L; Manero, Felicidad

    2011-07-01

    To report the outcomes on the Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis at our institution. Retrospective analysis case series. We analyzed 54 eyes of 53 patients who previously underwent Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis surgery at our institution from July 2006 to March 2011. Preoperative and postoperative parameters were collected and analyzed. Visual acuity and keratoprosthesis stability. Common preoperative diagnoses were penetrating keratoplasty failure in 49 eyes (90.7%), chronic keratitis in 2 eyes (3.7%), ocular cicatricial pemphigoid in 1 eye (1.85%), Stevens Johnson syndrome in 1 eye (1.85%) and corneal vascularization in 1 eye (1.85%). Additionally, 40 eyes (74%) had preoperative glaucoma, and an Ahmed valve was implanted in 55% of them. Preoperative BCVA ranged from 20/200 to light perception. At an average follow-up of 20.15 months ± 12.7 (range, 1-56), postoperative vision improved to ⩾20/200 in 18 eyes (33.3%) and ⩾20/50 in 4 eyes (7.4%). The graft retention was 96%. The Boston Type 1 keratoprosthesis is a valid option for high-risk patients. The design improvements in the Boston keratoprosthesis, as well as the daily implementation of the therapeutic methods, have notably diminished occurrence of the most serious complications, such as corneal necrosis and endophthalmitis. As such, glaucoma and its subsequent complications now stand as the most prevalent prognostic factor in the long term.

  3. The Path Forward: School Autonomy and Its Implications for the Future of Boston's Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dan; Miles, Karen Hawley; Nathan, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the question of how Boston Public Schools (BPS) can strengthen and support autonomy and accountability across its portfolio to promote innovation and expand access to equity and high performance. Some of the specific questions guiding this work are: (1) Should all schools within BPS operate within autonomous structures? (2) Is…

  4. With and Without ‘General’: The Representation of Wiranto in The Sydney Morning Herald during Indonesia’s 2004 General Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylanda Hidayati Dwi-Nugroho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports an analysis on the naming and title-giving practices of The Sydney Morning Herald toward General Wiranto in the news about Indonesia‟s 2004 General Election when he contested as a presidential candidate but failed. In the news data he was mostly related to the allegations of his responsibility as the Commander of Indonesia‟s armed forces for a number of atrocities committed by the Indonesian military and Jakarta-backed militias in East Timor. Honorification is one standard referencing in news. Its presence is believed to indicate respects, and its absence can be interpreted as either showing solidarity or less respect. However, Wiranto was negatively represented both when he was referred to with and without his military title. Such a representation suggests the newspaper‟s perception and stereotype it has had about Wiranto.

  5. Assessing the environmental justice consequences of flood risk: a case study in Miami, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Marilyn C.; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2015-09-01

    Recent environmental justice (EJ) research has emphasized the need to analyze social inequities in the distribution of natural hazards such as hurricanes and floods, and examine intra-ethnic diversity in patterns of EJ. This study contributes to the emerging EJ scholarship on exposure to flooding and ethnic heterogeneity by analyzing the racial/ethnic and socioeconomic characteristics of the population residing within coastal and inland flood risk zones in the Miami Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), Florida—one of the most ethnically diverse MSAs in the U.S. and one of the most hurricane-prone areas in the world. We examine coastal and inland flood zones separately because of differences in amenities such as water views and beach access. Instead of treating the Hispanic population as a homogenous group, we disaggregate the Hispanic category into relevant country-of-origin subgroups. Inequities in flood risk exposure are statistically analyzed using socio-demographic variables derived from the 2010 U.S. Census and 2007-2011 American Community Survey estimates, and 100-year flood risk zones from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Social vulnerability is represented with two neighborhood deprivation indices called economic insecurity and instability. We also analyze the presence of seasonal/vacation homes and proximity to public beach access sites as water-related amenity variables. Logistic regression modeling is utilized to estimate the odds of neighborhood-level exposure to coastal and inland 100-year flood risks. Results indicate that neighborhoods with greater percentages of non-Hispanic Blacks, Hispanics, and Hispanic subgroups of Colombians and Puerto Ricans are exposed to inland flood risks in areas without water-related amenities, while Mexicans are inequitably exposed to coastal flood risks. Our findings demonstrate the importance of treating coastal and inland flood risks separately while controlling for water-related amenities, and

  6. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1994 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stocker, L.E.; Miller, M.C.; Evans, R.L.; Koch, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Fish sampling by electroshocking in the Great Miami River upstream and downstream the Fernald site (September 25 and 26, 1994) was designed to determine changes in the health of the fish community compared to the previous ten years and to collect samples for uranium analyses in fish fillets. Samples of 853 fish, from 27 species, eight families and three sites at river mile (RM) 38, RM 24, and RM 19 provided seventy-eight samples for uranium analyses by an independent laboratory. The biomass of fish caught per hour was greatest at RM 24 > RM 19 > RM 3 8. The diversity index and the heaviest fish community was RM 24 > RM 38 > RM 19. The pooled site at RM 38 near Hamilton was diagnostically separated from the other sites by the young-of-the-year (YOY) golden redhorse, smallmouth bass and golden shiner. The darns at Hamilton acted as an effective barrier against fish migration upriver. Larger freshwater drum, gizzard shad, channel catfish and flathead catfish, which might be expected in rapid current reaches of mid-sized rivers characterize RM 24. The pool at RM 19 was distinguished from the others by YOY gizzard shad, bluegill, and longear sunfish. Thus the fish community in 1994 was separated ecologically by the physical features of the habitat more than by water quality differences between sites. These data suggest that the Fernald effluents in September were having no detectable effects on the distribution of fishes, independent of changes in habitat quality separated on physical attributes of the river channel at each site

  7. Electrical resistivity and porosity structure of the upper Biscayne Aquifer in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Dean; Yeboah-Forson, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Square array electrical soundings were made at 13 sites in the Biscayne Aquifer distributed between 1 and 20 km from the shoreline. These soundings were modeled to investigate how resistivity varies spatially and with depth in the upper 15 m of the aquifer. Porosity was estimated from the modeled formation resistivity and observed pore fluid resistivity with Archie's Law. The models were used to interpolate resistivity and porosity surfaces at -2, -5, -8, and -15 m elevations. Modeled resistivity in the unsaturated zone is generally higher than 300 Ω m with the resistivity at sites with thick unsaturated zones greater than 1000 Ω m. Resistivity in the saturated zone ranges from 30 to 320 Ω m. At many sites in the western portions of the study area, resistivity is constant or increases with depth whereas sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge exhibit a distinct low resistivity zone (ρ aquifer. The estimated porosity ranges between 14% and 71% with modal values near 25%. The porosity structure varies both with depth and spatially. Western sites exhibit a high porosity zone at shallow depths best expressed in a NE-SW trending zone of 40-50% porosity situated near the western margin of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge. This zone roughly corresponds in depth with the Q5 chronostratigraphic unit of the Miami Fm. which constitutes the upper flow unit of the Biscayne Aquifer. The highest porosity (>50%) is seen at elevations below -5 m at sites in the center of the Atlantic Coastal Ridge and likely corresponds to solution features. The general NE-SW trend of the resistivity and porosity structure suggests a causal connection with the Pleistocene paleogeography and sedimentary environments.

  8. Sediment Plumes Resulting from the Port of Miami Dredging: Analysis and Interpretation Using Satellite Data and Long Term Monitoring Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, B. B.; Hu, C.; Kovach, C.; Silverstein, R. N.

    2016-02-01

    From November 2013 through mid-2015, large turbidity plumes were observed offshore the Port of Miami (Florida, USA), likely associated with a project to deepen and widen the Miami Harbor channels. Using data from local monitoring programs, however, it is difficult to estimate the size, duration, extent, and severity (relative to natural turbidity events) of these plumes. In contrast, satellite observing systems offer a platform from which these plumes can be monitored and placed in historical context. As such, turbidity plumes captured by MODIS (Aqua) and Landsat 8 reflectance data were manually outlined. For MODIS, these delineations were refined using reflectance anomaly thresholds, determined from pre-dredging data. Long term records of local environmental conditions were used to account for conditions (e.g., wind speed, tidal stage) for which elevated reflectance data might be expected in the absence of dredging. The spatial extent of turbidity plumes observed in the Port of Miami region during the dredging period ranged from 127 and 228 km2, at least 5 times that immediately prior to dredging. The frequency of observed plumes in satellite imagery increased from 23% to 84% after dredging began, while temporal differences in plume location, severity, and size were also observed. Turbidity plumes may have large adverse effects on coral communities, and this region is home to many species of coral (including some considered threatened by the US Endangered Species Act). Indeed, over 11 km2 of coral area was affected by these plumes, with some locations within plume delineations on nearly 40% of images. The approaches developed in this work, in particular the focus on historical norms after considering all perturbation factors, may be included in monitoring and assessment of this and future dredging activities, especially where fragile marine ecosystems may potentially be impacted.

  9. Hydrologic conditions in urban Miami-Dade County, Florida, and the effect of groundwater pumpage and increased sea level on canal leakage and regional groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2014-01-01

    The extensive and highly managed surface-water system in southeastern Florida constructed during the 20th Century has allowed for the westward expansion of urban and agricultural activities in Miami-Dade County. In urban areas of the county, the surface-water system is used to (1) control urban flooding, (2) supply recharge to production well fields, and (3) control seawater intrusion. Previous studies in Miami-Dade County have determined that on a local scale, leakage from canals adjacent to well fields can supply a large percentage (46 to 78 percent) of the total groundwater pumpage from production well fields. Canals in the urban areas also receive seepage from the Biscayne aquifer that is derived from a combination of local rainfall and groundwater flow from Water Conservation Area 3 and Everglades National Park, which are west of urban areas of Miami-Dade County.

  10. Characterization of the spatial distribution of porosity in the eogenetic karst Miami Limestone using ground penetrating radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; McClellan, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeologic characterization of karst limestone aquifers is difficult due to the variability in the spatial distribution of porosity and dissolution features. Typical methods for aquifer investigation, such as drilling and pump testing, are limited by the scale or spatial extent of the measurement. Hydrogeophysical techniques such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) can provide indirect measurements of aquifer properties and be expanded spatially beyond typical point measures. This investigation used a multiscale approach to identify and quantify porosity distribution in the Miami Limestone, the lithostratigraphic unit that composes the uppermost portions of the Biscayne Aquifer in Miami Dade County, Florida. At the meter scale, laboratory measures of porosity and dielectric permittivity were made on blocks of Miami Limestone using zero offset GPR, laboratory and digital image techniques. Results show good correspondence between GPR and analytical porosity estimates and show variability between 22 and 66 %. GPR measurements at the field scale 10-1000 m investigated the bulk porosity of the limestone based on the assumption that a directly measured water table would remain at a consistent depth in the GPR reflection record. Porosity variability determined from the changes in the depth to water table resulted in porosity values that ranged from 33 to 61 %, with the greatest porosity variability being attributed to the presence of dissolution features. At the larger field scales, 100 - 1000 m, fitting of hyperbolic diffractions in GPR common offsets determined the vertical and horizontal variability of porosity in the saturated subsurface. Results indicate that porosity can vary between 23 and 41 %, and delineate potential areas of enhanced recharge or groundwater / surface water interactions. This study shows porosity variability in the Miami Limestone can range from 22 to 66 % within 1.5 m distances, with areas of high macroporosity or karst dissolution features

  11. Sexual risk behaviours associated with unlicensed driving among young adults in Miami's electronic dance music nightclub scene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, Mance E; Kurtz, Steven P; Paul, Roddia J

    2017-11-01

    Literature indicates that unlicensed driving (UD) offenders report substance use risk behaviours, yet data related to sexual risk behaviours is unknown. This study examined sexual and other risk behaviours among young adults in Miami, Florida, comparing UD and non-UD offenders (n=498). Compared with others, UD offenders were more likely to report group sex history, being high for sex half the time or more, purchasing sex and sexually transmissible infection history. Results suggest that locating sexual risk reduction interventions inside of the justice system would benefit UD offenders.

  12. Ground-water flow directions and estimation of aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley aquifer system, Hamilton Area, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rodney A.; Bossenbroek, Karen E.

    2005-01-01

    The Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System is one of the most productive sources of potable water in the Midwest, yielding as much as 3,000 gallons per minute to wells. Many water-supply wells tapping this aquifer system are purposely placed near rivers to take advantage of induced infiltration from the rivers. The City of Hamilton's North Well Field consists of 10 wells near the Great Miami River, all completed in the lower Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. A well-drilling program and a multiple-well aquifer test were done to investigate ground-water flow directions and to estimate aquifer hydraulic properties in the lower part of the Great Miami River Buried Valley Aquifer System. Descriptions of lithology from 10 well borings indicate varying amounts and thickness of clay or till, and therefore, varying levels of potential aquifer confinement. Borings also indicate that the aquifer properties can change dramatically over relatively short distances. Grain-size analyses indicate an average bulk hydraulic conductivity value of aquifer materials of 240 feet per day; the geometric mean of hydraulic conductivity values of aquifer material was 89 feet per day. Median grain sizes of aquifer material and clay units were 1.3 millimeters and 0.1 millimeters, respectively. Water levels in the Hamilton North Well Field are affected by stream stage in the Great Miami River and barometric pressure. Bank storage in response to stream stage is evident. Results from a multiple-well aquifer test at the well field indicate, as do the lithologic descriptions, that the aquifer is semiconfined in some areas and unconfined in others. Transmissivity and storage coefficient of the semiconfined part of the aquifer were 50,000 feet squared per day and 5x10-4, respectively. The average hydraulic conductivity (450 feet per day) based on the aquifer test is reasonable for glacial outwash but is higher than calculated from grain-size analyses, implying a scale effect

  13. Des gentrifieurs mobilisés. Les associations de quartier du South End à Boston The mobilised gentrifiers. The neighbourhood associations of South End, Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Tissot

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cet article porte sur un processus de gentrification dans un quartier d’une grande agglomération des États-Unis, Boston. Il montre que ce processus n’a pas seulement résulté de l’évolution des forces du marché et du retour des capitaux dans les centres-villes, des politiques de rénovation urbaine et de transformations culturelles. La mobilisation collective des nouveaux propriétaires a eu un impact décisif, via les associations de quartier dans lesquelles ils se sont engagés depuis les années 1960.This article concerns the process of gentrification in a district of a large urban area in the United States, Boston. It shows that this process has resulted not only from the evolution of market forces and the return of wealth to the inner cities, urban renewal policies and cultural transformations. The collective mobilisation of new property owners has also had a decisive impact, via the neighbourhood associations in which they have been involved since the 1960s.

  14. The Customer is Always Right, Right?A Look at How Yelp Has Taken Hold of the Boston Restaurant Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Rachel DeSimone

    2015-01-01

    The Internet and mobile availability has changed the restaurant review game. Local Boston chefs and restaurant managers reflect on the pros and cons of such outlets, like Yelp, on their businesses and menus.

  15. The Customer is Always Right, Right?A Look at How Yelp Has Taken Hold of the Boston Restaurant Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel DeSimone

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Internet and mobile availability has changed the restaurant review game. Local Boston chefs and restaurant managers reflect on the pros and cons of such outlets, like Yelp, on their businesses and menus.

  16. Methane source identification in Boston, Massachusetts using isotopic and ethane measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Down, A.; Jackson, R. B.; Plata, D.; McKain, K.; Wofsy, S. C.; Rella, C.; Crosson, E.; Phillips, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Methane has substantial greenhouse warming potential and is the principle component of natural gas. Fugitive natural gas emissions could be a significant source of methane to the atmosphere. However, the cumulative magnitude of natural gas leaks is not yet well constrained. We used a combination of point source measurements and ambient monitoring to characterize the methane sources in the Boston urban area. We developed distinct fingerprints for natural gas and multiple biogenic methane sources based on hydrocarbon concentration and isotopic composition. We combine these data with periodic measurements of atmospheric methane and ethane concentration to estimate the fractional contribution of natural gas and biogenic methane sources to the cumulative urban methane flux in Boston. These results are used to inform an inverse model of urban methane concentration and emissions.

  17. Cumulative Exposure to Prior Collective Trauma and Acute Stress Responses to the Boston Marathon Bombings

    OpenAIRE

    Garfin, DR; Holman, EA; Silver, RC

    2015-01-01

    © The Author(s) 2015 The role of repeated exposure to collective trauma in explaining response to subsequent community-wide trauma is poorly understood. We examined the relationship between acute stress response to the 2013 Boston Marathon bombings and prior direct and indirect media-based exposure to three collective traumatic events: the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks, Superstorm Sandy, and the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Representative samples of residents of metrop...

  18. Media’s role in broadcasting acute stress following the Boston Marathon bombings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, E. Alison; Garfin, Dana Rose; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2014-01-01

    We compared the impact of media vs. direct exposure on acute stress response to collective trauma. We conducted an Internet-based survey following the Boston Marathon bombings between April 29 and May 13, 2013, with representative samples of residents from Boston (n = 846), New York City (n = 941), and the remainder of the United States (n = 2,888). Acute stress symptom scores were comparable in Boston and New York [regression coefficient (b) = 0.43; SE = 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), −2.36, 3.23], but lower nationwide when compared with Boston (b = −2.21; SE = 1.07; 95% CI, −4.31, −0.12). Adjusting for prebombing mental health (collected prospectively), demographics, and prior collective stress exposure, six or more daily hours of bombing-related media exposure in the week after the bombings was associated with higher acute stress than direct exposure to the bombings (continuous acute stress symptom total: media exposure b = 15.61 vs. direct exposure b = 5.69). Controlling for prospectively collected prebombing television-watching habits did not change the findings. In adjusted models, direct exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the Sandy Hook School shootings were both significantly associated with bombing-related acute stress; Superstorm Sandy exposure wasn't. Prior exposure to similar and/or violent events may render some individuals vulnerable to the negative effects of collective traumas. Repeatedly engaging with trauma-related media content for several hours daily shortly after collective trauma may prolong acute stress experiences and promote substantial stress-related symptomatology. Mass media may become a conduit that spreads negative consequences of community trauma beyond directly affected communities. PMID:24324161

  19. Media's role in broadcasting acute stress following the Boston Marathon bombings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, E Alison; Garfin, Dana Rose; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2014-01-07

    We compared the impact of media vs. direct exposure on acute stress response to collective trauma. We conducted an Internet-based survey following the Boston Marathon bombings between April 29 and May 13, 2013, with representative samples of residents from Boston (n = 846), New York City (n = 941), and the remainder of the United States (n = 2,888). Acute stress symptom scores were comparable in Boston and New York [regression coefficient (b) = 0.43; SE = 1.42; 95% confidence interval (CI), -2.36, 3.23], but lower nationwide when compared with Boston (b = -2.21; SE = 1.07; 95% CI, -4.31, -0.12). Adjusting for prebombing mental health (collected prospectively), demographics, and prior collective stress exposure, six or more daily hours of bombing-related media exposure in the week after the bombings was associated with higher acute stress than direct exposure to the bombings (continuous acute stress symptom total: media exposure b = 15.61 vs. direct exposure b = 5.69). Controlling for prospectively collected prebombing television-watching habits did not change the findings. In adjusted models, direct exposure to the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the Sandy Hook School shootings were both significantly associated with bombing-related acute stress; Superstorm Sandy exposure wasn't. Prior exposure to similar and/or violent events may render some individuals vulnerable to the negative effects of collective traumas. Repeatedly engaging with trauma-related media content for several hours daily shortly after collective trauma may prolong acute stress experiences and promote substantial stress-related symptomatology. Mass media may become a conduit that spreads negative consequences of community trauma beyond directly affected communities.

  20. Adjustment among children with relatives who participated in the manhunt following the Boston Marathon attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S; Kerns, Caroline E; Elkins, R Meredith; Edson, Aubrey L; Chou, Tommy; Dantowitz, Annie; Miguel, Elizabeth; Brown, Bonnie; Coxe, Stefany; Green, Jennifer Greif

    2014-07-01

    Following the Boston Marathon attack, the extraordinary interagency manhunt and shelter-in-place made for a truly unprecedented experience for area families. Although research on Boston youth has found robust associations between manhunt-related experiences and post-attack functioning, such work does little to identify the specific needs of a particularly vulnerable population--i.e., children with a relative who participated in the manhunt. Understanding the adjustment of these youth is critical for informing clinical efforts. Survey of Boston-area parents/caretakers (N = 460) reporting on their child's attack/manhunt-related experiences, as well as psychosocial functioning in the first six post-attack months; analyses compared youth with and without a relative in law enforcement or the armed services who participated in the manhunt. The proportion of youth with likely PTSD was 5.7 times higher among youth with relatives in the manhunt than among youth without. After accounting for child demographics, blast exposure, and children's own exposure to manhunt events (e.g., hearing/seeing gunfire/explosions, having officers enter/search home), having a relative in the manhunt significantly predicted child PTSD symptoms, emotional symptoms, and hyperactivity/inattention. Fear during the manhunt that a loved one could be hurt mediated relationships between having a relative in the manhunt and clinical outcomes; living within the zone of greatest manhunt activity did not moderate observed relationships. Children with relatives called upon to participate in the unprecedented interagency manhunt following the Boston Marathon attack carried a particularly heavy mental health burden. Continued research is needed to clarify the clinical needs of youth with relatives in high-risk occupations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Crisis communication: an inequalities perspective on the 2010 Boston water crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarce, Ezequiel M; Viswanath, K

    2012-12-01

    Although the field of crisis risk communication has generated substantial research, the interaction between social determinants, communication processes, and behavioral compliance has been less well studied. With the goal of better understanding these interactions, this report examines how social determinants influenced communications and behavioral compliance during the 2010 Boston, Massachusetts, water crisis. An online survey was conducted to assess Boston residents' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, mass and interpersonal communication, and preventive behaviors on emergency preparedness topics dealing with the water crisis. Of a total sample of 726 respondents, approximately one-third (n = 267) reported having been affected by the water crisis. Only data from affected participants were analyzed. Following an order to boil water, 87.5% of respondents refrained from drinking unboiled tap water. These behaviors and other cognitive and attitudinal factors, however, were not uniform across population subgroups. All communication and behavioral compliance variables varied across sociodemographic factors. Crisis communication, in conjunction with other public health preparedness fields, is central to reducing the negative impact of sudden hazards. Emergency scenarios such as the Boston water crisis serve as unique opportunities to understand how effectively crisis messages are conveyed to and received by different segments of the population.

  2. Mortality Among Homeless Adults in Boston: Shifts in Causes of Death Over a 15-year Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Travis P.; Hwang, Stephen W.; O'Connell, James J.; Porneala, Bianca C.; Stringfellow, Erin J.; Orav, E. John; Singer, Daniel E.; Rigotti, Nancy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Homeless persons experience excess mortality, but U.S.-based studies on this topic are outdated or lack information about causes of death. No studies have examined shifts in causes of death for this population over time. Methods We assessed all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates in a cohort of 28,033 adults aged 18 years or older who were seen at Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2008. Deaths were identified through probabilistic linkage to the Massachusetts death occurrence files. We compared mortality rates in this cohort to rates in the 2003–08 Massachusetts population and a 1988–93 cohort of homeless adults in Boston using standardized rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Results 1,302 deaths occurred during 90,450 person-years of observation. Drug overdose (n=219), cancer (n=206), and heart disease (n=203) were the major causes of death. Drug overdose accounted for one-third of deaths among adults homeless adults in Boston remains high and unchanged since 1988–93 despite a major interim expansion in clinical services. Drug overdose has replaced HIV as the emerging epidemic. Interventions to reduce mortality in this population should include behavioral health integration into primary medical care, public health initiatives to prevent and reverse drug overdose, and social policy measures to end homelessness. PMID:23318302

  3. Head and neck injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing at four hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Buch, Karen; Sung, Edward; Abujudeh, Hani; Sakai, Osamu; Aaron, Sodickson; Lev, Michael

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the imaging findings of head and neck injuries in patients from the Boston Marathon bombing. A total of 115 patients from the Boston Marathon bombing presenting to four hospitals who underwent imaging to evaluate for head and neck injuries were included in the study. Twelve patients with positive findings on radiography or cross-sectional imaging were included in the final analysis. The radiographic, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of these patients were evaluated for the presence of shrapnel and morphological abnormality. Head and neck injuries were seen in 12 out of 115 patients presenting to the four hospitals. There were secondary blast injuries to the head and neck in eight patients, indicated by the presence of shrapnel on imaging. In the four patients without shrapnel, there were two with subgaleal hematomas, one with facial contusion and one with mastoid injury. There were two patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, one with brain contusion, one with cerebral laceration, and one with globe rupture. There was frontal bone, nasal bone, and orbital wall fracture in one patient each. Imaging identified 26 shrapnel fragments, 21 of which were ball bearings. Injuries to the head and neck region identified on imaging from the Boston Marathon bombing were not common. The injuries seen were predominantly secondary blast injuries from shrapnel, and did not result in calvarial penetration of the shrapnel fragments.

  4. Helicopter electromagnetic survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitterman, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Prinos, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a helicopter electromagnetic survey flown over the Model Land Area in southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, to map saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer. The survey, which is located south and east of Florida City, Florida, covers an area of 115 square kilometers with a flight-line spacing of 400 meters. A five-frequency, horizontal, coplanar bird with frequencies ranging from 400 to 100,000 Hertz was used. The data were interpreted using differential resistivity analysis and inversion to produce cross sections and resistivity depth-slice maps. The depth of investigation is as deep as 100 meters in freshwater-saturated portions of the Biscayne aquifer and the depth diminishes to about 50 meters in areas that are intruded by saltwater. The results compare favorably with ground-based, time-domain electromagnetic soundings and induction logs from observation wells in the area. The base of a high-resistivity, freshwater-saturated zone mapped in the northern 2 kilometers of the survey area corresponds quite well with the base of the surficial aquifer that has been determined by drilling. In general, saltwater in the survey area extends 9 to 12 kilometers inland from the coast; however, there is a long nose of saltwater centered along the Card Sound Road Canal that extends 15 kilometers inland. The cause of this preferential intrusion is likely due to uncontrolled surface flow along the canal and subsequent leakage of saltwater into the aquifer. Saltwater also extends farther inland in the area between U.S. Highway 1 and Card Sound Road than it does to the west of this area. Until 1944, a railroad grade occupied the current location of U.S. Highway 1. Borrow ditches associated with the railroad grade connected to Barnes Sound and allowed saltwater to flow during droughts and storm surges to within a few kilometers of Florida City. Relicts of this saltwater that settled to the bottom of the Biscayne aquifer can be seen in the helicopter

  5. Contextualizing Earth Science Professional Development Courses for Geoscience Teachers in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R. F.; Pelletier, P.; Dorsen, J.; Douglas, E. M.; Pringle, M. S.; Karp, J.

    2009-12-01

    Inquiry-based, hands-on, graduate content courses have been developed specifically for Boston Public School middle school teachers of Earth Science. Earth Science I: Weather and Water and Earth Science II: The Solid Earth--Earth History and Planetary Systems have been taught a total of seven times to over 120 teachers. Several key attributes to these successful courses have been identified, including co-instruction by a university professor and a high school and a middle school teacher that are familiar with the Boston curriculum, use of hands-on activities that are closed related to those used in the Boston curriculum, pre- and post-course local field trips, and identification of key learning objectives for each day. This model of professional development was developed over several years in all disciplines (Earth Science, Physics, Biology, Chemistry) by the Boston Science Partnership (BSP), an NSF-funded Math Science Partnership program. One of the core strategies of the BSP is these Contextualized Content Courses (CCC), graduate level, lab-based courses taught at either UMass Boston or Northeastern University during summer intensive or semester formats. Two of the eleven courses developed under the grant are Earth Science I & II. This presentation shares the model of the CCC, the impact on teacher participants, the value of these courses for the professor, and lessons learned for successful professional development. Findings about the courses’ impact and effectiveness come from our external evaluation by the Program Evaluation Research Group (PERG). The combination of content and modeling good instructional practices have many positive outcomes for teachers, including increased self-efficacy in science understanding and teaching, positive impacts on student achievement, and teacher shifts from more traditional, more lecture-based instructional models to more inquiry approaches. STEM faculty members become involved in science education and learn and practice new

  6. New development on materials and techniques used in the heraldic designs of illuminated Manueline foral charters by multi-analytical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Gac, A.; Pessanha, S.; Longelin, S.; Guerra, M.; Frade, J.C.; Lourenço, F.; Serrano, M.C.; Manso, M.; Carvalho, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    In the illuminated foral charters commissioned by D. Manuel I, King of Portugal (1495–1521), heraldry played a prominent role. In this work, royal emblems corresponding to the third heraldic design, applied to the Charter of Couto de Teixedo, are studied by means of EDXRF, SEM–EDS, micro-Raman, micro-FTIR and HPLC–DAD to characterize the materials and techniques used to produce this masterpiece of Portuguese Renaissance. By comparing this data with the results previously obtained in other three charters, this research allows for the first time an accurate insight into the reformed manuscripts production, especially since the illuminated charters under consideration were all investigated on the basis of similar micro-spectroscopic techniques. Inks, metal coatings, pigments, organic dyes, fillers or extenders, and binding media are discussed, and their use enlightened by the politic and legal messages the foral charters had to convey. Parchment analysis allowed us to identify the animal species, and all undertaken processes along its preparation. HPLC–DAD allowed us to differentiate the gums used. CaSO 4 was observed in the parchment as a degradation product of CaCO 3 used in parchment production in the presence of metal sulfates coming from the ink. Pigments used in the different colors as well as some specific phases for some colors were identified. Silvering and gilding processes, metal caratage and silver oxidation compounds were also objects of the present study. - Highlights: • Complementary analytical techniques using portable XRF and molecular techniques were used for the complete characterization of Portuguese illuminated manuscripts. • A comparison between four Manueline foral charters was undertaken, providing an accurate insight into their heraldic designs and production. • Inks, pigments and some of their specific phases, organic dyes, fillers or extenders, and binding media are discussed. • Silvering and gilding processes, metal caratage

  7. Improved Outcomes with Computer-Assisted Instruction in Mathematics and English Language Skills for Hispanic Students in Need of Remedial Education at Miami Dade College, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, John

    2011-01-01

    In this study, 180 first-time-in-college (FTIC) students at Miami Dade College, Florida in need of remedial instruction in basic mathematics, reading, and sentence skills utilized the A[superscript +]dvancer[R] College Readiness Online software. Significant results were found with increased ACCUPLACER[R] scores; number of students who avoided at…

  8. "PCI Reading Program": The Final Report of a Three Year Experimental Study in Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby, Megan; Jaciw, Andrew; Ma, Boya; Lipton, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    PCI Education conducted a three-year longitudinal study to determine the comparative effectiveness of the "PCI Reading Program" ("PCI") for students with severe disabilities as implemented in Florida's Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. The primary question addressed by the study is whether students…

  9. The Efficacy of PCI's Reading Program--Level One: A Report of a Randomized Experiment in Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Research Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empirical Education Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    PCI Education sought scientifically based evidence on the effectiveness of the "PCI Reading Program--Level One" for students with severe disabilities. During the 2007-2008 academic year. Empirical Education conducted a randomized control trial (RCT) in two Florida districts, Brevard and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. For this…

  10. The Efficacy of PCI's "Reading Program--Level One": A Report of a Randomized Experiment in Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toby, Megan; Ma, Boya; Jaciw, Andrew; Cabalo, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    PCI Education sought scientifically based evidence on the effectiveness of the "PCI Reading Program--Level One" for students with severe disabilities. During the 2007-2008 academic year. Empirical Education conducted a randomized control trial (RCT) in two Florida districts, Brevard and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. For this…

  11. HERALD, a programme enumerating the radiation doses to the population following the release of radioactive gases and aerosols into the atmosphere after a nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veverka, O.

    1986-01-01

    Program HERALD computes radiation doses to the population following an accident of a fission nuclear reactor, the destruction of the primary coolant circuit (LOCA), etc. The program was written with the intention to obtain a tool which would enable the user to follow numerically a radioactive cloud, its physical behaviour and its consequences up to extremely long distances of several thousands kilometres. Therefore the usual model of Gaussian distribution was avoided and the considerably simpler ''box model'' was chosen. This can be replaced by the ''semi-box model''. The fallout velocity of gases and particles is calculated using a simple model including the dependence on the Pasquillian stability class and on the local surface roughness. So is the scavenging coefficient for gases and particles, removed by either rainfalls, or snowfall or fogs. It is possible to employ corresponding empirical data. The program utilizes an ample data library holding nuclear data for approximately 500 fission products in 121 decay chains of at most 10 members, the corresponding dose factors for external gamma and beta irradiation from the cloud and the surface and from the inhaled and ingested radionuclides (ICRP-30). This library is now being extended to approximately 1,200 nuclides (products of activation, fission products and fuels including transuranium elements) for the purposes of normal operation and of heavy accidents. The program is written in standard language FORTRAN IV and is run on computer M 4030-1. (author) 5 figs., 34 tabs., 26 refs

  12. Occurrence and potential transport of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds from wastewater-treatment plant influent and effluent to groundwater and canal systems in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    An increased demand for fresh groundwater resources in South Florida has prompted Miami-Dade County to expand its water reclamation program and actively pursue reuse plans for aquifer recharge, irrigation, and wetland rehydration. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD) and the Miami-Dade Department of Environmental Resources Management (DERM), initiated a study in 2008 to assess the presence of selected pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater compounds in the influent and effluent at three regional wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs) operated by the WASD and at one WWTP operated by the City of Homestead, Florida (HSWWTP).

  13. Surface wave site characterization at 27 locations near Boston, Massachusetts, including 2 strong-motion stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Eric M.; Carkin, Bradley A.; Baise, Laurie G.; Kayen, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The geotechnical properties of the soils in and around Boston, Massachusetts, have been extensively studied. This is partly due to the importance of the Boston Blue Clay and the extent of landfill in the Boston area. Although New England is not a region that is typically associated with seismic hazards, there have been several historical earthquakes that have caused significant ground shaking (for example, see Street and Lacroix, 1979; Ebel, 1996; Ebel, 2006). The possibility of strong ground shaking, along with heightened vulnerability from unreinforced masonry buildings, motivates further investigation of seismic hazards throughout New England. Important studies that are pertinent to seismic hazards in New England include source-parameter studies (Somerville and others, 1987; Boore and others, 2010), wave-propagation studies (Frankel, 1991; Viegas and others, 2010), empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPE) for computing ground-motion intensity (Tavakoli and Pezeshk, 2005; Atkinson and Boore, 2006), site-response studies (Hayles and others, 2001; Ebel and Kim, 2006), and liquefaction studies (Brankman and Baise, 2008). The shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles collected for this report are pertinent to the GMPE, site response, and liquefaction aspects of seismic hazards in the greater Boston area. Besides the application of these data for the Boston region, the data may be applicable throughout New England, through correlations with geologic units (similar to Ebel and Kim, 2006) or correlations with topographic slope (Wald and Allen, 2007), because few VS measurements are available in stable tectonic regions.Ebel and Hart (2001) used felt earthquake reports to infer amplification patterns throughout the greater Boston region and noted spatial correspondence with the dominant period and amplification factors obtained from ambient noise (horizontal-to-vertical ratios) by Kummer (1998). Britton (2003) compiled geotechnical borings in the area and produced a

  14. A new spin on research translation: the Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica W; Scammell, Madeleine Kangsen; Altman, Rebecca Gasior; Webster, Thomas F; Ozonoff, David M

    2009-04-01

    Translating research to make it more understandable and effective (research translation) has been declared a priority in environmental health but does not always include communication to the public or residents of communities affected by environmental hazards. Their unique perspectives are also commonly missing from discussions about science and technology policy. The consensus conference process, developed in Denmark, offers a way to address this gap. The Boston Consensus Conference on Human Biomonitoring, held in Boston, Massachusetts, in the fall of 2006, was designed to educate and elicit input from 15 Boston-area residents on the scientifically complex topic of human biomonitoring for environmental chemicals. This lay panel considered the many ethical, legal, and scientific issues surrounding biomonitoring and prepared a report expressing their views. The lay panel's findings provide a distinct and important voice on the expanding use of biomonitoring. In some cases, such as a call for opt-in reporting of biomonitoring results to study participants, they mirror recommendations raised elsewhere. Other conclusions have not been heard previously, including the recommendation that an individual's results should be statutorily exempted from the medical record unless permission is granted, and the opportunity to use biomonitoring data to stimulate green chemistry. The consensus conference model addresses both aspects of a broader conception of research translation: engaging the public in scientific questions, and bringing their unique perspectives to bear on public health research, practice, and policy. In this specific application, a lay panel's recommendations on biomonitoring surveillance, communication, and ethics have practical implications for the conduct of biomonitoring studies and surveillance programs.

  15. A Secondary Spatial Analysis of Gun Violence near Boston Schools: a Public Health Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Gia

    2018-04-11

    School neighborhood violence continues to be a major public health problem among urban students. A large body of research addresses violence at school; however, fewer studies have explored concentrations of violence in areas proximal to schools. This study aimed to quantify the concentration of shootings near schools to elucidate the place-based dynamics that may be focal points for violence prevention. Geocoded databases of shooting and school locations were used to examine locational patterns of firearm shootings and elementary, middle, and high schools in Boston, Massachusetts. Analyses utilized spatial statistics for point pattern data including distance matrix and K function methodology to quantify the degree of spatial dependence of shootings around schools. Results suggested that between 2012 and 2015, there were 678 shooting incidents in Boston; the average density was 5.1 per square kilometer. The nearest neighbor index (NNI = 0.335 km, p shooting incidents indicative of a spatially non-random process. The mean and median distance from any school to the nearest shooting location was 0.35 and 0.33 km, respectively. A majority (56%, 74/133) of schools in Boston had at least one shooting incident within 400 m, a distance that would take about 5 min to walk if traveling by foot. The bivariate K function indicated that a significantly greater number of shootings were clustered within short distances from schools than would be expected under a null hypothesis of no spatial dependence. Implications for students attending schools in racially homogenous neighborhoods across all income levels are discussed.

  16. Application of Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis on operational development and evaluations of hospital development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Z-Q; Shi, A-M

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the application of Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis on operational development and evaluations of hospital departments. We selected 73 clinical and medical technology departments of our hospital from 2011 to 2013, and evaluated our hospital by Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis according to the volume of services, medical quality, work efficiency, patients' evaluations, development capacity, operational capability, economic benefits, comprehensive evaluation of hospital achievement, innovation ability of hospital, influence of hospital, human resources of hospital, health insurance costs, etc. It was found that among clinical departments, there were 11 in Stars (22.4%), 17 in cash cow (34.7%), 15 in question marks (31.2%), 6 Dogs (12.2%), 16 in the youth stage of life cycle assessment (27.6%), 14 in the prime stage (24.1%), 12 in the stationary stage (20.7%), 9 in the aristocracy stage (15.5%) and 7 in the recession stage (12.1%). Among medical technology departments, there were 5 in Stars (20.8%), 1 in Cash cow (4.2%), 10 in question marks (41.6%), 8 Dogs (29.1%), 9 in the youth stage of life cycle assessment (37.5%), 4 in the prime stage (16.7%), 4 in the stable stage (16.7%), 1 in the aristocracy stage (4.2%) and 6 in the recession stage (25%). In conclusion, Boston matrix combined with SWOT analysis is suitable for operational development and comprehensive evaluations of hospital development, and it plays an important role in providing hospitals with development strategies.

  17. Public health assessment for Munisport landfill, North Miami, Dade County, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD084535442. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Munisport Landfill site is an inactive landfill in, and owned by, the City of North Miami, Florida. The site is an urban area adjacent to the Oleta River Recreational Area, a state mangrove preserve, and Biscayne Bay. Soil, sediments, surface water, and ground water are contaminated. The authors selected ammonia, benzene, di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, carbon disulfide, chloromethane, coliform bacteria, dieldrin, lead, methylene chloride, pentachlorophenol, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), styrene, vanadium, and zinc as contaminants of concern. Accidentally ingesting contaminated soil and surface water, and breathing contaminated smoke are completed human exposure pathways. Children who swam in the landfill lakes risked bacterial and viral infections. Based on the available data, the authors categorize the Munisport Landfill site as an indeterminate public health hazard

  18. Caffeine and Insomnia in People Living With HIV From the Miami Adult Studies on HIV (MASH) Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Venkataraghavan; Campa, Adriana; Rubens, Muni; Martinez, Sabrina S; Fleetwood, Christina; Stewart, Tiffanie; Liuzzi, Juan P; George, Florence; Khan, Hafiz; Li, Yinghui; Baum, Marianna K

    We explored the relationship between caffeine consumption, insomnia, and HIV disease progression (CD4+ T cell counts and HIV viral loads). Caffeine intake and insomnia levels were measured using the Modified Caffeine Consumption Questionnaire and the Pittsburgh Insomnia Rating Scale (PIRS) in 130 clinically stable participants who were living with HIV, taking antiretroviral therapy, and recruited from the Miami Adult Studies on HIV cohort. Linear regressions showed that caffeine consumption was significantly and adversely associated with distress score, quality-of-life score, and global PIRS score. Linear regression analyses also showed that global PIRS score was significantly associated with lower CD4+ T cell counts and higher HIV viral loads. Caffeine could have precipitated insomnia in susceptible people living with HIV, which could be detrimental to their disease progression states. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental Aspects of Sites Like America's Stonehenge, (AS), Florida's Miami Tequesta Site, and Lowell's A.D. 1069

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, Michael Ann; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2002-04-01

    Subtle ``instrumentation" is often unnoticed. Stone-chamber transponder-receivers are principle and secondary wave detectors, part of the ``technologic" arsenal of men like Passaconaway/Metacomen of colonial-era Massachusetts, or the earthquake-predicting Shawnee Tecumseh of the Ohio Valley region, during 1811-1813. An Ohio stone-effigy ``serpent" is a thunderstorm precursor signal indicator. The Hopi require similar ``equipment," when duping gullible ``rain-dance" patrons. Tornado/waterspout activity is documented right in the Tequesta site at the river in Miami, Florida, which generates detectable signals. Columbus could have used similar ``secret sacred science" previously learned from American Indians, and thereby successfully predicted an anomalous hurricane on a subsequent trip. These, and the Hawaiian volcano goddess Pelee, seem to be a mythic equivalent of electromagnetically generated signals, i.e., a metaphor for ``environmental applied physics" we detect at A.S.

