WorldWideScience

Sample records for methane hydrate dissocation

  1. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  2. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  3. Investigation on Gas Storage in Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigao Sun; Rongsheng Ma; Shuanshi Fan; Kaihua Guo; Ruzhu Wang

    2004-01-01

    The effect of additives (anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), nonionic surfactant alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG), and liquid hydrocarbon cyclopentane (CP)) on hydrate induction time and formation rate, and storage capacity was studied in this work. Micelle surfactant solutions were found to reduce hydrate induction time, increase methane hydrate formation rate and improve methane storage capacity in hydrates. In the presence of surfactant, hydrate could form quickly in a quiescent system and the energy costs of hydrate formation were reduced. The critical micelle concentrations of SDS and APG water solutions were found to be 300× 10-6 and 500× 10-6 for methane hydrate formation system respectively. The effect of anionic surfactant (SDS) on methane storage in hydrates is more pronounced compared to a nonionic surfactant (APG). CP also reduced hydrate induction time and improved hydrate formation rate, but could not improve methane storage in hydrates.

  4. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  5. Methane storage in dry water gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixing; Bray, Christopher L; Adams, Dave J; Cooper, Andrew I

    2008-09-03

    Dry water stores 175 v(STP)/v methane at 2.7 MPa and 273.2 K in a hydrate form which is close to the Department of Energy volumetric target for methane storage. Dry water is a silica-stabilized free-flowing powder (95% wt water), and fast methane uptakes were observed (90% saturation uptake in 160 min with no mixing) as a result of the relatively large surface-to-volume ratio of this material.

  6. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release as much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  7. Methane hydrate stability and anthropogenic climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Archer

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Methane frozen into hydrate makes up a large reservoir of potentially volatile carbon below the sea floor and associated with permafrost soils. This reservoir intuitively seems precarious, because hydrate ice floats in water, and melts at Earth surface conditions. The hydrate reservoir is so large that if 10% of the methane were released to the atmosphere within a few years, it would have an impact on the Earth's radiation budget equivalent to a factor of 10 increase in atmospheric CO2.

    Hydrates are releasing methane to the atmosphere today in response to anthropogenic warming, for example along the Arctic coastline of Siberia. However most of the hydrates are located at depths in soils and ocean sediments where anthropogenic warming and any possible methane release will take place over time scales of millennia. Individual catastrophic releases like landslides and pockmark explosions are too small to reach a sizable fraction of the hydrates. The carbon isotopic excursion at the end of the Paleocene has been interpreted as the release of thousands of Gton C, possibly from hydrates, but the time scale of the release appears to have been thousands of years, chronic rather than catastrophic.

    The potential climate impact in the coming century from hydrate methane release is speculative but could be comparable to climate feedbacks from the terrestrial biosphere and from peat, significant but not catastrophic. On geologic timescales, it is conceivable that hydrates could release much carbon to the atmosphere/ocean system as we do by fossil fuel combustion.

  8. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  9. Experimental Dissociation of Methane Hydrates Through Depressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgfeldt, T.; Flemings, P. B.; Meyer, D.; You, K.

    2015-12-01

    We dissociated methane hydrates by stepwise depressurization. The initial hydrates were formed by injecting gas into a cylindrical sample of brine-saturated, coarse-grained sand at hydrate-stable conditions with the intention of reaching three-phase equilibrium. The sample was initially at 1°C with a pore pressure of 1775 psi and a salinity of 7 wt. % NaBr. The depressurization setup consisted of one pump filled with tap water attached to the confining fluid port and a second pump attached to the inlet port where the methane was injected. Depressurization was conducted over sixteen hours at a constant temperature of 1°C. The pore pressure was stepwise reduced from 1775 psi to atmospheric pressure by pulling known volumes of gas from the sample. After each extraction, we recorded the instantaneous and equilibrium pore pressure. 0.503 moles of methane were removed from the sample. The pore pressure decreased smoothly and nonlinearly with the cumulative gas withdrawn from the sample. We interpret that hydrate began to dissociate immediately with depressurization, and it continued to dissociate when the pressure decreased below the three-phase pressure for 1°C and 0 wt. % salinity. Two breaks in slope in the pressure vs. mass extracted data are bounded by smooth, nonlinear curves with differing slopes on either side. We attribute the breaks to dissociation of three zones of hydrate concentration. We created a box model to simulate the experimental behavior. For a 10% initial gas saturation (estimated from the hydrate formation experiment and based on mass conservation), an initial hydrate saturation of 55% is required to match the total methane extracted from the sample. Future experiments will be conducted over a longer timespan while monitoring hydrate dissociation with CT imaging throughout the process.

  10. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  11. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  12. Preventing Coal and Gas Outburst Using Methane Hydration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴强; 何学秋

    2003-01-01

    According to the characteristics of the methane hydrate condensing and accumulating methane, authors put forward a new technique thought way to prevent the accident of coal and gas outburst by urging the methane in the coal seams to form hydrate. The paper analyzes the feasibility of forming the methane hydrate in the coal seam from the several sides, such as, temperature,pressure, and gas components, and the primary trial results indicate the problems should be settled before the industrialization appliance realized.

  13. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  16. Evaluation of Heat Induced Methane Release from Methane Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, J.; Elwood-Madden, M.; Phelps, T. J.; Rawn, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    Clathrates, or gas hydrates, structurally are guest gas molecules populating a cavity in a cage of water molecules. Gas hydrates naturally occur on Earth under low temperature and moderate pressure environments including continental shelf, deep ocean, and permafrost sediments. Large quantities of methane are trapped in hydrates, providing significant near-surface reserves of carbon and energy. Thermodynamics predicts that hydrate deposits may be destabilized by reducing the pressure in the system or raising the temperature. However, the rate of methane release due to varying environmental conditions remains relatively unconstrained and complicated by natural feedback effects of clathrate dissociation. In this study, hydrate dissociation in sediment due to localized increases in temperature was monitored and observed at the mesoscale (>20L) in a laboratory environment. Experiments were conducted in the Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to simulate heat induced dissociation. The SPS, containing a column of Ottawa sand saturated with water containing 25mg/L Sno-Max to aid nucleation, was pressurized and cooled well into the hydrate stability field. A fiber optic distributed sensing system (DSS) was embedded at four depths in the sediment column. This allowed the temperature strain value (a proxy for temperature) of the system to be measured with high spatial resolution to monitor the clathrate formation/dissociation processes. A heat exchanger embedded in the sediment was heated using hot recirculated ethylene glycol and the temperature drop across the exchanger was measured. These experiments indicate a significant and sustained amount of heat is required to release methane gas from hydrate-bearing sediments. Heat was consumed by hydrate dissociated in a growing sphere around the heat exchanger until steady state was reached. At steady state all heat energy entering the system was consumed in maintaining the temperature profile

  17. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  18. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the

  19. Effects of salinity on methane gas hydrate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; DingHui; XU; WenYue

    2007-01-01

    Using an approximately analytical formation,we extend the steady state model of the pure methane hydrate system to include the salinity based on the dynamic model of the methane hydrate system.The top and bottom boundaries of the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ) and the actual methane hydrate zone (MHZ),and the top of free gas occurrence are determined by using numerical methods and the new steady state model developed in this paper.Numerical results show that the MHZ thickness becomes thinner with increasing the salinity,and the stability is lowered and the base of the MHSZ is shifted toward the seafloor in the presence of salts.As a result,the thickness of actual hydrate occurrence becomes thinner compared with that of the pure water case.On the other hand,since lower solubility reduces the amount of gas needed to form methane hydrate,the existence of salts in seawater can actually promote methane gas hydrate formation in the hydrate stability zone.Numerical modeling also demonstrates that for the salt-water case the presence of methane within the field of methane hydrate stability is not sufficient to ensure the occurrence of gas hydrate,which can only form when the methane concentration dissolved in solution with salts exceeds the local methane solubility in salt water and if the methane flux exceeds a critical value corresponding to the rate of diffusive methane transport.In order to maintain gas hydrate or to form methane gas hydrate in marine sediments,a persistent supplied methane probably from biogenic or thermogenic processes,is required to overcome losses due to diffusion and advection.

  20. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  3. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained

  4. Critical state soil constitutive model for methane hydrate soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S. Uchida; K. Soga; K. Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

      This paper presents a new constitutive model that simulates the mechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soil based on the concept of critical state soil mechanics, referred to as the Methane...

  5. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  6. The interaction of climate change and methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.; Kessler, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Gas hydrate, a frozen, naturally-occurring, and highly-concentrated form of methane, sequesters significant carbon in the global system and is stable only over a range of low-temperature and moderate-pressure conditions. Gas hydrate is widespread in the sediments of marine continental margins and permafrost areas, locations where ocean and atmospheric warming may perturb the hydrate stability field and lead to release of the sequestered methane into the overlying sediments and soils. Methane and methane-derived carbon that escape from sediments and soils and reach the atmosphere could exacerbate greenhouse warming. The synergy between warming climate and gas hydrate dissociation feeds a popular perception that global warming could drive catastrophic methane releases from the contemporary gas hydrate reservoir. Appropriate evaluation of the two sides of the climate-methane hydrate synergy requires assessing direct and indirect observational data related to gas hydrate dissociation phenomena and numerical models that track the interaction of gas hydrates/methane with the ocean and/or atmosphere. Methane hydrate is likely undergoing dissociation now on global upper continental slopes and on continental shelves that ring the Arctic Ocean. Many factors—the depth of the gas hydrates in sediments, strong sediment and water column sinks, and the inability of bubbles emitted at the seafloor to deliver methane to the sea-air interface in most cases—mitigate the impact of gas hydrate dissociation on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations though. There is no conclusive proof that hydrate-derived methane is reaching the atmosphere now, but more observational data and improved numerical models will better characterize the climate-hydrate synergy in the future.

  7. Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2011-01-01

    As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

  8. MORPHOLOGY OF METHANE HYDRATE HOST SEDIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JONES,K.W.; FENG,H.; TOMOV,S.; WINTER,W.J.; EATON,M.; MAHAJAN,D.

    2004-12-01

    Results from simulated experiments in several laboratories show that host sediments influence hydrate formation in accord with known heterogeneity of host sediments at sites of gas hydrate occurrence (1). For example, in Mackenzie Delta, NWT Canada (Mallik 2L-38 well), coarser-grained units (pore-filling model) are found whereas in the Gulf of Mexico, the found hydrate samples do not appear to be lithologically controlled. We have initiated a systematic study of sediments, initially focusing on samples from various depths at a specific site, to establish a correlation with hydrate occurrence (or variations thereof) to establish differences in their microstructure, porosity, and other associated properties. The synchrotron computed microtomography (CMT) set-up at the X-27A tomography beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory was used as a tool to study sediments from Blake Ridge at three sub bottom depths of 0.2, 50, and 667 meters. Results from the tomographic analysis of the deepest sample (667 m) are presented here to illustrate how tomography can be used to obtain new insights into the structures of methane hydrate host sediments. The investigation shows the internal grain/pore space resolution in the microstructure and a 3-D visualization of the connecting pathways obtained following data segmentation into pore space and grains within the sediment sample. The analysis gives the sample porosity, specific surface area, mean particle size, and tortuosity, as well. An earlier report on the experimental program has been given by Mahajan et al. (2).

  9. Fundamental challenges to methane recovery from gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servio, P.; Eaton, M.W.; Mahajan, D.; Winters, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The fundamental challenges, the location, magnitude, and feasibility of recovery, which must be addressed to recover methane from dispersed hydrate sources, are presented. To induce dissociation of gas hydrate prior to methane recovery, two potential methods are typically considered. Because thermal stimulation requires a large energy input, it is less economically feasible than depressurization. The new data will allow the study of the effect of pressure, temperature, diffusion, porosity, tortuosity, composition of gas and water, and porous media on gas-hydrate production. These data also will allow one to improve existing models related to the stability and dissociation of sea floor hydrates. The reproducible kinetic data from the planned runs together with sediment properties will aid in developing a process to economically recover methane from a potential untapped hydrate source. The availability of plentiful methane will allow economical and large-scale production of methane-derived clean fuels to help avert future energy crises.

  10. Methane Production and Carbon Capture by Hydrate Swapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Liang; von Solms, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    gas molecules in the structural lattice. In this work, we quantitatively investigate the swapping behavior from injection of pure carbon dioxide and the (CO2 + N2) binary gas mixture through artificial hydrate-bearing sandstone samples by use of a core-flooding experimental apparatus. A total of 13...... of pure carbon dioxide in swapping methane from its hydrate phase; the methane recovery efficiency in brine water systems is enhanced relative to pure water systems. The replenishment of a fresh (CO2 + N2) gas mixture into the vapor phase can be considered as an efficient extraction method because 46...... in small hydrate cages, as long as the equilibrium formation pressure of (CO2 + N2) binary gas hydrate is below that of methane hydrate, even though adding nitrogen to carbon dioxide reduces the thermodynamic driving force for the formation of a new hydrate. When other conditions are similar, the methane...

  11. Pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Shicai; LIU Changling; YE Yuguang; LIU Yufeng

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the relationship between the pore capillary pressure and hydrate saturation in sedi-ments, a new method was proposed. First, the phase equilibria of methane hydrate in fine-grained silica sands were measured. As to the equilibrium data, the pore capillary pressure and saturation of methane hydrate were calculated. The results showed that the phase equilibria of methane hydrates in fine-grained silica sands changed due to the depressed activity of pore water caused by the surface group and negatively charged characteristic of silica particles as well as the capillary pressure in small pores together. The capil-lary pressure increased with the increase of methane hydrate saturation due to the decrease of the available pore space. However, the capillary-saturation relationship could not yet be described quantitatively because of the stochastic habit of hydrate growth.

  12. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  13. Methane Hydrates: More Than a Viable Aviation Fuel Feedstock Option

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    2007-01-01

    Demand for hydrocarbon fuels is steadily increasing, and greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise unabated with the energy demand. Alternate fuels will be coming on line to meet that demand. This report examines the recovering of methane from methane hydrates for fuel to meet this demand rather than permitting its natural release into the environment, which will be detrimental to the planet. Some background on the nature, vast sizes, and stability of sedimentary and permafrost formations of hydrates are discussed. A few examples of the severe problems associated with methane recovery from these hydrates are presented along with the potential impact on the environment and coastal waters. Future availability of methane from hydrates may become an attractive option for aviation fueling, and so future aircraft design associated with methane fueling is considered.

  14. High-pressure structures of methane hydrate

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, H; Fujihisa, H; Sakashita, M; Katoh, E; Aoki, K; Yamamoto, Y; Nagashima, K; Yagi, T

    2002-01-01

    Three high-pressure structures of methane hydrate, a hexagonal structure (str. A) and two orthorhombic structures (str. B and str. C), were found by in situ x-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy. The well-known structure I (str. I) decomposed into str. A and fluid at 0.8 GPa. Str. A transformed into str. B at 1.6 GPa, and str. B further transformed into str. C at 2.1 GPa which survived above 7.8 GPa. The fluid solidified as ice VI at 1.4 GPa, and the ice VI transformed to ice VII at 2.1 GPa. The bulk moduli, K sub 0 , for str. I, str. A, and str. C were calculated to be 7.4, 9.8, and 25.0 GPa, respectively.

  15. Gas hydrates: entrance to a methane age or climate threat?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krey, Volker; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Grubler, Arnulf; O' Neill, Brian; Riahi, Keywan [International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Schlossplatz 1, 2361 Laxenburg (Austria); Canadell, Josep G [Global Carbon Project, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, GPO Box 3023, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Abe, Yuichi [Social Science Consulting Unit, Japan Nus Co. Ltd, Loop-X Building 7F, 9-15 Kaigan 3-Chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0022 (Japan); Andruleit, Harald [Bundesanstalt fuer Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR), Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany); Archer, David [Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Hamilton, Neil T M [WWF International Arctic Programme, Kristian Augusts gate 7a, 0130 Oslo (Norway); Johnson, Arthur [Hydrate Energy International, 612 Petit Berdot Drive, Kenner, LA 70065 (United States); Kostov, Veselin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N Charles Street Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lamarque, Jean-Francois [Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), PO Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Langhorne, Nicholas [US Office of Naval Research Global, Edison House, 223 Old Marylebone Road, London (United Kingdom); Nisbet, Euan G [Department of Geology, Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX (United Kingdom); Riedel, Michael [Earth and Planetary Sciences, McGill University, 3450 University Street, Montreal, QC, H3A 2A7 (Canada); Wang Weihua [Computer Network Information Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 4, 4th South Street, ZhongGuanCun, PO Box 349, Haidian District, Beijing 100080 (China); Yakushev, Vladimir, E-mail: krey@iiasa.ac.a [Gazprom VNIIGAZ LLC, Razvilka, Leninsky District, Moscow Region, 142717 (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-15

    Methane hydrates, ice-like compounds in which methane is held in crystalline cages formed by water molecules, are widespread in areas of permafrost such as the Arctic and in sediments on the continental margins. They are a potentially vast fossil fuel energy source but, at the same time, could be destabilized by changing pressure-temperature conditions due to climate change, potentially leading to strong positive carbon-climate feedbacks. To enhance our understanding of both the vulnerability of and the opportunity provided by methane hydrates, it is necessary (i) to conduct basic research that improves the highly uncertain estimates of hydrate occurrences and their response to changing environmental conditions, and (ii) to integrate the agendas of energy security and climate change which can provide an opportunity for methane hydrates-in particular if combined with carbon capture and storage-to be used as a 'bridge fuel' between carbon-intensive fossil energies and zero-emission energies. Taken one step further, exploitation of dissociating methane hydrates could even mitigate against escape of methane to the atmosphere. Despite these opportunities, so far, methane hydrates have been largely absent from energy and climate discussions, including global hydrocarbon assessments and the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

  16. Nonequilibrium adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations of methane clathrate hydrate decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    Nonequilibrium, constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the decomposition of methane clathrate hydrate in contact with water. Under adiabatic conditions, the rate of methane clathrate decomposition is affected by heat and mass transfer arising from the breakup of the clathrate hydrate framework and release of the methane gas at the solid-liquid interface and diffusion of methane through water. We observe that temperature gradients are established between the clathrate and solution phases as a result of the endothermic clathrate decomposition process and this factor must be considered when modeling the decomposition process. Additionally we observe that clathrate decomposition does not occur gradually with breakup of individual cages, but rather in a concerted fashion with rows of structure I cages parallel to the interface decomposing simultaneously. Due to the concerted breakup of layers of the hydrate, large amounts of methane gas are released near the surface which can form bubbles that will greatly affect the rate of mass transfer near the surface of the clathrate phase. The effects of these phenomena on the rate of methane hydrate decomposition are determined and implications on hydrate dissociation in natural methane hydrate reservoirs are discussed.

  17. Methane hydrate formation and dissociation in synthetic seawater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vikash Kumar Saw; Iqbal Ahmad; Ajay Mandal; G.Udayabhanu; Sukumar Laik

    2012-01-01

    The formation and dissociation of methane gas hydrate at an interface between synthetic seawater (SSW) and methane gas have been experimentally investigated in the present work.The amount of gas consumed during hydrate formation has been calculated using the real gas equation.Induction time for the formation of hydrate is found to depend on the degree of subcooling.All the experiments were conducted in quiescent system with initial cell pressure of 11.14 MPa.Salinity effects on the onset pressure and temperature of hydrate formation are also observed.The dissociation enthalpies of methane hydrate in synthetic seawater were determined by Clausius-Clapeyron equation based on the measured phase equilibrium data.The dissociation data have been analyzed by existing models and compared with the reported data.

  18. Effect of Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K.E.; Park, J.M.; Kim, C.U.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Research Inst. of Chemical Technology, Jang-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates are formed from water and natural gas molecules at particular temperatures and pressures that become ice-like inclusion compounds. Gas hydrates offer several benefits such as energy resource potential and high storage capacity of natural gas in the form of hydrates. However, the application of natural gas hydrates has been deterred by its low formation rate and low conversion ratio of water into hydrate resulting in low actual storage capacity. This paper presented an experimental study to determine the effect of adding a novel Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation. The experimental study was described with reference to the properties of prepared diols and properties of prepared disulfonates. Gemini surfactant is the family of surfactant molecules possessing more than one hydrophobic tail and hydrophilic head group. They generally have better surface-active properties than conventional surfactants of equal chain length. The paper presented the results of the study in terms of the reactions of diols with propane sultone; storage capacity of hydrate formed with and without surfactant; and methane hydrate formation with and without disulfonate. It was concluded that the methane hydrate formation was accelerated by the addition of novel anionic Gemini-type surfactants and that hydrate formation was influenced by the surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. For a given concentration, the surfactant with the highest chain length demonstrated the highest formation rate and storage capacity. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  19. Effect of bubble size and density on methane conversion to hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leske, J.; Taylor, C.E.; Ladner, E.P.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. One area of investigation is the storage of methane as methane hydrates. An economical and efficient means of storing methane in hydrates opens many commercial opportunities such as transport of stranded gas, off-peak storage of line gas, etc.We have observed during our investigations that the ability to convert methane to methane hydrate is enhanced by foaming of the methane–water solution using a surfactant. The density of the foam, along with the bubble size, is important in the conversion of methane to methane hydrate.

  20. Methane seeps, methane hydrate destabilization, and the late Neoproterozoic postglacial cap carbonates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ganqing; SHI Xiaoying; ZHANG Shihong

    2006-01-01

    Methane hydrates constitute the largest pool of readily exchangeable carbon at the Earth's sedimentary carapace and may destabilize, in some cases catastrophically, during times of global-scale warming and/or sea level changes. Given the extreme cold during Neoproterozoic ice ages, the aftermath of such events is perhaps amongst the most likely intervals in Earth history to witness a methane hydrate destabilization event. The coincidence of localized but widespread methane seep-like structures and textures, methane-derived isotopic signal,low sulfate concentration, marine barites, and a prominent, short-lived carbon isotope excursion (δ13C≤-5‰) from the post-Marinoan cap carbonates (~635 Ma) provides strong evidence for a methane hydrate destabilization event during the late Neoproterozoic postglacial warming and transgression. Methane release from hydrates could cause a positive feedback to global warming and oxidation of methane could result in ocean anoxia and fluctuation of atmospheric oxygen, providing an environmental force for the early animal evolution in the latest Neoproterozoic. The issues that remain to be clarified for this event include the trigger of methane hydrate destabilization, the time of initial methane release, the predicted ocean anoxia event and its relationship with the biological innovation, additional geochemical signals in response to methane release, and the regional and global synchrony of cap carbonate precipitation. The Doushantuo cap carbonate in South China provides one of the best examples of its age for a better understanding of these issues.

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of methane above gas hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treude, T.; Boetius, A.; Knittel, K.;

    2003-01-01

    At Hydrate Ridge (HR), Cascadia convergent margin, surface sediments contain massive gas hydrates formed from methane that ascends together with fluids along faults from deeper reservoirs. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), mediated by a microbial consortium of archaea and sulfate-reducing...... bacteria, generates high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the surface sediments. The production of sulfide supports chemosynthetic communities that gain energy from sulfide oxidation. Depending on fluid flow, the surface communities are dominated either by the filamentous sulfur bacteria Beggiatoa...

  2. Seismic-Scale Rock Physics of Methane Hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos Nur

    2009-01-08

    We quantify natural methane hydrate reservoirs by generating synthetic seismic traces and comparing them to real seismic data: if the synthetic matches the observed data, then the reservoir properties and conditions used in synthetic modeling might be the same as the actual, in-situ reservoir conditions. This approach is model-based: it uses rock physics equations that link the porosity and mineralogy of the host sediment, pressure, and hydrate saturation, and the resulting elastic-wave velocity and density. One result of such seismic forward modeling is a catalogue of seismic reflections of methane hydrate which can serve as a field guide to hydrate identification from real seismic data. We verify this approach using field data from known hydrate deposits.

  3. Methane Hydrate Field Program. Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collett, Tim [U.S. Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States); Bahk, Jang-Jun [Korea Inst. of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea); Frye, Matt [U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Sterling, VA (United States); Goldberg, Dave [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Palisades, NY (United States); Husebo, Jarle [Statoil ASA, Stavenger (Norway); Koh, Carolyn [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Malone, Mitch [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shipp, Craig [Shell International Exploration and Production Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Torres, Marta [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Myers, Greg [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Divins, David [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States); Morell, Margo [Consortium For Ocean Leadership Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-12-31

    This topical report represents a pathway toward better understanding of the impact of marine methane hydrates on safety and seafloor stability and future collection of data that can be used by scientists, engineers, managers and planners to study climate change and to assess the feasibility of marine methane hydrate as a potential future energy resource. Our understanding of the occurrence, distribution and characteristics of marine methane hydrates is incomplete; therefore, research must continue to expand if methane hydrates are to be used as a future energy source. Exploring basins with methane hydrates has been occurring for over 30 years, but these efforts have been episodic in nature. To further our understanding, these efforts must be more regular and employ new techniques to capture more data. This plan identifies incomplete areas of methane hydrate research and offers solutions by systematically reviewing known methane hydrate “Science Challenges” and linking them with “Technical Challenges” and potential field program locations.

  4. Structural stability of methane hydrate at high pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, J.; Chen, X.; Chou, I.-Ming; Yang, W.; Hu, Jiawen; Hemley, R.J.; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2011-01-01

    The structural stability of methane hydrate under pressure at room temperature was examined by both in-situ single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques on samples with structure types I, II, and H in diamond-anvil cells. The diffraction data for types II (sII) and H (sH) were refined to the known structures with space groups Fd3m and P63/mmc, respectively. Upon compression, sI methane hydrate transforms to the sII phase at 120 MPa, and then to the sH phase at 600 MPa. The sII methane hydrate was found to coexist locally with sI phase up to 500 MPa and with sH phase up to 600 MPa. The pure sH structure was found to be stable between 600 and 900 MPa. Methane hydrate decomposes at pressures above 3 GPa to form methane with the orientationally disordered Fm3m structure and ice VII (Pn3m). The results highlight the role of guest (CH4)-host (H2O) interactions in the stabilization of the hydrate structures under pressure. ?? 2011, China University of Geosciences (Beijing) and Peking University. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The strength and rheology of methane clathrate hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.; Zhang, W.

    2003-01-01

    Methane clathrate hydrate (structure I) is found to be very strong, based on laboratory triaxial deformation experiments we have carried out on samples of synthetic, high-purity, polycrystalline material. Samples were deformed in compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress, ??), at conditions of confining pressure P = 50 and 100 MPa, strain rate 4.5 ?? 10-8 ??? ?? ??? 4.3 ?? 10-4 s-1, temperature 260 ??? T ??? 287 K, and internal methane pressure 10 ??? PCH4 ??? 15 MPa. At steady state, typically reached in a few percent strain, methane hydrate exhibited strength that was far higher than expected on the basis of published work. In terms of the standard high-temperature creep law, ?? = A??ne-(E*+PV*)/RT the rheology is described by the constants A = 108.55 MPa-n s-1, n = 2.2, E* = 90,000 J mol-1, and V* = 19 cm3 mol-1. For comparison at temperatures just below the ice point, methane hydrate at a given strain rate is over 20 times stronger than ice, and the contrast increases at lower temperatures. The possible occurrence of syntectonic dissociation of methane hydrate to methane plus free water in these experiments suggests that the high strength measured here may be only a lower bound. On Earth, high strength in hydrate-bearing formations implies higher energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure. In the outer solar system, if Titan has a 100-km-thick near-surface layer of high-strength, low-thermal conductivity methane hydrate as has been suggested, its interior is likely to be considerably warmer than previously expected.

  6. Study on molecular controlled mining system of methane hydrate; Methane hydrate no bunshi seigyo mining ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyagawa, M.; Saito, T.; Kobayashi, H.; Karasawa, H.; Kiyono , F.; Nagaoki, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.; Haneda, H.; Takahashi, Y. [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba (Japan); Nada, H. [Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    Basic studies are conducted for the collection of methane from the methane hydrate that exists at levels deeper than 500m in the sea. The relationship between the hydrate generation mechanism and water cluster structure is examined by use of mass spectronomy. It is found that, among the stable liquid phase clusters, the (H2O)21H{sup +} cluster is the most stable. Stable hydrate clusters are in presence in quantities, and participate in the formation of hydrate crystal nuclei. For the elucidation of the nucleus formation mechanism, a kinetic simulation is conducted of molecules in the cohesion system consisting of water and methane molecules. Water molecules that array near methane molecules at the normal pressure is disarrayed under a higher pressure for rearray into a hydrate structure. Hydrate formation and breakdown in the three-phase equilibrium state of H2O, CH4, and CO2 at a low temperature and high pressure are tested, which discloses that supercooling is required for formation, that it is possible to extract CH4 first for replacement by guest molecule CO2 since CO2 is stabler than CH4 at a lower pressure or higher temperature, and that formation is easier to take place when the grain diameter is larger at the formation point since larger grain diameters result in a higher formation temperature. 3 figs.

  7. Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrates from Seawater in Consolidated Sand: Mimicking Methane Hydrate Dynamics beneath the Seafloor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad B. Kerkar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Methane hydrate formation and dissociation kinetics were investigated in seawater-saturated consolidated Ottawa sand-pack under sub-seafloor conditions to study the influence of effective pressure on formation and dissociation kinetics. To simulate a sub-seafloor environment, the pore-pressure was varied relative to confining pressure in successive experiments. Hydrate formation was achieved by methane charging followed by sediment cooling. The formation of hydrates was delayed with increasing degree of consolidation. Hydrate dissociation by step-wise depressurization was instantaneous, emanating preferentially from the interior of the sand-pack. Pressure drops during dissociation and in situ temperature controlled the degree of endothermic cooling within sediments. In a closed system, the post-depressurization dissociation was succeeded by thermally induced dissociation and pressure-temperature conditions followed theoretical methane-seawater equilibrium conditions and exhibited excess pore pressure governed by the pore diameter. These post-depressurization equilibrium values for the methane hydrates in seawater saturated consolidated sand-pack were used to estimate the enthalpy of dissociation of 55.83 ± 1.41 kJ/mol. These values were found to be lower than those reported in earlier literature for bulk hydrates from seawater (58.84 kJ/mol and pure water (62.61 kJ/mol due to excess pore pressure generated within confined sediment system under investigation. However, these observations could be significant in the case of hydrate dissociation in a subseafloor environment where dissociation due to depressurization could result in an instantaneous methane release followed by slow thermally induced dissociation. The excess pore pressure generated during hydrate dissociation could be higher within fine-grained sediments with faults and barriers present in subseafloor settings which could cause shifting in geological layers.

  8. Submarine methane hydrates - Potential fuel resource of the 21st century

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.

    initiated to date, some interesting ideas have been conceived for the production of methane from hydrates and its transportation to shore. Apart from being an abundant fuel resource, methane hydrates are also a matter of concern, as destabilization of sub...

  9. Methane hydrates and the future of natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    For decades, gas hydrates have been discussed as a potential resource, particularly for countries with limited access to conventional hydrocarbons or a strategic interest in establishing alternative, unconventional gas reserves. Methane has never been produced from gas hydrates at a commercial scale and, barring major changes in the economics of natural gas supply and demand, commercial production at a large scale is considered unlikely to commence within the next 15 years. Given the overall uncertainty still associated with gas hydrates as a potential resource, they have not been included in the EPPA model in MITEI’s Future of Natural Gas report. Still, gas hydrates remain a potentially large methane resource and must necessarily be included in any consideration of the natural gas supply beyond two decades from now.

  10. Experimental characterization of production behavior accompanying the hydrate reformation in methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.; Kang, J.M.; Nguyen, H.T. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. [Kangwon National Univ., (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. [Korea Inst., of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the production behaviour associated with gas hydrate reformation in methane hydrate-bearing sediment by hot-brine injection. A range of different temperature and brine injection rates were used to analyze the pressure and temperature distribution, the gas production behaviour and the movement of the dissociation front. The study showed that hydrate reformation reduces the production rate considerably at an early time. However, gas production increases during the dissociation, near the outlet because the dissociated methane around the inlet is consumed in reforming the hydrate and increases the hydrate saturation around the outlet. Higher temperature also increases the gas production rate and the speed of the dissociation front. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  11. Frozen heat: Global outlook on methane gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaudoin, Yannick; Solgaard, Anne

    2010-09-15

    The United Nations Environment Programme via its collaborating center in Norway, UNEP/GRID-Arendal, is undertaking an assessment of the state of the knowledge of methane gas hydrates. The Global Outlook on Methane Gas Hydrates seeks to bridge the gap between the science, research and development activities related to this potential large scale unconventional source of natural gas and the needs of decision makers and the general public to understand the underlying societal and environmental drivers and impacts. The Outlook aims to provide credible and unbiased information sourced from stakeholders representing the environment, government, industry and society.

  12. Anomalous preservation of pure methane hydrate at 1 atm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    Direct measurement of decomposition rates of pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate reveals a thermal regime where methane hydrate metastably `preserves' in bulk by as much as 75 K above its nominal equilibrium temperature (193 K at 1 atm). Rapid release of the sample pore pressure at isothermal conditions between 242 and 271 K preserves up to 93% of the hydrate for at least 24 h, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this regime. Subsequent warming through the H2O ice point then induces rapid and complete dissociation, allowing controlled recovery of the total expected gas yield. This behavior is in marked contrast to that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Anomalous preservation has potential application for successful retrieval of natural gas hydrate or hydrate-bearing sediments from remote settings, as well as for temporary low-pressure transport and storage of natural gas.

  13. Gas hydrates: entrance to a methane age or climate threat?

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Methane hydrates, ice-like compounds in which methane is held in crystalline cages formed by water molecules, are widespread in areas of permafrost such as the Arctic and in sediments on the continental margins. They are a potentially vast fossil fuel energy source but, at the same time, could be destabilized by changing pressure-temperature conditions due to climate change, potentially leading to strong positive carbon-climate feedbacks. To enhance our understanding of both the vulnerability...

  14. Direct measurement of methane hydrate composition along the hydrate equilibrium boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    The composition of methane hydrate, namely nW for CH 4??nWH2O, was directly measured along the hydrate equilibrium boundary under conditions of excess methane gas. Pressure and temperature conditions ranged from 1.9 to 9.7 MPa and 263 to 285 K. Within experimental error, there is no change in hydrate composition with increasing pressure along the equilibrium boundary, but nW may show a slight systematic decrease away from this boundary. A hydrate stoichiometry of n W = 5.81-6.10 H2O describes the entire range of measured values, with an average composition of CH4??5.99(??0.07) H2O along the equilibrium boundary. These results, consistent with previously measured values, are discussed with respect to the widely ranging values obtained by thermodynamic analysis. The relatively constant composition of methane hydrate over the geologically relevant pressure and temperature range investigated suggests that in situ methane hydrate compositions may be estimated with some confidence. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  16. Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate-Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report: Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report; Methane Hydrate Workshop Report; Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan; and Final Scientific/Technical Report.

  17. Cryolava flow destabilization of crustal methane clathrate hydrate on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Sotin, Christophe; Choukroun, Mathieu; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2016-08-01

    To date, there has been no conclusive observation of ongoing endogenous volcanic activity on Saturn's moon Titan. However, with time, Titan's atmospheric methane is lost and must be replenished. We have modeled one possible mechanism for the replenishment of Titan's methane loss. Cryolavas can supply enough heat to release large amounts of methane from methane clathrate hydrates (MCH). The volume of methane released is controlled by the flow thickness and its areal extent. The depth of the destabilisation layer is typically ≈30% of the thickness of the lava flow (≈3 m for a 10-m thick flow). For this flow example, a maximum of 372 kg of methane is released per m2 of flow area. Such an event would release methane for nearly a year. One or two events per year covering ∼20 km2 would be sufficient to resupply atmospheric methane. A much larger effusive event covering an area of ≈9000 km2 with flows 200 m thick would release enough methane to sustain current methane concentrations for 10,000 years. The minimum size of "cryo-flows" sufficient to maintain the current atmospheric methane is small enough that their detection with current instruments (e.g., Cassini) could be challenging. We do not suggest that Titan's original atmosphere was generated by this mechanism. It is unlikely that small-scale surface MCH destabilisation is solely responsible for long-term (> a few Myr) sustenance of Titan's atmospheric methane, but rather we present it as a possible contributor to Titan's past and current atmospheric methane.

  18. In situ High-pressure NMR Observations on the Formation and Dissociation of Methane Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Bing CHEN; Wei Ping ZHANG; Xi Jie LAN; Heng ZHENG; Xiu Mei LIU; Xiu Wen HAN; Xin He BAO

    2006-01-01

    A home-made static NMR cell with pressure up to 10 MPa was employed to observe the formation and dissociation processes of methane hydrate by in situ 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies. Methane hydrate can be formed or decomposed in the temperature range of -5 to-13℃ at pressures between 4.0 and 7.0 MPa. The higher methane pressure, the formation or dissociation temperature of methane hydrate was higher. In situ 1H NMR experiments indicated that the critical size of the hydrate clusters is crucial for the formation of methane hydrate.

  19. Acoustic Determination of Methane Hydrate Disssociation Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    centered- cubic orientation which forms naturally in deep oceans from biogenic gases. It is worth not- ing that this molecular geometry can trap great...until January 2010. At that time, the hydrates were packed in a dewar with liquid nitrogen and shipped from the storage fa- cility at the Naval Research

  20. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  1. Simulation of Methane Recovery from Gas Hydrates Combined with Storing Carbon Dioxide as Hydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Janicki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medium term, gas hydrate reservoirs in the subsea sediment are intended as deposits for carbon dioxide (CO2 from fossil fuel consumption. This idea is supported by the thermodynamics of CO2 and methane (CH4 hydrates and the fact that CO2 hydrates are more stable than CH4 hydrates in a certain P-T range. The potential of producing methane by depressurization and/or by injecting CO2 is numerically studied in the frame of the SUGAR project. Simulations are performed with the commercial code STARS from CMG and the newly developed code HyReS (hydrate reservoir simulator especially designed for hydrate processing in the subsea sediment. HyReS is a nonisothermal multiphase Darcy flow model combined with thermodynamics and rate kinetics suitable for gas hydrate calculations. Two scenarios are considered: the depressurization of an area 1,000 m in diameter and a one/two-well scenario with CO2 injection. Realistic rates for injection and production are estimated, and limitations of these processes are discussed.

  2. Stability Analysis of Methane Hydrate-Bearing Soils Considering Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromasa Iwai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the methane hydrate dissociation process may lead to unstable behavior such as large ground deformations, uncontrollable gas production, etc. A linear instability analysis was performed in order to investigate which variables have a significant effect on the onset of the instability behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soils subjected to dissociation. In the analysis a simplified viscoplastic constitutive equation is used for the soil sediment. The stability analysis shows that the onset of instability of the material system mainly depends on the strain hardening-softening parameter, the degree of strain, and the permeability for water and gas. Then, we conducted a numerical analysis of gas hydrate-bearing soil considering hydrate dissociation in order to investigate the effect of the parameters on the system. The simulation method used in the present study can describe the chemo-thermo-mechanically coupled behaviors such as phase changes from hydrates to water and gas, temperature changes and ground deformation. From the numerical results, we found that basically the larger the permeability for water and gas is, the more stable the simulation results are. These results are consistent with those obtained from the linear stability analysis.

  3. Salinity-buffered methane hydrate formation and dissociation in gas-rich systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Kehua; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Polito, Peter; Bryant, Steven L.

    2015-02-01

    Methane hydrate formation and dissociation are buffered by salinity in a closed system. During hydrate formation, salt excluded from hydrate increases salinity, drives the system to three-phase (gas, water, and hydrate phases) equilibrium, and limits further hydrate formation and dissociation. We developed a zero-dimensional local thermodynamic equilibrium-based model to explain this concept. We demonstrated this concept by forming and melting methane hydrate from a partially brine-saturated sand sample in a controlled laboratory experiment by holding pressure constant (6.94 MPa) and changing temperature stepwise. The modeled methane gas consumptions and hydrate saturations agreed well with the experimental measurements after hydrate nucleation. Hydrate dissociation occurred synchronously with temperature increase. The exception to this behavior is that substantial subcooling (6.4°C in this study) was observed for hydrate nucleation. X-ray computed tomography scanning images showed that core-scale hydrate distribution was heterogeneous. This implied core-scale water and salt transport induced by hydrate formation. Bulk resistivity increased sharply with initial hydrate formation and then decreased as the hydrate ripened. This study reproduced the salinity-buffered hydrate behavior interpreted for natural gas-rich hydrate systems by allowing methane gas to freely enter/leave the sample in response to volume changes associated with hydrate formation and dissociation. It provides insights into observations made at the core scale and log scale of salinity elevation to three-phase equilibrium in natural hydrate systems.

  4. Inhibition of Methane Hydrate Formation by Ice-Structuring Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Ramløv, Hans; Thomsen, Kaj

    2010-01-01

    , assumed biodegradable, are capable of inhibiting the growth of methane hydrate (a structure I hydrate). The ISPs investigated were type III HPLC12 (originally identified in ocean pout) and ISP type III found in meal worm (Tenebrio molitor). These were compared to polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) a well...... of inhibitors. The profile of the nonlinear growth was concentration-dependent but also dependent on the stirring rate. ISP type III HPLC12 decreased the growth rate of methane hydrate during the linear growth period by 17−75% at concentrations of 0.01−0.1 wt % (0.014−0.14 mM) while ISP from Tenebrio molitor...... and PVP decreased the growth rate by 30% and 39% at concentrations of 0.004 wt % (0.005 mM) and 0.1 wt % (0.1 mM), respectively. Considering the low concentration of Tenebrio molitor ISP used, these results indicate that ISP from Tenebrio molitor is the most effective hydrate inhibitor among those...

  5. Transient seafloor venting on continental slopes from warming-induced methane hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K. N.; Flemings, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Methane held in frozen hydrate cages within marine sediment comprises one of the largest carbon reservoirs on the planet. Recent submarine observations of widespread methane seepage may record hydrate dissociation due to oceanic warming, which consequently may further amplify climate change. Here we simulate the effect of seafloor warming on marine hydrate deposits using a multiphase flow model. We show that hydrate dissociation, gas migration, and subsequent hydrate formation cangenerate temporary methane venting into the ocean through the hydrate stability zone. Methane seeps venting through the hydrate stability zone on the eastern Atlantic margin may record this process due to warming begun thousands of years ago. Our results contrast with the traditional view that venting occurs only updip of the hydrate stability zone.

  6. The specific surface area of methane hydrate formed in different conditions and manners

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The specific surface area of methane hydrates, formed both in the presence and absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and processed in different manners (stirring, compacting, holding the hydrates at the formation conditions for different periods of time, cooling the hydrates for different periods of time before depressurizing them), was measured under atmospheric pressure and temperatures below ice point. It was found that the specific surface area of hydrate increased with the decreasing temperature. The methane hydrate in the presence of SDS was shown to be of bigger specific surface areas than pure methane hydrates. The experimental results further demonstrated that the manners of forming and processing hydrates affected the specific surface area of hydrate samples. Stirring or compacting made the hydrate become finer and led to a bigger specific surface area.

  7. Controls on gas hydrate stability in methane depleted sediments: Laboratory and field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Chanton, J.; Martens, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Gas hydrate deposits are the Earth’s largest reservoir of the powerful greenhouse gas methane and thus a key future energy resource. However, hydrate stability in sedimentary environments featuring highly variable methane concentrations needs to be understood to allow resource estimation and recovery. Hydrates are at chemical equilibrium and therefore stable where high pressures, low temperatures, and moderate salinities coexist with methane-saturated pore waters. When all of these conditions are not met, hydrates should dissociate or dissolve, releasing methane to the overlying water and possibly the atmosphere. In addition, other natural factors may control the kinetics of their degradation complicating models for hydrate stability and occurrence. Our measurements indicate that the pore-waters surrounding some shallow buried hydrates are not methane-saturated suggesting that dissolution should occur relatively rapidly. Yet, these hydrate deposits are known to persist relatively unchanged for years. We hypothesize that, once formed, hydrate deposits may be stabilized by natural factors inhibiting dissolution, including oil or microbial biofilm coatings. While most studies have focused on pressure and temperature changes where hydrates occur, relatively few have included measurements of in situ methane concentration gradients because of the difficulties inherent to making such measurements. Here we present recent measurements of methane concentration and stable carbon isotope gradients immediately adjacent to undisturbed hydrate surfaces obtained through deployments of novel seafloor instruments. Our results suggest that the hydrates studied are relatively stable when exposed to overlying and pore-waters that are undersaturated with methane. Concurrent laboratory measurements of methane concentration gradients next to artificial hydrate surfaces were utilized to test our protective coating hypothesis. After a stable dissolution rate for hydrate samples was

  8. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in the Presence of Silica Sand and Bentonite Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Saw V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in a porous media containing silica sand of different sizes and bentonite clay were studied in the presence of synthetic seawater with 3.55 wt% salinity. The phase equilibrium of methane hydrate under different experimental conditions was investigated. The effects of the particle size of silica sand as well as a mixture of bentonite clay and silica sand on methane hydrate formation and its dissociation were studied. The kinetics of hydrate formation was studied under different subcooling conditions to observe its effects on the induction time of hydrate formation. The amount of methane gas encapsulated in hydrate was computed using a real gas equation. The Clausius-Clapeyron equation is used to estimate the enthalpy of hydrate dissociation with measured phase equilibrium data.

  9. The influence of sedimentation rate variation on the occurrence of methane hydrate crystallized from dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncheng, C.; Chen, D.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is commonly delivered to the gas hydrate stability zone by advection of methane-bearing fluids, diffusion of dissolved methane, and in-situ biogenic methane production (Davie and Buffett, 2003), except at cold vent sites. Burial of pore water and sediment compaction can induce the fluid flux change (Bhatnagar et al., 2007). Sedimentation supply the organic material for methane production. In addition, Gas hydrate can move to below gas hydrate stability zone and decompose via sedimentation. Therefore, sedimentation significantly affect the gas hydrate accumulation. ODP site 997 located at the Blake Ridge. The sedimentation rate is estimated to 48 m/Ma, 245m/Ma, 17.2 m/Ma and 281m/Ma for 0-2.5Ma, 2.5-3.75Ma, 3.75-4.4Ma, and 4.4-5.9Ma, respectively, according to the age-depth profile of biostratigraphic marker of nonnofossils(Paull et al., 1996). We constructed a gas hydrate formation model and apply to ODP sites 997 to evaluate the influence of variation of sedimentation rate on gas hydrate accumulation. Our results show that the gas hydrate format rate varied from 0.013mol/m2-a to 0.017mol/m2-a and the gas hydrate burial to below gas hydrate stability zone varied from 0.001mol/m2-a to 0.018mol/m2-a during recently 5Ma. The gas hydrate formation rate by pore water advection and dissolved methane diffusion would be lower, and the top occurrence of gas hydrate would be shallower, when the sedimentation rate is higher. With higher sedimentation rate, the amount of gas hydrate burial to below stability zone would be larger. The relative high sedimentation rate before 2.5 Ma at ODP site 997 produced the gas hydrate saturation much lower than present value, and over 60% of present gas hydrates are formed during recent 2.5Ma. Reference: Bhatnagar,G., Chapman, W. G.,Dickens, G. R., et al. Generalization of gas hydrate distribution and saturation in marine sediments by scaling of thermodynamic and transport processes. American Journal of Science, 2007, 307, 861

  10. Methane Flux and Authigenic Carbonate in Shallow Sediments Overlying Methane Hydrate Bearing Strata in Alaminos Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Smith

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In June 2007 sediment cores were collected in Alaminos Canyon, Gulf of Mexico across a series of seismic data profiles indicating rapid transitions between the presence of methane hydrates and vertical gas flux. Vertical profiles of dissolved sulfate, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC concentrations in porewaters, headspace methane, and solid phase carbonate concentrations were measured at each core location to investigate the cycling of methane-derived carbon in shallow sediments overlying the hydrate bearing strata. When integrated with stable carbon isotope ratios of DIC, geochemical results suggest a significant fraction of the methane flux at this site is cycled into the inorganic carbon pool. The incorporation of methane-derived carbon into dissolved and solid inorganic carbon phases represents a significant sink in local carbon cycling and plays a role in regulating the flux of methane to the overlying water column at Alaminos Canyon. Targeted, high-resolution geochemical characterization of the biogeochemical cycling of methane-derived carbon in shallow sediments overlying hydrate bearing strata like those in Alaminos Canyon is critical to quantifying methane flux and estimating methane hydrate distributions in gas hydrate bearing marine sediments.

  11. Observation of ice sheet formation on methane and ethane gas hydrates using a scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, J.; Shimomura, N.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira, Sapporo (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Interest in gas hydrates has increased in recent years due to the discovery of large deposits under the ocean floor and in permafrost regions. Natural gas hydrates, including methane, is expected to become a new energy source and a medium for energy storage and transportation. Gas hydrates consist of an open network of water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded in a similar manner to ice. Gas molecules are interstitially engaged under high pressures and low temperatures. Although the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate under atmospheric pressure is about 193 K, studies have shown that methane hydrate can be stored at atmospheric pressure and 267 K for 2 years. Because of this phenomenon, known as self-preservation, transportation and storage of methane hydrate can occur at temperature conditions milder than those for liquefied methane gas at atmospheric pressure. This study examined the surface changes of methane and ethane hydrates during dissociation using an optical microscope and confocal scanning microscope (CSM). This paper reported on the results when the atmospheric gas pressure was decreased. Ice sheets formed on the surfaces of methane and ethane gas hydrates due to depressurizing dissociation of methane and ethane hydrates when the methane and ethane gas pressures were decreased at designated temperatures. The dissociation of methane gas hydrate below below 237 K resulted in the generation of small ice particles on the hydrate surface. A transparent ice sheet formed on the hydrate surface above 242 K. The thickness of the ice sheet on the methane hydrate surface showed the maximum of ca. 30 {mu}m at 253 K. In the case of ethane hydrates, ice particles and ice sheets formed below 262 and 267 respectively. Since the ice particles and ice sheets were formed by water molecules generated during the gas hydrate dissociation, the mechanism of ice sheet formation depends on the dissociation rate of hydrate, ice particle sintering rate, and water molecule

  12. Experimental and Modeling Study of Kinetics for Methane Hydrate Formation with Tetrahydrofuran as Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Zhengfu; Zhang Shixi; Zhang Qin; Zhen Shuangyi; Chen Guangjin

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics behavior of methane hydrate formation in the presence of tetrahydrofuran (THF) as promoter was studied. A set of experimental equipment was designed and constructed. A series of kinetics data for the formation of methane hydrate in the presence of THF were measured with the isochoric method. The influences of temperature,pressure and liquid flow rate on the methane consumption rate were studied respectively. Based on the Chen-Guo hydrate formation mechanism,a kinetics model for the formation of methane hydrate in the presence of THF by using the dimensionless Gibbs free energy difference of quasi-chemical reaction of basic hydrate formation,,as the driving force was proposed. The model was used to calculate the rate of methane consumption and it was shown that the calculated results were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Studying methane migration mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D methane hydrate reservoir modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nole, Michael [University of Texas at Austin; Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas at Austin; Mohanty, Kishore [University of Texas at Austin; Cook, Ann [Ohio State University; Hillman, Jess [Ohio State University

    2015-12-15

    We have developed a 3D methane hydrate reservoir simulator to model marine methane hydrate systems. Our simulator couples highly nonlinear heat and mass transport equations and includes heterogeneous sedimentation, in-situ microbial methanogenesis, the influence of pore size contrast on solubility gradients, and the impact of salt exclusion from the hydrate phase on dissolved methane equilibrium in pore water. Using environmental parameters from Walker Ridge in the Gulf of Mexico, we first simulate hydrate formation in and around a thin, dipping, planar sand stratum surrounded by clay lithology as it is buried to 295mbsf. We find that with sufficient methane being supplied by organic methanogenesis in the clays, a 200x pore size contrast between clays and sands allows for a strong enough concentration gradient to significantly drop the concentration of methane hydrate in clays immediately surrounding a thin sand layer, a phenomenon that is observed in well log data. Building upon previous work, our simulations account for the increase in sand-clay solubility contrast with depth from about 1.6% near the top of the sediment column to 8.6% at depth, which leads to a progressive strengthening of the diffusive flux of methane with time. By including an exponentially decaying organic methanogenesis input to the clay lithology with depth, we see a decrease in the aqueous methane supplied to the clays surrounding the sand layer with time, which works to further enhance the contrast in hydrate saturation between the sand and surrounding clays. Significant diffusive methane transport is observed in a clay interval of about 11m above the sand layer and about 4m below it, which matches well log observations. The clay-sand pore size contrast alone is not enough to completely eliminate hydrate (as observed in logs), because the diffusive flux of aqueous methane due to a contrast in pore size occurs slower than the rate at which methane is supplied via organic methanogenesis

  14. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stern, Laura A. [U. S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Constable, Steven [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Weitemeyer, Karen A. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); National Oceanography Centre Southampton (United Kingdom), Univ. of Southampton Waterfront Campus, Southampton (United Kingdom); Smith, Megan M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Roberts, Jeffery J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  15. Transformation of γ-Ray-Formed Methyl Radicals in Methane Hydrate at 10 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Tani, Atsushi; Otsuka, Takahiro; Nakashima, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    The stability of methyl radicals formed in synthetic methane hydrate by γ-ray irradiation at 77 K was studied at 200-273 K and 10 MPa. The methyl radicals decayed under these conditions, despite the stability of methane hydrate, and changed into other molecules that could not be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR). Decay products were investigated by gas cell infrared (IR) spectroscopy by measuring the decomposed gas from the γ-irradiated methane hydrate. Only ethane molecules were detected from the irradiated sample, while these were absent in an unirradiated sample. The molar ratio of ethane to methane (C2H6/CH4) was 12± 1 ppm, which did not contradict with that of methyl radical to methane (CH3{}\\bullet/CH4) in the literature. Hence, most of the methyl radicals generated by irradiation were supposed to be transformed to ethane in methane hydrate.

