WorldWideScience

Sample records for metallic re-re bond

  1. Unprecedented linking of two polyoxometalate units with a metal-metal multiple bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Maxim N; Korenev, Vladimir S; Izarova, Natalya V; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Vicent, Cristian; Fedin, Vladimir P

    2009-03-02

    The reaction of (Bu(4)N)(2)[Re(2)Cl(8)] with lacunary Keggin polyoxometalate K(7)[PW(11)O(39)] in water produces a new dumbbell-shaped heteropolyoxometalate anion, [Re(2)(PW(11)O(39))(2)](8-), whose structure contains a central Re(2) core with a quadruple bond between Re atoms (Re-Re 2.25 A), coordinated to two polyoxometalate units. This complex represents the first example of the direct linking of two polyoxometalate units via a metal-metal multiple bond. The compounds were characterized by X-ray analysis, IR, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

  2. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  3. Progress in cold roll bonding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Long; Nagai, Kotobu; Yin Fuxing

    2008-01-01

    Layered composite materials have become an increasingly interesting topic in industrial development. Cold roll bonding (CRB), as a solid phase method of bonding same or different metals by rolling at room temperature, has been widely used in manufacturing large layered composite sheets and foils. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of a technology using layered composite materials produced by CRB and discuss the suitability of this technology in the fabrication of layered composite materials. The effects of process parameters on bonding, mainly including process and surface preparation conditions, have been analyzed. Bonding between two sheets can be realized when deformation reduction reaches a threshold value. However, it is essential to remove surface contamination layers to produce a satisfactory bond in CRB. It has been suggested that the degreasing and then scratch brushing of surfaces create a strong bonding between the layers. Bonding mechanisms, in which the film theory is expressed as the major mechanism in CRB, as well as bonding theoretical models, have also been reviewed. It has also been showed that it is easy for fcc structure metals to bond compared with bcc and hcp structure metals. In addition, hardness on bonding same metals plays an important part in CRB. Applications of composites produced by CRB in industrial fields are briefly reviewed and possible developments of CRB in the future are also described. Corrections were made to the abstract and conclusion of this article on 18 June 2008. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version. (topical review)

  4. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2013-03-07

    To understand structural and chemical properties of metal-graphene composites, it is crucial to unveil the chemical bonding along the interface. We provide direct experimental evidence of atomic bonding between typical metal nano structures and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal atoms and clusters under electron irradiation. We demonstrate no electron-instigated interaction between Cr clusters and pristine graphene, though Cr has been reported to be highly reactive to graphene. The metal-mediated etching is a dynamic effect between metal clusters and pre-existing defects. The resolved atomic configurations of typical nano metal structures on graphene offer insight into modeling and simulations on properties of metal-decorated graphene for both catalysis and future carbon-based electronics. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Crystallochemistry of rhenium compounds with metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koz'min, P.A.; Surazhskaya, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented including a brief description of atomic structure of 59 coordination rhenium compounds with metal-metal bond. The most important bond lengths and valent angles are presented for each compound. The dependence of rhenium-rhenium bond length on its multiplicity is discussed and possible causes of deviations from this dependence (namely, axial ligand presence, steric repulsion of ligands) are considered. On the basis of qualitative comparison of electronegativity of ligands in dimer compounds with quarternary bond of rhenium-rhenium a supposition is made on the influence of formal charge of atomic group and summary electro-negativity of ligands on the possibility of the metal-metal bond formation

  6. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  7. Comparison of shear bond strength of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ravadgar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In orthodontic treatment, it is essential to establish a satisfactory bond between enamel and bracket. After the self-etch primers (SEPs were introduced for the facilitation of bracket bonding in comparison to the conventional etch-and-bond system, multiple studies have been carried out on their shear bond strengths which have yielded different results. This study was aimed at comparing shear bond strengths of the stainless steel metallic brackets bonded by three bonding systems. Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into three equal groups: in the first group, Transbond XT (TBXT light cured composite was bonded with Transbond plus self-etching primer (TPSEP; in the second group, TBXT composite was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching; and in the third group, the self cured composite Unite TM bonding adhesive was bonded with the conventional method of acid etching. In all the groups, Standard edgewise-022 metallic brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA were used. Twenty-four hours after the completion of thermocycling, shear bond strength of brackets was measured by Universal Testing Machine (Zwick. In order to compare the shear bond strengths of the groups, the variance analysis test (ANOVA was adopted and p≤0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: Based on megapascal, the average shear bond strength for the first, second, and third groups was 8.27±1.9, 9.78±2, and 8.92±2.5, respectively. There was no significant difference in the shear bond strength of the groups. Conclusions: Since TPSEP shear bond strength is approximately at the level of the conventional method of acid etching and within the desirable range for orthodontic brackets shear bond strength, applying TPSEP can serve as a substitute for the conventional method of etch and bond, particularly in orthodontic operations.

  8. Studies of Metal-Metal Bonded Compounds in Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, John F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-01-19

    The overall goals of this research are (1) to define the fundamental coordination chemistry underlying successful catalytic transformations promoted by metal-metal bonded compounds, and (2) to explore new chemical transformations that occur at metal-metal bonded sites that could lead to the discovery of new catalytic processes. Transformations of interest include metal-promoted reactions of carbene, nitrene, or nitrido species to yield products with new C–C and C–N bonds, respectively. The most promising suite of transition metal catalysts for these transformations is the set of metal-metal bonded coordination compounds of Ru and Rh of the general formula M2(ligand)4, where M = Ru or Rh and ligand = a monoanionic, bridging ligand such as acetate. Development of new catalysts and improvement of catalytic conditions have been stymied by a general lack of knowledge about the nature of highly reactive intermediates in these reactions, the knowledge that is to be supplied by this work. Our three specific objectives for this year have been (A) to trap, isolate, and characterize new reactive intermediates of general relevance to catalysis, (B) to explore the electronic structure and reactivity of these unusual species, and how these two properties are interrelated, and (C) to use our obtained mechanistic knowledge to design new catalysts with a focus on Earth-abundant first-row transition metal compounds.

  9. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the oxide layers are chemically bonded to graphene (Zhang ... sists of three glass chambers, one to contain the metal halide. (TiCl4, SiCl4 ... In this step, the metal halide reacts with the oxygen function- ... 1·0 g of FeCl3 were vigorously stirred in 30 ml of ethylene ... Reaction with water vapour results in hydrolysis of the un-.

  10. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  11. Covalent bonding in heavy metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagus, Paul S.; Nelin, Connie J.; Hrovat, Dave A.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2017-04-07

    Novel theoretical methods were used to quantify the magnitude and the energetic contributions of 4f/5f-O2p and 5d/6d-O2p interactions to covalent bonding in lanthanide and actinide oxides. Although many analyses have neglected the involvement of the frontier d orbitals, the present study shows that f and d covalency are of comparable importance. Two trends are identified. As is expected, the covalent mixing is larger when the nominal oxidation state is higher. More subtly, the importance of the nf covalent mixing decreases sharply relative to (n+1)d as the nf occupation increases. Atomic properties of the metal cations that drive these trends are identified.

  12. FFTF metal fuel pin sodium bond quality verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitner, A.L.; Dittmer, J.O.

    1988-12-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Series III driver fuel design consists of U-10Zr fuel slugs contained in a ferritic alloy cladding. A liquid metal, sodium bond between the fuel and cladding is required to prevent unacceptable temperatures during operation. Excessive voiding or porosity in the sodium thermal bond could result in localized fuel melting during irradiation. It is therefore imperative that bond quality be verified during fabrication of these metal fuel pins prior to irradiation. This document discusses this verification

  13. Factors affecting the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to different ceramic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Abu AlReesh, Issam A; AlWahadni, Ahed M S

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to two different all-ceramic crowns, IPS Empress 2 and In-Ceram Alumina, to compare the SBS between hydrofluoric acid (HFA), phosphoric acid etched, and sandblasted, non-etched all-ceramic surfaces. Ninety-six all-ceramic crowns were fabricated resembling a maxillary left first premolar. The crowns were divided into eight groups: (1) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (2) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (3) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (4) ceramic brackets bonded to sandblasted 9.6 per cent HFA-etched In-Ceram crowns; (5) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; (6) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted 37 per cent phosphoric acid-etched In-Ceram crowns; (7) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched IPS Empress 2 crowns; and (8) metal brackets bonded to sandblasted, non-etched In-Ceram crowns. Metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets were bonded using a conventional light polymerizing adhesive resin. An Instron universal testing machine was used to determine the SBS at a crosshead speed of 0.1 mm/minute. Comparison between groups was performed using a univariate general linear model and chi-squared tests. The highest mean SBS was found in group 3 (120.15 +/- 45.05 N) and the lowest in group 8 (57.86 +/- 26.20 N). Of all the variables studied, surface treatment was the only factor that significantly affected SBS (P Empress 2 and In-Ceram groups.

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW Progress in cold roll bonding of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Li, Kotobu Nagai and Fuxing Yin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Layered composite materials have become an increasingly interesting topic in industrial development. Cold roll bonding (CRB, as a solid phase method of bonding same or different metals by rolling at room temperature, has been widely used in manufacturing large layered composite sheets and foils. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of a technology using layered composite materials produced by CRB and discuss the suitability of this technology in the fabrication of layered composite materials. The effects of process parameters on bonding, mainly including process and surface preparation conditions, have been analyzed. Bonding between two sheets can be realized when deformation reduction reaches a threshold value. However, it is essential to remove surface contamination layers to produce a satisfactory bond in CRB. It has been suggested that the degreasing and then scratch brushing of surfaces create a strong bonding between the layers. Bonding mechanisms, in which the film theory is expressed as the major mechanism in CRB, as well as bonding theoretical models, have also been reviewed. It has also been showed that it is easy for fcc structure metals to bond compared with bcc and hcp structure metals. In addition, hardness on bonding same metals plays an important part in CRB. Applications of composites produced by CRB in industrial fields are briefly reviewed and possible developments of CRB in the future are also described.

  15. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of three resin systems for a Base Metal Alloy bonded to

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jlali H

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (F.P.D can be used for conservative treatment of partially edentulous"npatients. There are numerous studies regarding the strength of resin composite bond to base meta! alloys. Shear bond"nstrength of three resin systems were invistigated. In this study these systems consisted of: Panavia Ex, Mirage FLC and"nMarathon V. Thirty base metal specimens were prepared from rexillium III alloy and divided into three groups. Then each"ngroup was bonded to enamel of human extracted molar teeth with these systems. All of specimens were stored in water at"n37ac for 48 hours. A shear force was applied to each specimen by the instron universal testing machine. A statistical"nevaluation of the data using one-way analysis of variance showed that there was highly significant difference (P<0.01"nbetween the bond strengths of these three groups."nThe base metal specimens bonded with panavia Ex luting agent, exhibited the highest mean bond strength. Shear bond"nstrength of the specimens bonded to enamel with Mirage F1C showed lower bond strenght than panavia EX. However, the"nlowest bond strength was obtained by the specimens bonded with Marathon V.

  16. Dislocations in materials with mixed covalent and metallic bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Manh, D.; Cawkwell, M.J.; Groeger, R.; Mrovec, M.; Porizek, R.; Pettifor, D.G.; Vitek, V.

    2005-01-01

    Environment-dependent bond-order potentials have been developed for L1 0 TiAl, bcc Mo and fcc Ir. They comprise both the angular character of bonding and the screening effect of nearly free electrons. These potentials have been employed in atomistic studies of screw dislocations that revealed the non-planar character of their cores. It is argued that both covalent as well as metallic character of bonding govern these structures, which in turn control the mechanical behaviour

  17. Ultra-stiff metallic glasses through bond energy density design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Volker; Köhler, Mathias; Music, Denis; Bednarcik, Jozef; Clegg, William J; Raabe, Dierk; Schneider, Jochen M

    2017-07-05

    The elastic properties of crystalline metals scale with their valence electron density. Similar observations have been made for metallic glasses. However, for metallic glasses where covalent bonding predominates, such as metalloid metallic glasses, this relationship appears to break down. At present, the reasons for this are not understood. Using high energy x-ray diffraction analysis of melt spun and thin film metallic glasses combined with density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the physical origin of the ultrahigh stiffness in both metalloid and non-metalloid metallic glasses is best understood in terms of the bond energy density. Using the bond energy density as novel materials design criterion for ultra-stiff metallic glasses, we are able to predict a Co 33.0 Ta 3.5 B 63.5 short range ordered material by density functional theory based molecular dynamics simulations with a high bond energy density of 0.94 eV Å -3 and a bulk modulus of 263 GPa, which is 17% greater than the stiffest Co-B based metallic glasses reported in literature.