  20. Analysis of water quality and circulation of four recreational Miami beaches through the use of Lagrangian Coherent Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, L A; Olascoaga, M J; Reniers, A

    2014-06-15

    Four popular, recreational beaches in Miami, FL are Hobie Beach, Virginia Key Beach, Crandon Park Beach, and Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park. While all of the beaches are within a few miles of each other in Biscayne Bay, they have greatly differing water qualities, as determined by the testing for fecal indicator bacteria performed by the Florida Department of Health. Using the geodesic theory of transport barriers, we identify Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCSs) in each area. We show how these material curves, which shape circulation and mixing patterns, can be used to explain the incongruous states of the water at beaches that should be comparable. The LCSs are computed using a hydrodynamic model and verified through field experimentation at each beach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The air quality impacts of road closures associated with the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clougherty Jane E

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Democratic National Convention (DNC in Boston, Massachusetts in 2004 provided an opportunity to evaluate the impacts of a localized and short-term but potentially significant change in traffic patterns on air quality, and to determine the optimal monitoring approach to address events of this nature. It was anticipated that the road closures associated with the DNC would both influence the overall air pollution level and the distribution of concentrations across the city, through shifts in traffic patterns. Methods To capture these effects, we placed passive nitrogen dioxide badges at 40 sites around metropolitan Boston before, during, and after the DNC, with the goal of capturing the array of hypothesized impacts. In addition, we continuously measured elemental carbon at three sites, and gathered continuous air pollution data from US EPA fixed-site monitors and traffic count data from the Massachusetts Highway Department. Results There were significant reductions in traffic volume on the highway with closures north of Boston, with relatively little change along other highways, indicating a more isolated traffic reduction rather than an across-the-board decrease. For our nitrogen dioxide samples, while there was a relatively small change in mean concentrations, there was significant heterogeneity across sites, which corresponded with our a priori classifications of road segments. The median ratio of nitrogen dioxide concentrations during the DNC relative to non-DNC sampling periods was 0.58 at sites with hypothesized traffic reductions, versus 0.88 for sites with no changes hypothesized and 1.15 for sites with hypothesized traffic increases. Continuous monitors measured slightly lower concentrations of elemental carbon and nitrogen dioxide during road closure periods at monitors proximate to closed highway segments, but not for PM2.5 or further from major highways. Conclusion We conclude that there was a small but

  2. Complicated and messy politics of inclusion: Michfest and the Boston Dyke March.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigilio, Jo

    2016-01-01

    To illustrate the challenge of political organizing that grapples with identity politics and inclusion, I focus on two women-centered annual events with very different politics of inclusion: the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival and the Boston Dyke March. (1) arguments made by marginalized people for inclusion into established oppressed identity groups must be constructed with due care to avoid further marginalizing yet other liminal identities; (2) protesting/boycotting other oppressed groups for the purpose of achieving inclusion is often a problematic strategy; (3) the most effective strategy for honoring all people is to support organizations committed to the ideal of inclusion.

  3. Parkways und Freeways in der Bestimmung der Landschaft der Amerikanischen Grossstaedte. Der Fall Boston.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Maria Brignoli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Die Tradition der amerikanischen Landschaftarchitektur hatt aus Boston ein Planungsexperiment gemacht. Das Emerald Necklace, eine echte Ikone der Landschaftsarchitektur, bezeugt immer noch wirkungsvoll, wie die Landschaftsplanung die Struktur moderner Grossstaedte mit Raum zum wohnen staerken kann. Heute muss die Stadt mit ihren von der Central Artery hervorgerufenen Wunden fertigwerden, mit Risultaten, die wahrscheinlich nicht der Groesse ihrer Geschichte entsprechen. Der teilweise Erfolg der Rose Kennedy Greenway macht die Notwendigkeit klar, die Regelung fuer die Planung der offenen Gebiete neu zu bestimmen.

  4. The BCG (Boston Consulting Group) matrix for management of periodic publications

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano Gallardo, Mª del Pilar; Arroyo Gordo, Mª Pilar; Giménez Maroto, Ana Mª

    2005-01-01

    El marketing documental se ha de encargar de satisfacer las necesidades informativas de los usuarios de forma rentable para ellos y para el centro; para ello se ha de partir de un conjunto de herramientas técnicas que se conocen como el Marketing - Mix, y que abarcan el Producto, el Precio, la Distribución y la Comunicación. Dentro de las herramientas destinadas al producto se encuentra la matriz BCG (Boston Consulting Group), que está orientada a gestión, sobre la base de la situación del pr...

  5. Environmental injustice and flood risk: A conceptual model and case comparison of metropolitan Miami and Houston, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Timothy W; Grineski, Sara E; Chakraborty, Jayajit

    2018-02-01

    This article outlines a conceptual model and comparatively applies it to results from environmental justice (EJ) studies of flood risk in the Miami, Florida, and Houston, Texas, metropolitan areas. In contrast to most EJ studies of air pollution, which have found that socially-vulnerable groups experience disproportionate risk, distributive EJ studies of flooding reveal inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between social vulnerability and flood exposure. Counterintuitively (from a conventional EJ perspective), some pre-flood EJ studies have found that socially-advantaged people experience the highest residential exposure to flood risks. To integrate those anomalous findings within an EJ perspective, our conceptual model focuses on (1) the differential capacities of social groups to deploy/access protective resources for reducing the threat of loss, even while they reside amid flood-prone environments, and (2) both flood hazards and water-based benefits. Application of this model in Miami reveals that environmental injustices materialize as socially-privileged groups expose themselves to residential flood risks by seeking coastal amenities, as the costs of mitigating risks are conveyed to the broader public; in the process, socially-vulnerable residents are relegated to areas with air pollution and/or inland flood risks, where they experience constrained access to protective resources and coastal amenities. Findings from Houston better align with conventional EJ expectations-with flood zones disproportionately inhabited by socially-vulnerable people-because many coastal lands there are used by petrochemical industries, which produce major residential-environmental disamenities . Results underscore the need to consider protective resources and locational benefits in future empirical research on the EJ implications of flood hazards.

  6. Low Oxygen Modulates Multiple Signaling Pathways, Increasing Self-Renewal, While Decreasing Differentiation, Senescence, and Apoptosis in Stromal MIAMI Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Carmen; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Curtis, Kevin M.; Delcroix, Gaëtan J.-R.; Gomez, Lourdes A.; El Hokayem, Jimmy; Rieger, Megan; Parrondo, Ricardo; de las Pozas, Alicia; Perez-Stable, Carlos; Howard, Guy A.

    2016-01-01

    Human bone marrow multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) number decreases with aging. Subpopulations of hMSCs can differentiate into cells found in bone, vasculature, cartilage, gut, and other tissues and participate in their repair. Maintaining throughout adult life such cell subpopulations should help prevent or delay the onset of age-related degenerative conditions. Low oxygen tension, the physiological environment in progenitor cell-rich regions of the bone marrow microarchitecture, stimulates the self-renewal of marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells and expression of Sox2, Nanog, Oct4a nuclear accumulation, Notch intracellular domain, notch target genes, neuronal transcriptional repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), and additionally, by decreasing the expression of (i) the proapoptotic proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and Bak, and (ii) senescence-associated p53 expression and β-galactosidase activity. Furthermore, low oxygen increases canonical Wnt pathway signaling coreceptor Lrp5 expression, and PI3K/Akt pathway activation. Lrp5 inhibition decreases self-renewal marker Sox2 mRNA, Oct4a nuclear accumulation, and cell numbers. Wortmannin-mediated PI3K/Akt pathway inhibition leads to increased osteoblastic differentiation at both low and high oxygen tension. We demonstrate that low oxygen stimulates a complex signaling network involving PI3K/Akt, Notch, and canonical Wnt pathways, which mediate the observed increase in nuclear Oct4a and REST, with simultaneous decrease in p53, AIF, and Bak. Collectively, these pathway activations contribute to increased self-renewal with concomitant decreased differentiation, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and/or senescence in MIAMI cells. Importantly, the PI3K/Akt pathway plays a central mechanistic role in the oxygen tension-regulated self-renewal versus osteoblastic differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:27059084

  7. The energy efficiency partnership - Kraft General Foods and Boston Edison Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowley, J.C.; Donoghue, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    During the past twenty years, inordinate shifts in the supply and demand of energy have forced both electric utility companies and their customers to investigate new and innovative ways to satisfy the ever increasing demand for electricity. The Energy Efficiency Partnership, developed between Kraft General Foods and Boston Edison Company, presents an exemplary study of how two corporate giants creatively solved the problem of uncontrolled energy costs and its positive effect on the overall operations of Kraft General Foods, Framingham. But the Energy Efficiency Partnership did more than reduce energy costs, it provided benefits to all parties on the playing field. To understand its significance, a review of the partnership's history is paramount. The first official announcement of the Energy Efficiency Partnership was made on April 9, 1990. Framingham, MA, The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Kraft General Foods Framingham, and Boston Edison Company have joined forces in a $3.6 million dollar energy partnership that will help keep 250 industrial jobs in Massachusetts and could lead to the future expansion of the international food company's Framingham facility

  8. Adsorption behavior of ammonium by a bioadsorbent - Boston ivy leaf powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiwei Liu; Yuanhua Dong; Haiyun Wang; Yun Liu

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of ammonium ions from aqueous solution by a novel bioadsorbent,the Boston ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) leaf powder (BPTL) were investigated.The SEM images and FT-IR spectra were used to characterize BPTL.The mathematical models were used to analyze the adsorption kinetics and isotherms.The optimum pH range for ammonium adsorption by BPTL was found to be 5-10.The adsorption reached equilibrium at 14 hr,and the kinetic data were well fitted by the Logistic model.The intraparticle diffusion was the main rate-controlling step of the adsorption process.The high temperature was favorableto the ammonium adsorption by BPTL,indicating that the adsorption was endothermic.The adsorption equilibrium fitted well to both the Langrnuir model and Freundlich model,and the maximum monolayer adsorption capacities calculated from Langmuir model were 3.37,5.28 and 6.59 mg N/g at 15,25 and 35℃,respectively,which were comparable to those by reported minerals.Both the separation factor (RL) from the Langmuir model and Freundlich exponent (n) suggested that the ammonium adsorption by BPTL was favorable.Therefore,the Boston ivy leaf powder could be considered a novel bioadsorbent for ammonium removal from aqueous solution.

  9. Imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Sodickson, Aaron; Abujudeh, Hani

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the imaging findings of abdominal and pelvic injuries in victims of the Boston Marathon bombing. A retrospective review of 87 patients following the Boston Marathon bombing was performed to evaluate for abdominal and pelvic injuries on plain radiography or CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis. Imaging exams were evaluated for shrapnel, soft tissue injury, visceral damage, vascular disruption, and fractures. The injuries were classified as primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries. Eleven of the 87 patients had positive findings in the abdomen or pelvis (M:F = 7:4, average age 34.6 years). There were 22 ball bearings, two nails, one screw, and two irregular metal fragments in the 11 patients with secondary blast (shrapnel) injuries. There was no peritoneal penetration or visceral injury seen in any of the patients. One patient had multiple transverse process fractures, representing tertiary blast injury. All but one patient had superficial penetrating abdominal or pelvic injuries secondary to shrapnel. There were no cases of bowel or solid visceral organ injuries due to the lack of peritoneal violation from the relatively low-powered explosions. Absence of peritoneal penetration by shrapnel indicates no need for laparotomy following low-powered explosions.

  10. Radiologic features of injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing at three hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Goralnick, Eric; Velmahos, George; Biddinger, Paul D; Gates, Jonathan; Sodickson, Aaron

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the radiologic imaging findings of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries in patients injured in the Boston Marathon bombing on April 15, 2013. A total of 43 patients presenting to three acute care hospitals and undergoing radiologic investigation within 7 hours of the time of the bombing on April 15, 2013, were included in this study. The radiographic and CT features of these patients were evaluated for imaging findings consistent with primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury. There were no pulmonary or gastrointestinal manifestations of the primary blast wave on imaging. Secondary blast injuries identified on imaging included a total of 189 shrapnel fragments identified in 32 of the 43 patients. The shrapnel was identified most often in the soft tissues of the leg (36.5%), thigh (31.2%), and pelvis (13.2%). Imaging identified 125 ball bearings, 10 nails, one screw, 44 metal fragments, and nine other (gravel, glass, etc.) foreign bodies. Injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing were predominantly from the secondary blast wave and resulted in traumatic injuries predominantly of the lower extremities. The most common shrapnel found on radiologic evaluation was the ball bearing.

  11. Methane Emissions from Natural Gas in the Urban Region of Boston, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKain, K.; Down, A.; Raciti, S. M.; Budney, J.; Hutyra, L.; Floerchinger, C. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Nehrkorn, T.; Jackson, R. B.; Phillips, N. G.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    Methane emissions from the natural gas supply chain must be quantified to assess environmental impacts of natural gas and to develop emission reduction strategies. We report natural gas emission rates for one year in the urban region of Boston, MA, using an atmospheric measurement and modeling framework. Continuous methane observations from four stations are combined with a high-resolution transport model to quantify the regional average emission rate, 20.6 ± 1.7 (95 % CI) g CH4 m-2 yr-1. Simultaneous observations of atmospheric ethane, compared with the ethane to methane ratio in pipeline gas, demonstrate that natural gas accounted for 58 - 100 % of methane emissions, depending on season. Using government statistics and geospatial data on energy consumption, we estimate the fractional loss rate to the atmosphere from all downstream components of the natural gas system, including transmission, distribution, and end-use, was 2.9 ± 0.3 % in the Boston urban region, compared to 1.1 % inferred by the Massachusetts greenhouse gas inventory.

  12. "The reflection of England's light": the instructive District Nursing Association of Boston, 1884-1914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howse, Carrie

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which the Instructive District Nursing Association (IDNA) of Boston was influenced by the English system of district nursing. The schemes had the same aims and motivation, but the differences in their organizational structures, in particular the lack of specialist training and professional supervision of the Boston nurses, affected the IDNA's work with its poor, mainly immigrant patients. It is clear that much was achieved, but it is also apparent that problems increased as the work expanded. Attempts to solve these difficulties can be traced through the introduction of a nurse supervisor, establishment of a training school, and eventual radical reorganization. The IDNA also had a leading role in the expansion of the visiting nurse movement throughout the United States. I discuss attempts to establish national standards, particularly through the formation of the National Organization for Public Health Nursing (NOPHN). With the disparate arrangements in the U.S. health care system, the NOPHN was unable to reach a workable consensus and failed to produce a comprehensive and cohesive national system similar to that which had been established in England.

  13. Innovations in nutrition education and global health: the Bangalore Boston nutrition collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background India has a wide range of nutrition and health problems which require professionals with appropriate skills, knowledge and trans-disciplinary collaborative abilities to influence policy making at the national and global level. Methods The Bangalore Boston Nutrition Collaborative (BBNC) was established as collaboration between St. John’s Research Institute (SJRI), Harvard School of Public Health and Tufts University, with a focus on nutrition research and training. The goals of the BBNC were to conduct an interdisciplinary course, develop web-based courses and identify promising Indian students and junior faculty for graduate training in Boston. Results From 2010, an annual two-week short course in nutrition research methods was conducted on the SJRI campus taught by international faculty from Indian and US universities. More than 100 students applied yearly for approximately 30 positions. The course had didactic lectures in the morning and practical hands-on sessions in the afternoon. Student rating of the course was excellent and consistent across the years. The ratings on the design and conduct of the course significantly improved (p nutrition and global health. Efforts are ongoing to secure long term funding to sustain and expand this collaboration to deliver high quality nutrition and global health education enabled by information and communication technologies. PMID:24400811

  14. Self-reported illness among Boston-area international travelers: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin H.; Han, Pauline V.; Wilson, Mary E.; Stoney, Rhett J.; Jentes, Emily S.; Benoit, Christine; Ooi, Winnie W.; Barnett, Elizabeth D.; Hamer, Davidson H.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The Boston Area Travel Medicine Network surveyed travelers on travel-related health problems. Methods Travelers were recruited 2009–2011 during pre-travel consultation at three clinics. The investigation included pre-travel data, weekly during-travel diaries, and a post-travel questionnaire. We analyzed demographics, trip characteristics, health problems experienced, and assessed the relationship between influenza vaccination, influenza prevention advice, and respiratory symptoms. Results Of 987 enrolled travelers, 628 (64%) completed all surveys, of which 400 (64%) reported health problems during and/or after travel; median trip duration was 12 days. Diarrhea affected the most people during travel (172) while runny/stuffy nose affected the most people after travel (95). Of those with health problems during travel, 25% stopped or altered plans; 1% were hospitalized. After travel, 21% stopped planned activities, 23% sought physician or other health advice; one traveler was hospitalized. Travelers who received influenza vaccination and influenza prevention advice had lower rates of respiratory symptoms than those that received influenza prevention advice alone (18% vs 28%, P = 0.03). Conclusions A large proportion of Boston-area travelers reported health problems despite pre-travel consultation, resulting in inconveniences. The combination of influenza prevention advice and influenza immunization was associated with fewer respiratory symptoms than those who received influenza prevention advice alone. PMID:27687076

  15. CALIBRATION/VALIDATION OF LANDSAT-DERIVED OCEAN COLOUR PRODUCTS IN BOSTON HARBOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pahlevan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Landsat data archive provides a unique opportunity to investigate the long-term evolution of coastal ecosystems at fine spatial scales that cannot be resolved by ocean colour (OC satellite sensors. Recognizing Landsat’s limitations in applications over coastal waters, we have launched a series of field campaigns in Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay (MA, USA to validate OC products derived from Landsat-8. We will provide a preliminary demonstration on the calibration/validation of the existing OC algorithms (atmospheric correction and in-water optical properties to enhance monitoring efforts in Boston Harbor. To do so, Landsat optical images were first compared against ocean colour products over high-latitude regions. The in situ cruise data, including optical data (remote sensing reflectance and water samples were analyzed to obtain insights into the optical and biogeochemical properties of near-surface waters. Along with the cruise data, three buoys were deployed in three locations across the Harbor to complement our database of concentrations of chlorophyll a, total suspended solids (TSS, and absorption of colour dissolved organic matter (CDOM. The data collected during the first year of the project are used to develop and/or tune OC algorithms. The data will be combined with historic field data to map in-water constituents back to the early 1990’s. This paper presents preliminary analysis of some of the data collected under Landsat-8 overpasses.

  16. Methane emissions from natural gas infrastructure and use in the urban region of Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKain, Kathryn; Down, Adrian; Raciti, Steve M; Budney, John; Hutyra, Lucy R; Floerchinger, Cody; Herndon, Scott C; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Zahniser, Mark S; Jackson, Robert B; Phillips, Nathan; Wofsy, Steven C

    2015-02-17

    Methane emissions from natural gas delivery and end use must be quantified to evaluate the environmental impacts of natural gas and to develop and assess the efficacy of emission reduction strategies. We report natural gas emission rates for 1 y in the urban region of Boston, using a comprehensive atmospheric measurement and modeling framework. Continuous methane observations from four stations are combined with a high-resolution transport model to quantify the regional average emission flux, 18.5 ± 3.7 (95% confidence interval) g CH4 ⋅ m(-2) ⋅ y(-1). Simultaneous observations of atmospheric ethane, compared with the ethane-to-methane ratio in the pipeline gas delivered to the region, demonstrate that natural gas accounted for ∼ 60-100% of methane emissions, depending on season. Using government statistics and geospatial data on natural gas use, we find the average fractional loss rate to the atmosphere from all downstream components of the natural gas system, including transmission, distribution, and end use, was 2.7 ± 0.6% in the Boston urban region, with little seasonal variability. This fraction is notably higher than the 1.1% implied by the most closely comparable emission inventory.

  17. Emergency medical consequence planning and management for national special security events after September 11: Boston 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kade, Kristy A; Brinsfield, Kathryn H; Serino, Richard A; Savoia, Elena; Koh, Howard K

    2008-10-01

    The post-September 11 era has prompted unprecedented attention to medical preparations for national special security events (NSSE), requiring extraordinary planning and coordination among federal, state, and local agencies. For an NSSE, the US Secret Service (USSS) serves as the lead agency for all security operations and coordinates with relevant partners to provide for the safety and welfare of participants. For the 2004 Democratic National Convention (DNC), designated an NSSE, the USSS tasked the Boston Emergency Medical Services (BEMS) of the Boston Public Health Commission with the design and implementation of health services related to the Convention. In this article, we describe the planning and development of BEMS' robust 2004 DNC Medical Consequence Management Plan, addressing the following activities: public health surveillance, on-site medical care, surge capacity in the event of a mass casualty incident, and management of federal response assets. Lessons learned from enhanced medical planning for the 2004 DNC may serve as an effective model for future mass gathering events.

  18. The Relationship Between Neighborhood Socioeconomic Characteristics and Physical Inactivity Among Adolescents Living in Boston, Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Beth E.; Cradock, Angie; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to determine whether the socioeconomic environment was associated with no participation in physical activity among adolescents in Boston, Massachusetts. Methods. We used cross-sectional data from 1878 urban adolescents living in 38 neighborhoods who participated in the 2008 Boston Youth Survey, a biennial survey of high school students (aged 14–19 years). We used multilevel multiple regression models to determine the association between neighborhood-level exposures of economic deprivation, social fragmentation, social cohesion, danger and disorder, and students’ reports of no participation in physical activity in the previous week. Results. High social fragmentation within the residential neighborhood was associated with an increased likelihood of being inactive (odds ratio = 1.53; 95% confidence interval = 1.14, 2.05). No other neighborhood exposures were associated with physical inactivity. Conclusions. Social fragmentation might be an important correlate of physical inactivity among youths living in urban settings. Interventions might be needed to assist youths living in unstable neighborhoods to be physically active. PMID:25211727

  19. Outages of electric power supply resulting from cable failures Boston Edison Company system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Factual data are provided regarding 5 electric power supply interruptions that occurred in the Boston Metropolitan area during April to June, 1979. Common to all of these outages was the failure of an underground cable as the initiating event, followed by multiple equipment failures. There was significant variation in the voltage ratings and types of cables which failed. The investigation was unable to delineate a single specific Boston Edison design operating or maintenance practice that could be cited as the cause of the outages. After reviewing the investigative report the following actions were recommended: the development and implementation of a plan to eliminate the direct current cable network; develop a network outage restoration plan; regroup primary feeder cables wherever possible to minimize the number of circuits in manholes, and to separate feeders to high load density areas; develop a program to detect incipient cable faults; evaluate the separation of the north and south sections of Back Bay network into separate networks; and, as a minimum, install the necessary facilities to make it possible to re-energize one section without interfering with the other; and re-evaluate the cathodic protection scheme where necessary. (LCL)

  20. Investigations into the indoor environment and respiratory health in Boston public housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, H Patricia; Brugge, Doug; Osgood, Neal-Dra; Snell, John; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John

    2004-01-01

    The self-reported prevalence of asthma in the United States increased by 75% from 1980 to 1994, a trend found to be significant and evident in every region of the country. The increase was most marked in children from birth to 14 years of age; and growing evidence indicates that, as with lead poisoning, inner-city and urban populations are most at risk. Attention has turned to the role of indoor environmental risk factors, especially in homes and schools. Such factors include moisture and mold growth, pest infestation, dust mites, the building envelope, heating systems, inadequate ventilation, nitrogen dioxide, and environmental tobacco smoke. The Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI) is a Boston-based community-centered research and intervention project designed to engage Boston Housing Authority residents in a collaborative process to improve respiratory health, quality of life, building conditions, and building maintenance in public housing. This article summarizes the significant research findings from four pilot studies in housing developments that laid the foundation for the larger HPHI asthma-related environmental intervention study. The research design for the pilot projects is informed by principles of community-collaborative research. The strengths of this model of research for our work are also discussed.

  1. "We make the path by walking it": building an academic community partnership with Boston Chinatown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Allukian, Nathan; Wang, Xingyue; Ghosh, Sujata; Huang, Chien-Chi; Wang, Jacy; Brugge, Doug; Wong, John B; Mark, Shirley; Dong, Sherry; Koch-Weser, Susan; Parsons, Susan K; Leslie, Laurel K; Freund, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    The potential for academic community partnerships are challenged in places where there is a history of conflict and mistrust. Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) represents an academic community partnership between researchers and clinicians from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University and community partners from Boston Chinatown. Based in principles of community-based participatory research and partnership research, this partnership is seeking to build a trusting relationship between Tufts and Boston Chinatown. This case study aims to provides a narrative story of the development and formation of ADAPT as well as discuss challenges to its future viability. Using case study research tools, this study draws upon a variety of data sources including interviews, program evaluation data and documents. Several contextual factors laid the foundation for ADAPT. Weaving these factors together helped to create synergy and led to ADAPT's formation. In its first year, ADAPT has conducted formative research, piloted an educational program for community partners and held stakeholder forums to build a broad base of support. ADAPT recognizes that long term sustainability requires bringing multiple stakeholders to the table even before a funding opportunity is released and attempting to build a diversified funding base.

  2. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on "How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-01-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: "How Can the History and Philosophy of…

  3. Using state-of-the-art technology to evaluate saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer of Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The fresh groundwater supplies of many communities have been adversely affected or limited by saltwater intrusion. An insufficient understanding of the origin of intruded saltwater may lead to inefficient or ineffective water-resource management. A 2008–2012 cooperative U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Miami-Dade County study of saltwater intrusion describes state-of-the art technology used to evaluate the origin and distribution of this saltwater.

  4. A Cost Analysis of Hospitalizations for Infections Related to Injection Drug Use at a County Safety-Net Hospital in Miami, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Tookes, Hansel; Diaz, Chanelle; Li, Hua; Khalid, Rafi; Doblecki-Lewis, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections related to injection drug use are common. Harm reduction strategies such as syringe exchange programs and skin care clinics aim to prevent these infections in injection drug users (IDUs). Syringe exchange programs are currently prohibited by law in Florida. The goal of this study was to estimate the mortality and cost of injection drug use-related bacterial infections over a 12-month period to the county safety-net hospital in Miami, Florida. Additionally, the prevalence...

  5. Pol?tica migratoria y condiciones laborales: un estudio de caso comparado acerca de los colombianos en situaci?n irregular en las ciudades de Atlanta y Miami

    OpenAIRE

    Parra Mora, Laura Camila

    2016-01-01

    Este trabajo tiene por objetivo determinar la incidencia de las pol?ticas migratorias de las administraciones Bush y Obama en las condiciones laborales de los colombianos indocumentados en las ciudades de Atlanta y Miami. La hip?tesis planteada afirma que la transici?n que ha tenido la pol?tica migratoria estadounidense, ha deteriorado las condiciones laborales de los colombianos indocumentados. El art?culo se divide en cuatro apartados. Primeramente, define los aspectos conceptuales a tener ...

  6. Long-term results after Boston brace treatment in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steen Harald

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have evaluated long-term outcome after bracing using validated health related quality of life outcome measures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the long-term outcome in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS 12 years or more after treatment with the Boston brace. Methods 109 (80% of 135 patients (7 men with AIS treated with the Boston brace at a mean of 19.2 (range 12–28 years previously responded to long-term follow-up examination. All patients (n = 109 answered a standardised questionnaire including demographics, work status, treatment, Global Back Disability Question, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI (100-worst possible, General Function Score (GFS (100 – worst possible, EuroQol (EQ-5D (1 – best possible, EQ-VAS (100 – best possible and Scoliosis Research Society -22 (SRS – 22 (5 – best possible. Clinical and radiological examination was obtained in 86 patients. Results The magnitude of the primary prebrace major curve was in average 33.4° (range 20 – 52. At weaning and at the last follow-up the corresponding values were 28.3° (9–56 and 34.2° (8 – 87, respectively. The mean age at follow-up was 35 (27 – 46 years. Work status was: full time (80%, on sick-leave (3%, on rehabilitation (4%, disability pension (4%, homemaker (7%, students (2%, 7% had changed their job because of back pain. 88% had had delivered a baby, 55% of them had pain in pregnancy. Global back status was excellent or good in 81%. The mean (standard deviation ODI was 6.4 (9.8, GFS 5.4 (10.5, EQ-5D 0.84 (0.2, SRS-22: pain 4.2 (0.8, mental health 4.2 (0.7, self-image 3.9 (0.7, function 4.1 (0.6, satisfaction with treatment 3.7 (1.0. 28% had taken physiotherapy for back pain the last year and 12% had visited a doctor. Conclusion Long-term results were satisfactory in most patients with AIS treated with the Boston brace.

  7. Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms and Their Association With Smoking Outcome Expectancies Among Homeless Smokers in Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Travis P; Campbell, Eric G; Chang, Yuchiao; Magid, Leah M; Rigotti, Nancy A

    2016-06-01

    Cigarette smoking and traumatic life experiences are each common among homeless adults, but the prevalence and correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among homeless smokers are not known. We assessed symptoms of PTSD and their association with smoking outcome expectancies in a sample of homeless smokers in Boston. We used time-location sampling to conduct an in-person survey of homeless adult smokers using Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program clinical services. We assessed symptoms of PTSD with the PTSD Checklist-Civilian version and considered scores at least 14 as positive. We used the Smoking Effects Questionnaire to assess positive and negative smoking outcome expectancies. We modeled the associations between PTSD screening status and smoking expectancies using design-adjusted linear regression. Eighty-six percent of eligible individuals participated (N = 306). Sixty-eight percent of participants screened positive for PTSD. Screen-positive respondents were younger (P = .001), more likely to report fair/poor health (P = .01), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = .02), and past-month hallucinations (P = .004), and had greater drug (P smokers and strongly associated with positive smoking outcome expectancies. Tobacco cessation programs for this population should consider screening for PTSD and fostering a trauma-sensitive treatment environment. In this study of homeless cigarette smokers in Boston, over two-thirds of participants screened positive for PTSD. PTSD screen-positive respondents more strongly endorsed multiple positive smoking outcome expectancies than screen-negative individuals. These findings suggest that the psychological sequelae of trauma may be a pervasive but under-recognized factor impacting the persistence of smoking among homeless people. Tobacco cessation programs for this population should consider screening for PTSD, fostering a trauma-sensitive treatment environment, and incorporating strategies that have

  8. Using the Boston Matrix at Identification of the Corporate Life Cycle Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Konečný

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this article is to develop a new model supporting the identification of the particular corporate life stage within the corporate life cycle. This model will be derived from the Boston matrix. The main reason for using this approach as the base for making new model of the corporate life cycle is the fact, that every quadrant of the Boston matrix can be assigned to one phase of the product life cycle and there is supposed, that the phase, in which are most products, determines the phase of the corporate life cycle. For application the Boston matrix by identification phases of the corporate life cycle is necessary to define low and high values of both its variables using some quantities from the model of corporate- and market life cycle by Reiners (2004. So the interval of low and high sales growth is determined by comparing sales of the company and sales of the market and furthermore, there is considered the rate of inflation to eliminate the impact of price changes. And for determination low and high market shares, there are compared the shares of sales and shares of total assets. After that, there will be possible to identify all the quadrants and thus all the individual phases unequivocally, which is the basic advantage compared to most existing models of the corporate life cycle. The following aim of this article is to compare the occurrence of individual phases, identified by this modified model, depending on the sector sensitivity to the economic cycle, measured by the coefficient of correlation between sales on the market and GDP. There are selected two sectors of the Czech economy, namely one cyclical and one neutral sector. Subsequently there is selected a sample of companies from both these sectors. The data are collected from financial statements of companies and from analytical materials by the Czech Ministry of Industry and Trade and by the Czech Statistical Office. On the basis of this research, there were recorded

  9. Avalonian (Pan-African) mylonitic deformation west of Boston, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, N.; Skehan, J. W.

    1995-07-01

    West of Boston, Mass., Castle and others (1976) recognized an up to 5km wide, possibly folded, NE-SW trending Burlington Mylonite Zone. We have extended mapping south into Natick and Framington quadrangles, and supplemented it by fixing local directions of tectonic motion, which are more variable than reported by Goldstein (1989). In Natick the mylonite zone is partly migmatized and converted into blastomylonites, forming the lithodemic Rice Gneiss and is intersected by the Dedham Granite dated ca 630 Ma. The granite also invades deformed, folded, and commonly mylonitized Westboro Quartzite. Thus mylonitization, folding, and formation of migmatitic blastomylonites are all earlier than ca 630 Ma, and can collectively be attributed to the main phase of the Avalonian orogeny that in Africa is referred to as the Pan-African I. The sense of movements in the Rice Gneiss is generally sinistral strike-slip with a NE-SW trend of foliation. Other local mylonites have more variable directions of motion. A narrower E-W zone of mylonitization has been recognized by Grimes (M.S. thesis 1993, Boston College) and named the Nobscot Shear Zone. It affects the Milford Granite, also about 630 Ma in age, while similar but narrow shear zones affect other local granites including the Dedham. These zones, dipping steeply north and including the Nobscot, are less intensely mylonitized and are not associated with migmatites. Their age is not known, but since they affect only Precambrian rocks, they are assumed to be late Proterozoic. We attribute these zones to the second stage of the Avalonian or the Pan-African II. The older rocks west of Boston are widely affected by numerous brittle faults. These are all of unknown age, but probably Phanerozoic. The most significant brittle fault in the Burlington area is the mid to late Paleozoic Bloody Bluff Fault. We do not associate large scale mylonitization with that fault, because the mylonites are commonly cut by undeformed or little deformed

  10. Characterization of particulate and gas exposures of sensitive subpopulations living in Baltimore and Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutrakis, Petros; Suh, Helen H; Sarnat, Jeremy A; Brown, Kathleen Ward; Coull, Brent A; Schwartz, Joel

    2005-12-01

    Personal exposures to particulate and gaseous pollutants and corresponding ambient concentrations were measured for 56 subjects living in Baltimore, Maryland, and 43 subjects living in Boston, Massachusetts. The 3 Baltimore cohorts consisted of 20 healthy older adults (seniors), 21 children, and 15 individuals with physician-diagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD*). The 2 Boston cohorts were 20 healthy seniors and 23 children. All children were 9 to 13 years of age; seniors were 65 years of age or older; and the COPD participants had moderate to severe physician-diagnosed COPD. Personal exposures to particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5), sulfate (SO(4)2-), elemental carbon (EC), ozone (03), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) were measured simultaneously for 24 hours/day. All subjects were monitored for 8 to 12 consecutive days. The primary objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the personal particulate and gaseous exposures for individuals sensitive to PM health effects and (2) to assess the appropriateness of exposure assessment strategies for use in PM epidemiologic studies. Personal exposures to multiple pollutants and ambient concentrations were measured for subjects from each cohort from each location. Pollutant data were analyzed using correlation and mixed-model regression analyses. In Baltimore, personal PM2.5 exposures tended to be comparable to (and frequently lower than) corresponding ambient concentrations; in Boston, the personal exposures were frequently higher. Overall, personal exposures to the gaseous pollutants, especially O3 and SO2, were considerably lower than corresponding ambient concentrations because of the lack of indoor sources for these gases and their high removal rate on indoor surfaces. Further, the impact of ambient particles on personal exposure (the infiltration factor) and differences in infiltration factor by city, season, and cohort were investigated

  11. Statistical analysis and mapping of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer, water conservation areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-02-25

    Statistical analyses and maps representing mean, high, and low water-level conditions in the surface water and groundwater of Miami-Dade County were made by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade County Department of Regulatory and Economic Resources, to help inform decisions necessary for urban planning and development. Sixteen maps were created that show contours of (1) the mean of daily water levels at each site during October and May for the 2000–2009 water years; (2) the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of the daily water levels at each site during October and May and for all months during 2000–2009; and (3) the differences between mean October and May water levels, as well as the differences in the percentiles of water levels for all months, between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009. The 80th, 90th, and 96th percentiles of the annual maximums of daily groundwater levels during 1974–2009 (a 35-year period) were computed to provide an indication of unusually high groundwater-level conditions. These maps and statistics provide a generalized understanding of the variations of water levels in the aquifer, rather than a survey of concurrent water levels. Water-level measurements from 473 sites in Miami-Dade County and surrounding counties were analyzed to generate statistical analyses. The monitored water levels included surface-water levels in canals and wetland areas and groundwater levels in the Biscayne aquifer.

  12. Estimating porosity and solid dielectric permittivity in the Miami Limestone using high-frequency ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Gregory J.; Comas, Xavier

    2014-10-01

    Subsurface water flow in South Florida is largely controlled by the heterogeneous nature of the karst limestone in the Biscayne aquifer and its upper formation, the Miami Limestone. These heterogeneities are amplified by dissolution structures that induce changes in the aquifer's material and physical properties (i.e., porosity and dielectric permittivity) and create preferential flow paths. Understanding such patterns are critical for the development of realistic groundwater flow models, particularly in the Everglades, where restoration of hydrological conditions is intended. In this work, we used noninvasive ground penetrating radar (GPR) to estimate the spatial variability in porosity and the dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone at centimeter-scale resolution to evaluate the potential for field-based GPR studies. A laboratory setup that included high-frequency GPR measurements under completely unsaturated and saturated conditions was used to estimate changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through Miami Limestone samples. The Complex Refractive Index Model was used to derive estimates of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates of the samples ranged between 45.2 and 66.0% and showed good correspondence with estimates of porosity using analytical and digital image techniques. Solid dielectric permittivity values ranged between 7.0 and 13.0. This study shows the ability of GPR to image the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity in the Miami Limestone and shows potential for expanding these results to larger scales and other karst aquifers.

  13. Weekend Commercial Children's Television, 1975. A Study of Programming and Advertising to Children on Five Boston Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcus, F. Earle

    Some 25-1/2 hours of Boston commercial television for children were monitored on a Saturday and Sunday in April 1975. The monitoring covered three network affiliated stations and two independent UHF stations. Monitoring, coding, and editing provided much statistical data, which was analyzed to yield findings in the areas of distribution of…

  14. Caffeine in an Urbanized Estuary: Past and Present Influence of Wastewater Effluents in Boston Harbor, MA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffeine has been identified by previous research as a potential tracer of sanitary wastewater. To further assess the utility of caffeine as a tracer of wastewater sources, samples from 25 sites throughout Boston Harbor were collected and analyzed for caffeine by LC-MS/MS. Caff...

  15. Caffeine in Boston Harbor past and present, assessing its utility as a tracer of wastewater contamination in an urban estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites throughout Boston Harbor were analyzed for caffeine to assess its utility as a tracer in identifying sources of sanitary wastewater. Caffeine ranged from 15 ng/L in the outer harbor to a high of 185 ng/L in the inner harbor. Inner harbor concentrations were a result of comb...

  16. 77 FR 16849 - Notice of Realignment/Merger of Five Regional Audit Offices: Boston, MA Will Merge With New York...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... of Five Regional Audit Offices: Boston, MA Will Merge With New York, NY; and the Gulf Coast Region... result from the reorganization; (3) a discussion of the impact on the local economy; and (4) an estimate... Department (such as the establishment of new or combination of existing organization units within a field...

  17. Conexiones: Guia para Padres y Estudiantes. Directorio de Servicios y Programas de Educacion Especial de las Escuelas Publicas de Boston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celuzza, Paul W., Ed.; Clayton, Shelley Bakst, Ed.

    Intended for handicapped students and their parents, the booklet presents a guide in Spanish to special education services in the Boston public schools. Chapter 766, the Massachusetts law guaranteeing free appropriate public education to every child, is focused on. Section 1 discusses such evaluation aspects as early childhood screening, referral,…

  18. 75 FR 42814 - Boston & Maine Corporation―Abandonment Exemption―in Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. AB 32 (Sub-No. 71X)] Boston & Maine Corporation[horbar]Abandonment Exemption[horbar]in Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, MA..., extending from milepost 2.69 to milepost 12.43, in Saugus, Essex, Middlesex, and Suffolk Counties, Mass. The...