  16. Methane sources in gas hydrate-bearing cold seeps: Evidence from radiocarbon and stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.W.; Bauer, J.E.; Canuel, E.A.; Grabowski, K.S.; Knies, D.L.; Mitchell, C.S.; Whiticar, Michael J.; Coffin, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Fossil methane from the large and dynamic marine gas hydrate reservoir has the potential to influence oceanic and atmospheric carbon pools. However, natural radiocarbon (14C) measurements of gas hydrate methane have been extremely limited, and their use as a source and process indicator has not yet been systematically established. In this study, gas hydrate-bound and dissolved methane recovered from six geologically and geographically distinct high-gas-flux cold seeps was found to be 98 to 100% fossil based on its 14C content. Given this prevalence of fossil methane and the small contribution of gas hydrate (??? 1%) to the present-day atmospheric methane flux, non-fossil contributions of gas hydrate methane to the atmosphere are not likely to be quantitatively significant. This conclusion is consistent with contemporary atmospheric methane budget calculations. In combination with ??13C- and ??D-methane measurements, we also determine the extent to which the low, but detectable, amounts of 14C (~ 1-2% modern carbon, pMC) in methane from two cold seeps might reflect in situ production from near-seafloor sediment organic carbon (SOC). A 14C mass balance approach using fossil methane and 14C-enriched SOC suggests that as much as 8 to 29% of hydrate-associated methane carbon may originate from SOC contained within the upper 6??m of sediment. These findings validate the assumption of a predominantly fossil carbon source for marine gas hydrate, but also indicate that structural gas hydrate from at least certain cold seeps contains a component of methane produced during decomposition of non-fossil organic matter in near-surface sediment.

  17. Bacterial dominance in subseafloor sediments characterized by methane hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Brandon R.; Inagaki, Fumio; Morono, Yuki; Futagami, Taiki; Huguet, Carme; Rosell-Mele, Antoni; Lorenson, T.D.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of organic carbon in subseafloor sediments on continental margins contributes to the largest reservoir of methane on Earth. Sediments in the Andaman Sea are composed of ~ 1% marine-derived organic carbon and biogenic methane is present. Our objective was to determine microbial abundance and diversity in sediments that transition the gas hydrate occurrence zone (GHOZ) in the Andaman Sea. Microscopic cell enumeration revealed that most sediment layers harbored relatively low microbial abundance (103–105 cells cm−3). Archaea were never detected despite the use of both DNA- and lipid-based methods. Statistical analysis of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms revealed distinct microbial communities from above, within, and below the GHOZ, and GHOZ samples were correlated with a decrease in organic carbon. Primer-tagged pyrosequences of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that members of the phylum Firmicutes are predominant in all zones. Compared with other seafloor settings that contain biogenic methane, this deep subseafloor habitat has a unique microbial community and the low cell abundance detected can help to refine global subseafloor microbial abundance.

  18. Potential impact on climate of the exploitation of methane hydrate deposits offshore

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Glasby, G.P.

    –175 www.elsevier.com/locate/marpetgeo * Current address: 42 Warminster Cresent, Sheffield S8 9NW. E-mail address: g.p.glasby@talk21.com (G.P. Glasby). 2. Stability and occurrence of methane hydrates Methane hydrate has a clathrate structure in which..., it was concluded that the magnitude of the methane increases was insufficient to account for the extent of atmospheric warming and that about 50 Tg of methane per year (37 Mt of methane carbon) would have needed to be introduced into the atmosphere to account...

  19. Molecular modeling of the dissociation of methane hydrate in contact with a silica surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Englezos, Peter; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2012-03-15

    We use constant energy, constant volume (NVE) molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissociation of the fully occupied structure I methane hydrate in a confined geometry between two hydroxylated silica surfaces between 36 and 41 Å apart, at initial temperatures of 283, 293, and 303 K. Simulations of the two-phase hydrate/water system are performed in the presence of silica, with and without a 3 Å thick buffering water layer between the hydrate phase and silica surfaces. Faster decomposition is observed in the presence of silica, where the hydrate phase is prone to decomposition from four surfaces, as compared to only two sides in the case of the hydrate/water simulations. The existence of the water layer between the hydrate phase and the silica surface stabilizes the hydrate phase relative to the case where the hydrate is in direct contact with silica. Hydrates bound between the silica surfaces dissociate layer-by-layer in a shrinking core manner with a curved decomposition front which extends over a 5-8 Å thickness. Labeling water molecules shows that there is exchange of water molecules between the surrounding liquid and intact cages in the methane hydrate phase. In all cases, decomposition of the methane hydrate phase led to the formation of methane nanobubbles in the liquid water phase.

  20. Thermal conductivity measurements in Porous mixtures of methane hydrate and quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; deMartin, B.J.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.; Ruppel, C.D.

    2002-01-01

    Using von Herzen and Maxwell's needle probe method, we measured thermal conductivity in four porous mixtures of quartz sand and methane gas hydrate, with hydrate composing 0, 33, 67 and 100% of the solid volume. Thermal conductivities were measured at a constant methane pore pressure of 24.8 MPa between -20 and +15??C, and at a constant temperature of -10??C between 3.5 and 27.6 MPa methane pore pressure. Thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing methane pore pressure. Both dependencies weakened with increasing hydrate content. Despite the high thermal conductivity of quartz relative to methane hydrate, the largest thermal conductivity was measured in the mixture containing 33% hydrate rather than in hydrate-free sand. This suggests gas hydrate enhanced grain-to-grain heat transfer, perhaps due to intergranular contact growth during hydrate synthesis. These results for gas-filled porous mixtures can help constrain thermal conductivity estimates in porous, gas hydrate-bearing systems.

  1. P-T stability conditions of methane hydrate in sediment from South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shicai Sun; Yuguang Ye; Changling Liu; Fengkui Xiang; Yah Ma

    2011-01-01

    For reasonable assessment and safe exploitation of marine gas hydrate resource,it is important to determine the stability conditions of gas hydrates in marine sediment.In this paper,the seafloor water sample and sediment sample (saturated with pore water) from Shenhu Area of South China Sea were used to synthesize methane hydrates,and the stability conditions of methane hydrates were investigated by multi-step heating dissociation method.Preliminary experimental results show that the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate both in seafloor water and marine sediment,under any given pressure,is depressed by approximately -1.4 K relative to the pure water system.This phenomenon indicates that hydrate stability in marine sediment is mainly affected by pore water ions.

  2. Monitoring the Methane Hydrate Dissociation by the Offshore Methane Hydrate Production Tests using Multi-component Seismic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Hayashi, Tsutomu; Tsukahara, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Hiroo; Saeki, Tatsuo

    2013-04-01

    We developed a new OBC (Ocean Bottom Cable), named as 'DSS' (Deep-sea Seismic System). The sensor has 3-component accelerometer and a hydrophone applicable for four-component (4C) seismic survey. Using the DSS, the methane hydrate dissociation zone will be tried to be monitored at the water depth of around 1000m during JOGMEC offshore methane hydrate production test in early 2013. Before the DSS, we had developed the RSCS (Real-time Seismic Cable System) with 3-component gimbaled geophones, and carried out a reflection seismic survey in the Nankai Trough in 2006. Referring this successful survey, we improved the RSCS to the DSS. The receiver size is reduced to 2/3 and the receiver case has a protective metallic exterior and the cable is protected with steel-screened armouring, allowing burial usage using ROV for sub-seabed deployment at the water depth up to 2000m. It will realize a unique survey style that leaves the system on the seabed between pre-test baseline survey and post-test repeated surveys, which might be up to 6 months. The fixed location of the receiver is very important for time-lapse monitoring survey. The DSS has totally 36 sensors and the sensor spacing is 26.5m. The total length is about 1km. We carried out the pre-test baseline survey between off Atsumi and Shima-peninsula in August, 2012.We located the DSS close to the production test well. The nearest sensor is 63m apart from the well. A newly developed real-time 3-D laying simulation system consisting of ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler), transponders attached to the DSS, and real-time 3-D plotting system for transponder locations have been adopted. After we laid the cable, we buried the DSS using ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle). The baseline survey included 2D/3D seismic surveys with shooting vessel and cable laying/observation ship. The resultant 2D section and 3D volume shows the good quality to delineate the methane hydrate concentrated zone. After the baseline survey, we have left

  3. Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Pure Water and Inhibitor Containing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIUJunhong; GUOTianmin

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic data of methane hydrate formation in the presence of pure water,brines with single salt and mixed salts,and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol(EG) and salt+EG were measured.A new kinetic model of hydrate formation for the methane+water systems was developed based on a four-step formation mechanism and reaction kinetic approach.The proposed kinetic model predicts the kinetic behavior of methane hydrate formation in pure water with good accuracy.The feasibility of extending the kenetic model of salt(s) and EG containing systems was explored.

  4. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  5. DFT-based inhibitor and promoter selection criteria for pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Snehanshu Pal; T K Kundu

    2013-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT)-based simulations have been performed to provide electronic structure property correlation based reasoning for conceptualizing the effect of encapsulated methane molecule on the formation of methane hydrate cages, the role of methanol and ethylene glycol as inhibitor and the role of tetra-hydro-furan (THF) and cyclopentane as promoter of methane hydrate. Geometry optimization of 512 cage, 51262 cage and 51264 cage with and without encapsulated methane and the cluster of 512 cage with ethylene glycol, methanol, cyclopentane have been performed by density functional theory using B97X-D/6-31++G(d,p) method. Methane hydrate formation inhibition by methanol and ethylene glycol as well as methane hydrate stabilization by cyclopentane and tetrahydrofuran are critically analysed based on the interaction energy, free energy change, dipole moment and infrared frequency calculation. Calculation of free energy change for formation of methane hydrate with/without reagents at various temperature and pressure using optimized structure is reported here. It is observed that hydrogen bond between water molecules of clathrate 512 cages become stronger in the presence of cyclopentane and tetrahydrofuran but weaker/broken in the presence of ethylene glycol and methanol. Simulated results correspond well with experimental findings and can be useful for designing new inhibitor and promoter molecules for gas hydrate formation.

  6. Experimental study on steam and inhibitor injection into methane hydrate bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Temma, N.; Yamamoto, Y.; Komai, T.

    2007-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate that exists in the ocean sediment is thought to constitute a large methane gas reservoir and is expected to be an energy resource in the future. In order to make recovery of natural gas from hydrates commercially viable, hydrates must be dissociated in-situ. Inhibitor injection method is thought to be one of the effective dissociation method as well as depressurization and thermal stimulation. Meanwhile, steam injection method is practically used for oil sand to recover heavy oil and recognized as a means that is commercially successful. In this study, the inhibitor injection method and the steam injection method for methane hydrate bearing sediments have been examined and discussed on an experimental basis. New experimental apparatuses have been designed and constructed. Using these apparatuses, inhibitor and steam were successfully injected into artificial methane hydrate bearing sediments that were simulated in laboratory scale. In the case of inhibitor injection, characteristic temperature drop during dissociation was observed. And decreases of permeability that is caused by the reformation of methane hydrate were prevented effectively. In the case of steam injection, the phase transition from vapor water to liquid water in methane hydrate bearing sediments was observed. It can be concluded that roughly 44 % of total hydrate origin gas was produced after steam injection. From these approaches, the applicability of these methods as enhanced gas recovery methods are discussed.

  7. Deep-ocean field test of methane hydrate formation from a remotely operated vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Peter G.; Orr, Franklin M., Jr.; Friederich, Gernot; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Orange, Daniel L.; McFarlane, James; Kirkwood, William

    1997-05-01

    We have observed the process of formation of clathrate hydrates of methane in experiments conducted on the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Ventana in the deep waters of Monterey Bay. A tank of methane gas, acrylic tubes containing seawater, and seawater plus various types of sediment were carried down on Ventana to a depth of 910 m where methane gas was injected at the base of the acrylic tubes by bubble stream. Prior calculations had shown that the local hydrographic conditions gave an upper limit of 525 m for the P-T boundary defining methane hydrate formation or dissociation at this site, and thus our experiment took place well within the stability range for this reaction to occur. Hydrate formation in free seawater occurred within minutes as a buoyant mass of translucent hydrate formed at the gas-water interface. In a coarse sand matrix the filling of the pore spaces with hydrate turned the sand column into a solidified block, which gas pressure soon lifted and ruptured. In a fine-grained black mud the gas flow carved out flow channels, the walls of which became coated and then filled with hydrate in larger discrete masses. Our experiment shows that hydrate formation is rapid in natural seawater, that sediment type strongly influences the patterns of hydrate formation, and that the use of ROV technologies permits the synthesis of large amounts of hydrate material in natural systems under a variety of conditions so that fundamental research on the stability and growth of these substances is possible.

  8. Methane Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in the Presence of Silica Sand and Bentonite Clay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar Saw, V; Udayabhanu, G; Mandal, A; Laik, S

    2015-01-01

      The formation and dissociation of methane hydrates in a porous media containing silica sand of different sizes and bentonite clay were studied in the presence of synthetic seawater with 3.55 wt% salinity...

  9. Methane Hydrate Field Program: Development of a Scientific Plan for a Methane Hydrate‐Focused Marine Drilling, Logging and Coring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report: Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report; Methane Hydrate Workshop Report; Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan; and Final Scientific/Technical Report

  10. Dissolution Rates of Synthetic Methane Hydrate and Carbon Dioxide Hydrate in Undersaturated Seawater at 1000m depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, G.; Kirby, S. H.; Durham, W. B.; Brewer, P. G.; Stern, L.; Peltzer, E. T.; Pinkston, J.

    2001-12-01

    Dissolution of synthetic methane and carbon dioxide hydrates was monitored after their transport to the ocean floor at 1000m depth. Cylindrical test specimens were initially grown in the laboratory by combining either cold, pressurized methane gas or pressurized liquid CO2 with sieved granular water ice, then heating the reactants through the H2O melting point. Samples were then hydrostatically compacted to near-zero porosity, with resulting geometry of approximately 2.5 cm in diameter by 3-4 cm in length. Two samples each of methane and carbon dioxide hydrate were placed in a custom-made sample display rack having individual compartments for each sample with a transparent polycarbonate front window, and side and back walls of a flexible fine-mesh screen that permitted seawater flow around the hydrates. The sample rack was then transferred to the ocean in a stainless steel transport vessel pressurized with 10 MPa methane using the (ROV) Ventana. On the seafloor, the sample display rack was removed from the pressure vessel and secured in a stand attached to an autonomous underwater video recorder system using a time-programmable Hi8 video recorder. The samples were continuously monitored for 2.30 h using VentanaIs HDTV camera system, then followed by 20.75 h observation with the autonomous Hi8 time-lapse camera system (15 s every 0.25 h), and additional 3.33 h HDTV observation at the end of the experiment. Loss of volume and dissolution rates of the hydrates were derived from the measurement of the change of the projected diameter of the individual samples over time. During the first 2.30 h, the diameter of the two CO2 hydrates decreased from 22 mm to 15 and 13 mm, respectively. Diameter loss followed a generally linear trend of 0.94 and 1.20 μ m/sec, corresponding to a dissolution rate of 13 to 17 mole CO2/m2h. Similar short-term oscillations about this linear trend were observed on both samples, suggesting a link to bottom current velocity. The CH4 hydrates

  11. Effects of Salinity and Sea Level Change on Permafrost-Hosted Methane Hydrate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwood-Madden, M.

    2010-12-01

    Recent observations of methane release from sediments on the circum-arctic continental shelf indicate that arctic warming is likely leading to increased fluxes of methane . Thermodynamics predicts that 2-4 degree increases in global temperature will lead to massive marine hydrate decomposition; however, the rate of warming deep ocean waters and sediments is fairly slow, resulting in modest fluxes of methane over hundreds to thousands of years. In contrast, increasing arctic temperatures and rising sea level may have immediate effects on permafrost-hosted hydrate deposits. Rising sea level affects both the geothermal gradient of the region and the salinity of pore waters, leading to hydrate destabilization (Figure 1). Seawater infiltration of permafrost may be currently dissociating permafrost-hosted methane hydrate through a combination of mechanisms: shifting geothermal gradients to higher temperatures, addition of salts due to seawater encroachment, and the transition from solid state diffusion of methane through overlying ice cemented permafrost to mass transfer through seawater-saturated sediments via aqueous diffusion, advection, or ebullition. Effects of seawater erosion of permafrost have been observed in arctic coastal areas, and degradation of arctic permafrost is predicted to continue, especially in coastal areas. However, the rate at which these processes proceed and their effects on permafrost-hosted methane hydrates have been largely uninvestigated. Changes in geothermal gradient alone take hundreds to thousands of years to affect relatively deep hydrate reservoirs. However, warmer temperatures combined with freezing point depression effects of seawater may lead to rapid melting of permafrost ice, thus accelerating the transfer of heat to the hydrate reservoirs and changing the mass transfer mechanism of methane release from slow solid state diffusion through ice to more rapid aqueous diffusion, advection, or ebullition. Therefore, we hypothesize that

  12. Model-based temperature measurement system development for marine methane hydrate-bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, Masafumi; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Juei; Fujii, Kasumi; Shun' etsu, Onodera; Tertychnyi, Vladimir; Shandrygin, Alexander; Pimenov, Viacheslav; Shako, Valery; Matsubayashi, Osamu; Ochiai, Koji

    2005-07-01

    This paper describes the effect of the sensor installation on the temperature of the hydrate-bearing sediments through modeling, how the system was deployed in Nankai Trough area in Japan, and the features of the marine methane hydrate temperature measurement system. (Author)

  13. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  14. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  15. Potentials and risks of utilizing methane from methane hydrate as an energy support; Potentiale und Risiken der Nutzung von Methan aus Methandhydraten als Energietraeger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, Markus [Lueneburg Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Nachhaltigkeitsoekonomie

    2009-10-15

    Marine and permafrost-based methane hydrates are the largest existing fossil carbon resource, whereby the marine deposits far outweigh the terrestrial ones. Their broad geographic distribution, especially in comparison to oil and conventional gas, make them a promising future source of energy. However, there is a danger of forcing the greenhouse effect in the event of a release of methane into the atmosphere as well as causing the collapse of oceanic slope sediments. Also the technical difficulties in extracting methane from hydrates are not yet fully resolved. Nevertheless, research on methane hydrates has been forced both on political as well as economic considerations in recent years and methane hydrates have several practical advantages, which make them a transitional solution worth looking at on the way to a future renewable-based energy supply, not in the least in playing a role in carbon capture and sequestration. However, the knowledge of the potentials and risks of methane hydrates is still very poor, especially in the German-speaking public, administration and policies. This deficiency hopefully will be eased by this overview dealing with the current state of research and an outlook based on the most important findings. (orig.)

  16. Petrophysical Characterization and Reservoir Simulator for Methane Gas Production from Gulf of Mexico Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore Mohanty; Bill Cook; Mustafa Hakimuddin; Ramanan Pitchumani; Damiola Ogunlana; Jon Burger; John Shillinglaw

    2006-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Estimates of the amounts of methane sequestered in gas hydrates worldwide are speculative and range from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet (modified from Kvenvolden, 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In this project novel techniques were developed to form and dissociate methane hydrates in porous media, to measure acoustic properties and CT properties during hydrate dissociation in the presence of a porous medium. Hydrate depressurization experiments in cores were simulated with the use of TOUGHFx/HYDRATE simulator. Input/output software was developed to simulate variable pressure boundary condition and improve the ease of use of the simulator. A series of simulations needed to be run to mimic the variable pressure condition at the production well. The experiments can be matched qualitatively by the hydrate simulator. The temperature of the core falls during hydrate dissociation; the temperature drop is higher if the fluid withdrawal rate is higher. The pressure and temperature gradients are small within the core. The sodium iodide concentration affects the dissociation pressure and rate. This procedure and data will be useful in designing future hydrate studies.

  17. Equilibrium PT curve of methane hydrates in the presence of AlCl3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Using an experimental transparent sapphire high-pressure cell, three-phase (methane hydrate + AlCl3 solution + methane) equilibrium conditions of methane hydrates in the aqueous solution containing AlCl3 have been investigated under conditions of temperature from 272.15 to 278.15 K and pressure from 4.040 to 8.382 MPa. It could be clearly verified that AlCl3 is of stronger inhibitive effect than that observed for other electrolytes, such as KCl, CaCl2, at the same mole fraction. The induction time of the methane hydrate formation becomes longer when the water activity decreases with the increase of ion charge numbers. Methane hydrates tend to crystallize more easily with higher concentration (AlCl3 concentration of 18%) than lower one (AlCl3 concentration of 10%) in the same electriclyte solution. An empirical exponential equation is presented to calculate the equilibrium temperature and pressure of methane hydrate stable occurrence, and to correlate the measured data for aqueous AlCl3 solution. The results show that there was infinitely small discrepancy between the theoretical computed values and the data oberserved in actual experiments.

  18. Simultaneous determination of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat in sI methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat of sI methane hydrate were measured as functions of temperature and pressure using a needle probe technique. The temperature dependence was measured between −20°C and 17°C at 31.5 MPa. The pressure dependence was measured between 31.5 and 102 MPa at 14.4°C. Only weak temperature and pressure dependencies were observed. Methane hydrate thermal conductivity differs from that of water by less than 10 per cent, too little to provide a sensitive measure of hydrate content in water-saturated systems. Thermal diffusivity of methane hydrate is more than twice that of water, however, and its specific heat is about half that of water. Thus, when drilling into or through hydrate-rich sediment, heat from the borehole can raise the formation temperature more than 20 per cent faster than if the formation's pore space contains only water. Thermal properties of methane hydrate should be considered in safety and economic assessments of hydrate-bearing sediment.

  19. Detection of Occupancy Differences in Methane Gas Hydrates by Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds, which grow from micro crystals to bulk masses resembling ordinary slush, snow or ice. Since gas hydrates exist at elevated pressures at temperatures well above the ice point, they can cause severe problems under production and transportation of reserv......Gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds, which grow from micro crystals to bulk masses resembling ordinary slush, snow or ice. Since gas hydrates exist at elevated pressures at temperatures well above the ice point, they can cause severe problems under production and transportation...... of reservoir fluids due to plugging. Methods to prevent hydrate formation are in use, e.g. by injection of inhibitors. From environmental and security points of view an easy way to detect hydrate formation is of interest. We have tried to detect methane hydrate formation by use of Raman spectroscopy....

  20. Estimates of future warming-induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Marin-Moreno, Héctor; MINSHULL, Timothy A.; Westbrook, Graham K.; Sinha, Bablu

    2015-01-01

    Methane hydrate close to the hydrate stability limit in seafloor sediment could represent an important source of methane to the oceans and atmosphere as the oceans warm. We investigate the extent to which patterns of past and future ocean-temperature fluctuations influence hydrate stability in a region offshore West Svalbard where active gas venting has been observed. We model the transient behavior of the gas hydrate stability zone at 400–500 m water depth (mwd) in response to past temperatu...

  1. Estimates of future warming-induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Methane hydrate close to the hydrate stability limit in seafloor sediment could represent an important source of methane to the oceans and atmosphere as the oceans warm. We investigate the extent to which patterns of past and future ocean-temperature fluctuations influence hydrate stability in a region offshore West Svalbard where active gas venting has been observed. We model the transient behavior of the gas hydrate stability zone at 400–500 m water depth (mwd) in response to past temperatu...

  2. Preliminary Experimental Examination Of Controls On Methane Expulsion During Melting Of Natural Gas Hydrate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Flemings, P. B.; Bryant, S. L.; You, K.; Polito, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Global climate change will cause warming of the oceans and land. This will affect the occurrence, behavior, and location of subseafloor and subterranean methane hydrate deposits. We suggest that in many natural systems local salinity, elevated by hydrate formation or freshened by hydrate dissociation, may control gas transport through the hydrate stability zone. We are performing experiments and modeling the experiments to explore this behavior for different warming scenarios. Initially, we are exploring hydrate association/dissociation in saline systems with constant water mass. We compare experiments run with saline (3.5 wt. %) water vs. distilled water in a sand mixture at an initial water saturation of ~0.5. We increase the pore fluid (methane) pressure to 1050 psig. We then stepwise cool the sample into the hydrate stability field (~3 degrees C), allowing methane gas to enter as hydrate forms. We measure resistivity and the mass of methane consumed. We are currently running these experiments and we predict our results from equilibrium thermodynamics. In the fresh water case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 63% and all water is consumed. In the saline case, the modeled final hydrate saturation is 47%, the salinity is 12.4 wt. %, and final water saturation is 13%. The fresh water system is water-limited: all the water is converted to hydrate. In the saline system, pore water salinity is elevated and salt is excluded from the hydrate structure during hydrate formation until the salinity drives the system to three phase equilibrium (liquid, gas, hydrate) and no further hydrate forms. In our laboratory we can impose temperature gradients within the column, and we will use this to investigate equilibrium conditions in large samples subjected to temperature gradients and changing temperature. In these tests, we will quantify the hydrate saturation and salinity over our meter-long sample using spatially distributed temperature sensors, spatially distributed

  3. The Global Inventory of Methane Hydrate in Marine Sediments: A Theoretical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Dale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of methane hydrate in marine sediments is controlled by a number of physical and biogeochemical parameters including the thickness of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ, the solubility of methane in pore fluids, the accumulation of particulate organic carbon at the seafloor, the kinetics of microbial organic matter degradation and methane generation in marine sediments, sediment compaction and the ascent of deep-seated pore fluids and methane gas into the GHSZ. Our present knowledge on these controlling factors is discussed and new estimates of global sediment and methane fluxes are provided applying a transport-reaction model at global scale. The modeling and the data evaluation yield improved and better constrained estimates of the global pore volume within the modern GHSZ ( ≥ 44 × 1015 m3, the Holocene POC accumulation rate at the seabed (~1.4 × 1014 g yr−1, the global rate of microbial methane production in the deep biosphere (4−25 × 1012 g C yr−1 and the inventory of methane hydrates in marine sediments ( ≥ 455 Gt of methane-bound carbon.

  4. Quantifying methane hydrate distribution in worldwide sediments: Comparison between observations and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, G.; Chapman, W. G.; Dickens, G. D.; Dugan, B.; Hirasaki, G. J.

    2006-12-01

    Models for studying methane hydrate accumulation in marine sediments have previously been developed for specific locations and are valid only for the numerous parameters characteristic of these sites. To understand the general distribution of hydrates and explain the variability of hydrate saturations in different geologic settings, we develop a one-dimensional model that simulates accumulation of hydrates over time. We use results from our numerical model and dimensionless scalings to generate average gas hydrate saturation maps that are valid over a wide range of transport parameters. It is shown that just two saturation contour maps suffice in explaining gas hydrate distributions resulting from methane generated either via in-situ methanogenic reactions or transported through upward fluxes from deeper sources. These contour maps are also relatively insensitive to changes in seafloor properties (like seafloor depth, bottom water temperature and geothermal gradient), making them applicable to any general geologic setting. To test and validate our model, we have evaluated where known and well characterized gas hydrate systems such as Blake Ridge (offshore southeastern USA), Cascadia Margin (offshore northwestern USA), Peru Margin (offshore Peru), Costa Rica Margin and Nankai Trough (offshore Japan) lie on our simulated saturation maps. Average gas hydrate saturations at these locations are predicted to be about 4%, 9%, 8%, 1% and 3%, respectively. These saturations match values inferred from proxy data for most of the ODP Sites. Hence, our contour plots provide an approximate, yet accurate, estimate of gas hydrate saturations at the regional scale.

  5. GAS METHANE HYDRATES-RESEARCH STATUS, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, AND ENERGY IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Sorensen; Jaroslav Solc; Bethany Bolles

    2000-07-01

    The objective of this task as originally conceived was to compile an assessment of methane hydrate deposits in Alaska from available sources and to make a very preliminary evaluation of the technical and economic feasibility of producing methane from these deposits for remote power generation. Gas hydrates have recently become a target of increased scientific investigation both from the standpoint of their resource potential to the natural gas and oil industries and of their positive and negative implications for the global environment After we performed an extensive literature review and consulted with representatives of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Canadian Geological Survey, and several oil companies, it became evident that, at the current stage of gas hydrate research, the available information on methane hydrates in Alaska does not provide sufficient grounds for reaching conclusions concerning their use for energy production. Hence, the original goals of this task could not be met, and the focus was changed to the compilation and review of published documents to serve as a baseline for possible future research at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). An extensive annotated bibliography of gas hydrate publications has been completed. The EERC will reassess its future research opportunities on methane hydrates to determine where significant initial contributions could be made within the scope of limited available resources.

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of Parameters Governing the Recovery of Methane from Natural Gas Hydrate Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Giraldo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring gas hydrates are regarded as an important future source of energy and considerable efforts are currently being invested to develop methods for an economically viable recovery of this resource. The recovery of natural gas from gas hydrate deposits has been studied by a number of researchers. Depressurization of the reservoir is seen as a favorable method because of its relatively low energy requirements. While lowering the pressure in the production well seems to be a straight forward approach to destabilize methane hydrates, the intrinsic kinetics of CH4-hydrate decomposition and fluid flow lead to complex processes of mass and heat transfer within the deposit. In order to develop a better understanding of the processes and conditions governing the production of methane from methane hydrates it is necessary to study the sensitivity of gas production to the effects of factors such as pressure, temperature, thermal conductivity, permeability, porosity on methane recovery from naturally occurring gas hydrates. A simplified model is the base for an ensemble of reservoir simulations to study which parameters govern productivity and how these factors might interact.

  7. Synthesis of polycrystalline methane hydrate, and its phase stability and mechanical properties at elevated pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Test specimens of methane hydrate were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with H2O ice grains, then warming the system to promote the reaction CH4 (g) + 6H2O (s???l) ??? CH4??6H2O. Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above 271.5 K and up to 289 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 hours. The resulting material is pure methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random texture. Fabrication conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature before reaction completed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, verified that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting is easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably at temperatures well above its melting point. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T= 140-200 K, Pc= 50-100 MPa, and ????= 10-4-10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to a higher degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing stoichiometry under pressure during plastic deformation; x-ray analyses showed that methane hydrate undergoes a process of solid-state disproportionation or exsolution during deformation at conditions well within its conventional stability field.

  8. Methane budget of a large gas hydrate province offshore Georgia, Black Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeckel, M.; Reitz, A.; Klaucke, I. [Leibniz Inst. of Marine Sciences, Kiel (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Methane is the most common hydrocarbon in marine sediments. As such, all seas and oceans have methane seepage that comprises the flow of gases and natural fluids from rocks and sediments through the seabed into the water column. The main effect of methane seepage on the biosphere is the support of cold seep communities by methane and the production of hydrogen sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide is produced in the subsurface sediments by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) by a consortia of microbes and is then utilized by sulfide-oxidizing microbes. This paper reported on a study that investigated methane turnover in the surface sediments in the Batumi methane seep area in the Black Sea, offshore Georgia. The methane flux budget was determined by connecting the calculated methane sinks and sources to the gas bubble motion through the surface sediments. The calculation of methane sinks included benthic flux, AOM and hydrate formation, while the sources included the gas dissolution rate. Geochemical analyses revealed a microbial origin of the methane and a shallow fluid source. Although anaerobic methane oxidation rapidly consumed the SO4{sup 2-} within the top 5-20 cm, a large upward fluid advection was not observed in the porewater profiles. Therefore, it was determined that the Batumi seep area is dominated by methane gas seepage. 1-D transport-reaction modelling constrains the methane flux needed to support the observed SO4{sup 2-} flux as well as the rate of near-surface hydrate formation. The model results were in good agreement with the hydro-acoustic backscatter intensities observed at the bubble release sites using the sonar of a ROV. 52 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  9. Deep-ocean field test of methane hydrate formation from a remotely operated vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P.G.; Orr, F.M.; Friederich, G.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Orange, D.L.; McFarlane, J.; Kirkwood, W.

    1997-01-01

    We have observed the process of formation of clathrate hydrates of methane in experiments conducted on the remotely operated vehicle (ROY) Ventana in the deep waters of Monterey Bay. A tank of methane gas, acrylic tubes containing seawater, and seawater plus various types of sediment were carried down on Ventana to a depth of 910 m where methane gas was injected at the base of the acrylic tubes by bubble stream. Prior calculations had shown that the local hydrographic conditions gave an upper limit of 525 m for the P-T boundary defining methane hydrate formation or dissociation at this site, and thus our experiment took place well within the stability range for this reaction to occur. Hydrate formation in free sea-water occurred within minutes as a buoyant mass of translucent hydrate formed at the gas-water interface. In a coarse sand matrix the Filling of the pore spaces with hydrate turned the sand column into a solidified block, which gas pressure soon lifted and ruptured. In a fine-grained black mud the gas flow carved out flow channels, the walls of which became coated and then filled with hydrate in larger discrete masses. Our experiment shows that hydrate formation is rapid in natural seawater, that sediment type strongly influences the patterns of hydrate formation, and that the use of ROV technologies permits the synthesis of large amounts of hydrate material in natural systems under a variety of conditions so that fundamental research on the stability and growth of these substances is possible.

  10. Experimental Study on Mechanism of Depressurizing Dissociation of Methane Hydrate under Saturated Pore Fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Youhong; Su Kai; Guo Wei; Li Bing; Jia Rui

    2016-01-01

    Sediment-hosted hydrate reservoir often contains saturated pore lfuid, which changes the heat transfer and mass transfer characteristics of the hydrate reservoir. The exploitation of hydrate under saturated pore lfuid using depressurization is simulated experimentally to investigate the inlfuence of particle size of porous media, dissociation temperature, pressure drop and injected lfuid type on gas production behavior. Homogeneous methane hydrate was ifrstly formed in frozen quartz sand. With the formed hydrate sample, hydrate dissociation experiments by depressurization were conducted. The test results showed that the gas production rate of hydrate under saturated pore lfuid was substantially inlfuenced by the particle size, the pressure drop and the injected lfuid type, while it was inlfuenced little by the dissociation temperature. The hydrate dissociates faster under larger pressure drop and in the presence of smaller porous media within the experimental region. The dissociation rate increases with an increasing lfuid salinity in the initial stage, while it decreases in the later stage. The increase of gas diffusion resistance resulted from ionic hydration atmosphere in saturated chloride solution impeded the dissociation of hydrate. It can be solved by increasing the pressure drop and decreasing the lfuid salinity in the process of gas recovery from hydrate reservoir.

  11. Non-Isothermal, Multi-phase, Multi-component Flows through Deformable Methane Hydrate Reservoirs

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Shubhangi; Wohlmuth, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We present a hydro-geomechanical model for subsurface methane hydrate systems. Our model considers kinetic hydrate phase change and non-isothermal, multi-phase, multi-component flow in elastically deforming soils. The model accounts for the effects of hydrate phase change and pore pressure changes on the mechanical properties of the soil, and also for the effect of soil deformation on the fluid-solid interaction properties relevant to reaction and transport processes (e.g., permeability, capillary pressure, reaction surface area). We discuss a 'cause-effect' based decoupling strategy for the model and present our numerical discretization and solution scheme. We then identify the important model components and couplings which are most vital for a hydro-geomechanical hydrate simulator, namely, 1) dissociation kinetics, 2) hydrate phase change coupled with non-isothermal two phase two component flow, 3) two phase flow coupled with linear elasticity (poroelasticity coupling), and finally 4) hydrate phase change c...

  12. The influence of temperature, pressure, salinity and capillary force on the formation of methane hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhao Duan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We present here a thermodynamic model for predicting multi-phase equilibrium of methane hydrate liquid and vapor phases under conditions of different temperature, pressure, salinity and pore sizes. The model is based on the 1959 van der Waals–Platteeuw model, angle-dependent ab initio intermolecular potentials, the DMW-92 equation of state and Pitzer theory. Comparison with all available experimental data shows that this model can accurately predict the effects of temperature, pressure, salinity and capillary radius on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate. Online calculations of the p–T conditions for the formation of methane hydrate at given salinities and pore sizes of sediments are available on: www.geochem-model.org/models.htm.

  13. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol system—An ab initio study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Snehanshu Pal; T K Kundu

    2013-03-01

    Density functional theory based studies have been performed to elucidate the role of methanol as an methane hydrate inhibitor. A methane hydrate pentagonal dodecahedron cage’s geometry optimization, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, Mullikan charge determination, electrostatic potential evaluation and vibrational frequency calculation with and without the presence of methanol using WB97XD/6-31++G(d,p) have been carried out. Calculated geometrical parameters and interaction energies indicate that methanol destabilizes pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage (1CH4@512) with and without the presence of sodium ion. NBO analysis and red shift of vibrational frequency reveal that hydrogen bond formation between methanol and water molecules of 1CH4@512 cage is favourable subsequently after breaking its original hydrogen bonded network.

  14. Calculation of Liquid Water-Hydrate-Methane Vapor Phase Equilibria from Molecular Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled...... using the TIP4P/ice potential and a united-atom Lennard-Jones potential. respectively. The equilibrium calculation method for this system has three components, (i) thermodynamic integration from a supercritical ideal gas to obtain the fluid-phase chemical potentials. (ii) calculation of the chemical...... potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated...

  15. Methane flux in potential hydrate-bearing sediments offshore southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nai-Chen; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Chuang, Pei-Chuan; Hong, Wei-Li; Chen, Hsuan-Wen; Lin, Saulwood; Lin, Li-Hung; Mastumoto, Ryo; Hiruta, Akihiro; Sun, Chih-Hsien; Wang, Pei-Ling; Yang, Tau; Jiang, Shao-yong; Wang, Yun-shuen; Chung, San-Hsiung; Chen, Cheng-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Methane in interstitial water of hydrate-bearing marine sediments ascends with buoyant fluids and is discharged into seawater, exerting profound impacts on ocean biogeochemistry and greenhouse effects. Quantifying the exact magnitude of methane transport across different geochemical transitions in different geological settings would provide bases to better constrain global methane discharge to seawater and to assess physio-chemical contexts imposed on microbial methane production and consumption and carbon sequestration in marine environments. Using sediments collected from different geological settings offshore southwestern Taiwan through decadal exploration on gas hydrates, this study analyzed gas and aqueous geochemistry and calculated methane fluxes across different compartments. Three geochemical transitions, including sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ), shallow sediments, and sediment-seawater interface were specifically focused for the flux calculation. The results combined with previous published data showed that methane fluxes at three interfaces of 2.71×10-3 to 3.52×10-1, 5.28×10-7 to 1.08×100, and 1.34×10-6 to 3.17×100 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively. The ranges of fluxes suggest that more than 90 % of methane originating from depth was consumed by anaerobic methanotrophy at the SMTZ, and further >90% of the remnant methane was removed by aerobic methanotrophy prior to reaching the sediment-seawater interface. Exceptions are sites at cold seeps where the percentage of methane released into seawater can reach more than 80% of methane at depth. Most sites with such high methane fluxes are located at active margin where thrusts and diapirism are well developed. Carbon mass balance method was applied for the calculation of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) and organotrophic sulfate reduction rates at SMTZ. Results indicated that AOM rates were comparable with fluxes deduced from concentration gradients for most sites. At least 60% of sulfate

  16. Thermodynamic calculations in the system CH4-H2O and methane hydrate phase equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    Using the Gibbs function of reaction, equilibrium pressure, temperature conditions for the formation of methane clathrate hydrate have been calculated from the thermodynamic properties of phases in the system CH4-H 2O. The thermodynamic model accurately reproduces the published phase-equilibria data to within ??2 K of the observed equilibrium boundaries in the range 0.08-117 MPa and 190-307 K. The model also provides an estimate of the third-law entropy of methane hydrate at 273.15 K, 0.1 MPa of 56.2 J mol-1 K-1 for 1/n CH4??H 2O, where n is the hydrate number. Agreement between the calculated and published phase-equilibria data is optimized when the hydrate composition is fixed and independent of the pressure and temperature for the conditions modeled. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  17. Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, David; Buffett, Bruce; Brovkin, Victor

    2009-12-08

    We present a model of the global methane inventory as hydrate and bubbles below the sea floor. The model predicts the inventory of CH(4) in the ocean today to be approximately 1600-2,000 Pg of C. Most of the hydrate in the model is in the Pacific, in large part because lower oxygen levels enhance the preservation of organic carbon. Because the oxygen concentration today may be different from the long-term average, the sensitivity of the model to O(2) is a source of uncertainty in predicting hydrate inventories. Cold water column temperatures in the high latitudes lead to buildup of hydrates in the Arctic and Antarctic at shallower depths than is possible in low latitudes. A critical bubble volume fraction threshold has been proposed as a critical threshold at which gas migrates all through the sediment column. Our model lacks many factors that lead to heterogeneity in the real hydrate reservoir in the ocean, such as preferential hydrate formation in sandy sediments and subsurface gas migration, and is therefore conservative in its prediction of releasable methane, finding only 35 Pg of C released after 3 degrees C of uniform warming by using a 10% critical bubble volume. If 2.5% bubble volume is taken as critical, then 940 Pg of C might escape in response to 3 degrees C warming. This hydrate model embedded into a global climate model predicts approximately 0.4-0.5 degrees C additional warming from the hydrate response to fossil fuel CO(2) release, initially because of methane, but persisting through the 10-kyr duration of the simulations because of the CO(2) oxidation product of methane.

  18. Kinetics of hydrate formation and decomposition of methane in silica sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, S.C. [Korea Inst. of Energy Reserch, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Energy Conversion Research; Linga, P.; Haligva, C.; Englezos, P. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    The kinetics of hydrate formation and the decomposition behaviour of methane hydrates formed in a bed of silica sand particles were investigated. An experimental apparatus was used to study hydrate formation at temperatures of 7.0, 4.0, and 1.0 degrees C. Thermocouples were used to obtain temperature profiles during the experiments. Data obtained from the experiments were then used to determine formation gas uptake measurement curves and gas release decomposition measurement curves. Results of the study showed that the percentage of water converted to hydrates was higher when the temperature was 1.0 degrees C. Multiple nucleation points occurred during formation experiments conducted at 4.0 and 1.0 degrees C. A thermal stimulation approach was used to recover methane from the hydrates. The study showed that methane recovery occurred during 2 stages of the decomposition process. It was concluded that methane recovery rates of between 95 and 98 per cent were achieved using the method. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Methane hydrate stability in the presence of water-soluble hydroxyalkyl cellulose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Mohammad-Taheri; A. Zarringhalam Moghaddam; K. Nazari; N. Gholipour Zanjani

    2012-01-01

    The effect of low-dosage water-soluble hydroxyethyl cellulose (approximate Mw~90,000 and 250,000) as a member ofhydroxyalkyl cellulosic polymer group on methane hydrate stability was investigated by monitoring hydrate dissociation at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure in a closed vessel.In particular,the influence of molecular weight and mass concentration of hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) was studied with respect to hydrate formation and dissociation.Methane hydrate formation was performed at 2 ℃ and at a pressure greater than 100 bar.Afterwards,hydrate dissociation was initiated by step heating from - 10 ℃ at a mild pressure of 13 bar to -3 ℃,0 ℃ and 2 ℃.With respect to the results obtained for methane hydrate formation/dissociation and the amount of gas uptake,we concluded that HEC 90,000 at 5000 ppm is suitable for long-term gas storage and transportation under a mild pressure of 13 bar and at temperatures below the freezing point.

  20. Nitrogen-assisted Three-phase Equilibrium in Hydrate Systems Composed of Water, Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    Guest molecule exchange is a new and promising methane hydrate production technique in which methane gas is produced by injection of another gas without requiring depressurization or thermal stimulation. The technique is generally associated with injection of carbon dioxide, but injection of nitrogen and carbon dioxide mixtures are the most efficient and economical. However, thermodynamic behavior of injection mixtures is poorly understood, and it is unclear how nitrogen affects the exchange process. Here, we describe thermodynamic stability of hydrate systems that contain water, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. We present a series of ternary and quaternary phase diagrams and show the impact nitrogen has on hydrate stability. Our results demonstrate that nitrogen can either stabilize hydrate, de-stabilize hydrate, or produce three-phase equilibrium (gas, water, and hydrate) depending on its relative abundance. At low abundance nitrogen forms hydrate and directly contributes to the exchange process. At high abundance nitrogen de-stabilizes hydrate akin to traditional hydrate inhibitors, such as salt, alcohol, or mono-ethylene glycol. We show how the dual properties of nitrogen lead to three-phase equilibrium and how three-phase equilibrium may explain much of the behavior observed in methane production from nitrogen-rich injections. We apply our analysis to laboratory experiments and the methane hydrate field test on the northern Alaskan slope at Ignik Sikumi. These results can be extended to analyze dynamic evolution of mixed hydrate systems.

  1. Methane hydrate distribution from prolonged and repeated formation in natural and compacted sand samples: X-ray CT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, E.V.L.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Seol, Y.

    2010-07-01

    To study physical properties of methane gas hydrate-bearing sediments, it is necessary to synthesize laboratory samples due to the limited availability of cores from natural deposits. X-ray computed tomography (CT) and other observations have shown gas hydrate to occur in a number of morphologies over a variety of sediment types. To aid in understanding formation and growth patterns of hydrate in sediments, methane hydrate was repeatedly formed in laboratory-packed sand samples and in a natural sediment core from the Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. CT scanning was performed during hydrate formation and decomposition steps, and periodically while the hydrate samples remained under stable conditions for up to 60 days. The investigation revealed the impact of water saturation on location and morphology of hydrate in both laboratory and natural sediments during repeated hydrate formations. Significant redistribution of hydrate and water in the samples was observed over both the short and long term.

  2. Arguments for a Comprehensive Laboratory Research Subprogram on Hydrocarbon Gas Hydrates and Hydrate-Sediment Aggregates in the 2005-2010 DOE Methane Hydrate R & D Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, S. H.

    2005-12-01

    Field observations of natural hydrocarbon clathrate hydrates, including responses to drilling perturbations of hydrates, well logging and analysis of drill core, and field geophysics are, combined with theoretical modeling, justifiably key activities of the authorized 2005-2010 DOE Methane Hydrate Program. It is argued in this presentation that sustained fundamental laboratory research amplifies, extends and verifies results obtained from field and modeling investigations and does so in a cost-effective way. Recent developments of hydrocarbon clathrate hydrate and sediment aggregate synthesis methods, applications of in-situ optical cell, Raman, NMR, x-ray tomography and neutron diffraction techniques, and cryogenic x-ray and SEM methods re-enforce the importance of such lab investigations. Moreover, there are large data gaps for hydrocarbon-hydrate and hydrate-sediment-aggregate properties. We give three examples: 1) All natural hydrocarbon hydrates in sediment core have been altered to varying degrees by their transit, storage, depressurization, and subsequent lab investigations, as are well-log observations during drilling operations. Interpretation of drill core properties and structure and well logs are also typically not unique. Emulations of the pressure-temperature-deformation-time histories of synthetic samples offer a productive way of gaining insight into how natural samples and logging measurements may be compositionally and texturally altered during sampling and handling. 2) Rock physics models indicate that the effects of hydrates on sediment properties depend on the manner in which hydrates articulate with the sediment matrix (their conformation). Most of these models have not been verified by direct testing using hydrocarbon hydrates with conformation checked by optical cell observations or cryogenic SEM. Such tests are needed and technically feasible. 3) Modeling the effects of exchanges of heat, multiphase fluid fluxes, and deformation involve

  3. Analysis of Bubble Plume Distributions to Evaluate Methane Hydrate Decomposition on the Cascadia Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, U. K.; Johnson, H. P.; Salmi, M.; Solomon, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane gas is formed within the sediments of accretionary prisms by the biological and thermal degradation of organic matter. Some of this methane is trapped as solid-phase methane hydrate, the stability of which is temperature and pressure-dependent. Past fluctuations in global temperatures have resulted in the decomposition of continental margin gas hydrate reservoirs and subsequent emissions of methane, creating a positive feedback to global warming with additional impacts on the marine environment. Temperature data collected over the past four decades show that bottom water on the upper slope of the Washington State continental margin has undergone systematic warming. Thermal models of this heat propagation into the sediments indicate a 40 meter deepening of the methane hydrate stability depth (MHDS) that if correct, would suggest a preferential release of methane into the water column from these depths on the Cascadia margin. Location data for over 100 active methane seeps on the Cascadia margin were compiled from a variety of sources including research cruises, published literature, and local fishermen. Emission site locations show anomalous plume densities at depths associated with the MHDS, which lies at approximately 500 meters water depth in the NE Pacific. This supports the hypothesis that warming of seawater at intermediate depths due to contemporary climate change has begun to destabilize the Cascadia margin gas hydrate reservoir. While relatively small sample size and incomplete coverage due to the ad-hoc nature of data acquisition limit confidence in any conclusions drawn from this dataset, this study provides a framework for future analysis of methane plume distributions and supports the need for a comprehensive and systematic geophysical and geochemical examination of the Cascadia margin.

  4. Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, T.H.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.

    2011-02-15

    Replacement of methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposed as a strategy for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and/or production of methane (CH{sub 4}) from natural hydrate deposits. This replacement strategy requires a better understanding of the thermodynamic characteristics of binary mixtures of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} hydrate (CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates), as well as thermophysical property changes during gas exchange. This study explores the thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrates. We prepared CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate samples from two different, well-defined gas mixtures. During thermal dissociation of a CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate sample, gas samples from the head space were periodically collected and analyzed using gas chromatography. The changes in CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} compositions in both the vapor phase and hydrate phase during dissociation were estimated based on the gas chromatography measurements. It was found that the CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase became richer during dissociation because the initial hydrate composition contained relatively more CO{sub 2} than the vapor phase. The composition change in the vapor phase during hydrate dissociation affected the dissociation pressure and temperature; the richer CO{sub 2} in the vapor phase led to a lower dissociation pressure. Furthermore, the increase in CO{sub 2} concentration in the vapor phase enriched the hydrate in CO{sub 2}. The dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate was computed by fitting the Clausius-Clapeyron equation to the pressure-temperature (PT) trace of a dissociation test. It was observed that the dissociation enthalpy of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixed hydrate lays between the limiting values of pure CH{sub 4} hydrate and CO{sub 2} hydrate, increasing with the CO{sub 2} fraction in the hydrate phase.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrate pre-nucleation phenomena and the effect of PVCap kinetic inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Kvamme, Bjørn; Parmar, Archana

    2012-12-01

    MD simulations were employed to investigate a number of different systems of relevance for methane hydrate formation, dissociation and inhibition. Regions of stability for methane hydrate have been investigated using a model system consisting of a slab of hydrate embedded in liquid water. Water/methane interface structuring and possible precursors to hydrate formation have been investigated using a model system of water and methane at different densities. In yet another system we have investigated the impact of Dodecamers (twelve-unit molecules) of poly (vinyl caprolactam) or PVCap on structuring of water/methane interfaces. PVCap is well known for its performance as hydrate kinetic inhibitor1. Intermolecular interactions were treated by a combination of Coulomb and Lennard-Jones potentials. Temperature was controlled by a simple velocity scaling. Several of the hydrate-containing systems showed a tendency to melt when in contact with methane-saturated water even at temperatures well below the hydrate stability region. We have attributed this behavior to the fact that hydrate volume available in a MD experiment is small and lacks the stabilizing presence of bulk. Systems containing liquid water and methane showed certain signs of hydrate nucleation. The PVCap behavior was shown to be very dependent on its concentration in water. At low concentrations, PVCap tended to prefer the water-methane interface and not to interact with each other, similarly to another kinetic inhibitor, PVP2. When the liquid PVCap content was high, it evidently modified the interfacial tension of water-methane surface, converting the initially disperesed methane phase into separated bubbles. The PVCap molecules then built a system-wide network that partially covered the surface of methane bubbles.