  18. [The bonding mechanisms of base metals for metal-ceramic crown microstructure analysis of bonding agent and gold bond between porcelain and base metals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C C; Hsu, C S

    1996-06-01

    The use of base metal alloys for porcelain fused to a metal crown and bridges has increased recently because of lower price, high hardness, high tensile strength and high elastic modulus. The addition of beryllium to base metal alloys increased fluidity and improved casting fitness. Beryllium also controlled surface oxidation and bonding strength. The bonding agent and gold bonding agent also affected the bonding strength between porcelain and metal alloys. Four commercially available ceramic base alloys were studied (two alloys contained beryllium element, another two did not). The purpose of this investigation was to study the microstructure between porcelain matrix, bonding agent and alloy matrix interfaces. A scanning electron micro-probe analyzer and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were used to study the distribution of elements (Ni, Cr, Mo, Cu, O, Si, Sn, Al) in four base alloys. The following results were obtained: 1. The thickness of the oxidized layer of Rexillium III alloy and Unitbond alloy (contained beryllium) was thinner than Unibond alloy and Wiron 88 alloy (no beryllium). 2. The thickness of the oxidized layer of alloys in air (10 minutes and 30 minutes) was thinner in Unitbond (2.45 microns and 3.80 microns) and thicker in Wiron 88 (4.39 microns and 5.96 microns). 3. The thickness of the oxidized layer occurring for a duration of ten minutes (in vaccum) showed that the Rexillium III alloy was the thinnest (1.93 microns), and Wiron 88 alloy was the thickest (2.30 microns). But in thirty minutes (vacuum), Unitbond alloy was the thinnest (3.37 microns), and Wiron 88 alloy was the thickest (5.51 microns). 4. The intensity of Cr elements was increased obviously near the interface between Unitbond alloy, Wiron 88 alloy (no beryllium) and oxidized layer, but the intensity of Ni and Mo elements was slightly increased. The intensity of Cr element was not increased markedly between Rexillium III alloy, Unitbond alloy (beryllium) and oxidized

  19. Forging Unsupported Metal-Boryl Bonds with Icosahedral Carboranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Liban M A; Dziedzic, Rafal M; Khan, Saeed I; Spokoyny, Alexander M

    2016-06-13

    In contrast to the plethora of metal-catalyzed cross-coupling methods available for the installation of functional groups on aromatic hydrocarbons, a comparable variety of methods are currently not available for icosahedral carboranes, which are boron-rich three-dimensional aromatic analogues of aryl groups. Part of this is due to the limited understanding of the elementary steps for cross-coupling involving carboranes. Here, we report our efforts in isolating metal-boryl complexes to further our understanding of one of these elementary steps, oxidative addition. Structurally characterized examples of group 10 M-B bonds featuring icosahedral carboranes are completely unknown. Use of mercurocarboranes as a reagent to deliver M-B bonds saw divergent reactivity for platinum and palladium, with a Pt-B bond being isolated for the former, and a rare Pd-Hg bond being formed for the latter. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Development of dissimilar metal transition joint by hot bond rolling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Kajimura, Haruhiko; Nagai, Takayuki; Takeda, Seiichiro.

    1997-01-01

    Metallurgically bonded transition joints which enable to connect reprocessing equipments made of superior corrosion resistant valve metals (Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti) to stainless steel piping are required for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The authors have developed dissimilar transition joints made of stainless steel and Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti with an insert metal of Ta by the hot bond rolling process of clad bars and clad pipes, using a newly developed mill called 'rotary reduction mill'. This report presents the manufacturing process of dissimilar transition joints produced from the clad pipe with three layers by the hot bond rolling. First, the method of hot bond rolling of clad pipe is proposed. Then, the mechanical and corrosion properties of the dissimilar transition joints are evaluated in detail by carrying out various tests. Finally, the rolling properties in the clad pipe method are discussed. (author)

  1. Atomic bonding between metal and graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao; Feng, Qiong; Cheng, Yingchun; Yao, Yingbang; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Kun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    and graphene, agreeing well with density functional theory studies. Single Cr atoms are located in the valleys of a zigzag edge, and few-atom ensembles preferentially form atomic chains by self-assembly. Low migration barriers lead to rich dynamics of metal

  2. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  3. Shear bond strength of metallic brackets: influence of saliva contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Borges Retamoso

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of saliva contamination on shear bond strength and the bond failure pattern of 3 adhesive systems (Transbond XT, AdheSE and Xeno III on orthodontic metallic brackets bonded to human enamel. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventy-two permanent human molars were cut longitudinally in a mesiodistal direction, producing seventy-two specimens randomly divided into six groups. Each system was tested under 2 different enamel conditions: no contamination and contaminated with saliva. In T, A and X groups, the adhesive systems were applied to the enamel surface in accordance with manufacturer's instructions. In TS, AS and XS groups, saliva was applied to enamel surface followed by adhesive system application. The samples were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24 h, and then tested for shear bond strength in a universal testing machine (Emic, DL 2000 running at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. After bond failure, the enamel surfaces were observed under an optical microscope at 40x magnification. RESULTS: The control and contaminated groups showed no significant difference in shear bond strength for the same adhesive system. However, shear bond strength of T group (17.03±4.91 was significantly higher than that of AS (8.58±1.73 and XS (10.39±4.06 groups (p<0.05. Regarding the bond failure pattern, TS group had significantly higher scores of no adhesive remaining on the tooth in the bonding area than other groups considering the adhesive remnant index (ARI used to evaluate the amount of adhesive left on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: Saliva contamination showed little influence on the 24-h shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  4. Tensile bond strength of metal bracket bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces with different surface conditionings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoundi, Ms Ahmad; Kamel, M Rahmati; Hashemi, Sh Mahmood; Imani, M

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments. Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA). Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primer and adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively. The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (Ptensile bond strength.

  5. Tensile Bond Strength of Metal Bracket Bonding to Glazed Ceramic Surfaces With Different Surface Conditionings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Imani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the tensile bond strength of metal brackets bonding to glazed ceramic surfaces using three various surface treatments.Materials and Methods: Forty two glazed ceramic disks were assigned to three groups. In the first and second groups the specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid (HFA. Subsequently in first group, ceramic primer and adhesive were applied, but in second group a bonding agent alone was used. In third group, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid followed by ceramic primerand adhesive application. Brackets were bonded with light cure composites. The specimens were stored in distilled water in the room temperature for 24 hours and thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C. The universal testing machine was used to test the tensile bond strength and the adhesive remenant index scores between three groups was evaluated. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA, Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests respectively.Results: The tensile bond strength was 3.69±0.52 MPa forfirst group, 2.69±0.91 MPa for second group and 3.60±0.41 MPa for third group. Group II specimens showed tensile strength values significantly different from other groups (P<0.01.Conclusion: In spite of limitations in laboratory studies it may be concluded that in application of Scotch bond multipurpose plus adhesive, phosphoric acid can be used instead of HFA for bonding brackets to the glazed ceramic restorations with enough tensile bond strength.

  6. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2 NO(PH 3 ) 2 and a small proton donor H 2 O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H...H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions

  7. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Heiko

    2008-04-01

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO) 2NO(PH 3) 2 and a small proton donor H 2O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H⋯H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  8. Hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding of transition metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Heiko [KemKom, Libellenweg 2, 25917 Leck, Nordfriesland (Germany)], E-mail: jacobsen@kemkom.com

    2008-04-03

    Intermolecular interactions between a prototypical transition metal hydride WH(CO){sub 2}NO(PH{sub 3}){sub 2} and a small proton donor H{sub 2}O have been studied using DFT methodology. The hydride, nitrosyl and carbonyl ligand have been considered as site of protonation. Further, DFT-D calculations in which empirical corrections for the dispersion energy are included, have been carried out. A variety of pure and hybrid density functionals (BP86, PW91, PBE, BLYP, OLYP, B3LYP, B1PW91, PBE0, X3LYP) have been considered, and our calculations indicate the PBE functional and its hybrid variation are well suited for the calculation of transition metal hydride hydrogen and dihydrogen bonding. Dispersive interactions make up for a sizeable portion of the intermolecular interaction, and amount to 20-30% of the bond energy and to 30-40% of the bond enthalpy. An energy decomposition analysis reveals that the H...H bond of transition metal hydrides contains both covalent and electrostatic contributions.

  9. Spectroscopic monitoring of metallic bonding in laser metal deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ya, Wei; Konuk, A.R.; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Pathiraj, B.; Huis in 't Veld, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is presented in this paper to link optical emission spectrum analysis to the quality of clad layers produced with laser metal deposition (LMD). A Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1.064 μm) was used to produce clad tracks with Metco 42C powder on AISI 4140 steel substrate. The laser power was ramped

  10. Chemical bonding of hydrogen molecules to transition metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubas, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The complex W(CO) 3 (PR 3 ) 2 (H 2 ) (CO = carbonyl; PR 3 = organophosphine) was prepared and was found to be a stable crystalline solid under ambient conditions from which the hydrogen can be reversibly removed in vacuum or under an inert atmosphere. The weakly bonded H 2 exchanges easily with D 2 . This complex represents the first stable compound containing intermolecular interaction of a sigma-bond (H-H) with a metal. The primary interaction is reported to be donation of electron density from the H 2 bonding electron pair to a vacant metal d-orbital. A series of complexes of molybdenum of the type Mo(CO)(H 2 )(R 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PR 2 ) 2 were prepared by varying the organophosphine substitutent to demonstrate that it is possible to bond either dihydrogen or dihydride by adjusting the electron-donating properties of the co-ligands. Results of infrared and NMR spectroscopic studies are reported. 20 refs., 5 fig

  11. Bump Bonding Using Metal-Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, James L.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Kowalczyk, Robert S.; Liao, Anna; Bronikowski, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Bump bonding hybridization techniques use arrays of indium bumps to electrically and mechanically join two chips together. Surface-tension issues limit bump sizes to roughly as wide as they are high. Pitches are limited to 50 microns with bumps only 8-14 microns high on each wafer. A new process uses oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a metal (indium) in a wicking process using capillary actions to increase the aspect ratio and pitch density of the connections for bump bonding hybridizations. It merges the properties of the CNTs and the metal bumps, providing enhanced material performance parameters. By merging the bumps with narrow and long CNTs oriented in the vertical direction, higher aspect ratios can be obtained if the metal can be made to wick. Possible aspect ratios increase from 1:1 to 20:1 for most applications, and to 100:1 for some applications. Possible pitch density increases of a factor of 10 are possible. Standard capillary theory would not normally allow indium or most other metals to be drawn into the oriented CNTs, because they are non-wetting. However, capillary action can be induced through the ability to fabricate oriented CNT bundles to desired spacings, and the use of deposition techniques and temperature to control the size and mobility of the liquid metal streams and associated reservoirs. This hybridization of two technologies (indium bumps and CNTs) may also provide for some additional benefits such as improved thermal management and possible current density increases.

  12. Microstructure and bonding mechanism of Al/Ti bonded joint using Al-10Si-1Mg filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Woong H.; Bong, Ha H.; Hong, Soon H.

    2003-01-01

    The microstructures and liquid state diffusion bonding mechanism of cp-Ti to 1050 Al using an Al-10.0wt.%Si-1.0wt.%Mg filler metal with 100 μm in thickness have been investigated at 620 deg. C under 1x10 -4 Torr. The effects of bonding process parameters on microstructure of bonded joint have been analyzed by using an optical microscope, AES, scanning electron microscopy and EDS. The interfacial bond strength of Al/Ti bonded joints was measured by the single lap shear test. The results show that the bonding at the interface between Al and filler metal proceeds by wetting the Al with molten filler metal, and followed by removal of oxide layer on surface of Al. The interface between Al and filler metal moved during the isothermal solidification of filler metal by the diffusion of Si from filler metal into Al layer. The interface between Al and filler metal became curved in shape with increasing bonding time due to capillary force at grain boundaries. The bonding at the interface between Ti and filler metal proceeds by the formation of two different intermetallic compound layers, identified as Al 5 Si 12 Ti 7 and Al 12 Si 3 Ti 5 , followed by the growth of the intermetallic compound layers. The interfacial bond strength at Al/Ti joint increased with increasing bonding time up to 25 min at 620 deg. C. However, the interfacial bond strength of Al/Ti joint decreased after bonding time of 25 min at 620 deg. C due to formation of cavities in Al near Al/intermetallic interfaces

  13. Transition from metal-ligand bonding to halogen bonding involving a metal as halogen acceptor a study of Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, and Hg complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Vytor; Cremer, Dieter

    2017-08-01

    Utilizing all-electron Dirac-exact relativistic calculations with the Normalized Elimination of the Small Component (NESC) method and the local vibrational mode approach, the transition from metal-halide to metal halogen bonding is determined for Au-complexes interacting with halogen-donors. The local stretching force constants of the metal-halogen interactions reveal a smooth transition from weak non-covalent halogen bonding to non-classical 3-center-4-electron bonding and finally covalent metal-halide bonding. The strongest halogen bonds are found for dialkylaurates interacting with Cl2 or FCl. Differing trends in the intrinsic halogen-metal bond strength, the binding energy, and the electrostatic potential are explained.

  14. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-01-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  15. Comparison of the tensile bond strength of high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, D; Nayir, E; Pamuk, S

    2000-11-01

    Although the bond strengths of various resin composite luting materials have been reported in the literature, the evaluation of these systems with various cast alloys of different compositions has not been completely clarified. To evaluate the tensile bond strength of sandblasted high-noble, noble, and base metal alloys bonded to etched enamel by 2 different bonding agents of different chemical composition: Panavia-Ex (BIS-GMA) and Super-Bond (4-META acrylic). Flat enamel surfaces were prepared on buccal surfaces of 60 extracted noncarious human incisors. Teeth were divided into 3 groups of 20 each. Twenty circular disks of 5 mm diameter were prepared for casting for each group. Group I was cast with a high-noble, group II with a noble, and group III with a base metal alloy. The surfaces of the disks were sandblasted with 250 microm Al(2)O(3). Ten disks of each group were bonded to exposed enamel surfaces with Super-Bond and 10 disks with Panavia-Ex as recommended by the manufacturer. The tensile bond strength was measured with an Instron universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure occurred. Two-way ANOVA was used to evaluate the results. The differences in bond strengths of Super-Bond and Panavia-Ex with different alloys were not significant. The highest bond strengths were obtained in base metal alloys, followed by noble and high-noble alloys. These results were significant. Panavia-Ex and Super-Bond exhibited comparable tensile bond strengths. For both luting agents, the highest bond strengths were achieved with base metal alloys and the lowest with high-noble alloys.

  16. Techniques for hot-press-bonding dissimilar metal combinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1966-05-01

    High strength diffusionless bonds can be produced in a variety of dissimilar metal combinations by the hot press bonding technique covered by Canadian Patent application 904,548 June 6, 1964. Some of the combinations that can be joined successfully are Zircaloy-2 and 416 stainless steel, 416 stainless steel and mild steel, 1S aluminum and mild steel, Zircaloy-2 and M257 SAP, and Zircaloy-2 and 1S aluminum. Several other combinations were attempted but suitable joints could not be produced. The methods of producing the joints, the joint strength that can be developed and a discussion of some of the problems associated with making the joints are included in the report. (author)

  17. Development for dissimilar metal joint between stainless steel and zirconium by explosive bonding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Toshimi; Asano, Chooichi; Funamoto, Takao; Hirose, Yasuo; Sasada, Yasuhiro.