  19. 75 FR 38411 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Chelsea River, Chelsea and East Boston, MA, Event-Road Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... Operation Regulations; Chelsea River, Chelsea and East Boston, MA, Event--Road Race AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS... is necessary to facilitate a public event, the Chelsea River Revel 5K Road Race. DATES: This... public event, the Chelsea River Revel 5K Road Race. This deviation allows the bridge to remain closed...

  20. Race and the Metropolitan Origins of Postsecondary Access to Four Year Colleges: The Case of Greater Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Joseph B.; Smith, Suzanne M.; Coelen, Stephen P.

    2004-01-01

    The inequities of residential segregation and their impact on educational opportunity are a national problem, but greater metropolitan Boston has a particularly problematic history in terms of the extent to which racial segregation has deeply divided the city into separate and unequal systems of opportunity. Despite decades of policy efforts to…

  1. 76 FR 31230 - Safety Zone; M.I.T.'s 150th Birthday Celebration Fireworks, Charles River, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; M.I.T.'s 150th Birthday Celebration Fireworks, Charles River, Boston, MA AGENCY... regulated area on the Charles River around the fireworks launch barge during the fireworks display... portions of the Charles River during a fireworks display. This rule will not have a significant economic...

  2. 75 FR 47215 - Special Local Regulation; Marine Events Within the Captain of the Port Sector Boston Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... special local regulations on: (1) The Charles River between the Longfellow Bridge and the Harvard Bridge... local regulations are established for the following marine events: (1) Charles River One Mile Swim, Charles River, Boston, MA. (i) Location. All waters of the Charles River, from surface to bottom, between...

  3. Carbohydrate nutrition differs by diabetes status and is associated with dyslipidemia in Boston Puerto Rican adults without diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rican adults have a greater prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and lower HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) than the general U.S. population. Carbohydrate nutrition may play a role in this disparity. Cross-sectional analyses included data from 1219 Puerto Ricans aged 45-75 y enrolled in the Boston Puer...

  4. Recruiting a Diverse Set of Future Geoscientists through Outreach to Middle and High School Students and Teachers in Miami, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, D.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Draper, G.; Rego, R.; Gebelein, J.

    2014-12-01

    Florida International University (FIU), the State University of Florida in Miami is a large enrollment, federally recognized Minority Serving Institution with over 70% of the undergraduate population coming from groups underrepresented in the geoscience workforce. Recruiting local students into the geosciences is challenging because geology is not well integrated into the local school curriculum, the geology is poorly exposed in the low-relief south Florida region and many first generation college students are reluctant to enter unfamiliar fields. We describe and present preliminary findings from Growing Community Roots for the Geosciences in Miami, FL, a 2-year, NSF funded project run by the Department of Earth and Environment at FIU which aims to inform students enrolled in the local middle and high schools to educational and career opportunities in the geosciences. The project takes a multi-faceted approach which includes direct outreach through social media platforms and school visits, a 1-week workshop for middle school teachers and a 2-week summer camp aimed at high school students. An outreach team of undergraduate geoscience majors were recruited to build and maintain informational resources on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Google Plus and to accompany FIU faculty on visits to local middle schools and high schools. Both the teacher workshop and the summer camp included lectures on geoscience careers, fundamental concepts of solid earth and atmospheric science, hands on exercises with earth materials, fossils and microscopy, exercises with Google Earth imagery and GIS, and field trips to local geological sites and government facilities. Participants were surveyed at the beginning of the programs on their general educational background in math and science and their general attitudes of and interest in geoscience careers. Post program surveys showed significant increases in the comfort of teaching topics in geoscience among teachers and an increased

  5. Efecto de rizobacterias promotoras de crecimiento vegetal solubilizadoras de fosfato en Lactuca sativa cultivar White Boston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Beatriz Sanchez López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Título en español: Efecto de rizobacterias promotoras de crecimiento vegetal solubilizadoras de fosfato en Lactuca sativa cultivar White Boston Título en ingles: Effect of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria phosate solubilizing  Lactuca sativa cultivar White Boston Resumen:  En las últimas décadas, la agricultura colombiana se ha visto afectada por la reducción de la productividad en las zonas hortícolas, el incremento de los costos de producción y la dependencia del uso de productos químicos, produciendo un daño irreversible al medio ambiente y la calidad de vida de productores y consumidores. El objetivo de investigación fue evaluar el efecto de rizobacterias promotoras del crecimiento  vegetal del género Pseudomonas sp. sobre Lactuca sativa cultivar White Boston como solubilizadoras de roca fosfórica. El estudio se realizó en el Centro de Investigación Tibaitatá (Corpoica ubicado en Mosquera (Cundinamarca-Colombia. Los resultados demostraron que las cepas tienen la capacidad intrínseca para solubilizar fuentes de fósforo de baja solubilidad como la roca fosfórica. La aplicación de inoculantes con base en las cepas: Pseudomonas fluorescens FR1, Pseudomonas sp., UVLO27 y Pseudomonas sp. LEAV18 arrojaron los mejores resultados. Las cepas Pseudomonas sp. FR2, UVLO27 y K35, tienen la capacidad de producir índoles y sideróforos. El experimento en invernadero evidenció que las cepas Pseudomonas fluorescens FR1, Pseudomonas sp. FR2 y UVLO27 incrementaron de manera significativa (P<0.05 la biomasa y el desarrollo de las plantas. El uso de rocas fosfóricas representa una alternativa económica y ecológica viable, en sistemas de agricultura sostenible.  Palabras claves: Pseudomonas sp., Biofertilizantes, Roca fosfórica, Fósforo, Índoles totales. Abstract:  In the last decades, Colombian agriculture has been affected by the reduction in productivity in horticultural areas, increase in production costs and the dependence

  6. History and use of del Nido cardioplegia solution at Boston Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, Gregory S; del Nido, Pedro J

    2012-09-01

    Cardioplegia is an integral and essential method of myocardial protection for patients of all ages requiring cardiac surgery in which the heart must be stopped. Numerous cardioplegia solutions and delivery methods have been developed. The del Nido cardioplegia solution has been in use for 18 years at Boston Children's Hospital. This is a unique four parts crystalloid to one part whole blood formulation that is generally used in a single-dose fashion. Although the formulation was originally developed for use in pediatric and infant patients, its use for adult cardiac surgery has been expanding. National and international inquiries to our institution regarding this cardioplegia have been increasing over the last 2 years. We present the developmental history, supporting theory, and current protocol for use of what is now referred to as del Nido cardioplegia.

  7. History and Use of del Nido Cardioplegia Solution at Boston Children’s Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, Gregory S.; del Nido, Pedro J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Cardioplegia is an integral and essential method of myocardial protection for patients of all ages requiring cardiac surgery in which the heart must be stopped. Numerous cardioplegia solutions and delivery methods have been developed. The del Nido cardioplegia solution has been in use for 18 years at Boston Children’s Hospital. This is a unique four parts crystalloid to one part whole blood formulation that is generally used in a single-dose fashion. Although the formulation was originally developed for use in pediatric and infant patients, its use for adult cardiac surgery has been expanding. National and international inquiries to our institution regarding this cardioplegia have been increasing over the last 2 years. We present the developmental history, supporting theory, and current protocol for use of what is now referred to as del Nido cardioplegia. PMID:23198389

  8. EFISIENSI PERSAINGAN BANK UMUM SYARIAH: PENDEKATAN DATA ENVELOPMENT ANALYSIS (DEA DAN BOSTON CONSULTING GROUP (BCG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizqon Halal Syah Aji

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Islamic Banking industry in Indonesia has begun dynamic. Product availability and standardization of Islamic banking products, the level of understanding by the public of products of Islamic banks and human resources. Market share of Islamic Banking in Indonesia to lock everything. Recent data Directorate of Islamic Banking in 2011 reached Rp 127,19 T, assets of BPRS amounting to Rp 3.35 T, can be calculated total Islamic banking assets as of October 2011 reached Rp 130,5 T. Financing very important factor, Data Envelopment Analisys (DEA is a measuring instrument of financing. Map of the Bank's performance in the competition between banks can be analyzed by matrix BCG (Boston Consulting Group. This matrix is used to describe the difference between the position of the relative market share of the Bank.DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v3i1.2059

  9. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishler, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates.

  10. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishler, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  11. Long-Term Trends in the Sources of Boston Crime Guns

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    Anthony A. Braga

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of firearm trace data, most collected over relatively brief periods, suggest that a noteworthy share of guns used in crime were recently diverted from legal commerce. This article analyzes a longitudinal database on firearm recoveries by the Boston Police Department between 1981 and 2015 and successfully traced handguns between 1991 and 2015. The percentage of high-capacity semiautomatic pistols among recovered handguns increased dramatically in the 1980s and 1990s. A persistent share of traced handguns were imported from licensed dealers in southern states and an increasing share first purchased at licensed dealers in New Hampshire and Maine. These analyses suggest that market disruption strategies may reduce illegal diversions of new handguns from licensed dealers and the passage of one-handgun-a-month laws may influence where criminals get their guns.

  12. Boston City Hospital and the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory: the birth of modern haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, Jeffrey M; Karnad, Anand B

    2003-05-01

    Established in 1923, the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory at Boston City Hospital was the first clinical research laboratory in a municipal hospital in the United States of America. Minot and Castle, who were the second and third directors of the Laboratory, were pioneer haematologists and clinical investigators of the highest calibre who created an atmosphere at the Laboratory that would foster patient-centred research and attract the best physician-scientists to work and train there. The haematology research division of the Laboratory made important original contributions to the understanding of the pathophysiology of anaemia, the mechanisms of red cell and platelet destruction and the phagocytic role of the spleen, the nature of haemoglobin (normal and sickle cell), the nature of haemophilia and its therapy and the early classification of lymphoma. It contributed to the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory's worldwide reputation as a model research laboratory and established its reputation as the birthplace of modern haematology.

  13. Association between BDNF rs6265 and Obesity in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study

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    Xian-Yong Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been associated with regulation of body weight and appetite. The goal of this study was to examine the interactions of a functional variant (rs6265 in the BDNF gene with dietary intake for obesity traits in the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study. BDNF rs6265 was genotyped in 1147 Puerto Rican adults and examined for association with obesity-related traits. Men (n=242 with the GG genotype had higher BMI (P=0.009, waist circumference (P=0.002, hip (P=0.002, and weight (P=0.03 than GA or AA carriers (n=94. They had twice the risk of being overweight (BMI≥25 relative to GA or AA carriers (OR = 2.08, CI = 1.02–4.23, and P=0.043. Interactions between rs6265 and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA intake were associated with BMI, hip, and weight, and n-3 : n-6 PUFA ratio with waist circumference in men. In contrast, women (n=595 with the GG genotype had significantly lower BMI (P=0.009, hip (P=0.029, and weight (P=0.027 than GA or AA carriers (n=216. Women with the GG genotype were 50% less likely to be overweight compared to GA or AA carriers (OR = 0.05, CI = 0.27–0.91, and P=0.024. In summary, BDNF rs6265 is differentially associated with obesity risk by sex and interacts with PUFA intake influencing obesity traits in Boston Puerto Rican men.

  14. Priorities, concerns and unmet needs among Haitians in Boston after the 2010 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D; Leyva, Bryan; Hilaire, Dany M; Reich, Amanda J; Martinez, Linda Sprague

    2016-11-01

    In January 2010, a massive earthquake struck Haiti. The devastation not only affected those living in Haiti at the time but also those Haitians living in the United States (U.S.). Few studies have assessed the degree of impact of the earthquake in U.S. Haitian communities. The purpose of this study was to elicit information about health priorities, concerns and resources needed to improve the delivery of health and social care for Haitians in Boston, MA. We conducted six focus groups among 78 individuals in the spring of 2011. Participants were recruited through community organisations, including churches, Haitian social service centres, restaurants and by word of mouth. Analysis of qualitative data revealed an enormous psychological, emotional, financial and physical toll experienced by Boston-area Haitians following the earthquake. Participants described increased distress, depressive episodes, headaches and financial hardship. They also noted insufficient resources to meet the increased needs of those living in the U.S., and those who had immigrated after the earthquake. Most participants cited an increased need for mental health services, as well as assistance with finding employment, navigating the immigration system, and balancing the health and financial needs of families in the U.S. and in Haiti. Despite this, many reported that the tragedy created a sense of unity and solidarity within the Haitian community. These findings corroborate the need for culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health services, as well as for employment, immigration and healthcare navigation services. Participants suggested that interventions be offered through Haitian radio and television stations, as well as group events held in churches. Further research should assess the need for and barriers to utilisation of mental health services among the Haitian community. A multi-faceted approach that includes a variety of outreach strategies implemented through multiple

  15. Strategies to improve chronic disease management in seven metro Boston community health centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Russell, Beverley E; Ayanian, John Z; Landon, Bruce E; Keegan, Thomas; O'Malley, A James; Hicks, Leroi S

    2009-01-01

    The Community, Health Center, and Academic Medicine Partnership Project (CHAMPP) is a partnership between medical researchers, community health centers (CHCs), and a community advisory committee focused on reducing cardiovascular morbidity related to hypertension and diabetes for non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic populations in Boston, Massachusetts. We conducted site visits at seven participating CHCs, located in Boston. The visits were to solicit health center staff opinions about site-specific barriers and enabling factors for optimum preventative cardiovascular care for racial/ethnic minority patients receiving hypertension and diabetes care at their centers. Site visits included a tour of each health center and a series of directed interviews with center personnel. Site visit notes were reviewed to identify themes that emerged during the course of each site visit. A summary matrix was developed for each health center, which included information regarding the most salient and persistent themes of the visit. Site visits uncovered several patient-, provider-, CHC-, and community-based factors that either facilitate or hinder optimal care of chronic disease patients. Commonly referenced barriers included the need for improved patient adherence to provider recommendations; insufficient time for providers to address complex health issues presented by patients and the need for a broader range of healthier food options in surrounding communities. Interactive patient groups and community health workers (CHWs) have been well received when implemented. Recommendations included adopting case management as a part of usual care for chronic disease patients; additionally, widespread implementation of CHWs may to provide a platform for more comprehensive care for patients.

  16. Increased pediatric functional neurological symptom disorders after the Boston marathon bombings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Réjean M; Pier, Danielle B; de Gusmão, Claudio M; Bernson-Leung, Miya E; Maski, Kiran P; Urion, David K; Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-01

    Functional neurological symptom disorders are frequently the basis for acute neurological consultation. In children, they are often precipitated by high-frequency everyday stressors. The extent to which a severe traumatic experience may also precipitate functional neurological abnormalities is unknown. For the 2-week period after the Boston Marathon bombings, we prospectively collected data on patients whose presentation suggested a functional neurological symptom disorder. We assessed clinical and demographic variables, duration of symptoms, extent of educational impact, and degree of connection to the Marathon bombing. We contacted all patients at 6 months after presentation to determine the outcome and accuracy of the diagnosis. In a parallel study, we reported a baseline of 2.6 functional neurological presentations per week in our emergency room. In the week after the Marathon bombings, this frequency tripled. Ninety-one percent of presentations were delayed by 1 week, with onset around the first school day after a city-wide lockdown. Seventy-three percent had a history of a prior psychiatric diagnosis. At the 6 months follow-up, no functional neurological symptom disorder diagnoses were overturned and no new organic diagnosis was made. Pediatric functional neurological symptom disorder may be precipitated by both casual and high-intensity stressors. The 3.4-fold increase in incidence after the Boston Marathon bombings and city-wide lockdown demonstrates the marked effect that a community-wide tragedy can have on the mental health of children. Care providers must be aware of functional neurological symptom disorders after stressful community events in vulnerable patient populations, particularly those with prior psychiatric diagnoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. No difference in urinary iodine concentrations between Boston-area breastfed and formula-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Joshua H; Leung, Angela M; Hale, Andrea R; Pearce, Elizabeth N; Braverman, Lewis E; He, Xuemei; Belfort, Mandy B; Nelson, Sara M; Brown, Rosalind S

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormone is essential for normal mental and physical development in infancy and childhood and is dependent on adequate iodine intake. During the first few months of life, infants are reliant on breastmilk and/or infant formula as their sole sources of dietary iodine. The iodine status of U.S. infants has not been well studied. This was a cross-sectional study of 95 breastfed and/or formula-fed infants less than 3 months of age in the Boston area. We measured iodine content from infants' single spot urine samples and assessed associations with infant feeding type as well as maternal demographic data, salt and multivitamin use, smoking status, and diet. The median infant urine iodine concentration was 197.5 μg/L (range 40-897.5 μg/L). Median infant urine iodine concentrations were similar between infants who were exclusively breastfed (n=39, 203.5 μg/L; range 61.5-395.5 μg/L), formula-fed (n=44, 182.5 μg/L; range 40-897.5 μg/L), and mixed (n=10, 197.8 μg/L; range 123-592.5) (p=0.88). There were no significant correlations of infant urinary iodine with maternal salt or multivitamin use (regularly or in the past 24 hours), active or secondhand cigarette smoke exposures, infant weight, infant length, or recent maternal ingestion of common iodine-containing foods, although the correlations with iodine-containing foods are difficult to accurately determine due to the small sample sizes of these variables. Both breastfed and formula-fed infants less than 3 months of age in the Boston area were generally iodine sufficient. Larger studies are needed to confirm these observations among infants nationwide and elucidate other factors that may contribute to infant iodine nutrition.

  18. Rationale and design of the Miami Healthy Heart Initiative: a randomized controlled study of a community health worker intervention among Latino patients with poorly controlled diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasquillo O

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Olveen Carrasquillo,1,2 Elizabeth Patberg,1 Yisel Alonzo,1 Hua Li,2 Sonjia Kenya1 1Department of Medicine, 2Public Health Sciences, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus disproportionately affects the Latino community. Latinos with diabetes are also less likely to have adequate control of cardiovascular risk factors such as cholesterol and blood pressure. Community health workers (CHWs are increasingly being used to address various health disparity conditions, including diabetes. However, evidence of their effectiveness from randomized controlled trials is limited. Methods: The Miami Health Heart Initiative is a randomized controlled trial of 300 Latino patients with diabetes. Patients with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ≥8.0% were recruited from Miami-Dade's public hospital system. At baseline, all patients underwent phlebotomy, physical examination, and a structured 90-minute research interview. They were then randomized to either usual care or a CHW intervention called Cariño. For participants in the Cariño arm of the study, CHW services included assistance with nonmedical social services, health education, and patient navigation in which the CHWs serve as a bridge between patients and the health care system. These services were delivered through home visits, phone calls, and group visits. At 12 months, all subjects had a follow-up examination. The primary outcomes at 1 year are changes in systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, and HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include medication adherence, medication intensification, diabetes self-efficacy, physical activity, and self-reported fruit and vegetable intake. Discussion: The Miami Healthy Heart Initiative is one of the first rigorously conducted randomized controlled trials to provide evidence on the impact of CHWs on diabetes intermediate outcomes among Latinos. If the data support our primary hypotheses, the study would lend added

  19. ETHNICITY-BASED RELIGIOSITY: Multi-Faceted Islam in Miami, USA, in the Age of War on Terrorism

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    Ahmad Muttaqin

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Minoritas Muslim seringkali menunjukkan perilaku yang ambigu. Satu sisi mereka mendambakan pengakuan dan perlakukan yang tidak diskriminatif dari kalangan mayoritas-non Muslim, namun di sisi lain ada “keengganan” untuk berbaur dengan kelompok mayoritas. Tulisan ini menguraikan dua tipe minoritas Muslim di Miami, Florida, Amerika Serikat, Muslim imigran dan Muslim kelahiran Amerika, serta menjelaskan berbagai faktor keengganan mereka dalam berbaur dengan mayoritas non Muslim. Di antara faktor keengganan tersebut adalah kesulitan mereka mencari rujukan ajaran Islam yang melegitimitasi “etika proaktif ” minoritas terhadap mayoritas, segmentasi etnis, kebangsaan dan faham keagamaan minoritas Muslim, serta beban psikis mereka yang merasa belum sepenuhnya menjadi warga negara Amerika Serikat. Dibandingkan kaum Muslim imigran yang sebagian besar berasal dari Timur Tengah dan Pakistan, kaum Muslim keturunan Afrika yang lahir di Amerika cenderung lebih terbuka dan aktif berbaur dengan kelompok mayoritas non-Muslim. Sikap ini ternyata berkorelasi positif dengan perlakukan yang mereka peroleh pasca tragedy 9/11. Kelompok pertama merasa selalu menjadi target operasi anti teror pemerintah Amerika, sedangkan kelompok kedua justru menekankan bahwa mereka adalah korban dari terorisme tersebut.

  20. Conference program and abstracts. International Biogeography Society 6th Biennial Meeting – 9-13 January 2013, Miami, Florida, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Hortal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Proceedings of the Sixth biennial conference of the International Biogeography Society, an international and interdisciplinary society contributing to the advancement of all studies of the geography of nature. Held at Miami, Florida, USA, 9 – 13 January 2013.Abstracts include:(i the Opening, MacArthur & Wilson Award and Alfred Russel Award Plenary Lectures;(ii four symposia entitled "Island Biogeography: New Syntheses", "Beyond Bergmann: New perspectives on the biogeography of traits", "The Convergence of Conservation Paleontology and Biogeography" and "Predicting species and biodiversity in a warmer world: are we doing a good job?";(iii oral presentations from contributed papers on Phylogeography, Marine Biogeography, Biogeography of the Anthropocene, Hot Topics in biogeography, Island Biogeography, Neotropical Biogeography, Global Change Biogeography, Historical and Paleo-biogeography, Conservation Biogeography and Global-Scale Biogeography; and(iv contributions presented as posters on Phylogeography, Geospatial techniques and land cover, Biodiversity gradients and macroecology, Biogeography of traits, Island Biogeography, Neotropical Biogeography, Conservation Biogeography, Disturbance and Disease Biogeography, Climate Change Biogeography and Historical and Paleo-Biogeography.

  1. Family and cultural influences on cervical cancer screening among immigrant Latinas in Miami-Dade County, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhivanan, Purnima; Valderrama, Diana; Krupp, Karl; Ibanez, Gladys

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer disproportionately affects minorities, immigrants and low-income women in the USA, with disparities greatest among Latino immigrants. We examined barriers and facilitators to cervical cancer screening practices among a group of immigrant Latino women in Florida, USA. Between January and May 2013, six focus group discussions, involving 35 participants, were conducted among Hispanic women in Miami to explore their knowledge, beliefs about cervical cancer and facilitators and barriers to cervical cancer screening using a theoretical framework. The data showed that family support, especially from female relatives, was an important facilitator of screening and treatment. Women, however, reported prioritising family health over their own, and some expressed fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Major obstacles to receiving a Pap smear included fear that it might result in removal of the uterus, discomfort about being seen by a male doctor and concern that testing might stigmatise them as being sexually promiscuous or having a sexually transmitted disease. Targeted education on cancer and prevention is critically needed in this population. Efforts should focus on women of all ages since younger women often turn to older female relatives for advice.

  2. Mental Health Impact of Hosting Disaster Refugees: Analyses from a Random Sample Survey Among Haitians Living in Miami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiah, Antoine; Lacoste, Jérôme; Gokalsing, Erick; Shultz, James M; Rodríguez de la Vega, Pura; Castro, Grettel; Acuna, Juan M

    2016-08-01

    Studies on the mental health of families hosting disaster refugees are lacking. This study compares participants in households that hosted 2010 Haitian earthquake disaster refugees with their nonhost counterparts. A random sample survey was conducted from October 2011 through December 2012 in Miami-Dade County, Florida. Haitian participants were assessed regarding their 2010 earthquake exposure and impact on family and friends and whether they hosted earthquake refugees. Using standardized scores and thresholds, they were evaluated for symptoms of three common mental disorders (CMDs): posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants who hosted refugees (n = 51) had significantly higher percentages of scores beyond thresholds for MDD than those who did not host refugees (n = 365) and for at least one CMD, after adjusting for participants' earthquake exposures and effects on family and friends. Hosting refugees from a natural disaster appears to elevate the risk for MDD and possibly other CMDs, independent of risks posed by exposure to the disaster itself. Families hosting refugees deserve special attention.

  3. HIV risk and awareness and interest in pre-exposure and post-exposure prophylaxis among sheltered women in Miami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblecki-Lewis, Susanne; Lester, Larissa; Schwartz, Bryanna; Collins, Constance; Johnson, Rai; Kobetz, Erin

    2016-09-01

    Pre- and non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis for the prevention of HIV infection are recommended for adults at substantial risk of HIV. Women experiencing homelessness have increased risk of HIV infection compared with stably-housed women. We conducted a survey of 74 sheltered women at Lotus House Women's Shelter (Lotus House) in Miami to assess risk behaviour as well as knowledge and perception of pre- and non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis in this population. Of surveyed women, 58.1% engaged in vaginal and/or anal sex while sheltered, and of sexually-active women 55.4% reported inconsistent condom use. 83.8% of women reported no concern regarding HIV acquisition due to their behaviour. Few women surveyed (20.8%) had previously heard of pre- or non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis. The majority (58.3%) of respondents indicated receptiveness to these prevention methods when introduced. Those indicating that they would consider pre- or non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis were significantly younger than those indicating that they would not consider these prevention strategies (p = 0.004). Education and referral for pre- and non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis should be considered for sheltered women at risk of HIV infection. Additional research to optimise implementation of biomedical prevention strategies in this population is needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. The Mesmerizing Apparition of the Oracle of Joy Street: A Critical Study of John Wieners’ Life and Later Work in Boston

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, James C.

    2017-01-01

    My study examines the later work and life of Boston poet John Wieners, whose work and achievement as a poet were neglected later in his life. My thesis contextualizes his life and his work in relation to his hometown, Boston, reclaiming his rightful place in several seminal poetry movements of post-World War II America, such as Black Mountain College, the Beats, and the San Francisco Renaissance, and the Boston Occult School of poets. My analysis situates his later work properly in relation ...

  5. Air pollution in Boston bars before and after a smoking ban

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    Hyde James N

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We quantified the air quality benefits of a smoke-free workplace law in Boston Massachusetts, U.S.A., by measuring air pollution from secondhand smoke (SHS in 7 pubs before and after the law, comparing actual ventilation practices to engineering society (ASHRAE recommendations, and assessing SHS levels using health and comfort indices. Methods We performed real-time measurements of respirable particle (RSP air pollution and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH, in 7 pubs and outdoors in a model-based design yielding air exchange rates for RSP removal. We also assessed ventilation rates from carbon dioxide concentrations. We compared RSP air pollution to the federal Air Quality Index (AQI and the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS to assess health risks, and assessed odor and irritation levels using published SHS-RSP thresholds. Results Pre-smoking-ban RSP levels in 6 pubs (one pub with a non-SHS air quality problem was excluded averaged 179 μg/m3, 23 times higher than post-ban levels, which averaged 7.7 μg/m3, exceeding the NAAQS for fine particle pollution (PM2.5 by nearly 4-fold. Pre-smoking ban levels of fine particle air pollution in all 7 of the pubs were in the Unhealthy to Hazardous range of the AQI. In the same 6 pubs, pre-ban indoor carcinogenic PPAH averaged 61.7 ng/m3, nearly 10 times higher than post-ban levels of 6.32 ng/m3. Post-ban particulate air pollution levels were in the Good AQI range, except for 1 venue with a defective gas-fired deep-fat fryer, while post-ban carcinogen levels in all 7 pubs were lower than outdoors. Conclusion During smoking, although pub ventilation rates per occupant were within ASHRAE design parameters for the control of carbon dioxide levels for the number of occupants present, they failed to control SHS carcinogens or RSP. Nonsmokers' SHS odor and irritation sensory thresholds were massively exceeded. Post-ban air pollution measurements showed 90% to 95

  6. Air pollution in Boston bars before and after a smoking ban.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repace, James L; Hyde, James N; Brugge, Doug

    2006-10-27

    We quantified the air quality benefits of a smoke-free workplace law in Boston Massachusetts, U.S.A., by measuring air pollution from secondhand smoke (SHS) in 7 pubs before and after the law, comparing actual ventilation practices to engineering society (ASHRAE) recommendations, and assessing SHS levels using health and comfort indices. We performed real-time measurements of respirable particle (RSP) air pollution and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PPAH), in 7 pubs and outdoors in a model-based design yielding air exchange rates for RSP removal. We also assessed ventilation rates from carbon dioxide concentrations. We compared RSP air pollution to the federal Air Quality Index (AQI) and the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) to assess health risks, and assessed odor and irritation levels using published SHS-RSP thresholds. Pre-smoking-ban RSP levels in 6 pubs (one pub with a non-SHS air quality problem was excluded) averaged 179 microg/m3, 23 times higher than post-ban levels, which averaged 7.7 microg/m3, exceeding the NAAQS for fine particle pollution (PM2.5) by nearly 4-fold. Pre-smoking ban levels of fine particle air pollution in all 7 of the pubs were in the Unhealthy to Hazardous range of the AQI. In the same 6 pubs, pre-ban indoor carcinogenic PPAH averaged 61.7 ng/m3, nearly 10 times higher than post-ban levels of 6.32 ng/m3. Post-ban particulate air pollution levels were in the Good AQI range, except for 1 venue with a defective gas-fired deep-fat fryer, while post-ban carcinogen levels in all 7 pubs were lower than outdoors. During smoking, although pub ventilation rates per occupant were within ASHRAE design parameters for the control of carbon dioxide levels for the number of occupants present, they failed to control SHS carcinogens or RSP. Nonsmokers' SHS odor and irritation sensory thresholds were massively exceeded. Post-ban air pollution measurements showed 90% to 95% reductions in PPAH and RSP respectively, differing

  7. Relative Sea Level, Tidal Range, and Extreme Water Levels in Boston Harbor from 1825 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talke, S. A.; Kemp, A.; Woodruff, J. D.

    2017-12-01

    Long time series of water-level measurements made by tide gauges provide a rich and valuable observational history of relative sea-level change, the frequency and height of extreme water levels and evolving tidal regimes. However, relatively few locations have available tide-gauge records longer than 100 years and most of these places are in northern Europe. This spatio-temporal distribution hinders efforts to understand global-, regional- and local-scale trends. Using newly-discovered archival measurements, we constructed a 200 year, instrumental record of water levels, tides, and storm surges in Boston Harbor. We detail the recovery, datum reconstruction, digitization, quality assurance, and analysis of this extended observational record. Local, decadally-averaged relative sea-level rose by 0.28 ± 0.05 m since the 1820s, with an acceleration of 0.023 ±0.009 mm/yr2. Approximately 0.13 ± 0.02 m of the observed RSL rise occurred due to ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment, and the remainder occurred due to changes in ocean mass and volume associated with the onset of modern mean sea-level rise. Change-point analysis of the new relative sea level record confirms that anthropogenic rise began in 1924-1932, which is in agreement with global mean sea level estimates from the global tide gauge network. Tide range decreased by 5.5% between 1830 and 1910, likely due in large part to anthropogenic development. Storm tides in Boston Harbor are produced primarily by extratropical storms during the November-April time frame. The three largest storm tides occurred in 1851, 1909, and 1978. Because 90% of the top 20 storm tides since 1825 occurred during a spring tide, the secular change in tide range contributes to a slight reduction in storm tide magnitudes. However, non-stationarity in storm hazard was historically driven primarily by local relative sea-level rise; a modest 0.2 m increase in relative sea level reduces the 100 year high water mark to a once-in-10 year event.

  8. Bus Rapid Transit system’s influence on urban development: An inquiry to Boston and Seoul BRT systems’ technical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayogi, Lutfi

    2018-03-01

    This article explores the relation between bus rapid transit (BRT) system and urban development. This article was written through a multi-staged comprehensive literature review. It includes a general overview of widely acknowledged BRT technical characteristics. It explains the approach taken in understanding the relation between BRT system provision and urban development around the system. Findings regarding the influence of Boston Silver Line 4 and 5 and Seoul BRT systems on urban development around the systems are quoted and used as case studies. Investigation on the technical characteristics of Boston SL4/5 and Seoul BRT systems are provided. This article shows that the two BRT systems that influence urban development around the systems have technical characteristics that enable the BRT systems to have high performance. However, while the quoted BRT systems can influence urban development, they have significantly different performance.

  9. Boston in the 1970s: is there a lesbian community? And if there is, who is in it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This excerpt from Amy Hoffman's memoir, An Army of Ex-Lovers: My Life at the Gay Community News (University of Massachusetts Press, 2007), describes some of the alternative community institutions serving lesbian feminists in Boston in the late 1970s. Hoffman, in her twenties at the time and fairly newly out, is an enthusiastic patron of these institutions. However, after a while, she begins to wonder about them. Boston in the 1970s was racially segregated and tense; a judicial order to desegregate the schools led to racist riots. The women's community was, sadly, no more diverse than the city's neighborhoods, and the alternative institutions, Hoffman realizes, are organized by and cater mostly to young, white, middle-class women like her. They fail to appeal to the needs and interests of poor women of color-although of course some do participate, and others become active in service organizations such as battered women's shelters.

  10. 'Love and trust, you can be blinded': HIV risk within relationships among Latina women in Miami, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez, Gladys E; Whitt, Elaine; Avent, Tenesha; Martin, Steve S; Varga, Leah M; Cano, Miguel A; O'Connell, Daniel J

    2017-10-01

    Latina women are disproportionately affected by HIV in the US, and account for 30% of all HIV infections in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The main risk for Latina women is heterosexual contact. Little is known about the relational and cultural factors that may impact women's HIV risk perception. This study aims to describe Latina women's perception of their HIV risk within a relational, cultural, and linguistic context. Eight focus groups of Latina women (n = 28), four English speaking groups and four Spanish speaking groups, were conducted between December 2013 and May 2014. Women were recruited from a diversion program for criminal justice clients and by word of mouth. Eligibility criteria included the following: self-identify as Hispanic/Latino, 18-49 years of age, and self-identify as heterosexual. A two-level open coding analytic approach was conducted to identify themes across groups. Most participants were foreign-born (61%) and represented the following countries: Cuba (47%), Honduras (17.5%), Mexico (12%), as well as Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, Colombia, and Venezuela (15%). Participant ages ranged between 18 and 49, with a mean age of 32 years. Relationship factors were important in perceiving HIV risk including male infidelity, women's trust in their male partners, relationship type, and getting caught up in the heat of the moment. For women in the English speaking groups, drug use and trading sex for drugs were also reasons cited for putting them at risk for HIV. English speaking women also reported that women should take more responsibility regarding condom use. Findings emphasize the importance of taking relational and cultural context into account when developing HIV prevention programs for Latina women. Interventions targeting English speaking Latina women should focus on women being more proactive in their sexual health; interventions focused on Spanish speaking women might target their prevention messages to either men or couples.

  11. Cobia (Rachycentron canadum hatchery-to-market aquaculture technology: recent advances at the University of Miami Experimental Hatchery (UMEH Tecnologia da criação de beijupirá (Rachycentron canadum: recentes avanços do Laboratório de Larvicultura Experimental da Universidade de MIAMI (UMEH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Benetti

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Among warm-water marine fishes, cobia is one of the best aquaculture candidate species in the world. Currently there are commercial culture operations in several Asian countries and the industry has started developing elsewhere, including the Western Central Atlantic region. Significant research has been conducted at the University of Miami's Aquaculture Program / University of Miami Experimental Hatchery (UMEH during the last eight years, involving research to develop and optimize advanced technology to demonstrate the viability of raising hatchery-reared cobia in collaboration with the private sector. This paper reviews some of this recent advances for the development of Hatchery-to-Market Aquaculture Technology for commercial production of cobia.Dentre os peixes marinhos de águas quentes, o bijupirá é um dos grandes candidatos para a aquacultura no mundo. Atualmente, existem operações comerciais em vários países Asiáticos e a indústria iniciou suas operações em outros locais, incluindo a região do Atlântico Central. Pesquisas têm sido realizadas no "University of Miami's Aquaculture Program / University of Miami Experimental Hatchery (UMEH" durante os últimos oito anos envolvendo o desenvolvimento e otimização de tecnologia avançada para demonstrar a viabilidade da criação de bijupirá com colaboração com o setor privado. Este artigo revisa alguns destes avanços recentes para o desenvolvimento da tecnologia da larvicultura para o mercado para a produção comercial de bijupirá.

  12. Shaken but prepared: Analysis of disaster response at an academic medical centre following the Boston Marathon bombings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osgood, Robert; Scanlon, Courtney; Jotwani, Rohan; Rodkey, Daniel; Arshanskiy, Maria; Salem, Deeb

    Over the last decade, there has been a rise in the number of mass casualty incidences (MCIs) and their subsequent effect on hospital systems. While there has been much discussion over improving procedures to treat victims of MCIs, there has not been a thorough, systems-based analysis concerning the costs incurred by hospitals during such events. Here the authors examine the history of the Hospital Incident Command Center and how its evolution at Tufts Medical Center helped mitigate the damage following the Boston Marathon Bombings. Tufts' unique variations to the Hospital Incident Command Center include strategic communication hierarchies and a 'zero cost centre' financial system which both provided for a quick and adaptive response. Operating in collaboration with the Conference of Boston Teaching Hospitals encouraged coordination and preparation during emergency situations such as mass casualty events. The direct and indirect effects on Tufts Medical Center stemming from the Boston Marathon Bombings were analysed. Tufts MC treated 36 victims immediately following the MCI. The estimated total cost during the week of April 15 to April 19, 2013 was $776,051. The cost was primarily comprised of lost revenue from cancelled outpatient and inpatient hospital services, as well as expenses incurred due to overtime pay, salary expenses, PPE kits and hospitality services. Finally, the authors examine ways to reduce the future costs during emergency situations through increasing communication with employees, understanding the source of all direct expenses, and mitigating excess risk by developing partnerships with other hospital systems.

  13. Contaminant transport and accumulation in Massachusetts Bay and Boston Harbor; a summary of U.S. Geological Survey studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Bradford; Bothner, Michael H.; Hathaway, J.C.; Jenter, H.L.; Knebel, H.J.; Manheim, F.T.; Signell, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting studies in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts Bay, and Cape Cod Bay designed to define the geologic framework of the region and to understand the transport and accumulation of contaminated sediments. The region is being studied because of environmental problems caused by the introduction of wastes for a long time, because a new ocean outfall (to begin operation in 1995) will change the location for disposal of treated Boston sewage from Boston Harbor into Massachusetts Bay, and because of the need to understand the transport of sediments and associated contaminants in order to address a wide range of management questions. The USGS effort complements and is closely coordinated with the research and monitoring studies supported by the Massachusetts Environmental Trust, the Massachusetts Bays Program, and by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. The USGS study includes (1) geologic mapping, (2) circulation studies, (3) long-term current and sediment transport observations, (4) measurements of contaminant inventories and rates of sediment mixing and accumulation, (5) circulation modeling, (6) development of a contaminated sediments data base, and (7) information exchange. A long-term objective of the program is to develop a predictive capability for sediment transport and accumulation.

  14. Evaluation of the Environmental Scoring System in Multiple Child Asthma Intervention Programs in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhao; Nath, Anjali; Guo, Jing; Bhaumik, Urmi; Chin, May Y; Dong, Sherry; Marshall, Erica; Murphy, Johnna S; Sandel, Megan T; Sommer, Susan J; Ursprung, W W Sanouri; Woods, Elizabeth R; Reid, Margaret; Adamkiewicz, Gary

    2018-01-01

    To test the applicability of the Environmental Scoring System, a quick and simple approach for quantitatively measuring environmental triggers collected during home visits, and to evaluate its contribution to improving asthma outcomes among various child asthma programs. We pooled and analyzed data from multiple child asthma programs in the Greater Boston Area, Massachusetts, collected in 2011 to 2016, to examine the association of environmental scores (ES) with measures of asthma outcomes and compare the results across programs. Our analysis showed that demographics were important contributors to variability in asthma outcomes and total ES, and largely explained the differences among programs at baseline. Among all programs in general, we found that asthma outcomes were significantly improved and total ES significantly reduced over visits, with the total Asthma Control Test score negatively associated with total ES. Our study demonstrated that the Environmental Scoring System is a useful tool for measuring home asthma triggers and can be applied regardless of program and survey designs, and that demographics of the target population may influence the improvement in asthma outcomes.

  15. Policing Fish at Boston's Museum of Science: Studying Audiovisual Interaction in the Wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Hannah; Sun, Yile; Hickey, Timothy J; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara; Sekuler, Robert

    2015-08-01

    Boston's Museum of Science supports researchers whose projects advance science and provide educational opportunities to the Museum's visitors. For our project, 60 visitors to the Museum played "Fish Police!!," a video game that examines audiovisual integration, including the ability to ignore irrelevant sensory information. Players, who ranged in age from 6 to 82 years, made speeded responses to computer-generated fish that swam rapidly across a tablet display. Responses were to be based solely on the rate (6 or 8 Hz) at which a fish's size modulated, sinusoidally growing and shrinking. Accompanying each fish was a task-irrelevant broadband sound, amplitude modulated at either 6 or 8 Hz. The rates of visual and auditory modulation were either Congruent (both 6 Hz or 8 Hz) or Incongruent (6 and 8 or 8 and 6 Hz). Despite being instructed to ignore the sound, players of all ages responded more accurately and faster when a fish's auditory and visual signatures were Congruent. In a controlled laboratory setting, a related task produced comparable results, demonstrating the robustness of the audiovisual interaction reported here. Some suggestions are made for conducting research in public settings.