  6. Shallow-ocean methane leakage and degassing to the atmosphere: triggered by offshore oil-gas and methane hydrate explorations

    OpenAIRE

    Yong eZHANG; Weidong eZhai

    2015-01-01

    Both offshore oil-gas exploration and marine methane hydrate recovery can trigger massive CH4 release from seafloor. During upward transportation of CH4 plume through water column, CH4 is subjected to dissolution and microbial consumption despite the protection of hydrate and oil coating on bubbles surface. The ultimate CH4 degassing to the atmosphere appears to be water-depth dependent. In shallow oceans with water depth less than 100 m, the natural or human-induced leakages or both lead to ...

  7. Modeling the methane hydrate formation in an aqueous film submitted to steady cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avendano-Gomez, J.R. [ESIQIE, Laboratorio de Ingenieria Quimica Ambiental, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Politecnico Nacional; Garcia-Sanchez, F. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo; Gurrola, D.V. [UPIBI, Laboratorio de Diseno de Plantas, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Politecnico Nacional

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrate hydrates, are ice-like compounds that results from the kinetic process of crystallization of an aqueous solution supersaturated with a dissolved gas. This paper presented a model that took into account two factors involved in the hydrate crystallization, notably the stochastic nature of crystallization that causes sub-cooling and the heat resulting from the exothermic enthalpy of hydrate formation. The purpose of this study was to model the thermal evolution inside a hydrate forming system which was submitted to an imposed steady cooling. The study system was a cylindrical thin film of aqueous solution at 19 Mpa. The study involved using methane as the hydrate forming molecule. It was assumed that methane was homogeneously dissolved in the aqueous phase. Ethane hydrate was formed through a kinetic process of nucleation and crystallization. In order to predict the onset time of nucleation, the induction time needed to be considered. This paper discussed the probability of nucleation as well as the estimation of the rate of nucleation. It also presented the mathematical model and boundary conditions. These included assumptions and derivation of the model; boundary conditions; initial conditions; and numerical solution of the model equation. It was concluded that the heat source must be considered when investigating crystallization effects. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  8. Sponge Effect on Coal Mine Methane Separation Based on Clathrate Hydrate Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Baoyong; CHENG Yuanping; WU Qiang

    2011-01-01

    The findings were presented from laboratory investigations on the hydrate formation and dissociation processes employed to recover methane from coal mine gas.The separation process of coal mine methane(CMM) was carried out at 273.15K under 4.00 MPa.The key process variables of gas formation rate,gas volume stored in hydrate and separation concentration were closely investigated in twelve THF-SDS-sponge-gas systems to verify the sponge effect in these hydrate-based separation processes.The gas volume stored in hydrate is calculated based on the measured gas pressure.The CH4 mole fraction in hydrate phase is measured by gas chromatography to confirm the separation efficiency.Through close examination of the overall results,it was clearly verified that sponges with volumes of 40,60 and 80 cm 3 significantly increase gas hydrate formation rate and the gas volume stored in hydrate,and have little effect on the CH4 mole fraction in hydrate phase.The present study provides references for the application of the kinetic effect of porous sponge media in hydrate-based technology.This will contribute to CMM utilization and to benefit for local and global environment.

  9. Cyclic formation and dissociation of methane hydrate within partially water saturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Nakagawa, S.

    2010-12-01

    For partially water-saturated sediments, laboratory experiments have shown that methane hydrate forms heterogeneously within a sample at the core scale. The heterogeneous distribution of hydrate in combination with grain-scale hydrate location (eg. grain cementing, load bearing, and pore filling), determines the overall mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments including shear strength and seismic properties. For this reason, understanding the heterogeneity of hydrate-bearing sample is essential when the bulk properties of the sample are examined in the laboratory. We present a series of laboratory methane hydrate formation and dissociation experiments with concurrent x-ray CT imaging and low-frequency (near 1 kHz) seismic measurements. The seismic measurements were conducted using a new acoustic resonant bar technique called the Split Hopkinson Resonant Bar method, which allows using a small sediment core (3.75 cm diameter, 7.5 cm length). The experiment was conducted using a jacketed, pre-compacted, fine-grain silica sand sample with a 40% distilled water saturation. Under isotropic confining stress of 6.9 MPa and a temperature 4 oC, the hydrate was formed in the sample by injecting pure methane gas at 5.6 MPa. Once the hydrate formed, it was dissociated by reducing the pore pressure to 2.8 MPa. This cycle was repeated by three times (dissociation test for the third cycle was not done) to examine the resulting changes in the hydrate distribution and seismic signatures. The repeated formation of hydrate resulted in significant changes in its distribution, which resulted in differences in the overall elastic properties of the sample, determined from the seismic measurements. Interestingly, the time intervals between the dissociation and subsequent formation of hydrate affected the rate of hydrate formation, shorter intervals resulting in faster formation. This memory effect, possibly caused by the presence of residual “seed crystals” in the pore water

  10. Dynamic morphology of gas hydrate on a methane bubble in water: Observations and new insights for hydrate film models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warzinski, Robert P.; Lynn, Ronald; Haljasmaa, Igor; Leifer, Ira; Shaffer, Frank; Anderson, Brian J.; Levine, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-01

    Predicting the fate of subsea hydrocarbon gases escaping into seawater is complicated by potential formation of hydrate on rising bubbles that can enhance their survival in the water column, allowing gas to reach shallower depths and the atmosphere. The precise nature and influence of hydrate coatings on bubble hydrodynamics and dissolution is largely unknown. Here we present high-definition, experimental observations of complex surficial mechanisms governing methane bubble hydrate formation and dissociation during transit of a simulated oceanic water column that reveal a temporal progression of deep-sea controlling mechanisms. Synergistic feedbacks between bubble hydrodynamics, hydrate morphology, and coverage characteristics were discovered. Morphological changes on the bubble surface appear analogous to macroscale, sea ice processes, presenting new mechanistic insights. An inverse linear relationship between hydrate coverage and bubble dissolution rate is indicated. Understanding and incorporating these phenomena into bubble and bubble plume models will be necessary to accurately predict global greenhouse gas budgets for warming ocean scenarios and hydrocarbon transport from anthropogenic or natural deep-sea eruptions.

  11. A Sea Floor Methane Hydrate Displacement Experiment Using N2 Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, P. G.; Peltzer, E. T.; Walz, P. M.; Zhang, X.; Hester, K.

    2009-12-01

    The production of free methane gas from solid methane hydrate accumulations presents a considerable challenge. The presently preferred procedure is pressure reduction whereby the relief of pressure to a condition outside the hydrate phase boundary creates a gas phase. The reaction is endothermic and thus a problematic water ice phase can form if the extraction of gas is too rapid, limiting the applicability of this procedure. Additionally, the removal of the formation water in contact with the hydrate phase is required before meaningful pressure reduction can be attained -- and this can take time. An alternate approach that has been suggested is the injection of liquid CO2 into the formation, thereby displacing the formation water. Formation of a solid CO2 hydrate is thermodynamically favored under these conditions. Competition between CH4 and CO2 for the hydrate host water molecules can occur displacing CH4 from the solid to the gas phase with formation of a solid CO2 hydrate. We have investigated another alternate approach with displacement of the surrounding bulk water phase by N2 gas, resulting in rapid release of CH4 gas and complete loss of the solid hydrate phase. Our experiment was carried out at the Southern Summit of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon, at 780m depth. There we harvested hydrate fragments from surficial sediments using the robotic arm of the ROV Doc Ricketts. Specimens of the hydrate were collected about 1m above the sediment surface in an inverted funnel with a mesh covered neck as they floated upwards. The accumulated hydrate was transferred to an inverted glass cylinder, and N2 gas was carefully injected into this container. Displacement of the water phase occurred and when the floating hydrate material approached the lower rim the gas injection was stopped and the cylinder placed upon a flat metal plate effectively sealing the system. We returned to this site after 7 days to measure progress, and observed complete loss of the hydrate phase

  12. Methane-propane hydrate crystal growth in the presence of nanosized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.S.; Ryu, Y.B.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, J.D. [Korea Inst. of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of). Busan Research Center; Park, Y.H. [Pusan National Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    The impact of nano-sized titanium dioxide, silver, and silica (TiO{sub 2}-Ag-SiO{sub 2}) sols on the gas hydrate formation morphology within an enclosed cell partially filled with liquid water was investigated. The nano-sized particles were synthesized suing a modified sol-gel method with a reduction agent added to eliminate the need for auxiliary dispersants or surfactants. Structure 2 (s2) hydrates were synthesized using a gas mixture of 90.1 per cent methane and propane as guest molecules. Small amounts of the nano-sized sols were added to the liquid water. The aim of the study was to determine methods of ensuring the stability of methane hydrates in storage facilities and during transport using gas to solids technology (GTS). Nucleation, hydrate crystal growth, and the migration of the gas hydrate were studied in relation to the stationary interface between the liquid water and the gas. Results of the study showed that the hydrate's growth phase started with the formation of a film at the upper surface of the liquid water pool. Crystals then grew in a downward manner from the hydrate film. Video images of the crystals showed that the downward crystals grown in the presence of the nano-sized particles occurred at a faster rate and with finer arm spacing. It was concluded that the addition of the nano-particles provided a larger specific surface area and larger nucleation sides so that more gas was absorbed into the water. The TiO{sub 2}-Ag-SiO{sub 2} sols acted as a promoter for methane-propane hydrate formation. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Study of methane hydrate as a future energy resource: low emission extraction and power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L.; Yamada, H.; Kanda, Y.; Sasaki, H.; Okajima, J.; Iga, Y.; Komiya, A.; Maruyama, S.

    2016-08-01

    With the fast increase of world energy consumption in recent years, new and sustainable energy sources are becoming more and more important. Methane Hydrate is one promising candidate for the future energy supply of humankind, due to its vast existence in permafrost regions and near-coast seabed. This study is focused on the effective low emission utilization of methane hydrate from deep seabed. The Nankai Trough of Japan is taken as the target region in this study for methane hydrate extraction and utilization system design. Low emission system and power generation system with CCS (Carbon Capture and Sequestration) processes are proposed and analyzed for production rate and electricity generation efficiency problem study. It is found that the gas production price can reach the current domestic natural gas supply price level if the production rate can be improved. The optimized system is estimated to have power efficiency about 35%. In addition, current development and analysis from micro-to-macro scale methane hydrate production and dissociation dynamics are also discussed into detail in this study.

  14. Tracking Dissolved Methane Concentrations near Active Seeps and Gas Hydrates: Sea of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G. T.; Aoki, S.; Matsumoto, R.; Tomaru, H.; Owari, S.; Nakajima, R.; Doolittle, D. F.; Brant, B.

    2015-12-01

    A number of regions in the Sea of Japan are known for active gas venting and for gas hydrate exposures on the sea floor. In this investigation we employed several gas sensors mounted on a ROV in order to determine the concentrations of dissolved methane in the water near these sites. Methane concentrations were determined during two-second intervals throughout each ROV deployment during the cruise. The methane sensor deployments were coupled with seawater sampling using Niskin bottles. Dissolved gas concentrations were later measured using gas chromatography in order to compare with the sensor results taken at the same time. The observed maximum dissolved methane concentrations were much lower than saturation values, even when the ROV manipulators were in contact with gas hydrate. Nonetheless, dissolved concentrations did reach several thousands of nmol/L near gas hydrate exposures and gas bubbles, more than two orders of magnitude over the instrumental detection limits. Most of the sensors tested were able to detect dissolved methane concentrations as low as 10 nmol/L which permitted detection when the ROV approached methane plume sites, even from several tens of meters above the sea floor. Despite the low detection limits, the methane sensors showed variable response times when returning to low-background seawater (~5nM). For some of the sensors, the response time necessary to return to background values occurred in a matter of minutes, while for others it took several hours. Response time, as well as detection limit, should be an important consideration when selecting methane sensors for ROV or AUV investigations. This research was made possible, in part, through funding provided by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

  15. Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates: Outreach for the public and policy makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Yannick

    2010-05-01

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), via its official collaborating center in Norway, GRID-Arendal, is in the process of implementing a Global Assessment of Methane Gas Hydrates. Global reservoirs of methane gas have long been the topic of scientific discussion both in the realm of environmental issues such as natural forces of climate change and as a potential energy resource for economic development. Of particular interest are the volumes of methane locked away in frozen molecules known as clathrates or hydrates. Our rapidly evolving scientific knowledge and technological development related to methane hydrates makes these formations increasingly prospective to economic development. In addition, global demand for energy continues, and will continue to outpace supply for the foreseeable future, resulting in pressure to expand development activities, with associated concerns about environmental and social impacts. Understanding the intricate links between methane hydrates and 1) natural and anthropogenic contributions to climate change, 2) their role in the carbon cycle (e.g. ocean chemistry) and 3) the environmental and socio-economic impacts of extraction, are key factors in making good decisions that promote sustainable development. As policy makers, environmental organizations and private sector interests seek to forward their respective agendas which tend to be weighted towards applied research, there is a clear and imminent need for a an authoritative source of accessible information on various topics related to methane gas hydrates. The 2008 United Nations Environment Programme Annual Report highlighted methane from the Arctic as an emerging challenge with respect to climate change and other environmental issues. Building upon this foundation, UNEP/GRID-Arendal, in conjunction with experts from national hydrates research groups from Canada, the US, Japan, Germany, Norway, India and Korea, aims to provide a multi-thematic overview of the key

  16. Pressurized laboratory experiments show no stable carbon isotope fractionation of methane during gas hydrate dissolution and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Laura L; Wilson, Rachel M; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-15

    The stable carbon isotopic ratio of methane (δ(13)C-CH(4)) recovered from marine sediments containing gas hydrate is often used to infer the gas source and associated microbial processes. This is a powerful approach because of distinct isotopic fractionation patterns associated with methane production by biogenic and thermogenic pathways and microbial oxidation. However, isotope fractionations due to physical processes, such as hydrate dissolution, have not been fully evaluated. We have conducted experiments to determine if hydrate dissolution or dissociation (two distinct physical processes) results in isotopic fractionation. In a pressure chamber, hydrate was formed from a methane gas source at 2.5 MPa and 4 °C, well within the hydrate stability field. Following formation, the methane source was removed while maintaining the hydrate at the same pressure and temperature which stimulated hydrate dissolution. Over the duration of two dissolution experiments (each ~20-30 days), water and headspace samples were periodically collected and measured for methane concentrations and δ(13)C-CH(4) while the hydrate dissolved. For both experiments, the methane concentrations in the pressure chamber water and headspace increased over time, indicating that the hydrate was dissolving, but the δ(13)C-CH(4) values showed no significant trend and remained constant, within 0.5‰. This lack of isotope change over time indicates that there is no fractionation during hydrate dissolution. We also investigated previous findings that little isotopic fractionation occurs when the gas hydrate dissociates into gas bubbles and water due to the release of pressure. Over a 2.5 MPa pressure drop, the difference in the δ(13)C-CH(4) was dissociates and demonstrated that there is no fractionation when the hydrate dissolves. Therefore, measured δ(13)C-CH(4) values near gas hydrates are not affected by physical processes, and can thus be interpreted to result from either the gas source or

  17. Prediction of the phase equilibria of methane hydrates using the direct phase coexistence methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Vasileios K; Costandy, Joseph; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2015-01-28

    The direct phase coexistence method is used for the determination of the three-phase coexistence line of sI methane hydrates. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out in the isothermal-isobaric ensemble in order to determine the coexistence temperature (T3) at four different pressures, namely, 40, 100, 400, and 600 bar. Methane bubble formation that results in supersaturation of water with methane is generally avoided. The observed stochasticity of the hydrate growth and dissociation processes, which can be misleading in the determination of T3, is treated with long simulations in the range of 1000-4000 ns and a relatively large number of independent runs. Statistical averaging of 25 runs per pressure results in T3 predictions that are found to deviate systematically by approximately 3.5 K from the experimental values. This is in good agreement with the deviation of 3.15 K between the prediction of TIP4P/Ice water force field used and the experimental melting temperature of ice Ih. The current results offer the most consistent and accurate predictions from MD simulation for the determination of T3 of methane hydrates. Methane solubility values are also calculated at the predicted equilibrium conditions and are found in good agreement with continuum-scale models.

  18. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  19. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT OPERATION METHODS ON METHANE HYDRATE FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Wenfeng; FAN Shuanshi; WANG Jinqu

    2003-01-01

    Three experiments of static state storage method, low-temperature and constant-pressure storage method and low-temperature and constant-pressure storage method were carried out to investigate which method was best in gas hydrate. The relationships of hydrate rate, capacity and liquid temperature versus time were derived and three results were contrasted. The experimental results show lowtemperature and constant-pressure method is better than the other two methods because it's operation period is shorter and storage capacity is larger than the other two. Low-temperature and constant-pressure method is the best method. So new method will be new research objective.

  20. The response of methane hydrate offshore Svalbard to ocean warming during the next three centuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Moreno, Hector; Minshull, Tim; Westbrook, Graham; Sinha, Bablu; Sarkar, Sudipta

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale rapid release of methane from hydrate may have contributed to past abrupt climate change inferred from the geological record. The discovery in 2008 of numerous plumes of methane gas escaping from the seabed of the West Svalbard continental margin at ~400 m water depth, and the increase in the temperature of the West Spitsbergen current over the latter part of the 20th century, suggest that hydrate is dissociating in this region. We evaluate the possible effect on this system of future climate change, using output from a range of established climate models to drive a hydrate system model. We model the dynamic response of hydrate-bearing sediments to predicted seabed temperature changes, over the range of water depths for which hydrate destabilisation may be occurring and the periods for which climate model output is available, using the TOUGH + HYDRATE (T+H) v1.2 code. We constrain the present-day sub-seabed distribution of gas and hydrate by using seismic data that image the BSR in water depths of more than 580 m and the upper limit of gas-related reflectors in shallower water. We "grow" this initial distribution by running the T+H model over the past 2 kyr, driven by a model of changing ocean temperature, to provide a present-day sub-seabed distribution of gas and hydrate that is close to that indicated by the seismic data. Our results suggest that the active dissociation area between latitudes of 78°26'N-78°40'N (~25 km length) will extend to ~480 m water depth by 2100 CE and to ~550 m by the 2300 CE. Over the next century, 3.9-6.9 Gg yr-1 of methane may be released on the West Svalbard margin, and over the next three centuries 5.3-29 Gg yr-1. Emissions increase with time because the area over which they occur grows over time. The time of first methane emission at a given water depth is controlled by the rate of warming of the overlying ocean. The methane flux until 2050 CE is relatively insensitive to choice of climate model or scenario, but there

  1. Methane consumption in waters overlying a hydrate-associated mound in the Santa Monica Basin : a project synopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, M.B.; Mau, S.; Valentine, D.L.; Reed, J.H. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Hallam, S.J.; Yang, J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the role of methane hydrates in the global carbon cycle and climate change requires an understanding of methane consumption in hydrate-associated environments. A dual-component microbial biofilter consumes up to 80 per cent of methane produced in the marine environment. Throughout most of the oceans around the world, anaerobic methane oxidation within sediment prevents large quantities of methane from leaving the seafloor. However, in regions of increased methane production, methane is released to the water column. The water column component of the marine biofilter for methane is the largest uncharacterized global sink for methane. This study combined geochemical and molecular biology to develop a quantitative understanding of methane consumption in the marine water column of the Southern California Bight. The paper presented geochemical data demonstrating that the degree of basin enclosure and basin-scale circulation patterns, were first order controls on methane oxidation rates in the Santa Monica Basin (SMB). The paper also presented genetic data showing similarities and differences in methanotrophic communities in distinctive horizons within the SMB water column. It described the study site, sampling, and methods as well as the preliminary findings. A contrast was observed between methane concentration and methane turnover time profiles. It was concluded that although methane concentration is a first-order control on methanotrophic activity, community concentration, dilution and seeding control the broad scale efficacy of methane consumption. 23 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Methane Hydrate Pellet Transport Using the Self-Preservation Effect: A Techno-Economic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Osterkamp

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the German integrated project SUGAR, aiming for the development of new technologies for the exploration and exploitation of submarine gas hydrates, the option of gas transport by gas hydrate pellets has been comprehensively re-investigated. A series of pVT dissociation experiments, combined with analytical tools such as x-ray diffraction and cryo-SEM, were used to gather an additional level of understanding on effects controlling ice formation. Based on these new findings and the accessible literature, knowns and unknowns of the self-preservation effect important for the technology are summarized. A conceptual process design for methane hydrate production and pelletisation has been developed. For the major steps identified, comprising (i hydrate formation; (ii dewatering; (iii pelletisation; (iv pellet cooling; and (v pressure relief, available technologies have been evaluated, and modifications and amendments included where needed. A hydrate carrier has been designed, featuring amongst other technical solutions a pivoted cargo system with the potential to mitigate sintering, an actively cooled containment and cargo distribution system, and a dual fuel engine allowing the use of the boil-off gas. The design was constrained by the properties of gas hydrate pellets, the expected operation on continental slopes in areas with rough seas, a scenario-defined loading capacity of 20,000 m3 methane hydrate pellets, and safety as well as environmental considerations. A risk analysis for the transport at sea has been carried out in this early stage of development, and the safety level of the new concept was compared to the safety level of other ship types with similar scopes, i.e., LNG carriers and crude oil tankers. Based on the results of the technological part of this study, and with best knowledge available on the alternative technologies, i.e., pipeline, LNG and CNG transportation, an evaluation of the economic

  3. Growth kinetics and microstructure of methane hydrates formed in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falenty, A.; Klapproth, A.; Techmer, K.; Murshed, M. M.; Kuhs, W. F.

    2007-12-01

    The occurrence of natural gas hydrates within sediments is known from a large number of locations. They commonly occupy pore spaces cementing sedimentary deposits. Yet, detailed information about the influence of mineral composition on the formation process in porous media is still very limited. Laboratory investigations of the microstructure of gas hydrate in porous media, as a function of p-T conditions, mineral composition and water/gas supersaturation are therefore of considerable interest. Such studies may allow a better understanding of the formation process and even the prediction of accumulation /decomposition rates of some natural gas hydrates in a given geological setting. As a model study, we carried out various reactions with methane gas and water in three types of media: 1) quartz, 2) quartz + kaolinite, 3) quartz + montmorillonite. The progress of the reactions was recorded by gas consumption (pressure drop) at 3°C. Samples recovered at various stages of the formation or decomposition reactions were investigated using field-emission scanning electron microscopes (FE-SEM) equipped with a cryo-stage [1]. In the SEM investigations, methane hydrates appeared between the quartz grains acting as cement. Kaolinite particles were observed as a filigree network on the surface of hydrate cement, while montmorillonite form flakes or crust like features. Each of the minerals may play individual/coupled interaction with water and gas hydrate, and thereby display a characteristic configuration in the SEM images. Dissimilar kinetic features, using different porous media at the investigated conditions, confirm that mineral composition directly influences the progress of gas hydrate formation. Medium 3 shows the fastest hydrate saturation. With increasing water content of the porous media the formation tends to proceed in a multi-stage process with a slower diffusion-limited later stage. Reference: [1] A. Klapproth, K. Techmer, S.A. Klapp, M.M. Murshed and W.F. Kuhs

  4. Calculation of liquid water-hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars; Thomsen, Kaj; von Solms, Nicolas; Wierzchowski, Scott; Walsh, Matthew R; Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Wu, David T; Sum, Amadeu K

    2010-05-06

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for determining fluid- and crystal-phase chemical potentials are used for the first time to calculate liquid water-methane hydrate-methane vapor phase equilibria from knowledge of atomistic interaction potentials alone. The water and methane molecules are modeled using the TIP4P/ice potential and a united-atom Lennard-Jones potential, respectively. The equilibrium calculation method for this system has three components, (i) thermodynamic integration from a supercritical ideal gas to obtain the fluid-phase chemical potentials, (ii) calculation of the chemical potential of the zero-occupancy hydrate system using thermodynamic integration from an Einstein crystal reference state, and (iii) thermodynamic integration to obtain the water and guest molecules' chemical potentials as a function of the hydrate occupancy. The three-phase equilibrium curve is calculated for pressures ranging from 20 to 500 bar and is shown to follow the Clapeyron behavior, in agreement with experiment; coexistence temperatures differ from the latter by 4-16 K in the pressure range studied. The enthalpy of dissociation extracted from the calculated P-T curve is within 2% of the experimental value at corresponding conditions. While computationally intensive, simulations such as these are essential to map the thermodynamically stable conditions for hydrate systems.

  5. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  6. Effects of Halogen Ions on Phase Equilibrium of Methane Hydrate in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingjun; Song, Yongchen; Liu, Yu; Lam, Wei-Haur; Li, Qingping; Yu, Xichong

    2012-05-01

    The influences of halogen ions extracted from sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, sodium bromide, and sodium iodide and their concentrations on methane hydrate phase equilibrium conditions in porous media were investigated experimentally using an orthogonal test method at a pressure of 8 MPa. The experimental results showed that the equilibrium temperature of methane hydrate decreased when halogen ions were added. The equilibrium temperature decreased with the increase of halogen ion concentrations. The influence of the sources of the halogens ion to the methane hydrate equilibrium temperature were insensitive according to variance analysis, which could be explained by about the same mean ionic activity coefficient (a dimensionless coefficient relates the activity to a measured concentration) of sodium fluoride, sodium chloride, sodium bromide, and sodium iodide. The experimental measurements were also in close agreement with the thermodynamic model of Song et al. (J. Nat. Gas Chem. 19, 241 (2010)), in which the mechanical equilibrium of force between the interfaces in a hydrate-liquid-vapor system was considered.

  7. Aminopentol, a possible novel biomarker tracer for methane hydrate stability in sedimentary records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, L.; Talbot, H. M.; Cooke, M. P.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    The Congo Fan is a region of important methane (CH4) storage and seepage: large gas hydrate reservoirs at and just below the sediment surface occur alongside deeply-buried reservoirs of thermogenic methane linked with hydrocarbon source rocks. Methane release from both reservoirs has the potential to drive or respond to changes in local and global climate, thus causing changes in ocean chemical properties and biotic responses. Understanding these mechanisms of methane emission and reconstructing the history of past emissions in the Congo Fan (ODP Site 1075) is the main focus of this study. Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are lipid membrane constituents of bacteria and occur with a wide range of structural and functional variability. Amino-BHPs are produced by methane-oxidising bacteria and the 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) is a highly specific biomarker for aerobic methane oxidation. Aminopentol abundance varies significantly throughout the studied section with a suspected precession-driven cyclical variability superimposed on longer-term short eccentricity cycles. Compound-specific stable carbon isotope analyses confirm that the amino-BHPs are of methanotrophic origin. A period of sustained greater concentrations and inferred emissions occurs from ca. 500 and 600 ka during which soil organic matter input, as recorded by soil BHP concentrations and the BIT index, is consistently low. Unsaturated 6-bacteriohopanetetrol cyclitol ether, which is interpreted as a biomarker for nitrogen-fixing marine Tricodesmium cyanobacteria, was also found in this interval and is absent from the remainder of the section. This interval could therefore reflect a period of low terrigenous organic matter and associated nutrient input during which nitrogen-fixing bacteria may have flourished in the resultant nutrient-, in particular nitrate, poor water. Ongoing sea surface temperature reconstruction, using the TEX86 proxy, seeks to investigate potential

  8. A study of the methane hydrate formation by in situ turbidimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herri, J.M.

    1996-02-02

    The study of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) during the processes of crystallization is a subject of considerable interest, notably in the offshore exploitation of liquid fuels where the gas hydrate crystallization can plug production, treatment and transport facilities. The classical remedy to this problem is mainly thermodynamic additives such as alcohols or salts, but a new way of research is the use of dispersant additives which avoid crystals formation. In this paper, we show an original apparatus that is able to measure in situ the polychromatic UV-Visible turbidity spectrum in a pressurised reactor. We apply this technology to the calculation of the PSD during the crystallization of methane hydrate particles in a stirred semi-batch tank reactor. We discuss the mathematics treatment of the turbidity spectrum in order to determine the PSD and especially the method of matrix inversion with constraint. Moreover, we give a method to calculate theoretically the refractive index of the hydrate particles and we validate it experimentally with the methane hydrate particles. We apply this technology to the study of the crystallization of methane hydrate from pure liquid water and methane gas into the range of temperature [0-2 deg. C], into the range of pressure [30-100 bars] and into the range of stirring rate [0-600 rpm]. We produce a set of experiments concerning these parameters. Then we realize a model of the crystallization taking into account the processes of nucleation, of growth, of agglomeration and flotation. We compare this model with the experimental results concerning the complex influence of stirring rate at 1 deg. C and 30 bars. Then, we investigate the influence of additives such as Fontainebleau Sand, Potassium Chloride and a surfactant such as Poly-Vinyl-Pyrrolydone. (authors). 133 refs., 210 figs., 54 tabs.

  9. Experimental study on geochemical characteristic of methane hydrate formed in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Chen; Changling Liu; Yuguang Ye

    2009-01-01

    The natural occurrence of methane hydrates in marine sediments has been intensively studied over the past decades, and geochemical charac-teristic of hydrate is one of the most attractive research fields. In this paper, we discussed the geochemical anomaly during hydrate formation in porous media. By doing so, we also investigated the temperature influence on hydrate formation under isobaric condition. It turns out that sub-cooling is an important factor to dominate hydrate formation. Larger subcooling provides more powerful driving force for hydrate formation. During the geochemical anomaly research, six kinds of ions and the total dissolved salt (TDS) were measured before and after the experiment in different porous media. The result is that all kinds of ionic concentration increased after hydrate formation which can be defined as salting out effect mainly affected by gas consumption. But the variation ratio of different ions is not equal. Ca2+ seems to be the most significantly influenced one, and its variation ratio is up to 80%. Finally, we theoretically made a model to calculate the TDS variation, the result is in good accordance with measured one, especially when gas consumption is large.

  10. The inhibition of methane hydrate formation by water alignment underneath surface adsorption of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ngoc N.; Nguyen, Anh V.; Dang, Liem X.

    2017-06-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been widely shown to strongly promote the formation of methane hydrate. Here we show that SDS displays an extraordinary inhibition effect on methane hydrate formation when the surfactant is used in sub-millimolar concentration (around 0.3 mM). We have also employed Sum Frequency Generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG) and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this inhibition. The SFG and MDS results revealed a strong alignment of water molecules underneath surface adsorption of SDS in its sub-millimolar solution. Interestingly, both the alignment of water and the inhibition effect (in 0.3 mM SDS solution) went vanishing when an oppositely-charged surfactant (tetra-n-butylammonium bromide, TBAB) was suitably added to produce a mixed solution of 0.3 mM SDS and 3.6 mM TBAB. Combining structural and kinetic results, we pointed out that the alignment of water underneath surface adsorption of dodecyl sulfate (DS-) anions gave rise to the unexpected inhibition of methane hydration formation in sub-millimolar solution of SDS. The adoption of TBAB mitigated the SDS-induced electrostatic field at the solution’s surface and, therefore, weakened the alignment of interfacial water which, in turn, erased the inhibition effect. We discussed this finding using the concept of activation energy of the interfacial formation of gas hydrate. The main finding of this work is to reveal the interplay of interfacial water in governing gas hydrate formation which sheds light on a universal molecular-scale understanding of the influence of surfactants on gas hydrate formation. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. Role of critical state framework in understanding geomechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Shun; Xie, Xiao-Guang; Leung, Yat Fai

    2016-08-01

    A proper understanding of geomechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing sediments is crucial for sustainable future gas production. There are a number of triaxial experiments conducted over synthetic and natural methane hydrate (MH)-bearing sediments, and several soil constitutive models have been proposed to describe their behavior. However, the generality of a sophisticated model is questioned if it is tested only for a limited number of cases. Furthermore, it is difficult to experimentally determine the associated parameters if their physical meanings and significance are not elucidated. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate that a simple extension of the critical state framework is sufficient to capture the geomechanical behavior of MH-bearing soils from various sources around the world, while the significance of each parameter is quantified through variance-based global sensitivity analyses. Our results show that the influence of hydrates can be largely represented by one hydrate-dependent parameter, pcd', which controls the expansion of the initial yield surface. This is validated through comparisons with shearing and volumetric response of MH-bearing soils tested at various institutes under different confining stresses and with varying degrees of hydrate saturation. Our study suggests that the behavior of MH-bearing soils can be reasonably predicted based on pcd' and the conventional critical state parameters of the host sediments that can be obtained through typical geotechnical testing procedures.

  12. Formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum in marine methane hydrate settings: Evidence from the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qi; Wang, Jiasheng; Algeo, Thomas J.; Su, Pibo; Hu, Gaowei

    2016-09-01

    During the last decade, gypsum has been discovered widely in marine methane hydrate-bearing sediments. However, whether this gypsum is an in-situ authigenic precipitate remains controversial. The GMGS2 expedition carried out in 2013 by the Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey (GMGS) in the northern South China Sea provided an excellent opportunity for investigating the formation of authigenic minerals and, in particular, the relationship between gypsum and methane hydrate. In this contribution, we analyzed the morphology and sulfur isotope composition of gypsum and authigenic pyrite as well as the carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of authigenic carbonate in a drillcore from Site GMGS2-08. These methane-derived carbonates have characteristic carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions (δ13C: -57.9‰ to -27.3‰ VPDB; δ18O: +1.0‰ to +3.8‰ VPDB) related to upward seepage of methane following dissociation of underlying methane hydrates since the Late Pleistocene. Our data suggest that gypsum in the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ) of this core precipitated as in-situ authigenic mineral. Based on its sulfur isotopic composition, the gypsum sulfur is a mixture of sulfate derived from seawater and from partial oxidation of authigenic pyrite. Porewater Ca2+ ions for authigenic gypsum were likely generated from carbonate dissolution through acidification produced by oxidation of authigenic pyrite and ion exclusion during methane hydrate formation. This study thus links the formation mechanism of authigenic gypsum with the oxidation of authigenic pyrite and evolution of underlying methane hydrates. These findings suggest that authigenic gypsum may be a useful proxy for recognition of SMTZs and methane hydrate zones in modern and ancient marine methane hydrate geo-systems.

  13. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this

  14. Development of Ocean Bottom Multi-component Seismic System for Methane Hydrate Dissociation Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, H.; Asakawa, E.; Hayashi, T.; Inamori, T.; Saeki, T.

    2011-12-01

    A 2D multi-component seismic survey was carried out in the Nankai Trough using the RSCS (Real-time Seismic Cable System) system in 2006. The RSCS is the newly developed ocean bottom cable system which is usable in more than 2000m water depth. The results of the PP and data PS components gave us much information of the methane hydrates bearing zone. Based on RSCS technology, we are developing a new monitoring system using multi-component seismic sensors to delineate the methane hydrate dissociation zone for the offshore methane hydrate production test scheduled in FY2012. Conventional RSCS is composed of three component gimbaled geophones which require a large volume inside the receiver. We will adopt accelerometers to achieve a small receiver that is 2/3 the size of conventional RSCS. The accelerometer data can be corrected into horizontal or vertical directions based on the gravity acceleration. The receiver case has a protective metallic exterior and the cable is protected with steel-screened armoring, allowing for burial usage using ROV for sub-seabed deployment. It will realize a unique survey style that leaves the system on the seabed between pre-test baseline survey and post-test repeated survey, which might be up to 6 months. The fixed location of the receiver is very important for time-lapse monitoring survey. We name the new system as DSS (Deep-sea Seismic System). A feasibility study to detect the methane hydrate dissociation with the DSS was carried out and we found that the methane hydrate dissociation could be detected with the DSS depending on the area of the dissociation. The first experiment of the DSS performance test in a marine area is planned in November 2011. The main features of DSS are described as follows: (1) Deep-sea /Ultra Deep-sea Operation Methane hydrate exists in equilibrium temperature and pressure holds at water depths greater than 500m. The system water depth resistance target up to 2000m. The receiver case has a protective

  15. The scientific objectives and program of the Japanese offshore methane hydrate production test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Nagao, J.

    2012-12-01

    A gas production attempt from deepwater marine methane hydrate deposits is planned in early 2013 in the AT1 site in the north slope Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the Eastern Nankai Trough. The scientific goal of this production test is to understand the behavior of methane hydrate dissociation under an in-situ condition. The program includes one to several weeks of gas flow by applying depressurization technique. Drilling operations for the production test started in February 2012 at the test location, and two monitoring boreholes and part of production well have been drilled and completed. Reservoir characterization study is an essential part of the science program. For this purpose, intensive geophysical logging and coring programs are included in the drilling program. The logging data were mainly obtained from a hole named AT1-MC. The well was drilled with LWD tools, wireline logging suits were run subsequently. Also pressure-preserved cores were recovered from methane hydrate-concentrated and overburden sections in a dedicated borehole (AT1-C). To keep the pressure and temperature of cores under gas hydrate stability condition all the time, pressure core analysis and transfer system (PCATS) was used. Also the PCATS-triaxial device that can make mechanical and physical property measurements possible under tri-axial effective stress conditions was utilized. The physical, hydraulic and mechanical properties obtained from core and log data will be used for modeling works, and given to the numerical simulator MH21-HYDRES for methane hydrate production modeling as input parameters for forward analysis and inversion (history matching) to understand the in-situ processes. The monitoring of the methane hydrate dissociation processes is another important subject. The two monitoring holes have temperature sensors to detect temperature drop and recovery due to gas hydrate dissociation and heat transfer. Also, one of the monitoring holes is kept re-accessible to allow cased

  16. Composite model to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of methane hydrate bearing soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydrate bearing sediments (MHBS) are naturally-occurring materials containing different components in the pores that may suffer phase changes under relative small temperature and pressure variations for conditions typically prevailing a few hundreds of meters below sea level. Their modelling needs to account for heat and mass balance equations of the different components, and several strategies already exist to combine them (e.g., Rutqvist & Moridis, 2009; Sánchez et al. 2014). These equations have to be completed by restrictions and constitutive laws reproducing the phenomenology of heat and fluid flows, phase change conditions and mechanical response. While the formulation of the non-mechanical laws generally includes explicitly the mass fraction of methane in each phase, which allows for a natural update of parameters during phase changes, mechanical laws are, in most cases, stated for the whole solid skeleton (Uchida et al., 2012; Soga et al. 2006). In this paper, a mechanical model is proposed to cope with the response of MHBS. It is based on a composite approach that allows defining the thermo-hydro-mechanical response of mineral skeleton and solid hydrates independently. The global stress-strain-temperature response of the solid phase (grains + hydrate) is then obtained by combining both responses according to energy principle following the work by Pinyol et al. (2007). In this way, dissociation of MH can be assessed on the basis of the stress state and temperature prevailing locally within the hydrate component. Besides, its structuring effect is naturally accounted for by the model according to patterns of MH inclusions within soil pores. This paper describes the fundamental hypothesis behind the model and its formulation. Its performance is assessed by comparison with laboratory data presented in the literature. An analysis of MHBS response to several stress-temperature paths representing potential field cases is finally presented. References

  17. Diamond-anvil cell observations of a new methane hydrate phase in the 100-MPa pressure range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Sharma, A.; Burruss, R.C.; Hemley, R.J.; Goncharov, A.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2001-01-01

    A new high-pressure phase of methane hydrate has been identified based on its high optical relief, distinct pressure-temperature phase relations, and Raman spectra. In-situ optical observations were made in a hydrothermal diamond-anvil cell at temperatures between -40?? and 60 ??C and at pressures up to 900 MPa. Two new invariant points were located at -8.7 ??C and 99 MPa for the assemblage consisting of the new phase, structure I methane hydrate, ice Ih, and water, and at 35.3 ??C and 137 MPa for the new phase-structure I methane hydrate-water-methane vapor. Existence of the new phase is critical for understanding the phase relations among the hydrates at low to moderate pressures, and may also have important implications for understanding the hydrogen bonding in H2O and the behavior of water in the planetary bodies, such as Europa, of the outer solar system.

  18. Controls on methane expulsion during melting of natural gas hydrate systems. Topic area 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flemings, Peter [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-01-14

    1.1. Project Goal The project goal is to predict, given characteristic climate-induced temperature change scenarios, the conditions under which gas will be expelled from existing accumulations of gas hydrate into the shallow ocean or directly to the atmosphere. When those conditions are met, the fraction of the gas accumulation that escapes and the rate of escape shall be quantified. The predictions shall be applicable in Arctic regions and in gas hydrate systems at the up dip limit of the stability zone on continental margins. The behavior shall be explored in response to two warming scenarios: longer term change due to sea level rise (e.g. 20 thousand years) and shorter term due to atmospheric warming by anthropogenic forcing (decadal time scale). 1.2. Project Objectives During the first budget period, the objectives are to review and categorize the stability state of existing well-studied hydrate reservoirs, develop conceptual and numerical models of the melting process, and to design and conduct laboratory experiments that dissociate methane hydrate in a model sediment column by systematically controlling the temperature profile along the column. The final objective of the first budget period shall be to validate the models against the experiments. In the second budget period, the objectives are to develop a model of gas flow into sediment in which hydrate is thermodynamically stable, and conduct laboratory experiments of this process to validate the model. The developed models shall be used to quantify the rate and volume of gas that escapes from dissociating hydrate accumulations. In addition, specific scaled simulations characteristic of Arctic regions and regions near the stability limit at continental margins shall be performed. 1.3. Project Background and Rationale The central hypothesis proposed is that hydrate melting (dissociation) due to climate change generates free gas that can, under certain conditions, propagate through the gas hydrate stability

  19. Shallow-ocean methane leakage and degassing to the atmosphere: Triggered by offshore oil-gas and methane hydrate explorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong eZHANG

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Both offshore oil-gas exploration and marine methane hydrate recovery can trigger massive CH4 release from seafloor. During upward transportation of CH4 plume through water column, CH4 is subjected to dissolution and microbial consumption despite the protection of hydrate and oil coating on bubbles surface. The ultimate CH4 degassing to the atmosphere appears to be water-depth dependent. In shallow oceans with water depth less than 100 m, the natural or human-induced leakages or both lead to significant sea-to-air CH4 degassing from 3.00 to 1.36 × 105 μmol m-2 d-1. To quantify the human-perturbation induced CH4 degassing, the combination of top-down modeling and bottom-up calculations is essential due to spatial and temporal variability of diffusion and ebullition at water-air interface.

  20. Asymptotic Modelling of Crystallisation in Two Layers Systems. Application to Methane Hydrate Formation in Batch Reactor.

    OpenAIRE

    Cournil, Michel; Herri, Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    6 pages; This paper proposes to re-visit the problem of gas-liquid crystallization in the framework of a two-layer model and with the help of data coming from experiments on methane hydrate crystallization in a semi-batch reactor. Preliminary quantitative discussion of the order of magnitude of different effects makes possible realistic simplifications in the theoretical models. In particular, the role of the interfacial film is clearly defined. As previous authors did, we use a formulation i...

  1. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of Vp and Vs in compacted, polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements made on compacted polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate. The gas hydrate samples are synthesized directly in the measurement apparatus by warming granulated ice to 17??C in the presence of a clathrate-forming gas at high pressure (methane for sI, 90.2% methane, 9.8% ethane for sII). Porosity is eliminated after hydrate synthesis by compacting the sample in the synthesis pressure vessel between a hydraulic ram and a fixed end-plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Wave-speed measurements are made between -20 and 15??C and 0 to 105 MPa applied piston pressure.

  2. Can We Turn A Hazard Into A Development Tool ? The Case of Methane Hydrates In Permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, C.; Light, M. P. R.

    Permafrost regions in the northern hemisphere may contain as much as 3.9×1015 kg of methane carbon in gas hydrates. Methane is one of the greenhouse gases with the largest short term warming potential (up to 59 times greater than CO2 in a 20 yr time span). Current warming scenarios of 8C in the Arctic regions in the next 100 yr will be enough to release the methane contained in the permafrost, accelerating dramat- ically the existing global climate warming trend. Areas covered with permafrost are also some of the poorest in the world due to the extreme conditions of temperature and light. Small isolated communities in these regions depend heavily on external re- sources and their survival economies have little means for development. Methane in permafrost is beginning to be exploited on a large scale in Russia. Methane derived from the decomposition of organic matter, at household scale, is also proving success- ful as a source of energy in developing countries. If cheap, simple, individual systems could be designed for exploiting the methane from the permafrost (in the same way as geothermal energy is being used in Iceland) a natural hazard could be transformed into a profitable resource and development tool.

  3. Phase diagrams for clathrate hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane from first-principles thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yingying; Li, Wenbo; Zheng, Zhaoyang; Jiang, Xue; Su, Yan; Zhao, Jijun; Liu, Changling

    2016-01-28

    Natural gas hydrates are inclusion compounds composed of major light hydrocarbon gaseous molecules (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8) and a water clathrate framework. Understanding the phase stability and formation conditions of natural gas hydrates is crucial for their future exploitation and applications and requires an accurate description of intermolecular interactions. Previous ab initio calculations on gas hydrates were mainly limited by the cluster models, whereas the phase diagram and equilibrium conditions of hydrate formation were usually investigated using the thermodynamic models or empirical molecular simulations. For the first time, we construct the chemical potential phase diagrams of type II clathrate hydrates encapsulated with methane/ethane/propane guest molecules using first-principles thermodynamics. We find that the partially occupied structures (136H2O·1CH4, 136H2O·16CH4, 136H2O·20CH4, 136H2O·1C2H6, and 136H2O·1C3H8) and fully occupied structures (136H2O·24CH4, 136H2O·8C2H6, and 136H2O·8C3H8) are thermodynamically favorable under given pressure-temperature (p-T) conditions. The theoretically predicted equilibrium pressures for pure CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 hydrates at the phase transition point are consistent with the experimental data. These results provide valuable guidance for establishing the relationship between the accurate description of intermolecular noncovalent interactions and the p-T equilibrium conditions of clathrate hydrates and other molecular crystals.

  4. Thermal regulation of methane hydrate dissociation: Implications for gas production models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Thermal self-regulation of methane hydrate dissociation at pressure, temperature conditions along phase boundaries, illustrated by experiment in this report, is a significant effect with potential relevance to gas production from gas hydrate. In surroundings maintained at temperatures above the ice melting point, the temperature in the vicinity of dissociating methane hydrate will decrease because heat flow is insufficient to balance the heat absorbed by the endothermic reaction: CH4??nH2O (s) = CH4 (g) + nH2O (l). Temperature decreases until either all of the hydrate dissociates or a phase boundary is reached. At pressures above the quadruple point, the temperature-limiting phase boundary is that of the dissociation reaction itself. At lower pressures, the minimum temperature is limited by the H2O solid/liquid boundary. This change in the temperature-limiting phase boundary constrains the pressure, temperature conditions of the quadruple point for the CH4-H2O system to 2.55 ?? 0.02 MPa and 272.85 ?? 0.03 K. At pressures below the quadruple point, hydrate dissociation proceeds as the liquid H2O produced by dissociation freezes. In the laboratory experiments, dissociation is not impeded by the formation of ice byproduct per se; instead rates are proportional to the heat flow from the surroundings. This is in contrast to the extremely slow dissociation rates observed when surrounding temperatures are below the H2O solid/liquid boundary, where no liquid water is present. This "anomalous" or "self" preservation behavior, most pronounced near 268 K, cannot be accessed when surrounding temperatures are above the H2O solid/liquid boundary. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  5. Protocol for Measuring the Thermal Properties of a Supercooled Synthetic Sand-water-gas-methane Hydrate Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Michihiro; Susuki, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroko; Tsuji, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-03-21

    Methane hydrates (MHs) are present in large amounts in the ocean floor and permafrost regions. Methane and hydrogen hydrates are being studied as future energy resources and energy storage media. To develop a method for gas production from natural MH-bearing sediments and hydrate-based technologies, it is imperative to understand the thermal properties of gas hydrates. The thermal properties' measurements of samples comprising sand, water, methane, and MH are difficult because the melting heat of MH may affect the measurements. To solve this problem, we performed thermal properties' measurements at supercooled conditions during MH formation. The measurement protocol, calculation method of the saturation change, and tips for thermal constants' analysis of the sample using transient plane source techniques are described here. The effect of the formation heat of MH on measurement is very small because the gas hydrate formation rate is very slow. This measurement method can be applied to the thermal properties of the gas hydrate-water-guest gas system, which contains hydrogen, CO2, and ozone hydrates, because the characteristic low formation rate of gas hydrate is not unique to MH. The key point of this method is the low rate of phase transition of the target material. Hence, this method may be applied to other materials having low phase-transition rates.

  6. Methane sources and production in the northern Cascadia margin gas hydrate system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, John; Kaneko, Masanori; Heuer, Verena B.; Coffin, Richard B.; Whiticar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    -enrichment. The magnitude of the 13C-enrichment of CO2 correlates with decreasing sedimentation rates and a diminishing occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate. We suggest the decreasing sedimentation rates increase the exposure time of sedimentary organic matter to aerobic and anaerobic degradation, during burial, thereby reducing the availability of metabolizable organic matter available for methane production. This process is reflected in the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate within the northern Cascadia margin accretionary prism. Our observations are relevant for evaluating methane production and the occurrence of stratigraphic gas hydrate within other convergent margins.

  7. Methane in shallow subsurface sediments at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone offshore western Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Carolyn A.; James, Rachael H.; Sapart, Célia Julia; Stott, Andrew W.; Wright, Ian C.; Berndt, Christian; Westbrook, Graham K.; Connelly, Douglas P.

    2017-02-01

    Offshore western Svalbard plumes of gas bubbles rise from the seafloor at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (LLGHSZ; ∼400 m water depth). It is hypothesized that this methane may, in part, come from dissociation of gas hydrate in the underlying sediments in response to recent warming of ocean bottom waters. To evaluate the potential role of gas hydrate in the supply of methane to the shallow subsurface sediments, and the role of anaerobic oxidation in regulating methane fluxes across the sediment-seawater interface, we have characterised the chemical and isotopic compositions of the gases and sediment pore waters. The molecular and isotopic signatures of gas in the bubble plumes (C1/C2+ = 1 × 104; δ13C-CH4 = -55 to -51‰; δD-CH4 = -187 to -184‰) are similar to gas hydrate recovered from within sediments ∼30 km away from the LLGHSZ. Modelling of pore water sulphate profiles indicates that subsurface methane fluxes are largely at steady state in the vicinity of the LLGHSZ, providing no evidence for any recent change in methane supply due to gas hydrate dissociation. However, at greater water depths, within the GHSZ, there is some evidence that the supply of methane to the shallow sediments has recently increased, which is consistent with downslope retreat of the GHSZ due to bottom water warming although other explanations are possible. We estimate that the upward diffusive methane flux into shallow subsurface sediments close to the LLGHSZ is 30,550 mmol m-2 yr-1, but it is <20 mmol m-2 yr-1 in sediments further away from the seafloor bubble plumes. While anaerobic oxidation within the sediments prevents significant transport of dissolved methane into ocean bottom waters this amounts to less than 10% of the total methane flux (dissolved + gas) into the shallow subsurface sediments, most of which escapes AOM as it is transported in the gas phase.

  8. A Smoking Gun for Methane Hydrate Release During the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieling, J.; Peterse, F.; Lunt, D. J.; Bohaty, S. M.; S Sinninghe Damsté, J.; Reichart, G. J.; Sluijs, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; 56 Ma) was a period of rapid 4-5ºC global warming and a global negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) of 3-4.5‰, signaling the input of at least 1500 Gt of δ13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Methane from submarine hydrates has long been proposed as a carbon source, but direct and indirect evidence is lacking. We generated a new high-resolution TEX86 and δ13C record from Ocean Drilling Program Site 959 in the eastern tropical Atlantic and find that initial warming preceded the PETM CIE by 10 kyr. Moreover, time-shifted cross-correlations on these new and published temperature-δ13C data imply that substantial (2-3 °C) warming lead 13C-depleted carbon injection by an average of 2-3 kyr globally. Finally, a data compilation shows that global burial fluxes of biogenic Ba approximately doubled across all depths of the ocean studied, which on PETM time scales can only be explained by significant Ba addition to the oceans. Submarine hydrates are Ba-rich and require warming to dissociate. The simplest explanation for the temperature lead and Ba addition to the ocean is that methane hydrate dissociated as a response to initial warming and acted as a positive carbon cycle feedback during the PETM.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation for surface melting and self-preservation effect of methane hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The surface melting process of structure sI methane hydrate is simulated at T = 240, 260, 280, and 300 K using NVT molecular dynamics method. The simulation results show that a quasi-liquid layer will be formed during the melting process. The density distribution, translation, orientation, and dynamic properties of water molecules in the quasi-liquid layer are calculated as a function of the distance normal to the interface, which indicates the performance of quasi-liquid layer exhibits a continuous change from crystal-like to liquid-like. The quasi-liquid layer plays as a resistance of mass transfer restraining the diffusion of water and methane molecules during the melting process. The resistance of quasi-liquid layer will restrain methane molecules diffuse from hydrate phase to gas phase and slow the melting process, which can be considered as a possible mechanism of self-preservation effect. The performance of quasi-liquid layer is more crystal-like when the temperature is lower than the melt- ing-point of water, which will exhibit an obvious self-preservation. The self-preservation will weaken while the temperature is higher than the melting-point of water because of the liquid-like performance of the quasi-liquid layer.