    1988-01-01

    Development of dissimilar metal joints between stainless steel and Zr for application to nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment was studied. Two dissimilar metal joints (Zr to SUS 304 L joint and its joint using Ta as insert metal) were made by the explosive bonding technique. After bonding, microstructure, tensile strength and corrosion test of dissimilar metal joints were investigated. The results indicated that: (1) The good dissimilar metal joint is obtained between stainless steel and Zr with a Ta insert metal by using explosive bonding technique. (2) A Ta insert metal retards a growth of intermetallic compounds at the bonding interface. (3) The strength of the dissimilar metal joint in this study is higher than that of Zr metal. Any local attack was not observed at the bonding interface after corrosion test. (author)

  18. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded with two different bonding agents under dry conditions and with saliva contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanehmasjedi, Mashallah; Naseri, Mohammad Ali; Khanehmasjedi, Samaneh; Basir, Leila

    2017-02-01

    This study compared the shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded with Single Bond and Assure bonding agents under dry and saliva-contamination conditions. Sixty sound premolar teeth were selected, and stainless-steel brackets were bonded on enamel surfaces with Single Bond and Assure bonding agents under dry condition or with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength values of brackets were measured in a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index scores were determined after debonding of the brackets under a stereomicroscope. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze bond strength. Two-by-two comparisons were made with post hoc Tukey tests (pbrackets to tooth structure were 9.29±8.56 MPa and 21.25±8.93 MPa with the use of Assure resin bonding agent under saliva-contamination and dry conditions, respectively. These values were 10.13±6.69 MPa and 14.09±6.6 MPa, respectively, under the same conditions with the use of Single Bond adhesive. Contamination with saliva resulted in a significant decrease in the bond strength of brackets to tooth structure with the application of Assure adhesive resin (pbrackets to tooth structures. Contamination with saliva significantly decreased the bond strength of Assure bonding agent compared with dry conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  19. Metal-Free Approaches to Sterically-Hindered Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Veronica Vin-yi

    Developing methods to perform cross coupling reactions by means of catalysis is highly desirable in chemistry. Many industries in today's society, such as the petroleum, agriculture, pharmaceutical, electronics, and polymer industry, use catalysis to some extent whether it is to make molecules that offer crop protection or toward the synthesis of the active ingredient of a medication. It is noteworthy that over 90% of chemicals are made through catalytic processes and that the catalyst market reached $17 billion in 2014, which demonstrates the demand for such methods. While transition metal catalysts have advantages such as low catalyst loading, broad reactivity, and that they have been well studied, some disadvantages are that they can be relatively expensive and sometimes air sensitive which can make them challenging to use. Organocatalysis, specifically noncovalent catalysis operating through hydrogen bond donating interactions, offers an environmentally-friendly alternative to transition metal catalysis. Our lab utilizes organocatalysis as a strategy to synthesize challenging, sterically-hindered bonds. Nitrimines have been identified as powerful coupling partners for the sustainable construction of new sterically congested carbon-carbon and carbon-heteroatom bonds. Using urea catalysis, a metal-free method to synthesize previously inaccessible enamines has been developed. Conventional routes to synthesize enamines as important building blocks toward target molecules generally require Lewis/Bronsted acids or expensive transition metals; however, these methods are often unsuccessful when stericallyhindered substrates are used. To address this synthetic challenge, it was hypothesized that hydrogen bonding interactions between a urea organocatalyst and nitrimine would generate a reactive species suited for the effective carbon-nitrogen coupling with amines to give the desired enamine products. This reaction provides high yields (up to 99%) of enamines using a

  20. From covalent bonding to coalescence of metallic nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soohwan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Growth of metallic nanorods by physical vapor deposition is a common practice, and the origin of their dimensions is a characteristic length scale that depends on the three-dimensional Ehrlich-Schwoebel (3D ES barrier. For most metals, the 3D ES barrier is large so the characteristic length scale is on the order of 200 nm. Using density functional theory-based ab initio calculations, this paper reports that the 3D ES barrier of Al is small, making it infeasible to grow Al nanorods. By analyzing electron density distributions, this paper shows that the small barrier is the result of covalent bonding in Al. Beyond the infeasibility of growing Al nanorods by physical vapor deposition, the results of this paper suggest a new mechanism of controlling the 3D ES barrier and thereby nanorod growth. The modification of local degree of covalent bonding, for example, via the introduction of surfactants, can increase the 3D ES barrier and promote nanorod growth, or decrease the 3D ES barrier and promote thin film growth.

  1. Microstructure and properties of hot roll bonding layer of dissimilar metals. 2. Bonding interface microstructure of Zr/stainless steel by hot roll bonding and its controlling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuyama, Masanori; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Taka, Takao; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi.

    1996-01-01

    The hot roll bonding of zirconium and stainless steel inserted with tantalium was investigated using the newly developed rolling mill. The effect of hot rolling temperatures of zirconium/stainless steel joints on bonding interface structure was evaluated. Intermetallic compound layer containing cracks was observed at the bonding interface between stainless steel and tantalium when the rolling temperature was above 1373K. The hardness of the bonding layer of zirconium and tantalium bonded above 1273K was higher than tantalium or zirconium base metal in spite of absence of intermetallic compound. The growth of reaction layer at the stainless steel and tantalium interface and at the tantalium and zirconium interface was conforming a parabolic low when that was isothermally heated after hot roll bonding, and the growth rate was almost same as that of static diffusion bonding without using hot roll bonding process. It is estimated that the strain caused by hot roll bonding gives no effect on the growth of reaction layer. It was confirmed that the dissimilar joint of zirconium and stainless steel with insert of tantalium having the sound bonding interface were obtained at the suitable bonding temperature of 1173K by the usage of the newly developed hot roll bonding process. (author)

  2. Liquid phase diffusion bonding of A1070 by using metal formate coated Zn sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, K.; Koyama, S.; shohji, I.

    2017-05-01

    Aluminium alloy have high strength and easily recycle due to its low melting point. Therefore, aluminium is widely used in the manufacturing of cars and electronic devices. In recent years, the most common way for bonding aluminium alloy is brazing and friction stir welding. However, brazing requires positional accuracy and results in the formation of voids by the flax residue. Moreover, aluminium is an excellent heat radiating and electricity conducting material; therefore, it is difficult to bond together using other bonding methods. Because of these limitations, liquid phase diffusion bonding is considered to the suitable method for bonding aluminium at low temperature and low bonding pressure. In this study, the effect of metal formate coating processing of zinc surface on the bond strength of the liquid phase diffusion bonded interface of A1070 has been investigated by SEM observation of the interfacial microstructures and fractured surfaces after tensile test. Liquid phase diffusion bonding was carried out under a nitrogen gas atmosphere at a bonding temperature of 673 K and 713 K and a bonding load of 6 MPa (bonding time: 15 min). As a result of the metal formate coating processing, a joint having the ultimate tensile strength of the base aluminium was provided. It is hypothesized that this is because metallic zinc is generated as a result of thermal decomposition of formate in the bonded interface at lower bonding temperatures.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of some reduced ternary and quaternary molybdenum oxide phases with strong metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lii, K.H.

    1985-10-01

    In the course of our research on reduced ternary and quaternary molybdenum oxides, very interesting compounds with strong metal-metal bonds were discovered. Among these solid-state materials are found discrete cluster arrays and structures with extended metal-metal bonding. Further study in this system has revealed that many new structures exist in this new realm. The synthesis, structures, bonding, and properties of these new oxides, which are briefly summarized in tabular form, are presented in this thesis. 144 refs., 63 figs., 79 tabs

  4. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1991-10-01

    The formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies has been developed into a single equation which unifies the treatment of covalent bonds, ionic bonds, and partially ionic bonds. This relationship has been used to clarify the fundamental thermodynamic information relating to metal-hydrogen, metal-alkyl, and metal-metal bond energies. We have been able to obtain a direct observation and measurement of the stabilization energy provided by the agostic interaction of the C-H bond with the metal. The ionization energies have also been used to correlate the rates of carbonyl substitution reactions of (η 5 -C 5 H 4 X)Rh(CO) 2 complexes, and to reveal the electronic factors that control the stability of the transition state. The extent that the electronic features of these bonding interactions transfer to other chemical systems is being investigated in terms of the principle of additivity of ligand electronic effects. Specific examples under study include metal- phosphines, metal-halides, and metallocenes. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene, and its interaction with a metal surface. The high-resolution valence ionizations in the gas phase reveal the high symmetry of the molecule, and studies of thin films of C 60 reveal weak intermolecular interactions. Scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy reveal the arrangement of spherical molecules on gold substrates, with significant delocalization of charge from the metal surface. 21 refs

  5. Biomaterial based novel polyurethane adhesives for wood to wood and metal to metal bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitesh Ramanlal Patel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane adhesives made from synthetic chemicals are non-biodegradable, costly and difficult to find raw materials from local market. To avoid solid pollution problem, cost effectiveness and easy availability of raw materials, biomaterials based polyurethane adhesives are used in current industrial interest. Direct use of castor oil in polyurethane adhesive gives limited hardness. Modification on active sites of castor oil to utilize double bond of unsaturated fatty acid and carboxyl group yields new modified or activated polyols, which can be utilized for polyurethane adhesive formulation. In view of this, we have synthesized polyurethane adhesives from polyester polyols, castor oil based polyols and epoxy based polyols with Isocyanate adducts based on castor oil and trimethylolpropane. To study the effects of polyurethane adhesive strength (i.e. lap shear strength on wood-to-wood and metal-to-metal bonding through various types of polyols, cross-linking density, isocyanate adducts and also to compare adhesive strength between wood to wood and metal to metal surface. These polyols and polyurethanes were characterized through GPC, NMR and IR-spectroscopy, gel and surface drying time. Thermal stability of PU adhesives was determined under the effect of cross-linking density (NCO/OH ratio. The NCO/OH ratio (1.5 was optimized for adhesives as the higher NCO/OH ratio (2.0 increasing cross-linking density and decreases adhesion. Lower NCO/OH ratio (1.0 provideslow cross-linking density and low strength of adhesives.

  6. Experimental Investigations on the Influence of Adhesive Oxides on the Metal-Ceramic Bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Enghardt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test the influence of selected base metals, which act as oxide formers, on the metal-ceramic bond of dental veneer systems. Using ion implantation techniques, ions of Al, In and Cu were introduced into near-surface layers of a noble metal alloy containing no base metals. A noble metal alloy with base metals added for oxide formation was used as a reference. Both alloys were coated with a low-temperature fusing dental ceramic. Specimens without ion implantation or with Al2O3 air abrasion were used as controls. The test procedures comprised the Schwickerath shear bond strength test (ISO 9693-1, profile height (surface roughness measurements (ISO 4287; ISO 4288; ISO 25178, scanning electron microscopy (SEM imaging, auger electron spectroscopy (AES and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX. Ion implantation resulted in no increase in bond strength. The highest shear bond strengths were achieved after oxidation in air and air abrasion with Al2O3 (41.5 MPa and 47.8 MPa respectively. There was a positive correlation between shear bond strength and profile height. After air abrasion, a pronounced structuring of the surface occurred compared to ion implantation. The established concentration shifts in alloy and ceramic could be reproduced. However, their positive effects on shear bond strength were not confirmed. The mechanical bond appears to be of greater importance for metal-ceramic bonding.

  7. Effect of layered manufacturing techniques, alloy powders, and layer thickness on metal-ceramic bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekren, Orhun; Ozkomur, Ahmet; Ucar, Yurdanur

    2018-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) and direct metal laser melting (DMLM) have become popular for fabricating the metal frameworks of metal-ceramic restorations. How the type of layered manufacturing device, layer thickness, and alloy powder may affect the bond strength of ceramic to metal substructure is unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of dental porcelain to metal frameworks fabricated using different layered manufacturing techniques (DMLS and DMLM), Co-Cr alloy powders, and layer thicknesses and to evaluate whether a correlation exists between the bond strength and the number of ceramic remnants on the metal surface. A total of 75 bar-shaped metal specimens (n=15) were fabricated using either DMLS or DMLM. The powder alloys used were Keramit NP-S and EOS-Cobalt-Chrome SP-2 with layer thicknesses of 20 μm and 30 μm. After ceramic application, the metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated with a 3-point-bend test. Three-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey honest significance difference test were used for statistical analysis (α=.05). De-bonding surface microstructure was observed with scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was conducted to evaluate the correlation between ceramic remnants on the metal surface and bond strength values. The mean bond strength value of DMLS was significantly higher than that of DMLM. While no statistically significant difference was found between layer thicknesses, alloy powders closely affected bond strength. Statistical comparisons revealed that the highest bond strength could be achieved with DMLS-Cobalt-Chrome SP2-20μm, and the lowest bond strength was observed in DMLS-Keramit NP-S-20μm (P≤.05). No correlation was found between porcelain remnants on the metal surface and bond strength values. The layered manufacturing device and the alloy powders evaluated in the current study closely affected the bond strength of dental porcelain to a metal framework

  8. Role of contact bonding on electronic transport in metal-carbon nanotube-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deretzis, I; La Magna, A

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the interfacial bond arrangement on the electronic transport features of metal-nanotube-metal systems. The transport properties of finite, defect-free armchair and zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes attached to Au(111) metallic contacts have been calculated by means of the non-equilibrium Green functional formalism with the tight-binding and the extended Hueckel Hamiltonians. Our calculations show that the electrode material is not the only factor which rules contact transparency. Indeed, for the same electrode, but changing nanotube helicities, we have observed an overall complex behaviour of the transmission spectra due to band mixing and interference. A comparison of the two models shows that the tight-binding approach fails to give a satisfactory representation of the transmission function when a more accurate description of the C-C and Au-C chemical bonds has to be considered. We have furthermore examined the effect of interface geometry variance on conduction and found that the contact-nanotube distance has a significant impact, while the contact-nanotube symmetry plays a marginal, yet evident role

  9. Propensity of bond exchange as a window into the mechanical properties of metallic glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, W.; Wang, X. L., E-mail: xlwang@um.cityu.edu.hk; Lan, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Pan, S. P. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Lu, Z. P. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-02-09

    We investigated the mechanical properties of Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glasses, by compression experiment and molecular dynamics simulations. From the simulation, we found that the large, solvent atom, Zr, has high propensity of bond exchange compared to those of the smaller solute atoms. The difference in bond exchange is consistent with the observed disparity in mechanical behaviors: Zr-rich metallic glass exhibits low elastic modulus and large plastic strain. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements suggest that the increased propensity in bond exchange is related to the softening of Zr bonds with increasing Zr content.