  16. Factors influencing mobile source particulate matter emissions-to-exposure relationships in the Boston urban area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Susan L; Wilson, Andrew M; Hanna, Steven R; Levy, Jonathan I

    2007-11-15

    Benefit-cost and regulatory impact analyses often use atmospheric dispersion models with coarse resolution to estimate the benefits of proposed mobile source emission control regulations. This approach may bias health estimates or miss important intra-urban variability for primary air pollutants. In this study, we estimate primary fine particulate matter (PM2.5) intake fractions (iF; the fraction of a pollutant emitted from a source that is inhaled by the population) for each of 23 398 road segments in the Boston Metro Core area to evaluate the potential for intra-urban variability in the emissions-to-exposure relationship. We estimate iFs using the CAL3QHCR line source model combined with residential populations within 5000 m of each road segment. The annual average values for the road segments range from 0.8 to 53 per million, with a mean of 12 per million. On average, 46% of the total exposure is realized within 200 m of the road segment, though this varies from 0 to 93% largely due to variable population patterns. Our findings indicate the likelihood of substantial intra-urban variability in mobile source primary PM2.5 iF that accounting for population movement with time, localized meteorological conditions, and street-canyon configurations would likely increase.

  17. In vivo operation of the Boston 15-channel wireless subretinal visual prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Douglas B.; Doyle, Patrick; Kelly, Shawn K.; Gingerich, Marcus D.; Chen, Jinghua; Cogan, Stuart F.; Drohan, William A.; Mendoza, Oscar; Theogarajan, Luke; Wyatt, John; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2010-02-01

    This presentation concerns the engineering development of the Boston visual prosthesis for restoring useful vision to patients blind with degenerative retinal disease. A miniaturized, hermetically-encased, 15-channel wirelessly-operated retinal prosthetic was developed for implantation and pre-clinical studies in Yucatan mini-pig animal models. The prosthesis conforms to the eye and drives a microfabricated polyimide stimulating electrode array having sputtered iridium oxide electrodes. This array is implanted into the subretinal space using a specially-designed ab externo surgical technique; the bulk of the prosthesis is on the surface of the sclera. The implanted device includes a hermetic titanium case containing a 15-channel stimulator chip; secondary power/data receiving coils surround the cornea. Long-term in vitro pulse testing was also performed on the electrodes to ensure their stability over years of operation. Assemblies were first tested in vitro to verify wireless operation of the system in biological saline using a custom RF transmitter circuit and primary coils. Stimulation pulse strength, duration and frequency were programmed wirelessly using a computer with a custom graphical user interface. Operation of the retinal implant was verified in vivo in 3 minipigs for more than three months by measuring stimulus artifacts on the eye surface using contact lens electrodes.

  18. Iodine status and thyroid function of Boston-area vegetarians and vegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Angela M; Lamar, Andrew; He, Xuemei; Braverman, Lewis E; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2011-08-01

    Adequate dietary iodine is required for normal thyroid function. The iodine status and thyroid function of U.S. vegetarians and vegans have not been previously studied. Environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate (inhibitors of thyroid iodine uptake) exposures may adversely affect thyroid function. The objective of the study was to assess the iodine status and thyroid function of U.S. vegetarians (consume plant based products, eggs, milk; abstain from meat, poultry, fish, shellfish) and vegans (avoid all animal products) and whether these may be affected by environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate exposures. This was a cross-sectional assessment of urinary iodine, perchlorate, and thiocyanate concentrations and serum thyroid function in Boston-area vegetarians and vegans. One hundred forty-one subjects (78 vegetarians, 63 vegans) were recruited; one vegan was excluded. Median urinary iodine concentration of vegans (78.5 μg/liter; range 6.8-964.7 μg/liter) was lower than vegetarians (147.0 μg/liter; range 9.3-778.6 μg/liter) (P vegans (630 μg/liter; range 108-3085 μg/liter) was higher than vegetarians (341 μg/liter; range 31-1963 μg/liter) (P vegans may be at risk for low iodine intake, and vegan women of child-bearing age should supplement with 150 μg iodine daily. Environmental perchlorate and thiocyanate exposures are not associated with thyroid dysfunction in these groups.

  19. Premigration Exposure to Political Violence and Perpetration of Intimate Partner Violence Among Immigrant Men in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Garcia, Dolores; Hemenway, David; Decker, Michele R.; Raj, Anita; Silverman, Jay G.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We examined associations between premigration political violence exposure and past-year intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration among immigrant men attending community health centers in Boston. Methods. A convenience sample of immigrant men (N = 379; aged 18–35 years), largely from the Caribbean and Cape Verde, who attend community health centers, completed an anonymous, cross-sectional survey on risk and protective factors for male-perpetrated IPV and respondents’ exposure to political violence. Results. One in 5 (20.1%) immigrant men reported that they were exposed to political violence before arrival in the United States. Men reporting political violence exposure were significantly more likely to report IPV perpetration than were men not reporting such exposure (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.84; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.41, 5.74). Significant associations with political violence exposure were observed for both physical (AOR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.11, 6.54) and sexual (AOR = 2.37; 95% CI = 1.04, 5.44) IPV perpetration. Conclusions. To our knowledge, our findings document for the first time the significant association between premigration political violence exposure and recent IPV perpetration among immigrant men. Additional work is needed to examine underlying mechanisms to inform culturally appropriate programs. PMID:18703450

  20. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  1. Assessment of a Districtwide Policy on Availability of Competitive Beverages in Boston Public Schools, Massachusetts, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffarian, Rebecca S; Gortmaker, Steven L; Kenney, Erica L; Carter, Jill E; Howe, M Caitlin Westfall; Reiner, Jennifer F; Cradock, Angie L

    2016-03-03

    Competitive beverages are drinks sold outside of the federally reimbursable school meals program and include beverages sold in vending machines, a la carte lines, school stores, and snack bars. Competitive beverages include sugar-sweetened beverages, which are associated with overweight and obesity. We described competitive beverage availability 9 years after the introduction in 2004 of district-wide nutrition standards for competitive beverages sold in Boston Public Schools. In 2013, we documented types of competitive beverages sold in 115 schools. We collected nutrient data to determine compliance with the standards. We evaluated the extent to which schools met the competitive-beverage standards and calculated the percentage of students who had access to beverages that met or did not meet the standards. Of 115 schools, 89.6% met the competitive beverage nutrition standards; 88.5% of elementary schools and 61.5% of middle schools did not sell competitive beverages. Nutrition standards were met in 79.2% of high schools; 37.5% did not sell any competitive beverages, and 41.7% sold only beverages meeting the standards. Overall, 85.5% of students attended schools meeting the standards. Only 4.0% of students had access to sugar-sweetened beverages. A comprehensive, district-wide competitive beverage policy with implementation support can translate into a sustained healthful environment in public schools.

  2. The Great Diseases Project: a partnership between Tufts Medical School and the Boston public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacque, Berri; Malanson, Katherine; Bateman, Kathleen; Akeson, Bob; Cail, Amanda; Doss, Chris; Dugan, Matt; Finegold, Brandon; Gauthier, Aimee; Galego, Mike; Roundtree, Eugene; Spezzano, Lawrence; Meiri, Karina F

    2013-05-01

    Medical schools, although the gatekeepers of much biomedical education and research, rarely engage formally with K-12 educators to influence curriculum content or professional development. This segregation of content experts from teachers creates a knowledge gap that limits inclusion of current biomedical science into high school curricula, affecting both public health literacy and the biomedical pipeline. The authors describe how, in 2009, scientists from Tufts Medical School and Boston public school teachers established a partnership of formal scholarly dialogue to create 11th- to 12th-grade high school curricula about critical health-related concepts, with the goal of increasing scientific literacy and influencing health-related decisions. The curricula are based on the great diseases (infectious diseases, neurological disorders, metabolic disease, and cancer). Unlike most health science curricular interventions that provide circumscribed activities, the curricula are comprehensive, each filling one full term of in-class learning and providing extensive real-time support for the teacher. In this article, the authors describe how they developed and implemented the infectious disease curriculum, and its impacts. The high school teachers and students showed robust gains in content knowledge and critical thinking skills, whereas the Tufts scientists increased their pedagogical knowledge and appreciation for health-related science communication. The results show how formal interactions between medical schools and K-12 educators can be mutually beneficial.

  3. Biochemical and Molecular Analysis of the Hb Lepore Boston Washington in a Syrian Homozygous Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Pirastru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin (Hb Lepore is composed of two normal α chains and two δβ fusion globins that arise from unequal crossover events between the δ- and β-globin genes. The Hb Lepore is widespread all over the world and in many ethnic groups. It includes some of the few clinically significant Hb variants that are associated with a β-thalassemia phenotype. Here, we describe the first occurrence of Hb Lepore Boston Washington in a Syrian individual. The patient, a 10-year-old child, shows severe anemia with a Hb level of 6.85 g/dL and typical thalassemic red cell indices. The diagnostic procedure implies hematological, biochemical, and molecular analysis, including multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA assay, GAP-PCR, and DNA sequencing. This latter allowed us to define the correct structure of the hybrid δβ-globin gene. The knowledge of the spectrum of mutations associated with different geographical areas is the prerequisite to set up large-scale screening programs and be able to offer genetic counseling to couples at risk.

  4. Leadership During the Boston Marathon Bombings: A Qualitative After-Action Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goralnick, Eric; Halpern, Pinchas; Loo, Stephanie; Gates, Jonathan; Biddinger, Paul; Fisher, John; Velmahos, George; Chung, Sarita; Mooney, David; Brown, Calvin; Barnewolt, Brien; Burke, Peter; Gupta, Alok; Ulrich, Andrew; Hojman, Horacio; McNulty, Eric; Dorn, Barry; Marcus, Leonard; Peleg, Kobi

    2015-10-01

    On April 15, 2013, two improvised explosive devices (IEDs) exploded at the Boston Marathon and 264 patients were treated at 26 hospitals in the aftermath. Despite the extent of injuries sustained by victims, there was no subsequent mortality for those treated in hospitals. Leadership decisions and actions in major trauma centers were a critical factor in this response. The objective of this investigation was to describe and characterize organizational dynamics and leadership themes immediately after the bombings by utilizing a novel structured sequential qualitative approach consisting of a focus group followed by subsequent detailed interviews and combined expert analysis. Across physician leaders representing 7 hospitals, several leadership and management themes emerged from our analysis: communications and volunteer surges, flexibility, the challenge of technology, and command versus collaboration. Disasters provide a distinctive context in which to study the robustness and resilience of response systems. Therefore, in the aftermath of a large-scale crisis, every effort should be invested in forming a coalition and collecting critical lessons so they can be shared and incorporated into best practices and preparations. Novel communication strategies, flexible leadership structures, and improved information systems will be necessary to reduce morbidity and mortality during future events.

  5. Anatomy of an urban waterbody: A case study of Boston's Muddy River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Miriam; Yao Yifu; Cao Yixing; Shodhan, Khyati; Ghosh, Indrani; Bucci, Vanni; Leitao, Christopher; Njoka, Danson; Wei, Irvine; Hellweger, Ferdi L.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize and understand the water quality of Boston's Muddy River prior to restoration, to help guide those activities and evaluate their success. We use a combination of monitoring, data analysis and mathematical modeling. The seasonal pattern of temperature, pollutant signatures (identified using a principal component analysis), correlations with precipitation and spatial patterns all point to a significant wastewater input at one of the outfalls and suggest significant receiving water impact. However, a quantitative analysis using a mathematical model (QUAL2K) suggests this source is not significant. Rather, internal loading from algae, sediment bed and waterfowl dominate the spatial pattern of water quality. These results suggest significant improvement can be expected from planned sediment dredging. The paper provides a case study of water quality assessment in the context of urban river restoration, and it illustrates the utility of combining monitoring and data analysis with modeling. - Highlights: → The water quality of an urban river is studied using monitoring and modeling. → Data analysis suggest an important wastewater input at one outfall. → A mathematical model shows the outfall is not significant. → Internal loading from algae, sediment bed and waterfowl control the water quality. - Monitoring and data analysis are combined with mathematical modeling to understand the water quality of an urban river.

  6. High Resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements at the laboratory scale to model porosity and permeability in the Miami Limestone in South Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, G. J.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface water flow within the Biscayne aquifer is controlled by the heterogeneous distribution of porosity and permeability in the karst Miami Limestone and the presence of numerous dissolution and mega-porous features. The dissolution features and other high porosity areas can create preferential flow paths and direct recharge to the aquifer, which may not be accurately conceptualized in groundwater flow models. As hydrologic conditions are undergoing restoration in the Everglades, understanding the distribution of these high porosity areas within the subsurface would create a better understanding of subsurface flow. This research utilizes ground penetrating radar to estimate the spatial variability of porosity and dielectric permittivity of the Miami Limestone at centimeter scale resolution at the laboratory scale. High frequency GPR antennas were used to measure changes in electromagnetic wave velocity through limestone samples under varying volumetric water contents. The Complex Refractive Index Model (CRIM) was then applied in order to estimate porosity and dielectric permittivity of the solid phase of the limestone. Porosity estimates ranged from 45.2-66.0% from the CRIM model and correspond well with estimates of porosity from analytical and digital image techniques. Dielectric permittivity values of the limestone solid phase ranged from 7.0 and 13.0, which are similar to values in the literature. This research demonstrates the ability of GPR to identify the cm scale spatial variability of aquifer properties that influence subsurface water flow which could have implications for groundwater flow models in the Biscayne and potentially other shallow karst aquifers.

  7. A Cost Analysis of Hospitalizations for Infections Related to Injection Drug Use at a County Safety-Net Hospital in Miami, Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansel Tookes

    Full Text Available Infections related to injection drug use are common. Harm reduction strategies such as syringe exchange programs and skin care clinics aim to prevent these infections in injection drug users (IDUs. Syringe exchange programs are currently prohibited by law in Florida. The goal of this study was to estimate the mortality and cost of injection drug use-related bacterial infections over a 12-month period to the county safety-net hospital in Miami, Florida. Additionally, the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus among this cohort of hospitalized IDUs was estimated.IDUs discharged from Jackson Memorial Hospital were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes for illicit drug abuse and endocarditis, bacteremia or sepsis, osteomyelitis and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs. 349 IDUs were identified for chart abstraction and 92% were either uninsured or had publicly funded insurance. SSTIs, the most common infection, were reported in 64% of IDUs. HIV seroprevalence was 17%. Seventeen patients (4.9% died during their hospitalization. The total cost for treatment for injection drug use-related infections to Jackson Memorial Hospital over the 12-month period was $11.4 million.Injection drug use-related bacterial infections represent a significant morbidity for IDUs in Miami-Dade County and a substantial financial cost to the county hospital. Strategies aimed at reducing risk of infections associated with injection drug use could decrease morbidity and the cost associated with these common, yet preventable infections.

  8. A narrative method for analyzing transitions in urban water management: The case of the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuer, Galen; Koebele, Elizabeth; Deslatte, Aaron; Ernst, Kathleen; Garcia, Margaret; Manago, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Although the water management sector is often characterized as resistant to risk and change, urban areas across the United States are increasingly interested in creating opportunities to transition toward more sustainable water management practices. These transitions are complex and difficult to predict - the product of water managers acting in response to numerous biophysical, regulatory, political, and financial factors within institutional constraints. Gaining a better understanding of how these transitions occur is crucial for continuing to improve water management. This paper presents a replicable methodology for analyzing how urban water utilities transition toward sustainability. The method combines standardized quantitative measures of variables that influence transitions with contextual qualitative information about a utility's unique decision making context to produce structured, data-driven narratives. Data-narratives document the broader context, the utility's pretransition history, key events during an accelerated period of change, and the consequences of transition. Eventually, these narratives should be compared across cases to develop empirically-testable hypotheses about the drivers of and barriers to utility-level urban water management transition. The methodology is illustrated through the case of the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department (WASD) in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and its transition toward more sustainable water management in the 2000s, during which per capita water use declined, conservation measures were enacted, water rates increased, and climate adaptive planning became the new norm.

  9. Contextualizing Earth Science Professional Development Courses for Geoscience Teachers in Boston: Earth Science II (Solid Earth)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, M. S.; Kamerer, B.; Vugrin, M.; Miller, M.

    2009-12-01

    Earth Science II: The Solid Earth -- Earth History and Planetary Science -- is the second of two Earth Science courses, and one of eleven graduate level science Contextualized Content Courses (CCC), that have been developed by the Boston Science Partnership as part of an NSF-funded Math Science Partnership program. A core goal of these courses is to provide high level science content to middle and high school teachers while modeling good instructional practices directly tied to the Boston Public Schools and Massachusetts science curriculum frameworks. All of these courses emphasize hands-on, lab-based, inquiry-driven, student-centered lessons. The Earth Science II team aimed to strictly adhere to ABC (Activity Before Concept) and 5E/7E models of instruction, and limited lecture or teacher-centered instruction to the later “Explanation” stages of all lessons. We also introduced McNeill and Krajick’s Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) model of scientific explanation for middle school classroom discourse, both as a powerful scaffold leading to higher levels of accountable talk in the classroom, and to model science as a social construct. Daily evaluations, dutifully filled out by the course participants and diligently read by the course instructors, were quite useful in adapting instruction to the needs of the class on a real-time basis. We find the structure of the CCC teaching teams - university-based faculty providing expert content knowledge, K-12-based faculty providing age appropriate pedagogies and specific links to the K-12 curriculum - quite a fruitful, two-way collaboration. From the students’ perspective, one of the most useful takeaways from the university-based faculty was “listening to experts model out loud how they reason,” whereas some of the more practical takeaways (i.e., lesson components directly portable to the classroom?) came from the K-12-based faculty. The main takeaways from the course as a whole were the promise to bring more hands

  10. Integrating Art into Places in Transition - Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembeza, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    Among the many projects realized in public spaces, some are truly unique - and these are the ones that build the identity of a place. The aim of this paper is to examine how integrating art and cultural strategies into public space can enhance and reinforce the sense of a place. Particular attention is devoted to urban spaces that we call “places in transition”, where public art improves the city’s imaginative capacity, enlivens neighbourhoods, and sparks civic exchange. Research methods include multidisciplinary literature studies and a detailed case study of the Rose Kennedy Greenway (RKG) - a contemporary urban park in Boston, USA, intended to stitch together the various neighbourhoods surrounding downtown. The Greenway is also a place in transition, to which the Conservancy introduces innovative and contemporary art through temporary exhibitions, engaging people in experiences, interactions and dialogue with art. The five-year Public Art Strategy was supported by Fund for the Arts, a public art program of the New England Foundation for the Arts. The main vision of the project is to amplify the Greenway’s unique characteristic through art that is connective, innovative, and celebratory. There are the two main types of projects within the Public Art Strategy for the RKG: short-term projects called “Platforms” and long-term projects called “Magnets”. The particular conceptual framework is being developed to guide proposals: connection, interactivity, civic dialogue, ecology, and the environment. The article examines the case and analyses the important issues related to implementing art into a public space such as re-imagining places, short-term and long-term artistic interventions, arts and cultural programming.

  11. The Boston Marathon Bombers: the Lethal Cocktail that Turned Troubled Youth to Terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Speckhard

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Tsarnaev brothers came from the war-torn Chechen diaspora and found asylum in the United States. The elder brother,Tamerlan, carried actual memories of fleeing from the 1994-96 Chechen war. He also lived in Dagestan for a year at the time when the Chechen warlord Basayev was engaging in a campaign of more than thirty suicide attacks, including mass hostage takings. When Tamerlan made it to the United States, he tried to assimilate but failed to make it. The family struggled hard to make a living in the U.S.; but in the end the parents divorced and the father returned to Dagestan. Dzhokhar, the younger brother, made it into an American university but Tamerlan did not succeed in higher education, trying to pursue a boxing career instead. When his immigration status precluded a boxing career, he became disillusioned. Meanwhile his mother, concerned about his descent into smoking marijuana and drinking alcohol, arranged an Islamic tutor for him. The ingredients for the lethal cocktail of terrorism came together when Tamerlan's individual vulnerabilities made him seek online contacts via the Internet and brought him in touch with offline mentors, militants and extremists who glorified Al-Qaeda’s global jihad. Through these channels he became receptive to the terrorist ideology, found a jihadist group with global reach to align with, received technical instructions from the Inspire magazine and found enough support for executing the Boston marathon attack, pulling his younger brother along and dying in the process as he had expected.

  12. The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American physiology comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, Jack A

    2016-03-01

    In the 19th century, the concept of experimental physiology originated in France with Claude Bernard, evolved in Germany stimulated by the teaching of Carl Ludwig, and later spread to Britain and then to the United States. The goal was to develop a physicochemical understanding of physiological phenomena. The first International Physiological Congress occurred in 1889 in Switzerland with an emphasis on experimental demonstrations. The XIIIth Congress, the first to be held outside of Europe, took place in Boston, MA, in 1929. It was a watershed meeting and indicated that American physiology had come of age. Meticulously organized, it was the largest congress to date, with over 1,200 participants from more than 40 countries. Getting to the congress was a cultural adventure, especially for the 400 scientists and their families from over 20 European countries, who sailed for 10 days on the S.S. Minnekahda. Many of the great physiologists of the world were in attendance, including 22 scientists who were either or would become Nobel Laureates. There were hundreds of platform presentations and many experimental demonstrations. The meeting was not without controversy as a conflict, still not completely settled, arose over the discovery of ATP. After the meeting, hundreds of participants made a memorable trip to the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, MA, which culminated in a "good old fashioned Cape Cod Clambake." Although not as spectacular as the 1929 congress, the physiological congresses have continued with goals similar to those established more than a century ago. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  13. Urbanization effects on stream habitat characteristics in Boston, Massachusetts; Birmingham, Alabama; and Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, T.M.; Giddings, E.M.P.; Zappia, H.; Coles, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    Relations between stream habitat and urban land-use intensity were examined in 90 stream reaches located in or near the metropolitan areas of Salt Lake City, Utah (SLC); Birmingham, Alabama (BIR); and Boston, Massachusetts (BOS). Urban intensity was based on a multi-metric index (urban intensity index or UII) that included measures of land cover, socioeconomic organization, and urban infrastructure. Twenty-eight physical variables describing channel morphology, hydraulic properties, and streambed conditions were examined. None of the habitat variables was significantly correlated with urbanization intensity in all three study areas. Urbanization effects on stream habitat were less apparent for streams in SLC and BIR, owing to the strong influence of basin slope (SLC) and drought conditions (BIR) on local flow regimes. Streamflow in the BOS study area was not unduly influenced by similar conditions of climate and physiography, and habitat conditions in these streams were more responsive to urbanization. Urbanization in BOS contributed to higher discharge, channel deepening, and increased loading of fine-grained particles to stream channels. The modifying influence of basin slope and climate on hydrology of streams in SLC and BIR limited our ability to effectively compare habitat responses among different urban settings and identify common responses that might be of interest to restoration or water management programs. Successful application of land-use models such as the UII to compare urbanization effects on stream habitat in different environmental settings must account for inherent differences in natural and anthropogenic factors affecting stream hydrology and geomorphology. The challenge to future management of urban development is to further quantify these differences by building upon existing models, and ultimately develop a broader understanding of urbanization effects on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2005 by the American Fisheries Society.

  14. Social responsibility, international development, and institutional commitment: lessons from the Boston University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, Lauren P; Bicknell, William J; Culpepper, Larry; Jack, Brian W

    2008-02-01

    Boston University (BU) has a long history of a strong social mission and commitment to service. In August 2003, BU made an institutional commitment to work with the country of Lesotho to tackle the human capital implications of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Surrounded by South Africa, and with a population of two million, Lesotho, a stable democracy, suffers the world's third-highest adult HIV prevalence rate of about 24%. The initiation of the program required a substantial initial institutional investment without any promise of payback. This allowed BU to begin work in Lesotho while searching for additional funds. The government of Lesotho and BU agreed to focus on preserving the lives of Lesotho's citizens, building the capacity of the country's workforce, and maximizing the efficiency of Lesotho's existing systems and resources. Initial activities were modest, beginning with workshops on problem solving, then the launch of a primary care clinic that offered HIV/AIDS treatment services at the nation's only teacher training college. With support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the main focus is now on strengthening district-level primary care services, including the initiation of a family medicine residency training program in cooperation with the University of the Free State in Bloemfontein. The initial commitment has developed into a mutual partnership, with benefits to country and university alike. By combining the expertise from various schools and departments to focus on a single country, a university can significantly advance international development, strengthen its service mission, enrich teaching, and provide new opportunities for research.

  15. Mapping turbidity in the Charles River, Boston using a high-resolution satellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweger, Ferdi L; Miller, Will; Oshodi, Kehinde Sarat

    2007-09-01

    The usability of high-resolution satellite imagery for estimating spatial water quality patterns in urban water bodies is evaluated using turbidity in the lower Charles River, Boston as a case study. Water turbidity was surveyed using a boat-mounted optical sensor (YSI) at 5 m spatial resolution, resulting in about 4,000 data points. The ground data were collected coincidently with a satellite imagery acquisition (IKONOS), which consists of multispectral (R, G, B) reflectance at 1 m resolution. The original correlation between the raw ground and satellite data was poor (R2 = 0.05). Ground data were processed by removing points affected by contamination (e.g., sensor encounters a particle floc), which were identified visually. Also, the ground data were corrected for the memory effect introduced by the sensor's protective casing using an analytical model. Satellite data were processed to remove pixels affected by permanent non-water features (e.g., shoreline). In addition, water pixels within a certain buffer distance from permanent non-water features were removed due to contamination by the adjacency effect. To determine the appropriate buffer distance, a procedure that explicitly considers the distance of pixels to the permanent non-water features was applied. Two automatic methods for removing the effect of temporary non-water features (e.g., boats) were investigated, including (1) creating a water-only mask based on an unsupervised classification and (2) removing (filling) all local maxima in reflectance. After the various processing steps, the correlation between the ground and satellite data was significantly better (R2 = 0.70). The correlation was applied to the satellite image to develop a map of turbidity in the lower Charles River, which reveals large-scale patterns in water clarity. However, the adjacency effect prevented the application of this method to near-shore areas, where high-resolution patterns were expected (e.g., outfall plumes).

  16. Translation and Validation of the Persian Version the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassankhani, Golnaz Ghayyem; Moradi, Ali; Birjandinejad, Ali; Vahedi, Ehsan; Kachooei, Amir R; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H

    2018-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is recognized as the most common type of neuropathies. Questionnaires are the method of choice for evaluating patients with CTS. Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (BCTS) is one of the most famous questionnaires that evaluate the functional and symptomatic aspects of CTS. This study was performed to evaluate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of BCTS questionnaire. First, both parts of the original questionnaire (Symptom Severity Scale and Functional Status Scale) were translated into Persian by two expert translators. The translated questionnaire was revised after merging and confirmed by an orthopedic hand surgeon. The confirmed questionnaire was interpreted back into the original language (English) to check for any possible content inequality between the original questionnaire and its final translated version. The final Persian questionnaire was answered by 10 patients suffering from CTS to elucidate its comprehensibility; afterwards, it was filled by 142 participants along with the Persian version of the Quick-DASH questionnaire. After 2 to 6 days, the translated questionnaire was refilled by some of the previous patients who had not received any substantial medical treatment during that period. Among all 142 patients, 13.4 % were male and 86.6 % were female. The reliability of the questionnaire was tested using Cronbach's alpha and Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Cronbach's alpha was 0.859 for symptom severity scale (SSS) and 0.878 for functional status scale (FSS). Also, ICCs were calculated as 0.538 for SSS and 0.773 for FSS. In addition, construct validity of SSS and FSS against QuickDASH were 0.641 and 0.701, respectively. Based on our results, the Persian version of the BCTQ is valid and reliable. Level of evidence: II.

  17. Subcutaneous ICD screening with the Boston Scientific ZOOM programmer versus a 12-lead ECG machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu C; Patton, Kristen K; Robinson, Melissa R; Poole, Jeanne E; Prutkin, Jordan M

    2018-02-24

    The subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) requires preimplant screening to ensure appropriate sensing and reduce risk of inappropriate shocks. Screening can be performed using either an ICD programmer or a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) machine. It is unclear whether differences in signal filtering and digital sampling change the screening success rate. Subjects were recruited if they had a transvenous single-lead ICD without pacing requirements or were candidates for a new ICD. Screening was performed using both a Boston Scientific ZOOM programmer (Marlborough, MA, USA) and General Electric MAC 5000 ECG machine (Fairfield, CT, USA). A pass was defined as having at least one lead that fit within the screening template in both supine and sitting positions. A total of 69 subjects were included and 27 sets of ECG leads had differing screening results between the two machines (7%). Of these sets, 22 (81%) passed using the ECG machine but failed using the programmer and five (19%) passed using the ECG machine but failed using the programmer (P machine but failed using the programmer. No subject passed screening with the programmer but failed with the ECG machine. There can be occasional disagreement in S-ICD patient screening between an ICD programmer and ECG machine, all of whom passed with the ECG machine but failed using the programmer. On a per lead basis, the ECG machine passes more subjects. It is unknown what the inappropriate shock rate would be if an S-ICD was implanted. Clinical judgment should be used in borderline cases. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Using Photovoice and Asset Mapping to Inform a Community-Based Diabetes Intervention, Boston, Massachusetts, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Jana; Roy, Nicole M St Omer; Quintiliani, Lisa M; Truong, Ve; Feng, Yi; Bloch, Philippe P; Russinova, Zlatka L; Lasser, Karen E

    2016-08-11

    Diabetes self-management takes place within a complex social and environmental context.  This study's objective was to examine the perceived and actual presence of community assets that may aid in diabetes control. We conducted one 6-hour photovoice session with 11 adults with poorly controlled diabetes in Boston, Massachusetts.  Participants were recruited from census tracts with high numbers of people with poorly controlled diabetes (diabetes "hot spots").  We coded the discussions and identified relevant themes.  We further explored themes related to the built environment through community asset mapping.  Through walking surveys, we evaluated 5 diabetes hot spots related to physical activity resources, walking environment, and availability of food choices in restaurants and food stores. Community themes from the photovoice session were access to healthy food, restaurants, and prepared foods; food assistance programs; exercise facilities; and church.  Asset mapping identified 114 community assets including 22 food stores, 22 restaurants, and 5 exercise facilities.  Each diabetes hot spot contained at least 1 food store with 5 to 9 varieties of fruits and vegetables.  Only 1 of the exercise facilities had signage regarding hours or services.  Memberships ranged from free to $9.95 per month.  Overall, these findings were inconsistent with participants' reports in the photovoice group. We identified a mismatch between perceptions of community assets and built environment and the objective reality of that environment. Incorporating photovoice and community asset mapping into a community-based diabetes intervention may bring awareness to underused neighborhood resources that can help people control their diabetes.

  19. Association between Sleep Duration, Insomnia Symptoms and Bone Mineral Density in Older Boston Puerto Rican Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinya Niu

    Full Text Available To examine the association between sleep patterns (sleep duration and insomnia symptoms and total and regional bone mineral density (BMD among older Boston Puerto Rican adults.We conducted a cross-sectional study including 750 Puerto Rican adults, aged 47-79 y living in Massachusetts. BMD at 3 hip sites and the lumbar spine were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Sleep duration (≤5 h, 6 h, 7 h, 8 h, or ≥9 h/d and insomnia symptoms (difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early-morning awaking, and non-restorative sleep were assessed by a questionnaire. Multivariable regression was used to examine sex-specific associations between sleep duration, insomnia symptoms and BMD adjusting for standard confounders and covariates.Men who slept ≥9h/d had significantly lower femoral neck BMD, relative to those reporting 8 h/d sleep, after adjusting for age, education level, smoking, physical activity, depressive symptomatology, comorbidity and serum vitamin D concentration. This association was attenuated and lost significance after further adjustment for urinary cortisol and serum inflammation biomarkers. In contrast, the association between sleep duration and BMD was not significant in women. Further, we did not find any significant associations between insomnia symptoms and BMD in men or women.Our study does not support the hypothesis that shorter sleep duration and insomnia symptoms are associated with lower BMD levels in older adults. However, our results should be interpreted with caution. Future studies with larger sample size, objective assessment of sleep pattern, and prospective design are needed before a conclusion regarding sleep and BMD can be reached.

  20. The use of process models to inform and improve statistical models of nitrate occurrence, Great Miami River Basin, southwestern Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Donald A.; Starn, J. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    in estimated variables for circular buffers and contributing recharge areas of existing public-supply and network wells in the Great Miami River Basin. Large differences in areaweighted mean environmental variables are observed at the basin scale, determined by using the network of uniformly spaced hypothetical wells; the differences have a spatial pattern that generally is similar to spatial patterns in the underlying STATSGO data. Generally, the largest differences were observed for area-weighted nitrogen-application rate from county and national land-use data; the basin-scale differences ranged from -1,600 (indicating a larger value from within the volume-equivalent contributing recharge area) to 1,900 kilograms per year (kg/yr); the range in the underlying spatial data was from 0 to 2,200 kg/yr. Silt content, alfisol content, and nitrogen-application rate are defined by the underlying spatial data and are external to the groundwater system; however, depth to water is an environmental variable that can be estimated in more detail and, presumably, in a more physically based manner using a groundwater-flow model than using the spatial data. Model-calculated depths to water within circular buffers in the Great Miami River Basin differed substantially from values derived from the spatial data and had a much larger range. Differences in estimates of area-weighted spatial variables result in corresponding differences in predictions of nitrate occurrence in the aquifer. In addition to the factors affecting contributing recharge areas and estimated explanatory variables, differences in predictions also are a function of the specific set of explanatory variables used and the fitted slope coefficients in a given model. For models that predicted the probability of exceeding 1 and 4 milligrams per liter as nitrogen (mg/L as N), predicted probabilities using variables estimated from circular buffers and contributing recharge areas generally were correlated but differed

  1. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 91 - Airports/Locations: Special Operating Restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Chantilly, VA... (Miami International Airport) Minneapolis, MN (Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport) Newark, NJ.../Washington International Airport) Boston, MA (General Edward Lawrence Logan International Airport) Buffalo...

  2. Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health South Florida, Miami, FL, 2/01/2012) Children and Teenagers Circumcision Circumcision (Broward Health Coral Springs, ... Birth Defects Genetic Brain Disorders Treating Moyamoya Disease (Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, 6/08/2010) Injuries ...

  3. Impact of MODIS High-Resolution Sea-Surface Temperatures on WRF Forecasts at NWS Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jonathan L.; LaCasse, Katherine M.; Dembek, Scott R.; Santos, Pablo; Lapenta, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years,studies at the Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center have suggested that the use of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) composite sea-surface temperature (SST) products in regional weather forecast models can have a significant positive impact on short-term numerical weather prediction in coastal regions. The recent paper by LaCasse et al. (2007, Monthly Weather Review) highlights lower atmospheric differences in regional numerical simulations over the Florida offshore waters using 2-km SST composites derived from the MODIS instrument aboard the polar-orbiting Aqua and Terra Earth Observing System satellites. To help quantify the value of this impact on NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs), the SPoRT Center and the NWS WFO at Miami, FL (MIA) are collaborating on a project to investigate the impact of using the high-resolution MODIS SST fields within the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) prediction system. The scientific hypothesis being tested is: More accurate specification of the lower-boundary forcing within WRF will result in improved land/sea fluxes and hence, more accurate evolution of coastal mesoscale circulations and the associated sensible weather elements. The NWS MIA is currently running the WRF system in real-time to support daily forecast operations, using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Nonhydrostatic Mesoscale Model dynamical core within the NWS Science and Training Resource Center's Environmental Modeling System (EMS) software; The EMS is a standalone modeling system capable of downloading the necessary daily datasets, and initializing, running and displaying WRF forecasts in the NWS Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS) with little intervention required by forecasters. Twenty-seven hour forecasts are run daily with start times of 0300,0900, 1500, and 2100 UTC on a domain with 4-km grid spacing covering the southern half of Florida and the far

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of PCI Education's "PCI Reading Program": Phase 2--A Report of a Comparison Group Study in Brevard Public Schools and Miami-Dade County Public Schools. Research Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empirical Education Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    PCI Education sought scientifically based evidence on the comparative effectiveness of the "PCI Reading Program" through a five-year longitudinal study. Phase 1 of the study consisted of a randomized control trial studying the efficacy of the "PCI Reading Program-Level One" that was conducted in the 2007-2008 in Miami-Dade…

  5. Accurate Influenza Monitoring and Forecasting Using Novel Internet Data Streams: A Case Study in the Boston Metropolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fred Sun; Hou, Suqin; Baltrusaitis, Kristin; Shah, Manan; Leskovec, Jure; Sosic, Rok; Hawkins, Jared; Brownstein, John; Conidi, Giuseppe; Gunn, Julia; Gray, Josh; Zink, Anna; Santillana, Mauricio

    2018-01-09

    Influenza outbreaks pose major challenges to public health around the world, leading to thousands of deaths a year in the United States alone. Accurate systems that track influenza activity at the city level are necessary to provide actionable information that can be used for clinical, hospital, and community outbreak preparation. Although Internet-based real-time data sources such as Google searches and tweets have been successfully used to produce influenza activity estimates ahead of traditional health care-based systems at national and state levels, influenza tracking and forecasting at finer spatial resolutions, such as the city level, remain an open question. Our study aimed to present a precise, near real-time methodology capable of producing influenza estimates ahead of those collected and published by the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC) for the Boston metropolitan area. This approach has great potential to be extended to other cities with access to similar data sources. We first tested the ability of Google searches, Twitter posts, electronic health records, and a crowd-sourced influenza reporting system to detect influenza activity in the Boston metropolis separately. We then adapted a multivariate dynamic regression method named ARGO (autoregression with general online information), designed for tracking influenza at the national level, and showed that it effectively uses the above data sources to monitor and forecast influenza at the city level 1 week ahead of the current date. Finally, we presented an ensemble-based approach capable of combining information from models based on multiple data sources to more robustly nowcast as well as forecast influenza activity in the Boston metropolitan area. The performances of our models were evaluated in an out-of-sample fashion over 4 influenza seasons within 2012-2016, as well as a holdout validation period from 2016 to 2017. Our ensemble-based methods incorporating information from diverse models based

  6. Planejamento de Marketing Utilizando a Matriz Boston Consulting Group: Uma Análise em Instituições Educacionais

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Silvia Maria Morales; Giuliani, Antonio Carlos; Farah, Osvaldo Elias; Alves, Maria Izalina Ferreira

    2006-01-01

    As Instituições de Ensino Superior (IES) particulares vêm enfrentando inúmeras dificuldades nos últimos anos. A partir dessa perspectiva, o presente trabalho trata da implantação do Planejamento Estratégico de Marketing na Administração Educacional Superior e tem como principal objetivo, mostrar como a Matriz Boston Consulting Group (BCG) pode auxiliar o gestor educacional em sua função. A metodologia foi baseada num estudo exploratório em duas Universidades, uma Faculdade e um...

  7. A brief review of Boston type-1 and osteo-odonto keratoprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avadhanam, Venkata S; Liu, Christopher S C

    2015-07-01

    Globally there are ≈4.9 million bilaterally corneal blind and 23 million unilaterally corneal blind. Majority of this blindness exists in the developing countries, where resources for corneal banking and transplant surgery are less than adequate. Survival of corneal grafts gradually declines over the long term. Corneal transplantation has poor prognosis in vascularised corneal beds, ocular surface disease and viral keratitis. Keratoprosthesis (KPro) remains as a final option for end-stage ocular surface disease, multiple corneal transplant failures and high-risk corneal grafts. Boston type-1 KPro and osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis are the two devices proven useful in recent years. Choice of a keratoprosthetic device is patient specific based on the underlying diagnosis, ocular morbidity and patient suitability. KPro surgery demands a high level of clinical and surgical expertise, lifelong commitment and extensive resources. Improvements in techniques and biomaterials may in the future provide retainable KPros that do not need regular follow-up of patients, have low complications but high retention rates and may be produced at a low cost on a mass scale to be available as 'off the shelf' devices. Because KPros have the potential to effectively address the burden of surgically treatable corneal blindness and may also eliminate the problems of corneal transplantation, more research is required to develop KPros as substitutes for corneal transplantation even in low-risk cases. In those countries where corneal blindness is a major liability, we need a two pronged approach: one to develop eye donation, eye banking and corneal transplantation and the second to establish centres for keratoprostheses, which are affordable and technically not challenging, in a population where default on follow-up visits are high. Until the latter is achieved, KPros should be viewed as a temporary means for visual restoration and be offered in national and supraregional specialised centres

  8. Development and Evaluation of the Boston University Osteoarthritis Functional Pain Short Form (BU-OA-FPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Adam P; Ni, Pengshend; Jette, Alan; Fitzgerald, G Kelley

    2018-04-19

    Pragmatic studies have gained popularity, thus emphasizing the need for patient-reported outcomes (PRO) to be integrated into electronic health records. This study describes the development of a customized short form from the Boston University Osteoarthritis Functional Assessment PRO (BU-OA-PRO) for a specific pragmatic clinical trial. A Functional Pain Short Form was created from an existing item bank of deidentified data in the BU-OA-PRO. Item response theory (IRT) methods were used to select items. Reliability was measured with the Cronbach alpha, then with IRT simulation methods. To examine validity, ceiling and floor effects, correlations between the short-form scores and scores from the BU-OA-PRO and the Western Ontario McMasters University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) Pain and Difficulty subscales, and the area under the curve (AUC) were calculated. A minimum detectable change at 90% confidence (MDC90) was calculated based on a calibration sample. The BU-OA PRO was reduced from 126 items to 10 items to create the BU-OA Functional Pain Short Form (BU-OA-FPS). The Cronbach alpha indicated high internal consistency (0.91), and reliability distribution estimates were 0.96 (uniform) and 0.92 (normal). Low ceiling effects (4.57%), and floor effects (0%) were found. Moderate-to-high correlations between the BU-OA PRO and BU-OA-FPS were found with WOMAC Pain (BU-OA-FPS = 0.67; BU-OA-PRO = 0.64) and Difficulty (BU-OA-FPS = 0.73; BU-OA-PRO = 0.69) subscales. The correlation between the BU-OA-PRO and BU-OA-FPS was 0.94. The AUC ranged from 0.80 to 0.88. The MDC90 was approximately 6 standardized points. The BU-OA-FPS provides reliable and valid measurement of functional pain. Pragmatic studies may consider the BU-OA-FPS for use in electronic health records to capture outcomes.