  10. Evolution of a gas bubble in porous matrix filled by methane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill; Lyubimov, Dmitry; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Zikanov, Oleg

    2013-04-01

    Behavior of a small isolated hydrate-free inclusion (a bubble) within hydrate-bearing porous matrix is studied analytically and numerically. An infinite porous matrix of uniform properties with pores filled by methane hydrates and either water (excessive water situation) or methane gas (excessive gas situation) is considered. A small spherical hydrate-free bubble of radius R0 exists at initial moment within the matrix due to overheating relative to the surrounding medium. There is no continuing heat supply within the bubble, so new hydrate forms on its boundary, and its radius decreases with time. The process is analysed in the framework of the model that takes into account the phase transition and accompanying heat and mass transport processes and assumes spherical symmetry. It is shown that in the case of small (~ 10-2-10-1 m) bubbles, convective fluxes are negligible and the process is fully described by heat conduction and phase change equations. A spherically symmetric Stefan problem for purely conduction-controlled evolution is solved analytically for the case of equilibrium initial temperature and pressure within the bubble. The self-similar solution is verified, with good results, in numerical simulations based on the full filtration and heat transfer model and using the isotherm migration method. Numerical simulations are also conducted for a wide range of cases not amenable to analytical solution. It is found that, except for initial development of an overheated bubble, its radius evolves with time following the self-similar formula: R(t) ( t)1-2 R0-= 1 - tm- , (1) where tm is the life-time of bubble (time of its complete freezing). The analytical solution shows that tm follows 2 tm ~ (R0-?) , (2) where ? is a constant determined by the temperature difference ΔT between the bubble's interior and far field. We consider implications for natural hydrate deposits. As an example, for a bubble with R0 = 4 cm and ΔT = 0.001 K, we find tm ~ 5.7 ? 106 s (2

  11. Modeling pure methane hydrate dissociation using a numerical simulator from a novel combination of X-ray computed tomography and macroscopic data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Moridis, G.J.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Sloan, Jr., E.D.

    2009-08-15

    The numerical simulator TOUGH+HYDRATE (T+H) was used to predict the transient pure methane hydrate (no sediment) dissociation data. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to visualize the methane hydrate formation and dissociation processes. A methane hydrate sample was formed from granular ice in a cylindrical vessel, and slow depressurization combined with thermal stimulation was applied to dissociate the hydrate sample. CT images showed that the water produced from the hydrate dissociation accumulated at the bottom of the vessel and increased the hydrate dissociation rate there. CT images were obtained during hydrate dissociation to confirm the radial dissociation of the hydrate sample. This radial dissociation process has implications for dissociation of hydrates in pipelines, suggesting lower dissociation times than for longitudinal dissociation. These observations were also confirmed by the numerical simulator predictions, which were in good agreement with the measured thermal data during hydrate dissociation. System pressure and sample temperature measured at the sample center followed the CH{sub 4} hydrate L{sub w}+H+V equilibrium line during hydrate dissociation. The predicted cumulative methane gas production was within 5% of the measured data. Thus, this study validated our simulation approach and assumptions, which include stationary pure methane hydrate-skeleton, equilibrium hydrate-dissociation and heat- and mass-transfer in predicting hydrate dissociation in the absence of sediments. It should be noted that the application of T+H for the pure methane hydrate system (no sediment) is outside the general applicability limits of T+H.

  12. Determination of methane concentrations in water in equilibrium with sI methane hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2008-01-01

    Most submarine gas hydrates are located within the two-phase equilibrium region of hydrate and interstitial water with pressures (P) ranging from 8 to 60 MPa and temperatures (T) from 275 to 293 K. However, current measurements of solubilities of methane in equilibrium with hydrate in the absence of a vapor phase are limited below 20 MPa and 283.15 K, and the differences among these data are up to 30%. When these data were extrapolated to other P-T conditions, it leads to large and poorly known uncertainties. In this study, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to measure methane concentrations in pure water in equilibrium with sI (structure one) methane hydrate, in the absence of a vapor phase, at temperatures from 276.6 to 294.6 (??0.3) K and pressures at 10, 20, 30 and 40 (??0.4%) MPa. The relationship among concentration of methane in water in equilibrium with hydrate, in mole fraction [X(CH4)], the temperature in K, and pressure in MPa was derived as: X(CH4) = exp [11.0464 + 0.023267 P - (4886.0 + 8.0158 P)/T]. Both the standard enthalpy and entropy of hydrate dissolution at the studied T-P conditions increase slightly with increasing pressure, ranging from 41.29 to 43.29 kJ/mol and from 0.1272 to 0.1330 kJ/K ?? mol, respectively. When compared with traditional sampling and analytical methods, the advantages of our method include: (1) the use of in situ Raman signals for methane concentration measurements eliminates possible uncertainty caused by sampling and ex situ analysis, (2) it is simple and efficient, and (3) high-pressure data can be obtained safely. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

    2005-04-01

    The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane

  14. Methane Production from Gas Hydrate Deposits through Injection of Supercritical CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Haeckel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of natural gas from CH4-hydrate deposits in sub-marine and sub-permafrost environments through injection of CO2 is considered a suitable strategy towards emission-neutral energy production. This study shows that the injection of hot, supercritical CO2 is particularly promising. The addition of heat triggers the dissociation of CH4-hydrate while the CO2, once thermally equilibrated, reacts with the pore water and is retained in the reservoir as immobile CO2-hydrate. Furthermore, optimal reservoir conditions of pressure and temperature are constrained. Experiments were conducted in a high-pressure flow-through reactor at different sediment temperatures (2 °C, 8 °C, 10 °C and hydrostatic pressures (8 MPa, 13 MPa. The efficiency of both, CH4 production and CO2 retention is best at 8 °C, 13 MPa. Here, both CO2- and CH4-hydrate as well as mixed hydrates can form. At 2 °C, the production process was less effective due to congestion of transport pathways through the sediment by rapidly forming CO2-hydrate. In contrast, at 10 °C CH4 production suffered from local increases in permeability and fast breakthrough of the injection fluid, thereby confining the accessibility to the CH4 pool to only the most prominent fluid channels. Mass and volume balancing of the collected gas and fluid stream identified gas mobilization as equally important process parameter in addition to the rates of methane hydrate dissociation and hydrate conversion. Thus, the combination of heat supply and CO2 injection in one supercritical phase helps to overcome the mass transfer limitations usually observed in experiments with cold liquid or gaseous CO2.

  15. Modeling the Injection of Carbon Dioxide and Nitrogen into a Methane Hydrate Reservoir and the Subsequent Production of Methane Gas on the North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garapati, N.; McGuire, P. C.; Liu, Y.; Anderson, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    HydrateResSim (HRS) is an open-source finite-difference reservoir simulation code capable of simulating the behavior of gas hydrate in porous media. The original version of HRS was developed to simulate pure methane hydrates, and the relationship between equilibrium temperature and pressure is given by a simple, 1-D regression expression. In this work, we have modified HydrateResSim to allow for the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates made from gas mixtures. This modification allows one to model the ConocoPhillips Ignik Sikumi #1 field test performed in early 2012 on the Alaska North Slope. The Ignik Sikumi #1 test is the first field-based demonstration of gas production through the injection of a mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen gases into a methane hydrate reservoir and thereby sequestering the greenhouse gas CO2 into hydrate form. The primary change to the HRS software is the added capability of modeling a ternary mixture consisting of CH4 + CO2 + N2 instead of only one hydrate guest molecule (CH4), therefore the new software is called Mix3HydrateResSim. This Mix3HydrateResSim upgrade to the software was accomplished by adding primary variables (for the concentrations of CO2 and N2), governing equations (for the mass balances of CO2 and N2), and phase equilibrium data. The phase equilibrium data in Mix3HydrateResSim is given as an input table obtained using a statistical mechanical method developed in our research group called the cell potential method. An additional phase state describing a two-phase Gas-Hydrate (GsH) system was added to consider the possibility of converting all available free water to form hydrate with injected gas. Using Mix3HydrateResSim, a methane hydrate reservoir with coexisting pure-CH4-hydrate and aqueous phases at 7.0 MPa and 5.5°C was modeled after the conditions of the Ignik Sikumi #1 test: (i) 14-day injection of CO2 and N2 followed by (ii) 30-day production of CH4 (by depressurization of the well). During the

  16. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-16

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  17. Inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by altering the structure of water with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Jeong-Hoon; Kwak, Gye-Hoon; Han, Kunwoo; Ahn, Docheon; Cho, Seong Jun; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Kun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas hydrates are solid hydrogen-bonded water crystals containing small molecular gases. The amount of natural gas stored as hydrates in permafrost and ocean sediments is twice that of all other fossil fuels combined. However, hydrate blockages also hinder oil/gas pipeline transportation, and, despite their huge potential as energy sources, our insufficient understanding of hydrates has limited their extraction. Here, we report how the presence of amino acids in water induces changes in its structure and thus interrupts the formation of methane and natural gas hydrates. The perturbation of the structure of water by amino acids and the resulting selective inhibition of hydrate cage formation were observed directly. A strong correlation was found between the inhibition efficiencies of amino acids and their physicochemical properties, which demonstrates the importance of their direct interactions with water and the resulting dissolution environment. The inhibition of methane and natural gas hydrate formation by amino acids has the potential to be highly beneficial in practical applications such as hydrate exploitation, oil/gas transportation, and flow assurance. Further, the interactions between amino acids and water are essential to the equilibria and dynamics of many physical, chemical, biological, and environmental processes.

  18. Estimates of future warming-induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Moreno, Héctor; Minshull, Timothy A.; Westbrook, Graham K.; Sinha, Bablu

    2015-05-01

    Methane hydrate close to the hydrate stability limit in seafloor sediment could represent an important source of methane to the oceans and atmosphere as the oceans warm. We investigate the extent to which patterns of past and future ocean-temperature fluctuations influence hydrate stability in a region offshore West Svalbard where active gas venting has been observed. We model the transient behavior of the gas hydrate stability zone at 400-500 m water depth (mwd) in response to past temperature changes inferred from historical measurements and proxy data and we model future changes predicted by seven climate models and two climate-forcing scenarios (Representative Concentration Pathways RCPs 2.6 and 8.5). We show that over the past 2000 year, a combination of annual and decadal temperature fluctuations could have triggered multiple hydrate-sourced methane emissions from seabed shallower than 400 mwd during episodes when the multidecadal average temperature was similar to that over the last century (˜2.6°C). These temperature fluctuations can explain current methane emissions at 400 mwd, but decades to centuries of ocean warming are required to generate emissions in water deeper than 420 m. In the venting area, future methane emissions are relatively insensitive to the choice of climate model and RCP scenario until 2050 year, but are more sensitive to the RCP scenario after 2050 year. By 2100 CE, we estimate an ocean uptake of 97-1050 TgC from marine Arctic hydrate-sourced methane emissions, which is 0.06-0.67% of the ocean uptake from anthropogenic CO2 emissions for the period 1750-2011.

  19. International Methane Hydrate Research and Development Workshop (6th) held in Bergen, Norway on May 13-15, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-22

    Hydrae in Changing Environments. …………………………………………………………………. 73 3. J. Brugada and K. Soga. Geomechanical Study of Methane Hydrate Soil... geomechanic sediment properties, biogeochemical influence on hydrate formation and stability, and sediment thermodynamics. 5. Theoretical modeling needs...further development in rock physics flow simulations, geomechanical sediment properties, and environmental system cycling. 6. Production testing

  20. Estimating gas escape through taliks in relict submarine permafrost and methane hydrate deposits under natural climate variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Permafrost-associated methane hydrate deposits exist at shallow depths within the sediments of the Arctic continental shelves. This icy carbon reservoir is thought to be a relict of cold glacial periods, when sea levels are much lower, and shelf sediments are exposed to freezing air temperatures. During interglacials, rising sea levels flood the shelf, bringing dramatic warming to the permafrost and gas hydrate bearing sediments. Degradation of this shallow-water reservoir has the potential to release large quantities of methane gas directly to the atmosphere. Although relict permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits likely make up only a small fraction of the global hydrate inventory, they have received a disproportionate amount of attention recently because of their susceptibility to climate change. This study is motivated by several recent field studies which report elevated methane levels in Arctic coastal waters. While these observations are consistent with methane release as a result of decomposing submarine permafrost and gas hydrates, the source of gas cannot easily be distinguished from other possibilities, including the escape of deep thermogenic gas through permeable pathways such as faults, or microbial activity on thawing organic matter within the shelf sediments. In this study, we investigate the response of relict Arctic submarine permafrost and permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits to warming with a two-dimensional, finite-volume model for two-phase flow of pore fluid and methane gas within Arctic shelf sediments. We track the evolution of temperature, salinity, and pressure fields with prescribed boundary conditions, and account for latent heat of water ice and methane hydrate formation during growth/decay of permafrost or methane hydrate. The permeability structure of the sediments is coupled to changes in permafrost. We assess the role of taliks (unfrozen portions of continuous permafrost) as a pathway for methane gas escape and make

  1. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL

  2. A non-steady-state condition in sediments at the gas hydrate stability boundary off West Spitsbergen: Evidence for gas hydrate dissociation or just dynamic methane transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, Tina; Krause, Stefan; Bertics, Victoria; Steinle, Lea; Niemann, Helge; Liebetrau, Volker; Feseker, Tomas; Burwicz, Ewa; Krastel, Sebastian; Berndt, Christian

    2015-04-01

    In 2008, a large area with several hundred methane plumes was discovered along the West Spitsbergen continental margin at water depths between 150 and 400 m (Westbrook et al. 2009). Many of the observed plumes were located at the boundary of gas hydrate stability (~400 m water depth). It was speculated that the methane escape at this depth was correlated with gas hydrate destabilization caused by recent increases in water temperatures recorded in this region. In a later study, geochemical analyses of authigenic carbonates and modeling of heat flow data combined with seasonal changes in water temperature demonstrated that the methane seeps were active already prior to industrial warming but that the gas hydrate system nevertheless reacts very sensitive to even seasonal temperature changes (Berndt et al. 2014). Here, we report about a methane seep site at the gas hydrate stability boundary (394 m water depth) that features unusual geochemical profiles indicative for non-steady state conditions. Sediment was recovered with a gravity corer (core length 210 cm) and samples were analyzed to study porewater geochemistry, methane concentration, authigenic carbonates, and microbial activity. Porewater profiles revealed two zones of sulfate-methane transition at 50 and 200 cm sediment depth. The twin zones were confirmed by a double peaking in sulfide, total alkalinity, anaerobic oxidation of methane, and sulfate reduction. d18O values sharply increased from around -2.8 ‰ between 0 and 126 cm to -1.2 ‰ below 126 cm sediment depth. While U/Th isotope measurements of authigenic seep carbonates that were collected from different depths of the core illustrated that methane seepage must be occurring at this site since at least 3000 years, the biogeochemical profiles suggest that methane flux must have been altered recently. By applying a multi-phase reaction-transport model using known initial parameters from the study site (e.g. water depth, temperature profile, salinity

  3. Geological modeling for methane hydrate reservoir characterization in the eastern Nankai Trough, offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, M.; Komatsu, Y.; Suzuki, K.; Takayama, T.; Fujii, T.

    2012-12-01

    The eastern Nankai trough, which is located offshore of central Japan, is considered as an attractive potential resource field of methane hydrates. Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation is planning to conduct a production test in early 2013 at the AT1 site in the north slope of Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough. The depositional environment of methane hydrate-bearing sediments around the production test site is a deep submarine-fan turbidite system, and it is considered that the reservoir properties should show lateral as well as vertical heterogeneity. Since the variations in the reservoir heterogeneity have an impact on the methane hydrate dissociation and gas production performance, precise geological models describing reservoir heterogeneity would be required for the evaluation of reservoir potentials. In preparation for the production test, 3 wells; two monitoring boreholes (AT1-MC and AT1-MT1) and a coring well (AT1-C), were newly acquired in 2012. In addition to a geotechnical hole drilling survey in 2011 (AT1-GT), totally log data from 2 wells and core data from 2 wells were obtained around the production test site. In this study, we conducted well correlations between AT1 and A1 wells drilled in 2003 and then, 3D geological models were updated including AT1 well data in order to refine hydrate reservoir characterization around the production test site. The results of the well correlations show that turbidite sand layers are characterized by good lateral continuity, and give significant information for the distribution morphology of sand-rich channel fills. We also reviewed previously conducted 3D geological models which consist of facies distributions and petrophysical properties distributions constructed from integration of 3D seismic data and a well data (A1 site) adopting a geostatistical approach. In order to test the practical validity of the previously generated models, cross-validation was conducted using AT1 well data. The

  4. Why can water cages adsorb aqueous methane? A potential of mean force calculation on hydrate nucleation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guang-Jun; Li, Meng; Zhang, Yi-Gang; Wu, Chang-Hua

    2009-11-28

    By performing constrained molecular dynamics simulations in the methane-water system, we successfully calculated the potential of mean force (PMF) between a dodecahedral water cage (DWC) and dissolved methane for the first time. As a function of the distance between DWC and methane, this is characterized by a deep well at approximately 6.2 A and a shallow well at approximately 10.2 A, separated by a potential barrier at approximately 8.8 A. We investigated how the guest molecule, cage rigidity and the cage orientation affected the PMF. The most important finding is that the DWC itself strongly adsorbs methane and the adsorption interaction is independent of the guests. Moreover, the activation energy of the DWC adsorbing methane is comparable to that of hydrogen bonds, despite differing by a factor of approximately 10% when considering different water-methane interaction potentials. We explain that the cage-methane adsorption interaction is a special case of the hydrophobic interaction between methane molecules. The strong net attraction in the DWC shell with radii between 6.2 and 8.8 A may act as the inherent driving force that controls hydrate formation. A cage adsorption hypothesis for hydrate nucleation is thus proposed and discussed.

  5. CH4 Separation from Coal Bed Methane by Hydrate in the SDS and THF Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate-based separation experiments on simulate coal bed methane gas have been conducted in THF solution and SDS solution. In this work, a novel hydrate-based gas separation process was used to enhance CH4 separation from a 65.7% CH4/20.2% N2/O2 gas mixture in the presence of 300 ppm SDS and 19% THF solution. The characteristics of the CH4 separation efficiency, fluctuation of temperature, and pressure were studied at different promoter solution. It was found that hydrate formation was induced by promoter in the solution and occurred immediately as the experiments were started. THF performed better than SDS for CH4 separation from the CH4/N2/O2 gas mixture. In particular, the separation coefficients of CH4 and N2 were compared in two solutions. The gas mixture S.Fr. or CH4 recovery is increased from 1.056 to 1.259 while SF of N2 is decreased from 1.183 to 0.634 in THF solution.

  6. Relation between soil matrix potential changes and water conversion ratios during methane hydrate formation processes in loess

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Guanli Jiang; Yibin Pu

    2011-01-01

    With a new apparatus designed and assembled by ourselves,the matrix potential of non-saturated loess was firstly measured and studied during methane hydrate formation processes.The experimental results showed that during two formation processes,the matrix potential changes of the loess all presented a good linear relationship with water conversion ratios.In addition,although it was well known that the secondary gas hydrate formation was easier than the initial,our experimental results showed that the initial hydrate formation efficiency in non-saturated loess was higher than that of the secondary.

  7. Permeability of laboratory-formed methane-hydrate-bearing sand: Measurements and observations using x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T. J.; Seol, Y.; Gupta, A.; Tomutsa, L.

    2010-09-15

    Methane hydrate was formed in two moist sands and a sand/silt mixture under a confining stress in an X-ray-transparent pressure vessel. Three initial water saturations were used to form three different methane-hydrate saturations in each medium. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to observe location-specific density changes caused by hydrate formation and flowing water. Gas-permeability measurements in each test for the dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing states are presented. As expected, the effective permeabilities (intrinsic permeability of the medium multiplied by the relative permeability) of the moist sands decreased with increasing moisture content. In a series of tests on a single sample, the effective permeability typically decreased as the pore space became more filled, in the order of dry, moist, frozen, and hydrate-bearing. In each test, water was flowed through the hydrate-bearing medium and we observed the location-specific changes in water saturation using CT scanning. We compared our data to a number of models, and our relative permeability data compare most favorably with models in which hydrate occupies the pore bodies rather than the pore throats. Inverse modeling (using the data collected from the tests) will be performed to extend the relative permeability measurements.

  8. HyFlux - Part I: Regional Modeling of Methane Flux From Near-Seafloor Gas Hydrate Deposits on Continental Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Asper, V.; Garcia, O. P.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.; Naehr, T.; Solomon, E.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Zimmer, B.

    2008-12-01

    HyFlux - Part I: Regional modeling of methane flux from near-seafloor gas hydrate deposits on continental margins MacDonald, I.R., Asper, V., Garcia, O., Kastner, M., Leifer, I., Naehr, T.H., Solomon, E., Yvon-Lewis, S., and Zimmer, B. The Dept. of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) has recently awarded a project entitled HyFlux: "Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere." The project will address this problem with a combined effort of satellite remote sensing and data collection at proven sites in the Gulf of Mexico where gas hydrate releases gas to the water column. Submarine gas hydrate is a large pool of greenhouse gas that may interact with the atmosphere over geologic time to affect climate cycles. In the near term, the magnitude of methane reaching the atmosphere from gas hydrate on continental margins is poorly known because 1) gas hydrate is exposed to metastable oceanic conditions in shallow, dispersed deposits that are poorly imaged by standard geophysical techniques and 2) the consumption of methane in marine sediments and in the water column is subject to uncertainty. The northern GOM is a prolific hydrocarbon province where rapid migration of oil, gases, and brines from deep subsurface petroleum reservoirs occurs through faults generated by salt tectonics. Focused expulsion of hydrocarbons is manifested at the seafloor by gas vents, gas hydrates, oil seeps, chemosynthetic biological communities, and mud volcanoes. Where hydrocarbon seeps occur in depths below the hydrate stability zone (~500m), rapid flux of gas will feed shallow deposits of gas hydrate that potentially interact with water column temperature changes; oil released from seeps forms sea-surface features that can be detected in remote-sensing images. The regional phase of the project will quantify verifiable sources of methane (and oil) the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and selected margins (e.g. Pakistan Margin, South China Sea

  9. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work

  10. HyFlux - Part II: Subsurface sequestration of methane-derived carbon in gas-hydrate- bearing marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naehr, T. H.; Asper, V. L.; Garcia, O.; Kastner, M.; Leifer, I.; MacDonald, I. R.; Solomon, E. A.; Yvon-Lewis, S.; Zimmer, B.

    2008-12-01

    The recently funded DOE/NETL study "HyFlux: Remote sensing and sea-truth measurements of methane flux to the atmosphere" (see MacDonald et al.: HyFlux - Part I) will combine sea surface, water column and shallow subsurface observations to improve our estimates of methane flux from submarine seeps and associated gas hydrate deposits to the water column and atmosphere along the Gulf of Mexico continental margin and other selected areas world-wide. As methane-rich fluids rise towards the sediment-water interface, they will interact with sulfate-rich pore fluids derived from overlying bottom water, which results in the formation of an important biogeochemical redox boundary, the so-called sulfate-methane interface, or SMI. Both methane and sulfate are consumed within the SMI and dissolved inorganic carbon, mostly bicarbonate (HCO3-) and hydrogen sulfide are produced, stimulating authigenic carbonate precipitation at and immediately below the SMI. Accordingly, the formation of authigenic carbonates in methane- and gas-hydrate-rich sediments will sequester a portion of the methane-derived carbon. To date, however, little is known about the quantitative aspects of these reactions. Rates of DIC production are not well constrained, but recent biogeochemical models indicate that CaCO3 precipitation rates may be as high as 120 μmol cm-2a-1. Therefore, AOM-driven carbonate precipitation must be considered when assessing the impact of gas-hydrate-derived methane on the global carbon cycle. As part of HyFlux, we will conduct pore water analyses (DOC, DIC, CH4, δ13CDIC, δ13CDOC, δ13CCH4, δ18O, and δD isotope ratios) to evaluate the importance of authigenic carbonate precipitation as a sequestration mechanism for methane- derived carbon. In addition, sediment and seafloor carbonate samples will be analyzed for bulk sedimentary carbonate (δ13C and δ18O) and bulk sedimentary organic matter (δ13C and δ15N), as well as sulfur, bulk mineralogy, texture and morphological

  11. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  12. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank; Bohrmann, Gerhard; Trehu, Anne; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl

    2002-09-30

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred

  13. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank; Storms, Michael; Schroeder, Derryl; Dugan, Brandon; Schultheiss, Peter

    2002-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this

  14. X-ray computed-tomography observations of water flow through anisotropic methane hydrate-bearing sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2009-06-01

    We used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to image and quantify the effect of a heterogeneous sand grain-size distribution on the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate, as well as the effect on water flow through the heterogeneous hydrate-bearing sand. A 28 cm long sand column was packed with several segments having vertical and horizontal layers with sands of different grain-size distributions. During the hydrate formation, water redistribution occurred. Observations of water flow through the hydrate-bearing sands showed that water was imbibed more readily into the fine sand, and that higher hydrate saturation increased water imbibition in the coarse sand due to increased capillary strength. Hydrate dissociation induced by depressurization resulted in different flow patterns with the different grain sizes and hydrate saturations, but the relationships between dissociation rates and the grain sizes could not be identified using the CT images. The formation, presence, and dissociation of hydrate in the pore space dramatically impact water saturation and flow in the system.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Methane Production from Hydrates Induced by Different Depressurizing Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanghui Li

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated that methane production from hydrate-bearing porous media by means of depressurization-induced dissociation can be a promising technique. In this study, a 2D axisymmetric model for simulating the gas production from hydrates by depressurization is developed to investigate the gas production behavior with different depressurizing approaches. The simulation results showed that the depressurization process with depressurizing range has significant influence on the final gas production. On the contrary, the depressurizing rate only affects the production lifetime. More amount of cumulative gas can be produced with a larger depressurization range or lowering the depressurizing rate for a certain depressurizing range. Through the comparison of the combined depressurization modes, the Class 2 (all the hydrate dissociation simulations are performed by reducing the initial system pressure with the same depressurizing range initially, then to continue the depressurization process conducted by different depressurizing rates and complete when the system pressure decreases to the atmospheric pressure is much superior to the Class 1 (different depressurizing ranges are adopted in the initial period of the gas production process, when the pressure is reduced to the corresponding value of depressurization process at the different depressurizing range, the simulations are conducted at a certain depressurizing rate until the pressure reaches the atmospheric pressure for a long and stable gas production process. The parameter analysis indicated that the gas production performance decreases and the period of stable production increases with the initial pressure for the case of depressurizing range. Additionally, for the case of depressurizing range, the better gas production performance is associated with higher ambient temperature for production process, and the effect of thermal conductivity on gas production performance can be

  16. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer between guest species in small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tani, Atsushi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2012-03-15

    To investigate the molecular interaction between guest species inside of the small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates, thermal stabilities of the methyl radical (possibly induced in small cages) and the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals (induced in large cages) were investigated by means of electron spin resonance measurements. The increase of the total amount of the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals reveals that the methyl radical in the small cage withdraws one hydrogen atom from the propane molecule enclathrated in the adjacent large cage of the structure-II hydrate. A guest species in a hydrate cage has the ability to interact closely with the other one in the adjacent cages. The clathrate hydrate may be utilized as a possible nanoscale reaction field.

  17. Seismic exploration for methane hydrate. Example from Nankai trough; Metan haidoreto no tansa. Nankai torafu no rei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Y. [JAPEX Geoscience Inst. Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    The index which appears most readily in the reflected seismogram obtained in methane hydrate exploration is the change in the velocity of seismic waves originated by methane hydrate itself. The largest index is the presence of strong reflecting surface observed in earthquake cross section in a sea area. It is considered that a large amount of methane hydrate is distributed in the periphery of Japan on the shore side slope (on the Japanese Islands side) of the Nankai trough. As a result of underwater investigations carried out since 1984, it is clarified that there are many gushing points of comparatively high temperature methane-containing water in parallel with the Nankai trough on the land side slope of the Nankai trough. 583 excavation points were selected by Leg 87 of ODP held in 1982. Penetration of faults was attempted, but recovery of core was extremely difficult and faults themselves could not be found. However, the density and the rate of seismic waves could be recorded in shallow areas. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Marine-controlled source electromagnetic study of methane seeps and gas hydrates at Opouawe Bank, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalenberg, Katrin; Rippe, Dennis; Koch, Stephanie; Scholl, Carsten

    2017-05-01

    Marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) data have been collected to investigate methane seep sites and associated gas hydrate deposits at Opouawe Bank on the southern tip of the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand. The bank is located in about 1000 m water depth within the gas hydrate stability field. The seep sites are characterized by active venting and typical methane seep fauna accompanied with patchy carbonate outcrops at the seafloor. Below the seeps, gas migration pathways reach from below the bottom-simulating reflector (at around 380 m sediment depth) toward the seafloor, indicating free gas transport into the shallow hydrate stability field. The CSEM data have been acquired with a seafloor-towed, electric multi-dipole system measuring the inline component of the electric field. CSEM data from three profiles have been analyzed by using 1-D and 2-D inversion techniques. High-resolution 2-D and 3-D multichannel seismic data have been collected in the same area. The electrical resistivity models show several zones of highly anomalous resistivities (>50 Ωm) which correlate with high amplitude reflections located on top of narrow vertical gas conduits, indicating the coexistence of free gas and gas hydrates within the hydrate stability zone. Away from the seeps the CSEM models show normal background resistivities between 1 and 2 Ωm. Archie's law has been applied to estimate gas/gas hydrate saturations below the seeps. At intermediate depths between 50 and 200 m below seafloor, saturations are between 40 and 80% and gas hydrate may be the dominating pore filling constituent. At shallow depths from 10 m to the seafloor, free gas dominates as seismic data and gas plumes suggest.

  19. Multiple-pressure-tapped core holder combined with X-ray computed tomography scanning for gas-water permeability measurements of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Yoshihiro; Jin, Yusuke; Uchiumi, Takashi; Nagao, Jiro

    2013-06-01

    We present a novel setup for measuring the effective gas-water permeability of methane-hydrate-bearing sediments. We developed a core holder with multiple pressure taps for measuring the pressure gradient of the gas and water phases. The gas-water flooding process was simultaneously detected using an X-ray computed tomography scanner. We successfully measured the effective gas-water permeability of an artificial sandy core with methane hydrate during the gas-water flooding test.

  20. Chemistry, isotopic composition, and origin of a methane-hydrogen sulfide hydrate at the Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    Although the presence of extensive gas hydrate on the Cascadia margin, offshore from the western U.S. and Canada, has been inferred from marine seismic records and pore water chemistry, solid gas hydrate has only been found at one location. At Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 892, offshore from central Oregon, gas hydrate was recovered close to the sediment - water interface at 2-19 m below the seafloor, (mbsf) at 670 m water depth. The gas hydrate occurs as elongated platy crystals or crystal aggregates, mostly disseminated irregularly, with higher concentrations occurring in discrete zones, thin layers, and/or veinlets parallel or oblique to the bedding. A 2-to 3-cm thick massive gas hydrate layer, parallel to bedding, was recovered at ???17 mbsf. Gas from a sample of this layer was composed of both CH4 and H2S. This sample is the first mixed-gas hydrate of CH4-H2S documented in ODP; it also contains ethane and minor amounts of CO2. Measured temperature of the recovered core ranged from 2 to - 18??C and are 6 to 8 degrees lower than in-situ temperatures. These temperature anomalies were caused by the partial dissociation of the CH4-H2S hydrate during recovery without a pressure core sampler. During this dissociation, toxic levels of H2S (??34S, +27.4???) were released. The ??13C values of the CH4 in the gas hydrate, -64.5 to -67.5???(PDB), together with ??D values of - 197 to - 199???(SMOW) indicate a primarily microbial source for the CH4. The ??18O value of the hydrate H2O is +2.9???(SMOW), comparable with the experimental fractionation factor for sea-ice. The unusual composition (CH4-H2S) and depth distribution (2-19 mbsf) of this gas hydrate indicate mixing between a methane-rich fluid with a pore fluid enriched in sulfide; at this site the former is advecting along an inclined fault into the active sulfate reduction zone. The facts that the CH4-H2S hydrate is primarily confined to the present day active sulfate reduction zone (2-19 mbsf), and that from here

  1. Phase diagram of water-methane by first-principles thermodynamics: discovery of MH-IV and MH-V hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yingying; Jiang, Xue; Su, Yan; Zhao, Jijun

    2017-06-21

    Searching novel gas hydrates is an enduring topic of scientific investigations, owing to its outstanding implications on planetology, the origin of life and the exploitation of energy resources. Taking the methane-water system as a representative, we disclose two new dense methane hydrate phases (MH-IV and MH-V) using the Monte-Carlo packing algorithm and density-functional theory (DFT) optimization. Both of these methane clathrates with (CH4)(H2O)4 stoichiometry can be regarded as filled ices, since their hydrogen bond networks are closely related to that of ice i and ice XI, respectively. In particular, the former ice i network is observed for the first time in all gas hydrates. A new chemical composition phase diagram of methane hydrate is constructed. Our newly identified methane hydrate IV emerges in the transition zone for a water-methane ratio between 2 : 1 and 5.75 : 1. It suggests that our MH-IV phase can be stabilized without external pressure, which is superior to previous reported filled ices to apply to energy storage. These findings attest to the importance of composition effects on the packing mechanism of gas hydrate, and provide new perspectives for understanding the physicochemical and geophysical processes in the giant planets of the solar system.

  2. Reduced Numerical Model for Methane Hydrate Formation under Conditions of Variable Salinity. Time-Stepping Variants and Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Peszynska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider a reduced computational model of methane hydrate formation in variable salinity conditions, and give details on the discretization and phase equilibria implementation. We describe three time-stepping variants: Implicit, Semi-implicit, and Sequential, and we compare the accuracy and efficiency of these variants depending on the spatial and temporal discretization parameters. We also study the sensitivity of the model to the simulation parameters and in particular to the reduced phase equilibria model.

  3. Using Methane 14C to Determine the Origin of the Rapid Methane Rise at the End of the Younger Dryas 11,600 Years Ago: Increased Wetland Production or Methane Hydrates? A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, V. V.; Severinghaus, J.; Brook, E.; Reeh, N.

    2002-12-01

    The atmospheric methane concentration rose from about 500 parts per billion (ppb) to about 750 ppb over a period of just 150 years at the termination of the Younger Dryas cold period 11,600 years ago, as indicated by Greenland ice core records. The start of this rapid methane increase was synchronous with an even more rapid climate warming -- Greenland ice core nitrogen and argon isotope records indicate that temperatures rose 5 - 10 ?C over just a few decades. There has been considerable debate about the source of this methane rise. Currently, the two main hypotheses attribute the methane rise either to increased bacterial methane production in wetlands, or to the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor. Here we describe the progress of a project whose aim is to determine the origin of this methane rise. Our approach involves using 14C of ancient methane (derived from air bubbles in glacial ice) to determine its source. Methane hydrates are hundreds of thousands to millions of years old, and should contain virtually no 14C, whereas wetland-derived methane will have 14C content identical to that of atmospheric CO2 at the time of production. Obtaining enough ancient methane for a 14C measurement requires very large samples -- about 2 cubic meters. We have been able to locate a site on the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet where large amounts of uncontaminated ancient ice are available at the surface. Furthermore, our measurements of oxygen isotopes in the ice, as well as measurements of methane and oxygen and nitrogen isotopes in the air trapped in this ice have allowed us to date the ice and precisely locate the ice that contains the end-of-Younger-Dryas methane increase signal. Our data also demonstrate that the methane record in this ice is uncontaminated and suitable for methane 14C analysis. During the past year, we also constructed and are testing a device for melting and extracting air from large volumes of glacial ice.

  4. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank R. Rack; Peter Schultheiss; Melanie Holland

    2005-01-01

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) follow-up logging of pressure cores containing hydrate-bearing sediment; and (2) opening of some of these cores to establish ground-truth understanding. The follow-up measurements made on pressure cores in storage are part of a hydrate geriatric study related to ODP Leg 204. These activities are described in detail in Appendices A and B of this report. Work also continued on developing plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on evolving plans to schedule a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution.

  5. Dynamic morphology of gas hydrate on a methane bubble in water: Observations and new insights for hydrate film models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warzinski, Robert P; Lynn, Ronald; Haljasmaa, Igor; Leifer, Ira; Shaffer, Frank; Anderson, Brian J; Levine, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the fate of subsea hydrocarbon gases escaping into seawater is complicated by potential formation of hydrate on rising bubbles that can enhance their survival in the water column, allowing...

  6. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank R. Rack

    2006-09-20

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE

  8. Drilling and data acquisition programs for the methane hydrate offshore production test in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K.; Fujii, T.

    2013-12-01

    Marine methane hydrates are a matter of scientific interests from various viewpoints such as a key player of global carbon cycle, effects on climate change, cause of seafloor instability, and a possible future energy resource. Under the Japanese national research program, the MH21 research consortium (Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation and National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology) has conducted survey operations and subsequent analyses of data and samples from methane hydrate-bearing sediments in the Eastern Nankai Trough. The goal of the project was a gas production test from a methane hydrate deposits in sandy intervals of Pleistocene turbidite sediments. The test location was set in Daini Atsumi Knoll that is a ridge between forearc basin and accretionary prism, and the sediments cover the flank of the knoll. The water depth at the test location is approximately 1000m, and 50m thick methane hydrate concentrated zone exists around 300m below seafloor. The main interest of the MH21 research team is to know physical (thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical) parameters of sediments that are necessary to understand gas hydrate dissociation processes during the production test. Core samples and geophysical logging data obtained during past surveys are utilized for this purpose. Sedimentation and tectono-geophysical conditions govern such material properties, so the samples were analyzed from those viewpoints, too. The first drilling at the location was done in 2004 with logging and coring operation including pressure-conserved core sampling. In 2011, shallow geotechnical survey holes were drilled in the area for geo-hazard assessment, and core samples were taken in the holes, along with some in-situ mechanical and hydraulic testings. In early 2012, a well construction operation for the gas production test was conducted with logging operations that contains neutron porosity data using pulse-neutron devices, magnetic resonance log, etc. A

  9. A molecular dynamic study on the dissociation mechanism of SI methane hydrate in inorganic salt aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiafang; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Jinxiang; Sun, Zening; Wang, Xiaopu; Zhang, Jun

    2017-08-01

    Gas hydrate is not only a potential energy resource, but also almost the biggest challenge in oil/gas flow assurance. Inorganic salts such as NaCl, KCl and CaCl2 are widely used as the thermodynamic inhibitor to reduce the risk caused by hydrate formation. However, the inhibition mechanism is still unclear. Therefore, molecular dynamic (MD) simulation was performed to study the dissociation of structure I (SI) methane hydrate in existence of inorganic salt aqueous solution on a micro-scale. The simulation results showed that, the dissociation became stagnant due to the presence of liquid film formed by the decomposed water molecules, and more inorganic ions could shorten the stagnation-time. The diffusion coefficients of ions and water molecules were the largest in KCl system. The structures of ion/H2O and H2O/H2O were the most compact in hydrate/NaCl system. The ionic ability to decompose hydrate cells followed the sequence of: Ca(2+)>2K(+)>2Cl(-)>2Na(+). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Study of methane hydrate inhibition using AA/AMPS copolymers; Etude du mecanisme d'action d'une famille de copolymeres inhibiteurs cinetiques susceptibles de modifier la cristallisation des hydrates de methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cingotti, B.

    1999-12-02

    Gas hydrates are inclusion compounds that form when water and natural gas come into contact at high pressure and low temperature. In hydrocarbon production, these conditions can be reached in cold areas (artic zones) or in subsea pipelines where hydrates formation can block production facilities. For a few years, a lot of work has been done to develop a new class of low dosage additives called kinetic inhibitors. These hydrosoluble additives are crystallization inhibitors: they delay nucleation and/or slow down crystal growth and/or agglomeration. In this work, we have studied methane hydrate inhibition using AA/AMPS copolymers. To study methane hydrate crystallization, we use a semibatch reactor equipped with a turbidimetric sensor allowing to measure the turbidity spectrum in the reactor. From turbidity measurements, it is possible to calculate the particles size distribution. This set up allows us to obtain macroscopic results (induction time, gas consumption rate) and microscopic results (hydrate particles granulometry). With this set up, we have studied methane hydrate crystallization without additive at macroscopic and microscopic scale and at different pressures and stirring rates. Copolymers have then been tested in the same experimental conditions. Influence of copolymer composition, copolymer molecular mass and additive concentration has been studied. These copolymers have an inhibiting effect on crystals formation kinetics. Optimal performances are obtained for an AMPS molar ratio or 50 %. Furthermore, minimum additive concentration and minimum mean molecular mass are needed to obtain a kinetic effect on crystals. The higher the pressure (driving force) and the higher the stirring rate (gas transfer), the higher these minimum values. To understand results with and without additives, we have used a model. Relating gas consumption rate to crystal growth, it seems that the copolymer inhibits crystal growth by means of a dead zone. Then, using a model based

  11. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Porfirio Luis

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005, TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State and a united-atom one (UA; a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest.

  12. A Theoretical Study of the Hydration of Methane, from the Aqueous Solution to the sI Hydrate-Liquid Water-Gas Coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, Daniel Porfirio; García-González, Alcione; Saint-Martin, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations were done with three recent water models TIP4P/2005 (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/2005), TIP4P/Ice (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 Points/ Ice) and TIP4Q (Transferable Intermolecular Potential with 4 charges) combined with two models for methane: an all-atom one OPLS-AA (Optimal Parametrization for the Liquid State) and a united-atom one (UA); a correction for the C–O interaction was applied to the latter and used in a third set of simulations. The models were validated by comparison to experimental values of the free energy of hydration at 280, 300, 330 and 370 K, all under a pressure of 1 bar, and to the experimental radial distribution functions at 277, 283 and 291 K, under a pressure of 145 bar. Regardless of the combination rules used for σC,O, good agreement was found, except when the correction to the UA model was applied. Thus, further simulations of the sI hydrate were performed with the united-atom model to compare the thermal expansivity to the experiment. A final set of simulations was done with the UA methane model and the three water models, to study the sI hydrate-liquid water-gas coexistence at 80, 230 and 400 bar. The melting temperatures were compared to the experimental values. The results show the need to perform simulations with various different models to attain a reliable and robust molecular image of the systems of interest. PMID:27240339

  13. Black Sea mud volcanoes and their relation to the search for methane gas hydrates and environmental security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shnyukov, Evgeny; Yanko-Hombach, Valentina; Motnenko, Irena

    2016-04-01

    As of today, the number of known offshore mud volcanoes in the Black Sea is 68. The areas possessing the greatest abundance include the northern part of the Black Sea (Sorokin trough, Tuapsinskaya trough, Shatskiy arch) and the Kerch downfold (the area south of the Kerch peninsula). An intensive study of mud volcanoes has been performed in the course of on-shore and off-shore expeditions carried out by Ukrainian scientists since 1990. They brought to light new geological, geophysical, and geochemical data on the properties of mud volcanoes by (1) high resolution hydro-acoustic, seismic-acoustic, and gravity methods, (2) geothermal observations of the thermal regime of the water and uppermost sediments, (3) gravity core sampling of bottom deposits, (4) dredges and buckets, and (5) study of these samples by lithological, geochemical, paleontological, and biological methods. Methane gas hydrates have been recovered in about 28 localities largely associated with mud volcanoes below 600-700 m water depth, which suggests their close genetic relationships. Age of the sediments hosting methane gas hydrates as well as their lithological properties (e.g., grain-size) vary significantly. Relatively coarse-grained sediments make better hydrate reservoirs than fine-grained sediments. The area of the Black Sea suitable for gas hydrate formation is estimated at 288,100 km2, representing about 68% of the total Black Sea, or almost 91% of the deep-water basin; the volume of gas hydrates has been set at 4.8 km3 corresponding to 0.1-11012 m3 of free methane. A peculiar morphological structure of the sea bottom - conical hills (anticlinals) with low geostatic pressure and subsidence in their central part - provide a target in the search for underwater mud volcanoes. Our data show that such structures are formed by mud breccia and rock debris that are brought to the surface by methane flows, which escape along tectonic ruptures from the deep part of the lithosphere located beneath a

  14. Development of Carbon Sequestration Options by Studying Carbon Dioxide-Methane Exchange in Hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Kristine Nicole

    Gas hydrates form naturally at high pressures (>4 MPa) and low temperatures (climate change point of view, a 100 ppm increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels over the past century is of urgent concern. A potential solution to both of these issues is to simultaneously exchange CH4 with CO 2 in natural hydrate reserves by forming more stable CO2 hydrates. This approach would minimize disturbances to the host sediment matrix of the seafloor while sequestering CO2. Understanding hydrate growth over time is imperative to prepare for large scale CH4 extraction coupled with CO2 sequestration. In this study, we performed macroscale experiments in a 200 mL high-pressure Jerguson cell that mimicked the pressure-temperature conditions of the seafloor. A total of 13 runs were performed under varying conditions. These included the formation of CH4 hydrates, followed by a CO2 gas injection and CO2 hydrate formation followed by a CH4 gas injection. Results demonstrated that once gas hydrates formed, they show "memory effect" in subsequent charges, irrespective of the two gases injected. This was borne out by the induction time data for hydrate formation that reduced from 96 hours for CH4 and 24 hours for CO2 to instant hydrate formation in both cases upon injection of a secondary gas. During the study of CH4-CO2 exchange where CH4 hydrates were first formed and CO2 gas was injected into the system, gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the cell indicated a pure CH4 gas phase, i.e., all injected CO2 gas entered the hydrate phase and remained trapped in hydrate cages for several hours, though over time some CO2 did enter the gas phase. Alternatively, during the CH 4-CO2 exchange study where CO2 hydrates were first formed, the injected CH4 initially entered the hydrate phase, but quickly gaseous CO2 exchanged with CH4 in hydrates to form more stable CO2 hydrates. These results are consistent with the better thermodynamic stability of CO2 hydrates, and this appears to be a

  15. Air-sea flux of methane from selected marine hydrate/seep sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico during HYFLUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.; MacDonald, I.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is one of the most important greenhouse gases, playing a significant role in global climate change and atmospheric chemistry. In spite of tremendous efforts made to constrain the strength of its sources and sinks, large uncertainties remain for some individual sources. Based on the previous observations and modeling studies, the flux of CH4 from marine hydrates and seeps to the atmosphere comprises a significant fraction of the entire methane flux from the global ocean. However, most of the estimates are based on the seafloor methane flux or discrete water column concentrations of methane and the averaged atmospheric methane ratios. In this study, we investigated three marine hydrate/seep sites in northern Gulf of Mexico in July of 2009 during the HYFLUX cruise. Continuous saturation-anomaly (deviation from equilibrium) measurements of methane, ethane and propane were made by alternately sampling the air or the headspace of Weiss-type equilibrator and analyzing it in a GC-FID system. Some 13CH4 measurements were also made continuously using a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). During this cruise, the maximum concentrations observed at the 3 marine hydrate/seep sites MC118, GC600, and GC185 were 14.5, 5.1, and 2.2 nmol/L, respectively. The air-sea fluxes, calculated from saturation anomalies, are used to create extremely high resolution flux maps for the three marine hydrate/seeps sites.

  16. Perspectives of the utilization of methane hydrates as an energy source. An inventory; Perspektiven der Nutzung von Methanhydraten als Energietraeger. Eine Bestandsaufnahme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, Markus

    2008-02-15

    Methane hydrates are the largest existing carbon resource, and their broad geographic distribution, especially in comparison to oil and conventional gas, make them a promising future source of energy. On the other hand, there is a danger of forcing the greenhouse effect in the event of a release of methane in the atmosphere as well as causing a destabilisation of the oceanic sediments. Also the technical difficulties in the extraction of methane are not yet fully resolved. Nevertheless, the research on methane hydrates has been forced both based on political as well as economic considerations in recent years and methane hydrates have practical advantages, which make them a noteworthy transitional solution on the way to a renewable energy based future energy supply. The knowledge of the potentials and risks of methane hydrates, however, is still poor; especially in the German-speaking public and policy. This deficiency will be solved by a focused analysis of the current state of research and an outlook, based on the most important findings. (orig.)

  17. Measuring in situ dissolved methane concentrations in gas hydrate-rich systems, Part 1: Investigating the correlation between tectonics and methane release from sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, L.; Wilson, R. M.; Paull, C. K.; Chanton, J.; Riedel, M.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009, an area of extended methane venting at 1200 meters water depth was found with high resolution AUV bathymetry scans on the Northern Cascadia Margin that was previously unknown. When visited by ROV, we found seafloor cracks with active bubble streams and thin bacterial mats suggesting shallow gas and possible pore-fluid saturation. Upon coring into the cracks, a hard-substrate (carbonate or gas hydrate) was punctured and gas flows began. With these observations, we asked the question “is this shallow gas released from the seafloor from regional tectonic activity, and, if so, what is the temporal variability of such release events?” To answer this, we deployed a long term pore-water collection device at one of these gas crack sites, informally named “bubbly gulch”, for 9 months. The device is made up of 4 OsmoSamplers that were each plumbed to a port along a 1-meter probe tip using small diameter tubing. By osmosis, the samplers collected water samples slowly through the ports and maintained them within a 300 meter-long copper tubing coil. Because of the high methane concentrations anticipated, in situ pressures were maintained within the coil by the addition of a high pressure valve. Water samples were collected from the overlying water, at the sediment-water interface, and 6 and 10 cm into the sediments. Bottom water temperatures were also measured over the time series to determine pumping rates of the samplers but also to look for any temporal variability. In May 2010, the samplers were retrieved by ROV during efforts to install seafloor instruments for Neptune Canada. In a land-based lab, the coils were sub-sampled by cutting every 4 meters of tubing. With a pumping rate of 0.5 mL/day, this allowed a temporal resolution of 6 days. To date, one sampler coil has been sub-sampled and measured for methane concentrations and stable carbon isotopes. Preliminary results from this coil show pore-fluids nearly saturated with respect to methane, ~45 m

  18. Eukaryotic diversity in late Pleistocene marine sediments around a shallow methane hydrate deposit in the Japan Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouduka, M; Tanabe, A S; Yamamoto, S; Yanagawa, K; Nakamura, Y; Akiba, F; Tomaru, H; Toju, H; Suzuki, Y

    2017-09-01

    Marine sediments contain eukaryotic DNA deposited from overlying water columns. However, a large proportion of deposited eukaryotic DNA is aerobically biodegraded in shallow marine sediments. Cold seep sediments are often anaerobic near the sediment-water interface, so eukaryotic DNA in such sediments is expected to be preserved. We investigated deeply buried marine sediments in the Japan Sea, where a methane hydrate deposit is associated with cold seeps. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA in marine sediments at depths up to 31.0 m in the vicinity of the methane hydrate deposit. In contrast, the reproducible recovery of eukaryotic DNA was limited to a shallow depth (8.3 m) in marine sediments not adjacent to the methane hydrate deposit in the same area. Pyrosequencing of an 18S rRNA gene variable region generated 1,276-3,307 reads per sample, which was sufficient to cover the biodiversity based on rarefaction curves. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the eukaryotic DNA originated from radiolarian genera of the class Chaunacanthida, which have SrSO4 skeletons, the sea grass genus Zostera, and the seaweed genus Sargassum. Eukaryotic DNA originating from other planktonic fauna and land plants was also detected. Diatom sequences closely related to Thalassiosira spp., indicative of cold climates, were obtained from sediments deposited during the last glacial period (MIS-2). Plant sequences of the genera Alnus, Micromonas, and Ulmus were found in sediments deposited during the warm interstadial period (MIS-3). These results suggest the long-term persistence of eukaryotic DNA from terrestrial and aquatic sources in marine sediments associated with cold seeps, and that the genetic information from eukaryotic DNA from deeply buried marine sediments associated with cold seeps can be used to reconstruct environments and ecosystems from the past. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Investigating and Modeling the Thermo-dynamic Impact of Electrolyte Solutions of Sodium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate on Prevention of the Formation of Methane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manteghian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Devising methods to prevent hydrate formation is of the important issues in natural gas industry. Since a great deal of money is annually spent on using hydrate inhibitors, identification of new inhibitors with higher degrees of efficacy is economically justifiable. Bearing in mind the significant role of hydrate inhibitors in prevention of natural gas pipelines’ getting blocked, the present study attempts to investigate two compounds of NaCl and Na2SO4 as inhibitors of hydrate methane’s formation so as to respond to “what is the inhibitive thermo-dynamic impact of electrolyte compounds of NaCl and Na2SO4 on the formation of methane hydrate?” To do so, this study not only measures the equilibrium temperature and pressure of methane hydrate formation in the presence of electrolyte solutions of NaCl and Na2SO4 and compares the results obtained with the state lacking such inhibitors, but it also assesses the regression and mathematical modeling are utilized within a basic virtual environment in order to propose a model for prediction of thermo-dynamic equilibrium temperature and pressure of methane hydrate formation.