  10. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting, hydrofluoric acid and silane. Maxillary incisor metal brackets were bonded to half of the disks in each group by conventional orthodontic bonding resin and the other half bonded with a nano-filled composite. The samples then were thermocycled for 2000 cycle between 5-55° C. Shear bond strength was measured and the mode of failure was examined. Randomly selected samples were also evaluated by SEM.The lowest bond strength value was found infeldespathic ceramic bonded by nano-filled composite (p<0.05. There was not any statistically significant difference between other groups regarding bond strength. The mode of failure in the all groups except group 1 was cohesive and porcelain damages were detected.Since less damages to feldspathic porcelain was observed when the nano-filled composite was used to bond brackets, the use of nano-filled composite resins can be suggested for bonding brackets to feldspathic porcelain restorations.

  11. Method of bonding metals to ceramics and other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, D.M.; Krauss, A.R.; DeWald, A.P.; Chienping Ju; Rigsbee, J.M.

    1993-01-05

    A composite and method of forming same wherein the composite has a non-metallic portion and an alloy portion wherein the alloy comprises an alkali metal and a metal which is an electrical conductor such as Cu, Ag, Al, Sn or Au and forms an alloy with the alkali metal. A cable of superconductors and composite is also disclosed.

  12. Chemical Bond Energies of 3d Transition Metals Studied by Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltved, Klaus A.d; Kepp, Kasper P.

    2018-01-01

    Despite their vast importance to inorganic chemistry, materials science and catalysis, the accuracy of modelling the formation or cleavage of metal-ligand (M-L) bonds depends greatly on the chosen functional and the type of bond in a way that is not systematically understood. In order to approach...

  13. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  14. Environmental Exposure and Accelerated Testing of Rubber-to-Metal Vulcanized Bonded Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-11-01

    btadiene/acrylonitrile ( NBR ) rubber -to-metat -. canized bonded assemblies at the two exposure sites are shown in Table 5. After exposure for one year...AD-A0-17 368 EN~VIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE AND ACCELERATED TESTING OF RUBBER -TO-METAL VULCANIZED BONDED ASSEMBLIES John A. WilliamsI Rock Island Arseital...COMMERCE 325116 1AD R-TR-75-013 ENViRONMENTAL EXPOSURE AND ACCELERATED TESTING OF RUBBER -TO-METAL VULCANIZED BONDED ASSEMBLIES by __ John A. Williams

  15. Low temperature thermocompression bonding between aligned carbon nanotubes and metallized substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M X; Gan, Z Y; Liu, S [School of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Song, X H, E-mail: chimish@163.com [Division of MOEMS, Wuhan National Lab for Optoelectronics, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-08-26

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) turf is proposed for use as an electrical and thermal contact material. For these applications, one route for circumventing the high temperatures required for VACNT growth using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is used to grow firstly VACNTs on one substrate and then transfer them to other substrates. In this work, a nano thermocompression bonding technique between VACNTs and a metallized substrate is developed to allow dry mechanical transfer of the VACNTs. Unlike the diffusion bonding between two bulk materials, nano metal clusters have a high surface energy and the atoms are very active to form alloy with the contacted bulk metal material even at much lower temperatures, so nano thermocompression bonding can decrease the bonding temperature (150 deg. C) and pressure (1 MPa) and greatly shorten the bonding time from hours to 20 min. A debonding experiment shows that the bonding strength between VACNTs and the metallized layer is so high that a break is less likely to occur at the bonding interface.

  16. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha de Souza Gomes Stumpf

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. METHODS: Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI. RESULTS: The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. CONCLUSIONS: The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  17. Shear bond strength of metallic and ceramic brackets using color change adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Aisha de Souza Gomes; Bergmann, Carlos; Prietsch, José Renato; Vicenzi, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    To determine the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using color change adhesives that are supposed to aid in removing excess of bonding material and compare them to a traditional adhesive. Ninety metallic and ninety ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine incisors using two color change adhesives and a regular one. A tensile stress was applied by a universal testing machine. The teeth were observed in a microscope after debonding in order to determine the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). The statistical analysis (ANOVA, Tukey, and Kruskall-Wallis tests) demonstrated that the mean bond strength presented no difference when metallic and ceramic brackets were compared, but the bond resistance values were significantly different for the three adhesives used. The most common ARI outcome was the entire adhesive remaining on the enamel. The bond strength was similar for metallic and ceramic brackets when the same adhesive system was used. ARI scores demonstrated that bonding with these adhesives is safe even when ceramic brackets were used. On the other hand, bond strength was too low for orthodontic purposes when Ortho Lite Cure was used.

  18. Metal-Ligand Bonds of Second- and Third-Row d-Block Metals Characterized by Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kasper P.

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents systematic data for 200 neutral diatomic molecules ML (M is a second- or third-row d-block metal and L = H, F, Cl, Br, I, C, N, O, S, or Se) computed with the density functionals TPSSh and BP86. With experimental structures and bond enthalpies available for many of these molecules, the computations first document the high accuracy of TPSSh, giving metal-ligand bond lengths with a mean absolute error of ˜0.01 Å for the second row and 0.03 Å for the third row. TPSSh provides metal-ligand bond enthalpies with mean absolute errors of 37 and 44 kJ/mol for the second- and third-row molecules, respectively. Pathological cases (e.g., HgC and HgN) have errors of up to 155 kJ/mol, more than thrice the mean (observed with both functionals). Importantly, the systematic error component is negligible as measured by a coefficient of the linear regression line of 0.99. Equally important, TPSSh provides uniform accuracy across all three rows of the d-block, which is unprecedented and due to the 10% exact exchange, which is close to optimal for the d-block as a whole. This work provides an accurate and systematic prediction of electronic ground-state spins, characteristic metal-ligand bond lengths, and bond enthalpies for many as yet uncharacterized diatomics, of interest to researchers in the field of second- and third-row d-block chemistry. We stress that the success of TPSSh cannot be naively extrapolated to other special situations such as, e.g., metal-metal bonds. The high accuracy of the procedure further implies that the effective core functions used to model relativistic effects are necessary and sufficient for obtaining accurate geometries and bond enthalpies of second- and third-row molecular systems.

  19. Development of dissimilar metal transition joint by hot roll bonding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Takeda, Seiichiro; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Ikenaga, Yoshiaki.

    1994-01-01

    Metallurgically bonded transition joints which enable to connect reprocessing equipments made of superior corrosion resistant valve metals (Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti) with stainless steel piping is needed for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The authors have developed dissimilar metal transition joints between stainless steel and Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti with an insert metal of Ta by the hot roll bonding process, using the newly developed mill called 'rotary reduction mill'. In the R and D program, appropriate bonding conditions in the manufacturing process of the joints were established. This report presents the structure of transition joints and the manufacturing process by the hot roll bonding technique. Then, the evaluation of mechanical and corrosion properties and the results of demonstration test of joints for practical use are described. (author)

  20. Development of dissimilar metal transition joint by hot roll bonding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Takeda, Seiichiro; Shikakura, Sakae; Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Nakasuji, Kazuyuki; Kajimura, Haruhiko.

    1995-01-01

    Metallurgically bonded transition joints which enable to connect reprocessing equipments made of superior corrosion resistant valve metals (Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti) with stainless steel piping is needed for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The authors have developed dissimilar metal transition joints between stainless steel and Ti-5Ta, Zr or Ti with an insert metal of Ta by the hot roll bonding process, using the newly developed mill called 'rotary reduction mill'. In the R and D program, appropriate bonding conditions in the manufacturing process of the joints were established. This report presents the structure of transition joints and the manufacturing process by hot roll bonding technique. Then, the evaluation of mechanical and corrosion properties and the results of demonstration test of joints for practical use are described. (author)

  1. Analysis of surface bond lengths reported for chemisorption on metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K. A. R.

    1985-01-01

    A review is given of bond length information available from the techniques of surface crystallography (particularly with LEED, SEXAFS and photoelectron diffraction) for chemisorption on well-defined surfaces of metals (M). For adsorbed main-group atoms (X), measured X-M interatomic distances for 38 combinations of X and M have been assessed with a bond order-bond length relation in combination with the Schomaker-Stevenson approach for determining single-bond lengths. When the surface bond orders are fixed primarily by the valency of X, this approach appears to provide a simple framework for predicing X-M surface bond lengths. Further, in cases where agreement has been reached from different surface crystallographic techniques, this framework has the potential for assessing refinements to the surface bonding model (e.g. in determining the roles of the effective surface valency of M, and of coordinate bonding and supplementary π bonding between X and M). Preliminary comparisons of structural data are also given for molecular adsorption (CO and ethylidyne) and for the chemisorption of other metal atoms.

  2. Oxidation study on as-bonded intermetallic of copper wire–aluminum bond pad metallization for electronic microchip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph Sahaya Anand, T.; Yau, Chua Kok; Huat, Lim Boon

    2012-01-01

    In this work, influence of Copper free air ball (FAB) oxidation towards Intermetallic Compound (IMC) at Copper wire–Aluminum bond pad metallization (Cu/Al) is studied. Samples are synthesized with different Copper FAB oxidation condition by turning Forming Gas supply ON and OFF. Studies are performed using Optical Microscope (OM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and line-scan Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). SEM result shows there is a cross-sectional position offset from center in sample synthesized with Forming Gas OFF. This is due to difficulty of determining the position of cross-section in manual grinding/polishing process and high occurrence rate of golf-clubbed shape of oxidized Copper ball bond. TEM inspection reveals that the Copper ball bond on sample synthesized with Forming Gas OFF is having intermediate oxidation. Besides, the presence of IMC at the bonding interface of Cu/Al for both samples is seen. TEM study shows voids form at the bonding interface of Forming Gas ON sample belongs to unbonded area; while that in Forming Gas OFF sample is due to volume shrinkage of IMC growth. Line-scan EDX shows the phases present in the interfaces of as-bonded samples are Al 4 Cu 9 (∼3 nm) for sample with Forming Gas ON and mixed CuAl and CuAl 2 (∼15 nm) for sample with Forming Gas OFF. Thicker IMC in sample with Forming Gas OFF is due to cross-section is positioned at high stress area that is close to edge of ball bond. Mechanical ball shear test shows that shear strength of sample with Forming Gas OFF is about 19% lower than that of sample with Forming Gas ON. Interface temperature is estimated at 437 °C for as-bonded sample with Forming Gas ON by using empirical parabolic law of volume diffusion. -- Highlights: ► 3 nm Al 4 Cu 9 are found in sample prepared with Forming Gas ON. ► 15 nm mixed CuAl + CuAl 2 are found in sample prepared with Forming Gas OFF. ► Voids are present at the bonding interfaces of both

  3. Oxidation study on as-bonded intermetallic of copper wire-aluminum bond pad metallization for electronic microchip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Sahaya Anand, T., E-mail: anand@utem.edu.my [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, University Technical Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); Yau, Chua Kok [Faculty of Manufacturing Engineering, University Technical Malaysia Melaka, Hang Tuah Jaya, 76100 Durian Tunggal, Melaka (Malaysia); University of Technical Malaysia Supported by Infineon Technology - Malaysia - Sdn. Bhd., Melaka (Malaysia); Huat, Lim Boon [Department of Innovation, Infineon Technology - Malaysia - Sdn. Bhd., FTZ Batu Berendam, 75350 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, influence of Copper free air ball (FAB) oxidation towards Intermetallic Compound (IMC) at Copper wire-Aluminum bond pad metallization (Cu/Al) is studied. Samples are synthesized with different Copper FAB oxidation condition by turning Forming Gas supply ON and OFF. Studies are performed using Optical Microscope (OM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and line-scan Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX). SEM result shows there is a cross-sectional position offset from center in sample synthesized with Forming Gas OFF. This is due to difficulty of determining the position of cross-section in manual grinding/polishing process and high occurrence rate of golf-clubbed shape of oxidized Copper ball bond. TEM inspection reveals that the Copper ball bond on sample synthesized with Forming Gas OFF is having intermediate oxidation. Besides, the presence of IMC at the bonding interface of Cu/Al for both samples is seen. TEM study shows voids form at the bonding interface of Forming Gas ON sample belongs to unbonded area; while that in Forming Gas OFF sample is due to volume shrinkage of IMC growth. Line-scan EDX shows the phases present in the interfaces of as-bonded samples are Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 9} ({approx}3 nm) for sample with Forming Gas ON and mixed CuAl and CuAl{sub 2} ({approx}15 nm) for sample with Forming Gas OFF. Thicker IMC in sample with Forming Gas OFF is due to cross-section is positioned at high stress area that is close to edge of ball bond. Mechanical ball shear test shows that shear strength of sample with Forming Gas OFF is about 19% lower than that of sample with Forming Gas ON. Interface temperature is estimated at 437 Degree-Sign C for as-bonded sample with Forming Gas ON by using empirical parabolic law of volume diffusion. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 3 nm Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 9} are found in sample prepared with Forming Gas ON. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 15 nm mixed CuAl + CuAl{sub 2} are found