  9. Srategi The Boston Consulting Group Untuk Memastikan Kesinambungan Produk PT Gudang Garam Tbk Kediri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poniran Poniran

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lingkungan bisnis saat ini meningkat secara kompetitif, setiap perusahaan dituntut untuk memiliki kekuatan untuk bersaing di perdagangan global. PT Gudang Garam sebagai pasar dalam industri tembakau, untuk mempertahankan kondisi ini harus pandai dalam menentukan kebijakan manajemen . Alternatifnya adalah dengan menggunakan Strategi Analisis The Boston Consulting Group, sebuah analisis untuk mengukur pertumbuhan dan  pasar untuk produk SBU. Dengan analisis ini akan diketahui strategi apa yang harus dilakukan untuk mencapai keunggulan biaya serta bagaimana menentukan investasi yang tepat. Hal ini dapat dilihat dari analisis posisi kekuatan dan daya tarik perusahaan. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode deskriptif. Penelitian ini fokus untuk mempelajari (a Produksi (b penjualan (c daya tarik industri (d posisi kompetitif (e atribut produk perusahaan (fpajak/cukai. Penelitian ini dilakukan di perusahaan rokok PT Gudang Garam Tbk . Kediri alamat dengan : Jl . Semampir II / I Semampir Kediri - Indonesia Tel : 0354-682091-7 , fax: 0354-681555. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa PT. Gudang Garam adalah pimpinan pasar di posisi pangsa pasar tinggi BCG, GE - Mc. Kinsey, menang / kuat pada SKM dan SKT, SKL pada Mean Business, posisi PLC yang menurun untuk SKM, SKT dan SKL sekarang ini. Dengan kondisi seperti ini, penulis memberikan saran untuk perlunya perusahaan melakukan kegiatan yang spesifik, meliputi: (1 memastikan kesetimbangan portofolio melalui peluncuran produk baru yang menarik dan diharapkan mempunyai prospek bagus dalam jangka panjang, mengingat pada umumnya mengalami pengurangan produksi, dan peningkatan pajak, (2 berdasar portofolio produk PT Gudang Garam Tbk sebagian besar mempunyai posisi yang kuat, hal ini menunjukkan keberhasilan iklan produk dalam pandangan konsumen. Meskipun demikian PT Gudang Garam Tbk harus melakukan riset pasar untuk menentukan perubahan yang terjadi di pasar, (3 memaksimalkan pangsa pasar secara keseluruhan produk

  10. [Boston keratoprosthesis: 73 eyes from Germany : An overview of experiences from two centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, F; Neuhann, I; Enders, P; Bachmann, B O; Koller, B; Neuhann, T; Cursiefen, C

    2017-10-17

    The Boston Keratoprosthesis (B-KPro) is a therapeutic option for corneal replacement for visual rehabilitation in eyes with poor a prognosis for penetrating keratoplasty (high-risk eyes). Since 2009, this approach has been used in the MVZ Prof. Neuhann, Munich, and since 2013 also at the Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne. An overview of results from the first 73 eyes in these departments is presented. All recipient eyes of both centers which received a B-KPro type I (BI-KPro) between November 2009 and March 2017 were included. Indications, preoperative findings, intraoperative procedures, and clinical results, as well as postoperative complication and retention rates were documented and analyzed. A total of 73 eyes from 68 patients (mean age 55 ± 21.1 years, range 7 months-93 years; 26 women, 42 men) were treated with a BI-KPro. In 53 eyes (72.6%) the BI-KPro was implanted due to corneal graft failure, whereas BI-KPro was used as the primary corneal replacement in 20 eyes (27.4%). In 46 eyes (63.0%) a long-term increase in visual acuity was achieved and in 21.9% visual acuity was stabilized, while a decrease in preoperative visual acuity occurred in 15.1% of cases. During an average follow-up of 24.7 ± 23.0 months (range 1-78 months), 1.7 ± 2.4 re-interventions (range 0-9) were required. Only 4 keratoprostheses (5.5%) could not be retained. In 3 eyes (4.2%), a change of the BI-KPro device was necessary. There is a wide range of indications for BI-KPro in eyes with a poor prognosis for conventional keratoplasty. The surgical technique is safe but with a notable postoperative complication rate, which does not seem to decrease in the medium or long term. The retention rate is excellent for eyes without stem cell deficiency. Nevertheless, the BI-KPro is the only therapeutic option for high-risk eyes and leads to a gain in visual acuity in most cases.

  11. Water resources of southeastern Florida, with special reference to geology and ground water of the Miami area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Garald G.; Ferguson, G.E.; Love, S.K.

    1955-01-01

    partly occupied by fresh-water lakes and marshes. Elsewhere in southern Florida the deposits are mainly limestone and sandy terrace deposits. The Pliocene surface upon which there Pleistocene sediments were deposited was highest to the north and west of the present Everglades and Kissimmee River basin, and it sloped gently to the south, southeast, and east. On this slightly sloping floor, alternately submerged and emerged, the later materials were built; these materials, modified by wind, rain, and surface and ground waters. Have largely determined the present topographic and ecologic character of southern Florida. The most important aquifer in southern Florida, and the one in which most of the wells are developed, is the Biscayne aquifer. It is composed of parts of the Tamiami formation (Miocene), Caloosahatchee marl (Pliocene), fort Thompson formation, Anastasia formation, Key Largo limestone, Miami oolite, and Pamlico sand (Pleistoncene). In some parts of southern Florida, the Pamlico sand and the Anastasia formation are not a part of the Biscayne aquifer; however, they are utilized in the development of small water supplies. Most of the Calossahatchee marl and the Fort Thompson formation in the Lake Okeechobeee area is of very low permeability. In the northern Everglades their less permeable parts contain highly mineralized waters, which appear to have been trapped since the invasions by the Pleistocene seas. These waters have been modified by dilution with fresh ground water and by chemical reactions with surrounding materials. Sea-level fluctuations, starting at the close of the Pliocene with highest levels and progressing toward the Recent with successively lower levels. Have built a series of nearly flat marine terraces abutting against one another much like a series of broad stairsteps. Erosion and solution have deface and, in places, have obliterated the original surficial forms of these old sea bottoms, shores, and shoreline feathers,

  12. Caregiver-reports of Internet Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Among Boston-Area Youth Following the 2013 Marathon Bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S; DeSerisy, Mariah; Green, Jennifer Greif

    2016-01-01

    Although practitioners and researchers have considered children's television-based terrorism exposure, Internet-based exposure has not been sufficiently examined. We examined the scope and correlates of children's Internet-based exposure following the Boston Marathon bombing among Boston-area youth (N=460; 4-19 years), and the potential moderating role of age. Further exploratory analyses examined patterns of caregiver attempts to regulate child Internet exposure. Caregivers reported on child Internet-based and direct exposure to traumatic bombing-related events, and youth posttraumatic stress (PTS). Online youth consumed on average over two daily hours of Internet coverage, and roughly one-third consumed over three daily hours of coverage. Internet exposure was particularly high among children over 12. Greater Internet-based exposure was associated with PTS, and 12-15 year olds were particularly vulnerable. Further exploratory analyses found that although most caregivers reported believing media exposure can cause children further trauma, a considerable proportion of caregivers made no attempt to restrict or regulate their child's Internet-based exposure. These findings help practitioners clarify forms of indirect exposure that can place youth at risk following terrorism. Future work is needed to examine the important roles caregivers play as media regulators and as promoters of child coping and media literacy following terrorism.

  13. Evaluating availability and price of essential medicines in Boston area (Massachusetts, USA) using WHO/HAI methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Rorden, Lindsey; Ewen, Margaret; Laing, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Many patients even those with health insurance pay out-of-pocket for medicines. We investigated the availability and prices of essential medicines in the Boston area. Using the WHO/HAI methodology, availability and undiscounted price data for both originator brand (OB) and lowest price generic (LPG) equivalent versions of 25 essential medicines (14 prescription; 11 over-the-counter (OTC)) were obtained from 17 private pharmacies. The inclusion and prices of 26 essential medicines in seven pharmacy discount programs were also studied. The medicine prices were compared with international reference prices (IRPs). In surveyed pharmacies, the OB medicines were less available as compared to the generics. The OB and LPG versions of OTC medicines were 21.33 and 11.53 times the IRP, respectively. The median prices of prescription medicines were higher, with OB and LPG versions at 158.14 and 38.03 times the IRP, respectively. In studied pharmacy discount programs, the price ratios of surveyed medicines varied from 4.4-13.9. While noting the WHO target that consumers should pay no more than four times the IRPs, medicine prices were considerably higher in the Boston area. The prices for medicines included in the pharmacy discount programs were closest to WHO's target. Consumers should shop around, as medicine inclusion and prices vary across discount programs. In order for consumers to identify meaningful potential savings through comparison shopping, price transparency is needed.

  14. The Boston Puerto Rican Health Study, a longitudinal cohort study on health disparities in Puerto Rican adults: challenges and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collado Bridgette M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Boston Puerto Rican Health Study is an ongoing longitudinal cohort study designed to examine the role of psychosocial stress on presence and development of allostatic load and health outcomes in Puerto Ricans, and potential modification by nutritional status, genetic variation, and social support. Methods Self-identified Puerto Ricans, aged 45-75 years and residing in the Boston, MA metro area, were recruited through door-to-door enumeration and community approaches. Participants completed a comprehensive set of questionnaires and tests. Blood, urine and salivary samples were extracted for biomarker and genetic analysis. Measurements are repeated at a two-year follow-up. Results A total of 1500 eligible participants completed baseline measurements, with nearly 80% two-year follow-up retention. The majority of the cohort is female (70%, and many have less than 8th grade education (48%, and fall below the poverty level (59%. Baseline prevalence of health conditions is high for this age range: considerable physical (26% and cognitive (7% impairment, obesity (57%, type 2 diabetes (40%, hypertension (69%, arthritis (50% and depressive symptomatology (60%. Conclusions The enrollment of minority groups presents unique challenges. This report highlights approaches to working with difficult to reach populations, and describes some of the health issues and needs of Puerto Rican older adults. These results may inform future studies and interventions aiming to improve the health of this and similar communities.

  15. "Where does the damp come from?" Investigations into the indoor environment and respiratory health in Boston public housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, H Patricia; Brugge, Doug; Osgood, Neal-Dra; Snell, John; Vallarino, Jose; Spengler, John

    2003-01-01

    The self-reported prevalence of asthma increased by 75% from 1980 to 1994, a trend found to be significant and evident in every region of the country. The increase has been most marked in children 0-14 years of age, and there is evidence that, as with lead poisoning, inner-city and urban populations are most at risk. Attention has turned to the role of indoor environment risk factors, especially in homes and schools. Such factors include moisture and mold growth, pest infestation, dust mites, the building envelope, heating systems, inadequate ventilation, NO2, and environmental tobacco smoke. The Healthy Public Housing Initiative (HPHI) is a Boston-based community-centered research and intervention project designed to engage Boston Housing Authority residents in a collaborative process to improve respiratory health, quality of life, building conditions, and building maintenance in public housing. This article summarizes the significant research findings from four pilot studies in housing developments that lay the foundation for the larger HPHI asthma-related environmental intervention study. The research design for the pilot projects is informed by principles of community-collaborative research. The strengths of this model of research to our work are also discussed.

  16. Further investigations of plutonium in aquatic biota of the Great Miami River Watershed including the canal and ponds in Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayman, C.W.; Bartelt, G.E.; Groves, S.E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are reported from a preliminary investigation of Pu in aquatic organisms of the Great Miami River Watershed, Ohio. Data are presented on the Pu content of aquatic biota from the canal and ponds located adjacent to the Mound Laboratory. These areas have elevated levels of 238 Pu in the water and sediments as the result of a past incident. Radiochemical analysis of biota sampled both upstream and downstream from the effluent pipe of Mound Laboratory showed that plants collected downstream of the laboratory concentrate more 238 Pu than the plants located upstream by two to three orders of magnitude. Activities of 238 Pu in background samples are unexpectedly high and may be attributed to contamination. Activities of fallout 239 , 240 Pu in the plants from upstream and downstream were approximately the same

  17. Using High-Impact HIV Prevention to Achieve the National HIV/AIDS Strategic Goals in Miami-Dade County, Florida: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, James W; LaLota, Marlene; Villamizar, Kira; McElroy, Tamara; Wilson, M Maximillion; Garcia, Jersey; Sandrock, Robert; Taveras, Janelle; Candio, Darline; Flores, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    : In response to the release of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention developed the "Enhanced Comprehensive HIV Prevention Planning" project, which provided support to health departments in 12 Metropolitan Statistical Areas with the highest AIDS prevalence to strengthen local HIV programs. We describe a case study of how 1 Metropolitan Statistical Area, Miami-Dade County, developed and implemented a locally tailored plan. Examples include actions to reinforce local partnerships and identify neighborhoods with highest unmet needs, an improved condom distribution system to assist local HIV care providers, collaboration with local stakeholders to establish a new walk-in center for transgender client needs, and overcoming incompatibilities in health department and Ryan White Program computer record systems to facilitate faster and more efficient patient services. These examples show how jurisdictions both within Florida and elsewhere can create low-cost and sustainable activities tailored to improve local HIV prevention needs.

  18. Housing conditions and respiratory health in a Boston public housing community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugge, D; Rice, P W; Terry, P; Howard, L; Best, J

    2001-01-01

    To determine frequency of and possible associations between environmental housing factors and self-reported respiratory symptoms in public housing. We used a community-participatory method in which trained residents conducted in-person interviews with a random sample of 53 households in one housing development in Boston, Massachusetts. Environmental factors suspected of affecting respiratory health that were reported by more than 30 percent of respondents included: Moisture (43 percent), mold (43 percent), cracks in walls, floors and ceilings (49 percent), sewage leaks (33 percent), unexplained odor (35 percent), use of air fresheners (91 percent), use of gas ovens for heating (38 percent), no vent for the oven (74 percent), stuffy air (66 percent), overheating at least part of the winter (73 percent), cockroaches (70 percent), rodents (40 percent), pets (39 percent), frequent renovations (40 percent), repeated requests for repairs (52 percent), dust from construction (45 percent), use of more than three hazardous household products (32 percent), vehicle traffic nearby (81 percent), and smoking in the household (57 percent). Forty percent of respondents reported having asthma. Respondents also reported that 56 percent of their children had asthma. Forty percent of respondents reported wheeze and 48 percent reported coughing or sneezing episodes in the preceding month. We found the following positive statistically significant associations, adjusted for age, sex, Black or Hispanic origin, and years lived in public housing: wheeze with moisture problems (OR = 4.8; CI = 1.2, 19.3), sewage leaks (OR = 6.3; CI = 1.3, 30.3), odor (OR = 7.5; CI = 1 .4, 39.0), cracks in walls,floors and ceilings (OR = 8.6; CI 1.9, 38.0), and frequency of renovations (OR = 9.8; CI = 1.8, 54.4); cough with moisture problems (OR = 5.3; CI = 1.3, 20.8), stuffy air (OR = 4.4; CI = 1.2, 16.7), cockroaches (OR = 5.4; CI = 1.2, 24.2), smoking (OR = 5.0; CI = 1.2, 20.5), odor (OR = 10.9; CI = 2

  19. Pathways to Banking: Improving Access for Students from Non-Privileged Backgrounds. Research by The Boston Consulting Group for the Sutton Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    The financial services sector is a vital and vibrant part of a national economy but it recruits from a small and relatively privileged segment of society. This report, which summarises research from the Boston Consulting Group (BCG), shows for the first time the extent of the challenge. The Sutton Trust's "Pathways to Banking" programme…

  20. The flowering of pathology as a medical discipline in Boston, 1892-c.1950: W.T. Councilman, FB Mallory, JH Wright, SB Wolbach and their descendants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, David N; O'Brien, Michael J; Young, Robert H

    2016-09-01

    During most of the nineteenth century, the discipline of pathology in Boston made substantial strides as a result of physicians and surgeons who practiced pathology on a part-time basis. The present essay tells the subsequent story, beginning in 1892, when full-time pathologists begin to staff the medical schools and hospitals of Boston. Three individuals from this era deserve special mention: William T Councilman, Frank Burr Mallory and James Homer Wright, with Councilman remembered primarily as a visionary and teacher, Mallory as a trainer of many pathologists, and Wright as a scientist. Together with S Burt Wolbach in the early-to-mid-twentieth century, these pathologists went on to train the next generation of pathologists-a generation that then populated the various hospitals that were developed in Boston in the early 1900s. This group of seminal pathologists in turn formed the diagnostically strong, academically productive, pathology departments that grew in Boston over the remainder of the twentieth century.

  1. What Progress Has Been Made in Meeting the Needs of Seriously Maltreated Children? The Course of 200 Cases through the Boston Juvenile Court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Sandra J.; Murphy, J. Michael; Hicks, Roger; Quinn, Dorothy; Lewis, Paul J.; Grace, Martha; Jellinek, Michael S.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined child, parent, and case characteristics over 4 years in 200 cases of serious child maltreatment in Boston, Massachusetts. Comparison with 1985-1986 cases (before relevant state legislative changes) found children permanently removed from parental custody in the 1994 sample required only slightly less time to achieve permanent…

  2. Summaries of oral sessions at the XXI World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics, Boston, Massachusetts, 17-21 October 2013: state of the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpudo, H.; Aleksic, B.; Alkelai, A.; Burton, C.; Carillo Roa, T.; Chen, D.T.; Cheng, M.C.; Cocchi, E.; Davis, L.K.; Giori, I.G.; Hubbard, L.M.; Merikangas, A.; Moily, N.S.; Okewole, A.; Olfson, E.; Pappa, I.; Reitt, M.; Singh, A.B.; Steinberg, J.; Strohmaier, J.; Ting, T.T.; Hulzen, K.J.E. van; O'Shea, A.; DeLisi, L.E.

    2014-01-01

    The XXI World Congress of Psychiatric Genetics (WCPG), sponsored by the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics (ISPG), took place in Boston, Massachusetts, on 17-21 October 2013. Approximately 900 participants gathered to discuss the latest findings in this rapidly advancing field. The

  3. INDOOR AND OUTDOOR SOURCE CONTRIBUTIONS TO PERSONAL PM2.5 FOR A PANEL OF INDIVIDUALS WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE OR COPD LIVING IN BOSTON, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repeated personal, home indoor, home outdoor, and ambient particulate and gaseous pollutant levels were characterized for individuals with cardiovascular disease or COPD and their partners living in the Boston area. Health status was determined by self-reported history of myoc...

  4. Mapping carbon storage in urban trees with multi-source remote sensing data: Relationships between biomass, land use, and demographics in Boston neighborhoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raciti, Steve M.; Hutyra, Lucy R.; Newell, Jared D.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution maps of urban vegetation and biomass are powerful tools for policy-makers and community groups seeking to reduce rates of urban runoff, moderate urban heat island effects, and mitigate the effects of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a very high resolution map of urban tree biomass, assessed the scale sensitivities in biomass estimation, compared our results with lower resolution estimates, and explored the demographic relationships in biomass distribution across the City of Boston. We integrated remote sensing data (including LiDAR-based tree height estimates) and field-based observations to map canopy cover and aboveground tree carbon storage at ∼ 1 m spatial scale. Mean tree canopy cover was estimated to be 25.5 ± 1.5% and carbon storage was 355 Gg (28.8 Mg C ha −1 ) for the City of Boston. Tree biomass was highest in forest patches (110.7 Mg C ha −1 ), but residential (32.8 Mg C ha −1 ) and developed open (23.5 Mg C ha −1 ) land uses also contained relatively high carbon stocks. In contrast with previous studies, we did not find significant correlations between tree biomass and the demographic characteristics of Boston neighborhoods, including income, education, race, or population density. The proportion of households that rent was negatively correlated with urban tree biomass (R 2 = 0.26, p = 0.04) and correlated with Priority Planting Index values (R 2 = 0.55, p = 0.001), potentially reflecting differences in land management among rented and owner-occupied residential properties. We compared our very high resolution biomass map to lower resolution biomass products from other sources and found that those products consistently underestimated biomass within urban areas. This underestimation became more severe as spatial resolution decreased. This research demonstrates that 1) urban areas contain considerable tree carbon stocks; 2) canopy cover and biomass may not be related to the demographic characteristics of Boston

  5. Mapping carbon storage in urban trees with multi-source remote sensing data: Relationships between biomass, land use, and demographics in Boston neighborhoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raciti, Steve M., E-mail: Steve.M.Raciti@Hofstra.edu [Department of Biology, Hofstra University, Gittleson Hall, Hempstead, NY 11549 (United States); Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University, 685 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Hutyra, Lucy R.; Newell, Jared D. [Department of Earth and Environment, Boston University, 685 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    High resolution maps of urban vegetation and biomass are powerful tools for policy-makers and community groups seeking to reduce rates of urban runoff, moderate urban heat island effects, and mitigate the effects of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a very high resolution map of urban tree biomass, assessed the scale sensitivities in biomass estimation, compared our results with lower resolution estimates, and explored the demographic relationships in biomass distribution across the City of Boston. We integrated remote sensing data (including LiDAR-based tree height estimates) and field-based observations to map canopy cover and aboveground tree carbon storage at ∼ 1 m spatial scale. Mean tree canopy cover was estimated to be 25.5 ± 1.5% and carbon storage was 355 Gg (28.8 Mg C ha{sup −1}) for the City of Boston. Tree biomass was highest in forest patches (110.7 Mg C ha{sup −1}), but residential (32.8 Mg C ha{sup −1}) and developed open (23.5 Mg C ha{sup −1}) land uses also contained relatively high carbon stocks. In contrast with previous studies, we did not find significant correlations between tree biomass and the demographic characteristics of Boston neighborhoods, including income, education, race, or population density. The proportion of households that rent was negatively correlated with urban tree biomass (R{sup 2} = 0.26, p = 0.04) and correlated with Priority Planting Index values (R{sup 2} = 0.55, p = 0.001), potentially reflecting differences in land management among rented and owner-occupied residential properties. We compared our very high resolution biomass map to lower resolution biomass products from other sources and found that those products consistently underestimated biomass within urban areas. This underestimation became more severe as spatial resolution decreased. This research demonstrates that 1) urban areas contain considerable tree carbon stocks; 2) canopy cover and biomass may not be related to the demographic

  6. A crisis in waste management, economic vitality, and a coastal marine environment: Boston Harbor and Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, F.T.; Butman, B.

    1994-01-01

    Discharge of sewage sludge and effluent from 43 communities in the greater Boston metropolitan area has helped make the harbor one of the most polluted in the nation. As part of a court-mandated plan to end pollution of the harbor, effluent will no longer be discharged into the harbor, but instead, by 1995 it will be discharged into Massachusetts Bay through a record-long 15.34 km tunnel. By the year 2000 all of the sewage is scheduled to recive full secondary treatment. The public is concerned about long-term effects of the new ocean outfall on the environment, including Cape Cod Bay and Stellwagen Bank, which is an important habitat for whales and a newly designated national marine sanctuary. The bay has been additionally stressed by dumping of low-level radioactive and other hazardous wastes during the 1950s and 1960s. -from Authors

  7. Debt management and financial planning support for primary care students and residents at Boston University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, C; Hindle, D

    1999-01-01

    Boston University Medical Center created the Office of Residency Planning and Practice Management as part of The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Generalist Physician Initiative. Since 1995, the office has improved the medical center's ability to promote and support the generalist career decisions of its students and residents by removing indebtedness as a disincentive. After a brief review of the relationship between indebtedness and specialty selection, the authors delineate the nature and volume of debt-management assistance provided by the office to students and residents through individual counseling sessions, workshops, and other means between April 1995 and March 1998. A case study shows the progression of these services throughout residency training. The medical center also coordinates its debt-management assistance with counseling from physician-oriented financial planning groups. In conclusion, the authors discuss several characteristics of a successful debt-management program for residents.

  8. Normative data for the Boston Naming Test in native Dutch-speaking Belgian children and the relation with intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storms, Gert; Saerens, Jos; De Deyn, Peter P

    2004-12-01

    This paper reports the results of a normative study of the 60-item version of the Boston Naming Test (BNT) in a group of 371 native Dutch-speaking Flemish children between the ages of 6 and 12 years. Analysis of test results revealed that BNT performance was significantly affected by age and gender. The gathered norms were shown to be significantly lower than published norms for comparable North-American children. Error analysis disclosed remarkable similarities with data from elderly subjects, with verbal semantic paraphasias and 'don't know' responses occurring most frequently. Finally, BNT scores were shown to correlate strongly with general intelligence as measured with the Raven Progressive Matrices. The relation between both measures can be of help in the diagnosis of identification naming deficits and impaired word-retrieval capacities.

  9. The effects of biogeography on ant diversity and activity on the Boston Harbor Islands, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam T; Rykken, Jessica J; Farrell, Brian D

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have examined how island biogeography affects diversity on the scale of island systems. In this study, we address how diversity varies over very short periods of time on individual islands. To do this, we compile an inventory of the ants living in the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, Boston, Massachusetts, USA using data from a five-year All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory of the region's arthropods. Consistent with the classical theory of island biogeography, species richness increased with island size, decreased with island isolation, and remained relatively constant over time. Additionally, our inventory finds that almost half of the known Massachusetts ant fauna can be collected in the BHI, and identifies four new species records for Massachusetts, including one new to the United States, Myrmica scabrinodis. We find that the number of species actually active on islands depended greatly on the timescale under consideration. The species that could be detected during any given week of sampling could by no means account for total island species richness, even when correcting for sampling effort. Though we consistently collected the same number of species over any given week of sampling, the identities of those species varied greatly between weeks. This variation does not result from local immigration and extinction of species, nor from seasonally-driven changes in the abundance of individual species, but rather from weekly changes in the distribution and activity of foraging ants. This variation can be upwards of 50% of ant species per week. This suggests that numerous ant species on the BHI share the same physical space at different times. This temporal partitioning could well explain such unexpectedly high ant diversity in an isolated, urban site.

  10. The effects of biogeography on ant diversity and activity on the Boston Harbor Islands, Massachusetts, U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Clark

    Full Text Available Many studies have examined how island biogeography affects diversity on the scale of island systems. In this study, we address how diversity varies over very short periods of time on individual islands. To do this, we compile an inventory of the ants living in the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, Boston, Massachusetts, USA using data from a five-year All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory of the region's arthropods. Consistent with the classical theory of island biogeography, species richness increased with island size, decreased with island isolation, and remained relatively constant over time. Additionally, our inventory finds that almost half of the known Massachusetts ant fauna can be collected in the BHI, and identifies four new species records for Massachusetts, including one new to the United States, Myrmica scabrinodis. We find that the number of species actually active on islands depended greatly on the timescale under consideration. The species that could be detected during any given week of sampling could by no means account for total island species richness, even when correcting for sampling effort. Though we consistently collected the same number of species over any given week of sampling, the identities of those species varied greatly between weeks. This variation does not result from local immigration and extinction of species, nor from seasonally-driven changes in the abundance of individual species, but rather from weekly changes in the distribution and activity of foraging ants. This variation can be upwards of 50% of ant species per week. This suggests that numerous ant species on the BHI share the same physical space at different times. This temporal partitioning could well explain such unexpectedly high ant diversity in an isolated, urban site.

  11. Modeling Boston: A workflow for the efficient generation and maintenance of urban building energy models from existing geospatial datasets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerezo Davila, Carlos; Reinhart, Christoph F.; Bemis, Jamie L.

    2016-01-01

    City governments and energy utilities are increasingly focusing on the development of energy efficiency strategies for buildings as a key component in emission reduction plans and energy supply strategies. To support these diverse needs, a new generation of Urban Building Energy Models (UBEM) is currently being developed and validated to estimate citywide hourly energy demands at the building level. However, in order for cities to rely on UBEMs, effective model generation and maintenance workflows are needed based on existing urban data structures. Within this context, the authors collaborated with the Boston Redevelopment Authority to develop a citywide UBEM based on official GIS datasets and a custom building archetype library. Energy models for 83,541 buildings were generated and assigned one of 52 use/age archetypes, within the CAD modelling environment Rhinoceros3D. The buildings were then simulated using the US DOE EnergyPlus simulation program, and results for buildings of the same archetype were crosschecked against data from the US national energy consumption surveys. A district-level intervention combining photovoltaics with demand side management is presented to demonstrate the ability of UBEM to provide actionable information. Lack of widely available archetype templates and metered energy data, were identified as key barriers within existing workflows that may impede cities from effectively applying UBEM to guide energy policy. - Highlights: • Data requirements for Urban Building Energy Models are reviewed. • A workflow for UBEM generation from available GIS datasets is developed. • A citywide demand simulation model for Boston is generated and tested. • Limitations for UBEM in current urban data systems are identified and discussed. • Model application for energy management policy is shown in an urban PV scenario.

  12. Application of a Density-Dependent Numerical Model (MODHMS) to Assess Salinity Intrusion in the Biscayne Aquifer, North Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, H.; Panday, S.

    2005-05-01

    Miami-Dade County is located at the Southeastern part of the State of Florida adjoining the Atlantic coast. The sole drinking water source is the Biscayne Aquifer, which is an unconfined freshwater aquifer, composed of marine limestone with intermediate sand lenses. The aquifer is highly conductive with hydraulic conductivity values ranging from 1,000 ft/day to over 100,000 ft/day in some areas. Saltwater intrusion from the coast is an immediate threat to the freshwater resources of the County. Therefore, a multilayer density-dependent transient groundwater model was developed to evaluate the saltwater intrusion characteristics of the system. The model was developed using MODHMS, a finite difference, fully coupled groundwater and surface water flow and transport model. The buoyancy term is included in the equation for unconfined flow and the flow and transport equations are coupled using an iterative scheme. The transport equation was solved using an adaptive implicit total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme and anisotropy of dispersivity was included for longitudinal, transverse, vertical transverse, and vertical longitudinal directions. The model eastern boundaries extended approximately 3.5 miles into the Atlantic Ocean while the western boundary extended approximately 27 miles inland from the coast. The northern and southern boundaries extend 6 miles into Broward County and up to the C-100 canal in Miami-Dade County respectively. Close to 2 million active nodes were simulated, with horizontal discretization of 500 feet. A total of nine different statistical analyses were conducted with observed and simulated hydraulic heads. The analysis indicates that the model simulated hydraulic heads matched closely with the observed heads across the model domain. In general, the model reasonably simulated the inland extent of saltwater intrusion within the aquifer, and matched relatively well with limited observed chloride data from monitoring wells along the coast

  13. (Re) framing the nation : the Afro -Cuban challenge to Black and Latino struggles for American identity

    OpenAIRE

    Gosin, Monika

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation interrogates the complexity of late 20th and early 21st century racial projects, focusing on conflict and convergence among African Americans, Cuban exiles, and Afro-Cubans in the United States. A textual analysis of the African American Miami Times and the Spanish language El Herald/El Nuevo Herald during the 1980 Mariel exodus and 1994 Balsero crisis, reveals the concerns of Miami African Americans and Cubans related to issues of race, immigration, and national belonging. ...

  14. HIV risk behaviors of Latin American and Caribbean men who have sex with men in Miami, Florida, USA Comportamientos de riesgo de infección por el VIH en hombres latinoamericanos y caribeños que tienen sexo con hombres en Miami, Florida, EUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mete Akin

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study is to describe the sexual practices, drug use behaviors, psychosocial factors, and predictors of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI in a sample of Hispanic men who have sex with men (MSM born in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC countries who currently reside in Miami-Dade County, Florida. METHODS: Hispanic MSM (N = 566 recruited from community and Internet venues completed a computer-assisted self-interview assessing sociodemographic factors, drug use, sexual behaviors, and psychosocial factors. We focused on the 470 men who were born in LAC countries, including Puerto Rico. We first examined separately, by country of origin, the sexual practices, drug use behaviors, and psychosocial factors of the sample. We then collapsed the groups and examined the factors associated with UAI in the previous 6 months for the entire sample of Hispanic MSM from LAC countries. RESULTS: In the previous 6 months, 44% of the sample engaged in UAI, and 41% used club drugs. At the multivariate level, psychological distress, higher number of sexual partners, club drug use, HIV-positive status at the time of immigration, and greater orientation to American culture were significantly associated with UAI in the previous 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: Many MSM born in LAC countries engage in HIV-related risk behaviors in the AIDS epicenter of Miami-Dade County, Florida. Culturally appropriate interventions should address these risk behaviors in this underserved population.OBJETIVO: Describir las prácticas sexuales, el consumo de drogas y los factores psicosociales y de predicción del coito anal sin protección (CASP, en una muestra de hombres nacidos en América Latina y el Caribe (ALC residentes actualmente en el Condado de Miami-Dade, Florida, que tienen sexo con hombres. MÉTODOS: En total, 566 hispanos que tienen sexo con hombres (HSH, captados en la comunidad y sitios de Internet, completaron una encuesta autoaplicada por computadora que

  15. Map of the approximate inland extent of saltwater at the base of the Biscayne aquifer in the Model Land Area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2017-07-11

    The inland extent of saltwater at the base of the Biscayne aquifer in the Model Land Area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, was mapped in 2011. Since that time, the saltwater interface has continued to move inland. The interface is near several active well fields; therefore, an updated approximation of the inland extent of saltwater and an improved understanding of the rate of movement of the saltwater interface are necessary. A geographic information system was used to create a map using the data collected by the organizations that monitor water salinity in this area. An average rate of saltwater interface movement of 140 meters per year was estimated by dividing the distance between two monitoring wells (TPGW-7L and Sec34-MW-02-FS) by the travel time. The travel time was determined by estimating the dates of arrival of the saltwater interface at the wells and computing the difference. This estimate assumes that the interface is traveling east to west between the two monitoring wells. Although monitoring is spatially limited in this area and some of the wells are not ideally designed for salinity monitoring, the monitoring network in this area is improving in spatial distribution and most of the new wells are well designed for salinity monitoring. The approximation of the inland extent of the saltwater interface and the estimated rate of movement of the interface are dependent on existing data. Improved estimates could be obtained by installing uniformly designed monitoring wells in systematic transects extending landward of the advancing saltwater interface.

  16. Evaluation of Confining Layer Integrity Beneath the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, Dade County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, Robert Charles; Green, Timothy Scott; Hull, Laurence Charles

    2001-02-01

    A review has been performed of existing information that describes geology, hydrogeology, and geochemistry at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is operated by the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, in Dade County, Florida. Treated sanitary wastewater is injected into a saline aquifer beneath the plant. Detection of contaminants commonly associated with treated sanitary wastewater in the freshwater aquifer that overlies the saline aquifer has indicated a need for a reevaluation of the ability of the confining layer above the saline aquifer to prevent fluid migration into the overlying freshwater aquifer. Review of the available data shows that the geologic data set is not sufficient to demonstrate that a competent confining layer is present between the saline and freshwater aquifers. The hydrogeologic data also do not indicate that a competent confining layer is present. The geochemical data show that the freshwater aquifer is contaminated with treated wastewater, and the spatial patterns of contamination are consistent with upward migration through localized conduits through the Middle Confining Unit, such as leaking wells or natural features. Recommendations for collection and interpretation of additional site characterization data are provided.

  17. Seismic-sequence stratigraphy and geologic structure of the Floridan aquifer system near "Boulder Zone" deep wells in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, acquired, processed, and interpreted seismic-reflection data near the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields to determine if geologic factors may contribute to the upward migration of injected effluent into that upper part of the Floridan aquifer system designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as an underground source of drinking water. The depth of the Boulder Zone at the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields ranges from about 2,750 to 3,300 feet below land surface (ft bls), whereas overlying permeable zones used as alternative drinking water supply range in depth from about 825 to 1,580 ft bls at the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields. Seismic-sequence stratigraphy and geologic structures imaged on seismic-reflection profiles created for the study describe the part of the Floridan aquifer system overlying and within the Boulder Zone. Features of the Floridan aquifer system underlying the Boulder Zone were not studied because seismic-reflection profiles acquired near the North and South District “Boulder Zone” Well Fields lacked adequate resolution at such depths.

  18. Condom use preferences among Latinos in Miami-Dade: emerging themes concerning men’s and women’s culturally-ascribed attitudes and behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Francisco; De La Rosa, Mario; Ibanez, Gladys E.; Whitt, Elaine; Martin, Steven S.; O’Connell, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Among Latinos, cultural values such as machismo and marianismo may promote inconsistent condom use representing a significant risk factor for HIV infection. Yet, there continues to be a need for additional research to explore the influence these cultural values have on Latino men and women’s condom use attitudes and behaviours given increasing HIV rates of HIV infection among Latinos. The purpose of this study was to explore further Latino traditional culturally-ascribed attitudes and behaviour for emerging themes toward condom use among a diverse group of adult Latino men and women living in Miami-Dade County, Florida (USA). The study used a qualitative study-design and collected data from sixteen focus groups with a total of 67 Latino men and women. Finding from the focus groups described attitudes and behaviours that counter traditional gender roles towards sex and expected sexual behaviours informed by machismo and marianismo. Common attitudes noted in the study include men’s classification of women as clean/dirty to determine condom use and women’s assertiveness during sexual encounters negotiating condom use-in favour and against it. As the findings of this study suggest, the process differ greatly between Latino men and women, having an impact on the risk behaviours in which each engage. PMID:25530309

  19. Condom use preferences among Latinos in Miami-Dade: emerging themes concerning men's and women's culturally-ascribed attitudes and behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Francisco; De La Rosa, Mario; Ibanez, Gladys E; Whitt, Elaine; Martin, Steven S; O'Connell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Among Latinos, cultural values such as machismo and marianismo may promote inconsistent condom use representing a significant risk factor for HIV infection. Yet there continues to be a need for additional research to explore the influence these cultural values have on Latino men and women's condom use attitudes and behaviours given increasing HIV rates of HIV infection among Latinos. The purpose of this study was to explore further Latino traditional culturally-ascribed attitudes and behaviour for emerging themes toward condom use among a diverse group of adult Latino men and women living in Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA. The study used a qualitative study-design and collected data from 16 focus groups with a total of 67 Latino men and women. Findings from the focus groups described attitudes and behaviours that counter traditional gender roles towards sex and expected sexual behaviours informed by machismo and marianismo. Common attitudes noted in the study include men's classification of women as dirty-clean to determine condom use and women's assertiveness during sexual encounters negotiating condom use--in favour and against it. As the findings of this study suggest, the process differ greatly between Latino men and women, having an impact on the risk behaviours in which each engage.

  20. Preliminary evidence of HIV seroconversion among HIV-negative men who have sex with men taking non-prescribed antiretroviral medication for HIV prevention in Miami, Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, Mance E; Kurtz, Steven P

    2017-04-01

    Background Limited information suggests that men who have sex with men (MSM) are informally obtaining antiretroviral medication (ARVs) and using them for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Data are drawn from an on-going study examining the use of non-prescribed ARVs for PrEP. To date, 24 qualitative interviews have been conducted with HIV-negative, substance-using MSM living in Miami, Florida, USA. Data are presented from two participants who reported HIV seroconversion while using non-prescribed ARVs for PrEP. Preliminary data indicate that some young MSM: (i) lack awareness of and accurate information about the efficacious use of PrEP; (ii) obtain non-prescribed ARVs from HIV-positive sex partners and use these medications for PrEP in a way that does not provide adequate protection against HIV infection or cohere with established guidelines; and (iii) engage in multiple HIV transmission risk behaviours, including condomless anal sex and injection drug use. The informal, non-prescribed and non-medically supervised use of ARVs for HIV prevention has the potential to undermine the protective benefits of PrEP and leave men unprotected against HIV transmission and at risk for ARV resistance.