  20. Distribution of long-lived radioactive iodine isotope (I-129) in pore waters from the gas hydrate fields on the continental margins: Indication for methane source of gas hydrate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaru, H.; Lu, Z.; Fehn, U.

    2011-12-01

    Because iodine has a strong association with organic matters in marine environments, pore waters in high methane potential region, in particular gas hydrate occurrences on the continental margins, are enriched significantly in iodine compared with seawater. Natural iodine system is composed of stable and radioactive species, I-129 (half-life of 15.7 Myr) has been used for estimating the age of source formations both for methane and iodine, because iodine can be liberated into pore water during the degradation of organic matter to methane in deep sediments. Here we present I-129 age data in pore waters collected from variety of gas hydrate occurrences on the continental margins. The I-129 ages in pore waters from these locations are significantly older than those of host sediments, indicating long-term transport and accumulation from deep/old sediments. The I-129 ages in the Japan Sea and Okhotsk Sea along the plate boundary between the North American and Amurian Plates correspond to the ages of initial spreading of these marginal seas, pointing to the massive deposition of organic matter for methane generation in deep sediments within limited periods. On the Pacific side of these areas, organic matter-rich back stop is responsible for methane in deep-seated gas hydrate deposits along the Nankai Trough. Deep coaly sequences responsible for deep conventional natural gas deposits are also responsible for overlying gas hydrate deposits off Shimokita Peninsula, NE Japan. Those in the Gulf of Mexico are correlative to the ages of sediments where the top of salt diapirs intrude. Marine sediments on the Pacific Plate subducting beneath the Australian Plate are likely responsible for the methane and iodine in the Hikurangi Trough, New Zealand. These ages reflect well the regional geological settings responsible for generation, transport, and accumulation of methane, I-129 is a key to understand the geological history of gas hydrate deposition.

  1. Biogeographical distribution and diversity of microbes in methane hydrate-bearing deep marine sediments, on the Pacific Ocean Margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inagaki, F.; Nunoura, T.; Nakagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The deep subseafloor biosphere is among the least-understood habitats on Earth, even though the huge microbial biomass therein plays an important role for potential long-term controls on global biogeochemical cycles. We report here the vertical and geographical distribution of microbes and their ......The deep subseafloor biosphere is among the least-understood habitats on Earth, even though the huge microbial biomass therein plays an important role for potential long-term controls on global biogeochemical cycles. We report here the vertical and geographical distribution of microbes...... in prokaryotic distribution patterns in sediments with or without methane hydrates, we studied > 2,800 clones possessing partial sequences (400-500 bp) of the 16S rRNA gene and 348 representative clone sequences (approximate to 1 kbp) from the two geographically separated subseafloor environments. Archaea...... of the JS1 group, Planctomycetes, and Chloroflexi. Results from cluster and principal component analyses, which include previously reported data from the West and East Pacific Margins, suggest that, For these locations in the Pacific Ocean, prokaryotic communities from methane hydrate-bearing sediment cores...

  2. Comparison of the water change characteristics between the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate and the freezing and thawing of ice in sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Zhang; Qingbai Wu; Yingmei Wang

    2009-01-01

    Hydrate formation and dissociation processes are always accompanied by water migration in porous media, which is similar to the ice. In our study, a novel pF-meter sensor which could detect the changes of water content inside sand was first applied to hydrate formation and dissociation processes. It also can study the water change characteristics in the core scale of a partially saturated silica sand sample and compare the differences of water changes between the processes of formation and dissociation of methane hydrate and freezing and thawing of ice. The experimental results showed that the water changes in the processes of formation and dissociation of methane hydrate were basically similar to that of the freezing and thawing of ice in sand. When methane hydrate or ice was formed, water changes showed the decrease in water content on the whole and the pF values rose following the formation processes. However, there were very obvious differences between the ice thawing and hydrate dissociation.

  3. Quantifying Long-term Methane Flux Change by Coupling Authigenic Mineral Distribution and Kinetic Modeling at Southern Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, W.; Torres, M. E.; Johnson, J. E.; Pinero, E.; Rose, K.

    2010-12-01

    To understand the complex feedbacks between methane flux and environmental change, we need to develop robust proxies that can record methane dynamics through time. Here we present data from the upper 100 mbsf drilled at Site 1252, during ODP Leg 204 in southern Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. We use a combined approach that incorporates a high-resolution record of sedimentary sulfur and barium with Mg/Ca ratios and carbon and oxygen isotopes from benthic foraminifera, as well as with shipboard magnetic susceptibility data. Our results document the presence of at least five iron sulfide fronts, which occur in low magnetic susceptibility, fine grained sediments and lie beneath high magnetic susceptibility slope failure deposits (see Johnson et al., this session). Two obvious barite fronts were also observed and confirmed by XRD. These fronts occur ~5 m deeper than the nearest slope failure sequence. This association suggests rapid sedimentation due to slope failure may be linked to the barite fronts. Barite fronts have long been known to develop at the sulfate methane interface (SMI) as a result of barite dissolution driven by sulfate depletion, and barite re-precipitation fueled by upward diffusion of barium and downward diffusion of sulfate. The ~5 m offset between the slope failure sequences and the nearest barite front at Site 1252 is similar to the depth of the modern SMI at this site. This suggests that the depth to the SMI (from the seafloor at times in the past) has not significantly changed over the ~100 thousand year interval covered by this sedimentary sequence. Thus the two paleo-barite fronts were probably formed under the same sulfate reduction rates as present day. Stable isotopes and Mg/Ca ratios of benthic foraminifera indicate that there are no apparent changes in temperature or carbon cycling at this site. A kinetic model was applied to reconstruct and simulate the changes in redox state and methane flux in response to the repeated cycles of slope

  4. Study on the recovery of hydrogen from refinery (hydrogen+methane) gas mixtures using hydrate technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for separating hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) gas mixtures through hydrate formation/dissociation was proposed. In this work, a systematic experimental study was performed on the separation of hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) feed mixtures with various hydrogen contents (mole fraction x = 40%-90%). The experimental results showed that the hydrogen content could be enriched to as high as ~94% for various feed mixtures using the proposed hydrate technology under a temperature slightly above 0℃ and a pressure below 5.0 MPa. With the addition of a small amount of suitable additives, the rate of hydrate formation could be increased significantly. Anti-agglomeration was used to disperse hydrate particles into the condensate phase. Instead of preventing hydrate growth (as in the kinetic inhibitor tests), hydrates were allowed to form, but only as small dispersed particles. Anti-agglomeration could keep hydrate particles suspended in a range of condensate types at 1℃ and 5 MPa in the water-in-oil emulsion.

  5. Study on the recovery of hydrogen from refinery (hydrogen + methane) gas mixtures using hydrate technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XiuLin; CHEN GuangJin; YANG LanYing; ZHANG LinWei

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for separating hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) gas mixtures through hydrate forma-tion/dissociation was proposed.In this work, a systematic experimental study was performed on the separation of hydrogen from (H2+CH4) feed mixtures with various hydrogen contents (mole fraction x =40%-90%).The experimental results showed that the hydrogen content could be enriched to as high as~94% for various feed mixtures using the proposed hydrate technology under a temperature slightly above 0℃ and a pressure below 5.0 MPa.With the addition of a small amount of suitable additives, the rate of hydrate formation could be increased significantly.Anti-agglomeration was used to disperse hydrate particles into the condensate phase.Instead of preventing hydrate growth (as in the kinetic inhibitor tests), hydrates were allowed to form, but only as small dispersed particles.Anti-agglomera-tion could keep hydrate particles suspended in a range of condensate types at 1℃ and 5 MPa in the water-in-oil emulsion.

  6. Heat Transfer Analysis of Methane Hydrate Sediment Dissociation in a Closed Reactor by a Thermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjun Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The heat transfer analysis of hydrate-bearing sediment involved phase changes is one of the key requirements of gas hydrate exploitation techniques. In this paper, experiments were conducted to examine the heat transfer performance during hydrate formation and dissociation by a thermal method using a 5L volume reactor. This study simulated porous media by using glass beads of uniform size. Sixteen platinum resistance thermometers were placed in different position in the reactor to monitor the temperature differences of the hydrate in porous media. The influence of production temperature on the production time was also investigated. Experimental results show that there is a delay when hydrate decomposed in the radial direction and there are three stages in the dissociation period which is influenced by the rate of hydrate dissociation and the heat flow of the reactor. A significant temperature difference along the radial direction of the reactor was obtained when the hydrate dissociates and this phenomenon could be enhanced by raising the production temperature. In addition, hydrate dissociates homogeneously and the temperature difference is much smaller than the other conditions when the production temperature is around the 10 °C. With the increase of the production temperature, the maximum of ΔToi grows until the temperature reaches 40 °C. The period of ΔToi have a close relation with the total time of hydrate dissociation. Especially, the period of ΔToi with production temperature of 10 °C is twice as much as that at other temperatures. Under these experimental conditions, the heat is mainly transferred by conduction from the dissociated zone to the dissociating zone and the production temperature has little effect on the convection of the water in the porous media.

  7. Methane fluxes and gas hydrates as well as seismic activity in the Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatoly Obzhirov

    2006-01-01

    The research works of methane concentration in water column of the Okhotsk Sea from 1984 to 2005 were reviewed. And some regularities of methane distribution in water column in the North-East Sakhalin slope of the Okhotsk Sea were concluded.

  8. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank; Schroeder, Derryl; Storms, Michael

    2001-03-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the deployment of tools and measurement systems for testing on ODP Leg 201, which is intended to study hydrate deposits on the Peru margin as part of other scientific investigations. Additional accomplishments were related to the continuing evolution of tools and measurements systems in preparation for deployment on ODP Leg 204, Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon in July 2002. The design for PCS Gas Manifold was finalized and parts were procured to assemble the gas manifold and deploy this system with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool on ODP Leg 201. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane hydrates. The results of these deployments will be the subject of a future progress report. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, and two FUGRO engineers were deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at sites located offshore Peru. The HYACINTH project is a European Union (EU) funded effort to develop tools to characterize methane hydrate and measure physical properties under in-situ conditions. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The opportunity to test these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were

  9. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank R.; Dickens, Gerald; Ford, Kathryn; Schroeder, Derryl; Storms, Michael

    2002-08-01

    The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the preparation of tools and measurement systems for deployment, testing and use on ODP Leg 204, which will study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Additional accomplishments were related to the postcruise evaluation of tools and measurements systems used on ODP Leg 201 along the Peru margin from January through March, 2002. The operational results from the use of the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool and the PCS Gas Manifold on ODP Leg 201 are evaluated in this progress report in order to prepare for the upcoming deployments on ODP Leg 204 in July, 2002. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane gas hydrates. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, was also deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at three shallow-water sites located offshore Peru. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The testing of these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively during ODP Leg 201. The data obtained from the successful deployments of these tools is still being evaluated by the scientists and engineers involved in this testing; however, preliminary results are presented in this

  10. Pore-water chemistry of sediment cores off Mahanadi Basin, Bay of Bengal: Possible link to deep seated methane hydrate deposit

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mazumdar, A.; Peketi, A.; Joao, H; Dewangan, P.; Ramprasad, T.

    ) induced sulfate consumption. The gas rich layers just below the base of hydrate stability zone (BGHSZ) is the possible source of the enhanced diffusive flux of biogenic methane (dalta13CCH4 ranging from -99.7 to - 106.3 percentage...

  11. Direct phase coexistence molecular dynamics study of the phase equilibria of the ternary methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalis, Vasileios K; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N; Stubos, Athanassios K; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-09-14

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to predict the phase equilibrium conditions of a ternary hydrate system. In particular, the direct phase coexistence methodology is implemented for the determination of the three-phase coexistence temperature of the methane-carbon dioxide-water hydrate system at elevated pressures. The TIP4P/ice, TraPPE-UA and OPLS-UA forcefields for water, carbon dioxide and methane respectively are used, in line with our previous studies of the phase equilibria of the corresponding binary hydrate systems. The solubility in the aqueous phase of the guest molecules of the respective binary and ternary systems is examined under hydrate-forming conditions, providing insight into the predictive capability of the methodology as well as the combination of these forcefields to accurately describe the phase behavior of the ternary system. The three-phase coexistence temperature is calculated at 400, 1000 and 2000 bar for two compositions of the methane-carbon dioxide mixture. The predicted values are compared with available calculations with satisfactory agreement. An estimation is also provided for the fraction of the guest molecules in the mixed hydrate phase under the conditions examined.

  12. Volcanic Destabilisation of Methane Clathrate Hydrate on Titan: the Mechanism for Resupplying Atmospheric CH4?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley; Sotin, C.; Choukroun, M.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.

    2013-10-01

    Titan may have an upper crust rich in methane clathrates which would have formed early in Titan’s history [1-3]. The abundance of atmospheric methane, which has a limited lifetime, and the presence of 40Ar require replenishment over time. Volcanic processes may release these gases from Titan’s interior, although, so far, no conclusive evidence of an ongoing volcanic event has been observed: no “smoking gun” has been seen. Still, some process has recently supplied a considerable amount of methane to Titan’s atmosphere. We have investigated the emplacement of “cryolavas” of varying composition to quantify thermal exchange and lava solidification processes to model thermal wave penetration into a methane-rich substrate (see [4]), and to determine event detectability. Clathrate destabilisation releases methane and other trapped gases, such as argon. A 10-m-thick cryolava covering 100 km2 raises 3 x 108 m3 of substrate methane clathrates to destabilization temperature in ~108 s. With a density of 920 kg/m3, and ≈13% of the mass being methane, 4 x 1010 kg of methane is released. This is an impressive amount, but it would take 5 million similar events to yield the current mass of atmospheric methane. However, meeting Titan’s current global methane replenishment rate is feasible through the thermal interaction between cryolavas and methane clathrate deposits, but only (1) after the flow has solidified; (2) if cracks form, connecting surface to substrate; and (3) the cracks form while the temperature of the clathrates is greater than the destabilisation temperature. The relatively small scale of this activity may be hard to detect. This work was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Choukroun, M. and Sotin, C. (2012) GRL, 39, L04201. [2] Tobie, G. et al. (2006) Nature, 440, 61-64. [3] Lunine, J. et al. (2009) Origin and Evolution of Titan, in Titan From Cassini-Huygens, ed. R. Brown et al

  13. Gas hydrate destabilization and methane release events in the Krishna-Godavari Basin, Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joshi, R.K.; Mazumdar, A.; Peketi, A.; Ramamurty, P.B.; Naik, B.G.; Kocherla, M.; Carvalho, M.A.; Mahalakshmi, P.; Dewangan, P.; Ramana, M.V.

    ) with strong depletion in carbon isotope ratios (Table TS 5) and presence of fossil shells of shallow surface dwelling or burrowing mollusk (Scaphopoda) suggest near surface precipitation of high magnesian carbonates at MD161-15 due to methane emission... perturbations in the foraminifera in MD161-8 can be correlated with the earlier reports on occurrence of chemosythetic bivalve fossils and positive Mo anomaly within same time window. The above observations have attributed to methane emmision event likely...

  14. Study of the mechanism of a kinetic inhibitor on the crystallization of methane hydrate; Etude du mecanisme d'action d'un inhibiteur cinetique sur la cristallisation de l'hydrate de methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pic, J.St.

    2000-01-14

    In the offshore exploitation of liquid fuels, problems of line plugging often occur, especially due to gas hydrates crystallization. At the present time, operators resort to antifreeze additives, which efficiency is defeated either by harder operating conditions or by a more severe environmental legislation. So research recently shifted towards a new class of 'low dosage inhibitors'. In order to understand the influence of such additives, we designed a high pressure reactor, fitted with a liquid injection device and an in situ turbidimetric sensor. Access to both the particle size distribution of the suspension during the first stages of crystallization, and the total gas consumption, allows us to characterize the kinetics of methane hydration formation. First, we developed an original experimental procedure, which generates an initial 'breeding' of the solution, and thus improves the mastering of nucleation. The induction time then becomes one of the relevant parameters to investigate the performance of inhibitors. Afterwards, we performed a first series of experiments which allowed us to determine the influence of the operating conditions (pressure and stirring) on the evolution of the particle size distribution, in the absence of additives. Then, we pointed out the inhibiting effect of a model kinetic inhibitor, polyvinylpyrrolidone. When dissolved in the solution before crystallization occurs, it increases the induction delay, decreases the gas consumption rate and also slows down the birth of new particles for several hours. On the contrary, when injected in the medium during crystallization, this polymer no more affects the reaction kinetics. At last, we raise the bases for a modelling, taking into account the elementary crystallization processes of nucleation, growth and particles agglomeration. A parametric study has been confronted to the experimental data. It enables us to suggest hypotheses regarding the effect of gas hydrates kinetic

  15. Methane Hydrate Dissociation by Depressurization in a Mount Elbert Sandstone Sample: Experimental Observations and Numerical Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-15

    A preserved sample of hydrate-bearing sandstone from the Mount Elbert Test Well was dissociated by depressurization while monitoring the internal temperature of the sample in two locations and the density changes at high spatial resolution using x-ray CT scanning. The sample contained two distinct regions having different porosity and grain size distributions. The hydrate dissociation occurred initially throughout the sample as a result of depressing the pressure below the stability pressure. This initial stage reduced the temperature to the equilibrium point, which was maintained above the ice point. After that, dissociation occurred from the outside in as a result of heat transfer from the controlled temperature bath surrounding the pressure vessel. Numerical modeling of the test using TOUGH+HYDRATE yielded a gas production curve that closely matches the experimentally measured curve.

  16. Occurrence of methane hydrate in saturated and unsaturated solutions of sodium chloride and water in dependence of temperature and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Roo, J.L.; Diepen, G.A.M.; Lichtenthaler, R.N.; Peters, C.J.

    1983-07-01

    Experimental results of the formation of methane hydrate in dependence of temperature and pressure in unsaturated solutions of NaCl in water will be presented in a temperature range from 261.85 to 285.98 K and pressure up to 11.0 MPa. Furthermore the four-phase equilibrium NaCl X 2H/sub 2/O /SUB s/ -CH/sub 4/ X nH/sub 2/O /SUB s/ -L-G has been calculated from the experimental results. Also the heats of transformation of several other equilibria in the ternary system CH/sub 4/-H/sub 2/O-NaCl are obtained.

  17. Sensitivity of Deep-Towed Marine Electrical Resistivity Imaging Using Two-Dimensional Inversion: A Case Study on Methane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wen Chiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncertain physical properties of methane hydrate (MH above a bottom simulating reflector should be estimated for detecting MH-bearing formations. In contrast to general marine sediments, MH-bearing formations have a relatively high electrical resistivity. Therefore, marine electrical resistivity imaging (MERI is a well-suited method for MH exploration. The authors conducted sensitivity testing of sub-seafloor MH exploration using a two-dimensional (2D inversion algorithm with the Wenner, Pole-Dipole (PD and Dipole-Dipole (DD arrays. The results of the Wenner electrode array show the poorest resolution in comparison to the PD and DD arrays. The results of the study indicate that MERI is an effective geophysical method for exploring the sub-seafloor electrical structure and specifically for delineating resistive anomalies that may be present because of MH-bearing formations at a shallow depth beneath the seafloor.

  18. Methane hydrate-bearing sediments in the Terrebonne basin, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazell, K.; Flemings, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    We characterize the geological, geophysical, and thermodynamic state of three dipping, hydrate-bearing sands in the Terrebonne mini basin of the northern Gulf of Mexico, and describe three potential drilling locations to sample these hydrate reservoirs. Within the sand bodies, there is a prominent negative polarity seismic reflection (opposite phase to the seafloor reflector) that we interpret to record the boundary between gas hydrate above and free gas below. This anomaly is the Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR) and the base of the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (BGHSZ). Above the BSR, reflection seismic data record these reservoirs with a positive polarity while below it, they record the reservoirs with a negative polarity event. Within the sand bodies, seismic amplitudes are generally strongest immediately above and below the BSR and weaken in updip and downdip directions. Beneath the BSR, two of the reservoirs have a strong negative amplitude event that parallels structure that we interpret to record a gas-water contact, while the third reservoir does not clearly record this behavior. Much like the seafloor, the BSR is bowl-shaped, occurring at greatest depths in the northwest and rising near salt bodies in the south and east. In the north east area of previous exploration, the BSR is found at a depth of 2868 meters below sealevel, implying a geothermal gradient of 20.1oC/km for type I hydrates. Logging while drilling data reveal that the sands are composed of numerous thin, hydrocarbon-charged, coarse-grained sediments. Hydrate saturation in these sands is greatest near the BGHSZ. Pressure coring is proposed for three wells that will penetrate the reservoirs at different structural elevations in order to further elucidate reservoir conditions of the sands.

  19. Methane hydrates. A possible energy source in the twenty-first century; Dagli idrati di metano l`energia del XXI secolo?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorassi, S.

    1998-11-01

    The morphological characteristics of particular crystal structures, to be found in nature both in arctic and Antarctic regions and under seas and oceans, and consisting of water and gas molecules, the so-called `gas hydrates`, are dealt with. Technical problems related to gas recovery (methane in particular) from hydrates, above all under sea level, mainly due to their reduced stability, are examined. On the ground of these considerations, various gas recovery methods from hydrate fields are described. An overall evaluation of methane availability as hydrates all over the world, as well as a comparison between extraction costs from hydrate and well as a comparison between extraction costs from hydrate and conventional fields, are made. Finally, short-term programmes on research and development of methane hydrate fields in some areas of the Earth are described. [Italiano] L`articolo esamina, in apertura, le caratteristiche morfologiche di particolari strutture cristalline, presenti in natura sia nelle regioni artiche ed antartiche che nelle profondita` marine ed oceaniche, costituite da molecole di acqua e di gas, dette `idrati di gas`. Vengono successivamente presentati i problemi tecnici connessi con il recupero del gas (e del metano in particolare) da tali formazioni, specie da quelle sottomarine, dovuti principalmente alla loro scarsa stabilita`. In funzione di tali considerazioni, viene presentata una rassegna dei metodi di recupero del gas da giacimenti di idrati. Segue una valutazione di massima delle disponibilita` di metano sotto forma di idrati a livello globale ed il confronto dei costi di estrazione del prodotto da giacimenti di idrati, rispetto ai costi di estrazione da giacimenti convenzionali. L`articolo si conclude con l`indicazione dei programmi di a breve termine di ricerca e di sfruttamento di giacimenti di idrati di metano in alcune regioni del globo.

  20. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank

    2003-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Frank Rack, Anne Trehu, and Tim Collett presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting in Salt Lake City, UT; (2) several Leg 204 scientists participated in special hydrate sessions at the international EGS/AGU/EUG meeting in Nice, France and presented initial science results from the cruise, which included outcomes arising from this cooperative agreement; and, (3) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. At the EGS/EUG/AGU meeting in Nice, France in April, Leg 204 Co-chiefs Anne Trehu and Gerhard Bohrmann, as well as ODP scientists Charlie Paull, Erwin Suess, and Jim Kennett, participated in a press conference on hydrates. The well-attended press conference entitled ''Gas Hydrates: Free methane found and controversy over the 'hydrate gun''' led to stories in Nature on-line and BBC radio, among others. There were six (6) oral and fifteen (15) poster presentations on ODP Leg 204 hydrate science at the EGS/AGU/EUG Meeting in Nice, France on April 6-11, 2003. This was a very strong showing at a meeting just over six month following the completion of the drilling cruise and highlighted many of the results of the leg, including the results obtained with instruments and equipment funded under this cooperative agreement. At the AAPG annual meeting in Salt Lake City, UT on May 11-14, 2003, Anne Trehu gave an oral presentation about the scientific results of Leg 204, and Frank Rack presented a poster outlining the operational and technical accomplishments. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  1. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Rack

    2005-06-30

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

  2. 甲烷水合物在纯水和抑制剂体系中的生成动力学%Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Formation in Pure Water and Inhibitor Containing Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘俊红; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    Kinetic data of methane hydrate formation in the presence of pure water, brines with single salt and mixed salts, and aqueous solutions of ethylene glycol(EG) and salt+EG were measured. A new kinetic model of hydrate formation for the methane-Fwater systems was developed based on a four-step formation mechanism and reaction kinetics approach. The proposed kinetic model predicts the kinetic behavior of methane hydrate formation in pure water with good accuracy. The feasibility of extending the kinetic model to salt(s) and EG containing systems was explored.

  3. Kinetics of methane-ethane gas replacement in clathrate-hydrates studied by time-resolved neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshed, M Mangir; Schmidt, Burkhard C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2010-01-14

    The kinetics of CH(4)-C(2)H(6) replacement in gas hydrates has been studied by in situ neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Deuterated ethane structure type I (C(2)H(6) sI) hydrates were transformed in a closed volume into methane-ethane mixed structure type II (CH(4)-C(2)H(6) sII) hydrates at 5 MPa and various temperatures in the vicinity of 0 degrees C while followed by time-resolved neutron powder diffraction on D20 at ILL, Grenoble. The role of available surface area of the sI starting material on the formation kinetics of sII hydrates was studied. Ex situ Raman spectroscopic investigations were carried out to crosscheck the gas composition and the distribution of the gas species over the cages as a function of structure type and compared to the in situ neutron results. Raman micromapping on single hydrate grains showed compositional and structural gradients between the surface and core of the transformed hydrates. Moreover, the observed methane-ethane ratio is very far from the one expected for a formation from a constantly equilibrated gas phase. The results also prove that gas replacement in CH(4)-C(2)H(6) hydrates is a regrowth process involving the nucleation of new crystallites commencing at the surface of the parent C(2)H(6) sI hydrate with a progressively shrinking core of unreacted material. The time-resolved neutron diffraction results clearly indicate an increasing diffusion limitation of the exchange process. This diffusion limitation leads to a progressive slowing down of the exchange reaction and is likely to be responsible for the incomplete exchange of the gases.

  4. Implementation of subsea system to monitor in-situ temperature and formation pressure in methane hydrates sediments for the production test in 2017, offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, K.

    2016-12-01

    The methane hydrates phase changes, from solid to fluid, is governed by pressure drop and heat transportation through a geological formation. For the world's first offshore production test of methane hydrates conducted in 2013, the MH21 research team installed distributed temperature sensing (DTS) cables and array type resistance temperature devices (RTD) behind the casings of the monitoring wells. The temperature monitoring was continued over the period of 18 months. As a result, the thermal response of the methane hydrate-bearing sediment during depressurization was observed, and the obtained data was used to evaluate the methane dissociation behavior and to estimate the dissociation front radius from a producer well. The second offshore production test is planned in the same area in 2017 with the extended period up to one month. Two sets of a pair of monitoring and producer well were drilled in 2016. A pair of monitoring and producer wells is only 20m apart. An improved monitoring system is prepared for the second test with additional pressure measurement capability with new features of subsea system. The planed formation pressure measurement is expected to contribute not only for the evaluation of methane hydrate phase changes and estimation of its areal distribution but also the analyzing the interference in the vicinity of the producer wells from the geo-mechanical point of view. The DTS resolution was improved with longer averaging time than the previously utilized system. To accomplish the continuous acquisition up running over longer than 18 months to cover pre-flow and post-flow periods, the subsea acquisition system was equipped with an exchangeable subsea batteries by ROV. As for the surface communication method, the acoustic transponder was added in the subsea system. In this technical presentation, the improvements on the monitoring system are discussed and the scientific objectives for new measurements such as formation pressure are presented.

  5. Methane hydrate resource assessment of the outer continental shelf : in-place Gulf of Mexico results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frye, M. [Minerals Mangement Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Grace, J. [Earth Science Associates, Long Beach, CA (United States); Hunt, J.; Shedd, W. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States); Kaufman, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Boston, MA (United States); Schuenemeyer, J. [Southwest Statistical Consulting, Cortez, CO (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) is division of the United States (U.S.) Department of the Interior. Its mandate is to manage natural gas, oil, and other mineral resources on the U.S. outer continental shelf (OCS). The MMS launched a project in order to provide an assessment of the natural gas hydrate resource potential across the entire OCS, including the Alaskan, Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific margins. The purpose of this ongoing project is to provide a probabilistic evaluation of in-place, technically recoverable, and economically recoverable gas hydrate resources. This paper provided an overview of the project, including a preliminary assessment of in-place gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. The paper described the probabilistic model that was built on a mass balance approach to assessment. The model provided a high degree of spatial resolution and supported detailed mapping. The model produced a Monte Carlo distribution of in-place resources that ranged from 314 trillion to 974 trillion cubic meters (TCM) with a mean value of 607 TCM. The paper also provided a link to the full report which included the model methodology, underlying assumptions, and input datasets. Additional work on the development of a technically recoverable model component is currently underway. 1 fig.

  6. 0℃以下含SDS的甲烷水合物生成方式及过程对其分解速率的影响%The Dependence of the Dissociation Rate of Methane-SDS Hydrate below Ice Point on Its Manners of Forming and Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀林; 陈卫东; 陈光进; 孙长宇; 杨兰英; 马庆兰; 陈俊; 刘鹏; 唐绪龙; 赵焕伟

    2009-01-01

    The dissociation rates of methane hydrates formed with and without the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (methane-SDS hydrates), were measured under atmospheric pressure and temperatures below ice point to investigate the influence of the hydrate production conditions and manners upon its dissociation kinetic behavior. The experimental results demonstrated that the dissociation rate of methane hydrate below ice point is strongly dependent on the manners of hydrate formation and processing. The dissociation rate of hydrate formed quiescently was lower than that of hydrate formed with stirring; the dissociation rate of hydrate formed at lower pressure was higher than that of hydrate formed at higher pressure; the compaction of hydrate after its formation lowered its sta-bility, i.e., increased its dissociation rate. The stability of hydrate could be increased by prolonging the time period for which hydrate was held at formation temperature and pressure before it was cooled down, or by prolonging the time period for which hydrate was held at dissociation temperature and formation pressure before it was depressurized to atmospheric pressure. It was found that the dissociation rate of methane hydrate varied with the temperature (ranging from 245.2 to 272.2 K) anomalously as reported on the dissociation of methane hydrate without the presence of surfactant as kinetic promoter. The dissociation rate at 268 K was found to be the lowest when the manners and conditions at which hydrates were formed and processed were fixed.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Their Mixture in Montmorillonite Clay Hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2016-05-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the structural and transport properties of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixture at 298.15 K in Na-montmorillonite clay in the presence of water. The simulations show that, the self-diffusion coefficients of pure CO2 and CH4 molecules in the interlayers of Na-montmorillonite decrease as their loading increases, possibly because of steric hindrance. The diffusion of CO2 in the interlayers of Na-montmorillonite, at constant loading of CO2, is not significantly affected by CH4 for the investigated CO2/CH4 mixture compositions. We attribute this to the preferential adsorption of CO2 over CH4 in Na-montmorillonite. While the presence of adsorbed CO2 molecules, at constant loading of CH4, very significantly reduces the self-diffusion coefficients of CH4, and relatively larger decrease in those diffusion coefficients are obtained at higher loadings. The preferential adsorption of CO2 molecules to the clay surface screens those possible attractive surface sites for CH4. The competition between screening and steric effects leads to a very slight decrease in the diffusion coefficients of CH4 molecules at low CO2 loadings. The steric hindrance effect, however, becomes much more significant at higher CO2 loadings and the diffusion coefficients of methane molecules significantly decrease. Our simulations also indicate that, similar effects of water on both carbon dioxide and methane, increase with increasing water concentration, at constant loadings of CO2 and CH4 in the interlayers of Na-montmorillonite. Our results could be useful, because of the significance of shale gas exploitation and carbon dioxide storage.

  8. Methane Hydrate Exploration, Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf: Geophysical and Geochemical Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-27

    material was discarded. Sediment from the interior of the core were scooped out and placed inside the body of the press. The press bodies were filled...with sediment to maximum capacity in order to leave a minimum volume of air. A clean dental dam was place on the air inflow side of the press body to...were by adding 100 μl of 10% HCl into the sample serum vial. Methane was oxidized to carbon dioxide prior to its introduction into the IRMS . Solid

  9. HYFLUX: Satellite Exploration of Natural Hydrocarbon Seeps and Discovery of a Methane Hydrate Mound at GC600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; MacDonald, I. R.; Shedd, W.; Zimmer, B.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of natural hydrocarbon seeps is important to improve our understanding of methane flux from deeper sediments to the water column. In order to quantify natural hydrocarbon seep formations in the Northern Gulf of Mexico, a set of 686 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images was analyzed using the Texture Classifying Neural Network Algorithm (TCNNA), which processes SAR data to delineate oil slicks. This analysis resulted in a characterization of 396 natural seep sites distributed in the northern GOM. Within these sites, a maximum of 1248 individual vents where identified. Oil reaching the sea-surface is deflected from its source during transit through the water column. This presentation describes a method for estimating locations of active oil vents based on repeated slick detection in SAR. One of the most active seep formations was detected in MMS lease block GC600. A total of 82 SAR scenes (collected by RADARSAT-1 from 1995 to 2007) was processed covering this region. Using TCNNA the area covered by each slick was computed and Oil Slicks Origins (OSO) were selected as single points within detected oil slicks. At this site, oil slick signatures had lengths up to 74 km and up to 27 km^2 of area. Using SAR and TCNNA, four active vents were identified in this seep formation. The geostatistical mean centroid among all detections indicated a location along a ridge-line at ~1200m. Sea truth observations with an ROV, confirmed that the estimated location of vents had a maximum offset of ~30 m from their actual locations on the seafloor. At the largest vent, a 3-m high, 12-m long mound of oil-saturated gas hydrate was observed. The outcrop contained thousands of ice worms and numerous semi-rigid chimneys from where oily bubbles were escaping in a continuous stream. Three additional vents were found along the ridge; these had lower apparent flow, but were also plugged with gas hydrate mounds. These results support use of SAR data for precise delineation of active seep

  10. Planning and Execution of a Marine Methane Hydrate Pressure Coring Program for the Walker Ridge and Green Canyon Areas of the Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphrey, Gary [Fugro Geoconsulting Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The objective of this project (and report) is to produce a guide to developing scientific, operational, and logistical plans for a future methane hydrate-focused offshore pressure coring program. This report focuses primarily on a potential coring program in the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks where previous investigations were undertaken as part of the 2009 Department of Energy JIP Leg II expedition, however, the approach to designing a pressure coring program that was utilized for this project may also serve as a useful model for planning pressure coring programs for hydrates in other areas. The initial portion of the report provides a brief overview of prior investigations related to gas hydrates in general and at the Walker Ridge 313 and Green Canyon 955 blocks in particular. The main content of the report provides guidance for various criteria that will come into play when designing a pressure coring program.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation on influence of guest molecule number on methane hydrate thermal performance%客体分子数对甲烷水合物导热性能影响的分子动力学模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万丽华; 梁德青; 吴能友; 关进安

    2012-01-01

    采用EMD方法Green-Kubo理论计算263.15 K晶穴占有率0~100% sI甲烷水合物的热导率,研究客体分子数对甲烷水合物导热性能的影响.模拟结果显示,甲烷水合物的低导热性能由主体分子构建的笼形结构决定.而在相同温压条件下,随着客体分子甲烷进入晶胞数目增多,晶穴占有率增大后,密度增大,同时客体分子对声子的散射也增强,二者均导致导热性能增强.%Thermal conductivity of methane hydrate is an important physical parameter in processes of methane hydrate exploration, mining, gas hydrate storage and transportation as well as other applications. In this paper, equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulation and the Green-Kubo method are used for the systems with 0-100% occupancy of sI methane hydrate to evaluate the influence of guest molecule number on the thermal performance of methane hydrate. The EMD simulation for the thermodynamics of equilibrium state of si methane hydrate is performed via the Green-Kubo approach for the thermal conductivity of methane hydrates. The DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation package is employed. TIP4P/Ice water model is used for water-water interactions and the Lennard-Jones potential for methane-methane and methane-water interactions. The Lorentz-Berthelot combination rule is used to determine the parameters of Lennard-Jones potentials between water and methane molecules. The equations of motion are integrated using the Verlet algorithm and the Ewald method is used to handle long-range electrostatic interactions. Results indicate that the poor thermal conduction of methane hydrate is resultedfrom the framework of cage. The thermal conduction of methane hydrate is improved when the framework of cage has slightly higher thermal conductivity with more guest molecules enclosed in the cage> since higher cage occupancy ratio by guest molecules increases the density and their scattering.

  12. Methane Hydrate and Gas In The Continental Margin of West Svalbard - Preliminary Results of The Hydratech Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, G. K.; Hydratech Consortium

    In July 2001, two sites in the continental margin west of Svalbard were the subject of seismic investigation as part of the EC-FP5-EESD project HYDRATECH - Tech- niques for the Quantification of Methane Hydrate in European Continental Margins. The northern of the two sites, is underlain by a bottom-simulating reflector (BSR), be- lieved to mark the downward transition from sediment containing hydrate to sediment containing free gas [Posewang &Mienert, Geo-Marine Letters, 19, 150-156, 1999]. At the southern site, bright spots, associated with a decrease in seismic velocity, occur above active mud diapirs that intrude a local basin near the foot of the continental margin. At each site, an array of 20 four-component OBS at 400-m spacing was de- ployed at the centre of a grid of seismic lines shot with 200-m line spacing and a 20-m shot spacing. The seismic source comprised two 0.65-litre sleeve guns, and single- channel reflection profiles were recorded along each shot line. At the northern site, a BSR is seen in most of the reflection profiles, at a depth of about 250 ms below the sea bed. It has opposite polarity to the seabed reflector, and obliquely cuts across the reflectors related to bedding, which show increased amplitude and lower frequency content beneath the BSR. Some of these reflectors show a change in polarity where they cross the BSR. Generally, the BSR is a reflector that exists independently of the other reflectors, at the scale of the seismic resolution of the profiles, although in parts of the profiles the hydrate/gas transition is only evident from the change in amplitude of the bedding reflectors. A preliminary inversion of the travel-time data recorded by one OBS from one shot line shows that P-wave velocity increases steadily with depth to 1800 m/s at the BSR, at a depth of 205 m, beneath which the velocity decreases rapidly to about 1460 m/s. This zone of low velocity, about 50-m thick, beneath the BSR is interpreted to be caused by the

  13. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank; Schultheiss, Peter

    2005-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed

  14. Evidence for large methane releases to the atmosphere from deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation during the last glacial episode

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Garidel-Thoron, Thibault; Beaufort, Luc; Bassinot, Franck; Henry, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Past atmospheric methane-concentration oscillations recorded in polar ice cores vary together with rapid global climatic changes during the last glacial episode. In the “clathrate gun hypothesis,” massive releases of deep-sea methane from marine gas-hydrate dissociation led to these well known, global, abrupt warmings in the past. If evidence for such releases in the water column exists, however, the mechanism and eventual transfer to the atmosphere has not yet been documented clearly. Here we describe a high-resolution marine-sediment record of stable carbon isotopic changes from the Papua Gulf, off Papua New Guinea, which exhibits two extremely depleted excursions (down to -9‰) at ≈39,000 and ≈55,000 years. Morphological, isotopic, and trace metal evidence dismisses authigenic calcite as the main source of depleted carbon. Massive methane release associated with deep-sea gas-hydrate dissociation is the most likely cause for such large depletions of δ13C. The absence of a δ13C gradient in the water column during these events implies that the methane rose through the entire water column, reaching the sea–air interface and thus the atmosphere. Foraminiferal δ18O composition suggests that the rise of the methane in the water column created an upwelling flow. These inferred emission events suggest that during the last glacial episode, this process was likely widespread, including tropical regions. Thus, the release of methane from the ocean floor into the atmosphere cannot be dismissed as a strong positive feedback in climate dynamics processes. PMID:15197255

  15. Comparison of Archaeal and Bacterial Diversity in Methane Seep Carbonate Nodules and Host Sediments, Eel River Basin and Hydrate Ridge, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Olivia U; Case, David H; Naehr, Thomas H; Lee, Raymond W; Thomas, Randal B; Bailey, Jake V; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) impacts carbon cycling by acting as a methane sink and by sequestering inorganic carbon via AOM-induced carbonate precipitation. These precipitates commonly take the form of carbonate nodules that form within methane seep sediments. The timing and sequence of nodule formation within methane seep sediments are not well understood. Further, the microbial diversity associated with sediment-hosted nodules has not been well characterized and the degree to which nodules reflect the microbial assemblage in surrounding sediments is unknown. Here, we conducted a comparative study of microbial assemblages in methane-derived authigenic carbonate nodules and their host sediments using molecular, mineralogical, and geochemical methods. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene diversity from paired carbonate nodules and sediments revealed that both sample types contained methanotrophic archaea (ANME-1 and ANME-2) and syntrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria (Desulfobacteraceae and Desulfobulbaceae), as well as other microbial community members. The combination of geochemical and molecular data from Eel River Basin and Hydrate Ridge suggested that some nodules formed in situ and captured the local sediment-hosted microbial community, while other nodules may have been translocated or may represent a record of conditions prior to the contemporary environment. Taken together, this comparative analysis offers clues to the formation regimes and mechanisms of sediment-hosted carbonate nodules.

  16. Methane Hydrate-A Potential New Energy Source%海底甲烷水合物-未来可能的新能源

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李步通; 董丽荣; 周权宝

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays people have to face the problem of the world's energy crisis.Making major efforts to development and utilization of energy , then mankind in the near future will face a major energy shortage problem.Human need to find a new energy to replace oil and natural gas to alleviate the energy crisis urgently.The methane hydrate with its rich reserves is regarded by great scientists as a possible new energy replacement , but no seabed mining methane hydrates which was still in the prospecting stage.According to scientists'prediction , large-scale exploitation of seabed methane hydrate could lead to global warming , tsunami.If these issues were resolved , it would bring disastrous consequences to human beings , but it was predicted in the next ten to fifteen years a maturity of mining technology would present.Methane hydrate as a possible new energy was optimistic about the prospects for development .%能源问题是现今我们全人类共同的问题。如何能够尽快找到煤炭和石油的替代能源是解决能源问题的紧迫任务。海底甲烷水合物以其丰富的储量、巨大的能量被科学家视为未来可能的新能源。本文从甲烷水合物的状态和结构、相平衡特征、赋存、勘探方法及深海拟开发技术、开发所面临的困难和可能导致的问题以及目前未能开采的原因几个方面对这一科学问题进行了综述。指出目前海底甲烷水合物尚没有开采,还处于探矿阶段。而且,海底甲烷水合物大规模不当开采可能会导致全球气候变暖、海啸等灾难。但是在未来10~15年将会有成熟的开采技术。海底甲烷作为一种可能的新能源具有乐观的开发前景。

  17. Experimental Investigations into the Production Behavior of Methane Hydrate in Porous Sediment under Ethylene Glycol Injection and Hot Brine Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaosen; Li, Gang

    2010-01-01

    1 2 3 The flowing of hot water or hot brine injected in the vessel can be regarded as the moving of a piston from the inlet to the outlet. The hydrate dissociation process is divided into three stages: free gas production, hydrate dissociation and residual gas production. The process of the hydrate dissociation is a process of the temperature decrease in the presence of the brine solution. The duration of the hydrate dissociation is shortened and the degree of the depth of the temperature dro...

  18. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been

  19. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been sugges

  20. Estimates of future warming‐induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marín‐Moreno, Héctor; Minshull, Timothy A; Westbrook, Graham K; Sinha, Bablu

    2015-01-01

    .... We investigate the extent to which patterns of past and future ocean‐temperature fluctuations influence hydrate stability in a region offshore West Svalbard where active gas venting has been observed...

  1. Estimates of future warming‐induced methane emissions from hydrate offshore west Svalbard for a range of climate models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marín‐Moreno, Héctor; Minshull, Timothy A; Westbrook, Graham K; Sinha, Bablu

    2015-01-01

    ... (Representative Concentration Pathways RCPs 2.6 and 8.5). We show that over the past 2000 year, a combination of annual and decadal temperature fluctuations could have triggered multiple hydrate...

  2. Ocean Bottom Gamma-Ray Anomaly Around Methane Seeps Related to Gas Hydrate- Bearing Zone in The Eastern Margin of Japan Sea and Off Southwest Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiyama, H.; Kinoshita, M.; Lin, S.; Matsumoto, R.; Soh, W.

    2008-12-01

    JAMSTEC has conducted the ocean bottom gamma-ray measurement using ROVs and Submersibles since 1997. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizes 3-inch spherical NaI(Tl) scintillator and the signal processor including DA converter in a pressure case. After processing data, we get total count rate (intensity value: count per second (cps)) of gamma ray and contents of K, U-, and Th-series radionuclides. The sensor was equipped to the side of the sample basket or foot of ROVs and submersibles, and always touches the seafloor when ROVs completely landed. Their results are posted on JAMSTEC website as a database. On the basis of past achievements, we present the results of the ocean bottom gamma-ray measurement at the methane seep sites related to gas hydrate off Joetsu in the eastern margin of Japan Sea and off southwest Taiwan. Off Joetsu: A number of mounds, large pockmarks (20 - 50 m deep and 200 - 500 m across), gas plumes, and gas hydrate are found at water depth of 900 - 1000 m in the Umitaka Spur and the Joetsu Knoll. Gamma-ray intensity values are 50 - 70 cps in normal muddy seafloor. On the other hand, the intensity values are 100 - 200 cps around methane venting sites, bacteria mats, and 'collapsed hydrate zone' which has an undulating, rugged seafloor with carbonate nodules and gravels. Contents of each radionuclide are also high. Low U/Th ratio suggests that there is less contribution of Rn accompanied with a recent fault activity. Off southwest Taiwan: Large, dense chemosynthetic communities, associated with carbonate pavements, were discovered at water depth of about 1100 - 1200 m on the top of the Formosa Ridge. Gamma-ray intensity values in normal muddy seafloor (120 - 150 cps) are higher than those around Japan. Since Th-series radionuclide easily absorbs other particles, it is commonly included in surface sediments. This may cause higher content of Th-series radionuclide in normal muddy seafloor. On the other hand, anomaly of gamma-ray intensity (200 - 300 cps

  3. In situ study of mass transfer in aqueous solutions under high pressures via Raman spectroscopy: A new method for the determination of diffusion coefficients of methane in water near hydrate formation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W.J.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.; Yang, M.Z.

    2006-01-01

    A new method was developed for in situ study of the diffusive transfer of methane in aqueous solution under high pressures near hydrate formation conditions within an optical capillary cell. Time-dependent Raman spectra of the solution at several different spots along the one-dimensional diffusion path were collected and thus the varying composition profile of the solution was monitored. Diffusion coefficients were estimated by the least squares method based on the variations in methane concentration data in space and time in the cell. The measured diffusion coefficients of methane in water at the liquid (L)-vapor (V) stable region and L-V metastable region are close to previously reported values determined at lower pressure and similar temperature. This in situ monitoring method was demonstrated to be suitable for the study of mass transfer in aqueous solution under high pressure and at various temperature conditions and will be applied to the study of nucleation and dissolution kinetics of methane hydrate in a hydrate-water system where the interaction of methane and water would be more complicated than that presented here for the L-V metastable condition. ?? 2006 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  4. High-pressure experiments on the stability of methane hydrates in the H2O-NH3-CH4 system with applications to Titan's cryovolcanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukroun, M.; Le Menn, E.; Grasset, O.

    2007-08-01

    The current methane abundance in Titan's thick atmosphere cannot be explained without the existence of replenishment processes. Indeed, the intense photochemistry taking place in the atmosphere would destroy the 2-5% CH4 amounts measured by the GCMS onboard the Huygens probe [1] within 10-100 Myr [e.g. 2]. Among the several hypotheses that could explain this replenishment, release of methane during cryovolcanic events seems highly likely. The VIMS [3] and Radar instruments [4] onboard the Cassini spacecraft have brought substantial evidence for cryovolcanic features on Titan's surface. A numerical model has shown the possibility to release CH4 by dissociating methane clathrate hydrates at depth, due to interaction of a clathrate layer with warm ice intrusions [5]. However, the effect of volatile compounds, dissolved (e.g. N2) or in solution (e.g. NH3), would most certainly play a major role in cryovolcanic processes. High-pressure low-temperature experimental investigations on the effect of ammonia on methane hydrates' dissociation are conducted within an optical sapphire-anvil cell. Preliminary results have been previously presented, which lead to contradictory interpretations so far [6,7]. As further experiments are being performed, the reliability of the experimental measurements and the reasons for observing discrepancies in the results can be adressed with more and more confidence. This poster will discuss the experimental issues encountered in the H2O-NH3-CH4 system, up-todate experimental results, as well as their implications for Titan's cryovolcanism. References: [1] Niemann HB et al., Nature 438, 779-784 (2005). [2] Yung YL et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl., 55, 465-506 (1984). [3] Sotin C et al., Nature 435, 786-789 (2005). [4] Lopes RMC et al., Icarus 186, 395-412 (2007). [5] Tobie G et al., Nature 440 (2), 61-64 (2006). [6] Choukroun M et al., 37th Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf. Abstract #1640 (2006). [7] Choukroun M et al., 38th Lunar and Planet. Sci. Conf

  5. Investigation of Methane Hydrate Formation in a Recirculating Flow Loop: Modeling of the Kinetics and Tests of Efficiency of Chemical Additives on Hydrate Inhibition Étude de la formation de l'hydrate de méthane dans une conduite de recirculation : modélisation de la cinétique et tests d'efficacité d'additifs chimiques inhibiteurs d'hydrates de gaz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peytavy J. L.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gas hydrates can be formed when light gases, such as the components of natural gas, come into contact with water under particular conditions of temperature and pressure. These solid compounds give rise to problems in natural gas and oil industry because they can plug pipelines and process equipment. To prevent hydrate formation methanol and glycols are commonly and extensively used as inhibitors. Today, the thermodynamic equilibria of hydrate formation are well known, but the kinetics of gas hydrate formation and growth has to be studied in order to find means of controlling these processes and to explore the mechanisms for hydrate formation that follows non equilibrium laws. The present work deals with the kinetics of methane hydrate formation studied in a laboratory loop where the liquid blend saturated with methane is circulated up to a pressure of 75 bar. Pressure is maintained at a constant value during experimental runs by means of methane gas make-up. First the effects of pressure (35-75 bar, liquid velocity (0. 5-3 m/s, liquid cooling temperature ramp (2-15°C/h, and liquid hydrocarbon amount (0-96%, on hydrate formation kinetics are investigated. Then a new method is proposed to predict firstly the thermodynamic conditions (pressure and temperature at the maximum values of the growth rate of methane hydrate and secondly the methane hydrate growth rate. A good agreement is found between calculated and experimental data. Finally the evaluation of the efficiency of some kinetic additives and some surfactants developed to avoid either nucleation or crystal growth and agglomeration of methane hydrates is tested based on the proposed experimental procedure. Les hydrates de gaz des composés légers du gaz naturel se forment lorsque ceux-ci entrent en contact avec l'eau dans certaines conditions de température et de pression. Ces composés solides sont nuisibles pour les industries gazière et pétrolière car des bouchons solides peuvent

  6. Modeling of tri-chloro-fluoro-methane hydrate formation in a w/o emulsion submitted to steady cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avendano-Gomez, Juan Ramon; Limas-Ballesteros, Roberto [Laboratorio de Investigacion en Ingenieria Quimica Ambiental, SEPI-ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Zacatenco, Edificio 8, 3. piso 07738, Mexico DF (Mexico); Garcia-Sanchez, Fernando [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of this work is to study the modeling of the thermal evolution inside an hydrate forming system which is submitted to an imposed steady cooling. The study system is a w/o emulsion where the formulation considers the CCl{sub 3}F as the hydrate forming molecule dissolved in the oil phase. The hydrate formation occurs in the aqueous phase of the emulsion, i.e. in the dispersed phase. The model equation is based on the resolution of the continuity equation in terms of a heat balance for the dispersed phase. The crystallization of the CCl{sub 3}F hydrate occurs at supercooling conditions (T{sub c}hydrate crystallization. Three time intervals characterize the evolution of temperature during the steady cooling of the w/o emulsion: (1) steady cooling, (2) hydrate formation with a release of heat, (3) a last interval of steady cooling. (author)

  7. The role of heat transfer time scale in the evolution of the subsea permafrost and associated methane hydrates stability zone during glacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhova, Valentina V.; Eliseev, Alexey V.