  4. A contribution to the study of metal-ceramic bonding by direct vacuum brazing with reactive metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Wettability and bonding tests were utilized to evaluate the behaviour of various specials alloys, for work at high temperature under vacuum, for the inter-bonding of silicon carbide, alumina ceramic, graphite (for electrical applications) and petroleum coke and their joining with themselves as the metals titanium, molybdenum, nickel and copper. The joints exhibiting effective bonding were investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-rays diffraction. Elemental mapping of the constituents and quantitative chemical microanalysis were also undertaken, via the energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDS). On the basis of the results the possible mechanisms of bond-formation have been discussed. It was verified that: a) of the filler metals studied, those which exhibited effective wettability on all the above materials were: 49Cu-49Ti-2Be, Zircaloy4-5Be and a commercial alloy Ticusil, which consisted of a Cu-Ag eutectic with a small addition of pure Ti, of nominal composition 26.7Cu-68.8Ag-4.5Ti; b) the alloys with high levels of reactive metals such as Ti and Zr tended to form low ductility bonds due to the formation of hard, brittle phases; c) the copper suffered pronounced erosion when in direct contact with alloys of high Ti and Zr contents, due to the formation of phases whose melting points were below the brazing temperature of those materials; e) the compounds detected as reaction products were identified as, TiC in the samples rich in carbon, such as the SiC ceramic and graphite joints, or the oxides Cu2Ti2O5 and Cu3TiO4 in the bonding of alumina to alloys including Ti in their composition or in that of the filler metal, proving that the effectiveness of the bond is dependent upon an initial and indispensable chemical bonding. (author)

  5. Microleakage under Orthodontic Metal Brackets Bonded with Three Different Bonding Techniques with/without Thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berahman Sabzevari

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the microleakage of beneath the orthodontic brackets bonded with 3 different bonding techniques and evaluate the effect of thermocycling. Methods: One hundred and twenty premolars were randomly divided into 6 groups, received the following treatment: group 1: 37% phosphoric acid gel+Unite primer+Unite adhesive, group 2: 37% phosphoric acid gel+ Transbond XT primer+Transbond XT adhesive, group 3: Transbond plus Self Etching Primer (TSEP+Transbond XT adhesive. Groups 4, 5, and 6 were similar to groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Evaluation of microleakage was done following to thermocycling test. After bonding, the specimens were sealed with nail varnish except for 1 mm around the brackets and then stained with 0.5% basic fuchsine. The specimens were sectioned at buccolingual direction in 2 parallel planes and evaluated under a stereomicroscope to determine the amount of microleakage at bracket-adhesive and adhesive-enamel interfaces from gingival and occlusal margins. Results: Microleakage was observed in all groups, and increased significantly after thermocycling at some interfaces of Unite adhesive group and conventional etching+Transbond XT adhesive group, but the increase was not significant in any interface of TSEP group. With or without thermocycling, TSEP displayed more microleakage than other groups. In most groups, microleakage at gingival margin was significantly higher than occlusal margin. Conclusion: Thermocycling and type of bonding technique significantly affect the amount of microleakage.

  6. Saturated bonds and anomalous electronic transport in transition-metal aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.

    2006-05-22

    This thesis deals with the special electronic properties of the transition-metal aluminides. Following quasicrystals and their approximants it is shown that even materials with small elementary cells exhibit the same surprising effects. So among the transition-metal aluminides also semi-metallic and semiconducting compounds exist, although if they consist of classic-metallic components like Fe, Al, or Cr. These properties are furthermore coupled with a deep pseusogap respectively gap in the density of states and strongly covalent bonds. Bonds are described in this thesis by two eseential properties. First by the bond charge and second by the energetic effect of the bond. It results that in the caes of semiconducting transition-metal aluminides both a saturation of certain bonds and a bond-antibond alteration in the Fermi level is present. By the analysis of the near-order in form of the so-calles coordination polyeders it has been succeeded to establish a simple rule for semiconductors, the five-fold coordination for Al. This rule states that aluminium atoms with their three valence electrons are not able to build more than five saturated bonds to their nearest transition-metal neighbours. In excellent agreement with the bond angles predicted theoretically under assumption of equal-type bonds it results that all binary transition-element aluminide semiconductors exhibit for the Al atoms the same near order. Typical values for specific resistances of the studied materials at room temperature lie in the range of some 100 {mu}{omega}cm, which is farly larger than some 10 {mu}{omega}cm as in the case of the unalloyed metals. SUrprising is furthermore a high transport anisotropy with a ratio of the specific resistances up to 3.0. An essential result of this thesis can be seen in the coupling of the properties of the electronic transport and the bond properties. The small conducitivities could be explained by small values in the density of states and a bond

  7. Relativistic Effects on Metal-Metal Bonding. Comparison of the Performance of ECP and Scalar DKH Description on the Picture of Metal-Metal Bonding in Re2Cl8(2-)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert; Bučinský, L.; Gatti, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 10 (2010), s. 3113-3121 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0118 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 1/0817/08; VEGA(SK) 1/0127/09; APVV(SK) 0093-07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : relativistic effects * metal-metal bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.138, year: 2010

  8. Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d > 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems

  9. Effect of various commercially available mouthrinses on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazeer Ahmed Meeran

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Alcohol containing mouthrinses affect the shear bond strength of the metal orthodontic brackets bonded with composite resin (Transbond XT in the present study, more when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. It is, therefore, highly advisable to avoid alcohol containing mouthrinses in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and use alcohol-free mouthrinses as adjuncts to regular oral hygiene procedures for maintaining good enamel integrity and periodontal health, without compromising the shear bond strength of the bonded metal brackets.

  10. Bond ionicity in crystals of transition metal compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesler, Ya.A.

    1989-01-01

    A unified method of calculating bond ionicity in inorganic crystals is suggested. The approach presented envisages the sealing of d-electron contribution to ξ,p-electron contribution for the retention of community which can only be implemented by a self-consistent procedure. The results of self-consistent calculations of bond parameters of a number of crystals (ScN, Sc 2 O 3 , In 2 O 3 , J 2 O 3 ) as compared with the data for ξ,p-analogues are given. Ionicity changes in the series of analogous compounds utterly correspond to existing chemical concepts. The data for oxides of 4d-, 5d-elements (ZrO 2 , CeO 2 , ThO 2 ) and for a number of ternary compounds containing two types of bonds (LiNbO 3 , CdSc 2 S 4 , CdCr 2 Se 4 etc) are also given. In the case of transition elements ionicity to a great extent depends on the symmetry of anion environment and correlates to orbital population well. Ionicity values are in direct proportion to effective charges of atoms of transition elements

  11. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of metallic brackets bonded with two different bonding agents under dry conditions and with saliva contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashallah Khanehmasjedi

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Application of Single Bond and Assure bonding agents resulted in adequate bond strength of brackets to tooth structures. Contamination with saliva significantly decreased the bond strength of Assure bonding agent compared with dry conditions.

  12. Microstructure of bonding interface for resistance welding of Zr-based metallic glass sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Toshio; Ikeuchi, Kenji; Shimada, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Akira; Kimura, Hisamichi; Inoue, Akihisa

    2009-01-01

    Resistance welding of Zr 55 Cu 30 Al 10 Ni 5 metallic glass sheets was investigated at 723 K in a supercooled liquid region. The welding time was changed from 5 s to 20 s at 723 K. The joint interface of the metallic glass was no defect and no crack. X-ray diffraction technique of the bonding interface of specimens was performed. The specimens showed halo patterns showing existence of only glassy phase, when the welding time was 5 s and 10 s. X-ray diffraction patterns of specimen bonded for 20 s showed crystalline peaks with halo patterns for the welding for 20 s. The crystalline phase at the bonding interface was small. Transmission electron micrograph at the bonding interface showed nanostructures of NiZr 2 and Al 5 Ni 3 Zr 2 . (author)

  13. A Metal Bump Bonding Method Using Ag Nanoparticles as Intermediate Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Weixin; Nimura, Masatsugu; Kasahara, Takashi; Mimatsu, Hayata; Okada, Akiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Ishizuka, Shugo; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The future development of low-temperature and low-pressure bonding technology is necessary for fine-pitch bump application. We propose a bump structure using Ag nanoparticles as an intermediate layer coated on a fine-pitch Cu pillar bump. The intermediate layer is prepared using an efficient and cost-saving squeegee-coating method followed by a 100°C baking process. This bump structure can be easily flattened before the bonding process, and the low-temperature sinterability of the nanoparticles is retained. The bonding experiment was successfully performed at 250°C and 39.8 MPa and the bonding strength was comparable to that achieved via other bonding technology utilizing metal particles or porous material as bump materials.

  14. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichienberger, D.L.

    1990-10-01

    This quarter has witnessed further progress both in our experimental methods of photoelectron spectroscopy and in our understanding the fundamental relationships between ionization energies and the chemistry of transition metal species. Progress continues on the new gas phase photoelectron spectrometer that combine improved capabilities for HeI/HeII UPS, XPS, and Auger investigations of organometallic molecules. Several measurements have been accomplished this year that were not possible previously. We have published the formal relationship between measured molecular ionization energies and thermodynamic bond dissociation energies, and applied the relationships to homonuclear and heteronuclear diatomic molecules, multiple bonds, and metal-ligand bonds. Studies of C-H bond activation have continued with examination of different degrees of Si-H bond addition to metals. the electronic effects of intermolecular interactions have been observed by comparing the ionizations of metal complexes in the gas phase with the ionizations of monolayer solid organometallic films prepared in ultra-high vacuum. The orientations of the molecules have been determined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Especially interesting has been the recent application of these techniques to the characterization of the soccer-ball shaped C 60 molecule, buckminsterfullerene. Studies of the following complexes are described : Fe, Os, Nb, Mo, Rh, Re, Al, and Mn. 19 refs

  15. Metal-Ligand Bonds of Second- and Third-Row d-Block Metals Characterized by Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents systematic data for 200 neutral diatomic molecules ML (M is it second- or third-row d-block metal and L = H, F, Cl, Br, I, C, N, O, S, or Se) Computed with the density functionals TPSSh and BP86. With experimental Structures and bond enthalpies available for many of these mole...

  16. Ultra-low coupling loss fully-etched apodized grating coupler with bonded metal mirror

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Peucheret, Christophe; Ou, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    A fully etched apodized grating coupler with bonded metal mirror is designed and demonstrated on the silicon-on-insulator platform, showing an ultra-low coupling loss of only 1.25 dB with 3 dB bandwidth of 69 nm.......A fully etched apodized grating coupler with bonded metal mirror is designed and demonstrated on the silicon-on-insulator platform, showing an ultra-low coupling loss of only 1.25 dB with 3 dB bandwidth of 69 nm....

  17. Direct measurement and modulation of single-molecule coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhu, Nan; Gschneidtner, Tina

    2013-01-01

    remain a daunting challenge. Here we demonstrate an interdisciplinary and systematic approach that enables measurement and modulation of the coordinative bonding forces in a transition metal complex. Terpyridine is derived with a thiol linker, facilitating covalent attachment of this ligand on both gold...... substrate surfaces and gold-coated atomic force microscopy tips. The coordination and bond breaking between terpyridine and osmium are followed in situ by electrochemically controlled atomic force microscopy at the single-molecule level. The redox state of the central metal atom is found to have...

  18. Metal-mediated DNA base pairing: alternatives to hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takezawa, Yusuke; Shionoya, Mitsuhiko

    2012-12-18

    With its capacity to store and transfer the genetic information within a sequence of monomers, DNA forms its central role in chemical evolution through replication and amplification. This elegant behavior is largely based on highly specific molecular recognition between nucleobases through the specific hydrogen bonds in the Watson-Crick base pairing system. While the native base pairs have been amazingly sophisticated through the long history of evolution, synthetic chemists have devoted considerable efforts to create alternative base pairing systems in recent decades. Most of these new systems were designed based on the shape complementarity of the pairs or the rearrangement of hydrogen-bonding patterns. We wondered whether metal coordination could serve as an alternative driving force for DNA base pairing and why hydrogen bonding was selected on Earth in the course of molecular evolution. Therefore, we envisioned an alternative design strategy: we replaced hydrogen bonding with another important scheme in biological systems, metal-coordination bonding. In this Account, we provide an overview of the chemistry of metal-mediated base pairing including basic concepts, molecular design, characteristic structures and properties, and possible applications of DNA-based molecular systems. We describe several examples of artificial metal-mediated base pairs, such as Cu(2+)-mediated hydroxypyridone base pair, H-Cu(2+)-H (where H denotes a hydroxypyridone-bearing nucleoside), developed by us and other researchers. To design the metallo-base pairs we carefully chose appropriate combinations of ligand-bearing nucleosides and metal ions. As expected from their stronger bonding through metal coordination, DNA duplexes possessing metallo-base pairs exhibited higher thermal stability than natural hydrogen-bonded DNAs. Furthermore, we could also use metal-mediated base pairs to construct or induce other high-order structures. These features could lead to metal-responsive functional

  19. Metal-free oxidative olefination of primary amines with benzylic C-H bonds through direct deamination and C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Xing, Li-Juan; Xu, Tong; Zhu, Xue-Ping; Zhou, Wen; Kang, Ning; Wang, Bin

    2014-09-14

    An oxidative olefination reaction between aliphatic primary amines and benzylic sp(3) C-H bonds has been achieved using N-bromosuccinimide as catalyst and tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant. The olefination proceeds under mild metal-free conditions through direct deamination and benzylic C-H bond activation, and provides easy access to biologically active 2-styrylquinolines with (E)-configuration.