  1. Long-term results after Boston brace treatment in late-onset juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunderson Ragnhild

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is recommended that research in patients with idiopathic scoliosis should focus on short- and long-term patient-centred outcome. The aim of the present study was to evaluate outcome in patients with late-onset juvenile or adolescent idiopathic scoliosis 16 years or more after Boston brace treatment. Methods 272 (78% of 360 patients, 251 (92% women, responded to follow-up examination at a mean of 24.7 (range 16 - 32 years after Boston brace treatment. Fifty-eight (21% patients had late-onset juvenile and 214 had adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. All patients had clinical and radiological examination and answered a standardised questionnaire including work status, demographics, General Function Score (GFS (100 - worst possible and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI (100 - worst possible, EuroQol (EQ-5D (1 - best possible, EQ-VAS (100 - best possible, and Scoliosis Research Society - 22 (SRS - 22 (5 - best possible. Results The mean age at follow-up was 40.4 (31-48 years. The prebrace major curve was in average 33.2 (20 - 57°. At weaning and at the last follow-up the corresponding values were 28.3 (1 - 58° and 32.5 (7 - 80°, respectively. Curve development was similar in patients with late-onset juvenile and adolescent start. The prebrace curve increased > 5° in 31% and decreased > 5° in 26%. Twenty-five patients had surgery. Those who did not attend follow-up (n = 88 had a lower mean curve at weaning: 25.4 (6-53°. Work status was 76% full-time and 10% part-time. Eighty-seven percent had delivered a baby, 50% had pain in pregnancy. The mean (SD GFS was 7.4 (10.8, ODI 9.3 (11.0, EQ-5D 0.82 (0.2, EQ-VAS 77.6 (17.8, SRS-22: pain 4.1 (0.8, mental health 4.1 (0.6, self-image 3.7 (0.7, function 4.0 (0.6, satisfaction with treatment 3.7 (1.0. Surgical patients had significantly reduced scores for SRS-physical function and self-image, and patients with curves ≥ 45° had reduced self-image. Conclusion Long-term results were

  2. Propofol Infusion Syndrome Heralded by ECG Changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mijzen, Elsbeth J.; Jacobs, Bram; Aslan, Adnan; Rodgers, Michael G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS) is well known, often associated with, lethal complication of sedation with propofol. PRIS seems to be associated with young age, traumatic brain injury (TBI), higher cumulative doses of propofol, and the concomitant use of catecholamines. Known manifestations of

  3. Neutrinos herald possible new physics in Japan

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    There’s an embarrassment of choice for my message this week. Firstly, it was great to see a press release from the Japanese T2K (Tokai to Kamioka) experiment on 15 June, signalling not only potentially great physics, but also that the Japanese physics community is getting back on its feet after the earthquake and tsunami. Back home, the LHC is running beautifully...    Crossing the inverse femtobarn threshold so early into this years run is wonderful achievement, and augurs well for the summer conferences. We’ve now reached the stage where a single LHC fill is delivering as much data as the entire 2010 run. And finally, when Council met this week, I was pleased to announce that CERN has received formal confirmation from all five applicants for membership, opening the way to CERN welcoming new members soon. A busy two weeks, then, but what I’d like to focus on is the new result from Japan.   Simply stated, the T2K result shows the first indication of...

  4. Heralded entanglement of two remote atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Michael; Hofmann, Julian; Ortegel, Norbert; Gerard, Lea; Redeker, Kai; Henkel, Florian; Rosenfeld, Wenjamin; Weber, Markus; Weinfurter, Harald

    2012-06-01

    Entanglement between atomic quantum memories at remote locations will be a key resource for future applications in quantum communication. One possibility to generate such entanglement over large distances is entanglement swapping starting from two quantum memories each entangled with a photon. The photons can be transported to a Bell-state measurement where after the atomic quantum memories are projected onto an entangled state. We have set up two independently operated single atom experiments separated by 20 m. Via a spontaneous decay process each quantum memory, in our case a single Rb-87 atom, emits a single photon whose polarization is entangled with the atomic spin. The photons one emitted from each atom are collected into single-mode optical fibers guided to a non-polarizing 50-50 beam-splitter and detected by avalanche photodetectors. Bunching of indistinguishable photons allows to perform a Bell-state measurement on the photons. Conditioned on the registration of particular two-photon coincidences the spin states of both atoms are measured. The observed correlations clearly prove the entanglement of the two atoms. This is a first step towards creating a basic node of a quantum network as well as a key prerequisite for a future loophole-free test of Bell's inequality.

  5. What it Takes to Get Passed On: Message Content, Style, and Structure as Predictors of Retransmission in the Boston Marathon Bombing Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Sutton

    Full Text Available Message retransmission is a central aspect of information diffusion. In a disaster context, the passing on of official warning messages by members of the public also serves as a behavioral indicator of message salience, suggesting that particular messages are (or are not perceived by the public to be both noteworthy and valuable enough to share with others. This study provides the first examination of terse message retransmission of official warning messages in response to a domestic terrorist attack, the Boston Marathon Bombing in 2013. Using messages posted from public officials' Twitter accounts that were active during the period of the Boston Marathon bombing and manhunt, we examine the features of messages that are associated with their retransmission. We focus on message content, style, and structure, as well as the networked relationships of message senders to answer the question: what characteristics of a terse message sent under conditions of imminent threat predict its retransmission among members of the public? We employ a negative binomial model to examine how message characteristics affect message retransmission. We find that, rather than any single effect dominating the process, retransmission of official Tweets during the Boston bombing response was jointly influenced by various message content, style, and sender characteristics. These findings suggest the need for more work that investigates impact of multiple factors on the allocation of attention and on message retransmission during hazard events.

  6. A health impact assessment of proposed public transportation service cuts and fare increases in Boston, Massachusetts (U.S.A.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Peter; Ito, Kate; Buonocore, Jonathan J; Levy, Jonathan I; Arcaya, Mariana C

    2014-08-07

    Transportation decisions have health consequences that are often not incorporated into policy-making processes. Health Impact Assessment (HIA) is a process that can be used to evaluate health effects of transportation policy. We present a rapid HIA, conducted over eight weeks, evaluating health and economic effects of proposed fare increases and service cuts to Boston, Massachusetts' public transportation system. We used transportation modeling in concert with tools allowing for quantification and monetization of multiple pathways. We estimated health and economic costs of proposed public transportation system changes to be hundreds of millions of dollars per year, exceeding the budget gap the public transportation authority was required to close. Significant health pathways included crashes, air pollution, and physical activity. The HIA enabled stakeholders to advocate for more modest fare increases and service cuts, which were eventually adopted by decision makers. This HIA was among the first to quantify and monetize multiple pathways linking transportation decisions with health and economic outcomes, using approaches that could be applied in different settings. Including health costs in transportation decisions can lead to policy choices with both economic and public health benefits.

  7. A Health Impact Assessment of Proposed Public Transportation Service Cuts and Fare Increases in Boston, Massachusetts (U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter James

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transportation decisions have health consequences that are often not incorporated into policy-making processes. Health Impact Assessment (HIA is a process that can be used to evaluate health effects of transportation policy. We present a rapid HIA, conducted over eight weeks, evaluating health and economic effects of proposed fare increases and service cuts to Boston, Massachusetts’ public transportation system. We used transportation modeling in concert with tools allowing for quantification and monetization of multiple pathways. We estimated health and economic costs of proposed public transportation system changes to be hundreds of millions of dollars per year, exceeding the budget gap the public transportation authority was required to close. Significant health pathways included crashes, air pollution, and physical activity. The HIA enabled stakeholders to advocate for more modest fare increases and service cuts, which were eventually adopted by decision makers. This HIA was among the first to quantify and monetize multiple pathways linking transportation decisions with health and economic outcomes, using approaches that could be applied in different settings. Including health costs in transportation decisions can lead to policy choices with both economic and public health benefits.

  8. Application of analytical hierarchy process to analyze stakeholders preferences for municipal solid waste management plans, Boston, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Francisco; Hanaki, Keisuke; Aramaki, Toshiya [Department of Urban Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, the University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Hongo 7-3-1, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Connors, Stephen [Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, One Amherst Street E40, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307 (United States)

    2008-05-15

    This paper presents analytical hierarchical process (AHP) in combination with life cycle assessment (LCA) as a decision support tool for municipal solid waste (MSW) management. A proposed set of treatment plans and an array of impacts create a complex decision environment for MSW management in the city of Boston. AHP is utilized to incorporate the relative importance of the different impact categories and treatment plans into the decision scheme regarding stakeholder group's preferences. The use of biogasification and refuse derived fuel (RDF) technologies into different management plans is presented as an alternative to the actual management of household solid waste. The results of the AHP application show that between the impact categories presented, green house gas emissions and landfill capacity constrains are ranked higher rather than the cost associated to the operation of the plan and health damage associated to the treatment plans presented among the stakeholder groups. In a broader context, the use of a hierarchical approach on AHP to structure the decision problem allows the development of four different scenarios according to the contribution of each stakeholder group to the decision scheme. In this analysis, the use of biogasification was considered as the most suitable plan to follow. (author)

  9. Preventative health, diversity, and inclusion: a qualitative study of client experience aboard a mobile health clinic in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchelle, Zoe; Rawlins, Yasmin; Hill, Caterina; Bennet, Jennifer; Perez, Leonor Xochitl; Oriol, Nancy

    2017-11-03

    There are approximately 2000 mobile health clinics operating in the United States. While researchers have established that mobile health clinics can be cost effective and improve outcomes, there is scant research examining the healthcare experience on a mobile health clinic from patients' perspectives. Data were gathered from interviews with 25 clients receiving care on a Boston-based mobile health clinic and analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Emerging patterns in the data revealed three relational and three structural factors most significant to participants' experience of care on The Family Van. Relational factors include providers who 1) Communicate understandably, 2) Create a culture of respect and inclusivity, and 3) Are diverse with knowledge of the community. Structural factors include 1) A focus on preventative health and managing chronic disease, 2) Expeditious, free, and multiple services, and 3) Location. The participant accounts in this report serve to expand on prior research exploring mobile health clinics' role in patients' healthcare, to more clearly define the most salient aspects of the mobile health clinic model for the patients they serve, and to give voice to patients too seldom heard in the academic literature.

  10. The Boston Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury-Lifetime (BAT-L) semistructured interview: evidence of research utility and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Catherine Brawn; Amick, Melissa M; Grande, Laura; McGlynn, Susan; Kenna, Alexandra; Morra, Lindsay; Clark, Alexandra; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E

    2014-01-01

    Report the prevalence of lifetime and military-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans and validate the Boston Assessment of TBI-Lifetime (BAT-L). The BAT-L is the first validated, postcombat, semistructured clinical interview to characterize head injuries and diagnose TBIs throughout the life span. Community-dwelling convenience sample of 131 OEF/OIF veterans. TBI criteria (alteration of mental status, posttraumatic amnesia, and loss of consciousness) were evaluated for all possible TBIs, including a novel evaluation of blast exposure. BAT-L, Ohio State University TBI Identification Method (OSU-TBI-ID). About 67% of veterans incurred a TBI in their lifetime. Almost 35% of veterans experienced at least 1 military-related TBI; all were mild in severity, 40% of them were due to blast, 50% were due to some other (ie, blunt) mechanism, and 10% were due to both types of injuries. Predeployment TBIs were frequent (45% of veterans). There was strong correspondence between the BAT-L and the OSU-TBI-ID (Cohen κ = 0.89; Kendall τ-b = 0.95). Interrater reliability of the BAT-L was strong (κs >0.80). The BAT-L is a valid instrument with which to assess TBI across a service member's lifetime and captures the varied and complex nature of brain injuries across OEF/OIF veterans' life span.

  11. Item analysis of the Spanish version of the Boston Naming Test with a Spanish speaking adult population from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Stella H; Strutt, Adriana M; Olabarrieta-Landa, Laiene; Lequerica, Anthony H; Rivera, Diego; De Los Reyes Aragon, Carlos Jose; Utria, Oscar; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2018-02-23

    The Boston Naming Test (BNT) is a widely used measure of confrontation naming ability that has been criticized for its questionable construct validity for non-English speakers. This study investigated item difficulty and construct validity of the Spanish version of the BNT to assess cultural and linguistic impact on performance. Subjects were 1298 healthy Spanish speaking adults from Colombia. They were administered the 60- and 15-item Spanish version of the BNT. A Rasch analysis was computed to assess dimensionality, item hierarchy, targeting, reliability, and item fit. Both versions of the BNT satisfied requirements for unidimensionality. Although internal consistency was excellent for the 60-item BNT, order of difficulty did not increase consistently with item number and there were a number of items that did not fit the Rasch model. For the 15-item BNT, a total of 5 items changed position on the item hierarchy with 7 poor fitting items. Internal consistency was acceptable. Construct validity of the BNT remains a concern when it is administered to non-English speaking populations. Similar to previous findings, the order of item presentation did not correspond with increasing item difficulty, and both versions were inadequate at assessing high naming ability.

  12. Culture Qualitatively but Not Quantitatively Influences Performance in the Boston Naming Test in a Chinese-Speaking Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Bin Chen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The Boston Naming Test (BNT is the most frequently administered confrontational naming test, but the cultural background of the patients may influence their performance in the BNT. The aim of this study was to identify differences in performance in the BNT between a Chinese population in Taiwan, Chinese populations in other areas and a Caucasian population. Methods: A total of 264 native, Chinese-speaking, cognitively normal elders aged >60 years were enrolled in our study and conducted the 30-item Chinese version of the BNT. Another 10 BNT studies were categorized, analyzed and compared with the present study. Results: Higher education was associated with higher scores, whereas age and gender had no effect on performance in the BNT. The score of the Chinese-speaking population was equivalent to the English-speaking population. A disparity in difficulties with items was not only apparent between the Taiwanese and Caucasian populations, but also between the Chinese-speaking populations in the different geographic areas. Conclusion: For the most part, the impact of culture on performance in the BNT may not be quantitative but qualitative. Attention should be paid to a potential effect of culture on difficulties with items when administering the BNT to non-English-speaking populations. Understanding differences in performance in the BNT in distinct cultural settings improves the clinical application of the BNT.

  13. FOX: A Fault-Oblivious Extreme-Scale Execution Environment Boston University Final Report Project Number: DE-SC0005365

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appavoo, Jonathan [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2013-03-17

    Exascale computing systems will provide a thousand-fold increase in parallelism and a proportional increase in failure rate relative to today's machines. Systems software for exascale machines must provide the infrastructure to support existing applications while simultaneously enabling efficient execution of new programming models that naturally express dynamic, adaptive, irregular computation; coupled simulations; and massive data analysis in a highly unreliable hardware environment with billions of threads of execution. The FOX project explored systems software and runtime support for a new approach to the data and work distribution for fault oblivious application execution. Our major OS work at Boston University focused on developing a new light-weight operating systems model that provides an appropriate context for both multi-core and multi-node application development. This work is discussed in section 1. Early on in the FOX project BU developed infrastructure for prototyping dynamic HPC environments in which the sets of nodes that an application is run on can be dynamically grown or shrunk. This work was an extension of the Kittyhawk project and is discussed in section 2. Section 3 documents the publications and software repositories that we have produced. To put our work in context of the complete FOX project contribution we include in section 4 an extended version of a paper that documents the complete work of the FOX team.

  14. Boat-Based Education for Boston Area Public Schools: Encouraging Marine Science and Technology Literacy and Awareness of the Coastal "Backyard"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E. M.; Reynolds, R. M.; Wright, A. K.; Deschenes, H. A.

    2016-02-01

    Half the global population lives within 60 km of the ocean, profoundly influencing environmental quality and services to local communities. Adoption of marine science curricula creates opportunities for educators and scientists to engage and entrain K-12 students as ocean stewards. In particular, boat-based science activities facilitate hands-on inquiry. These activities reinforce key science concepts while creating a tangible connection to our shared coastal "backyard." A collaboration between Zephyr Education Foundation, the New England Aquarium, the University of Massachusetts Boston and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has taken >500 Boston, MA area students from 26 public schools on boat-based education trips in Boston Harbor. Marine science and technology professionals and educators facilitate participatory activities using modern marine technology aboard a research vessel. Trips are funded at no cost to participants by a grant from the Richard Lounsbery Foundation; cost-free outings are essential for participation from underserved public school districts. Participants perceived three important outcomes of their outings: the trips 1) enhanced in-class curricular learning and improved marine science literacy 2) increased personal connections to local marine environments, and 3) increased interest in careers in marine science, including engineering and technical positions. Despite living in close proximity to water, this was the first boat outing for many students; boat-based education trips enhanced student awareness of local environments in a way that curricular study had not. Boston trip results are being evaluated, but 3000 evaluations from similar trips in Woods Hole, MA indicate that 98% of participants gained a better understanding and appreciation of the work conducted by marine scientists, engineers, and other professionals, and 82% said their experience made them more interested in becoming involved in science at school and/or as a job. In summary

  15. La Matriz BCG (Boston Consulting Group para la Gestión de Publicaciones Periádicas The BCG (Boston Consulting Group matrix for management of periodic publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª del Pilar Serrano Gallardo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available El marketing documental se ha de encargar de satisfacer las necesidades informativas de los usuarios de forma rentable para ellos y para el centro; para ello se ha de partir de un conjunto de herramientas técnicas que se conocen como el Marketing - Mix, y que abarcan el Producto, el Precio, la Distribución y la Comunicación. Dentro de las herramientas destinadas al producto se encuentra la matriz BCG (Boston Consulting Group, que está orientada a gestión, sobre la base de la situación del producto en el mercado. El objetivo del presente artículo es proponer una matriz BCG para la gestión de una publicación periódica enfermera en nuestro mercado.La matriz BCG se construye con dos variables: el Crecimiento del Mercado y la Tasa Relativa del Mercado, las cuales se han operacionalizado como Media de Crecimiento Anual en el número de suscripciones de tres revistas enfermeras (Rol de Enfermería, Metas de Enfermería y Nursing durante el último quinquenio y Media de Tirada Actual de las tres publicaciones. Se han utilizado datos ofrecidos por la Oficina para el Control de la Difusión (OJD. La matriz BCG puede constituirse como herramienta básica en la gestión de publicaciones, dado que tras determinar la situación del producto, se pueden establecer estrategias que ayuden o favorezcan el mejor posicionamiento posible del producto en el mercado.Documentary marketing has to address the information needs of the users in a manner that is cost-effective not only for them but also for the institution. To do this, a set of technical tools, known as Marketing- Mix, need to be used. These tools include the Product, Price, Distribution and Communication. Within the set of tools used for the Product, we find the BCG matrix (Boston Consulting Group, a tool aimed at the management of the product on the basis of where it is positioned in the market. The objective of this paper is to propose a BCG matrix for the management of a nursing periodic

  16. Origins and delineation of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer and changes in the distribution of saltwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.; Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Fitterman, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Intrusion of saltwater into parts of the shallow karst Biscayne aquifer is a major concern for the 2.5 million residents of Miami-Dade County that rely on this aquifer as their primary drinking water supply. Saltwater intrusion of this aquifer began when the Everglades were drained to provide dry land for urban development and agriculture. The reduction in water levels caused by this drainage, combined with periodic droughts, allowed saltwater to flow inland along the base of the aquifer and to seep directly into the aquifer from the canals. The approximate inland extent of saltwater was last mapped in 1995. An examination of the inland extent of saltwater and the sources of saltwater in the aquifer was completed during 2008–2011 by using (1) all available salinity information, (2) time-series electromagnetic induction log datasets from 35 wells, (3) time-domain electromagnetic soundings collected at 79 locations, (4) a helicopter electromagnetic survey done during 2001 that was processed, calibrated, and published during the study, (5) cores and geophysical logs collected from 8 sites for stratigraphic analysis, (6) 8 new water-quality monitoring wells, and (7) analyses of 69 geochemical samples. The results of the study indicate that as of 2011 approximately 1,200 square kilometers (km2) of the mainland part of the Biscayne aquifer were intruded by saltwater. The saltwater front was mapped farther inland than it was in 1995 in eight areas totaling about 24.1 km2. In many of these areas, analyses indicated that saltwater had encroached along the base of the aquifer. The saltwater front was mapped closer to the coast than it was in 1995 in four areas totaling approximately 6.2 km2. The changes in the mapped extent of saltwater resulted from improved spatial information, actual movement of the saltwater front, or a combination of both. Salinity monitoring in some of the canals in Miami-Dade County between 1988 and 2010 indicated influxes of saltwater, with maximum

  17. Identifying sources of children's consumption of junk food in Boston after-school programs, April-May 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Austin, S Bryn; Cradock, Angie L; Giles, Catherine M; Lee, Rebekka M; Davison, Kirsten K; Gortmaker, Steven L

    2014-11-20

    Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children's dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received program-provided snacks during after-school time. Our study objective was to determine how different sources of snacks affect children's snack consumption in after-school settings. We recorded snacks served to and brought in by 298 children in 18 after-school programs in Boston, Massachusetts, on 5 program days in April and May 2011. We measured children's snack consumption on 2 program days using a validated observation protocol. We then calculated within-child change-in-change models to estimate the effect of nonprogram snacks on children's dietary intake after school. Nonprogram snacks contained more sugary beverages and candy than program-provided snacks. Having a nonprogram snack was associated with significantly higher consumption of total calories (+114.7 kcal, P < .001), sugar-sweetened beverages (+0.5 oz, P = .01), desserts (+0.3 servings, P < .001), and foods with added sugars (+0.5 servings; P < .001) during the snack period. On days when children brought their own after-school snack, they consumed more salty and sugary foods and nearly twice as many calories than on days when they consumed only program-provided snacks. Policy strategies limiting nonprogram snacks or setting nutritional standards for them in after-school settings should be explored further as a way to promote child health.

  18. Stiffness control of balance during dual task and prospective falls in older adults: the MOBILIZE Boston Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Gu; Quach, Lien; Li, Wenjun; Lipsitz, Lewis A

    2013-09-01

    Outdoor fallers differ from indoor fallers substantially in demographics, lifestyle, health condition and physical function. Biomechanical predictors of outdoor falls have not been well characterized. Current validated measures of postural deficits, which describe only the overall postural behavior, are predictive of indoor falls but not outdoor falls. We hypothesized that a model-based description of postural muscle tone and reflexes, particularly during dual tasking, would predict outdoor falls. We tested whether postural stiffness and damping from an inverted pendulum model were predictive of future indoor and outdoor falls among older adults from the MOBILIZE Boston Study. The center of pressure data during standing were obtained from 717 participants aged 77.9±5.3 years. Participants stood barefoot with eyes open for 30s per trial, in two sets of five standing trials. One set included a serial subtractions task. Postural stiffness and damping values were determined from the postural sway data. After the postural measurements, falls were monitored prospectively using a monthly mail-in calendar over 6-36 months. Associations of postural measures with fall rates were determined using negative binomial regressions. After covariate adjustments, postural stiffness (p=0.02-0.05) and damping (p=0.007-0.1) were associated with lower outdoor falls risk, but not with indoor falls. Results were invariant by direction (anteroposterior versus mediolateral) or by condition (quiet standing versus dual task). Outdoor fall risk may be tied to postural control more so than indoor falls. Dual tasking is likely related to fall risk among older and sicker older adults, but not those relatively healthy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reliability of tonosafe disposable tonometer prisms: clinical implications from the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System Quality Assurance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V; Daly, M K; Cakiner-Egilmez, T; Baker, E

    2011-05-01

    Given the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System's recent introduction of single-use Tonosafe disposable tonometer prisms as an alternative to Goldmann applanation tonometers (GATs), this study had two aims: to conduct a large-scale quality assurance trial to assess the reliability of intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements of the Tonosafe disposable tonometer compared with GAT, particularly at extremes of pressure; to evaluate the suitability of Tonosafe disposable tonometer prisms as an acceptable substitute for GATs and for clinic-wide implementation in an academic tertiary referral setting. Ophthalmology resident physicians measured the IOPs of patients in general and specialty eye clinics with the Tonosafe disposable tonometer and GAT. Tonosafe test-retest reliability data were also collected. A retrospective review of patient charts and data analysis were performed to determine the reliability of measurements. The IOPs of 652 eyes (326 patients) were measured with both GAT and Tonosafe, with a range of 3-34 mm Hg. Linear regression analysis showed R=0.93, slope=0.91, both of which supported the proposed hypothesis, and the y-intercept=-1.05 was significantly different from the hypothesized value. The Tonosafe test-retest repeatability (40 eyes of 40 patients), r=0.977, was very high, which was further supported by linear regression slope=0.993, y-intercept=0.118, and a Tonosafe repeatability coefficient of 2.06, similar to GAT repeatability. The IOP measurements by Tonosafe disposable prisms correlated closely with Goldmann measurements, with similar repeated measurement variability to GAT. This suggests that the Tonosafe is an acceptable substitute for GAT to measure IOP in ophthalmology clinic settings.

  20. Lung function, asthma symptoms, and quality of life for children in public housing in Boston: a case-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinbach Suzanne

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children in urban public housing are at high risk for asthma, given elevated environmental and social exposures and suboptimal medical care. For a multifactorial disease like asthma, design of intervention studies can be influenced by the relative prevalence of key risk factors. To better understand risk factors for asthma morbidity in the context of an environmental intervention study, we conducted a detailed baseline evaluation of 78 children (aged 4–17 years from three public housing developments in Boston. Methods Asthmatic children and their caregivers were recruited between April 2002 and January 2003. We conducted intake interviews that captured a detailed family and medical history, including questions regarding asthma symptom severity, access to health care, medication usage, and psychological stress. Quality of life was evaluated for both the child and caregiver with an asthma-specific scale. Pulmonary function was measured with a portable spirometer, and allergy testing for common indoor and outdoor allergens was conducted with skin testing using the prick puncture method. Exploratory linear and logistic regression models evaluating predictors of respiratory symptoms, quality of life, and pulmonary function were conducted using SAS. Results We found high rates of obesity (56% and allergies to indoor contaminants such as cockroaches (59% and dust mites (59%. Only 36% of children with persistent asthma reported being prescribed any daily controller medication, and most did not have an asthma action plan or a peak flow meter. One-time lung function measures were poorly correlated with respiratory symptoms or quality of life, which were significantly correlated with each other. In multivariate regression models, household size, body mass index, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were positively associated with respiratory symptom severity (p Conclusion Given the elevated prevalence of multiple risk factors

  1. Beyond anal sex: sexual practices associated with HIV risk reduction among men who have sex with men in Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Sari L; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Skeer, Margie; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2009-07-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to bear a disproportionate HIV and sexually transmitted disease (STD) burden. The current study examined the frequency and associations of sexual risk reduction behaviors among a sample of MSM in the greater Boston, Massachusetts area. One hundred eighty-nine MSM completed a one-time behavioral and psychosocial assessment between March 2006 and May 2007. Logistic regression procedures examined the association of demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors with risk reduction practices. Twenty percent of the sample reported rimming, mutual masturbation, digital penetration, using sex toys, or 100% condom use as a means to reduce their risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV in the prior 12 months. In bivariate analyses, risk reducers were more likely to disclose their MSM status (i.e., be "out"; odds ratio [OR] = 3.64; p < 0.05), and report oral sex with a condom in the prior 12 months (OR = 4.85; p < 0.01). They were less likely to report: depression (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale [CES-D] score 16+; OR = 0.48; p < 0.05), a history of one or more sexually transmitted diseases (STDs; OR = 0.40; p < 0.05), and meeting sexual partners at public cruising areas (OR = 0.32; p < 0.01). In a multivariable model, risk reducers were less likely to report: alcohol use during sex (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.33; p < 0.05), depression (CESD score 16+; AOR = 0.32; p < 0.05), or meeting sexual partners at public cruising areas (AOR = 0.30; p < 0.05), or via the Internet (AOR = 0.12; p < 0.05) in the previous 12 months. Identifying and understanding such factors associated with risk reduction behaviors may be important to consider in designing effective prevention interventions to promote sexual health for MSM.

  2. Identifying Sources of Children’s Consumption of Junk Food in Boston After-School Programs, April–May 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S. Bryn; Cradock, Angie L.; Giles, Catherine M.; Lee, Rebekka M.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about how the nutrition environment in after-school settings may affect children’s dietary intake. We measured the nutritional quality of after-school snacks provided by programs participating in the National School Lunch Program or the Child and Adult Care Food Program and compared them with snacks brought from home or purchased elsewhere (nonprogram snacks). We quantified the effect of nonprogram snacks on the dietary intake of children who also received program-provided snacks during after-school time. Our study objective was to determine how different sources of snacks affect children’s snack consumption in after-school settings. Methods We recorded snacks served to and brought in by 298 children in 18 after-school programs in Boston, Massachusetts, on 5 program days in April and May 2011. We measured children’s snack consumption on 2 program days using a validated observation protocol. We then calculated within-child change-in-change models to estimate the effect of nonprogram snacks on children’s dietary intake after school. Results Nonprogram snacks contained more sugary beverages and candy than program-provided snacks. Having a nonprogram snack was associated with significantly higher consumption of total calories (+114.7 kcal, P snack period. Conclusion On days when children brought their own after-school snack, they consumed more salty and sugary foods and nearly twice as many calories than on days when they consumed only program-provided snacks. Policy strategies limiting nonprogram snacks or setting nutritional standards for them in after-school settings should be explored further as a way to promote child health. PMID:25412028

  3. Factors Associated with Hallux Valgus in a Population-Based Study of Older Women and Men: the MOBILIZE Boston Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen-Sa D.T.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Li, Wenjun; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Gagnon, Margaret M.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine potential risk factors for hallux valgus in community-dwelling elders. Method Data from 600 MOBILIZE Boston Study participants (386 women and 214 men) were analyzed. Hallux valgus was defined as > 15 degrees angular deviation of the hallux with respect to the first metatarsal bone toward the lesser toes. Associations of hallux valgus with age, body mass index (BMI), race, education, pes planus, foot pain, and in women, history of high heel shoe use, were assessed using sex-specific Poisson regression with robust variance estimation for risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Hallux valgus was present in 58% of women and 25% of men. Higher BMI was inversely associated with presence of hallux valgus in women (p trend = 0.001), with the strongest inverse association observed in those with BMI of 30.0 or more compared to those with normal BMI (RR=0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 0.9). Women, who usually wore high-heeled shoes during ages 20 to 64 years compared to those who did not, had increased likelihood of hallux valgus (RR=1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.5). Among men, those with BMI between 25.0 and 29.9 had increased likelihood of hallux valgus compared to those with normal BMI (RR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.0, 3.5). Men with pes planus were more likely to have hallux valgus (RR=2.1, 95% CI: 1.3, 3.3) compared to men without pes planus. Conclusion In women, hallux valgus was associated with lower BMI and high heel use during ages 20 to 64, while in men, associations were observed with higher BMI and pes planus. Our results suggest that the etiologic mechanisms for hallux valgus may differ between men and women. PMID:19747997

  4. Mapping carbon storage in urban trees with multi-source remote sensing data: relationships between biomass, land use, and demographics in Boston neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti, Steve M; Hutyra, Lucy R; Newell, Jared D

    2014-12-01

    High resolution maps of urban vegetation and biomass are powerful tools for policy-makers and community groups seeking to reduce rates of urban runoff, moderate urban heat island effects, and mitigate the effects of greenhouse gas emissions. We developed a very high resolution map of urban tree biomass, assessed the scale sensitivities in biomass estimation, compared our results with lower resolution estimates, and explored the demographic relationships in biomass distribution across the City of Boston. We integrated remote sensing data (including LiDAR-based tree height estimates) and field-based observations to map canopy cover and aboveground tree carbon storage at ~1m spatial scale. Mean tree canopy cover was estimated to be 25.5±1.5% and carbon storage was 355Gg (28.8MgCha(-1)) for the City of Boston. Tree biomass was highest in forest patches (110.7MgCha(-1)), but residential (32.8MgCha(-1)) and developed open (23.5MgCha(-1)) land uses also contained relatively high carbon stocks. In contrast with previous studies, we did not find significant correlations between tree biomass and the demographic characteristics of Boston neighborhoods, including income, education, race, or population density. The proportion of households that rent was negatively correlated with urban tree biomass (R(2)=0.26, p=0.04) and correlated with Priority Planting Index values (R(2)=0.55, p=0.001), potentially reflecting differences in land management among rented and owner-occupied residential properties. We compared our very high resolution biomass map to lower resolution biomass products from other sources and found that those products consistently underestimated biomass within urban areas. This underestimation became more severe as spatial resolution decreased. This research demonstrates that 1) urban areas contain considerable tree carbon stocks; 2) canopy cover and biomass may not be related to the demographic characteristics of Boston neighborhoods; and 3) that recent advances

  5. Mapping Carbon Storage in Urban Trees with Multi-source Remote Sensing Data: Relationships between Biomass, Land Use, and Demographics in Boston Neighborhoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti, S. M.; Hutyra, L.

    2014-12-01

    High resolution maps of urban vegetation and biomass are powerful tools for policy-makers and community groups seeking to reduce rates of urban runoff, moderate urban heat island effects, and mitigate the effects of greenhouse gas emissions. We develop a very high resolution map of urban tree biomass, assess the scale sensitivities in biomass estimation, compare our results with lower resolution estimates, and explore the demographic relationships in biomass distribution across the City of Boston. We integrated remote sensing data (including LiDAR-based tree height estimates) and field-based observations to map canopy cover and aboveground tree carbon storage at ~1 m spatial scale. Mean tree canopy cover was estimated to be 25.5±1.5% and carbon storage was 355 Gg (28.8 Mg C ha-1) for the City of Boston. Tree biomass was highest in forest patches (110.7 Mg C ha-1), but residential (32.8 Mg C ha-1) and developed open (23.5 Mg C ha-1) land uses also contained relatively high carbon stocks. In contrast with previous studies, we did not find significant correlations between tree biomass and the demographic characteristics of Boston neighborhoods, including income, education, race, or population density. The proportion of households that rent was negatively correlated with urban tree biomass (R2=0.26, p=0.04) and correlated with Priority Planting Index values (R2=0.55, p=0.001), potentially reflecting differences in land management among rented and owner-occupied residential properties. We compared our very high resolution biomass map to lower resolution biomass products from other sources and found that those products consistently underestimated biomass within urban areas. This underestimation became more severe as spatial resolution decreased. This research demonstrates that 1) urban areas contain considerable tree carbon stocks; 2) canopy cover and biomass may not be related to the demographic characteristics of Boston neighborhoods; and 3) that recent advances in

  6. Acid-base disturbances in nephrotic syndrome: analysis using the CO2/HCO3 method (traditional Boston model) and the physicochemical method (Stewart model).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasagi, Tomomichi; Imai, Hirokazu; Miura, Naoto; Suzuki, Keisuke; Yoshino, Masabumi; Nobata, Hironobu; Nagai, Takuhito; Banno, Shogo

    2017-10-01

    The Stewart model for analyzing acid-base disturbances emphasizes serum albumin levels, which are ignored in the traditional Boston model. We compared data derived using the Stewart model to those using the Boston model in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Twenty-nine patients with nephrotic syndrome and six patients without urinary protein or acid-base disturbances provided blood and urine samples for analysis that included routine biochemical and arterial blood gas tests, plasma renin activity, and aldosterone. The total concentration of non-volatile weak acids (A TOT ), apparent strong ion difference (SIDa), effective strong ion difference (SIDe), and strong ion gap (SIG) were calculated according to the formulas of Agrafiotis in the Stewart model. According to the Boston model, 25 of 29 patients (90%) had alkalemia. Eighteen patients had respiratory alkalosis, 11 had metabolic alkalosis, and 4 had both conditions. Only three patients had hyperreninemic hyperaldosteronism. The Stewart model demonstrated respiratory alkalosis based on decreased PaCO 2 , metabolic alkalosis based on decreased A TOT , and metabolic acidosis based on decreased SIDa. We could diagnose metabolic alkalosis or acidosis with a normal anion gap after comparing delta A TOT [(14.09 - measured A TOT ) or (11.77 - 2.64 × Alb (g/dL))] and delta SIDa [(42.7 - measured SIDa) or (42.7 - (Na + K - Cl)]). We could also identify metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap using SIG > 7.0 (SIG = 0.9463 × corrected anion gap-8.1956). Patients with nephrotic syndrome had primary respiratory alkalosis, decreased A TOT due to hypoalbuminemia (power to metabolic alkalosis), and decreased levels of SIDa (power to metabolic acidosis). We could detect metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap by calculating SIG. The Stewart model in combination with the Boston model facilitates the analysis of complex acid-base disturbances in nephrotic syndrome.

  7. Sex differences in circumstances and consequences of outdoor and indoor falls in older adults in the MOBILIZE Boston cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite extensive research on risk factors associated with falling in older adults, and current fall prevention interventions focusing on modifiable risk factors, there is a lack of detailed accounts of sex differences in risk factors, circumstances and consequences of falls in the literature. We examined the circumstances, consequences and resulting injuries of indoor and outdoor falls according to sex in a population study of older adults. Methods Men and women 65 years and older (N = 743) were followed for fall events from the Maintenance of Balance, Independent Living, Intellect, and Zest in the Elderly (MOBILIZE) Boston prospective cohort study. Baseline measurements were collected by comprehensive clinical assessments, home visits and questionnaires. During the follow-up (median = 2.9 years), participants recorded daily fall occurrences on a monthly calendar, and fall circumstances were determined by a telephone interview. Falls were categorized by activity and place of falling. Circumstance-specific annualized fall rates were calculated and compared between men and women using negative binomial regression models. Results Women had lower rates of outdoor falls overall (Crude Rate Ratio (RR): 0.72, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.56-0.92), in locations of recreation (RR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.17-0.70), during vigorous activity (RR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.18-0.81) and on snowy or icy surfaces (RR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.36-0.86) compared to men. Women and men did not differ significantly in their rates of falls outdoors on sidewalks, streets, and curbs, and during walking. Compared to men, women had greater fall rates in the kitchen (RR: 1.88, 95% CI: 1.04-3.40) and while performing household activities (RR: 3.68, 95% CI: 1.50-8.98). The injurious outdoor fall rates were equivalent in both sexes. Women’s overall rate of injurious indoor falls was nearly twice that of men’s (RR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.44-2.72), especially in the kitchen (RR: 6.83, 95% CI: 2

  8. Changes in erectile dysfunction over time in relation to Framingham cardiovascular risk in the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shona C; Rosen, Raymond C; Vita, Joseph A; Ganz, Peter; Kupelian, Varant

    2015-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the association between change in ED status over time and future underlying CVD risk is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between change in ED status and Framingham CVD risk, as well change in Framingham risk. We studied 965 men free of CVD in the Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey, a longitudinal cohort study with three assessments. ED was assessed with the five-item International Index of Erectile Function at BACH I (2002-2005) and BACH II (2007-2010) and classified as no ED/transient ED/persistent ED. CVD risk was assessed with 10-year Framingham CVD risk algorithm at BACH I and BACH III (2010-2012). Linear regression models controlled for baseline age, socio-demographic and lifestyle factors, as well as baseline Framingham risk. Models were also stratified by age (≥/< 50 years). Framingham CVD risk and change in Framingham CVD risk were the main outcome measures. Transient and persistent ED was significantly associated with increased Framingham risk and change in risk over time in univariate and age-adjusted models. In younger men, persistent ED was associated with a Framingham risk that was 1.58 percentage points higher (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.11, 3.06) and in older men, a Framingham risk that was 2.54 percentage points higher (95% CI: -1.5, 6.59), compared with those without ED. Change in Framingham risk over time was also associated with transient and persistent ED in men <50 years, but not in older men. Data suggest that even after taking into account other CVD risk factors, transient and persistent ED is associated with Framingham CVD risk and a greater increase in Framingham risk over time, particularly in younger men. Findings further support clinical assessment of CVD risk in men presenting with ED, especially those under 50 years. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  9. Long-Term Oceanographic Observations in Western Massachusetts Bay Offshore of Boston, Massachusetts: Data Report for 1989-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Bradford; Bothner, Michael H.; Alexander, P. Soupy; Lightsom, Frances L.; Martini, Marinna A.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Strahle, William S.

    2004-01-01

    This data report presents long-term oceanographic observations made in western Massachusetts Bay at two locations: (1) 42 deg 22.6' N., 70 deg 47.0' W. (Site A, 33 m water depth) from December 1989 through December 2002 (figure 1), and (2) 42 deg 9.8' N., 70 deg 38.4' W. (Site B, 21 m water depth) from October 1997 through December 2002. Site A is approximately 1 km south of the new ocean outfall that began discharging treated sewage effluent from the Boston metropolitan area into Massachusetts Bay on September 6, 2000. These long-term oceanographic observations have been collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in partnership with the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and with logistical support from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG - http://www.uscg.mil). This report presents time series data through December 2002, updating a similar report that presented data through December 2000 (Butman and others, 2002). In addition, the Statistics and Mean Flow sections include some new plots and tables and the format of the report has been streamlined by combining yearly figures into single .pdfs. Figure 1 (PDF format) The long-term measurements are planned to continue at least through 2005. The long-term oceanographic observations at Sites A and B are part of a USGS study designed to understand the transport and long-term fate of sediments and associated contaminants in the Massachusetts bays. (See http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/bostonharbor/ and Butman and Bothner, 1997.) The long-term observations document seasonal and inter-annual changes in currents, hydrography, and suspended-matter concentration in western Massachusetts Bay, and the importance of infrequent catastrophic events, such as major storms or hurricanes, in sediment resuspension and transport. They also provide observations for testing numerical models of circulation. This data report presents a description of the field program and instrumentation, an overview of the data through

  10. 77 FR 16928 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Miami River, Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ...,'' and then click on the balloon shape in the ``Actions'' column. If you submit your comments [[Page... N.W. 12th Avenue Bridge provides a vertical clearance of 22 feet above mean high water in the closed position, and a horizontal clearance of 150 feet. The normal operating schedule for the bridge is set forth...