    2017-10-01

    Climate warming may lead to degradation of the subsea permafrost developed during Pleistocene glaciations and release methane from the hydrates, which are stored in this permafrost. It is important to quantify time scales at which this release is plausible. While, in principle, such time scale might be inferred from paleoarchives, this is hampered by considerable uncertainty associated with paleodata. In the present paper, to reduce such uncertainty, one-dimensional simulations with a model for thermal state of subsea sediments forced by the data obtained from the ice core reconstructions are performed. It is shown that heat propagates in the sediments with a time scale of ∼ 10-20 kyr. This time scale is longer than the present interglacial and is determined by the time needed for heat penetration in the unfrozen part of thick sediments. We highlight also that timings of shelf exposure during oceanic regressions and flooding during transgressions are important for simulating thermal state of the sediments and methane hydrates stability zone (HSZ). These timings should be resolved with respect to the contemporary shelf depth (SD). During glacial cycles, the temperature at the top of the sediments is a major driver for moving the HSZ vertical boundaries irrespective of SD. In turn, pressure due to oceanic water is additionally important for SD ≥ 50 m. Thus, oceanic transgressions and regressions do not instantly determine onsets of HSZ and/or its disappearance. Finally, impact of initial conditions in the subsea sediments is lost after ∼ 100 kyr. Our results are moderately sensitive to intensity of geothermal heat flux.

  8. 甲烷水合物导热机理的分子动力学模拟%Molecular dynamics simulation on the mechanisms of thermal conduction in methane hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万丽华; 梁德青; 吴能友; 关进安

    2012-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of methane hydrate is an important physical parameter serving in processes of methane hydrate exploration, mining, gas hydrate storage and transportation as well as other applications. In this paper, equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation and the Green-Kubo method for the systems of from fully occupied to vacant occupied si methane hydrate have been performed to estimate their thermal conductivity. The estimation was carried out at temperatures about 203.1-5263.15 K and at pressures around 3-100 MPa. Potential models selected for water were TIP4P, TIP4P-Ew, TIP4P/2005, TIP4P-FQ and TIP4P/lce. Effects of composition in the host and guest molecules and the outside thermobaric condition on the methane hydrate heat performance were studied. Results indicate that the thermal conduction of methane hydrate is determined by framework of cage which constitutes the hydrate lattices and, in reverse, framework of cage has slightly higher thermal conductivity after the presence of the guest molecules. Further, more guest molecules enclosed the cage improve on the poor thermal conduction of methane hydrate. It is also revealed that all sI hydrate has the similar heat performance with the effect of high temperature(T> TDDebye/3). Pressure has certain effect on the thermal conductivity, particularly under the higher pressure. As the pressure increases, it encounters slightly higher thermal conductivity. With the effects of temperatures and pressures, density shift has little impact on thermal conductivity from methane hydrate.%甲烷水合物导热系数是甲烷水合物勘探、开采、储运以及其他应用过程中一个十分重要的物理参数.我们采用平衡分子动力学(EMD)方法Green-Kubo理论计算温度203.15~263.15K、压力范围3~100MPa、晶穴占有率为0~1的sI甲烷水合物的导热系数,采用的水分子模型包括TIP4P、TIP4P-Ew、TIP4P-FQ、TIP4P/2005、TIP4P/Ice.研究了主客体分子、外界温压条件等

  9. Permafrost and gas hydrate related methane release in the Arctic and its impact on climate change - European cooperation for long-term monitoring: COST Action PERGAMON (www.cost-pergamon.eu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Jens; Treude, Tina; Members, Pergamon

    2010-05-01

    The Arctic is a key area in our warming world as massive releases of terrestrial and oceanic methane could increase atmospheric methane concentrations much faster than expected. The vast Arctic shelf might become a major emitter of methane in the future. Only a few projects are engaged in research on methane seepage in this area. The exchange of information about ongoing and planned activities in the Arctic with respect to gas hydrate destabilization and permafrost thawing is low within the EU and almost non-existent at an international level. The aim of the COST Action PERGAMON is to promote networking internationally within the EU and beyond: data integration of terrestrial studies from wetlands and permafrost regions marine research on gas release from seeps due to decomposing gas hydrate and/or permafrost melting and atmospheric investigations carried out by monitoring stations and via satellite is urgently needed to achieve a better understanding of methane emission processes in high latitude areas. The "official" main objective of PERGAMON is to quantify the methane input from marine and terrestrial sources into the atmosphere in the Arctic region, and ultimately to evaluate the impact of Arctic methane seepage on the global climate. This will be achieved by studying the origin and type of occurrence (dissolved/free gas, gas hydrate) of different methane sources (both on land and in the sub-seabed) as well as methane migration mechanisms, biogeochemical turnover, release mechanisms, and finally by quantifying the flux into the atmosphere. Biannual meetings and open workshops/conferences that will be announced throughout the scientific community serve as a platform to exchange and proliferate knowledge on methane in the Arctic. At present, fourteeen European countries are partners in PERGAMON, several non-COST country institutions are currently applying to participate (e.g. the US and Russia). PERGAMON aims to be open for new members, suggestions and input at

  10. In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occuring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rack, Frank; Guerin, Gilles; Goldberg, David

    2003-12-31

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Leg 204 scientific party members presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting, which was held in San Francisco, CA; and, (2) a report was prepared by Dr. Gilles Guerin and David Goldberg from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University on their postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) experiments during ODP Leg 204. The VSP report is provided herein. Intermediate in scale and resolution between the borehole data and the 3-D seismic surveys, the Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) carried during Leg 204 were aimed at defining the gas hydrate distribution on hydrate ridge, and refining the signature of gas hydrate in the seismic data. VSP surveys were attempted at five sites, following completion of the conventional logging operations. Bad hole conditions and operational difficulties did not allow to record any data in hole 1245E, but vertical and constant offset VSP were successful in holes 1244E, 1247B and 1250F, and walk-away VSP were successfully completed in holes 1244E, 1250F and 1251H. Three different tools were used for these surveys. The vertical VSP provided the opportunity to calculate interval velocity that could be compared and validated with the sonic logs in the same wells. The interval velocity profiles in Holes 1244E and 1247B are in very good agreement with the sonic logs. Information about the Leg 204 presentations at the AGU meeting are included in a separate Topical Report, which has been provided to DOE/NETL in addition to this Quarterly Report. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  11. Molecular Visualization of Methane - Carbon Dioxide Solid Solution in Gas Hydrates by High Resolution Neutron Powder Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M.; Rawn, C.; Huq, A.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Phelps, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The exchange of CO2 for CH4 in natural gas hydrates could produce energy from untapped sources while at the same time sequestering CO2. In addition to the energy and environmental aspects the solid solution of (CH4)1-x(CO2)x 5.75H2O provides a framework inclusion structure that enables the scientific study of how two molecules that differ greatly in their bonding, shape, coordination and molecular weight can influence the structure and properties of the compound and interact with the framework that occludes the molecules. Samples synthesized by cooling liquid water pressurized with either pure CH4 or CO2 or mixtures of the two gases to temperatures where hydrate formation occurs have been studied using high-resolution neutron diffraction. Static images of the nuclear scattering density of the free moving gas molecules have been determined. Cage occupants and occupancies, the volume change of the unit cell and the individual cages based on composition have been determined.

  12. Micro-bond contact model and its parameters for the deep-sea methane hydrate bearing soils%深海能源土微观力学胶结模型及参数研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋明镜; 肖俞; 朱方园

    2012-01-01

    天然气水合物主要以胶结物形式存在深海能源土颗粒之间,对能源土强度影响显著,因此研究水合物胶结接触力学特性对能源土力学性质研究有重要作用,而其中的关键是水合物胶结模型及胶结参数的确定。首先,引入并讨论了一种微观胶结接触模型及其对于能源土胶结接触力学特性的适用性;其次,通过文献资料系统分析,获取不同温度、压力及水合物密度条件下天然气水合物的强度与弹性模量表达式;最后,进一步研究了水合物微观胶结模型中的胶结参数,该类水合物微观胶结参数取决于能源土中水合物埋藏深度(赋存环境压力)、温度、水合物密度,这些宏观参量容易确定。%Methane hydrate (MH), which has significant influences on the strength of methane hydrate bearing soils, exits mainly in the form of cement materials between soil particles. Hence, the study of bond mechanical behavior of MH between soil particles is significant to the research of methane hydrate bearing soils, of which the keypoint is the determination of the micro-contact model and corresponding bond parameters of MH. First, a micro-bond contact model is introduced to reflect the contact properties of the soil particles. Second, the strengths and elastic modulus of MH (such as the tensile strength, compressive strength, shear strength and torsion strength) are obtained through the literatures about methane hydrate triaxial tests. Finally, micro bond parameters needed by the contact model are obtained. The results show that the micro bond parameters of gas hydrate are determined by the saturation and strength parameters of gas hydrate, which can be obtained through the temperature, density of hydrate and its burial depth which are easy to be determined.

  13. Structure and energetic characteristics of methane hydrates. From single cage to triple cage: A DFT-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giricheva, N. I.; Ischenko, A. A.; Yusupov, V. I.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Girichev, G. V.

    2017-03-01

    Electronic, geometrical, vibrational and energetic characteristics of the ice I TDT fragment consisted of dodecahedron H2O[512] (D) fused with two tetrakaidecahedrons H2O[51262] (T) and of the TDT cluster with three encapsulated CH4 molecules (3CH4·TDT) were calculated using a DFT/B97-D/6-311++G(2d,2p) approach. Binding energies, hydrogen bonding energies, energies of encapsulation of methane molecules into small D- and large T-cages of the TDT fragment, energies of frontier orbitals, the translational and librational frequencies, as well as the intramolecular vibrations of methane within the cages of different sizes were studied. Similar characteristics of isolated D- and T-cages and clathrates CH4·D and CH4·T were studied as function of compression/expansion of their oxygen skeletons using DFT/B97-D, LC-B3LYP, B3LYP-D2 methods.

  14. Geological & Geophysical findings from seismic, well log and core data for marine gas hydrate deposits at the 1st offshore methane hydrate production test site in the eastern Nankai Trough, offshore Japan: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T.; Noguchi, S.; Takayama, T.; Suzuki, K.; Yamamoto, K.

    2012-12-01

    In order to evaluate productivity of gas from marine gas hydrate by the depressurization method, Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation is planning to conduct a full-scale production test in early 2013 at the AT1 site in the north slope of Daini-Atsumi Knoll in the eastern Nankai Trough, Japan. The test location was determined using the combination of detailed 3D seismic reflection pattern analysis, high-density velocity analysis, and P-impedance inversion analysis, which were calibrated using well log data obtained in 2004. At the AT1 site, one production well (AT1-P) and two monitoring wells (AT1-MC and MT1) were drilled from February to March 2012, followed by 1 coring well (AT1-C) from June to July 2012. An extensive logging program with logging while drilling (LWD) and wireline-logging tools, such as GeoVISION (resistivity image), EcoScope (neutron/density porosity, mineral spectroscopy etc.), SonicScanner (Advanced Sonic tool), CMR/ProVISION (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Tools), XPT (formation pressure, fluid mobility), and IsolationScanner (ultrasonic cement evaluation tools) was conducted at AT1-MC well to evaluate physical reservoir properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments, to determine production test interval in 2013, and to evaluate cement bonding. Methane hydrate concentrated zone (MHCZ) confirmed by the well logging at AT1-MC was thin turbidites (tens of centimeters to few meters) with 60 m of gross thickness, which is composed of lobe type sequences in the upper part of it and channel sand sequences in the lower part. The gross thickness of MHCZ in the well is thicker than previous wells in 2004 (A1, 45 m) located around 150 m northeast, indicating that the prediction given by seismic inversion analysis was reasonable. Well-to-well correlation between AT1-MC and MT1 wells within 40 m distance exhibited that lateral continuity of these sand layers (upper part of reservoir) are fairly good, which representing ideal reservoir for the production

  15. IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank R. Rack

    2004-05-01

    The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Frank Rack presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the DOE/NETL project review and two made two presentations at the ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Hydrate JIP meeting, which were both held in Westminster, CO; and, (2) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

  16. 含气水合物沉积物弹塑性损伤本构模型探讨%A constitutive model coupling elastoplasticity and damage for methane hydrate-bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨期君; 赵春风

    2014-01-01

    天然气水合物的开采会带来一系列的岩土工程问题,为了保障相关工程设施的安全,有必要建立一个合理的水合物沉积物本构模型。通过深入分析水合物沉积物力学特点,从颗粒间的作用机制出发,认为水合物沉积物的力学响应是沉积物中土体颗粒间摩擦与水合物胶结二者共同作用的结果;考虑到摩擦与接触特性不同的力学机制,分别采用修正剑桥模型和弹性损伤模型对土体骨架及水合物胶结的应力-应变关系进行描述;通过假定水合物胶结的损伤演化规律,并认为在受力变形过程中二者的应变始终相等,初步建立了一个水合物沉积物的弹塑性损伤本构模型。不同水合物饱和度沉积物应力-应变曲线的模型预测结果与室内三轴排水试验结果吻合良好,表明了所建模型的可行性和合理性。%The extraction of methane hydrate in the seabed will result in a series of geotechnical engineering problems and disasters. In order to ensure the safety of the related engineering facilities during the extraction, it is necessary to build reasonable constitutive model for methane hydrate bearing sediments. Based on the thorough study of the geomechanical characteristics of hydrate bearing sediments and the contacts between soil grains, the authors suppose that the geomechanical behavior of hydrate bearing sediments resulting from the combination of the friction between soil grains and cementation due to methane hydrate. Considering the different mechanical mechanisms of the friction and cementation, the modified Cam-clay model and elasticity damage model are employed to describe their mechanical responses respectively. By assuming that soil skeleton and cementation have the same strain during the loading, a constitutive model coupling elastoplasticity and damage for methane hydrate bearing sediments is then established based on a simplified damage evolution law. The

  17. Authigenic sulfide minerals and their sulfur isotopes in sediments of the northern continental slope of the South China Sea and their implications for methane flux and gas hydrate formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU XiaoQiang; ZHONG ShaoJun; YU WenQuan; TAO XiaoWan

    2007-01-01

    This is a report of the study of the authigenic sulfide minerals and their sulfur isotopes in a sediment core (NH-1) collected on the northern continental slope of the South China Sea, where other geophysical and geochemical evidence seems to suggest gas hydrate formation in the sediments. The study has led to the findings: (1) the pyrite content in sediments was relatively high and its grain size relatively large compared with that in normal pelagic or hemipelagic sediments; (2) the shallowest depth of the acid volatile sulfide (AVS) content maximum was at 437.5 cm (>2 μmol/g), which was deeper than that of the authigenic pyrite content maximum (at 141.5-380.5 cm); (3) δ34S of authigenic pyrite was positive (maximum: +15‰) at depth interval of 250-380 cm; (4) the positive δ34S coincided with pyrite enrichment. Compared with the results obtained from the Black Sea sediments by Jorgensen and coworkers, these observations indicated that at the NH-1 site, the depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) would be or once was at about 437.5-547.5 cm and the relatively shallow SMI depth suggested high upward methane fluxes. This was in good agreement with the results obtained from pore water sulfate gradients and core head-space methane concentrations in sediment cores collected in the area. All available evidence suggested that methane gas hydrate formation may exist or may have existed in the underlying sediments.

  18. Methane release from the East-Siberian Arctic Shelf and its connection with permafrost and hydrate destabilization: First results and potential future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhova, N.; Semiletov, I.

    2012-04-01

    The East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) is home to the world's largest hydrocarbon stocks, which consist of natural gas, coal bed methane (CH4), and shallow Arctic hydrates. Until recently, the ESAS was not considered a CH4 source due to the supposed impermeability of sub-sea permafrost, which was thought to completely isolate the CH4 beneath from modern biogeochemical cycles. However, the ESAS represents an enormous potential CH4 source that could be responsive to ongoing global warming. Such response could occur in substantially shorter time than that of terrestrial Arctic ecosystems, because sub-sea permafrost has experienced long-lasting destabilization initiated by its inundation during the Holocene ocean transgression. ESAS permafrost stability and integrity is key to whether sequestered ancient carbon escapes as the potent greenhouse gas CH4. Recent data suggest the sub-sea permafrost is currently experiencing significant changes in its thermal regime. For example, our recent data obtained in the ESAS during the drilling expedition of 2011 showed no frozen sediments at all within the 53 m long drilling core at water temperatures varying from -0.6°C to -1.3°C. Unfrozen sediments provide multiple potential CH4 migration pathways. We suggest that open taliks have formed beneath the areas underlain or influenced by the nearby occurrence of fault zones, under paleo-valleys, and beneath thaw lakes submerged several thousand years ago during the ocean transgression. Temporary gas migration pathways might occur subsequent to seismic and tectonic activity in an area, due to sediment settlement and subsidence; hydrates could destabilize due to development of thermokarst-related features or ice-scouring. Recently obtained geophysical data identified numerous gas seeps, mostly above prominent reflectors, and the ubiquitous occurrence of shallow gas-charged sediments containing numerous gas chimneys, underscoring the likelihood that the ability of sub-sea permafrost to

  19. China's Research on Non-conventional Energy Resources- Gas Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pu Ming; Ma Jianguo

    2002-01-01

    @@ Methane exists in ice-like formations called gas hydrate. Hydrate traps methane molecules inside a cage of frozen water. The magnitude of this previously unknown global storehouse of methane is truly staggering and has raised serious inquiry into the possibility of using methane hydrate as a substitute source of energy for oil and conventional natural gas. According to the estimation by PGC, gas hydrate deposits amount to 7.6 × 1018m3 and contain more than twice as much organic carbon as all the world's coal, oil and non-hydrate natural gas combined.

  20. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the twenty first century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byung Jae; Kim, Won Sik; Oh, Jae Ho [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Methane hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound mainly consisted of methane and water and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low- temperature/high-pressure conditions. Very large amount of methane that is the main component of natural gas, is accumulated in the form of methane hydrate subaquatic areas. Methane hydrate are the major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the development and transmission through pipeline of oil and natural gas in the permafrost and deep subaquatic regions are significantly complicated by formation and dissociation of methane hydrate. The dissociation of natural methane hydrates caused by increasing temperature and decreasing pressure could cause the atmospheric pollution and geohazard. The formation, stable existence and dissociation of natural methane hydrates depend on the temperature, pressure, and composition of gas and characteristics of the interstitial waters. For the study on geophysical and geological conditions for the methane hydrate accumulation and to find BSR in the East Sea, Korea, the geophysical surveys using air-gun system, multibeam echo sounder, SBP were implemented in last September. The water temperature data vs. depth were obtained to determine the methane hydrate stability zone in the study area. The experimental equilibrium condition of methane hydrate was also measured in 3 wt.% sodium chloride solution. The relationship between Methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was analyzed through the laboratory work. (author). 49 refs., 6 tabs., 26 figs.

  1. Using magnetic resonance imaging to monitor CH4 hydrate formation and spontaneous conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Bernard A; Stevens, Jim; Howard, James J; Graue, Arne; Kvamme, Bjorn; Aspenes, Erick; Ersland, Geir; Husebø, Jarle; Zornes, David R

    2009-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to monitor and quantify methane hydrate formation and exchange in porous media. Conversion of methane hydrate to carbon dioxide hydrate, when exposed to liquid carbon dioxide at 8.27 MPa and approximately 4 degrees C, was experimentally demonstrated with MRI data and verified by mass balance calculations of consumed volumes of gases and liquids. No detectable dissociation of the hydrate was measured during the exchange process.

  2. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Process of Methane Hydrate Formationdissociation and Its Resistivity Changes in Coarse Sand%温度梯度对粗砂中甲烷水合物形成和分解过程的影响及电阻率响应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王英梅; 吴青柏; 蒲毅彬; 展静

    2012-01-01

    评价甲烷水合物形成和分解过程中电阻率的变化对多年冻土区天然气水合物的勘测具有重要意义。利用本实验室自主研发设计的测量冻土相变温度和电阻率分布的装置,研究温度梯度对粗砂中甲烷水合物形成和分解过程的影响以及在此过程中的电阻率响应。实验表明,该装置可以准确有效地探测出水合物成核、形成、聚集及分解的过程。同时温度梯度的大小对多孔介质中水合物的形成和分布具有很大影响,随着温度梯度的增大,水合物的分布越不均匀,在高温端富集的水合物越多,水合物发生富集的时间间隔就越短。随着反应过程中水合物饱和度的增大,电阻率随之也增大。%It is important for methane hydrate exploration in the permafrost region to evaluate the resistivity changes during the process of methane hydrate formation and decomposition of gas hydrate. In this paper, we use the devices of frozen phase transition temperature and resistivity distribution which are self designed to elucidate the methane hydrate formation and decomposition process in the coarse sand. The experimental results show that the processes of hydrate nucleation,formation,aggregation and decomposition can be detected accurately and efficiently by the experimental devices. The differences temperature gradients obviously influence the formation and distribution of the methane hydrate in the coarse sand. With increase of temperature gradient ,the distribution of the methane hydrate becomes uneven. The methane hydrate is aggregated more easily at the apex of hightemperature while the time interval of the hydrate aggregation is shorter. The resistivity of the samples increased with increase of hydrate saturation.

  3. Phase equilibria of carbon dioxide and methane gas-hydrates predicted with the modified analytical S-L-V equation of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Span Roland

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Gas-hydrates (clathrates are non-stoichiometric crystallized solutions of gas molecules in the metastable water lattice. Two or more components are associated without ordinary chemical union but through complete enclosure of gas molecules in a framework of water molecules linked together by hydrogen bonds. The clathrates are important in the following applications: the pipeline blockage in natural gas industry, potential energy source in the form of natural hydrates present in ocean bottom, and the CO2 separation and storage. In this study, we have modified an analytical solid-liquid-vapor equation of state (EoS [A. Yokozeki, Fluid Phase Equil. 222–223 (2004] to improve its ability for modeling the phase equilibria of clathrates. The EoS can predict the formation conditions for CO2- and CH4-hydrates. It will be used as an initial estimate for a more complicated hydrate model based on the fundamental EoSs for fluid phases.

  4. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually....... For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems...

  5. Clathrate Hydrates of Isopentane + Carbon Dioxide and Isopentane + Methane: Experimental Measurements of Dissociation Conditions Hydrates (clathrates d’isopentane + dioxyde de carbone et d’isopentane + méthane : Déterminations expérimentales des conditions de dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi A.H.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experimental dissociation data for clathrate hydrates of isopentane + carbon dioxide and isopentane + methane are reported in the temperature ranges of (273.5-282.4 and (275.5-285.7 K, respectively. The experimental data were generated using an isochoric pressure-search method. The reliability of this method is examined by generating new dissociation data for clathrate hydrates of isopentane + methane and comparing them with the experimental data reported in the literature. The acceptable agreement demonstrates the reliability of the experimental method used in this work. The experimental data for all measured systems are finally compared with the corresponding experimental data in the absence of isopentane reported in the literature to identify its promotion effects. Des données expérimentales de dissociation d’hydrates d’isopentane + dioxyde de carbone et d’isopentane + méthane sont respectivement présentées ici dans les gammes de température (273.5-282.4 et (275.5-285.7 K. Ces valeurs expérimentales ont été générées en utilisant une méthode isochore de recherche d’une discontinuité de pression. La fiabilité de cette méthode est examinée grâce à la production de données nouvelles pour la dissociation des hydrates de méthane + isopentane et à leur comparaison à des données expérimentales disponibles dans la littérature. L’accord tout à fait acceptable permet de garantir la fiabilité de la méthode expérimentale utilisée. Les valeurs expérimentales de tous les systèmes mesurés sont finalement comparées aux données expérimentales correspondantes de la littérature, obtenues toutefois en l’absence d’isopentane, et ce afin de quantifier ses effets promoteurs de formation d’hydrates.

  6. 次氯酸钙对水合物中甲烷储气量的影响%Methane Storage via Hydrate Formation Using Calcium Hypochlorite as Additive

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭彦坤; 樊栓狮; 郭开华; 石磊; 陈勇

    2002-01-01

    @@ 1 INTRODUCTION At present,natural gas accounts for 3% of the total energy consumption in China.It will go up to 5% in 2005 and 8% in 2010. Natural gas storage is a subject of great interest to many industries and particularly to transportation.Compressed natural gas,liquefied natural gas and adsorbed natural gas are techniques widely used.The possibility of developing a convenient storage system based on hydrate has been explored for about ten years around the world[1-5].Gudmundsson[1] has focused on the storage and transportation of gas as hydrate at atmospheric pressure since 1990.Khokhar[2] used 1,3-dimethylcyclohexane and polyvinyl-pyrrolidone as additives to lower hydrate formation pressure. Saito[3] surveyed the effects of tetrahydrofuran and acetone.Rogers[3] used sodium dodecyl sulfate as accelerator to natural gas hydrate formation. In this work,the effects of calcium hypochlorite on hydrate formation are investigated.The data show that it can lower the degree of supercooling and enhance the relative cage occupancy.

  7. A study on gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byoung Jae; Jung, Tae Jin; Sunwoo, Don [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    Sufficient documents were reviewed to understand solid components of water and gaseous hydrocarbon known as gas hydrates, which represent an important potential energy resource of the future. The review provides us with valuable information on crystal structures, kinetics, origin and distribution of gas hydrates. In addition, the review increased our knowledge of exploration and development methods of gas hydrates. Large amounts of methane, the principal component of natural gas, in the form of solid gas hydrate are found mainly offshore in outer continental margin sediment and, to a lesser extent, in polar regions commonly associated with permafrost. Natural gas hydrates are stable in some environments where the hydrostatic pressure exerted by overlying water column is sufficient for hydrate formation and stability. The required high pressures generally restrict gas hydrate to sediments beneath water of approximately 400 m. Higher sediment temperatures at greater subbottom depths destabilize gas hydrates. Based on the pressure- temperature condition, the outer continental margin of East Sea where water depth is deep enough to form gas hydrate is considered to have high potential of gas hydrate accumulations. (author). 56 refs., tabs., figs.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON GAS HYDRATE FORMATION IN PRESENCE OF ADDITIVE COMPONENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zhigao; FAN Shuanshi; GUO Kaihua

    2003-01-01

    Additives were used to increase gas hydrate formation rate and storage capacity. Experimental tests of methane hydrate formation were carried out in surfactant water solutions in a high-pressure cell.Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and alkyl polysaccharide glycoside (APG) were used to increase hydrate formation. The effect of SDS on hydrate formation is more pronounced compared APG. Cyclopentane (CP) also improves hydrate formation rates while it cannot increase methane gas storage capacity.

  9. New Methods for Gas Hydrate Energy and Climate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, C. D.; Pohlman, J.; Waite, W. F.; Hunt, A. G.; Stern, L. A.; Casso, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few years, the USGS Gas Hydrates Project has focused on advancements designed to enhance both energy resource and climate-hydrate interaction studies. On the energy side, the USGS now manages the Pressure Core Characterization Tools (PCCTs), which includes the Instrumented Pressure Testing Chamber (IPTC) that we have long maintained. These tools, originally built at Georgia Tech, are being used to analyze hydrate-bearing sediments recovered in pressure cores during gas hydrate drilling programs (e.g., Nankai 2012; India 2015). The USGS is now modifying the PCCTs for use on high-hydrate-saturation and sand-rich sediments and hopes to catalyze third-party tool development (e.g., visualization). The IPTC is also being used for experiments on sediments hosting synthetic methane hydrate, and our scanning electron microscope has recently been enhanced with a new cryo-stage for imaging hydrates. To support climate-hydrate interaction studies, the USGS has been re-assessing the amount of methane hydrate in permafrost-associated settings at high northern latitudes and examined the links between methane carbon emissions and gas hydrate dissociation. One approach relies on the noble gas signature of methane emissions. Hydrate dissociation uniquely releases noble gases partitioned by molecular weight, providing a potential fingerprint for hydrate-sourced methane emissions. In addition, we have linked a DOC analyzer with an IRMS at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, allowing rapid and precise measurement of DOC and DIC concentrations and carbon isotopic signatures. The USGS has also refined methods to measure real-time sea-air flux of methane and CO2 using cavity ring-down spectroscopy measurements coupled with other data. Acquiring ~8000 km of data on the Western Arctic, US Atlantic, and Svalbard margins, we have tested the Arctic methane catastrophe hypothesis and the link between seafloor methane emissions and sea-air methane flux.

  10. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH) stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial) and anthropogenic (climate change) forcing. Our models focus on the interval b...

  11. Modeling of methane bubbles released from large sea-floor area: Condition required for methane emission to the atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, A.; Yamanaka, Y.; Tajika, E.

    2009-01-01

    Massive methane release from sea-floor sediments due to decomposition of methane hydrate, and thermal decomposition of organic matter by volcanic outgassing, is a potential contributor to global warming. However, the degree of global warming has not been estimated due to uncertainty over the proportion of methane flux from the sea-floor to reach the atmosphere. Massive methane release from a large sea-floor area would result in methane-saturated seawater, thus some methane would reach the atm...

  12. Pathways and regulation of carbon, sulfur and energy transfer in marine sediments overlying methane gas hydrates on the Opouawe Bank (New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, A. W.; Sommer, S.; Haeckel, M.; Wallmann, K.; Linke, P.; Wegener, G.; Pfannkuche, O.

    2010-10-01

    This study combines sediment geochemical analysis, in situ benthic lander deployments and numerical modeling to quantify the biogeochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur and the associated rates of Gibbs energy production at a novel methane seep. The benthic ecosystem is dominated by a dense population of tube-building ampharetid polychaetes and conspicuous microbial mats were unusually absent. A 1D numerical reaction-transport model, which allows for the explicit growth of sulfide and methane oxidizing microorganisms, was tuned to the geochemical data using a fluid advection velocity of 14 cm yr -1. The fluids provide a deep source of dissolved hydrogen sulfide and methane to the sediment with fluxes equal to 4.1 and 18.2 mmol m -2 d -1, respectively. Chemosynthetic biomass production in the subsurface sediment is estimated to be 2.8 mmol m -2 d -1 of C biomass. However, carbon and oxygen budgets indicate that chemosynthetic organisms living directly above or on the surface sediment have the potential to produce 12.3 mmol m -2 d -1 of C biomass. This autochthonous carbon source meets the ampharetid respiratory carbon demand of 23.2 mmol m -2 d -1 to within a factor of 2. By contrast, the contribution of photosynthetically-fixed carbon sources to ampharetid nutrition is minor (3.3 mmol m -2 d -1 of C). The data strongly suggest that mixing of labile autochthonous microbial detritus below the oxic layer sustains high measured rates of sulfate reduction in the uppermost 2 cm of the sulfidic sediment (100-200 nmol cm -3 d -1). Similar rates have been reported in the literature for other seeps, from which we conclude that autochthonous organic matter is an important substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria in these sediment layers. A system-scale energy budget based on the chemosynthetic reaction pathways reveals that up to 8.3 kJ m -2 d -1 or 96 mW m -2 of catabolic (Gibbs) energy is dissipated at the seep through oxidation reactions. The microorganisms mediating sulfide

  13. Drilling Gas Hydrates on hydrate Ridge, Oregon continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehu, A. M.; Bohrmann, G.; Leg 204 Science Party

    2002-12-01

    During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which gas hydrate is forming. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: 1) that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally

  14. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  15. Seepage from an arctic shallow marine gas hydrate reservoir is insensitive to momentary ocean warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei-Li; Torres, Marta E.; Carroll, Jolynn; Crémière, Antoine; Panieri, Giuliana; Yao, Haoyi; Serov, Pavel

    2017-06-01

    Arctic gas hydrate reservoirs located in shallow water and proximal to the sediment-water interface are thought to be sensitive to bottom water warming that may trigger gas hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. Here, we evaluate bottom water temperature as a potential driver for hydrate dissociation and methane release from a recently discovered, gas-hydrate-bearing system south of Spitsbergen (Storfjordrenna, ~380 m water depth). Modelling of the non-steady-state porewater profiles and observations of distinct layers of methane-derived authigenic carbonate nodules in the sediments indicate centurial to millennial methane emissions in the region. Results of temperature modelling suggest limited impact of short-term warming on gas hydrates deeper than a few metres in the sediments. We conclude that the ongoing and past methane emission episodes at the investigated sites are likely due to the episodic ventilation of deep reservoirs rather than warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation in this shallow water seep site.

  16. Experimental study of separation of ammonia synthesis vent gas by hydrate formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Taibin; Wang Leiyan; Liu Aixian; Guo Xuqiang; Ma Qinglan; Li Guowen; Sun Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Termodynamic data on methane hydrate formation in the presence of ammonia are very important for upgrading of ammonia synthesis vent gas using hydrate formation.This paper is focused on the formation conditions of methane hydrate in the presence of ammonia and the effects of gas-liquid ratio and temperature on the separation of vent gas by hydrate formation.Equilibrium data for methane hydrate within an ammonia mole concentration range from 1% to 5 % were obtained.The experimental results indicated that ammonia has an inhibitive effect on hydrate formation.The higher the ammonia concentration, the higher is the pressure reguired for methane hydrate formation would be.The primary experimental results showed that when volume ratio of gas to liquid was 80:1 and temperature was 283.15 K, total mole fraction of (H2+N2) in gas phase could reach 96.9 %.

  17. Kinetic studies of gas hydrate formation with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Pipeline blockage by gas hydrates is a serious problem in the petroleum industry.Low-dosage inhibitors have been developed for its cost-effective and environmentally acceptable characteristics.In a 1.072-L reactor with methane,ethane and propane gas mixture under the pressure of about 8.5 MPa at 4 °C,hydrate formation was investigated with low-dosage hydrate inhibitors PVP and GHI1,the change of the compressibility factor and gas composition in the gas phase was analyzed,the gas contents in hydrates were compared with PVP and GHI1 added,and the inhibition mechanism of GHI1 was discussed.The results show that PVP and GHI1 could effectively inhibit the growth of gas hydrates but not nucleation.Under the experimental condition with PVP added,methane and ethane occupied the small cavities of the hydrate crystal unit and the ability of ethane entering into hydrate cavities was weaker than that of methane.GHI1 could effectively inhibit molecules which could more readily form hydrates.The ether and hydroxy group of diethylene glycol monobutyl ether have the responsibility for stronger inhibition ability of GHI1 than PVP.

  18. Methane Gas Hydrate Stability Models on Continental Shelves in Response to Glacio-Eustatic Sea Level Variations: Examples from Canadian Oceanic Margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Safanda

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We model numerically regions of the Canadian continental shelves during successive glacio-eustatic cycles to illustrate past, current and future marine gas hydrate (GH stability and instability. These models indicated that the marine GH resource has dynamic features and the formation age and resource volumes depend on the dynamics of the ocean-atmosphere system as it responds to both natural (glacial-interglacial and anthropogenic (climate change forcing. Our models focus on the interval beginning three million years ago (i.e., Late Pliocene-Holocene. They continue through the current interglacial and they are projected to its anticipated natural end. During the current interglacial the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ thickness in each region responded uniquely as a function of changes in water depth and sea bottom temperature influenced by ocean currents. In general, the GHSZ in the deeper parts of the Pacific and Atlantic margins (≥1316 m thinned primarily due to increased water bottom temperatures. The GHSZ is highly variable in the shallower settings on the same margins (~400–500 m. On the Pacific Margin shallow GH dissociated completely prior to nine thousand years ago but the effects of subsequent sea level rise reestablished a persistent, thin GHSZ. On the Atlantic Margin Scotian Shelf the warm Gulf Stream caused GHSZ to disappear completely, whereas in shallow water depths offshore Labrador the combination of the cool Labrador Current and sea level rise increased the GHSZ. If future ocean bottom temperatures remain constant, these general characteristics will persist until the current interglacial ends. If the sea bottom warms, possibly in response to global climate change, there could be a significant reduction to complete loss of GH stability, especially on the shallow parts of the continental shelf. The interglacial GH thinning rates constrain rates at which carbon can be transferred between the GH reservoir and the atmosphere

  19. Preliminary discussion on gas hydrate reservoir system of Shenhu Area, North Slope of South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, N.; Yang, S.; Liang, J.; Wang, H.; Fu, S. [Guangzhou Marine Geological Survey, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, H. [China Geological Survey, Beijing (China); Su, X. [China Univ. of Geosciences, Beijing (China)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrate is a type of ice-like solid substance formed by the combination of certain low-molecular-weight gases such as methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide with water. Gas hydrate primarily occurs naturally in sediments beneath the permafrost and the sediments of the continental slope with the water depth greater than 300 m. Marine gas hydrate geological systems are important because they may be sufficiently concentrated in certain locations to be an economically viable fossil fuel resource. However, gas hydrates can cause geo-hazards through large-scale slope destabilization and can release methane, a potential greenhouse gas, into the environment. This paper discussed the hydrate drilling results from a geological and geophysical investigation of the gas hydrate reservoir system of the Shenhu Area, located in the north slope of South China Sea. The paper identified the basic formation conditions, and discussed the pore-water geochemical features of shallow sediments and their inflected gas sources, gas hydrate distribution and seismic characteristics. It was concluded that the gas hydrate was heterogeneously distributed in space, and mainly distributed in certain ranges above the bottom of the gas hydrate stability zone. It was also concluded that methane gas that formed hydrate was likely from in-situ micro-biogenic methane. Last, it was found that distributed and in-situ micro-biogenic methane resulted in low methane flux, and formed the distributed pattern of gas hydrate system with the features of differential distribution and saturation. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  20. The characteristics of gas hydrates recovered from the Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Lorenson, T.D.; Moudrakovski, I.L.; Ripmeester, J.A.; Collett, T.S.; Hunter, R.B.; Ratcliffe, C.I.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic analyses have been carried out on two gas hydrate-bearing sediment core samples, HYPV4, which was preserved by CH4 gas pressurization, and HYLN7, which was preserved in liquid-nitrogen, recovered from the BPXA-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Stratigraphic Test Well. Gas hydrate in the studied core samples was found by observation to have developed in sediment pores, and the distribution of hydrate saturation in the cores imply that gas hydrate had experienced stepwise dissociation before it was stabilized by either liquid nitrogen or pressurizing gas. The gas hydrates were determined to be structure Type I hydrate with hydration numbers of approximately 6.1 by instrumentation methods such as powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and solid state 13C NMR. The hydrate gas composition was predominantly methane, and isotopic analysis showed that the methane was of thermogenic origin (mean ??13C=-48.6??? and ??D=-248??? for sample HYLN7). Isotopic analysis of methane from sample HYPV4 revealed secondary hydrate formation from the pressurizing methane gas during storage. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Geo-scientific investigations of gas-hydrates in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sain, K.; Gupta, H.; Mazumdar, A.; Bhaumik, A.K.; Bhowmick, P.K.

    The best solution to meet India's overwhelming energy requirement is to tap the nuclear and solar power to the maximum extent possible. Another feasible major energy resource is gas-hydrates (crystalline substances of methane and water) that have...

  2. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crémière, Antoine; Lepland, Aivo; Chand, Shyam; Sahy, Diana; Condon, Daniel J.; Noble, Stephen R.; Martma, Tõnu; Thorsnes, Terje; Sauer, Simone; Brunstad, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean-atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220-400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zone during the last glaciation. The onset of methane release was coincident with deglaciation-induced pressure release and thinning of the hydrate stability zone. Methane efflux continued for 7-10 kyr, tracking hydrate stability changes controlled by relative sea-level rise, bottom water warming and fluid pathway evolution in response to changing stress fields. The protracted nature of seafloor methane emissions probably attenuated the impact of hydrate dissociation on the climate system.

  3. Crystallite size distributions of marine gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapp, S.A.; Bohrmann, G.; Abegg, F. [Bremen Univ., Bremen (Germany). Research Center of Ocean Margins; Hemes, S.; Klein, H.; Kuhs, W.F. [Gottingen Univ., Gottingen (Germany). Dept. of Crystallography

    2008-07-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to determine the crystallite size distributions of natural gas hydrate samples retrieved from the Gulf of Mexico, the Black Sea, and a hydrate ridge located near offshore Oregon. Synchrotron radiation technology was used to provide the high photon fluxes and high penetration depths needed to accurately analyze the bulk sediment samples. A new beam collimation diffraction technique was used to measure gas hydrate crystallite sizes. The analyses showed that gas hydrate crystals were globular in shape. Mean crystallite sizes ranged from 200 to 400 {mu}m for hydrate samples taken from the sea floor. Larger grain sizes in the hydrate ridge samples suggested differences in hydrate formation ages or processes. A comparison with laboratory-produced methane hydrate samples showed half a lognormal curve with a mean value of 40{mu}m. Results of the study showed that a cautious approach must be adopted when transposing crystallite-size sensitive physical data from laboratory-made gas hydrates to natural settings. It was concluded that crystallite size information may also be used to resolve the formation ages of gas hydrates when formation processes and conditions are constrained. 48 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  4. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  5. Timescales of methane seepage on the Norwegian margin following collapse of the Scandinavian Ice Sheet

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Gas hydrates stored on continental shelves are susceptible to dissociation triggered by environmental changes. Knowledge of the timescales of gas hydrate dissociation and subsequent methane release are critical in understanding the impact of marine gas hydrates on the ocean–atmosphere system. Here we report a methane efflux chronology from five sites, at depths of 220–400 m, in the southwest Barents and Norwegian seas where grounded ice sheets led to thickening of the gas hydrate stability zo...

  6. Response of the Black Sea methane budget to massive short-term submarine inputs of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmale, O.; Haeckel, M.; McGinnis, D. F.

    2011-01-01

    A steady state box model was developed to estimate the methane input into the Black Sea water column at various water depths. Our model results reveal a total input of methane of 4.7 Tg yr(-1). The model predicts that the input of methane is largest at water depths between 600 and 700 m (7......% of the total input), suggesting that the dissociation of methane gas hydrates at water depths equivalent to their upper stability limit may represent an important source of methane into the water column. In addition we discuss the effects of massive short-term methane inputs (e. g. through eruptions of deep......-water mud volcanoes or submarine landslides at intermediate water depths) on the water column methane distribution and the resulting methane emission to the atmosphere. Our non-steady state simulations predict that these inputs will be effectively buffered by intense microbial methane consumption...

  7. Are seafloor pockmarks on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand, linked to CO2 hydrates? Gas hydrate stability considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Rose, P. S.; Coffin, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Vast areas of the Chatham Rise east of New Zealand are covered by seafloor pockmarks. Pockmark occurrence appears to be bathymetrically controlled with a band of smaller pockmarks covering areas between 500 and 700 m and large seafloor depressions beneath 800 m water depth. The current depth of the top of methane gas hydrate stability in the ocean is about 500 m and thus, we had proposed that pockmark formation may be linked to methane gas hydrate dissociation during sealevel lowering. However, while seismic profiles show strong indications of fluid flow, geochemical analyses of piston cores do not show any evidence for current or past methane flux. The discovery of Dawsonite, indicative of significant CO2 flux, in a recent petroleum exploration well, together with other circumstantial evidence, has led us to propose that instead of methane hydrate, CO2 hydrate may be linked to pockmark formation. We here present results from CO2 hydrate stability calculations. Assuming water temperature profiles remain unchanged, we predict the upper limit of pockmark occurrence to coincide with the top of CO2 gas hydrate stability during glacial-stage sealevel lowstands. CO2 hydrates may therefore have dissociated during sealevel lowering leading to gas escape and pockmark formation. In contrast to our previous model linking methane hydrate dissociation to pockmark formation, gas hydrates would dissociate beneath a shallow base of CO2 hydrate stability, rather than on the seafloor following upward "grazing" of the top of methane hydrate stability. Intriguingly, at the water depths of the larger seafloor depressions, the base of gas hydrate stability delineates the phase boundary between CO2 hydrates and super-saturated CO2. We caution that because of the high solubility of CO2, dissociation from hydrate to free gas or super-saturated CO2 would imply high concentrations of CO2 and speculate that pockmark formation may be linked to CO2 hydrate dissolution rather than dissociation

  8. The characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, H.; Moudrakovski, I.; Udachin, K.; Enright, G.; Ratcliffe, C.; Ripmeester, J.

    2009-12-01

    In the past few years, extensive analyses have been carried out for characterizing the natural gas hydrate samples from Cascadia, offshore Vancouver Island; Mallik, Mackenzie Delta; Mount Elbert, Alaska North Slope; Nankai Trough, offshore Japan; Japan Sea and offshore India. With the results obtained, it is possible to give a general picture of the characteristics of gas hydrates occurring in natural environment. Gas hydrate can occur in sediments of various types, from sands to clay, although it is preferentially enriched in sediments of certain types, for example coarse sands and fine volcanic ash. Most of the gas hydrates in sediments are invisible, occurring in the pores of the sediments, while some hydrates are visible, appearing as massive, nodular, planar, vein-like forms and occurring around the seafloor, in the fractures related to fault systems, or any other large spaces available in sediments. Although methane is the main component of most of the natural gas hydrates, C2 to C7 hydrocarbons have been recognized in hydrates, sometimes even in significant amounts. Shallow marine gas hydrates have been found generally to contain minor amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Gas hydrate samples with complex gas compositions have been found to have heterogeneous distributions in composition, which might reflect changes in the composition of the available gas in the surrounding environment. Depending on the gas compositions, the structure type of a natural gas hydrate can be structure I, II or H. For structure I methane hydrate, the large cages are almost fully occupied by methane molecules, while the small cages are only partly occupied. Methane hydrates occurring in different environments have been identified with almost the same crystallographic parameters.

  9. Gas hydrates

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.

    and the role it plays in the global climate and the future of fuels. Russia, Japan, Nigeria, Peru, Chile, Pakistan, Indonesia, Korea, etc are various countries who are perusing the gas hydrates studies as a future resource for fuel. Indian Initiative..., 1993, Free gas at the base of the gas hydrate zone in the vicinity of the Chile Triple junction: Geology, v. 21, pp. 905-908. Borowski, W.S., C.K. Paull, and U. William, III, 1999, Global and local variations of interstitial sulfate gradients...

  10. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  11. Preface to the special issue on gas hydrate drilling in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Koji; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Methane hydrate traps enormous amounts of methane in frozen deposits in continental margin sediments, and these deposits have long been targeted for studies investigating their potential as an energy resource. As a concentrated form of methane that occurs at shallower depths than conventional and most unconventional gas reservoirs, methane hydrates could be a readily accessible source of hydrocarbons for countries hosting deposits within their Exclusive Economic Zones. Japan is one such country, and since 2001 the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (referred to as MH21) has conducted laboratory, modeling, and field-based programs to study methane hydrates as an energy resource. The MH21 consortium is funded by the Japanese Ministry of Trade and Industry (METI) and led by the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Oil Corporation (JOGMEC) and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST).

  12. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  13. Linking basin-scale and pore-scale gas hydrate distribution patterns in diffusion-dominated marine hydrate systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Hillman, Jess I. T.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to computationally determine the potential distribution patterns of diffusion-driven methane hydrate accumulations in coarse-grained marine sediments. Diffusion of dissolved methane in marine gas hydrate systems has been proposed as a potential transport mechanism through which large concentrations of hydrate can preferentially accumulate in coarse-grained sediments over geologic time. Using one-dimensional compositional reservoir simulations, we examine hydrate distribution patterns at the scale of individual sand layers (1-20 m thick) that are deposited between microbially active fine-grained material buried through the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). We then extrapolate to two-dimensional and basin-scale three-dimensional simulations, where we model dipping sands and multilayered systems. We find that properties of a sand layer including pore size distribution, layer thickness, dip, and proximity to other layers in multilayered systems all exert control on diffusive methane fluxes toward and within a sand, which in turn impact the distribution of hydrate throughout a sand unit. In all of these simulations, we incorporate data on physical properties and sand layer geometries from the Terrebonne Basin gas hydrate system in the Gulf of Mexico. We demonstrate that diffusion can generate high hydrate saturations (upward of 90%) at the edges of thin sands at shallow depths within the GHSZ, but that it is ineffective at producing high hydrate saturations throughout thick (greater than 10 m) sands buried deep within the GHSZ. Furthermore, we find that hydrate in fine-grained material can preserve high hydrate saturations in nearby thin sands with burial.Plain Language SummaryThis study combines one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations to explore one potential process by which methane dissolved in water beneath the seafloor can be converted into solid methane hydrate. This work specifically examines one end-member methane transport

  14. Guest-Host Interaction Study in Clathrate Hydrates Using Lattice Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maofeng Jing; Shunle Dong

    2005-01-01

    Lattice dynamics simulation of several gas hydrates (helium, argon, and methane) with different occupancy rates has been performed using TIP3P potential model. Results show that the coupling between the guest and host is not simple as depicted by the conventional viewpoints. For clathrate hydrate enclosing small guest, the small cages are dominantly responsible for the thermodynamic stability of clathrate hydrates. And the spectrum of methane hydrate is studied compared with argon hydrate,then as a result, shrink effect from positive hydrogen shell is proposed.

  15. Natural marine seepage blowout: Contribution to atmospheric methane

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The release of methane sequestered within deep-sea methane hydrates is postulated as a mechanism for abrupt climate change; however, whether emitted seabed methane reaches the atmosphere is debatable. We observed methane emissions for a blowout from a shallow (22 m) hydrocarbon seep. The emission from the blowout was determined from atmospheric plume measurements. Simulations suggest a 1.1% gas loss to dissolution compared to ∼ 10% loss for a typical low-flux bubble plume. Transfer to the atm...

  16. Postglacial response of Arctic Ocean gas hydrates to climatic amelioration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Pavel; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Mienert, Jürgen; Patton, Henry; Portnov, Alexey; Silyakova, Anna; Panieri, Giuliana; Carroll, Michael L.; Carroll, JoLynn; Andreassen, Karin; Hubbard, Alun

    2017-06-01

    Seafloor methane release due to the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates is pervasive across the continental margins of the Arctic Ocean. Furthermore, there is increasing awareness that shallow hydrate-related methane seeps have appeared due to enhanced warming of Arctic Ocean bottom water during the last century. Although it has been argued that a gas hydrate gun could trigger abrupt climate change, the processes and rates of subsurface/atmospheric natural gas exchange remain uncertain. Here we investigate the dynamics between gas hydrate stability and environmental changes from the height of the last glaciation through to the present day. Using geophysical observations from offshore Svalbard to constrain a coupled ice sheet/gas hydrate model, we identify distinct phases of subglacial methane sequestration and subsequent release on ice sheet retreat that led to the formation of a suite of seafloor domes. Reconstructing the evolution of this dome field, we find that incursions of warm Atlantic bottom water forced rapid gas hydrate dissociation and enhanced methane emissions during the penultimate Heinrich event, the Bølling and Allerød interstadials, and the Holocene optimum. Our results highlight the complex interplay between the cryosphere, geosphere, and atmosphere over the last 30,000 y that led to extensive changes in subseafloor carbon storage that forced distinct episodes of methane release due to natural climate variability well before recent anthropogenic warming.

  17. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage.