  20. Bad metal behaviour in the new Hg-rich amalgam KHg{sub 6} with polar metallic bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tambornino, Frank; Hoch, Constantin, E-mail: constantin.hoch@cup.uni-muenchen.de

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The novel Hg-rich amalgam KHg{sub 6} was synthesised by electrocrystallisation. • The structure was investigated by single crystal and powder diffraction. • Thermal decomposition, electric resistance and magnetic susceptibiliy were examined. • Band structure, total and partial density of states and Bader charges were calculated. • Bad metal behaviour results from ionic, metallic and covalent bonding contributions. - Abstract: The new mercury-rich amalgam KHg{sub 6} crystallises with the BaHg{sub 6} structure type (orthorhombic, space group Pnma (No. 62), a = 13.394(9) Å, b = 5.270(3) Å, c = 10.463 Å). It was prepared by electrolysis of a solution of KI in N,N′-Dimethylformamide at 343 K at a reactive Hg cathode. The structure of KHg{sub 6} shows motifs of ionic packing, covalent Hg cluster formation and metallic properties. KHg{sub 6} decomposes peritectically at 443 K. The combination of alkali metals with a noble metal with moderate electron affinity results in the formation of polar metal–metal bonding with considerable but incomplete electron transfer from the electropositive to the electronegative sublattice, resulting in typical “bad metal behaviour”, illustrated by resistance and susceptibility measurements and quantum theoretical calculations.

  1. Metal-metal bonds involving the f elements. 4. Molecular orbital studies of metal-metal and metal-ligand interactions in dinuclear uranium(V) systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayton, R.H.; Novo-Gradac, K.J.; Bursten, B.E.

    1991-01-01

    The electronic structures of a series of dinuclear uranium(V) complexes have been investigated using Xα-SW molecular orbital calculations including quasirelativistic corrections. Complexes of the formula U 2 H 10 and U 2 (OH) 10 were used to model the metal-ligand σ and π interactions, respectively, in the known species U 2 (O-i-Pr) 10 . Two basic geometries were investigated: a vertex-sharing bioctahedron with only terminal ligands (D 4h symmetry) and an edge-sharing bioctahedron containing two bridging ligands (D 2h symmetry). The latter geometry, which is that of U 2 (O-i-Pr) 10 , was also examined at U-U bonding and nonbonding distances. The calculations indicate that the U-U interactions are significantly perturbed when H is replaced by OH, owing to strong donation from the OH pπ orbitals into selected U 5f orbitals. The result is a lack of any appreciable U-U interaction for U 2 (OH) 10 in either the D 4h or D 2h geometry. In addition, the overall OH π donation to the U 5f levels is enhanced in the D 2h geometry. The electronic structure of a hypothetical U(V) dimer, Cp 2 U 2 O 4 , was also examined in both bridged and unsupported geometries. The unbridged geometry, like that for U 2 (OH) 10 , suffered from a destabilization of the U-U σ orbital due to ligand π donation and revealed no net U-U bonding. However, the geometry exhibiting two bridging oxo ligands maintains the U-U σ-bonding MO as its lowest energy U 5f orbital. 21 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  2. The importance of atomic and molecular correlation on the bonding in transition metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Walch, Stephen P.

    1986-01-01

    The determination of accurate spectroscopic parameters for molecular systems containing transition metal atoms is shown to require extensive data sets and a high level correlation treatment, and techniques and their limitations are considered. Extensive results reported on the transition metal atoms, hydrides, oxides, and dimers makes possible the design of a calculation to correctly describe the mixing of different atomic asymptotes, and to give a correct balance between molecular bonding and exchange interactions. Examples considered include the dipole moment of the 2Delta state of NiH, which can help determine the mixture of 3d(8)4s(2) and 3d(9)4s(1) in the NiH wavefunction, and the bonding in CrO, where an equivalent description of the relative energies associated with the Cr 3d-3d atomic exchange and the Cr-O bond is important.

  3. Formation of metal-F bonds during frictional sliding : Influence of water and applied load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J. T.; Pei, Y. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2016-01-01

    Effects of water lubrication and applied load on the formation of PTFE transfer films and metal-F bonds during sliding when PTFE filled composites sliding against steel and Al2O3 are investigated. In water lubricated conditions, XPS analysis reveals that a thin layer of water molecules at the

  4. Metal-ceramic bond strength of Co-Cr alloy fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Xin, Xian-Zhen; Chen, Jie; Wei, Bin

    2012-06-01

    This study was to evaluated the metal-ceramic bond strength of a Co-Cr dental alloy prepared using a selective laser melting (SLM) technique. Two groups comprised of twenty Co-Cr metal bars each were prepared using either a SLM or traditional lost-wax casting method. Ten bars from each group were moulded into standard ISO 9693:1999 dimensions of 25 mm × 3 mm × 0.5 mm with 1.1 mm of porcelain fused onto an 8 mm × 3 mm rectangular area in the centre of each bar. Metal-ceramic bonding was assessed using a three-point bending test. Fracture mode analysis and area fraction of adherence porcelain (AFAP) were determined by measuring Si content of specimens by SEM/EDS. Student's t-test within the groups demonstrated no significant difference for the mean bond strength between the SLM and traditional cast sample groups. While SEM/EDS analysis indicated a mixed fracture mode on the debonding interface of both the SLM and the cast groups, the SLM group showed significantly more porcelain adherence than the control group (p<0.05). The SLM metal-ceramic system exhibited a bonding strength that exceeds the requirement of ISO 9691:1999(E) and it even showed a better behaviour in porcelain adherence test comparable to traditional cast methods. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of alloy type and surface conditioning on roughness and bond strength of metal brackets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nergiz, I.; Schmage, P.; Herrmann, W.; Ozcan, M.; Nergiz, [No Value

    2004-01-01

    The effect of 5 different surface conditioning methods on bonding of metal brackets to cast dental alloys was examined. The surface conditioning methods were fine (30-µm) or rough (125-µm) diamond bur, sandblasting (50-µm or 110-µm aluminum oxide [Al2O3]), and silica coating (30-µm silica). Fifty

  6. Preparation of low valent technetium metal-metal bonded species via solvothermal reduction of pertechnetate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerlin, W.M.; Poineau, F.; Forster, P.M.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Sattelberger, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    A new one-step solvothermal synthesis route for reduction of pertechnetate salts to low valent technetium metal-metal bonded dimers will be presented. The reaction of potassium pertechnetate with glacial acetic acid plus either halo acids or halo salts under in-situ hydrogen production by sodium borohydride at various temperatures yields multiple products consisting of tetraacetate Tc-Tc (II,III) and Tc-Tc (III,III) paddle wheel dimers. Solid products isolated and analyzed via Single Crystal X-ray Diffraction (SC-XRD) in these reactions consist of polymeric chains Tc 2 +5 core: Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 (O 2 CCH 3 ), Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 Cl, Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 Br, Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 I, molecular Tc 2 +5 core: Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 3 Cl 2 (H 2 O) 2 ·H 2 O, K[Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 Br 2 ], and molecular Tc 2 +6 core: Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 Cl 2 , Tc 2 (μ-O 2 CCH 3 ) 4 Br 2 . Of the compounds listed, four are newly discovered using the one-step technique and two more additions to crystal database. Additional spectroscopic (X-ray Absorbance Fine Structure, UV-Vis, and FT-IR) characterization of the new compounds will be shown and used to propose a mechanism. Analysis of the mother liquor of each reaction by UV-Vis and formation of crystals over time due to oxidation of solutions affords a possible insight into mechanism of the Tc 2 +5 to Tc 2 +6 core formation. The oxidation states of Tc-Tc dimers formed is also dependent on temperature and pH of the starting solutions and will be explained in extensive detail. These one step reactions of reducing Tc(VII) to low valent technetium provides high yield intermediates for potential waste forms, use in nuclear fuel cycle separations, and radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  7. Binding of hydrocarbons and other extremely weak ligands to transition metal complexes that coordinate hydrogen: Investigation of cis-interactions and delocalized bonding involving sigma bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubas, G.J.; Eckert, J.; Luo, X.L.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). At the forefront of chemistry are efforts to catalytically transform the inert C-H bonds in alkanes to more useful products using metal compounds. The goal is to observe binding and cleavage of alkane C-H bonds on metals or to use related silane Si-H bonding as models, analogous to the discovery of hydrogen (H 2 ) binding to metals. Studies of these unique sigma complexes (M hor-ellipsis H-Y; Y double-bond H, Si, C) will aid in developing new catalysts or technologies relevant to DOE interest, e.g., new methods for tritium isotope separation. Several transition metals (Mo, W, Mn, and Pt) were found to reversibly bind and cleave H 2 , silanes, and halocarbons. The first metal-SiH 4 complexes, thus serving as a model for methane reactions. A second goal is to study the dynamics and energetics of H-Y bonds on metals by neutron scattering, and evidence for interactions between bound H-Y and nearby H atoms on metal complexes has been found

  8. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  9. Using graphitic foam as the bonding material in metal fuel pins for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karahan, Aydın; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluates the possible use of graphite foam as the bonding material between U–Pu–Zr metallic fuel and steel clad for sodium fast reactor applications using FEAST-METAL fuel performance code. Furthermore, the applicability of FEAST-METAL to the advanced fuel designs is demonstrated. Replacing the sodium bond with a chemically stable foam material would eliminate fuel clad metallurgical interactions, and allow for fuel swelling under low external stress. Hence, a significant improvement is expected for the steady state and transient performance. FEAST-METAL was used to assess the thermo-mechanical behavior of the new fuel form and a reference metallic fuel pin. Nearly unity conversion ratio, 75% smear density U–15Pu–6Zr metallic fuel pin with sodium bond, and T91 cladding was selected as a reference case. It was found that operating the reference case at high clad temperatures (600–660 °C) results in (1) excessive clad wastage formation/clad thinning due to lanthanide migration and formation of brittle phases at clad inner surface, and (2) excessive clad hoop strain at the upper axial section due mainly to the occurrence of thermal creep. The combination of these two factors may lead to cladding breach. The work concludes that replacing the sodium bond with 80% porous graphite foam and reducing the fuel smear density to 70%, it is likely that the fuel clad metallurgical interaction would be eliminated while the fuel swelling is allowed without excessive fuel clad mechanical interaction. The suggested design appears as an alternative for a high performance metallic fuel design for sodium fast reactors

  10. Using graphitic foam as the bonding material in metal fuel pins for sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karahan, Aydın, E-mail: karahan@alum.mit.edu; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2013-10-15

    The study evaluates the possible use of graphite foam as the bonding material between U–Pu–Zr metallic fuel and steel clad for sodium fast reactor applications using FEAST-METAL fuel performance code. Furthermore, the applicability of FEAST-METAL to the advanced fuel designs is demonstrated. Replacing the sodium bond with a chemically stable foam material would eliminate fuel clad metallurgical interactions, and allow for fuel swelling under low external stress. Hence, a significant improvement is expected for the steady state and transient performance. FEAST-METAL was used to assess the thermo-mechanical behavior of the new fuel form and a reference metallic fuel pin. Nearly unity conversion ratio, 75% smear density U–15Pu–6Zr metallic fuel pin with sodium bond, and T91 cladding was selected as a reference case. It was found that operating the reference case at high clad temperatures (600–660 °C) results in (1) excessive clad wastage formation/clad thinning due to lanthanide migration and formation of brittle phases at clad inner surface, and (2) excessive clad hoop strain at the upper axial section due mainly to the occurrence of thermal creep. The combination of these two factors may lead to cladding breach. The work concludes that replacing the sodium bond with 80% porous graphite foam and reducing the fuel smear density to 70%, it is likely that the fuel clad metallurgical interaction would be eliminated while the fuel swelling is allowed without excessive fuel clad mechanical interaction. The suggested design appears as an alternative for a high performance metallic fuel design for sodium fast reactors.

  11. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Souza Henkin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM. Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM. The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface.

  12. Bonding of Metal Orthodontic Attachments to Sandblasted Porcelain and Zirconia Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitoj S. Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates tensile bond strength (TBS of metal orthodontic attachments to sandblasted feldspathic porcelain and zirconia with various bonding protocols. Thirty-six (36 feldspathic and 36 zirconia disc samples were prepared, glazed, embedded in acrylic blocks and sandblasted, and divided into three groups according to one or more of the following treatments: hydrofluoric acid 4% (HF, Porcelain Conditioner silane primer, Reliance Assure® primer, Reliance Assure plus® primer, and Z Prime™ plus zirconia primer. A round traction hook was bonded to each sample. Static tensile bond strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine and adhesive remnant index (ARI scoring was done using a digital camera. One-way ANOVA and Pearson chi-square tests were used to analyze TBS (MPa and ARI scores. No statistically significant mean differences were found in TBS among the different bonding protocols for feldspathic and zirconia, p values = 0.369 and 0.944, respectively. No statistically significant distribution of ARI scores was found among the levels of feldspathic, p value = 0.569. However, statistically significant distribution of ARI scores was found among the levels of zirconia, p value = 0.026. The study concluded that silanization following sandblasting resulted in tensile bond strengths comparable to other bonding protocols for feldspathic and zirconia surface.