  11. Report on a Boston University Conference December 7-8, 2012 on How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garik, Peter; Benétreau-Dupin, Yann

    2014-09-01

    This is an editorial report on the outcomes of an international conference sponsored by a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) (REESE-1205273) to the School of Education at Boston University and the Center for Philosophy and History of Science at Boston University for a conference titled: How Can the History and Philosophy of Science Contribute to Contemporary US Science Teaching? The presentations of the conference speakers and the reports of the working groups are reviewed. Multiple themes emerged for K-16 education from the perspective of the history and philosophy of science. Key ones were that: students need to understand that central to science is argumentation, criticism, and analysis; students should be educated to appreciate science as part of our culture; students should be educated to be science literate; what is meant by the nature of science as discussed in much of the science education literature must be broadened to accommodate a science literacy that includes preparation for socioscientific issues; teaching for science literacy requires the development of new assessment tools; and, it is difficult to change what science teachers do in their classrooms. The principal conclusions drawn by the editors are that: to prepare students to be citizens in a participatory democracy, science education must be embedded in a liberal arts education; science teachers alone cannot be expected to prepare students to be scientifically literate; and, to educate students for scientific literacy will require a new curriculum that is coordinated across the humanities, history/social studies, and science classrooms.

  12. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Hate Crimes and Suicidality Among a Population-Based Sample of Sexual-Minority Adolescents in Boston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether past-year suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents was more common in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Methods. Participants’ data came from a racially/ethnically diverse population-based sample of 9th- through 12th-grade public school students in Boston, Massachusetts (n = 1292). Of these, 108 (8.36%) reported a minority sexual orientation. We obtained data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults with battery between 2005 and 2008 from the Boston Police Department and linked the data to the adolescent’s residential address. Results. Sexual-minority youths residing in neighborhoods with higher rates of LGBT assault hate crimes were significantly more likely to report suicidal ideation (P = .013) and suicide attempts (P = .006), than were those residing in neighborhoods with lower LGBT assault hate crime rates. We observed no relationships between overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes and suicidality among sexual-minority adolescents (P > .05), providing evidence for specificity of the results to LGBT assault hate crimes. Conclusions. Neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual-orientation disparities in adolescent suicidality, highlighting potential targets for community-level suicide-prevention programs. PMID:24328619

  13. Basemap, Miami County, Kansas, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  14. Blue Hole, Little Miami River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoman, Carol

    1986-01-01

    Students in grades 10-12 are introduced to a romantic-realist approach to landscape painting using masterpiece by Robert S. Duncanson. The activity helps students consider the decisions artists make in choosing how they will interpret nature. (RM)

  15. The MOBILIZE Boston Study: Design and methods of a prospective cohort study of novel risk factors for falls in an older population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannan Marian T

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are the sixth leading cause of death in elderly people in the U.S. Despite progress in understanding risk factors for falls, many suspected risk factors have not been adequately studied. Putative risk factors for falls such as pain, reductions in cerebral blood flow, somatosensory deficits, and foot disorders are poorly understood, in part because they pose measurement challenges, particularly for large observational studies. Methods The MOBILIZE Boston Study (MBS, an NIA-funded Program Project, is a prospective cohort study of a unique set of risk factors for falls in seniors in the Boston area. Using a door-to-door population-based recruitment, we have enrolled 765 persons aged 70 and older. The baseline assessment was conducted in 2 segments: a 3-hour home interview followed within 4 weeks by a 3-hour clinic examination. Measures included pain, cerebral hemodynamics, and foot disorders as well as established fall risk factors. For the falls follow-up, participants return fall calendar postcards to the research center at the end of each month. Reports of falls are followed-up with a telephone interview to assess circumstances and consequences of each fall. A second assessment is performed 18 months following baseline. Results Of the 2382 who met all eligibility criteria at the door, 1616 (67.8% agreed to participate and were referred to the research center for further screening. The primary reason for ineligibility was inability to communicate in English. Results from the first 600 participants showed that participants are largely representative of seniors in the Boston area in terms of age, sex, race and Hispanic ethnicity. The average age of study participants was 77.9 years (s.d. 5.5 and nearly two-thirds were women. The study cohort was 78% white and 17% black. Many participants (39% reported having fallen at least once in the year before baseline. Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility of conducting

  16. A Remote Sensing-based Characterization of the Urban Heat Island and its Implications for Modeled Estimates of Urban Biogenic Carbon Fluxes in Boston, MA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Friedl, M. A.; Hutyra, L.; Hardiman, B. S.

    2015-12-01

    Urban land use occupies a small but critical proportion of global land area for the carbon cycle, and in the coming decades, urban land area is expected to nearly double. Conversion of natural land cover to urban land cover imposes myriad ecological effects, including increased land surface and air temperatures via the urban heat island effect. In this study, we characterize the seasonal and spatial characteristics of the urban heat island over Boston, MA and estimate its consequences on biogenic carbon fluxes with a remote sensing-based model. Using a 12-year time series of emissivity- and atmospherically-corrected land surface temperatures from Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery, we find a high degree of spatial heterogeneity and consistent seasonal patterns in the thermal properties of Boston, controlled mainly by variations in vegetative cover. Field measurements of surface air temperature across an urbanization gradient show season- and vegetation-dependent patterns consistent with those observed in the Landsat data. With a fused data set that combines surface air temperature, MODIS, and Landsat observations, we modify and run the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) to explore 1) how elevated temperatures affect diurnal and seasonal patterns of hourly urban biogenic carbon fluxes in Massachusetts in 2013 and 2014 and 2) to what extent these fluxes follow spatial patterns found in the urban heat island. Model modifications simulate the ecological effects of urbanization, including empirical adjustments to reanalysis-driven air temperatures (up to 5 K) and ecosystem respiration reduced by impervious surface area. Model results reveal spatio-temporal patterns consistent with strong land use and vegetation cover controls on biogenic carbon fluxes, with non-trivial biogenic annual net ecosystem exchange occurring in urban and suburban areas (up to -2.5 MgC/ha/yr). We specifically consider the feedbacks between Boston's urban heat island and landscape

  17. "Write a chapter and change the world". How the Boston Women's Health Book Collective transformed women's health then--and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Stephenson; Zeldes, Kiki

    2008-10-01

    Working together informally, the core group of women who would later form the Boston Women's Health Book Collective wrote a book that would become the bible of women's health, selling more than 4 million copies. They also created an organization that would carry their mission forward. From the first newsprint edition of Our Bodies, Ourselves, which became an underground sensation, to the brand new book, Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth, released in March 2008, the group has educated women and men, critiqued the medical system, examined inequalities based on gender, race, sexual orientation, class, and other categories, and urged readers to move from individual self-help to collective action promoting social policies that support the health of women and communities.

  18. Boston 10 x 20 NTMS area, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire. Data report (abbreviated): National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Results of ground water and stream sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Boston 1 0 x 2 0 quadrangle are presented. Surface sediment samples were collected at 669 sites. Ground water samples were collected at 303 sites. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 8 other elements in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, etc.), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), and (2) elemental analyses for sediment samples (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements and for U/Th and U/Hf ratios are included on the microfiche. Key data from stream water sites include (1) water quality measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity) and (2) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Ci, Dy, F, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). The maximum uranium concentration in the sediments of the Boston quadrangle was 82.1 ppM. The mean of the logarithms of the uranium concentrations in sediments was 0.68, which corresponds to 4.8 ppM uranium. A cluster of samples with uranium values greater than 40 ppM and which have low thorium concentrations occurs in Essex County, Massachusetts

  19. Long-term visual acuity, retention and complications observed with the type-I and type-II Boston keratoprostheses in an Irish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, E S; Ní Dhubhghaill, S; Malone, C; Power, W

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of the type-I and type-II Boston keratoprostheses in a single Irish centre. A retrospective chart review of keratoprosthesis implantations carried out in our institution from November 2002 to March 2014 was performed. All procedures were performed by a single surgeon (WP). Thirty-four keratoprosthesis implantations were carried out in 31 patients with a mean follow-up of 42±31 months (range 2-110 months). Seventeen patients were female (54.8%) and 14 were male (45.2%). The majority of keratoprostheses implanted were type-I (31/34, 91.2%), and three were type-II (3/34, 8.8%). Twenty-nine patients (85.3%) had an improvement in distance best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) from baseline. Fifty per cent (17/34) of patients had a best-ever BCVA of at least 6/12. Eighteen patients (64.3%) retained a BCVA of at least 6/60 at 1 year. Over the course of follow-up, six keratoprostheses were explanted from six eyes of five patients, one of which was a type-II keratoprosthesis. Twenty-six patients (76.5%) developed postoperative complications. Complications included retroprosthetic membrane (18 patients, 52.9%), an exacerbation or new diagnosis of glaucoma (6 patients, 17.6%), endophthalmitis (5 patients, 14.7%) and retinal detachment (2 patients, 5.9%). These data demonstrate excellent visual acuity and retention outcomes in a cohort with a long follow-up period in a single centre. Complications remain a considerable source of morbidity. These outcomes provide further evidence for the long-term stability of type-I and type-II Boston keratoprostheses in the management of patients in whom a traditional graft is likely to fail. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Five year outcomes of Boston type I keratoprosthesis as primary versus secondary penetrating corneal procedure in a matched case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai B Kang

    Full Text Available Despite improved retention and reduced complication rates paving the way for the current expansion of applications and surge in prevalence for the Boston type I Keratoprosthesis (KPro, the most frequent indication for its implantation today remains prior graft failure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of primary KPro and compare to secondary implantation in a matched cohort study. This study included patients who underwent KPro implantation in a single center by two surgeons between July 2008 and October 2014. All eyes with KPro implantation as the primary procedure with a minimum follow up of 12 months were matched with eyes with same preoperative diagnoses that underwent secondary KPro implantation. Main outcomes included visual acuity and device retention. A total of 56 eyes were included with 28 eyes in each group. Mean follow up was 5.0 years for both groups. Twenty-nine percent (8 of the eyes in the primary group had a diagnosis of chemical or thermal injuries, 25% (7 aniridia, 18% (5 autoimmune disease, 4% (1 infectious keratitis/neurotrophic cornea, 7% (2 gelatinous corneal dystrophy, 7% (2 ectrodactyly ectodermal dysplasia/limbal stem cell deficiency, and 11% (3 uveitis/hypotony. Sixty-one percent (17 of the eyes in the primary group and 39% (11 in the secondary group maintained a final best-corrected visual acuity of 20/200 or better at a mean follow up of 5.0 years; the probability of maintaining best-corrected vision is 0.83 and 0.49 for primary and secondary groups at 5.0 years (p = 0.02. There is no statistically significant difference between groups in device retention (p = 0.22 or postoperative complication rates (p >0.05. This study demonstrates that Boston KPro implantation may be successful as a primary procedure in patients at high risk of failure with traditional penetrating keratoplasty. The device has a good long-term retention rate and visual outcomes are promising however a larger study is

  1. Globalización y reconfiguración en ciudades puerto de norte y sur América. Notas a partir de los casos de Miami y Buenos Aires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Arriagada Luco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo hace una revisión de la evolución de los centros y periferias de dos ciudades puerto del Atlántico de Norte y Sur américa, Miami y Buenos Aires, urbes que atravesaron sendos procesos de globalización económica a fines del siglo XX y auges inmobiliarios que coinciden en mostrar dos transformaciones posibles de la función y espacio urbano portuario empujados por el desarrollo del turismo y los servicios de la economía junto con problemas de gobernanza urbana asociados a la fragmentación. Ambas ciudades en procesos muy conectados al redesarrollo de sus centros de borde costero junto al movimiento de poblaciones hacia los suburbios, pero con tendencias sociales diferentes respecto a la situación inicial. En ambas se reorganizan las zonas de exclusión o segregación, que se mudan al suburbio en norteamérica y se consolidan o agravan en barrios obrero pericentrales del sur.

  2. Clinical Exposure to Transgender Medicine Improves Students' Preparedness Above Levels Seen with Didactic Teaching Alone: A Key Addition to the Boston University Model for Teaching Transgender Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jason A.; Safer, Joshua D.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Transgender individuals are medically underserved in the United States and face many documented disparities in care due to providers' lack of education, training, and comfort. We have previously demonstrated that specific transgender medicine content in a medical school curriculum increases students' willingness to treat transgender patients. However, we have also identified that those same students are less comfortable with transgender care relative to care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual patients. We aimed to demonstrate that clinical exposure to care for transgender patients would help close this gap. Methods: At Boston University School of Medicine, we piloted a transgender medicine elective where students rotate on services that provide clinical care for transgender individuals. Pre- and postsurveys were administered to students who participated in the elective. Results: After completing the elective, students who reported “high” comfort increased from 45% (9/20) to 80% (16/20) (p=0.04), and students who reported “high” knowledge regarding management of transgender patients increased from 0% (0/20) to 85% (17/20) (ptransgender-specific content into medical curricula improves student knowledge and comfort with transgender medical care, gaps remain. Clinical exposure to transgender medicine during clinical years can contribute to closing that gap and improving access to care for transgender individuals. PMID:29344576

  3. Census Cities experiment in urban change detection. [mapping of land use changes in San Francisco, Washington D.C., Phoenix, Tucson, Boston, New Haven, Cedar Rapids, and Pontiac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, J. R. (Principal Investigator); Milazzo, V. A.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Mapping of 1970 and 1972 land use from high-flight photography has been completed for all test sites: San Francisco, Washington, Phoenix, Tucson, Boston, New Haven, Cedar Rapids, and Pontiac. Area analysis of 1970 and 1972 land use has been completed for each of the mandatory urban areas. All 44 sections of the 1970 land use maps of the San Francisco test site have been officially released through USGS Open File at 1:62,500. Five thousand copies of the Washington one-sheet color 1970 land use map, census tract map, and point line identification map are being printed by USGS Publication Division. ERTS-1 imagery for each of the eight test sites is being received and analyzed. Color infrared photo enlargements at 1:100,000 of ERTS-1 MSS images of Phoenix taken on October 16, 1972 and May 2, 1973 are being analyzed to determine to what level land use and land use changes can be identified and to what extent the ERTS-1 imagery can be used in updating the 1970 aircraft photo-derived land use data base. Work is proceeding on the analysis of ERTS-1 imagery by computer manipulation of ERTS-1 MSS data in digital format. ERTS-1 CCT maps at 1:24,000 are being analyzed for two dates over Washington and Phoenix. Anniversary tape sets have been received at Purdue LARS for some additional urban test sites.

  4. Clinical Exposure to Transgender Medicine Improves Students' Preparedness Above Levels Seen with Didactic Teaching Alone: A Key Addition to the Boston University Model for Teaching Transgender Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jason A; Safer, Joshua D

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Transgender individuals are medically underserved in the United States and face many documented disparities in care due to providers' lack of education, training, and comfort. We have previously demonstrated that specific transgender medicine content in a medical school curriculum increases students' willingness to treat transgender patients. However, we have also identified that those same students are less comfortable with transgender care relative to care for lesbian, gay, and bisexual patients. We aimed to demonstrate that clinical exposure to care for transgender patients would help close this gap. Methods: At Boston University School of Medicine, we piloted a transgender medicine elective where students rotate on services that provide clinical care for transgender individuals. Pre- and postsurveys were administered to students who participated in the elective. Results: After completing the elective, students who reported "high" comfort increased from 45% (9/20) to 80% (16/20) ( p =0.04), and students who reported "high" knowledge regarding management of transgender patients increased from 0% (0/20) to 85% (17/20) ( p <0.001 ) . Conclusion: Although integrating evidence-based, transgender-specific content into medical curricula improves student knowledge and comfort with transgender medical care, gaps remain. Clinical exposure to transgender medicine during clinical years can contribute to closing that gap and improving access to care for transgender individuals.

  5. Semantic error patterns on the Boston Naming Test in normal aging, amnestic mild cognitive impairment, and mild Alzheimer's disease: is there semantic disruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balthazar, Marcio Luiz Figueredo; Cendes, Fernando; Damasceno, Benito Pereira

    2008-11-01

    Naming difficulty is common in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the nature of this problem is not well established. The authors investigated the presence of semantic breakdown and the pattern of general and semantic errors in patients with mild AD, patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and normal controls by examining their spontaneous answers on the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and verifying whether they needed or were benefited by semantic and phonemic cues. The errors in spontaneous answers were classified in four mutually exclusive categories (semantic errors, visual paragnosia, phonological errors, and omission errors), and the semantic errors were further subclassified as coordinate, superordinate, and circumlocutory. Patients with aMCI performed normally on the BNT and needed fewer semantic and phonemic cues than patients with mild AD. After semantic cues, subjects with aMCI and control subjects gave more correct answers than patients with mild AD, but after phonemic cues, there was no difference between the three groups, suggesting that the low performance of patients with AD cannot be completely explained by semantic breakdown. Patterns of spontaneous naming errors and subtypes of semantic errors were similar in the three groups, with decreasing error frequency from coordinate to superordinate to circumlocutory subtypes.

  6. How Regenerative Medicine Stakeholders Adapt to Ever-Changing Technology and Regulatory Challenges? Snapshots from the World TERMIS Industry Symposium (September 10, 2015, Boston).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayon, Yves; Van Dyke, Mark; Buelher, Robert; Tubo, Ross; Bertram, Tim; Malfroy-Camine, Bernard; Rathman, Michelle; Ronfard, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Regenerative medicine (RM) is a fascinating area of research and innovation. The huge potential of the field has been fairly underexploited so far. Both TERMIS-AM and TERMIS-EU Industry Committees are committed to mentoring and training young entrepreneurs for more successful commercial translation of upstream research. With this objective in mind, the two entities jointly organized an industry symposium during the past TERMIS World Congress (Boston, September 8-11, 2015) and invited senior managers of the RM industry for lectures and panel discussions. One of the two sessions of the symposium-How to overcome obstacles encountered when bringing products to the commercial phase?-aimed to share the inside, real experiences of leaders from TEI Biosciences (an Integra Company), Vericel (formerly Aastrom; acquirer of Genzyme Regenerative Medicine assets), RegenMedTX (formerly Tengion), Mindset Rx, ViThera Pharmaceuticals, and L'Oreal Research & Innovation. The symposium provided practical recommendations for RM product development, for remaining critical and objective when reviewing progress, for keeping solutions simple, and for remaining relevant and persistent.

  7. Crisis in Honduras: The Search for Answers to the Removal of President Manuel Zelaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    gravity for Zelaya’s growing leftist rhetoric and ideology.185 She “had embraced Marxism and Central America’s revolutionary movements in her...349 Ruhl, “Honduras Unravels,” 102. 350 Frances Robles, “Top Honduran Military Lawyer: We Broke the Law,” The Miami Herald, July 3, 2009, News...in Latin America.” Comparative Politics 42, no. 4 (2010). Robles, Frances . “Top Honduran Military Lawyer: We Broke the Law.” The Miami Herald

  8. The Impact of Contemporary Conflicts Between Latin American Nations on Regional Stability and Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-12

    of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs, Winter 88-89, pp 139-170. 20. " Bogota y Caracas Acuerdan Med iac ion, " Nuevo Heral1d (Miami), 29 March...Banco Central del Ecuador. El Ecuadur in La OPEP. Quito: Ediciones Bancentral, 1979. 8. "Bogota y Caracas Acuerdan Mediacion." Nuevo Herald (Miami...Sur. Revista Chileno de Geooolitica, Vol. 3, April 1989, pp 59-98. 69. Porse, Ernesto G. "El Conflicto de los Grandes Proyectos Hidroelectricos

  9. Occupational dust exposure and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma risk in a population-based case–control study conducted in the greater Boston area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langevin, Scott M; McClean, Michael D; Michaud, Dominique S; Eliot, Melissa; Nelson, Heather H; Kelsey, Karl T

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck cancers account for an estimated 549,000 global cancer diagnoses each year. While tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and HPV16 infection are considered to be the major risk factors for this disease, occupational risk factors, including exposure to asbestos, have also been described, although dust exposures other than asbestos have been historically understudied. We have investigated the relationship between occupational exposures to five types of dusts, including sawdust, concrete dust, leather dust, metal dust, and chimney soot, and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) in the greater Boston area. We report findings from a population-based case–control study involving 951 incident HNSCC cases and 1193 controls, frequency matched on age (±3 years), sex, and town/neighborhood of residence. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between occupational exposure to each type of dust and HNSCC, overall and by primary tumor site. After adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking, alcohol consumption, education, and HPV16 serology, laryngeal carcinoma risk increased for each decade of occupational exposure to sawdust (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.3) and metal dust (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.4); and HNSCC risk increased for each decade of occupational leather dust exposure (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.9). We have provided evidence for an association between occupational sawdust and metal dust and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and leather dust and HNSCC, with increasing risk with longer duration at the exposed occupation

  10. Long-term impact of a chef on school lunch consumption: findings from a 2-year pilot study in Boston middle schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Smit, Liesbeth A; Parker, Ellen; Austin, S Bryn; Frazier, A Lindsay; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2012-06-01

    School cafeterias can play an important role in providing healthy meals. Although schools participating in the National School Lunch Program are required to meet minimum program standards, advocates recommend that innovations be sought to enhance menu dietary quality. This study evaluated the Chef Initiative, a 2-year pilot study in two Boston middle schools, designed to increase the availability and consumption of healthier school foods. Between 2007 and 2009, a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to prepare healthier school lunches (ie, more whole grains, fresh/frozen fruits and vegetables, and less sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fats). Meal nutrient compositions were monitored from 2007 to 2009, and a plate waste study conducted in the spring of 2009 compared food selection and consumption patterns among students at Chef Initiative schools, with students receiving standard school lunches at two matched control schools. Paired t tests and descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in menus and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to analyze differences in students' food selection and consumption between Chef Initiative and control schools. Overall, the Chef Initiative schools provided healthier lunches and the percent of foods consumed at Chef Initiative and control schools were similar (61.6% vs 57.3%; P=0.63). Of the areas targeted, there was greater whole-grain selection and vegetable consumption; 51% more students selected whole grains (P=0.02) and students consumed 0.36 more vegetable servings/day (P=0.01) at Chef Initiative schools. The potential of chefs collaborating with cafeteria staff to improve the availability, selection, and consumption of healthier meals is promising. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A short-form version of the Boston Naming Test for language screening in dementia in a bilingual rural community in Galicia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebreda, M C; García-Caballero, A; Asensio, E; Revilla, P; Rodriguez-Girondo, M; Mateos, R

    2011-04-01

    Aphasia, one of the core symptoms of cortical dementia, is routinely evaluated using graded naming tests like the Boston Naming Test (BNT). However, the application of this 60-item test is time-consuming and shortened versions have been devised for screening. The hypothesis of this research is that a specifically designed shortened version of the BNT could replace the original 60-item BNT as part of a mini-battery for screening for dementia. The objective of this study was to design a short version of the BNT for a rural population in Galicia (Spain). A clinic group of 102 patients including 43 with dementia was recruited along with 78 healthy volunteers. The clinic and control groups were scored on the Spanish version of the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) and BNT. In addition, the clinic group was tested with standard neuropsychological instruments and underwent brain investigations and routine neurological examination. BNT items with specificity and sensitivity above 0.5 were selected to compose a short battery of 11 pictures named BNTOu11. ANOVA and mean comparisons were made for MMSE and BNT versions. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and internal consistency were calculated. Areas under ROC curves (AUC) did not show statistically significant differences; therefore BNTOu11's AUC (0.814) was similar to the 60-item BNT versions (0.785 and 0.779), to the short versions from Argentina (0.772) and Andalusia (0.799) and to the Spanish MMSE (0.866). BNTOu11 had higher internal consistency than the other short versions. BNTOu11 is a useful and time-saving method as part of a battery for screening for dementia in a psychogeriatric outpatient unit.

  12. Integration of basic science and clinical medicine: the innovative approach of the cadaver biopsy project at the Boston University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Anna; Vaisman, Lev; Johnston-Cox, Hillary; Gallan, Alexander; Shaffer, Kitt; Vaughan, Deborah; O'Hara, Carl; Joseph, Lija

    2014-01-01

    Curricular integration has emerged as a consistent theme in medical education reform. Vertical integration of topics such as pathology offers the potential to bring basic science content into the clinical arena, but faculty/student acceptance and curricular design pose challenges for such integration. The authors describe the Cadaver Biopsy Project (CBP) at Boston University School of Medicine as a sustainable model of vertical integration. Faculty and select senior medical students obtained biopsies of cadavers during the first-year gross anatomy course (fall 2009) and used these to develop clinical cases for courses in histology (spring 2010), pathology (fall 2010-spring 2011), and radiology (fall 2011 or spring 2012), thereby linking students' first experiences in basic sciences with other basic science courses and later clinical courses. Project goals included engaging medical stu dents in applying basic science princi ples in all aspects of patient care as they acquire skills. The educational intervention used a patient (cadaver)-centered approach and small-group, collaborative, case-based learning. Through this project, the authors involved clinical and basic science faculty-plus senior medical students-in a collaborative project to design and implement an integrated curriculum through which students revisited, at several different points, the microscopic structure and pathophysiology of common diseases. Developing appropriate, measurable out comes for medical education initiatives, including the CBP, is challenging. Accumu lation of qualitative feedback from surveys will guide continuous improvement of the CBP. Documenting longer-term impact of the curricular innovation on test scores and other competency-based outcomes is an ultimate goal.

  13. Correspondence of the Boston Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury-Lifetime (BAT-L) clinical interview and the VA TBI screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Catherine Brawn; Amick, Melissa M; Kenna, Alexandra; Milberg, William P; McGlinchey, Regina E

    2015-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is the signature injury of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), and Operation New Dawn (OND), yet its identification and diagnosis is controversial and fraught with challenges. In 2007, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) implemented a policy requiring traumatic brain injury (TBI) screening on all individuals returning from deployment in the OEF/OIF/OND theaters of operation that lead to the rapid and widespread use of the VA TBI screen. The Boston Assessment of TBI-Lifetime (BAT-L) is the first validated, postcombat semistructured clinical interview to characterize head injuries and diagnose TBIs throughout the life span, including prior to, during, and post-military service. Community-dwelling convenience sample of 179 OEF/OIF/OND veterans. BAT-L, VA TBI screen. Based on BAT-L diagnosis of military TBI, the VA TBI screen demonstrated similar sensitivity (0.85) and specificity (0.82) when administered by research staff. When BAT-L diagnosis was compared with historical clinician-administered VA TBI screen in a subset of participants, sensitivity was reduced. The specificity of the research-administered VA TBI screen was more than adequate. The sensitivity of the VA TBI screen, although relatively high, suggests that it does not oversample or "catch all" possible military TBIs. Traumatic brain injuries identified by the BAT-L, but not identified by the VA TBI screen, were predominantly noncombat military injuries. There is potential concern regarding the validity and reliability of the clinician administered VA TBI screen, as we found poor correspondence between it and the BAT-L, as well as low interrater reliability between the clinician-administered and research-administered screen.

  14. Occupational dust exposure and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma risk in a population-based case-control study conducted in the greater Boston area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Scott M; McClean, Michael D; Michaud, Dominique S; Eliot, Melissa; Nelson, Heather H; Kelsey, Karl T

    2013-12-01

    Head and neck cancers account for an estimated 549,000 global cancer diagnoses each year. While tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and HPV16 infection are considered to be the major risk factors for this disease, occupational risk factors, including exposure to asbestos, have also been described, although dust exposures other than asbestos have been historically understudied. We have investigated the relationship between occupational exposures to five types of dusts, including sawdust, concrete dust, leather dust, metal dust, and chimney soot, and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) in the greater Boston area. We report findings from a population-based case-control study involving 951 incident HNSCC cases and 1193 controls, frequency matched on age (±3 years), sex, and town/neighborhood of residence. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between occupational exposure to each type of dust and HNSCC, overall and by primary tumor site. After adjusting for age, sex, race, smoking, alcohol consumption, education, and HPV16 serology, laryngeal carcinoma risk increased for each decade of occupational exposure to sawdust (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.3) and metal dust (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.4); and HNSCC risk increased for each decade of occupational leather dust exposure (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2, 1.9). We have provided evidence for an association between occupational sawdust and metal dust and laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, and leather dust and HNSCC, with increasing risk with longer duration at the exposed occupation. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Differing Experiences with Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in Boston Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Specialists and Generalists in Primary Care: Implications for Scale-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakower, Douglas S; Ware, Norma C; Maloney, Kevin M; Wilson, Ira B; Wong, John B; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-07-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in four sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM) could decrease their HIV risk by using HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Because many MSM access healthcare from primary care providers (PCPs), these clinicians could play an important role in providing access to PrEP. Semistructured qualitative interviews were conducted with 31 PCPs in Boston, MA, to explore how they approach decisions about prescribing PrEP to MSM and their experiences with PrEP provision. Purposive sampling included 12 PCPs from an urban community health center specializing in the care of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons ("LGBT specialists") and 19 PCPs from a general academic medical center ("generalists"). Analyses utilized an inductive approach to identify emergent themes. Both groups of PCPs approached prescribing decisions about PrEP as a process of informed decision-making with patients. Providers would defer to patients' preferences if they were unsure about the appropriateness of PrEP. LGBT specialists and generalists were at vastly different stages of adopting PrEP into practice. For LGBT specialists, PrEP was a disruptive innovation that rapidly became normative in practice. Generalists had limited experience with PrEP; however, they desired succinct decision-support tools to help them achieve proficiency, because they considered preventive medicine to be central to their professional role. As generalists vastly outnumber LGBT specialists in the United States, interventions to support PrEP provision by generalists could accelerate the scale-up of PrEP for MSM nationally, which could in turn decrease HIV incidence for this priority population.

  16. Primary care clinicians' experiences prescribing HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis at a specialized community health centre in Boston: lessons from early adopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakower, Douglas S; Maloney, Kevin M; Grasso, Chris; Melbourne, Katherine; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 1.2 million Americans have indications for using antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) to prevent HIV acquisition. For many of these at-risk individuals, the best opportunity to learn about and receive PrEP will be during routine visits to their generalist primary care clinicians. However, few generalist clinicians have prescribed PrEP, primarily because of practical concerns about providing PrEP in primary care settings. The experiences of specialized primary care clinicians who have prescribed PrEP can inform the feasibility of PrEP provision by generalists. During January to February 2015, 35 primary care clinicians at a community health centre in Boston that specializes in the care of sexual and gender minorities completed anonymous surveys about their experiences and practices with PrEP provision. Responses were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Thirty-two clinicians (response rate=91%) completed the surveys. Nearly all clinicians (97%) had prescribed PrEP (median 20 patients, interquartile range 11-33). Most clinicians reported testing and risk-reduction counselling practices concordant with U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines for PrEP. Clinicians indicated that patients using PrEP experienced medication toxicities infrequently and generally reported high adherence. However, some clinicians' practices differed from guideline recommendations, and some clinicians observed patients with increased risk behaviours. Most clinicians (79%) rated PrEP provision as easy to accomplish, and 97% considered themselves likely to prescribe PrEP in the future. In a primary care clinic with specialized expertise in HIV prevention, clinicians perceived that PrEP provision to large numbers of patients was safe, feasible and potentially effective. Efforts to engage generalist primary care clinicians in PrEP provision could facilitate scale-up of this efficacious intervention.

  17. High temporal resolution modeling of the impact of rain, tides, and sea level rise on water table flooding in the Arch Creek basin, Miami-Dade County Florida USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukop, Michael C; Rogers, Martina; Guannel, Greg; Infanti, Johnna M; Hagemann, Katherine

    2018-03-01

    Modeling of groundwater levels in a portion of the low-lying coastal Arch Creek basin in northern Miami-Dade County in Southeast Florida USA, which is subject to repetitive flooding, reveals that rain-induced short-term water table rises can be viewed as a primary driver of flooding events under current conditions. Areas below 0.9m North American Vertical Datum (NAVD) elevation are particularly vulnerable and areas below 1.5m NAVD are vulnerable to exceptionally large rainfall events. Long-term water table rise is evident in the groundwater data, and the rate appears to be consistent with local rates of sea level rise. Linear extrapolation of long-term observed groundwater levels to 2060 suggest roughly a doubling of the number of days when groundwater levels exceed 0.9m NAVD and a threefold increase in the number of days when levels exceed 1.5m NAVD. Projected sea level rise of 0.61m by 2060 together with increased rainfall lead to a model prediction of frequent groundwater-related flooding in areas1.5m NAVD and widespread flooding of the area in the past. Tidal fluctuations in the water table are predicted to be more pronounced within 600m of a tidally influenced water control structure that is hydrodynamically connected to Biscayne Bay. The inland influence of tidal fluctuations appears to increase with increased sea level, but the principal driver of high groundwater levels under the 2060 scenario conditions remains groundwater recharge due to rainfall events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Unlocking Miami’s suburban gated communities: a semiotic and iconographic approach Les complexes résidentiels sécurisés dans l'espace périurbain de Miami : Une approche sémiotique et iconographique

    OpenAIRE

    Franziska Pufe

    2009-01-01

    Since the end of the 1990s, gated residential neighbourhoods have moved into the focus of an interdisciplinary scientific community. Asking why they have loomed in the last two decades, the majority of publications find the answer in an increased fear of crime, a widened socio-economic polarisation and a wish to privatise public goods. Arguing from a constructivist and critical point of view, chiefly with respect to the ideas of the new cultural geography, I assert in the context of Miami tha...

  19. Environmental Assessment for Boston Harbor Maintenance Dredging, Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Harbor was developed by Jerome et al (1966), Chesmore et al (1971) and Iwanowicz et al. (1973). The studies on the Lower Mystic River were concentrated in... Iwanowicz et al. (1973) and this data should be referred to for detailed information. Waters overlying the shellfish beds are contaminated by wastes...DMRP Technical Report DS-78-5, Environmental Laboratory, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi. Iwanowicz , H. R., R D

  20. Competitividad de las exportaciones argentinas de fruta a la Unión Europea : su análisis mediante los métodos del Boston Consulting Group (BCG) y la matriz refinada de Viaene Gellynck

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Gloria Virginia; Pena de Ladaga, Beatriz Susana; Gil Roig, José María

    2000-01-01

    p.409-419 En el presente trabajo se analizó el desempeño competitivo de las seis principales frutas exportadas por la Argentina (manzanas, peras, naranjas, mandarinas, limones y pomelos) en el mercado de importaciones de terceros países del Hemisferio Sur de la Unión Europea. Los métodos elegidos para medir el desempeño competitivo fueron el Boston Consulting Group (BCG) y la matriz refinada del BCG teniendo en cuenta a la modificación realizada por Viaene-Gellynck. Se trabajó con datos de...

  1. Boston Type 1 Keratoprosthesis versus Repeat Donor Keratoplasty for Corneal Graft Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sumayya; Mathews, Priya M; Lindsley, Kristina; Alkharashi, Majed; Hwang, Frank S; Ng, Sueko M; Aldave, Anthony J; Akpek, Esen Karamursel

    2016-01-01

    To compare repeat penetrating keratoplasty (PK) with Boston type I keratoprosthesis (KPro) implantation for full-thickness donor corneal graft failure. Previous donor graft failure is a common indication for both PK and KPro implantation. Selection of the surgical procedure is entirely dependent on the surgeon because there are no studies available for guidance. Therefore, a systematic review was undertaken to examine vision, device retention, graft clarity, and postoperative glaucoma and infection outcomes after repeat PK versus KPro implantation. Articles with data regarding repeat PK published between 1990 and 2014 were identified in PubMed, EMBASE, the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and were reviewed. Results were compared with a retrospective review of consecutive, nonrandomized, longitudinal case series of KPro implantations performed at 5 tertiary care centers in the United States. Visual acuity at 2 years was the primary outcome measure. The proportion of clear grafts in the repeat PK group, device retention in the KPro group, and the development of postoperative glaucoma and infection were secondary outcome measures. The search strategy identified 17 128 articles in the PK analysis. After screening, 26 studies (21 case series and 5 cohort studies) were included in the review. Pooled analysis of the 26 unique studies demonstrated a 42% (95% confidence interval [CI], 30%-56%) likelihood of maintaining 20/200 or better at 2 years after repeat PK, compared with an 80% (95% CI, 68%-88%) probability with KPro implantation. The probability of maintaining a clear graft at 5 years was 47% (95% CI, 40%-54%) after repeat PK, whereas the probability of retention of the KPro at 5 years was 75% (95% CI, 64%-84%). The rate of progression of glaucoma at 3 years was 25% (95% CI, 10%-44%) after repeat PK and 30% in the KPro cohort. These results demonstrate favorable outcomes of KPro

  2. Thrombosed Popliteal Artery Pseudoaneurysm as Herald of Tibial Osteochondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Ruales Romero

    Full Text Available Background: Osteochondroma is the most common non-malignant tumour of bone, accounting for approximately one third of benign lesions in the skeleton. They often develop around the knee in the distal femur and in the proximal tibia and fibula. They present as a painless slow growing mass during adolescence and have been reported to cause damage to adjacent structures such as blood vessels; arterial damage is more common than venous injury and is usually a result of compression, stretching, and rubbing of the arterial wall. Such lesions include stenosis, thrombosis, and pseudoaneurysm formation possibly causing lower limb claudication or acute limb ischemia. Methods: An 18 year old male patient with a 4 week history of pain, hematoma, and oedema of the left calf without previous trauma is reported. A computed tomography scan (CT revealed a large popliteal artery pseudoaneurysm and its close relationship to a protrusion of the proximal tibia. Results: The popliteal artery was repaired by an external saphenous patch and the exostosis was removed. The patient had palpable popliteal and distal pulses after surgery and during the first year follow-up. Conclusions: Tibial osteochondroma should be considered in the differential diagnosis in young patients, among the potential causes of pseudoaneurysm of the femoral or popliteal artery. Surgical repair should be performed to restore normal blood flow with resection of the exostosis to prevent recurrence. Keywords: Popliteal artery, Pseudoaneurysm, Tibial exostosis, Osteochondroma

  3. Light higgsinos as heralds of higher-dimensional unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, F.; Buchmueller, W.

    2011-05-01

    Grand-unified models with extra dimensions at the GUT scale will typically contain exotic states with Standard Model charges and GUT-scale masses. They can act as messengers for gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. If the number of messengers is sizeable, soft terms for the visible sector fields will be predominantly generated by gauge mediation, while gravity mediation can induce a small μ parameter. We illustrate this hybrid mediation pattern with two examples, in which the superpartner spectrum contains light and near-degenerate higgsinos with masses below 200 GeV. The typical masses of all other superpartners are much larger, from at least 500 GeV up to several TeV. The lightest superparticle is the gravitino, which may be the dominant component of dark matter. (orig.)

  4. Electronic personal dosimeter heralds a revolution in legal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R.

    1991-01-01

    The Electronic Personal Dosimeter (EPD) developed by Siemens Plessey Controls and the UK's national Radiological Protection Board is approaching the pre-production stage. It provides ''legal'' dosimetry and all the features of a personal alarming dosimeter. The EPD uses solid state semiconductor detectors for gamma and beta radiation and has a dose threshold of about 1μ Sv, with a low energy gamma range down to 20 KeV. It has a multi function liquid crystal display for instant readout and audible and visual alarms. Two separates dose stores are maintained. Short term dose for tactical management and long term dose for approved dosimetry service record keeping. The latter can be reset only by an approved dosimetry service and is maintained on a search memory disk which can be read even if the EPD is destroyed. (UK)

  5. Light higgsinos as heralds of higher-dimensional unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, F.; Buchmueller, W.

    2011-05-15

    Grand-unified models with extra dimensions at the GUT scale will typically contain exotic states with Standard Model charges and GUT-scale masses. They can act as messengers for gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. If the number of messengers is sizeable, soft terms for the visible sector fields will be predominantly generated by gauge mediation, while gravity mediation can induce a small {mu} parameter. We illustrate this hybrid mediation pattern with two examples, in which the superpartner spectrum contains light and near-degenerate higgsinos with masses below 200 GeV. The typical masses of all other superpartners are much larger, from at least 500 GeV up to several TeV. The lightest superparticle is the gravitino, which may be the dominant component of dark matter. (orig.)