  18. Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

    2011-07-01

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate

  19. A new geotechnical gas hydrates research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates encapsulate natural gas molecules in a very compact form, as ice-like compounds composed of water molecules. Permafrost environments and offshore areas contain vast quantities of gas hydrates within soil and rock. This paper describes the role played by gas hydrates in submarine slope instability, their potential as a sustainable energy source, and their effects on global climate change. A new state-of-the-art laboratory located at the University of Calgary, which was developed to study the geomechanical behaviour of gas hydrate-sediment mixtures, was also presented. A specialized high pressure low temperature triaxial apparatus capable of performing a suite of tests on gas hydrate-sediment mixtures is housed in this laboratory. Extensive renovations were required in order to enable the use of methane gas to simulate natural hydrate formation conditions. The laboratory is specifically designed to examine the properties and behaviour of reconstituted gas hydrate-sediment mixtures and natural gas hydrate core samples. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Origin and character of gaseous hydrocarbons in the hydrate and non-hydrate charged sediments on the Norway - Svalbard margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaular, Espen Nesheim

    2011-05-15

    Gas incubated in clathrate water-structures, stabilizes the hydrogen bonded substance termed gas hydrate. In the marine environment vast amount of carbon is stored as gas hydrates within the temperature and pressure zone these ice-like structures are stable. Natural gas hydrate mapping and characterization is important basic research that brings about critical knowledge concerning various topics. Natural gas hydrates is a vital part of the carbon cycle, it is a potential energy resource (and thereby a potential climate agent) and it is a potential geo-hazard. One of the goals the GANS initiative aimed at exploring, was the hydrate bearing sediment of the Norway -Svalbard margins, to investigate the character and expansion of natural gas hydrates. Part of the investigation was to define how the gas in the hydrated sediment was produced and where it came from. As a result this thesis addresses the matter of light hydrocarbon characterization and origin in two Norwegian hydrate deposits. On cruises to Vestnesa on the Svalbard margin and to Nyegga in the mid-Norwegian margin, samples of hydrate charged and non-hydrate charged sediments were obtained and analyzed. Through compositional and isotopic analyses the origin of the hydrate bound gas in the fluid escape feature G11 at Nyegga was determined. The hydrate incubated methane is microbial produced as well as parts of the hydrate bound ethane. The compositional analysis in both the Nyegga area and at the Vestnesa Ridge points at thermogenic contributions in the sediment interstitials and pore water. The two hydrate bearing margins show large differences in hydrocarbon content and microbial activity in the pockmarks investigated. The gravity cores from the penetrated pockmark at Vestnesa showed low hydrocarbon content and thus suggest ceased or periodic venting. The fluid flow escape features at Nyegga show large variety of flux rates based on ROV monitoring and headspace analysis of the sediment and pore water. The

  1. Impact of Residual Water on CH4-CO2 Exchange rate in Hydrate bearing Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersland, G.; Birkedal, K.; Graue, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is previously shown that sequestration of CO2 in natural gas hydrate reservoirs may offer stable long term deposition of a greenhouse gas while benefiting from methane production, without adding heat to the process. In this work CH4 hydrate formation and CO2 reformation in sandstone has been quantified in a series of experiments using Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The overall objective was to provide an improved basic understanding of processes involved in formation and production of methane from methane hydrates within porous media, and to provide data for numerical modeling and scaling. CH4 hydrate has been formed repeatedly in Bentheim sandstone rocks to study hydrate growth patterns for various brine salinities and saturations to prepare for subsequent lab-scale methane production tests through carbon dioxide replacement at various residual water saturations. Surface area for CO2 exposure and the role of permeability and diffusion on the CH4-CO2 exchange rate will also be discussed.

  2. Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-06-20

    Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.

  3. Kinetics of hydrate formation using gas bubble suspended in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马昌峰; 陈光进; 郭天民

    2002-01-01

    An innovative experimental technique, which was devised to study the effects of temperature and pressure on the rate of hydrate formation at the surface of a gas bubble suspended in a stagnant water phase, was adapted in this work. Under such conditions, the hydrate-growth process is free from dynamic mass transfer factors. The rate of hydrate formation of methane and carbon dioxide has been systematically studied. The measured hydrate-growth data were correlated by using the molar Gibbs free energy as driving force. In the course of the experiments, some interesting surface phenomena were observed.

  4. Formulating formation mechanism of natural gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palodkar, Avinash V; Jana, Amiya K

    2017-07-25

    A large amount of energy, perhaps twice the total amount of all other hydrocarbon reserves combined, is trapped within gas hydrate deposits. Despite emerging as a potential energy source for the world over the next several hundred years and one of the key factors in causing future climate change, gas hydrate is poorly known in terms of its formation mechanism. To address this issue, a mathematical formulation is proposed in the form of a model to represent the physical insight into the process of hydrate growth that occurs on the surface and in the irregular nanometer-sized pores of the distributed porous particles. To evaluate the versatility of this rigorous model, the experimental data is used for methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrates grown in different porous media with a wide range of considerations.

  5. Quantifying hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloan, E.D.; Subramanian, S.; Matthews, P.N.; Lederhos, J.P.; Khokhar, A.A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Hydrate Research

    1998-08-01

    In the Prausnitz tradition, molecular and macroscopic evidence of hydrate formation and kinetic inhibition is presented. On the microscopic level, the first Raman spectra are presented for the formation of both uninhibited and inhibited methane hydrates with time. This method has the potential to provide a microscopic-based kinetics model. Three macroscopic aspects of natural gas hydrate kinetic inhibition are also reported: (1) The effect of hydrate dissociation residual structures was measured, which has application in decreasing the time required for subsequent formation. (2) The performance of a kinetic inhibitor (poly(N-vinylcaprolactam) or PVCap) was measured and correlated as a function of PVCap molecular weight and concentrations of PVCap, methanol, and salt in the aqueous phase. (3) Long-duration test results indicated that the use of PVCap can prevent pipeline blockage for a time exceeding the aqueous phase residence time in some gas pipelines.

  6. In Situ Raman Analyses of Natural Gas and Gas Hydrates at Hydrate Ridge, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; White, S. N.; Dunk, R. M.; Brewer, P. G.; Sherman, A. D.; Schmidt, K.; Hester, K. C.; Sloan, E. D.

    2004-12-01

    During a July 2004 cruise to Hydrate Ridge, Oregon, MBARI's sea-going laser Raman spectrometer was used to obtain in situ Raman spectra of natural gas hydrates and natural gas venting from the seafloor. This was the first in situ analysis of gas hydrates on the seafloor. The hydrate spectra were compared to laboratory analyses performed at the Center for Hydrate Research, Colorado School of Mines. The natural gas spectra were compared to MBARI gas chromatography (GC) analyses of gas samples collected at the same site. DORISS (Deep Ocean Raman In Situ Spectrometer) is a laboratory model laser Raman spectrometer from Kaiser Optical Systems, Inc modified at MBARI for deployment in the deep ocean. It has been successfully deployed to depths as great as 3600 m. Different sampling optics provide flexibility in adapting the instrument to a particular target of interest. An immersion optic was used to analyze natural gas venting from the seafloor at South Hydrate Ridge ( ˜780 m depth). An open-bottomed cube was placed over the vent to collect the gas. The immersion optic penetrated the side of the cube as did a small heater used to dissociate any hydrate formed during sample collection. To analyze solid hydrates at both South and North Hydrate Ridge ( ˜590 m depth), chunks of hydrate were excavated from the seafloor and collected in a glass cylinder with a mesh top. A stand-off optic was used to analyze the hydrate inside the cylinder. Due to the partial opacity of the hydrate and the small focal volume of the sampling optic, a precision underwater positioner (PUP) was used to focus the laser spot onto the hydrate. PUP is a stand-alone system with three degrees-of-freedom, capable of moving the DORISS probe head with a precision of 0.1 mm. In situ Raman analyses of the gas indicate that it is primarily methane. This is verified by GC analyses of samples collected from the same site. Other minor constituents (such as CO2 and higher hydrocarbons) are present but may be in

  7. Physical properties of gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kliner, J.T.R.; Grozic, J.L.H. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring, solid crystalline compounds (clathrates) that encapsulate gas molecules inside the lattices of hydrogen bonded water molecules within a specific temperature-pressure stability zone. Estimates of the total quantity of available methane gas in natural occurring hydrates are based on twice the energy content of known conventional fossil fuels reservoirs. Accurate and reliable in-situ quantification techniques are essential in determining the economic viability of this potential energy yield, which is dependent upon several factors such as sensitivity of the temperature-pressure stability zone, sediment type, porosity, permeability, concentration/abundance of free gas, spatial distribution in pore spaces, specific cage occupancy, and the influence of inhibitors. Various techniques like acoustic P and S waves, time domain reflectometry, and electrical resistance have been used to analyze the quantity and spatial distribution of the gas hydrate samples. These techniques were reviewed and the results obtained in the course of gas hydrate research were presented. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Increasing the storage capacity and selectivity in the formation of natural gas hydrates using porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholipour Zanjani, N.; Zarringhalam Moghaddam, A.; Mohammad-Taheri, M. [Tarbiat Modares University, Chemical Engineering Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazari, K. [Research Institute of Petroleum Industry, Chemistry and Petrochemical Research Division, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Formation of a gas hydrate with two different gas compositions (natural gas and a mixture of methane-ethane-propane) was investigated using a special method of producing the hydrate from ice. Gas uptake, splitting the fraction of each component between the gas phase and hydrate phase, and purification of methane were studied in the presence of silica-based porous media. Addition of a small amount of colloidal silica media increased considerably the gas storage capacity of the hydrate phase. In the presence of silica-based porous media, the purification factor of CH{sub 4} became significantly higher. The results can provide the basis for the storage of natural gas in hydrate form and application of the hydrate-based gas separation technology to achieve methane with high purity from natural gas. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Formation rate of natural gas hydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mork, Marit

    2002-07-01

    The rate of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate formation was measured in a 9.5 litre stirred tank reactor of standard design. The experiments were performed to better understand the performance and scale-up of a reactor for continuous production of natural gas hydrates. The hydrate formation rate was measured at steady-state conditions at pressures between 70 and 90 bar and temperatures between 7 and 15 deg C. Between 44 and 56 % of the gas continuously supplied to the reactor was converted to hydrate. The experimental results show that the rate of hydrate formation is strongly influenced by gas injection rate and pressure. The effect of stirring rate is less significant and subcooling has no observable effect on the formation rate. Hydrate crystal concentration and gas composition do not influence the hydrate formation rate. Observations of produced hydrate crystals indicate that the crystals are elongated, about 5 micron in diameter and 10 micron long. Analysis of the results shows that the rate of hydrate formation is dominated by gas-liquid mass transfer. A mass transfer model, the bubble-to-crystal model, was developed for the hydrate formation rate in a continuous stirred tank reactor, given in terms of concentration driving force and an overall mass transfer coefficient. The driving force is the difference between the gas concentration at the gas-liquid interface and at the hydrate crystal surface. These concentrations correspond to the solubility of gas in water at experimental temperature and pressure and the solubility of gas at hydrate equilibrium temperature and experimental pressure, respectively. The overall mass transfer coefficient is expressed in terms of superficial gas velocity and impeller power consumption, parameters commonly used in study of stirred tank reactors. Experiments and modeling show that the stirred tank reactor has a considerable potential for increased production capacity. However, at higher hydrate production rates the

  10. Determination of the Physical Properties of Sediments Depending on Hydrate Saturation Using a "Quick Look" Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, B.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Seyberth, K.; Heeschen, K. U.; Priegnitz, M.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and electromagnetic measurements are promising tools for the detection and quantification of gas hydrate occurrences in nature. The seismic wave velocity depends among others on the hydrate quantity and the quality (e.g. pore filling or cementing hydrate). For a proper interpretation of seismic data the knowledge of the dependency of physical properties as a function of hydrate saturation in a certain scenario is crucial. Within the SUGAR III project we determine such dependencies for various scenarios to support models for joint inversion of seismic and EM data e.g. for the shallow gas hydrate reservoirs in the Danube Delta. Since the formation of artificial lab samples containing pore filling hydrate from methane dissolved in water is a complex and time consuming procedure, we developed an easier alternative. Ice is very similar to hydrate in some of its physical properties. Therefore it might be used as analogous pore fill in a "quick look" experiment to determine the dependency of rock physical properties on hydrate content. We used the freezing point depression of a KCl solution to generate a dependency of ice saturation on temperature. The measured seismic wave velocity in dependence on ice saturation compares very well with data measured on a glass bead sediment sample with methane hydrate formed from methane dissolved in water. We could also observe that ice, formed from a salt solution in the pore space of sediment, behaves similar to methane hydrate as a non-cementing solid pore fill.

  11. Overestimating climate warming-induced methane gas escape from the seafloor by neglecting multiphase flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranne, C.; O'Regan, M.; Jakobsson, M.

    2016-08-01

    Continental margins host large quantities of methane stored partly as hydrates in sediments. Release of methane through hydrate dissociation is implicated as a possible feedback mechanism to climate change. Large-scale estimates of future warming-induced methane release are commonly based on a hydrate stability approach that omits dynamic processes. Here we use the multiphase flow model TOUGH + hydrate (T + H) to quantitatively investigate how dynamic processes affect dissociation rates and methane release. The simulations involve shallow, 20-100 m thick hydrate deposits, forced by a bottom water temperature increase of 0.03°C yr-1 over 100 years. We show that on a centennial time scale, the hydrate stability approach can overestimate gas escape quantities by orders of magnitude. Our results indicate a time lag of > 40 years between the onset of warming and gas escape, meaning that recent climate warming may soon be manifested as widespread gas seepages along the world's continental margins.

  12. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  13. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  14. Focus on the Development of Natural Gas Hydrate in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Tan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrate, also known as combustible ice, and mainly composed of methane, is identified as a potential clean energy for the 21st century. Due to its large reserves, gas hydrate can ease problems caused by energy resource shortage and has gained attention around the world. In this paper, we focus on the exploration and development of gas hydrate as well as discussing its status and future development trend in China and abroad. We then analyze its opportunities and challenges in China from four aspects, resource, technology, economy and policy, with five forces model and Politics Economics Society Technology method. The results show China has abundance gas hydrate resource; however, backward technologies and inadequate investment have seriously hindered the future development of gas hydrate; thus, China should establish relevant cooperation framework and intuitional arrangement to attract more investment as well as breaking through technical difficulties to commercialization gas hydrate as soon as possible.

  15. Recent changes to the Gulf Stream causing widespread gas hydrate destabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phrampus, Benjamin J; Hornbach, Matthew J

    2012-10-25

    The Gulf Stream is an ocean current that modulates climate in the Northern Hemisphere by transporting warm waters from the Gulf of Mexico into the North Atlantic and Arctic oceans. A changing Gulf Stream has the potential to thaw and convert hundreds of gigatonnes of frozen methane hydrate trapped below the sea floor into methane gas, increasing the risk of slope failure and methane release. How the Gulf Stream changes with time and what effect these changes have on methane hydrate stability is unclear. Here, using seismic data combined with thermal models, we show that recent changes in intermediate-depth ocean temperature associated with the Gulf Stream are rapidly destabilizing methane hydrate along a broad swathe of the North American margin. The area of active hydrate destabilization covers at least 10,000 square kilometres of the United States eastern margin, and occurs in a region prone to kilometre-scale slope failures. Previous hypothetical studies postulated that an increase of five degrees Celsius in intermediate-depth ocean temperatures could release enough methane to explain extreme global warming events like the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and trigger widespread ocean acidification. Our analysis suggests that changes in Gulf Stream flow or temperature within the past 5,000 years or so are warming the western North Atlantic margin by up to eight degrees Celsius and are now triggering the destabilization of 2.5 gigatonnes of methane hydrate (about 0.2 per cent of that required to cause the PETM). This destabilization extends along hundreds of kilometres of the margin and may continue for centuries. It is unlikely that the western North Atlantic margin is the only area experiencing changing ocean currents; our estimate of 2.5 gigatonnes of destabilizing methane hydrate may therefore represent only a fraction of the methane hydrate currently destabilizing globally. The transport from ocean to atmosphere of any methane released--and thus its

  16. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  17. Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Archer; Bruce Buffett

    2011-12-31

    We produced a two-dimensional geological time- and basin-scale model of the sedimentary margin in passive and active settings, for the simulation of the deep sedimentary methane cycle including hydrate formation. Simulation of geochemical data required development of parameterizations for bubble transport in the sediment column, and for the impact of the heterogeneity in the sediment pore fluid flow field, which represent new directions in modeling methane hydrates. The model is somewhat less sensitive to changes in ocean temperature than our previous 1-D model, due to the different methane transport mechanisms in the two codes (pore fluid flow vs. bubble migration). The model is very sensitive to reasonable changes in organic carbon deposition through geologic time, and to details of how the bubbles migrate, in particular how efficiently they are trapped as they rise through undersaturated or oxidizing chemical conditions and the hydrate stability zone. The active margin configuration reproduces the elevated hydrate saturations observed in accretionary wedges such as the Cascadia Margin, but predicts a decrease in the methane inventory per meter of coastline relative to a comparable passive margin case, and a decrease in the hydrate inventory with an increase in the plate subduction rate.

  18. Natural Gas Evolution in a Gas Hydrate Melt: Effect of Thermodynamic Hydrate Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujith, K S; Ramachandran, C N

    2017-01-12

    Natural gas extraction from gas hydrate sediments by injection of hydrate inhibitors involves the decomposition of hydrates. The evolution of dissolved gas from the hydrate melt is an important step in the extraction process. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we study the evolution of dissolved methane from its hydrate melt in the presence of two thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors, NaCl and CH3OH. An increase in the concentration of hydrate inhibitors is found to promote the nucleation of methane nanobubbles in the hydrate melt. Whereas NaCl promotes bubble formation by enhancing the hydrophobic interaction between aqueous CH4 molecules, CH3OH molecules assist bubble formation by stabilizing CH4 bubble nuclei formed in the solution. The CH3OH molecules accumulate around the nuclei leading to a decrease in the surface tension at their interface with water. The nanobubbles formed are found to be highly dynamic with frequent exchange of CH4 molecules between the bubble and the surrounding liquid. A quantitative analysis of the dynamic behavior of the bubble is performed by introducing a unit step function whose value depends on the location of CH4 molecules with respect to the bubble. It is observed that an increase in the concentration of thermodynamic hydrate inhibitors reduces the exchange process, making the bubble less dynamic. It is also found that for a given concentration of the inhibitor, larger bubbles are less dynamic compared to smaller ones. The dependence of the dynamic nature of nanobubbles on bubble size and inhibitor concentration is correlated with the solubility of CH4 and the Laplace pressure within the bubble. The effect of CO2 on the formation of nanobubble in the CH4-CO2 mixed gas hydrate melt in the presence of inhibitors is also examined. The simulations show that the presence of CO2 molecules significantly reduces the induction time for methane nanobubble nucleation. The role of CO2 in the early nucleation of bubble is explained

  19. Large-scale simulation of methane dissociation along the West Spitzbergen Margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.

    2009-07-15

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope west of Spitsbergen could be an indication of this process, if the source of the methane can be confidently attributed to dissociating hydrates. In the first large-scale simulation study of its kind, we simulate shallow hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the West Spitsbergen margin to test the hypothesis that the observed gas release originated from hydrates. The simulation results are consistent with this hypothesis, and are in remarkable agreement with the recently published observations. They show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, when subjected to temperature increases at the seafloor, can release significant quantities of methane, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the top of the GHSZ. These results indicate the possibility that hydrate dissociation and methane release may be both a consequence and a cause of climate change.

  20. Decarbonisation of fossil energy via methane pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreysa, G.; Agar, D.W.; Schultz, I. [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Despite the rising consumption of energy over the last few decades, the proven reserves of fossil fuels have steadily increased. Additionally, there are potentially tremendous reserves of methane hydrates available, which remain to be exploited. The use of fossil energy sources is thus increasingly being dictated less by supply than by the environmental concerns raised by climate change. In the context of the decarbonisation of the global energy system that this has stimulated, new means must be explored for using methane as energy source. Noncatalytic thermal pyrolysis of methane is proposed here as a promising concept for utilising methane with low to zero carbon dioxide emissions. Following cracking, only the energy content of the hydrogen is used, while the carbon can be stored safely and retrievably in disused coal mines. The thermodynamics and different process engineering concepts for the technical realisation of such a carbon moratorium technology are discussed. The possible contribution of methane pyrolysis to carbon negative geoengineering is also addressed. (orig.)

  1. Gas hydrate dissociation prolongs acidification of the Anthropocene oceans

    OpenAIRE

    Boudreau, B.P.; Luo, Yiming; Filip J R Meysman; J. J. Middelburg; G. R. Dickens

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic warming of the oceans can release methane (CH4) currently stored in sediments as gas hydrates. This CH4 will be oxidized to CO2, thus increasing the acidification of the oceans. We employ a biogeochemical model of the multimillennial carbon cycle to determine the evolution of the oceanic dissolved carbonate system over the next 13 kyr in response to CO2 from gas hydrates, combined with a reasonable scenario for long-term anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Hydrate-derived CO2 will appr...

  2. Water permeability in hydrate-bearing sediments: A pore-scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Seol, Yongkoo

    2014-06-01

    Permeability is a critical parameter governing methane flux and fluid flow in hydrate-bearing sediments; however, limited valid data are available due to experimental challenges. Here we investigate the relationship between apparent water permeability (k') and hydrate saturation (Sh), accounting for hydrate pore-scale growth habit and meso-scale heterogeneity. Results from capillary tube models rely on cross-sectional tube shapes and hydrate pore habits, thus are appropriate only for sediments with uniform hydrate distribution and known hydrate pore character. Given our pore network modeling results showing that accumulating hydrate in sediments decreases sediment porosity and increases hydraulic tortuosity, we propose a modified Kozeny-Carman model to characterize water permeability in hydrate-bearing sediments. This model agrees well with experimental results and can be easily implemented in reservoir simulators with no empirical variables other than Sh. Results are also relevant to flow through other natural sediments that undergo diagenesis, salt precipitation, or bio-clogging.

  3. Anaerobic methane oxidation in low-organic content methane seep sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, John W.; Riedel, Michael; Bauer, James E.; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Paull, Charles K.; Lapham, Laura; Grabowski, Kenneth S.; Coffin, Richard B.; Spence, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is the key sedimentary microbial process limiting methane emissions from marine sediments and methane seeps. In this study, we investigate how the presence of low-organic content sediment influences the capacity and efficiency of AOM at Bullseye vent, a gas hydrate-bearing cold seep offshore of Vancouver Island, Canada. The upper 8 m of sediment contains 14C. A fossil origin for the DIC precludes remineralization of non-fossil OM present within the sulfate zone as a significant contributor to pore water DIC, suggesting that nearly all sulfate is available for anaerobic oxidation of fossil seep methane. Methane flux from the SMT to the sediment water interface in a diffusion-dominated flux region of Bullseye vent was, on average, 96% less than at an OM-rich seep in the Gulf of Mexico with a similar methane flux regime. Evidence for enhanced methane oxidation capacity within OM-poor sediments has implications for assessing how climate-sensitive reservoirs of sedimentary methane (e.g., gas hydrate) will respond to ocean warming, particularly along glacially-influenced mid and high latitude continental margins.

  4. Hydrates of nat­ural gas in continental margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Barnard, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    Natural gas hydrates in continental margin sediment can be inferred from the widespread occurrence of an anomalous seismic reflector which coincides with the predicted transition boundary at the base of the gas hydrate zone. Direct evidence of gas hydrates is provided by visual observations of sediments from the landward wall of the Mid-America Trench off Mexico and Guatemala, from the Blake Outer Ridge off the southeastern United States, and from the Black Sea in the U.S.S.R. Where solid gas hydrates have been sampled, the gas is composed mainly of methane accompanied by CO2 and low concentrations of ethane and hydrocarbons of higher molecular weight. The molecular and isotopic composition of hydrocarbons indicates that most of the methane is of biolog cal origin. The gas was probably produced by the bacterial alteration of organic matter buried in the sediment. Organic carbon contents of the sediment containing sampled gas hydrates are higher than the average organic carbon content of marine sediments. The main economic importance of gas hydrates may reside in their ability to serve as a cap under which free gas can collect. To be producible, however, such trapped gas must occur in porous and permeable reservoirs. Although gas hydrates are common along continental margins, the degree to which they are associated with significant reservoirs remains to be investigated.

  5. Calorimetric Determination of Enthalpy of Formation of Natural Gas Hydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高军; KennethN.Marsh

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the measurements of enthalpies of natural gas hydrates in typical natural gas mixture containing methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane at pressure in the vicinity of 2000 kPa (300 psi) and 6900 kPa(1000psi). The measurements were made in a multi-cell differential scanning calorimeter using modified high pressure cells. The enthalpy of water and the enthalpy of dissociation of the gas hydrate were determined from the calorimeter response during slow temperature scanning at constant pressure. The amount of gas released from the dissociation of hydrate was determined from the pumped volume of the high pressure pump. The occupation ratio (mole ratio) of the water to gas and the enthalpy of hydrate formation are subject to uncertainty of 1.5%.The results show that the enthalpy of hydrate formation and the occupation ratio are essentially independent of pressure.

  6. Gas Hydrate Stability and Sampling: The Future as Related to the Phase Diagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dendy Sloan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The phase diagram for methane + water is explained, in relation to hydrate applications, such as in flow assurance and in nature. For natural applications, the phase diagram determines the regions for hydrate formation for two- and three-phase conditions. Impacts are presented for sample preparation and recovery. We discuss an international study for “Round Robin” hydrate sample preparation protocols and testing.

  7. Enhanced lifetime of methane bubble streams within the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Gregor; Brewer, Peter W.; Peltzer, Edward T.; Friederich, Gernot

    2002-08-01

    We have made direct comparisons of the dissolution and rise rates of methane and argon bubbles experimentally released in the ocean at depths from 440 to 830 m. The bubbles were injected from the ROV Ventana into a box open at the top and the bottom, and imaged by HDTV while in free motion. The vehicle was piloted upwards at the rise rate of the bubbles. Methane and argon show closely similar behavior at depths above the methane hydrate stability field. Below that boundary (~520 m) markedly enhanced methane bubble lifetimes are observed, and are attributed to the formation of a hydrate skin. This effect greatly increases the ease with which methane gas released at depth, either by natural or industrial events, can penetrate the shallow ocean layers.

  8. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  9. Gas hydrate dissociation prolongs acidification of the Anthropocene oceans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudreau, B.P.; Luo, Y.; Meysman, F.J.R.; Middelburg, J

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic warming of the oceans can release methane (CH4) currently stored in sediments as gas hydrates. This CH4 will be oxidized to CO2, thus increasing the acidification of the oceans. We employ a biogeochemical model of the multimillennial carbon cycle to determine the evolution of the ocean

  10. Gas hydrates in Krishna-Godavari offshore basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramprasad, T.; Mazumdar, A.; Dewangan, P.

    or in the permafrost regions in the form of methane hydrates is twice that are found in the fossil fuels. The biological debris/remnants of the dead animals and plants from land areas transported by the river system, as well as the dead flora/fauna in oceanic...

  11. Gas hydrate decomposition recorded by authigenic barite at pockmark sites of the northern Congo Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Sabine; Nöthen, Kerstin; Hensen, Christian; Spieß, Volkhard; Blumenberg, Martin; Schneider, Ralph R.

    2012-12-01

    The geochemical cycling of barium was investigated in sediments of pockmarks of the northern Congo Fan, characterized by surface and subsurface gas hydrates, chemosynthetic fauna, and authigenic carbonates. Two gravity cores retrieved from the so-called Hydrate Hole and Worm Hole pockmarks were examined using high-resolution pore-water and solid-phase analyses. The results indicate that, although gas hydrates in the study area are stable with respect to pressure and temperature, they are and have been subject to dissolution due to methane-undersaturated pore waters. The process significantly driving dissolution is the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) above the shallowest hydrate-bearing sediment layer. It is suggested that episodic seep events temporarily increase the upward flux of methane, and induce hydrate formation close to the sediment surface. AOM establishes at a sediment depth where the upward flux of methane from the uppermost hydrate layer counterbalances the downward flux of seawater sulfate. After seepage ceases, AOM continues to consume methane at the sulfate/methane transition (SMT) above the hydrates, thereby driving the progressive dissolution of the hydrates "from above". As a result the SMT migrates downward, leaving behind enrichments of authigenic barite and carbonates that typically precipitate at this biogeochemical reaction front. Calculation of the time needed to produce the observed solid-phase barium enrichments above the present-day depths of the SMT served to track the net downward migration of the SMT and to estimate the total time of hydrate dissolution in the recovered sediments. Methane fluxes were higher, and the SMT was located closer to the sediment surface in the past at both sites. Active seepage and hydrate formation are inferred to have occurred only a few thousands of years ago at the Hydrate Hole site. By contrast, AOM-driven hydrate dissolution as a consequence of an overall net decrease in upward methane flux seems to

  12. Simulation experiments on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were made on 58 sediment samples from four sites(1244,1245,1250 and 1251) of ODP204 at five temperature points(25,35,45,55 and 65℃) to simulate methane production from hydrate-bearing sediments.Simulation results from site 1244 show that the gas components consist mainly of methane and carbon dioxide,and heavy hydrocarbons more than C2+ cannot be detected.This site also gives results,similar to those from the other three,that the methane production is controlled by experimental temperatures,generally reaching the maximum gas yields per gram sediment or TOC under lower temperatures(25 and 35 ℃).In other words,the methane amount could be related to the buried depth of sediments,given the close relation between the depth and temperature.Sediments less than 1200 m below seafloor are inferred to still act as a biogenic gas producer to pour methane into the present hydrate zone,while sedimentary layers more than 1200 m below seafloor have become too biogenically exhausted to offer any biogas,but instead they produce thermogenic gas to give additional supply to the hydrate formation in the study area.

  13. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-01-01

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  14. Experimental study of enhanced gas recovery from gas hydrate bearing sediments by inhibitor and steam injection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, T.; Ohtake, M.; Sakamoto, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.; Haneda, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Laboratory; Komai, T. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technoloyg, Tsukuba (Japan). Inst. for Geo-Resource and Environment; Higuchi, S. [Nihon Axis Co. Ltd., Mito (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Inhibitor and steam injection methods for recovering methane hydrate-bearing sediments were investigated. New apparatus designs were used to inject steam into artificial methane hydrate-bearing sediments. Aqueous methanol was injected into a silica-based hydrate-bearing sediment in order to examine the dissociation behaviour of the methane hydrates. Experiments were conducted to examine the effects of steam injection using pure water; an aqueous methyl alcohol (MeOh) solution at 10 wt per cent; and an aqueous sodium chloride (NaC1) solution at 3 wt per cent. Temperatures for the injected fluids were set at 40 degrees C. Total gas production behaviour was divided into 3 stages: (1) the replacement of the remaining gas with the injected solution in the pore space; (2) gas production by hydrate dissociation; and (3) steady state and gas release. Results showed that cumulative gas production using the inhibitor solutions of MeOH and NaC1 proceeded more rapidly than the pure water samples. Downstream temperatures were not maintained at initial temperatures but decreased following the initiation of hydrate dissociation. Temperature changes were attributed to the coupling effect of the dissociation temperature and changes in inhibitor concentrations at the methane hydrate's surface. The use of inhibitors resulted in higher levels of cumulative gas production and more rapid hydrate dissociation rates. It was concluded that depressurization and steam injection induced hydrate dissociation from both upstream and downstream to the center of the sediment sample. 18 refs., 9 figs.

  15. Small Molecule Catalysts for Harvesting Methane Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, S. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ceron-Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oakdale, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lau, E. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-06

    As the average temperature of the earth increases the impact of these changes are becoming apparent. One of the most dramatic changes to the environment is the melting of arctic permafrost. The disappearance of the permafrost has resulted in release of streams of methane that was trapped in remote areas as gas hydrates in ice. Additionally, the use of fracking has also increased emission of methane. Currently, the methane is either lost to the atmosphere or flared. If these streams of methane could be brought to market, this would be an abundant source of revenue. A cheap conversion of gaseous methane to a more convenient form for transport would be necessary to economical. Conversion of methane is a difficult reaction since the C-H bond is very stable (104 kcal/mole). At the industrial scale, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction can be used to convert gaseous methane to liquid methanol but is this method is impractical for these streams that have low pressures and are located in remote areas. Additionally, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction results in over oxidation of the methane leading to many products that would need to be separated.

  16. A thermodynamic model based on ab initio intermolecular potential to predict the equilibrium condition of methane hydrate under the influence of temperature, pressure, salinity and capillary force%利用量子力学势能数据预测温度、压力、盐度和沉积物孔径对甲烷水合物形成和分解的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雅丽; 段振豪; 孙睿; 毛世德; 张驰

    2009-01-01

    介绍一个预测不同温度、压力、盐度和沉积物毛细管孔径条件下甲烷水合物-溶液-气体多相平衡模型.该模型以Van der Waals和 Platteeuw热力学模型、量子力学从头算粒子相互作用势能、DMW-92状态方程和Pitzer电解质理论为基础,能在很宽广温压范围内预测温度、压力、盐度和毛细管力对甲烷水合物形成和分解的影响.通过对比本模型的预测结果与实验数据,可知本模型能够准确地预测海水和多孔介质中甲烷水合物的相平衡条件.对于一定盐度下多孔介质中甲烷水合物的形成温压条件的在线计算可浏览: www.geochem-model.org/models.htm.%A thermodynamic model is presented for predicting the multi-phase equilibria of methane hydrate, liquid and vapor phases under conditions of different temperature, pressure, salinity and pore sizes. The model is based on Van der Waals - Platteeuw model, angle-dependent ab initio intermolecular potentials, DMW-92 equation of state and Pitzer theory. Comparison with the experimental data shows that this model can predict the equilibrium p-T condition of CH_4 hydrate in seawater and porous media with high accuracy. Online calculations of the p-T condition for the formation of methane hydrate at a given salinity and pore sizes of sediments is available on: www.geochem-model.org/models.htm.

  17. The role of water in gas hydrate dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    When raised to temperatures above the ice melting point, gas hydrates release their gas in well-defined, reproducible events that occur within self-maintained temperature ranges slightly below the ice point. This behavior is observed for structure I (carbon dioxide, methane) and structure II gas hydrates (methane-ethane, and propane), including those formed with either H2O- or D2O-host frameworks, and dissociated at either ambient or elevated pressure conditions. We hypothesize that at temperatures above the H2O (or D2O) melting point: (1) hydrate dissociation produces water + gas instead of ice + gas, (2) the endothermic dissociation reaction lowers the temperature of the sample, causing the water product to freeze, (3) this phase transition buffers the sample temperatures within a narrow temperature range just below the ice point until dissociation goes to completion, and (4) the temperature depression below the pure ice melting point correlates with the average rate of dissociation and arises from solution of the hydrate-forming gas, released by dissociation, in the water phase at elevated concentrations. In addition, for hydrate that is partially dissociated to ice + gas at lower temperatures and then heated to temperatures above the ice point, all remaining hydrate dissociates to gas + liquid water as existing barriers to dissociation disappear. The enhanced dissociation rates at warmer temperatures are probably associated with faster gas transport pathways arising from the formation of water product.

  18. Pectin as an Extraordinary Natural Kinetic Hydrate Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shurui; Fan, Shuanshi; Fang, Songtian; Lang, Xuemei; Wang, Yanhong; Chen, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Pectin as a novel natural kinetic hydrate inhibitor, expected to be eco-friendly and sufficiently biodegradable, was studied in this paper. The novel crystal growth inhibition (CGI) and standard induction time methods were used to evaluate its effect as hydrate inhibitor. It could successfully inhibit methane hydrate formation at subcooling temperature up to 12.5 °C and dramatically slowed the hydrate crystal growth. The dosage of pectin decreased by 66% and effective time extended 10 times than typical kinetic inhibitor. Besides, its maximum growth rate was no more than 2.0%/h, which was far less than 5.5%/h of growth rate for PVCap at the same dosage. The most prominent feature was that it totally inhibited methane hydrate crystal rapid growth when hydrate crystalline occurred. Moreover, in terms of typical natural inhibitors, the inhibition activity of pectin increased 10.0-fold in induction time and 2.5-fold in subcooling temperature. The extraordinary inhibition activity is closely related to its hydrogen bonding interaction with water molecules and the hydrophilic structure. Finally, the biodegradability and economical efficiency of pectin were also taken into consideration. The results showed the biodegradability improved 75.0% and the cost reduced by more than 73.3% compared to typical commercial kinetic inhibitors.

  19. Geochemical and geologic factors effecting the formulation of gas hydrate: Task No. 5, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

    1988-01-01

    The main objective of our work has been to determine the primary geochemical and geological factors controlling gas hydrate information and occurrence and particularly in the factors responsible for the generation and accumulation of methane in oceanic gas hydrates. In order to understand the interrelation of geochemical/geological factors controlling gas hydrate occurrence, we have undertaken a multicomponent program which has included (1) comparison of available information at sites where gas hydrates have been observed through drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) on the Blake Outer Ridge and Middle America Trench; (2) regional synthesis of information related to gas hydrate occurrences of the Middle America Trench; (3) development of a model for the occurrence of a massive gas hydrate as DSDP Site 570; (4) a global synthesis of gas hydrate occurrences; and (5) development of a predictive model for gas hydrate occurrence in oceanic sediment. The first three components of this program were treated as part of a 1985 Department of Energy Peer Review. The present report considers the last two components and presents information on the worldwide occurrence of gas hydrates with particular emphasis on the Circum-Pacific and Arctic basins. A model is developed to account for the occurrence of oceanic gas hydrates in which the source of the methane is from microbial processes. 101 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUAN XiWu; JIN YoungKeun; Anatoly OBZHIROV; YUE BaoJing

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Korea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scansonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure detected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%-30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  1. Characteristics of shallow gas hydrate in Okhotsk Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatoly; OBZHIROV

    2008-01-01

    Multidisciplinary field investigations were carried out in Okhotsk Sea by R/V Akademik M.A. Lavrentyev (LV) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) in May 2006, supported by funding agencies from Ko- rea, Russia, Japan and China. Geophysical data including echo-sounder, bottom profile, side-scan- sonar, and gravity core sample were obtained aimed to understand the characteristics and formation mechanism of shallow gas hydrates. Based on the geophysical data, we found that the methane flare detected by echo-sounder was the evidence of free gas in the sediment, while the dome structure de- tected by side-scan sonar and bottom profile was the root of gas venting. Gas hydrate retrieved from core on top of the dome structure which was interbedded as thin lamination or lenses with thickness varying from a few millimeters to 3 cm. Gas hydrate content in hydrate-bearing intervals visually amounted to 5%―30% of the sediment volume. This paper argued that gases in the sediment core were not all from gas hydrate decomposition during the gravity core lifting process, free gases must existed in the gas hydrate stability zone, and tectonic structure like dome structure in this paper was free gas central, gas hydrate formed only when gases over-saturated in this gas central, away from these struc- tures, gas hydrate could not form due to low gas concentration.

  2. Gas hydrates and magnetism : comparative geological settings for diagenetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, L.; Enkin, R.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Sidney, BC (Canada). Geological Survey of Canada; Hamilton, T. [Camosun College, Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Geophysical and geochemical methods assist in locating and quantifying natural gas hydrate deposits. They are also useful in understanding these resources, their climate impacts and their potential role in geohazards. In order to understand the mechanisms of gas hydrate formation and its natural distribution in sediments, magnetic studies were conducted on cores from three different geological settings. This paper presented the results of a detailed magnetic investigation, as well as petrological observations, that were conducted on cores from a permafrost setting in the Mackenzie Delta located in the Canadian Northwest Territories Mallik region, and two marine settings, from the Cascadia margin off Vancouver Island and the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program from the Bengal Fan. The paper provided background information on the permafrost setting in Mallik region of the Mackenzie Delta as well as the Cascadia margin. The magnetic properties of gas hydrate bearing sediments were found to be a combination of the original detrital content and the diagenetic transformations of iron minerals caused by the unique environment produced by gas hydrate formation. The availability of methane to provide food for bacteria coupled with the concentration of solutes outside gas hydrate accumulation zones led to the creation of iron sulphides. These new minerals were observable using magnetic techniques, which help in delineating the gas hydrate formation mechanism and may be developed into new geophysical methods of gas hydrate exploration. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  3. Temperature, pressure, and compositional effects on anomalous or "self" preservation of gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    We previously reported on a thermal regime where pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate is preserved metastably in bulk at up to 75 K above its nominal temperature stability limit of 193 K at 0.1 MPa, following rapid release of the sample pore pressure. Large fractions (>50 vol.%) of methane hydrate can be preserved for 2-3 weeks by this method, reflecting the greatly suppressed rates of dissociation that characterize this "anomalous preservation" regime. This behavior contrasts that exhibited by methane hydrate at both colder (193-240 K) and warmer (272-290 K) isothermal test conditions, where dissociation rates increase monotonically with increasing temperature. Here, we report on recent experiments that further investigate the effects of temperature, pressure, and composition on anomalous preservation behavior. All tests conducted on sI methane hydrate yielded self-consistent results that confirm the highly temperature-sensitive but reproducible nature of anomalous preservation behavior. Temperature-stepping experiments conducted between 250 and 268 K corroborate the relative rates measured previously in isothermal preservation tests, and elevated pore-pressure tests showed that, as expected, dissociation rates are further reduced with increasing pressure. Surprisingly, sII methane-ethane hydrate was found to exhibit no comparable preservation effect when rapidly depressurized at 268 K, even though it is thermodynamically stable at higher temperatures and lower pressures than sI methane hydrate. These results, coupled with SEM imaging of quenched sample material from a variety of dissociation tests, strongly support our earlier arguments that ice-"shielding" effects provided by partial dissociation along hydrate grain surfaces do not serve as the primary mechanism for anomalous preservation. The underlying physical-chemistry mechanism(s) of anomalous preservation remains elusive, but appears to be based more on textural or morphological changes within the hydrate

  4. The impact of hydrate saturation on the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silts, and clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamarina, J.C. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A study was conducted to provide an internally-consistent, systematically-acquired database that could help in evaluating gas hydrate reservoirs. Other objectives were to assist in geomechanical analyses, hazards evaluation and the development of methane hydrate production techniques in sandy lithologies and fine-grained sediments that exist in the northern Gulf of Mexico. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments facilitates the interpretation of geophysical field data, borehole and slope stability analyses, and reservoir simulation and production models. This paper reported on the key findings derived from 5 years of laboratory experiments conducted on synthetic samples of sand, silts, or clays subjected to various confining pressures. The samples contained controlled saturations of tetrahydrofuran hydrate formed from the dissolved phase. This internally-consistent data set was used to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the trends in geophysical and geotechnical properties as a function of hydrate saturation, soil characteristics, and other parameters. The experiments emphasized measurements of seismic velocities, electrical conductivity and permittivity, large strain deformation and strength, and thermal conductivity. The impact of hydrate formation technique on the resulting physical properties measurements were discussed. The data set was used to identify systematic effects of sediment characteristics, hydrate concentration, and state of stress. The study showed that the electrical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are less sensitive to the method used to form hydrate in the laboratory than to hydrate saturation. It was concluded that mechanical properties are strongly influenced by both soil properties and the hydrate loci. Since the thermal conductivity depends on the interaction of several factors, it cannot be readily predicted by volume average formulations. 23 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  5. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  6. Gas hydrate detection and mapping on the US east coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlbrandt, T.S.; Dillon, W.P.

    1993-12-31

    Project objectives are to identify and map gas hydrate accumulations on the US eastern continental margin using remote sensing (seismic profiling) techniques and to relate these concentrations to the geological factors that-control them. In order to test the remote sensing methods, gas hydrate-cemented sediments will be tested in the laboratory and an effort will be made to perform similar physical tests on natural hydrate-cemented sediments from the study area. Gas hydrate potentially may represent a future major resource of energy. Furthermore, it may influence climate change because it forms a large reservoir for methane, which is a very effective greenhouse gas; its breakdown probably is a controlling factor for sea-floor landslides; and its presence has significant effect on the acoustic velocity of sea-floor sediments.

  7. Scanning electron microscopy investigations of laboratory-grown gas clathrate hydrates formed from melting ice, and comparison to natural hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Circone, S.; Durham, W.B.

    2004-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate grain texture and pore structure development within various compositions of pure sI and sII gas hydrates synthesized in the laboratory, as well as in natural samples retrieved from marine (Gulf of Mexico) and permafrost (NW Canada) settings. Several samples of methane hydrate were also quenched after various extents of partial reaction for assessment of mid-synthesis textural progression. All laboratory-synthesized hydrates were grown under relatively high-temperature and high-pressure conditions from rounded ice grains with geometrically simple pore shapes, yet all resulting samples displayed extensive recrystallization with complex pore geometry. Growth fronts of mesoporous methane hydrate advancing into dense ice reactant were prevalent in those samples quenched after limited reaction below and at the ice point. As temperatures transgress the ice point, grain surfaces continue to develop a discrete "rind" of hydrate, typically 5 to 30 ??m thick. The cores then commonly melt, with rind microfracturing allowing migration of the melt to adjacent grain boundaries where it also forms hydrate. As the reaction continues under progressively warmer conditions, the hydrate product anneals to form dense and relatively pore-free regions of hydrate grains, in which grain size is typically several tens of micrometers. The prevalence of hollow, spheroidal shells of hydrate, coupled with extensive redistribution of reactant and product phases throughout reaction, implies that a diffusion-controlled shrinking-core model is an inappropriate description of sustained hydrate growth from melting ice. Completion of reaction at peak synthesis conditions then produces exceptional faceting and euhedral crystal growth along exposed pore walls. Further recrystallization or regrowth can then accompany even short-term exposure of synthetic hydrates to natural ocean-floor conditions, such that the final textures may closely mimic

  8. Tectonic Controls on Gas Hydrate Distribution off SW Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, C.; Chi, W. C.; Jegen, M. D.; Muff, S.; Hölz, S.; Lebas, E.; Sommer, M.; Lin, S.; Liu, C. S.; Lin, A. T.; Klaucke, I.; Klaeschen, D.; Chen, L.; Kunath, P.; McIntosh, K. D.; Feseker, T.

    2015-12-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea is characterized by wide-spread occurrence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSR), indicating the presence of marine gas hydrates. Because the area covers both the tectonically inactive passive margin and the northern termination of the Manila Trench subduction zone while sediment input is broadly similar, this area provides an excellent opportunity to study the influence of tectonic processes on the dynamics of gas hydrate systems. Long-offset multi-channel seismic data show that movement along thrust faults and blind thrust faults caused anticlinal ridges on the active margin, while faults are absent on the passive margin. This coincides with high-hydrate saturations derived from ocean bottom seismometer data and controlled source electromagnetic data, and conspicuous high-amplitude reflections in P-Cable 3D seismic data above the BSR in the anticlinal ridges of the active margin. On the contrary, all geophysical evidence for the passive margin points to normal- to low-hydrate saturations. Geochemical analysis of gas samples collected at seep sites on the active margin show methane with heavy δ13C isotope composition, while gas collected on the passive margin shows highly depleted (light) carbon isotope composition. Thus, we interpret the passive margin as a typical gas hydrate province fuelled by biogenic production of methane and the active margin gas hydrate system as a system that is fuelled not only by biogenic gas production but also by additional advection of thermogenic methane from the subduction system. The location of the highest gas hydrate saturations in the hanging wall next to the thrust faults suggests that the thrust faults represent pathways for the migration of methane. Our findings suggest that the most promising gas hydrate occurrences for exploitation of gas hydrate as an energy source may be found in the core of the active margin roll over anticlines immediately above the BSR and that high

  9. Constraining gas hydrate occurrence in the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope : fine scale analysis of grain-size in hydrate-bearing sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangsterfer, A.; Driscoll, N.; Kastner, M. [Scripps Inst. of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States). Geosciences Research Division

    2008-07-01

    Methane hydrates can form within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) in sea beds. The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) contains an underlying petroleum system and deeply buried, yet dynamic salt deposits. Salt tectonics and fluid expulsion upward through the sediment column result in the formation of fractures, through which high salinity brines migrate into the GHSZ, destabilizing gas hydrates. Thermogenic and biogenic hydrocarbons also migrate to the seafloor along the GOMs northern slope, originating from the thermal and biogenic degradation of organic matter. Gas hydrate occurrence can be controlled by either primary permeability, forming in coarse-grained sediment layers, or by secondary permeability, forming in areas where hydrofracture and faulting generate conduits through which hydrocarbon-saturated fluids flow. This paper presented a study that attempted to determine the relationship between grain-size, permeability, and gas hydrate distribution. Grain-size analyses were performed on cores taken from Keathley Canyon and Atwater Valley in the GOM, on sections of cores that both contained and lacked gas hydrate. Using thermal anomalies as proxies for the occurrence of methane hydrate within the cores, samples of sediment were taken and the grain-size distributions were measured to see if there was a correlation between gas hydrate distribution and grain-size. The paper described the methods, including determination of hydrate occurrence and core analysis. It was concluded that gas hydrate occurrence in Keathley Canyon and Atwater Valley was constrained by secondary permeability and was structurally controlled by hydrofractures and faulting that acted as conduits through which methane-rich fluids flowed. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  10. Investigating the Metastability of Clathrate Hydrates for Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Carolyn Ann [Colorado School of Mines

    2014-11-18

    Important breakthrough discoveries have been achieved from the DOE award on the key processes controlling the synthesis and structure-property relations of clathrate hydrates, which are critical to the development of clathrate hydrates as energy storage materials. Key achievements include: (i) the discovery of key clathrate hydrate building blocks (stable and metastable) leading to clathrate hydrate nucleation and growth; (ii) development of a rapid clathrate hydrate synthesis route via a seeding mechanism; (iii) synthesis-structure relations of H2 + CH4/CO2 binary hydrates to control thermodynamic requirements for energy storage and sequestration applications; (iv) discovery of a new metastable phase present during clathrate hydrate structural transitions. The success of our research to-date is demonstrated by the significant papers we have published in high impact journals, including Science, Angewandte Chemie, J. Am. Chem. Soc. Intellectual Merits of Project Accomplishments: The intellectual merits of the project accomplishments are significant and transformative, in which the fundamental coupled computational and experimental program has provided new and critical understanding on the key processes controlling the nucleation, growth, and thermodynamics of clathrate hydrates containing hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide, and other guest molecules for energy storage. Key examples of the intellectual merits of the accomplishments include: the first discovery of the nucleation pathways and dominant stable and metastable structures leading to clathrate hydrate formation; the discovery and experimental confirmation of new metastable clathrate hydrate structures; the development of new synthesis methods for controlling clathrate hydrate formation and enclathration of molecular hydrogen. Broader Impacts of Project Accomplishments: The molecular investigations performed in this project on the synthesis (nucleation & growth)-structure-stability relations of clathrate

  11. Norwegian Research Strategies on gas Hydrates and Natural Seeps in the Nordic Seas Region (GANS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelstuen, B. O.; Sejrup, H. P.; Andreassen, K.; Boe, R.; Eldholm, O.; Hovland, M.; Knies, J.; Kvalstad, T.; Kvamme, B.; Mienert, J.; Pedersen, R. B.

    2004-12-01

    Continuous leakage of methane to the oceans from hydrate reservoirs that partially are exposed towards the seafloor is an increasing international concern, as the greenhouse gas methane is significantly more (c. 20 times) aggressive than CO2. In Norway we have research groups with interest and experience on natural seeps and gas hydrates. These features, and processes related to them, are challenging research targets which demands inputs from different fields if important research breakthroughs shall be made. In February 2004 deep sea researchers from the University of Tromso, Geological Survey of Norway, Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Statoil and University of Bergen met to obtain an overview of the research effort in the fields of natural seeps and gas hydrates in Norway and to discuss national coordination, research strategies, research infrastructure and international co-operation. The following research strategies were agreed upon: i) Strengthen multidisciplinary research on deep sea systems, ii) develop a strategy for research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, iii) contribute in national coordination of research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, iv) Coordinate the use and development of research infrastructures important for research on natural seeps and gas hydrates, and v) contribute in the international evaluations of strategies for hydrate reservoir exploitation. Proposed research tasks for GANS include: i) Gas and gas hydrate formation processes and conditions for transport, accumulation, preservation and dissociation in sediments, ii) Effect of gas hydrate on physical properties of sediment, iii) Detection and quantification of in situ gas hydrate content and distribution pattern, iv) Effect of dissociation on soil properties, v) Gas hydrates as an energy resource, vi) Rapid methane release and climate change, and vii) Geohazard and environmental impact.