  13. In vitro analysis of shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of different metal brackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, Fernanda de Souza; de Macêdo, Érika de Oliveira Dias; Santos, Karoline da Silva; Schwarzbach, Marília; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Mundstock, Karina Santos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: There is a great variety of orthodontic brackets in the Brazilian market, and constantly evaluating them is critical for professionals to know their properties, so as to be able to choose which product best suits their clinical practice. Objectives: To evaluate the bond strength and the adhesive remnant index (ARI) of different brands of metal brackets. Material and Methods: A total of 105 bovine incisors were used, and brackets of different brands were bonded to teeth. Seven different bracket brands were tested (MorelliTM, American OrthodonticsTM, TP OrthodonticsTM, Abzil-3MTM, OrthometricTM, TecnidentTM and UNIDENTM). Twenty-four hours after bonding, shear bond strength test was performed; and after debonding, the ARI was determined by using an optical microscope at a 10-fold increase. Results: Mean shear bond strength values ranged from 3.845 ± 3.997 (MorelliTM) to 9.871 ± 5.106 MPa (TecnidentTM). The majority of the ARI index scores was 0 and 1. Conclusion: Among the evaluated brackets, the one with the lowest mean shear bond strength values was MorelliTM. General evaluation of groups indicated that a greater number of bond failure occurred at the enamel/adhesive interface. PMID:28125142

  14. Thermal bonding of light water reactor fuel using nonalkaline liquid-metal alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, R.F.; Tulenko, J.S.; Schoessow, G.J.; Connell, R.G. Jr.; Dubecky, M.A.; Adams, T.

    1996-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance is limited by thermal and mechanical constraints associated with the design, fabrication, and operation of fuel in a nuclear reactor. A technique is explored that extends fuel performance by thermally bonding LWR fuel with a nonalkaline liquid-metal alloy. Current LWR fuel rod designs consist of enriched uranium oxide fuel pellets enclosed in a zirconium alloy cylindrical clad. The space between the pellets and the clad is filled by an inert gas. Because of the low thermal conductivity of the gas, the gas space thermally insulates the fuel pellets from the reactor coolant outside the fuel rod, elevating the fuel temperatures. Filling the gap between the fuel and clad with a high-conductivity liquid metal thermally bonds the fuel to the cladding and eliminates the large temperature change across the gap while preserving the expansion and pellet-loading capabilities. The application of liquid-bonding techniques to LWR fuel is explored to increase LWR fuel performance and safety. A modified version of the ESCORE fuel performance code (ESBOND) is developed to analyze the in-reactor performance of the liquid-metal-bonded fuel. An assessment of the technical feasibility of this concept for LWR fuel is presented, including the results of research into materials compatibility testing and the predicted lifetime performance of liquid-bonded LWR fuel. The results show that liquid-bonded boiling water reactor peak fuel temperatures are 400 F lower at beginning of life and 200 F lower at end of life compared with conventional fuel

  15. A metallization and bonding approach for high performance carbon nanotube thermal interface materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, Robert; Graham, Samuel; Cola, Baratunde A; Fisher, Timothy; Xu Xianfan; Gall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed to create vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) thermal interface materials that can be attached to a variety of metallized surfaces. VACNT films were grown on Si substrates using standard CVD processing followed by metallization using Ti/Au. The coated CNTs were then bonded to metallized substrates at 220 deg. C. By reducing the adhesion of the VACNTs to the growth substrate during synthesis, the CNTs can be completely transferred from the Si growth substrate and used as a die attachment material for electronic components. Thermal resistance measurements using a photoacoustic technique showed thermal resistances as low as 1.7 mm 2 K W -1 for bonded VACNT films 25-30 μm in length and 10 mm 2 K W -1 for CNTs up to 130 μm in length. Tensile testing demonstrated a die attachment strength of 40 N cm -2 at room temperature. Overall, these metallized and bonded VACNT films demonstrate properties which are promising for next-generation thermal interface material applications.

  16. Determination of bond energies by mass spectrometry. Some transition metal carbonyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michels, G.D.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of transition metal carbonyls have been studied, M(CO) 6 and M(CO) 5 CS complexes of the Group VIB metals and M 2 (CO) 10 complexes of the Group VIIB metals. Results for the hexacarbonyl complexes indicate that the measured fragmentation energies are in error by 0.25 +- 0.02 eV per CO produced. This is attributed to excitation of CO to the first vibrational state. Least-squares dissociation energies calculated from corrected data for M(CO) 5 CS complexes indicate that the M--CS bond is 3 to 4 times stronger than the M--CO bonds. Substitution of CS for CO in going from M(CO) 6 to M(CO) 5 CS weakens the remaining M--CO bonds by an average of 0.2 eV. Previously unreported MnTc(CO) 10 and TcRe(CO) 10 are prepared by halide substitution of Tc(CO) 5 Br and Re(CO) 5 Br with Mn(CO) 5 - and Tc(CO) 5 - , respectively. In the positive ion, metal and mixed-metal decacarbonyls are considered as (CO) 5 M + --M(CO) 5 complexes possessing five strong and five weak M--CO bonds. For Mn 2 (CO) 10 and Re 2 (CO) 10 , M + --M dissociation energies are 3.0 +- 0.1 and 4.0 +- 0.3 eV, respectively. These energies are 2.5 times greater than those reported for homolytic cleavage to M(CO) 5 + and M(CO) 5

  17. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Shirazi, Sajjad; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-02-01

    Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch.

  18. Oxidative addition of C--H bonds in organic molecules to transition metal centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.G.

    1989-04-01

    Alkanes are among the most chemically inert organic molecules. They are reactive toward a limited range of reagents, such as highly energetic free radicals and strongly electrophilic and oxidizing species. This low reactivity is a consequence of the C--H bond energies in most saturated hydrocarbons. These values range from 90 to 98 kcal/mole for primary and secondary C--H bonds; in methane, the main constituent of natural gas, the C--H bond energy is 104 kcal/mole. This makes methane one of the most common but least reactive organic molecules in nature. This report briefly discusses the search for metal complexes capable of undergoing the C--H oxidative addition process allowing alkane chemistry to be more selective than that available using free radical reagents. 14 refs

  19. Joining of dissimilar metals by diffusion bonding. Titanium alloy with aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akca, Enes [International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Research and Development Center; International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Gursel, Ali [International Univ. of Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a novel diffusion bonding process of commercially pure aluminum to Ti-6Al-4V alloy at 520, 560, 600 and 640 C for 30, 45 and 60 minutes under argon gas shielding without the use of interlayer. The approach is to overcome the difficulties in fusion welding of dissimilar alloys. Diffusion bonding is a dissimilar metal welding process which can be applied to the materials without causing any physical deformations. Processed samples were metallographically prepared, optically examined followed by Vickers microhardness test and subjected to tensile test in order to determine joint strength. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used in this work to investigate the compositional changes across the joint region. Elemental composition of the region has been successfully defined between titanium alloy and aluminum. The maximum tensile strength was obtained from the samples bonded at the highest temperatures of 600 and 640 C.

  20. Mechanical tunability via hydrogen bonding in metal-organic frameworks with the perovskite architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Thirumurugan, A; Barton, Phillip T; Lin, Zheshuai; Henke, Sebastian; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Wharmby, Michael T; Bithell, Erica G; Howard, Christopher J; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-06-04

    Two analogous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the perovskite architecture, [C(NH2)3][Mn(HCOO)3] (1) and [(CH2)3NH2][Mn(HCOO)3] (2), exhibit significantly different mechanical properties. The marked difference is attributed to their distinct modes of hydrogen bonding between the A-site amine cation and the anionic framework. The stronger cross-linking hydrogen bonding in 1 gives rise to Young's moduli and hardnesses that are up to twice those in 2, while the thermal expansion is substantially smaller. This study presents clear evidence that the mechanical properties of MOF materials can be substantially tuned via hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  1. Influencing the bonding and assembly of a multiterminal molecule on a metal surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukas, Maya; Doessel, Kerrin; Fink, Karin; Fuhr, Olaf [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Nanotechnology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center of Functional Nanostructures (CFN), D-76049 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schramm, Alexandrina; Stroh, Christophe [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Nanotechnology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mayor, Marcel [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Nanotechnology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center of Functional Nanostructures (CFN), D-76049 Karlsruhe (Germany); University of Basel, Department of Chemistry, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Loehneysen, Hilbert von [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute of Nanotechnology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Center of Functional Nanostructures (CFN), D-76049 Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Physics Institute and Institute for Solid State Physics, D-76049 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The bond of a molecule to a metallic electrode is known to have a crucial influence on the molecular conductance. As electronic functionalities are integrated into molecules or several subunits are connected to a three-dimensional multiterminal molecule, it is not obvious that a ''well-known'' chemical linker group will lead to the bonding configuration known from simpler molecules. We investigated a series of tripodal molecules on metal surfaces by STM. The chemical linker groups and the complex connecting the three wire-units are varied. We find that the position of molecules on the surface is governed by a subtle balance of intermolecular and molecule-surface interactions, partly in strong contrast to expectations. This emphasizes the need to characterize the nature of molecule-electrode contacts along with the investigation of the electronic conductance.

  2. Causal Relationship Between Islamic Bonds, Oil Price and Precious Metals: Evidence From Asia Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metadjer Widad

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Sukuk or Islamic bonds as new “Halal” securities had wildly expanded in Muslim and non-Muslim capital markets. So, this study aims to investigate the causal relationship between Islamic bonds (sukuk, oil and precious metals “silver and gold” prices in Asia pacific. This study used VAR model relying on daily data. The findings of Granger causality test and impulse-responses analysis results provide substantial evidence in favor of the relation between sukuk and the commodity market variables (oil, gold, and silver meanwhile and unlike many empirical studies, don’t we have found that oil doesn’t cause changes in precious metals prices. Therefore, the idea that Islamic financial markets provide diversification benefits and they are safe havens during oil crisis cannot be supported empirically.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v10i2.7171

  3. Bonding and vibrational dynamics of a large π-conjugated molecule on a metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temirov, R; Soubatch, S; Lassise, A; Tautz, F S

    2008-01-01

    The interplay between the substrate bonding of a large π-conjugated semiconductor molecule and the dynamical properties of the metal-organic interface is studied, employing the prototypical PTCDA/Ag(111) monolayer as an example. Both the coupling of molecular vibrations to the electron-hole-pair continuum of the metal surface and the inelastic scattering of tunnelling electrons by the molecular vibrations on their passage through the molecule are considered. The results of both types of experiment are consistent with the findings of measurements which probe the geometric and electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex directly; generally speaking, they can be understood in the framework of standard theories for the electron-vibron coupling. While the experiments reported here in fact provide additional qualitative insights into the substrate bonding of our π-conjugated model molecule, their detailed quantitative understanding would require a full calculation of the dynamical interface properties, which is currently not available

  4. Finding high-temperature superconductors by metallizing the σ-bonding electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Miao; Lu Zhongyi; Xiang Tao

    2015-01-01

    Raising superconducting transition temperature (T_c) is an important task of fundamental research on superconductivity. It is also a prerequisite for the large scale application of superconductors. Since the microscopic mechanism of high-T_c superconductivity is unknown, the conventional approach for increasing T_c is either to apply high pressure to a material which has the potential to become superconducting, or to push it close to an antiferromagnetic or some other quantum instability point by chemical doping. In this article, the authors point out that another general approach for raising T_c is to lift the σ-bonding bands to the Fermi level, or to metallize the σ-bonding elections. This approach can increase the probability of finding a novel high-T_c superconductor because the coupling of σ-bonding electrons with phonons is generally strong and the superconducting transition induced by this interaction can occur at relatively high temperatures. After elucidating the underlying mechanism, the authors discuss a number of schemes to metallize σ-bonding electrons, and present their recent prediction for the crystalline and electronic structures of two potential high-T_c superconductors, Li_2B_3C and Li_3B_4C_2, with T_c higher than 50 K. (authors)

  5. Low cycle fatigue lifetime of HIP bonded Bi-metallic first wall structures of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Toshihisa; Sato, Satoshi; Furuya, Kazuyuki; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Takatsu, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Hashimoto, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Kazunori

    1998-10-01

    A HIP bonded bi-metallic panel composed of a dispersion strengthened copper (DSCu) layer and type 316L stainless steel (SS316L) cooling pipes is the reference design of the ITER first wall. To examine the fatigue lifetime of the first wall panel under cyclic mechanical loads, low cycle fatigue tests of HIP bonded bi-metallic specimens made of SS316L and DSCu were conducted with the stress ratio of -1.0 and five nominal strain range conditions ranging from 0.2 to 1.0%. Elasto-plastic analysis has also been conducted to evaluate local strain ranges under the nominal strains applied. Initial cracks were observed at the inner surface of the SS316L cooling pipes for all of the specimens tested, which was confirmed by the elasto-plastic analysis that the maximum strains of the test specimens were developed at the same locations. It was found that the HIP bonded bi-metallic test specimens had a fatigue lifetime longer than that of the SS316L raw material obtained by round bar specimens. Similarly, the fatigue lifetime of the DSCu/SS316L HIP interface was also longer than the round bar test results for the HIP joints. From these results, it has been confirmed that the bi-metallic first wall panel with built-in cooling pipes made by HIP bonding has a sufficient fatigue lifetime in comparison with the raw fatigue data of the materials, which also suggests that the fatigue lifetime evaluation has an adequate margin against fracture if it follows the design fatigue curve based on the material fatigue data. (author)

  6. In situ metalation of free base phthalocyanine covalently bonded to silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lupo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Free 4-undecenoxyphthalocyanine molecules were covalently bonded to Si(100 and porous silicon through thermic hydrosilylation of the terminal double bonds of the undecenyl chains. The success of the anchoring strategy on both surfaces was demonstrated by the combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with control experiments performed adopting the commercially available 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(octyloxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine, which is not suited for silicon anchoring. Moreover, the study of the shape of the XPS N 1s band gave relevant information on the interactions occurring between the anchored molecules and the substrates. The spectra suggest that the phthalocyanine ring interacts significantly with the flat Si surface, whilst ring–surface interactions are less relevant on porous Si. The surface-bonded molecules were then metalated in situ with Co by using wet chemistry. The efficiency of the metalation process was evaluated by XPS measurements and, in particular, on porous silicon, the complexation of cobalt was confirmed by the disappearance in the FTIR spectra of the band at 3290 cm−1 due to –NH stretches. Finally, XPS results revealed that the different surface–phthalocyanine interactions observed for flat and porous substrates affect the efficiency of the in situ metalation process.