  6. Heralding the authoritarian? Orientation toward authority in early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifen Tagar, Michal; Federico, Christopher M; Lyons, Kristen E; Ludeke, Steven; Koenig, Melissa A

    2014-04-01

    In the research reported here, we examined whether individual differences in authoritarianism have expressions in early childhood. We expected that young children would be more responsive to cues of deviance and status to the extent that their parents endorsed authoritarian values. Using a sample of 43 preschoolers and their parents, we found support for both expectations. Children of parents high in authoritarianism trusted adults who adhered to convention (vs. adults who did not) more than did children of parents low in authoritarianism. Furthermore, compared with children of parents low in authoritarianism, children of parents high in authoritarianism gave greater weight to a status-based "adult = reliable" heuristic in trusting an ambiguously conventional adult. Findings were consistent using two different measures of parents' authoritarian values. These findings demonstrate that children's trust-related behaviors vary reliably with their parents' orientations toward authority and convention, and suggest that individual differences in authoritarianism express themselves well before early adulthood.

  7. G8 decision on fusion would herald nuclear future

    CERN Multimedia

    Starck, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear fusion as a future abundant energy source would receive a boost if G8 leaders agree next month on the site for the world's first fusion test reactor, two nuclear scientists said on Wednesday (1 page)

  8. Heralding the Other: Sousa, Simulacra, and Settler Colonialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of music and music education in the perpetuation of settler colonialism (a particular colonial configuration predicated on the expulsion of indigenous people and occupation of indigenous land) within the United States. Using Baudrillard's notion of simulacra, or "false truths," to look at racialized…

  9. Heralded Magnetism in Non-Hermitian Atomic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony E. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantum phase transitions are usually studied in terms of Hermitian Hamiltonians. However, cold-atom experiments are intrinsically non-Hermitian because of spontaneous decay. Here, we show that non-Hermitian systems exhibit quantum phase transitions that are beyond the paradigm of Hermitian physics. We consider the non-Hermitian XY model, which can be implemented using three-level atoms with spontaneous decay. We exactly solve the model in one dimension and show that there is a quantum phase transition from short-range order to quasi-long-range order despite the absence of a continuous symmetry in the Hamiltonian. The ordered phase has a frustrated spin pattern. The critical exponent ν can be 1 or 1/2. Our results can be seen experimentally with trapped ions, cavity QED, and atoms in optical lattices.

  10. Cryptogenic pyogenic liver abscess as the herald of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Soung Won; Jang, Jae Young; Lee, Tae Hee; Kim, Hyun Gun; Hong, Sung Wook; Park, Seung Hoon; Kim, Sang Gyune; Cheon, Young Koog; Kim, Young Seok; Cho, Young Deok; Kim, Jin-Oh; Kim, Boo Sung; Lee, Eun Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong

    2012-02-01

    Colonic mucosal defects might be a route for bacterial invasion into the portal system, with subsequent hematogenous spread to the liver. We retrospectively investigated the results of colonoscopy and the clinical characteristics of patients with pyogenic liver abscess of colonic origin. A total of 230 consecutive patients with pyogenic liver abscess were reviewed between 2003 and 2010. The 230 patients were categorized into three groups (pancreatobiliary [n = 135], cryptogenic [n = 81], and others [n = 14]). Of the 81 cryptogenic patients, 37 (45.7%) underwent colonoscopy. Colonic lesions with mucosal defects were considered colonic causes of abscess. In the 37 colonoscopic investigations, colon cancer was found in six patients (16.2%), laterally-spreading tumor (LST) in two patients (5.4%), multiple colon ulcers in one patient (2.7%), colon polyps in 17 patients (45.9%), and diverticula in four patients (10.8%). Nine (11%) of 81 cryptogenic abscesses were therefore reclassified as being of colonic origin (colon cancer = 6, LST = 2, ulcer = 1). Three cases were stage III colon cancer, and the others were stage I. Two LST were high-grade dysplasia. The percentage of patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) and diabetes mellitus (DM) of colonic origin was 66.7%, which was significantly higher than the 8.6% for other causes (P colonic cause. Colonoscopy should be considered for the detection of hidden colonic malignant lesions in patients with cryptogenic pyogenic liver abscess, especially for patients with K. pneumoniae and DM. © 2011 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. PAMELA mission: heralding a new era in cosmic ray physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricciarini S. B.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available After seven years of data taking in space, the experiment PAMELA is showing very interesting features in cosmic rays, namely in the fluxes of protons, helium, electrons, that might change our basic vision of the mechanisms of production, acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in the galaxy. In addition, PAMELA measurements of cosmic antiproton and positron fluxes are setting strong constraints to the nature of Dark Matter. The continuous particle detection is allowing a constant monitoring of the solar activity and detailed study of the solar modulation for a long period, giving important improvements to the comprehension of the heliosphere mechanisms. PAMELA is also measuring the radiation environment around the Earth, and has recently discovered an antiproton radiation belt.

  12. Growing Community Roots for the Geosciences in Miami, Florida, A Program Aimed at High School and Middle School Students to Increase Awareness of Career and Educational Opportunities in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, D.; Hickey-Vargas, R.; Gebelein, J.; Draper, G.; Rego, R.

    2013-12-01

    Growing Community Roots for the Geosciences is a 2-year pilot recruitment project run by the Department of Earth and Environment at Florida International University (FIU) and funded by the NSF OEDG (Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences) program. FIU, the State University of Florida in Miami is a federally recognized Minority Serving Institution with over 70% of the undergraduate population coming from groups underrepresented in the geoscience workforce. The goal of this project is to inform students enrolled in the local middle and high schools to career opportunities in the geosciences and to promote pathways for underrepresented groups to university geoscience degree programs. The first year's program included a 1-week workshop for middle school teachers and a 2-week summer camp aimed at high school students in the public school system. The teacher workshop was attended by 20 teachers who taught comprehensive and physical science in grades 6-8. It included lectures on geoscience careers, fundamental concepts of solid earth and atmospheric science, hands on exercises with earth materials, fossils and microscopy, interpretation of landform with Google Earth imagery, and a field trip to a local working limestone quarry. On the first day of the workshop, participants were surveyed on their general educational background in science and their familiarity and comfort with teaching basic geoscience concepts. On the final day, the teachers participated in a group discussion where we discussed how to make geoscience topics and careers more visible in the school curriculum. The 2-week summer camp was attended by 21 students entering grades 9-12. The program included hands on exercises on geoscience and GIS concepts, field trips to local barrier islands, the Everglades, a limestone quarry and a waste to energy facility, and tours of the NOAA National Hurricane Center and the FIU SEM lab. Participants were surveyed on their general educational background

  13. Stigma, medical mistrust, and perceived racism may affect PrEP awareness and uptake in black compared to white gay and bisexual men in Jackson, Mississippi and Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Sean; Taylor, S Wade; Elsesser, Steven A; Mena, Leandro; Hickson, DeMarc; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2017-11-01

    Gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM) account for more than two thirds of new HIV infections in the U.S., with Black MSM experiencing the greatest burden. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) can reduce MSM's vulnerability to HIV infection. Uptake of PrEP has been limited, particularly among racial and ethnic minority MSM. Four semi-structured focus groups with gay and bisexual men and other MSM at risk for HIV infection were convened in Boston and Jackson in late 2013. The analysis plan utilized a within-case, across-case approach to code and analyze emerging themes, and to compare results across the two cities. Participants recruited in Jackson were primarily Black gay men, while Boston participants were mostly non-Hispanic White gay men. Participants in both sites shared concerns about medication side effects and culturally insensitive health care for gay men. Jackson participants described stronger medical mistrust, and more frequently described experiences of anti-gay and HIV related stigma. Multiple addressable barriers to PrEP uptake were described. Information about side effects should be explicitly addressed in PrEP education campaigns. Providers and health departments should address medical mistrust, especially among Black gay and bisexual men and other MSM, in part by training providers in how to provide affirming, culturally competent care. Medicaid should be expanded in Mississippi to cover low-income young Black gay and bisexual men and other MSM.

  14. Black carbon exposure more strongly associated with census tract poverty compared to household income among US black, white, and Latino working class adults in Boston, MA (2003–2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Nancy; Waterman, Pamela D.; Gryparis, Alexandros; Coull, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the association of individual-level ambient exposure to black carbon (spatiotemporal model-based estimate for latitude and longitude of residential address) with individual, household, and census tract socioeconomic measures among a study sample comprised of 1757 US urban working class white, black and Latino adults (age 25–64) recruited for two studies conducted in Boston, MA (2003–2004; 2008–2010). Controlling for age, study, and exam date, the estimated average annual black carbon exposure for the year prior to study enrollment at the participants' residential address was directly associated with census tract poverty (beta = 0.373; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.322, 0.423) but not with annual household income or education; null associations with race/ethnicity became significant only after controlling for socioeconomic position. - Highlights: • The study included 1757 black, Latino, and white working class adults in Boston, MA. • Census tract poverty was associated with annual average black carbon exposure. • Annual household income was not associated with black carbon exposure. • Individual-level education was not associated with black carbon exposure. • The observed socioeconomic patterns varied by race/ethnicity. - In a US multiethnic urban working adult population, exposure to black carbon was more strongly associated with census tract as compared to household- or individual-level socioeconomic measures

  15. 76 FR 20595 - Special Local Regulation; Extreme Sailing Series Boston; Boston Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    .... If you submit comments by mail and would like to know that they reached the Facility, please enclose... without creating a wake. (iv) Due to the waterway area restriction and the expected increase in...

  16. Iranian-Venezuelan Relations and Impacts on the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    COMITEE FARC REVOLUTIONARY ARMED FORCES OF COLOMBIA FTA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT FTAA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT AREA IAEA INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY...Latin America,” The Miami Herald, Mar . 14, 2012. 20 Jaime Daremblum, Iran and Latin America (Hudson Institute, 2011). 21 Countering Iran in the

  17. Venezuela: Political Conditions and U.S. Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-11

    Testimony of Miguel Diaz , Center for Strategic and International Studies, at a hearing of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on the “The State of...Posada Bid for Asylum,” Miami Herald, May 7, 2005. 143 Department of Homeland Security, Office of Public Affairs, Statement, May 17, 2005. 144 Alicia

  18. Estimation of capture zones and drawdown at the Northwest and West Well Fields, Miami-Dade County, Florida, using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis: recent (2004) and proposed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakefield, Linzy K.; Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Chartier, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Travel-time capture zones and drawdown for two production well fields, used for drinking-water supply in Miami-Dade County, southeastern Florida, were delineated by the U.S Geological Survey using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis. The well fields, designed to supply a combined total of approximately 250 million gallons of water per day, pump from the highly transmissive Biscayne aquifer in the urban corridor between the Everglades and Biscayne Bay. A transient groundwater flow model was developed and calibrated to field data to ensure an acceptable match between simulated and observed values for aquifer heads and net exchange of water between the aquifer and canals. Steady-state conditions were imposed on the transient model and a post-processing backward particle-tracking approach was implemented. Multiple stochastic realizations of horizontal hydraulic conductivity, conductance of canals, and effective porosity were simulated for steady-state conditions representative of dry, average and wet hydrologic conditions to calculate travel-time capture zones of potential source areas of the well fields. Quarry lakes, formed as a product of rock-mining activities, whose effects have previously not been considered in estimation of capture zones, were represented using high hydraulic-conductivity, high-porosity cells, with the bulk hydraulic conductivity of each cell calculated based on estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, lake depths and aquifer thicknesses. A post-processing adjustment, based on calculated residence times using lake outflows and known lake volumes, was utilized to adjust particle endpoints to account for an estimate of residence-time-based mixing of lakes. Drawdown contours of 0.1 and 0.25 foot were delineated for the dry, average, and wet hydrologic conditions as well. In addition, 95-percent confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the capture zones and drawdown contours to delineate a zone of uncertainty about the median estimates

  19. 33 CFR 117.305 - Miami River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the United States, tugs, tugs with tows, and vessels in a situation where a delay would endanger life... section at any time. (b) The draws of the S.W. First Street Bridge, mile 0.9, up to and including the N.W...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Miami County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Miami County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  2. Hydrodynamic simulations of physical aquatic habitat availability for Pallid Sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River, at Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri, 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Johnson, Harold E.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of habitat availability in the Lower Missouri River to discharge variation, with emphasis on habitats that might support spawning of the endangered pallid sturgeon. We constructed computational hydrodynamic models for four reaches that were selected because of evidence that sturgeon have spawned in them. The reaches are located at Miami, Missouri (river mile 259.6–263.5), Little Sioux, Iowa (river mile 669.6–673.5), Kenslers Bend, Nebraska (river mile 743.9–748.1), and Yankton, South Dakota reach (river mile 804.8–808.4). The models were calibrated for a range of measured flow conditions, and run for a range of discharges that might be affected by flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam. Model performance was assessed by comparing modeled and measured water velocities.A selection of derived habitat units was assessed for sensitivity to hydraulic input parameters (drag coefficient and lateral eddy viscosity). Overall, model results were minimally sensitive to varying eddy viscosity; varying lateral eddy viscosity by 20 percent resulted in maximum change in habitat units of 5.4 percent. Shallow-water habitat units were most sensitive to variation in drag coefficient with 42 percent change in unit area resulting from 20 percent change in the parameter value; however, no habitat unit value changed more than 10 percent for a 10 percent variation in drag coefficient. Sensitivity analysis provides guidance for selecting habitat metrics that maximize information content while minimizing model uncertainties.To assess model sensitivities arising from topographic variation from sediment transport on an annual time scale, we constructed separate models from two complete independent surveys in 2006 and 2007. The net topographic change was minimal at each site; the ratio of net topographic change to water volume in the reaches at 95 percent exceedance flow was less than 5 percent, indicating that on a reach

  3. Avaliação do questionário de Boston aplicado no pós-operatório tardio da síndrome do tunel do carpo operados pela técnica de retinaculótomo de paine por via palmar Evaluation of Boston questionnaire applied at late pos-operative period of carpal tunnel syndrome operated with the paine retinaculatome through palmar port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Miyamoto Meirelles

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Entre os anos de 1995 e 1998, foram realizadas 112 cirurgias para tratamento da Síndrome do Túnel do Carpo (STC pela técnica de incisão palmar e utilização do retináculo de Paine. Com o objetivo de avaliar os resultados em longo prazo, os pacientes foram convocados. Houve o retorno de 44 pacientes. Deste total, três pacientes, por terem doenças associadas, foram excluídos, resultando, um total de 53 mãos analisadas. Apresentaremos os resultados da avaliação subjetiva, obtidos através da aplicação de um teste de auto-avaliação chamado de questionário de Boston. Este questionário consiste em perguntas que avaliam a gravidade dos sintomas e o estado funcional no momento da aplicação do mesmo. Através da aplicação do referido questionário encontramos um escore de 1,41 ± 0,57 para gravidade dos sintomas e 1,59 ± 0,93 para o estado funcional. Como este questionário não foi aplicado no pré-operatório deste grupo de pacientes analisados, comparou-se a pontuação obtida com as encontradas na literatura pertinente. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que as pontuações pós-operatórias são similares àquelas existentes na literatura, mesmo sendo referidas a tempos diferentes de seguimento pós-operatórios, concluindo que havendo uma melhora dos sintomas, o questionário de Boston é sensível a esta mudança clínica.Between the years of 1995 and 1998, 112 surgeries were performed for treating Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS using the technique of palmar incision employing the Paine retinaculum. With the objective of analyzing results in the long-term, the patients were called for review. Forty four patients returned. From these, three patients were excluded due to associated diseases, thus resulting in a total of 53 hands assessed. Here we present the results of the subjective evaluation achieved by applying a self-assessment test called Boston questionnaire. This questionnaire consists of questions evaluating symptoms

  4. Unlocking Miami’s suburban gated communities: a semiotic and iconographic approach Les complexes résidentiels sécurisés dans l'espace périurbain de Miami : Une approche sémiotique et iconographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Pufe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the end of the 1990s, gated residential neighbourhoods have moved into the focus of an interdisciplinary scientific community. Asking why they have loomed in the last two decades, the majority of publications find the answer in an increased fear of crime, a widened socio-economic polarisation and a wish to privatise public goods. Arguing from a constructivist and critical point of view, chiefly with respect to the ideas of the new cultural geography, I assert in the context of Miami that these generalisations have to be challenged, particularly since there are many to be found in suburban spaces.Depuis la fin des années 1990, les complexes résidentiels sécurisés focalisent l'attention d’une communauté scientifique interdisciplinaire. S’interrogeant sur leur émergence au cours de ces deux dernières décennies, la majorité des publications l’explique par la peur du crime, en recrudescence, associée à une polarisation socio-économique élargie et à la privatisation des biens publics qui se poursuit. En adoptant un point de vue constructiviste et critique, principalement en ce qui concerne les idées de la nouvelle géographie culturelle, j’affirme que, dans le contexte de Miami, ces généralisations doivent être mises en doute, d’autant plus qu’elles sont très répandues au sein des espaces périurbains.

  5. 78 FR 54585 - Safety Zone; Escape to Miami Triathlon, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-05

    ... Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). This provision authorizes an agency to issue a rule without prior notice... Security Management Directive 023-01 and Commandant Instruction M16475.lD, which guide the Coast Guard in...

  6. OMICS and 21st century brain surgery from education to practice: James Rutka of the University of Toronto interviewed by Joseph B. Martin (Boston) and Türker Kılıç (İstanbul).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutka, James; Martin, Joseph; Kılıç, Türker

    2014-12-01

    The Science-in-Backstage interviews aim to share experiences by global medical and life sciences thought leaders on emergent technologies and novel scientific, medical, and educational practices, situating them in both a historical and contemporary science context so as to "look into the biotechnology and innovation futures" reflexively and intelligently. OMICS systems diagnostics and personalized medicine are greatly impacting brain surgery, not to forget the training of the next generation of neurosurgeons. What do the futures hold for the practice of, and education in 21(st) century brain surgery in the age of OMICS systems science, personalized medicine, and the use of simulation in surgeon training? James Rutka is a clinician scientist and a world leader in diagnosis and treatment of brain tumors. He is Professor and Chair of the Department of Surgery at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, a President Emeritus of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neurosurgery. Professor Rutka was interviewed for the global medical, biotechnology, and life sciences readership of the OMICS: A Journal of Integrative Biology to speak on these pressing questions in his personal capacity as an independent senior scholar. The issues debated in the present interview are of broad relevance for 21(st) century surgery and postgenomics medicine. The interviewers were Professor Joseph B. Martin, Harvard Medical School Dean Emeritus in Boston and Joint Dean of Medicine at Bahçeşehir University in İstanbul, and the author of "Alfalfa to Ivy: Memoir of a Harvard Medical School Dean," and Professor Türker Kılıç, Dean of Medicine at Bahçeşehir University in İstanbul, and an elected member of the Turkish Academy of Sciences.

  7. Tartu on Eesti Boston / Silver Meikar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meikar, Silver, 1978-

    2007-01-01

    Tartu eeldustest kujuneda hariduse, innovaatilise tootmise, pärimuskultuuri ja linnaruumi tasakaalustatud kasutamise südameks. Ettevõtluse, transpordi ja turismi arengust. Lisa: Silver Meikari Lõuna-Eesti edu top 10

  8. A Conversation with Composer Lansing McLoskey

    OpenAIRE

    MOORE, TOM

    2013-01-01

    Lansing McLoskey (b. 1964) first came to my attention through a rave review for his CD in Gramophone in 2008, when he had recently moved from the Boston area to Miami, where he is professor of composition at the Frost School of Music of the University of Miami. His musical background is almost psychedelically diverse, ranging from both prog-rock and punk-rock, through early music, to study of contemporary composition at UC Santa Barbara, USC, The Royal Danish Academy of Music and Harvard.

  9. 78 FR 6782 - Safety Zone-Chelsea River, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Management Facility. 3. Privacy Act Anyone can search the electronic form of comments received into any of... factors led to the establishment of the present safety zone regulation which restricts certain vessel...

  10. 78 FR 48085 - Safety Zones; Chelsea River, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... width of 175 feet. Six new permanent fixed lighted aids to navigation structures have been installed in... supplemented by Executive Order 13563, and does not require an assessment of potential costs and benefits under... Risks We have analyzed this proposed rule under Executive Order 13045, Protection of Children from...

  11. 78 FR 58882 - Safety Zone; Chelsea River, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... navigational channel has been expanded to a width of 175 feet. Six new permanent fixed lighted aids to..., Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review, and does not require an assessment of potential costs and... From Environmental Health Risks We have analyzed this rule under Executive Order 13045, Protection of...

  12. 75 FR 61096 - Regulated Navigation Area; Reserved Channel, Boston Harbor, Boston, MA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-04

    ... not a significant regulatory action for the following reasons: The RNA will be of limited duration, it.... ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a Regulated Navigation Area (RNA... control the speed of all vessels transiting within the RNA. The RNA is necessary to protect participants...

  13. 3rd Miami international conference on alternative energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejat Veziroglu, T.

    1980-01-01

    The conference includes sessions on solar energy, ocean thermal energy, wind energy, hydro power, nuclear breeders and nuclear fusion, synthetic fuels from coal or wastes, hydrogen production and uses, formulation of workable policies on energy use and energy conservation, heat and energy storage, and energy education. The volume of the proceedings presents the papers and lectures in condensed format grouped by subject under forty-two sessions for 319 presentations

  14. Urban Data Book : Volume 1. Urban Data - Atlanta-Miami

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-11-01

    A quick reference compilation of certain population, socio-economic, employment, and modal split characteristics of the 35 largest Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSA) in the United States is presented. The three basic groups or urban data ...

  15. Cable Communications in the Dayton Miami Valley: Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Leland L.

    The report summarizes a ten-part study of prospects for cable television (CATV) in the 13 communities that make up the metropolitan area of Dayton, Ohio. The report, written in non-technical language, deals with the economics and technology of CATV, the range of new services that might be provided via CATV, and questions of franchising and…

  16. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MIAMI - DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  17. Linguistic Variability and Intellectual Development. Miami Linguistics Series No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Humboldt, Wilhelm

    Although this edition of Wilhelm von Humboldt's "Linguistic Variability and Intellectual Development" is based entirely on the original German edition, the translators (George C. Buck and Frithjof A. Raven) and the publisher have attempted to clarify certain aspects of this work for the modern-day reader. These features include the addition of…

  18. Narratives of Miami in Dexter and Burn Notice

    OpenAIRE

    Myles McNutt

    2017-01-01

    In popular discourse around television, a series’ relationship with place is often marked through the suggestion its setting is “like a character in the show”, but this article argues against adopting this as a framework for analyzing television’s relationship with space and place. It articulates the relationship between this discourse of “spatial capital” and hierarchies of cultural capital within the television industry, limiting the types of series that are deemed to warrant closer investi...

  19. 3rd Miami international conference on alternative energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejat Veziroglu, T.

    1980-01-01

    The conference includes sessions on solar energy, ocean thermal energy, wind energy, hydro power, nuclear breeders and nuclear fusion, synthetic fuels from coal or wastes, hydrogen production and uses, formulation of workable policies on energy use and energy conservation, heat and energy storage, and energy education. The volume of the proceedings presents the papers and lectures in condensed format grouped by subject under forty-two sessions for 319 presentations.

  20. The Acute Brain Response to Levodopa Heralds Dyskinesias in Parkinson Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson disease (PD), long‐term treatment with the dopamine precursor levodopa gradually induces involuntary “dyskinesia” movements. The neural mechanisms underlying the emergence of levodopa‐induced dyskinesias in vivo are still poorly understood. Here, we applied functional magnetic...

  1. Do subjective memory complaints herald the onset of mild cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erro, Roberto; Santangelo, Gabriella; Barone, Paolo; Picillo, Marina; Amboni, Marianna; Longo, Katia; Giordano, Flavio; Moccia, Marcello; Allocca, Roberto; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Vitale, Carmine

    2014-12-01

    Longitudinal studies on healthy participants have shown that subjective memory impairment (defined as subjective cognitive complaints with normal cognitive objective performance) might be a strong predictor of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Parkinson disease (PD) also manifests cognitive disturbances, but whether subjective memory complaints may predict the development of MCI in PD has not yet been explored. We prospectively screened newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD in order to evaluate whether subjective memory complaints may predict development of MCI over a 2-year follow-up evaluation. We enrolled 76 de novo untreated patients with PD. Of the 76 patients, 23 (30.3%) complained memory issues. Among the patients cognitively unimpaired at baseline, those with subjective complaints were more likely to develop MCI at follow-up. The regression model confirmed that presence of subjective memory complaints at baseline was an independent predictor of development of MCI at follow-up. This is the first prospective study to explore the relationship between subjective and objective cognitive deficits in newly diagnosed, untreated patients. Our results provide preliminary evidence that subjective memory complaints might predict future development of MCI. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Continuous multi-parameter heart rate variability analysis heralds onset of sepsis in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Ahmad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis of sepsis enables timely resuscitation and antibiotics and prevents subsequent morbidity and mortality. Clinical approaches relying on point-in-time analysis of vital signs or lab values are often insensitive, non-specific and late diagnostic markers of sepsis. Exploring otherwise hidden information within intervals-in-time, heart rate variability (HRV has been documented to be both altered in the presence of sepsis, and correlated with its severity. We hypothesized that by continuously tracking individual patient HRV over time in patients as they develop sepsis, we would demonstrate reduced HRV in association with the onset of sepsis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We monitored heart rate continuously in adult bone marrow transplant (BMT patients (n = 21 beginning a day before their BMT and continuing until recovery or withdrawal (12+/-4 days. We characterized HRV continuously over time with a panel of time, frequency, complexity, and scale-invariant domain techniques. We defined baseline HRV as mean variability for the first 24 h of monitoring and studied individual and population average percentage change (from baseline over time in diverse HRV metrics, in comparison with the time of clinical diagnosis and treatment of sepsis (defined as systemic inflammatory response syndrome along with clinically suspected infection requiring treatment. Of the 21 patients enrolled, 4 patients withdrew, leaving 17 patients who completed the study. Fourteen patients developed sepsis requiring antibiotic therapy, whereas 3 did not. On average, for 12 out of 14 infected patients, a significant (25% reduction prior to the clinical diagnosis and treatment of sepsis was observed in standard deviation, root mean square successive difference, sample and multiscale entropy, fast Fourier transform, detrended fluctuation analysis, and wavelet variability metrics. For infected patients (n = 14, wavelet HRV demonstrated a 25% drop from baseline 35 h prior to sepsis on average. For 3 out of 3 non-infected patients, all measures, except root mean square successive difference and entropy, showed no significant reduction. Significant correlation was present amongst these HRV metrics for the entire population. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Continuous HRV monitoring is feasible in ambulatory patients, demonstrates significant HRV alteration in individual patients in association with, and prior to clinical diagnosis and treatment of sepsis, and merits further investigation as a means of providing early warning of sepsis.

  3. Henryk Uziębło's heraldic decoration in the chapter house in Wawel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Marecki

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Henryk Uziembło (27 February 1879 – 3 May 1945 was one of the creators of modern decorative art; he also made graphics. From 1922 to the outbreak of World War II he was a lecturer at the Institute of Fine Arts in Krakow. He designed polychromes, stained glass windows and mosaics, book bindings, posters and made oil paintings. He is the author of the decorations of the wall of the Wawel chapter house.

  4. Direct neuronal glucose uptake Heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using two......-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anaesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover......, hexokinase, which catalyses the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identify the neuron as the principal locus...

  5. The PAMELA Mission: Heralding a new era in precision cosmic ray physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G.C.; Bazilevskaya, G.A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E.A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carbone, R.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.

    2014-01-01

    On the 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) satellite-borne experiment was launched onboard the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite by a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur space centre. The satellite was placed in a quasi-polar 70°inclination orbit at an altitude varying between 350 km and 600 km. New results on the antiparticle component of the cosmic radiation were obtained. The positron energy spectrum and positron fraction were measured from 400 MeV up to 200 GeV revealing a positron excess over the predictions of commonly used propagation models. This can be interpreted either as evidence that the propagation models should be revised or in terms of dark matter annihilation or a pulsar contribution. The antiproton spectrum was measured over the energy range from 60 MeV to 350 GeV. The antiproton spectrum is consistent with secondary production and significantly constrains dark matter models. The energy spectra of protons and helium nuclei were measured up to 1.2 TV. The spectral shapes of these two species are different and cannot be described well by a single power law. For the first time the electron spectrum was measured up to 600 GeV complementing the information obtained from the positron data. Nuclear and isotopic composition was obtained with unprecedented precision. The variation of the low energy proton, electron and positron energy spectra was measured from July 2006 until December 2009 accurately sampling the unusual conditions of the most recent solar minimum activity period (2006–2009). Low energy particle spectra were accurately measured also for various solar events that occurred during the PAMELA mission. The Earth’s magnetosphere was studied measuring the particle radiation in different regions of the magnetosphere. Energy spectra and composition of sub-cutoff and trapped particles were obtained. For the first time a belt of trapped antiprotons was detected in the South Atlantic Anomaly region. The flux was found to exceed that for galactic cosmic-ray antiprotons by three order of magnitude

  6. Ischemic Stroke in a Young Patient Heralding a Left Ventricular Noncompaction Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Lestienne

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Strokes in young patients may be the clinical expression of many complex and extremely rare diseases. Uncommon causes constitute less than 5% of all strokes, but are present in 30% of strokes in young patients. We report the case of a young woman whose ischemic stroke led to the diagnosis of a rare embolic cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy, requiring a heart transplant.

  7. The PAMELA Mission: Heralding a new era in precision cosmic ray physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O. [University of Florence, Department of Physics, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G.C. [University of Naples “Federico II”, Department of Physics, I-80126 Naples (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G.A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E.A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bongi, M. [University of Florence, Department of Physics, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bonvicini, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Bruno, A. [University of Bari, Department of Physics, I-70126 Bari (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Casolino, M. [INFN, Sezione di Rome “Tor Vergata”, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Castellini, G. [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); and others

    2014-11-30

    On the 15th of June 2006, the PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) satellite-borne experiment was launched onboard the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite by a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur space centre. The satellite was placed in a quasi-polar 70°inclination orbit at an altitude varying between 350 km and 600 km. New results on the antiparticle component of the cosmic radiation were obtained. The positron energy spectrum and positron fraction were measured from 400 MeV up to 200 GeV revealing a positron excess over the predictions of commonly used propagation models. This can be interpreted either as evidence that the propagation models should be revised or in terms of dark matter annihilation or a pulsar contribution. The antiproton spectrum was measured over the energy range from 60 MeV to 350 GeV. The antiproton spectrum is consistent with secondary production and significantly constrains dark matter models. The energy spectra of protons and helium nuclei were measured up to 1.2 TV. The spectral shapes of these two species are different and cannot be described well by a single power law. For the first time the electron spectrum was measured up to 600 GeV complementing the information obtained from the positron data. Nuclear and isotopic composition was obtained with unprecedented precision. The variation of the low energy proton, electron and positron energy spectra was measured from July 2006 until December 2009 accurately sampling the unusual conditions of the most recent solar minimum activity period (2006–2009). Low energy particle spectra were accurately measured also for various solar events that occurred during the PAMELA mission. The Earth’s magnetosphere was studied measuring the particle radiation in different regions of the magnetosphere. Energy spectra and composition of sub-cutoff and trapped particles were obtained. For the first time a belt of trapped antiprotons was detected in the South Atlantic Anomaly region. The flux was found to exceed that for galactic cosmic-ray antiprotons by three order of magnitude.

  8. Salmonella Urinary Tract Infection Heralding Thoracic Mycotic Aneurysm: Case Report as Medical Apology

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jennifer L.; Golfus, Gabriel R.; Sadosty, Annie T.

    2017-01-01

    We report a case as a patient apology as a means of teaching other physicians about a unique presentation of a rare disease. Salmonella species are unusually isolated organisms in urine. In the case described, appreciation for the rarity of Salmonella species in the urine facilitated recognition of a serious disseminated Salmonella infection. Physicians should consider disseminated Salmonella infection, as was found in a patient with an aortic mycotic an eurysm, after isolation of Salmonella in urine despite an initially benign clinical presentation.

  9. Decrease in fruit moisture content heralds and might launch the onset of ripening processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Chaim; Hartman, Thomas G

    2012-10-01

    It is known that fruit ripening is a genetically programmed event but it is not entirely clear what metabolic cue(s) stimulate the onset of ripening, ethylene action notwithstanding. Here, we examined the conjecture that fruit ripening might be evoked by an autonomously induced decrease in tissue water status. We found decline in water content occurring at the onset of ripening in climacteric and nonclimacteric fruit, suggesting that this phenomenon might be universal. This decline in water content persisted throughout the ripening process in some fruit, whereas in others it reversed during the progression of the ripening process. Applied ethylene also induced a decrease in water content in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers. In ethylene-mutant tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit (antisense to1-aminocyclopropane carboxylate synthase), cold-induced decline in water content stimulated onset of ripening processes apparently independently of ethylene action, suggesting cause-and-effect relationship between decreasing water content and onset of ripening. The decline in tissue water content, occurring naturally or induced by ethylene, was strongly correlated with a decrease in hydration (swelling) efficacy of cell wall preparations suggesting that hydration dynamics of cell walls might account for changes in tissue moisture content. Extent of cell wall swelling was, in turn, related to the degree of oxidative cross-linking of wall-bound phenolic acids, suggesting that oxidant-induced wall restructuring might mediate cell wall and, thus, fruit tissue hydration status. We propose that oxidant-induced cell wall remodeling and consequent wall dehydration might evoke stress signaling for the onset of ripening processes. This study suggests that decline in fruit water content is an early event in fruit ripening. This information may be used to gauge fruit maturity for appropriate harvest date and for processing. Control of fruit hydration state might be used to regulate the onset of fruit ripening. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Coral recovery may not herald the return of fishes on damaged coral reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Bellwood, David R.; Baird, Andrew Hamilton; Depczynski, Martial R.; Gonzá lez-Cabello, Alonso; Hoey, Andrew; Lefé vre, Carine D.; Tanner, Jennifer K.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamic nature of coral reefs offers a rare opportunity to examine the response of ecosystems to disruption due to climate change. In 1998, the Great Barrier Reef experienced widespread coral bleaching and mortality. As a result, cryptobenthic fish assemblages underwent a dramatic phase-shift. Thirteen years, and up to 96 fish generations later, the cryptobenthic fish assemblage has not returned to its pre-bleach configuration. This is despite coral abundances returning to, or exceeding, pre-bleach values. The post-bleach fish assemblage exhibits no evidence of recovery. If these short-lived fish species are a model for their longer-lived counterparts, they suggest that (1) the full effects of the 1998 bleaching event on long-lived fish populations have yet to be seen, (2) it may take decades, or more, before recovery or regeneration of these long-lived species will begin, and (3) fish assemblages may not recover to their previous composition despite the return of corals. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Heralded source of bright multi-mode mesoscopic sub-Poissonian light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskhakov, Timur; Usenko, V. C.; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2016-01-01

    In a direct detection scheme, we observed 7.8 dB of twin-beam squeezing for multi-mode two-color squeezed vacuum generated via parametric downconversion. Applying postselection, we conditionally prepared a sub-Poissonian state of light containing 6.3 . 105 photons per pulse on the average...

  12. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John D R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-04-23

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using two-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anaesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyses the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identify the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging.

  13. Coral recovery may not herald the return of fishes on damaged coral reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Bellwood, David R.

    2012-03-25

    The dynamic nature of coral reefs offers a rare opportunity to examine the response of ecosystems to disruption due to climate change. In 1998, the Great Barrier Reef experienced widespread coral bleaching and mortality. As a result, cryptobenthic fish assemblages underwent a dramatic phase-shift. Thirteen years, and up to 96 fish generations later, the cryptobenthic fish assemblage has not returned to its pre-bleach configuration. This is despite coral abundances returning to, or exceeding, pre-bleach values. The post-bleach fish assemblage exhibits no evidence of recovery. If these short-lived fish species are a model for their longer-lived counterparts, they suggest that (1) the full effects of the 1998 bleaching event on long-lived fish populations have yet to be seen, (2) it may take decades, or more, before recovery or regeneration of these long-lived species will begin, and (3) fish assemblages may not recover to their previous composition despite the return of corals. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Shale Gas: Myths and Realities. The Stakes in this Much-Heralded Revolution and its Limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papon, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    With the European Commission having just timidly reopened the door to renewed exploitation of shale gas in Europe provided that 'minimum principles' are met, particularly with regard to health and the environment (Recommendation of 22 January 2014), what lessons can we take today from the experience of other nations, particularly the USA, who were the first to travel down this new energy path a little more than a decade ago? Drawing, in particular, on the most recent literature on the subject, Pierre Papon is at pains here to take stock of this major issue, which has already begun to recast the global energy landscape and might have major economic and geopolitical con sequences in the medium and long term. After reminding us of the nature of this unconventional gas and the conditions for its exploitation, together with the USA's highly optimistic projections for the future, he highlights the economic advantage the production of shale gas affords that country at both the national and global levels thanks to a knock-on effect of improved competitiveness in certain industries. Papon goes on to specify the environmental concerns that re main and the technical alternatives that are to be envisaged for exploiting shale gas. Lastly, he outlines the issues and perspectives for Europe and France, provided that other lines of research can be explored with regard to the exploitation of this resource. At the same time he reminds us of the need to be vigilant about the future: this is essential if we are to remain aware of the inherent risks in this field, but also not overlook any technical advance that might afford an opportunity to exploit shale gas on this side of the Atlantic. (author)

  15. Direct neuronal glucose uptake heralds activity-dependent increases in cerebral metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgaard, Iben; Li, Baoman; Xie, Lulu; Kang, Hongyi; Sanggaard, Simon; Haswell, John Douglas R; Sun, Wei; Goldman, Siri; Blekot, Solomiya; Nielsen, Michael; Takano, Takahiro; Deane, Rashid; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2015-01-01

    Metabolically, the brain is a highly active organ that relies almost exclusively on glucose as its energy source. According to the astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttle hypothesis, glucose is taken up by astrocytes and converted to lactate, which is then oxidized by neurons. Here we show, using 2-photon imaging of a near-infrared 2-deoxyglucose analogue (2DG-IR), that glucose is taken up preferentially by neurons in awake behaving mice. Anesthesia suppressed neuronal 2DG-IR uptake and sensory stimulation was associated with a sharp increase in neuronal, but not astrocytic, 2DG-IR uptake. Moreover, hexokinase, which catalyze the first enzymatic steps in glycolysis, was highly enriched in neurons compared with astrocytes, in mouse as well as in human cortex. These observations suggest that brain activity and neuronal glucose metabolism are directly linked, and identifies the neuron as the principal locus of glucose uptake as visualized by functional brain imaging. PMID:25904018

  16. Water Resources Development Miami River, Little Miami River, and Mill Creek Basins, Southwest Ohio. Volume 2. Appendices A-G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    the area. Common species include boxelder, black locust, hackberry, tree of heaven, sycamore, Osage orange, black willow, mulberry, slippery elm ...and maple include tulip poplar, white ash, red elm , American elm , black cherry, hackberry, walnut, basswood, buckeye, white oak, shagbark hickory, and...willow. Other canopy species in these communities include buckeye, elm , beech, black locust, hackberry, walnut, and silver maple. The most prevalent

  17. Comparison of Police Social Media Strategies Used in Boston Marathon Bombing and Ferguson Emergency Events%突发事件中美国警方社交媒体的危机传播策略*--基于波士顿马拉松爆炸案和弗格森案的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高扬; 吴锋

    2015-01-01

    波士顿马拉松爆炸案和弗格森案对美国执法体系带来了重大影响。本文对波士顿和圣路易斯警察局在这两起突发事件中的警用社交媒体的使用进行对比数据分析,阐述这两个警察局在使用社交媒体应对突发事件的成功和失败的根本原因,进而总结美国警察局在突发事件中如何利用社交媒体发布、获取和传播信息,安抚稳定公众情绪,呼吁配合案件调查,与市民增强互动,赢得社区信任和支持。这对我国公安机关使用社交媒体应对突发事件,开展警务执法工作等方面有着重要借鉴意义。%In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive review, comparison, and analysis of how the St. Louis Police Department and the Boston Police Department use the social media for emergency response and crisis management during the Ferguson and Boston Bombing e-vents. We perform both qualitative and quantitative analysis of their original social media content posted during these two events and the past two years. We study the successful experience obtained, valuable lesson learned, and efficient measures established by these two po-lice departments in using social media for effective communication and interactions with citizens during emergency events. This will pro-vide useful reference for law enforcement and crisis management by Chinese police departments in the age of social media.

  18. 77 FR 39249 - Boston Area Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Purpose The AMSCs shall assist the Captain of the Port in the development, review, update, and exercising..., including labor; other port stakeholders having a special competence in maritime security; and port...

  19. 78 FR 42101 - Boston Area Maritime Security Advisory Committee; Vacancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... the Captain of the Port in the development, review, update, and exercising of the Area Maritime..., including labor; other port stakeholders having a special competence in maritime security; and port...

  20. Two Boston Organizations Awarded EPA Environmental Education Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two organizations in Massachusetts have been awarded 181,864 in Environmental Education Grants by the US Environmental Protection Agency to support their work in addressing a range of topics in classrooms.