  12. Study on gas hydrate as a new energy resource in the 21th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Byeong-Jae; Kwak Young-Hoon; Kim, Won-Sik [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (KR)] (and others)

    1999-12-01

    Natural gas hydrate, a special type of clathrate hydrates, is a metastable solid compound which mainly consists of methane and water, and generally called as gas hydrate. It is stable in the specific low-temperature/high-pressure conditions. Gas hydrates play an important role as major reservoir of methane on the earth. On the other hand, the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates could cause the plugging in pipeline, gas kick during production, atmospheric pollution and geohazard. To understand the formation and dissociation of the gas hydrate, the experimental equilibrium conditions of methane hydrate were measured in pure water, 3 wt.% NaCl and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. The equilibrium conditions of propane hydrates were also measured in pure water. The relationship between methane hydrate formation time and overpressure was also analyzed through the laboratory work. The geophysical surveys using air-gun system and multibeam echo sounder were implemented to develop exploration techniques and to evaluate the gas hydrate potential in the East Sea, Korea. General indicators of submarine gas hydrates on seismic data is commonly inferred from the BSR developed parallel to the see floor, amplitude blanking at the upper part of the BSR, and phase reversal and decrease of the interval velocity at BSR. The field data were processed using Geobit 2.9.5 developed by KIGAM to detect the gas hydrate indicators. The accurate velocity analysis was performed by XVA (X-window based Velocity Analysis). Processing results show that the strong reflector occurred parallel to the sea floor were shown at about 1800 ms two way travel time. The interval velocity decrease at this strong reflector and at the reflection phase reversal corresponding to the reflection at the sea floor. Gas hydrate stability field in the study area was determined using the data of measured hydrate equilibrium condition, hydrothermal gradient and geothermal gradient. The depth of BSR detected in the seismic

  13. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas

  14. Hydrate Evolution in Response to Ongoing Environmental Shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempel, Alan [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Natural gas hydrates have the potential to become a vital domestic clean-burning energy source. However, past changes in environmental conditions have caused hydrates to become unstable and trigger both massive submarine landslides and the development of crater-like pockmarks, thereby releasing methane into the overlying seawater and atmosphere, where it acts as a powerful greenhouse gas. This project was designed to fill critical gaps in our understanding of domestic hydrate resources and improve forecasts for their response to environmental shifts. Project work can be separated into three interrelated components, each involving the development of predictive mathematical models. The first project component concerns the role of sediment properties on the development and dissociation of concentrated hydrate anomalies. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict equilibrium solubility of methane in twophase equilibrium with hydrate as a function of measureable porous medium characteristics. The second project component concerned the evolution of hydrate distribution in heterogeneous reservoirs. To this end, we developed numerical models to predict the growth and decay of anomalies in representative physical environments. The third project component concerned the stability of hydrate-bearing slopes under changing environmental conditions. To this end, we developed numerical treatments of pore pressure evolution and consolidation, then used "infinite-slope" analysis to approximate the landslide potential in representative physical environments, and developed a "rate-and-state" frictional formulation to assess the stability of finite slip patches that are hypothesized to develop in response to the dissociation of hydrate anomalies. The increased predictive capabilities that result from this work provide a framework for interpreting field observations of hydrate anomalies in terms of the history of environmental forcing that led to their development. Moreover

  15. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. Toward this goal, we built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. Here we report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. These results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  16. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  17. Geochemical Monitoring Of The Gas Hydrate Production By CO2/CH4 Exchange In The Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Production Test Well, Alaska North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T. D.; Collett, T. S.; Ignik Sikumi, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrocarbon gases, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water were collected from production streams at the Ignik Sikumi gas hydrate production test well (TD, 791.6 m), drilled on the Alaska North Slope. The well was drilled to test the feasibility of producing methane by carbon dioxide injection that replaces methane in the solid gas hydrate. The Ignik Sikumi well penetrated a stratigraphically-bounded prospect within the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate accumulation overlies the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and is restricted to the up-dip portion of a series of nearshore deltaic sandstone reservoirs in the Sagavanirktok Formation. Hydrate-bearing sandstones penetrated by Ignik Sikumi well occur in three primary horizons; an upper zone, ("E" sand, 579.7 - 597.4 m) containing 17.7 meters of gas hydrate-bearing sands, a middle zone ("D" sand, 628.2 - 648.6 m) with 20.4 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands and a lower zone ("C" sand, 678.8 - 710.8 m), containing 32 m of gas hydrate-bearing sands with neutron porosity log-interpreted average gas hydrate saturations of 58, 76 and 81% respectively. A known volume mixture of 77% nitrogen and 23% carbon dioxide was injected into an isolated section of the upper part of the "C" sand to start the test. Production flow-back part of the test occurred in three stages each followed by a period of shut-in: (1) unassisted flowback; (2) pumping above native methane gas hydrate stability conditions; and (3) pumping below the native methane gas hydrate stability conditions. Methane production occurred immediately after commencing unassisted flowback. Methane concentration increased from 0 to 40% while nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations decreased to 48 and 12% respectively. Pumping above the hydrate stability phase boundary produced gas with a methane concentration climbing above 80% while the carbon dioxide and nitrogen concentrations fell to 2 and 18

  18. Dissociation and specific heats of gas hydrates under submarine and sublacustrine environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, R.; Hachikubo, A.; Shoji, H. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Studies have shown that natural gas hydrates located near a mud volcano in Lake Baikal contain high concentrations of ethane. Gas hydrates absorb and release large amounts of latent heat during their formation and dissociation processes. In this study, the specific heat of synthetic methane and ethane hydrates were measured under high pressure using a heat-flow calorimeter. The aim of the study was to develop an improved understanding of the thermal environment of gas hydrate-bearing sediments in submarine and sublacustrine environments. Ice was placed in 2 sampling cells and pressurized with methane and ethane at 5 MPa and 2 MPa. After the gas hydrates formed, the samples were then heated from 263 K to 288 K. An analysis of data obtained from the experiment showed that large negative heat flow peaks corresponding with methane gas hydrate dissociation occurred in temperature ranges of 279 to 282 K at a pressure of 5 MPa, and at temperatures of 283-286 K at 2 MPa for the ethane gas hydrate. Future experiments with the calorimeter will be conducted at higher pressure ranges. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-06-01

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  20. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearing sediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed, at least briefly, to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine the effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes, and speeds of the original and depressurized/repressurized samples are compared. X-ray computed tomography images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands owing to the depressurizaton/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  1. 环戊烷水合物平衡数据%EQUILIBRIUM DATA OF CYCLOPENTANE HYDRATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁德青; 郭开华; 樊栓狮; 王如竹

    2001-01-01

    @@ In the oil and gas industry, it is important to determine hydrate phase boundary for avoiding hydrate formation. In general n-butane is regarded as the heaviest hydrocarbon hydrate. But for oil and gas condensate systems, it has been found that some hydrocarbons heavier than n-butane could enter the large cavity of structure-II hydrate due to their effective van der Waal's diameter. The hydrate formation characteristics of benzene[1], cyclohexane[2], and cyclopentane and neopentane in their binaries/tern-aries with methane or/and nitrogen have been reported[3]. Ripmeester et al[4] pointed out that cyclopentane could form gas hydrates without a help gas. However there are no further experimental data to support it.

  2. Monitoring hydrate formation and dissociation in sandstone and bulk with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Moradi-Araghi, A; Stevens, J C

    2003-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be a very effective tool for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates because of the large intensity contrast between the images of the liquid components and the solid hydrate. Tetrahydrofuran/water hydrate was used because the two liquid components are miscible and form hydrate at ambient pressure. These properties made this feasibility study proceed much faster than using methane/water, which requires high pressure to form the hydrate. The formation and dissociation was monitored first in a THF/water-saturated Berea sandstone plug and second in the bulk. In both cases it appeared that nucleation was needed to begin the formation process, i.e., the presence of surfaces in the sandstone and shaking of the bulk solution. Dissociation appeared to be dominated by the rate of thermal energy transfer. The dissociation temperature of hydrate formed in the sandstone plug was not significantly different from the dissociation temperature in bulk.

  3. Simulation experiments on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG JianMing; CAO ZhiMin; CHEN JianWen; ZHANG Min; LI Jin; YANG GuiFang

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were made on 58 sediment samples from four sites (1244, 1245, 1250 and 1251) of ODP204 at five temperature points (25, 35, 45, 55 and 65℃) to simulate methane production from hy drate-bearing sediments. Simulation results from site 1244 show that the gas components consist mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, and heavy hydrocarbons more than C2+ cannot be detected.This site also gives results, similar to those from the other three, that the methane production is con trolled by experimental temperatures, generally reaching the maximum gas yields per gram sediment or TOC under lower temperatures (25 and 35℃). In other words, the methane amount could be related to the buried depth of sediments, given the close relation between the depth and temperature. Sediments less than 1200 m below seafioor are inferred to still act as a biogenic gas producer to pour methane into the present hydrate zone, while sedimentary layers more than 1200 m below seafloor have become too biogenically exhausted to offer any biogas, but instead they produce thermogenic gas to give ad ditional supply to the hydrate formation in the study area.

  4. Mechanical and electromagnetic properties of northern Gulf of Mexico sediments with and without THF hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.Y.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2008-01-01

    Using an oedometer cell instrumented to measure the evolution of electromagnetic properties, small strain stiffness, and temperature, we conducted consolidation tests on sediments recovered during drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico at the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon sites as part of the 2005 Chevron Joint Industry Project on Methane Hydrates. The tested specimens include both unremolded specimens (as recovered from the original core liner) and remolded sediments both without gas hydrate and with pore fluid exchanged to attain 100% synthetic (tetrahydrofuran) hydrate saturation at any stage of loading. Test results demonstrate the extent to which the electromagnetic and mechanical properties of hydrate-bearing marine sediments are governed by the vertical effective stress, stress history, porosity, hydrate saturation, fabric, ionic concentration of the pore fluid, and temperature. We also show how permittivity and electrical conductivity data can be used to estimate the evolution of hydrate volume fraction during formation. The gradual evolution of geophysical properties during hydrate formation probably reflects the slow increase in ionic concentration in the pore fluid due to ion exclusion in closed systems and the gradual decrease in average pore size in which the hydrate forms. During hydrate formation, the increase in S-wave velocity is delayed with respect to the decrease in permittivity, consistent with hydrate formation on mineral surfaces and subsequent crystal growth toward the pore space. No significant decementation/debonding occurred in 100% THF hydrate-saturated sediments during unloading, hence the probability of sampling hydrate-bearing sediments without disturbing the original sediment fabric is greatest for samples in which the gas hydrate is primarily responsible for maintaining the sediment fabric and for which the time between core retrieval and restoration of in situ effective stress in the laboratory is minimized. In evaluating the

  5. Detection and Appraisal of Gas Hydrates: Indian Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sain, K.

    2009-04-01

    Gas hydrates, found in shallow sediments of permafrost and outer continental margins, are crystalline form of methane and water. The carbon within global gas hydrates is estimated two times the carbon contained in world-wide fossil fuels. It is also predicted that 15% recovery of gas hydrates can meet the global energy requirement for the next 200 years. Several parameters like bathymetry, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, rate of sedimentation and total organic carbon content indicate very good prospect of gas hydrates in the vast offshore regions of India. Methane stored in the form of gas hydrates within the Indian exclusive economic zone is estimated to be few hundred times the country's conventional gas reserve. India produces less than one-third of her oil requirement and gas hydrates provide great hopes as a viable source of energy in the 21st century. Thus identification and quantitative assessment of gas hydrates are very important. By scrutiny and reanalysis of available surface seismic data, signatures of gas hydrates have been found out in the Kerala-Konkan and Saurashtra basins in the western margin, and Krishna-Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman regions in the eastern margin of India by mapping the bottom simulating reflector or BSR based on its characteristic features. In fact, the coring and drilling in 2006 by the Indian National Gas Hydrate Program have established the ground truth in the eastern margin. It has become all the more important now to identify further prospective regions with or without BSR; demarcate the lateral/areal extent of gas hydrate-bearing sediments and evaluate their resource potential in both margins of India. We have developed various approaches based on seismic traveltime tomography; waveform inversion; amplitude versus offset (AVO) modeling; AVO attributes; seismic attributes and rock physics modeling for the detection, delineation and quantification of gas-hydrates. The blanking, reflection strength, instantaneous

  6. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  7. Optical-cell evidence for superheated ice under gas-hydrate-forming conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, L.A.; Hogenboom, D.L.; Durham, W.B.; Kirby, S.H.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1998-01-01

    We previously reported indirect but compelling evidence that fine-grained H2O ice under elevated CH4 gas pressure can persist to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while slowly reacting to form methane clathrate hydrate. This phenomenon has now been visually verified by duplicating these experiments in an optical cell while observing the very slow hydrate-forming process as the reactants were warmed from 250 to 290 K at methane pressures of 23 to 30 MPa. Limited hydrate growth occurred rapidly after initial exposure of the methane gas to the ice grains at temperatures well within the ice subsolidus region. No evidence for continued growth of the hydrate phase was observed until samples were warmed above the equilibrium H2O melting curve. With continued heating, no bulk melting of the ice grains or free liquid water was detected anywhere within the optical cell until hydrate dissociation conditions were reached (292 K at 30 MPa), even though full conversion of the ice grains to hydrate requires 6-8 h at temperatures approaching 290 K. In a separate experimental sequence, unreacted portions of H2O ice grains that had persisted to temperatures above their ordinary melting point were successfully induced to melt, without dissociating the coexisting hydrate in the sample tube, by reducing the pressure overstep of the equilibrium phase boundary and thereby reducing the rate of hydrate growth at the ice-hydrate interface. Results from similar tests using CO2 as the hydrate-forming species demonstrated that this superheating effect is not unique to the CH4-H2O system.

  8. New insights into the transport processes controlling the sulfate-methane-transition-zone near methane vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Nabil; Garziglia, Sébastien; Ruffine, Livio

    2016-05-01

    Over the past years, several studies have raised concerns about the possible interactions between methane hydrate decomposition and external change. To carry out such an investigation, it is essential to characterize the baseline dynamics of gas hydrate systems related to natural geological and sedimentary processes. This is usually treated through the analysis of sulfate-reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Here, we model sulfate reduction coupled with AOM as a two-dimensional (2D) problem including, advective and diffusive transport. This is applied to a case study from a deep-water site off Nigeria’s coast where lateral methane advection through turbidite layers was suspected. We show by analyzing the acquired data in combination with computational modeling that a two-dimensional approach is able to accurately describe the recent past dynamics of such a complex natural system. Our results show that the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ) is not a vertical barrier for dissolved sulfate and methane. We also show that such a modeling is able to assess short timescale variations in the order of decades to centuries.

  9. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-12-31

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  10. Improving methane storage on wet activated carbons at various amounts of water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MOHAMMAD JABER DARABI MAHBOUB; ALI AHMADPOUR; HAMED RASHIDI

    2012-01-01

    Different mesoporous activated carbons were prepared by both chemical and physical activation processes and were examined for methane uptake in the presence of water.Methane isotherms were obtained at wet condition by wetting samples with water at mass ratio of water/carbon (R) close to 1.0.To compare,the amount of methane storage were also measured at dry situation.The maximum amount of methane stored was attained as 237 WV at R=1.0 by hydrate formation at the methane critical pressure.In the next step,mass ratios of water/carbon were changed to investigate various amount of water for methane storage enhancement.Two other values of mass ratio of water/carbon ( R =0.8 and 1.4 ) were selected and methane isotherms were obtained at the same conditions.Maximum values of 210 and 248 V/V were reached for methane storage,respectively.It was also observed that,in the pressure range lower than hydrate pressure,by increasing water ratio the hydrate formation pressure was decreased and methane uptake was much less than that of dry condition due to pore filling by water.

  11. Permafrost-associated gas hydrate: is it really approximately 1% of the global system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Permafrost-associated gas hydrates are often assumed to contain ∼1 % of the global gas-in-place in gas hydrates based on a study26 published over three decades ago. As knowledge of permafrost-associated gas hydrates has grown, it has become clear that many permafrost-associated gas hydrates are inextricably linked to an associated conventional petroleum system, and that their formation history (trapping of migrated gas in situ during Pleistocene cooling) is consistent with having been sourced at least partially in nearby thermogenic gas deposits. Using modern data sets that constrain the distribution of continuous permafrost onshore5 and subsea permafrost on circum-Arctic Ocean continental shelves offshore and that estimate undiscovered conventional gas within arctic assessment units,16 the done here reveals where permafrost-associated gas hydrates are most likely to occur, concluding that Arctic Alaska and the West Siberian Basin are the best prospects. A conservative estimate is that 20 Gt C (2.7·1013 kg CH4) may be sequestered in permafrost-associated gas hydrates if methane were the only hydrate-former. This value is slightly more than 1 % of modern estimates (corresponding to 1600 Gt C to 1800 Gt C2,22) for global gas-in-place in methane hydrates and about double the absolute estimate (11.2 Gt C) made in 1981.26

  12. Stages of Gas-Hydrate Evolution on the Northern Cascadia Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the IODP Expedition 311 Scientists

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas hydrate occurs beneath many continental slopes and in arctic permafrost areas. Recent studies have indicated that the largest deposits of gas hydrate might lie in nearly horizontal layers several hundred meters beneath the seafloor of continental slopes, especially in the large, accretionary sedimentary prisms of subduction zones. Expedition 311 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP investigated the formation of gas hydrate in the accretionary prism of the Cascadia subduction zone (Fig. 1. The primary objectives of Expedition 311 were to test and constraingeological models of gas hydrate formation by upward fluidand methane transport in accretionary prisms. We specifi -cally sought to (a determine the mechanisms that controlthe nature, magnitude, and distribution of the gas hydrate,(b find the pathways of the fluid migration required to formlarge concentrations of gas hydrate, (c examine the effectsof gas hydrate on the physical properties of the host sediment,and (d investigate the microbiology and geochemistryassociated with the occurrence of gas hydrate. Furthermore,we concentrated on the contrast between methane transportby focused fl ow in fault zones and by dispersed pervasiveupward flow at various scales of permeability.

  13. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments 1. Conceptual model of gas hydrate growth conditioned by host sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clennell, M.B.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Henry, P.; Winters, W.J.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of submarine gas hydrates is largely dictated by pressure and temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of deep marine sediments may also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our conceptual model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in a freezing soil. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments by a combination of reduced pore water activity in the vicinity of hydrophilic mineral surfaces, and the excess internal energy of small crystals confined in pores. The excess energy can be thought of as a "capillary pressure" in the hydrate crystal, related to the pore size distribution and the state of stress in the sediment framework. The base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature (nearer to the seabed) than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. Capillary effects or a build up of salt in the system can expand the phase boundary between hydrate and free gas into a divariant field extending over a finite depth range dictated by total methane content and pore-size distribution. Hysteresis between the temperatures of crystallization and dissociation of the clathrate is also predicted. Growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, and lenses in muds; cements in sands) can largely be explained by capillary effects, but kinetics of nucleation and growth are also important. The formation of concentrated gas hydrates in a partially closed system with respect to material transport, or where gas can flush through the system, may lead to water depletion in the host sediment. This "freeze-drying" may be detectable through physical changes to the sediment (low water content and overconsolidation) and/or chemical anomalies in the pore waters and metastable

  14. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  15. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    OpenAIRE

    Stanković Mirjana S.; Kovačević Branimir T.; Pezo Lato L.

    2003-01-01

    The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE), Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate ...

  16. Three-phase flow of submarine gas hydrate pipe transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李立; 徐海良; 杨放琼

    2015-01-01

    In the hydraulic transporting process of cutter-suction mining natural gas hydrate, when the temperature−pressure equilibrium of gas hydrate is broken, gas hydrates dissociate into gas. As a result, solid−liquid two-phase flow (hydrate and water) transforms into gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow (methane, hydrate and water) inside the pipeline. The Euler model and CFD-PBM model were used to simulate gas−solid−liquid three-phase flow. Numerical simulation results show that the gas and solid phase gradually accumulate to the center of the pipe. Flow velocity decreases from center to boundary of the pipe along the radial direction. Comparison of numerical simulation results of two models reveals that the flow state simulated by CFD-PBM model is more uniform than that simulated by Euler model, and the main behavior of the bubble is small bubbles coalescence to large one. Comparison of numerical simulation and experimental investigation shows that the values of flow velocity and gas fraction in CFD-PBM model agree with experimental data better than those in Euler model. The proposed PBM model provides a more accurate and effective way to estimate three-phase flow state of transporting gas hydrate within the submarine pipeline.

  17. Observed correlation between the depth to base and top of gas hydrate occurrence from review of global drilling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Michael; Collett, Timothy S.

    2017-01-01

    A global inventory of data from gas hydrate drilling expeditions is used to develop relationships between the base of structure I gas hydrate stability, top of gas hydrate occurrence, sulfate-methane transition depth, pressure (water depth), and geothermal gradients. The motivation of this study is to provide first-order estimates of the top of gas hydrate occurrence and associated thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone for climate-change scenarios, global carbon budget analyses, or gas hydrate resource assessments. Results from publically available drilling campaigns (21 expeditions and 52 drill sites) off Cascadia, Blake Ridge, India, Korea, South China Sea, Japan, Chile, Peru, Costa Rica, Gulf of Mexico, and Borneo reveal a first-order linear relationship between the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrence. The reason for these nearly linear relationships is believed to be the strong pressure and temperature dependence of methane solubility in the absence of large difference in thermal gradients between the various sites assessed. In addition, a statistically robust relationship was defined between the thickness of the gas hydrate occurrence zone and the base of gas hydrate stability (in meters below seafloor). The relationship developed is able to predict the depth of the top of gas hydrate occurrence zone using observed depths of the base of gas hydrate stability within less than 50 m at most locations examined in this study. No clear correlation of the depth to the top and base of gas hydrate occurrences with geothermal gradient and sulfate-methane transition depth was identified.

  18. CO2 hydrate: Synthesis, composition, structure, dissociation behavior, and a comparison to structure I CH4 hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circone, S.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Rawn, C.J.; Rondinone, A.J.; Ishii, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Structure I (sI) carbon dioxide (CO2) hydrate exhibits markedly different dissociation behavior from sI methane (CH4) hydrate in experiments in which equilibrated samples at 0.1 MPa are heated isobarically at 13 K/h from 210 K through the H2O melting point (273.15 K). The CO2 hydrate samples release only about 3% of their gas content up to temperatures of 240 K, which is 22 K above the hydrate phase boundary. Up to 20% is released by 270 K, and the remaining CO2 is released at 271.0 plusmn; 0.5 K, where the sample temperature is buffered until hydrate dissociation ceases. This reproducible buffering temperature for the dissociation reaction CO2??nH2O = CO2(g) + nH2O(1 to s) is measurably distinct from the pure H2O melting point at 273.15 K, which is reached as gas evolution ceases. In contrast, when si CH4 hydrate is heated at the same rate at 0.1 MPa, >95% of the gas is released within 25 K of the equilibrium temperature (193 K at 0.1 MPa). In conjunction with the dissociation study, a method for efficient and reproducible synthesis of pure polycrystalline CO2 hydrate with suitable characteristics for material properties testing was developed, and the material was characterized. CO2 hydrate was synthesized from CO2 liquid and H2O solid and liquid reactants at pressures between 5 and 25 MPa and temperatures between 250 and 281 K. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination indicates that the samples consist of dense crystalline hydrate and 50-300 ??m diameter pores that are lined with euhedral cubic hydrate crystals. Deuterated hydrate samples made by this same procedure were analyzed by neutron diffraction at temperatures between 4 and 215 K; results confirm that complete conversion of water to hydrate has occurred and that the measured unit cell parameter and thermal expansion are consistent with previously reported values. On the basis of measured weight gain after synthesis and gas yields from the dissociation experiments, approximately all cages in the

  19. The impact of permafrost-associated microorganisms on hydrate formation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Liebner, Susanne; Spangenberg, Erik; Wagner, Dirk; Schicks, Judith M.

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between gas hydrates, microorganisms and the surrounding sediment is extremely complex: On the one hand, microorganisms producing methane provide the prerequisite for gas hydrate formation. As it is known most of the gas incorporated into natural gas hydrates originates from biogenic sources. On the other hand, as a result of microbial activity gas hydrates are surrounded by a great variety of organic compounds which are not incorporated into the hydrate structure but may influence the formation or degradation process. For gas hydrate samples from marine environments such as the Gulf of Mexico a direct association between microbes and gas hydrates was shown by Lanoil et al. 2001. It is further assumed that microorganisms living within the gas hydrate stability zone produce biosurfactants which were found to enhance the hydrate formation process significantly and act as nucleation centres (Roger et al. 2007). Another source of organic compounds is sediment organic matter (SOM) originating from plant material or animal remains which may also enhance hydrate growth. So far, the studies regarding this relationship were focused on a marine environment. The scope of this work is to extend the investigations to microbes originating from permafrost areas. To understand the influence of microbial activity in a permafrost environment on the methane hydrate formation process and the stability conditions of the resulting hydrate phase we will perform laboratory studies. Thereby, we mimic gas hydrate formation in the presence and absence of methanogenic archaea (e.g. Methanosarcina soligelidi) and other psychrophilic bacteria isolated from permafrost environments of the Arctic and Antarctic to investigate their impact on hydrate induction time and formation rates. Our results may contribute to understand and predict the occurrences and behaviour of potential gas hydrates within or adjacent to the permafrost. Lanoil BD, Sassen R, La Duc MT, Sweet ST, Nealson KH

  20. Cryopegs as destabilization factor of intra-permafrost gas hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Istomin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    decomposition in the permafrost deposits during cryopegs' migration. From these horizons will be active methane emissions, including gas explosion in coastal areas and on the Arctic shelf. This mechanism of methane emissions is a significant geological hazard during the development of oil and gas fields in the Arctic. References. 1. Chuvilin EM, Yakushev VS, Perlova EV. Gas and gas hydrates in the permafrost of Bovanenkovo gas field, Yamal Peninsula, West Siberia. // Polarforschung 68: 215-219, 1998. (erschienen 2000). 2. Chuvilin E.M., Bukhanov B.A., Ekimova V.V. et al. Experimental modeling of interaction between salt solutions and frozen sediments containing gas hydrates. / The 8th International Conference on Gas Hydrates. Beijing, China, 2014. These researches were supported by grants RFBR № 13-05-12039 and RSF №16-17-00051.

  1. Long-term monitoring of methane release and associated oceanographc setting offshore Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dølven, Knut Ola; Ferre, Benedicte; Frank, Carsten; Mienert, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Large amounts of methane are stored in the Arctic Ocean sediments, both as free gas and in form of methane hydrates. Warming of Arctic Ocean bottom water can destabilize methane hydrates and cause extensive methane release to the ocean, influencing marine environments (Åström et al., 2016). Previous oceanographic studies have shown a significant methane release from seep-sites offshore western Svalbard, mainly based on hydrographic snapshots and/or echosounder data. These studies have shown that the methane release has significant temporal variations, and these variations can only be investigated properly with ocean observatories. Two K-Lander ocean observatories, developed in collaboration between CAGE and Kontgberg Maritime were deployed at two of these seep sites at 90 and 240 meter depth, from July 2015 to May 2016. Time series obtained from these two observatories include ocean current profiles, temperature, salinity, pressure, as well as dissolved methane and CO2 concentration. The oceanographic data show a clear seasonal variation and indicates that the water column can be significantly affected by atmospheric forcing during winter season. At the same time, methane concentration shows significant temporal variations on both relatively short (hours) and long (seasonal) time scales, with values ranging from 90 to 800 nmol/kg. The short term variations indicates a non-mixed benthic boundary layer with respect to dissolved methane, while the long term variations may indicate seasonal changes in the vertical transport of methane in the water column. Acknowledgements This project is funded by CAGE (Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate), Norwegian Research Council grant no. 223259. Reference Åström, E. Carrol, M. L., Ambrose, W., Carrol, J. "Arctic cold seeps in marine methane hydrate environments: impacts on shelf macrobenthic community structure offshore Svalbard". Marine Ecology Progress Series, 2016 (1616-1599) 552 p. 1-18.

  2. Grain-scale imaging and compositional characterization of cryo-preserved India NGHP 01 gas-hydrate-bearing cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Laura A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2014-01-01

    We report on grain-scale characteristics and gas analyses of gas-hydrate-bearing samples retrieved by NGHP Expedition 01 as part of a large-scale effort to study gas hydrate occurrences off the eastern-Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. Using cryogenic scanning electron microscopy, X-ray spectroscopy, and gas chromatography, we investigated gas hydrate grain morphology and distribution within sediments, gas hydrate composition, and methane isotopic composition of samples from Krishna–Godavari (KG) basin and Andaman back-arc basin borehole sites from depths ranging 26 to 525 mbsf. Gas hydrate in KG-basin samples commonly occurs as nodules or coarse veins with typical hydrate grain size of 30–80 μm, as small pods or thin veins 50 to several hundred microns in width, or disseminated in sediment. Nodules contain abundant and commonly isolated macropores, in some places suggesting the original presence of a free gas phase. Gas hydrate also occurs as faceted crystals lining the interiors of cavities. While these vug-like structures constitute a relatively minor mode of gas hydrate occurrence, they were observed in near-seafloor KG-basin samples as well as in those of deeper origin (>100 mbsf) and may be original formation features. Other samples exhibit gas hydrate grains rimmed by NaCl-bearing material, presumably produced by salt exclusion during original hydrate formation. Well-preserved microfossil and other biogenic detritus are also found within several samples, most abundantly in Andaman core material where gas hydrate fills microfossil crevices. The range of gas hydrate modes of occurrence observed in the full suite of samples suggests a range of formation processes were involved, as influenced by local in situconditions. The hydrate-forming gas is predominantly methane with trace quantities of higher molecular weight hydrocarbons of primarily microbial origin. The composition indicates the gas hydrate is Structure I.

  3. Identification of a mechanism of transformation of clathrate hydrate structures I to II or H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioki, Shuzo

    2012-07-01

    Binary mixed-gas hydrates including methane and other guest gases demonstrate a structural transition between the sI and sII phases. Under increasing pressure pure methane hydrate exhibits a phase transition first from sI to sII and then to sH. But the mechanism of the transformation from sI to sII or sH has not yet been identified. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations of methane hydrates suggest there may exist uncommon 15-hedral cages (5¹²6³), linking the sI and sII cages. In addition, xenon hydrate involving 15-hedral cages has been synthesized and named an hsI hydrate. Based on the hsI cages, we propose a mechanism for the transition of sI to sII or sH at atomic level resolution. The sI hydrate is first transformed to hsI, and hsI is further transformed to sII. Upon compression, hsI is transformed to sH owing to depletion of atomic layers. The mechanism of transformation speculated here calls for experimental verification.

  4. THCM Coupled Model for Hydrate-Bearing Sediments: Data Analysis and Design of New Field Experiments (Marine and Permafrost Settings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Marcelo J. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Santamarina, J. Carlos [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-14

    Gas hydrates are solid compounds made of water molecules clustered around low molecular weight gas molecules such as methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Methane hydrates form under pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions that are common in sub-permafrost layers and in deep marine sediments. Stability conditions constrain the occurrence of gas hydrates to submarine sediments and permafrost regions. The amount of technically recoverable methane trapped in gas hydrate may exceed 104tcf. Gas hydrates are a potential energy resource, can contribute to climate change, and can cause large-scale seafloor instabilities. In addition, hydrate formation can be used for CO2 sequestration (also through CO2-CH4 replacement), and efficient geological storage seals. The experimental study of hydrate bearing sediments has been hindered by the very low solubility of methane in water (lab testing), and inherent sampling difficulties associated with depressurization and thermal changes during core extraction. This situation has prompted more decisive developments in numerical modeling in order to advance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments, and to investigate/optimize production strategies and implications. The goals of this research has been to addresses the complex thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical THCM coupled phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments, using a truly coupled numerical model that incorporates sound and proven constitutive relations, satisfies fundamental conservation principles. Analytical solutions aimed at verifying the proposed code have been proposed as well. These tools will allow to better analyze available data and to further enhance the current understanding of hydrate bearing sediments in view of future field experiments and the development of production technology.

  5. Energy from gas hydrates - assessing the opportunities and challenges for Canada: report of the expert panel on gas hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-09-15

    Gas hydrates form when water and natural gas combine at low temperatures and high pressures in regions of permafrost and in marine subseafloor sediments. Estimates suggest that the total amount of natural gas bound in hydrate form may exceed all conventional gas resources, or even the amount of all combined hydrocarbon energy. Gas from gas hydrate could provide a potentially vast new source of energy to offset declining supplies of conventional natural gas in North America and to provide greater energy security for countries such as Japan and India that have limited domestic sources. However, complex issues would need to be addressed if gas hydrate were to become a large part of the energy future of Canada. Natural Resources Canada asked the Council of Canadian Academies to assemble a panel of experts to examine the challenges for an acceptable operational extraction of gas hydrates in Canada. This report presented an overview of relevant contextual background, including some basic science; the medium-term outlook for supply and demand in markets for natural gas; broad environmental issues related to gas hydrate in its natural state and as a fuel; and an overview of Canada's contribution to knowledge about gas hydrate in the context of ongoing international research activity. The report also presented current information on the subject and what would be required to delineate and quantify the resource. Techniques for extracting gas from gas hydrate were also outlined. The report also addressed safety issues related to gas hydrate dissociation during drilling operations or release into the atmosphere; the environmental issues associated with potential leakage of methane into the atmosphere and with the large volumes of water produced during gas hydrate dissociation; and jurisdictional and local community issues that would need to be resolved in order to proceed with the commercial exploitation of gas hydrate. It was concluded that there does not appear to be

  6. Site selection for DOE/JIP gas hydrates drilling in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, D.R.; Ruppel, C. [United States Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States); Shelander, D.; Dai, J. [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States); McConnell, D. [AOA Geophysics Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Shedd, W. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States); Frye, M. [Minerals Management Service, Herndon, VA (United States); Boswell, R.; Rose, K. [United States Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Lab; Jones, E.; Latham, T. [Chevron Energy Technology Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Collett, T. [United States Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dugan, B. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Earth Science; Wood, W. [United States Naval Research Lab, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States)

    2008-07-01

    As drilling operations in the Gulf of Mexico shift from shallow water to deeper water targets, operators are encountering sediments with pressure-temperature regimes for gas hydrate stability. The Chevron-led Joint Industry Project (JIP) on methane hydrates was formed in 2001 to study the hazards associated with drilling these types of hydrate-bearing sediments and to assess the capacity of geological and geophysical tools to predict gas hydrate distributions and concentrations. Selected reservoirs units with high concentrations of gas hydrate were sampled to obtain physical data on hydrate bearing sediments. The JIP work validates methods devised to estimate gas hydrate distribution and concentrations in order to analyze the resource potential of these hydrate-bearing sediments. This paper described the geologic and geophysical setting of 3 sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico that contain hydrate-bearing reservoir sands. The three sites that will undergo exploratory drilling and a logging campaign in late spring 2008 include the Alaminos Canyon (AC) lease block 818, Green Canyon (GC) 955, and Walker Ridge (WR) 313. At the AC818 site, gas hydrate is interpreted to occur within the Oligocene Frio volcaniclastic sand at the crest of a fold that is shallow enough to be in the hydrate stability zone. Drilling at GC955 will sample a faulted, buried Pleistocene channel-levee system characterized with seafloor fluid expulsion features, structural closure associated with uplifted salt, and seismic evidence for upward migration of fluids and gas into the sand-rich parts of the sedimentary section. Drilling at WR313 targets sheet sands and associated channel deposits within a small basin. The potential for gas hydrate occurrence at WR313 is supported by shingled phase reversals consistent with the transition from gas-charged sand to overlying gas-hydrate saturated sand. 39 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  7. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Vlasic

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work uses density functional theory (DFT to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane, at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  8. Indicators of δ13C and δ18O of gas hydrate-associated sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The analyses of δ13C and δ18O of gas hydrate-associated sediments from two cores on Hydrate Ridge in Cascadia convergent margin offshore Oregon, eastern North Pacific show the values of d 13C from -29.81‰ to -48.28‰ (PDB) and d 18O from 2.56‰ to 4.28‰ (PDB), which could be plotted into a group called typical carbonate minerals influenced by the methane in cold venting. Moreover, the values of d 13C and d 18O show a consistent trend in both cores from top to bottom with increasing of d 13C and decreasing of d 18O. This trend could be explained as an effect caused by the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in depth and the oxygen fraction during the formation of gas hydrate in depth together. These characteristics of d 13C and d 18O indicate that the gas hydrate-associated sediments are significantly different from the normal marine carbonates, and they are deeply influenced by the formation and evolution of gas hydrate. So, the distinct characteristics of d 13C and d 18O of gas hydrate-associated sediments could be undoubtedly believed as one of parameters to determine the presence of gas hydrates in other unknown marine sediment cores.

  9. Atomistic modeling of structure II gas hydrate mechanics: Compressibility and equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasic, Thomas M.; Servio, Phillip; Rey, Alejandro D.

    2016-08-01

    This work uses density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the poorly characterized structure II gas hydrates, for various guests (empty, propane, butane, ethane-methane, propane-methane), at the atomistic scale to determine key structure and mechanical properties such as equilibrium lattice volume and bulk modulus. Several equations of state (EOS) for solids (Murnaghan, Birch-Murnaghan, Vinet, Liu) were fitted to energy-volume curves resulting from structure optimization simulations. These EOS, which can be used to characterize the compressional behaviour of gas hydrates, were evaluated in terms of their robustness. The three-parameter Vinet EOS was found to perform just as well if not better than the four-parameter Liu EOS, over the pressure range in this study. As expected, the Murnaghan EOS proved to be the least robust. Furthermore, the equilibrium lattice volumes were found to increase with guest size, with double-guest hydrates showing a larger increase than single-guest hydrates, which has significant implications for the widely used van der Waals and Platteeuw thermodynamic model for gas hydrates. Also, hydrogen bonds prove to be the most likely factor contributing to the resistance of gas hydrates to compression; bulk modulus was found to increase linearly with hydrogen bond density, resulting in a relationship that could be used predictively to determine the bulk modulus of various structure II gas hydrates. Taken together, these results fill a long existing gap in the material chemical physics of these important clathrates.

  10. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  11. Is Submarine Groundwater Discharge a Gas Hydrate Formation Mechanism on the Circum-Arctic Shelf?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate is an ice-like solid that can sequester large quantities of methane gas in marine sediments along most continental margins where thermodynamic conditions permit its formation. Along the circum-Arctic shelf, relict permafrost-associated methane hydrate deposits formed when non-glaciated portions of the shelf experienced subaerial exposure during ocean transgressions. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of circum-Arctic shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Heat flow observations on the Alaskan North Slope and Canadian Beaufort Shelf suggest the movement of groundwater offshore, but direct observations of groundwater flow do not exist. Submarine discharge, an offshore flow of fresh, terrestrial groundwater, can affect the temperature and salinity field in shelf sediments, and may be an important factor in submarine permafrost and gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. Submarine groundwater discharge may also enhance the transport of organic matter for methanogenesis within marine sediments. Because it is buoyancy-driven, the velocity field contains regions with a vertical (upward) component as groundwater flows offshore. This combination of factors makes submarine groundwater discharge a potential mechanism controlling permafrost-associated gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. In this study, we quantitatively investigate the feasibility of submarine groundwater discharge as a control on permafrost-associated gas hydrate formation on the Arctic continental shelf, using the Canadian Beaufort Shelf as an example. We have developed a shelf-scale, two-dimensional numerical model based on the finite volume method for two-phase flow of pore fluid and methane gas within Arctic shelf sediments. The model tracks the evolution of the pressure, temperature, salinity, methane gas, methane hydrate, and permafrost fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of

  12. Numerical studies of gas production from several CH4 hydrate zones at the Mallik site, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridis, G.J.; Collett, T.S.; Dallimore, S.R.; Satoh, T.; Hancock, S.; Weatherill, B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mallik site represents an onshore permafrost-associated gas hydrate accumulation in the Mackenzie Delta, Northwest Territories, Canada. A gas hydrate research well was drilled at the site in 1998. The objective of this study is the analysis of various gas production scenarios from five methane hydrate-bearing zones at the Mallik site. In Zone #1, numerical simulations using the EOSHYDR2 model indicated that gas production from hydrates at the Mallik site was possible by depressurizing a thin free gas zone at the base of the hydrate stability field. Horizontal wells appeared to have a slight advantage over vertical wells, while multiwell systems involving a combination of depressurization and thermal stimulation offered superior performance, especially when a hot noncondensible gas was injected. Zone #2, which involved a gas hydrate layer with an underlying aquifer, could yield significant amounts of gas originating entirely from gas hydrates, the volumes of which increased with the production rate. However, large amounts of water were also produced. Zones #3, #4 and #5 were lithologically isolated gas hydrate-bearing deposits with no underlying zones of mobile gas or water. In these zones, thermal stimulation by circulating hot water in the well was used to induce dissociation. Sensitivity studies indicated that the methane release from the hydrate accumulations increased with the gas hydrate saturation, the initial formation temperature, the temperature of the circulating water in the well, and the formation thermal conductivity. Methane production appears to be less sensitive to the specific heat of the rock and of the hydrate, and to the permeability of the formation. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. PART II. HYDRATED CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Drabik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential focus of the study has been to acquire thermoanalytical events, incl. enthalpies of decompositions - ΔH, of technological materials based on two types of Portland cements. The values of thermoanalytical events and also ΔH of probes of technological compositions, if related with the data of a choice of minerals of calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates, served as a valued input for the assessment of phases present and phase changes due to the topical hydraulic processes. The results indicate mainly the effects of "standard humidity" or "wet storage" of the entire hydration/hydraulic treatment, but also the presence of cement residues alongside calcium-silicate-sulfate-aluminate hydrates (during the tested period of treatment. "A diluting" effect of unhydrated cement residues upon the values of decomposition enthalpies in the studied multiphase system is postulated and discussed

  14. Sediment and water column geochemistry related to methane seepage along the northern US Atlantic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, J.; Ruppel, C. D.; Colwell, F. S.; Krause, S.; Treude, T.; Graw, M.; Casso, M.; Boze, L. G.; Buczkowski, B.; Brankovits, D.

    2015-12-01

    Many of the more than 550 gas plumes recently identified along the northern US Atlantic margin (USAM) using multibeam water-column backscatter data lie at, or shallower than, the upper limit of gas hydrate stability on the continental slope. Important questions remain unanswered regarding the gas sources feeding these seeps, the export of carbon from the seafloor and the fundamental biogeochemical processes that regulate the flux and transformation of carbon along this margin. In addition, few programs have ever systematically studied the dynamics across the upper slope transition from no hydrate to hydrate. In September 2015, the US Geological Survey, Oregon State University, Geomar and UCLA conducted a multidisciplinary study aboard the R/V Sharp that included piston coring, multicoring, seafloor heat flow measurements, imaging of sub-seafloor sediments and water column methane plumes, and sampling of methane plumes in the water column. This presentation provides some of the basic geochemical results from the cruise, focusing on the pore water characteristics in upper slope gas hydrate provinces that will be used to constrain the fundamental biogeochemical processes operating at methane seeps, including data on the origin of seep methane at sites with and without a possible association with gas hydrate degradation. Water column profiling of methane and other biogeochemically relevant species (e.g., dissolved inorganic and organic carbon) are also used to establish how carbon exported from the seeps affects ocean chemistry and carbon availability in the deep ocean.

  15. Tuning the composition of guest molecules in clathrate hydrates: NMR identification and its significance to gas storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yutaek; Lee, Jong-Won; Kumar, Rajnish; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Lee, Huen; Ripmeester, John A

    2009-08-03

    Gas hydrates represent an attractive way of storing large quantities of gas such as methane and carbon dioxide, although to date there has been little effort to optimize the storage capacity and to understand the trade-offs between storage conditions and storage capacity. In this work, we present estimates for gas storage based on the ideal structures, and show how these must be modified given the little data available on hydrate composition. We then examine the hypothesis based on solid-solution theory for clathrate hydrates as to how storage capacity may be improved for structure II hydrates, and test the hypothesis for a structure II hydrate of THF and methane, paying special attention to the synthetic approach used. Phase equilibrium data are used to map the region of stability of the double hydrate in P-T space as a function of the concentration of THF. In situ high-pressure NMR experiments were used to measure the kinetics of reaction between frozen THF solutions and methane gas, and (13)C MAS NMR experiments were used to measure the distribution of the guests over the cage sites. As known from previous work, at high concentrations of THF, methane only occupies the small cages in structure II hydrate, and in accordance with the hypothesis posed, we confirm that methane can be introduced into the large cage of structure II hydrate by lowering the concentration of THF to below 1.0 mol %. We note that in some preparations the cage occupancies appear to fluctuate with time and are not necessarily homogeneous over the sample. Although the tuning mechanism is generally valid, the composition and homogeneity of the product vary with the details of the synthetic procedure. The best results, those obtained from the gas-liquid reaction, are in good agreement with thermodynamic predictions; those obtained for the gas-solid reaction do not agree nearly as well.

  16. Kinetics of methane fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. R.; Hashimoto, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics on methane fermentation are described using published data for livestock residue, sewage sludge, and municipal refuse. Methods are presented to determine the kinetic constants and the finally attainable methane production using steady-state methane production data. The effects of temperature, loading rate, and influent substrate concentration on methane fermentation kinetics are discussed. These relationships were used to predict the rate of methane production of a pilot-scale fermentor with excellent results.

  17. High pressure rheology of gas hydrate formed from multiphase systems using modified Couette rheometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gaurav; Linga, Praveen; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2017-02-01

    Conventional rheometers with concentric cylinder geometries do not enhance mixing in situ and thus are not suitable for rheological studies of multiphase systems under high pressure such as gas hydrates. In this study, we demonstrate the use of modified Couette concentric cylinder geometries for high pressure rheological studies during the formation and dissociation of methane hydrate formed from pure water and water-decane systems. Conventional concentric cylinder Couette geometry did not produce any hydrates in situ and thus failed to measure rheological properties during hydrate formation. The modified Couette geometries proposed in this work observed to provide enhanced mixing in situ, thus forming gas hydrate from the gas-water-decane system. This study also nullifies the use of separate external high pressure cell for such measurements. The modified geometry was observed to measure gas hydrate viscosity from an initial condition of 0.001 Pa s to about 25 Pa s. The proposed geometries also possess the capability to measure dynamic viscoelastic properties of hydrate slurries at the end of experiments. The modified geometries could also capture and mimic the viscosity profile during the hydrate dissociation as reported in the literature. The present study acts as a precursor for enhancing our understanding on the rheology of gas hydrate formed from various systems containing promoters and inhibitors in the context of flow assurance.

  18. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  19. Formation of porous gas hydrates

    CERN Document Server

    Salamatin, Andrey N

    2015-01-01

    Gas hydrates grown at gas-ice interfaces are examined by electron microscopy and found to have a submicron porous texture. Permeability of the intervening hydrate layers provides the connection between the two counterparts (gas and water molecules) of the clathration reaction and makes further hydrate formation possible. The study is focused on phenomenological description of principal stages and rate-limiting processes that control the kinetics of the porous gas hydrate crystal growth from ice powders. Although the detailed physical mechanisms involved in the porous hydrate formation still are not fully understood, the initial stage of hydrate film spreading over the ice surface should be distinguished from the subsequent stage which is presumably limited by the clathration reaction at the ice-hydrate interface and develops after the ice grain coating is finished. The model reveals a time dependence of the reaction degree essentially different from that when the rate-limiting step of the hydrate formation at...

  20. Parametric study of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sand, silt, and clay sediments: 2. Small-strain mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. Y.; Francisca, F. M.; Santamarina, J. C.; Ruppel, C.

    2010-11-01

    The small-strain mechanical properties (e.g., seismic velocities) of hydrate-bearing sediments measured under laboratory conditions provide reference values for calibration of logging and seismic exploration results acquired in hydrate-bearing formations. Instrumented cells were designed for measuring the compressional (P) and shear (S) velocities of sand, silts, and clay with and without hydrate and subject to vertical effective stresses of 0.01 to 2 MPa. Tetrahydrofuran (THF), which is fully miscible in water, was used as the hydrate former to permit close control over the hydrate saturation Shyd and to produce hydrate from dissolved phase, as methane hydrate forms in most natural marine settings. The results demonstrate that laboratory hydrate formation technique controls the pattern of P and S velocity changes with increasing Shyd and that the small-strain properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are governed by effective stress, σ'v and sediment specific surface. The S velocity increases with hydrate saturation owing to an increase in skeletal shear stiffness, particularly when hydrate saturation exceeds Shyd≈ 0.4. At very high hydrate saturations, the small strain shear stiffness is determined by the presence of hydrates and becomes insensitive to changes in effective stress. The P velocity increases with hydrate saturation due to the increases in both the shear modulus of the skeleton and the bulk modulus of pore-filling phases during fluid-to-hydrate conversion. Small-strain Poisson's ratio varies from 0.5 in soft sediments lacking hydrates to 0.25 in stiff sediments (i.e., subject to high vertical effective stress or having high Shyd). At Shyd ≥ 0.5, hydrate hinders expansion and the loss of sediment stiffness during reduction of vertical effective stress, meaning that hydrate-rich natural sediments obtained through pressure coring should retain their in situ fabric for some time after core retrieval if the cores are maintained within the hydrate

  1. Methane and other hydrocarbon gases in sediment from the southeastern North American continental margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Residual concentrations and distributions of hydrocarbon gases from methane to n-heptane were measured in sediments at seven sites on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 164. Three sites were drilled at the Cape Fear Diapir of the Carolina Rise, and one site was drilled on the Blake Ridge Diapir. Methane concentrations at these sites result from microbial generation which is influenced by the amount of pore-water sulfate and possible methane oxidation. Methane hydrate was found at the Blake Ridge Diapir site. The other hydrocarbon gases at these sites are likely the produce of early microbial processes. Three sites were drilled on a transect of holes across the crest of the Blake Ridge. The base of the zone of gas-hydrate occurrence was penetrated at all three sites. Trends in hydrocarbon gas distributions suggest that methane is microbial in origin and that the hydrocarbon gas mixture is affected by diagenesis, outgassing, and, near the surface, by microbial oxidation. Methane hydrate was recovered at two of these three sites, although gas hydrate is likely present at all three sites. The method used here for determining amounts of residual hydrocarbon gases has its limitations and provides poor assessment of gas distributions, particularly in the stratigraphic interval below about ~ 100 mbsf. One advantage of the method, however, is that it yields sufficient quantities of gas for other studies such as isotopic determinations.

  2. Molecular and Isotopic Composition of Volatiles in Gas Hydrates and in Sediment from the Joetsu Basin, Eastern Margin of the Japan Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Hachikubo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrate-bearing sediment cores were retrieved from the Joetsu Basin (off Joetsu city, Niigata Prefecture at the eastern margin of the Japan Sea during the MD179 gas hydrates cruise onboard R/V Marion Dufresne in June 2010. We measured molecular and stable isotope compositions of volatiles bound in the gas hydrates and headspace gases obtained from sediments to clarify how the minor components of hydrocarbons affects to gas hydrate crystals. The hydrate-bound hydrocarbons at Umitaka Spur (southwestern Joetsu Basin primarily consisted of thermogenic methane, whereas those at Joetsu Knoll (northwestern Joetsu Basin, about 15 km from Umitaka Spur contained both thermogenic methane and a mixture of thermogenic and microbial methane. The depth concentration profiles of methane, ethane, propane, CO2, and H2S in the sediments from the Joetsu Basin area showed shallow sulfate–methane interface (SMI and high microbial methane production beneath the SMI depth. Relatively high concentrations of propane and neopentane (2,2-dimethylpropane were detected in the headspace gases of the hydrate-bearing sediment cores obtained at Umitaka Spur and Joetsu Knoll. Propane and neopentane cannot be encaged in the structure I hydrate; therefore, they were probably excluded from the hydrate crystals during the structure I formation process and thus remained in the sediment and/or released from the small amounts of structure II hydrate that can host such large gas molecules. The lower concentrations of ethane and propane in the sediment, high δ13C of propane and isobutane, and below-detection normal butane and normal pentane at Umitaka Spur and Joetsu Knoll suggest biodegradation in the sediment layers.

  3. Submarine creeping landslide deformation controlled by the presence of gas hydrates: The Tuaheni Landslide Complex, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Felix; Mountjoy, Joshu; Crutchle, Garethy; Koch, Stephanie; Bialas, Jörg; Pecher, Ingo; Woelz, Susi; Dannowski, Anke; Carey, Jon; Micallef, Aaron; Böttner, Christoph; Huhn, Katrin; Krastel, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydrate occurrence is bound to a finite pressure/temperature window on continental slopes, known as the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Hydrates within sediment pore spaces and fractures are recognized to act like a cement, increasing shear strength and stabilizing slopes. However, recent studies show that over longer strain periods methane hydrates can undergo ductile deformation. This combination of short term strengthening and longer term ductile behavior is implicated in the development of slow creeping submarine landforms within the GHSZ. In order to study this phenomenon, a new high-resolution seismic 3D volume was acquired at the Tuaheni Landslide Complex (TLC) at the Hikurangi margin offshore the North Island of New Zealand. Parts of TLC have been interpreted as a slow moving landslide controlled by the gas hydrate system. Two hypotheses for its slow deformation related to the presence of methane hydrates have been proposed: i) Hydrofracturing, driven by gas pressure at the base of the GHSZ, allows pressurized fluids to ascend toward the seafloor, thereby weakening the shallow debris and promoting failure. ii) The mixture of methane hydrates and sediment results in a rheology that behaves in a ductile way under sustained loading, resulting in slow deformation comparable to that of terrestrial and extra-terrestrial rock glaciers. The 3D dataset reveals the distribution of gas and the extend of gas hydrate stability within the deformed debris, as well as deformation fabrics like tectonic-style faulting and a prominent basal décollement, known to be a critical element of terrestrial earth-flows and rock glaciers. Observations from 3D data indicate that the TLC represents the type example of a new submarine landform - an active creeping submarine landslide - which is influenced by the presence of gas hydrates. The morphology, internal structure and deformation of the landslide are comparable with terrestrial- and extra-terrestrial earth flows and