  7. Effects of different etching methods and bonding procedures on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different CAD/CAM ceramic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, S Kutalmış; Kucukekenci, Ahmet Serkan

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic metal brackets applied to different types of ceramic surfaces treated with different etching procedures and bonding agents. Monolithic CAD/CAM ceramic specimens (N = 120; n = 40 each group) of feldspathic ceramic Vita Mark II, resin nanoceramic Lava Ultimate, and hybrid ceramic Vita Enamic were fabricated (14 × 12 × 3 mm). Ceramic specimens were separated into four subgroups (n = 10) according to type of surface treatment and bonding onto the ceramic surface. Within each group, four subgroups were prepared by phosphoric acid, hydrofluoric acid, Transbond XT primer, and Clearfill Ceramic primer. Mandibular central incisor metal brackets were bonded with light-cure composite. The SBS data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. The highest SBS was found in the Vita Enamic group, which is a hybrid ceramic, etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Transbond XT Adhesive primer (7.28 ± 2.49 MPa). The lowest SBS was found in the Lava Ultimate group, which is a resin nano-ceramic etched with hydrofluoric acid and applied Clearfill ceramic primer (2.20 ± 1.21 MPa). CAD/CAM material types and bonding procedures affected bond strength ( P .05). The use of Transbond XT as a primer bonding agent resulted in higher SBS.

  8. A novel metal-to-metal bonding process through in-situ formation of Ag nanoparticles using Ag2O microparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Akio; Tatsumi, Hiroaki; Takeda, Naoya; Akada, Yusuke; Ogura, Tomo; Ide, Eiichi; Morita, Toshiaki

    2009-01-01

    The metal-to-metal bonding has been successfully achieved via the bonding process using Ag metallo-organic nanoparticles at a bonding temperature of around 300-, which can be alternative to the current microsoldering in electronics assembly using high-temperature solders. However, further reduction of bonding temperature and/or bonding pressure is needed. In the present research, a novel bonding process through in-situ formation of Ag nanoparticles instead of the filler material of the Ag metallo-organic nanoparticles has been developed. The Ag nanoparticles can form by the reduction of Ag 2 O particles. In this study, the Ag 2 O particles were mixed with triethylene glycol as a reducing agent to form a paste for bonding. The Au coated cylindrical specimens were bonded using the paste. The Ag nanoparticles formed at around 130 to 160 through the reduction process of Ag2O particles with triethylene glycol. The Ag nanoparticles were immediately sintered each other due to a great surface energy per volume. A transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the sintered Ag metallurgically bonded to the Au substrate at around 160 and a dense Ag layer formed after further heating. The tensile strength of the joint bonded at 250 under a bonding pressure of 5MPa was around 60MPa

  9. Surface analysis applied to metal-ceramic and bioceramic interfacial bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, R.St.C.; Arora, P.S.; Steveson, M.; Kawashima, N.; Cavallaro, G.P.; Ming, H.; Skinner, W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Low temperature plasma reactions, combined with sol-gel coatings, have been used to produce a variety of ceramic surface layers on metal substrates and interfacial layers between metals and oxides or other ceramics. These layers can be designed to be compositionally and functionally graded from the metal to bulk ceramic material, eg. silica, alumina, hydroxyapatite. The graded layers are generally <50nm thick, continuous, fully bonded to the substrate and deformable without disbonding. The objectives in design of these layers have been to produce: metal surfaces protected from oxidation, corrosion and acid attack; improved metal-ceramic bonding; and bioceramic titanium-based interfaces to bioactive hydroxyapatite for improved dental and medical implants. Modified Auger parameter studies for Si in XPS spectra show that the structure on the metal surfaces grades from amorphous, dehydroxylated silica on the outer surface through layer silicates, chain silicates, pyrosilicates to orthosilicates close to the metal interface. At the metal interface, detached grains of the metal are imaged with interpenetration of the oxide and silicate species linking the layer to the oxidised metal surface. The ∼30nm layer has a substantially increased frictional load compared with the untreated oxidised metal, i.e. behaviour consistent with either stronger adhesion of the coating to the substrate or a harder surface. The composition, structure and thickness of these layers can be controlled by the duration of each plasma reaction and the choice of the final reagent. The mechanisms of reaction in each process step have been elucidated with a combination of XPS, TOF-SIMS, TEM, SEM and FTIR. Similar, graded titanium/oxide/silicate/silica ceramic surface layers have been shown to form using the low temperature plasma reactions on titanium alloys used in medical and dental implants. Thicker (i.e. μm) overlayers of ceramic materials can be added to the graded surface layers

  10. Influence of various surface-conditioning methods on the bond strength of metal brackets to ceramic surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Nergiz, [No Value; Herrmann, W; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, Ibrahim; �zcan, Mutlu

    With the increase in adult orthodontic treatment comes the need to find a reliable method for bonding orthodontic brackets onto metal or ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. In this study, shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface

  11. A real time evaluation technique of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite metal joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Kwon Oh Yang [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Inje Univesity, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-15

    One of the problems for practical use of fiber-reinforced composite material is performance degradation by fatigue damage in the joints. The study is to develope a nondestructive technique for real-time evaluation of adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. From the prior study we confirmed that the bonding strength can be estimated from the correlation between quality of bonded parts and AUP's. We obtained a curve showing the correlation between AUP's calculated from signals obtained from single-lap and double-lap joints and the degree of fatigue damage at bonding interface during fatigue test. The curve is an analogy to the one showing stiffness reduction(E/E{sub 0}) of polymer matrix composites by fatigue damage. From those facts, it is possible to predict degree of damage in real-time. Amplitude and AUP2 appeared to be optimal parameters to provide more reliable results for single-lap joint whereas amplitude and AUP1 did for double-lap joints. It is recommended to select optimal parameters for different geometries in the real structure.

  12. A real time evaluation technique of fatigue damage in adhesively bonded composite metal joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Kwon Oh Yang

    1999-01-01

    One of the problems for practical use of fiber-reinforced composite material is performance degradation by fatigue damage in the joints. The study is to develope a nondestructive technique for real-time evaluation of adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. From the prior study we confirmed that the bonding strength can be estimated from the correlation between quality of bonded parts and AUP's. We obtained a curve showing the correlation between AUP's calculated from signals obtained from single-lap and double-lap joints and the degree of fatigue damage at bonding interface during fatigue test. The curve is an analogy to the one showing stiffness reduction(E/E 0 ) of polymer matrix composites by fatigue damage. From those facts, it is possible to predict degree of damage in real-time. Amplitude and AUP2 appeared to be optimal parameters to provide more reliable results for single-lap joint whereas amplitude and AUP1 did for double-lap joints. It is recommended to select optimal parameters for different geometries in the real structure.

  13. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinby, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a tool for effecting high-temperature, high compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, the target assembly comprising a uranium foil and an aluminum-alloy substrate. The tool preferably is composed throughout of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus with the member. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend respectively into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hotpress evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity

  14. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinby, T.C.

    A tool is described for effecting high-temperature, high-compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators. The target assembly comprising a uranum foil and an aluninum-alloy substrate. The tool is composed of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hot-press evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity.

  15. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughlala, Zakaria; Fonseca Guerra, Célia; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-06-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl-X and [HCl-X](+) complexes for X(+)= H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+), using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl(-) and HCl for the various cations. The Cl-X bond becomes longer and weaker along X(+) = H(+), CH3 (+), Li(+), and Na(+). Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence of solvent) alkali metal cation affinities (AMCA) and how this compares with and differs from those of the proton affinity (PA) and methyl cation affinity (MCA). Our analyses are based on Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory in combination with a quantitative energy decomposition analysis (EDA) that pinpoints the importance of the different features in the bonding mechanism. Orbital overlap appears to play an important role in determining the trend in cation affinities.

  16. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, M. K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x)81

  17. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mi-Kyung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn13-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3.6Zn13-xAl7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x

  18. Al/Ni metal intermetallic composite produced by accumulative roll bonding and reaction annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozaffari, A.; Hosseini, M.; Manesh, H. Danesh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Al/Ni metallic composites produced by accumulative roll bonding were heat treated at different temperatures and periods, to investigate the effect of reaction annealing on the structure and mechanical properties. → Based on the annealing conditions, various intermetallic phases were formed. The structure and composition of the composites were detected by SEM and XRD techniques. → The strength of the initial metallic composite can be improved due to the formation of the hard intermetallic phases, by the heat treatment process. - Abstract: In this research, Al/Ni multilayers composites were produced by accumulative roll bonding and then annealed at different temperatures and durations. The structure and mechanical properties of the fabricated metal intermetallic composites (MICs) were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses were used to evaluate the structure and composition of the composite. The Al 3 Ni intermetallic phase is formed in the Al/Ni interface of the samples annealed at 300 and 400 deg. C. When the temperature increased to 500 deg. C, the Al 3 Ni 2 phase was formed in the composite structure and grew, while the Al 3 Ni and Al phases were simultaneously dissociated. At these conditions, the strength of MIC reached the highest content and was enhanced by increasing time. At 600 deg. C, the AlNi phase was formed and the mechanical properties of MIC were intensively degraded due to the formation of structural porosities.

  19. Some reduced ternary and quaternary oxides of molybdenum. A family of compounds with strong metal-metal bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torardi, C.C.; McCarley, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Several new, reduced ternary and quaternary oxides of molybdenum are reported, each containing molybdenum in an average oxidation state 2 sealed in Mo tubes held at 1100 0 C for ca. 7 days. Refinement of the substructure of the new compound Ba 0 62 Mo 4 O 6 was based on an orthorhombic cells, with a = 9.509(2), b = 9.825(2), c = 2.853(1) A, Z = 2 in space group Pbam; weak supercell reflections indicate the true structure has c = 8(2.853) A. The chief structural feature is closely related to that of NaMo 4 O 6 which consists of infinite chains of Mo 6 octahedral clusters fused on opposite edges, bridged on the outer edges by O atoms and crosslinked by Mo-O-Mo bonding to create four-sided tunnels in which the Ba 2+ ions are located. The structure of Ba 1 13 Mo 8 O 16 is triclinic, a = 7.311(1), b = 7.453(1), c = 5.726(1) A, α = 101.49(2), β = 99.60(2), γ = 89.31(2) 0 , Z = 1, space group P1. It is a low-symmetry, metal-metal bonded variant of the hollandite structure, in which two different infinite chains, built up from Mo 4 O 8 2- and Mo 4 O 8 0 26- cluster units, respectively, are interlinked via Mo-O-Mo bridge bonding to create again four-sided tunnels in which the Ba 2+ ions reside. Other compounds prepared and characterized by analyses and x-ray powder diffraction data are Pb/sub x/Mo 4 O 6 (x approx. 0.6), LiZn 2 Mo 3 O 8 , , CaMo 5 O 8 , K 2 Mo 12 O 19 , and Na 2 Mo 12 O 19

  20. Effect of various commercially available mouthrinses on shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeran, Nazeer Ahmed; George, Ashwin Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is known to degrade and dissolve the bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate present in the composite resin. The effect of alcohol containing mouthrinses on the shear bond strength of orthodontic metal brackets bonded with composite resin has not been verified until date and is the purpose of this study. The aims and objectives of the present study were to evaluate (1) Whether there is a significant difference in the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets after the 1 year (12 h) and 2 years simulation (24 h) of mouth rinsing with 4 different commercially available mouthrinses (2 alcoholic and 2 alcohol-free mouthrinses) when compared to the control. (2) Whether alcohol containing mouthrinses have more adverse effect on the shear bond strength when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. (3) To assess the site of bond failure using adhesive remnant index. Experimental - laboratory based. A total of 100 upper premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were collected immediately after extraction, cleared soft-tissue debris and blood and immediately stored in distilled water with 0.1% thymol crystals added to inhibit bacterial growth. Two alcohol containing mouthrinses and two alcohol-free mouthrinses were used and the bonded teeth were placed in the mouthrinses for a stipulated period of time (1 year simulation and 2 years simulation) and shear bond strength were tested using Lloyd Universal Testing Machine. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance and paired samples t-test. After the 1 year and 2 years simulation time, samples stored in alcohol containing mouthrinses showed lower bond strength (P orthodontic brackets bonded with composite resin (Transbond XT in the present study), more when compared with alcohol-free mouthrinses. It is, therefore, highly advisable to avoid alcohol containing mouthrinses in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and use alcohol-free mouthrinses as adjuncts to regular oral hygiene procedures for maintaining

  1. The synthesis and properties of some organometallic compounds containing group IV (Ge, Sn)-group II (Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Des Tombe, F.J.A.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der; Creemers, H.M.J.C.; Carey, N.A.D.; Noltes, J.G.

    1972-01-01

    The reactions of triphenylgermane and triphenyltin hydride with coordinatively saturated organozinc or organocadmium compounds give organometallic complexes containing Group IV (Ge, Sn)-Group II(Zn, Cd) metal---metal bonds. The 2,2′-bipyridine complexes show solvent-dependent charge-transfer

  2. A manganese sulfite with extended metal-oxygen-metal bonds exhibiting hydrogen uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K. Prabhakara; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C.N.R.

    2007-01-01

    A manganese sulfite of the formula Mn 5 (OH) 4 (SO 3 ) 3 .2H 2 O, I{a=7.5759(7) A, b=8.4749(8) A, c=10.852(1) A, β=100.732(2) o , Z=2, space group=P2 1 /m (no. 11), R 1 =0.0399 and wR 2 =0.1121 [for R indexes I>2σ(I)]}, comprising Mn 3 O 14 units and extended Mn-O-Mn bonds along the three dimensions has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. It has narrow channels along the b-axis and exhibits hydrogen storage of 2.1 wt% at 300 K and 134 bar. - Graphical abstract: A three-dimensional manganese sulfite with one-dimensional channels showing selective hydrogen absorption has been synthesized and characterized

  3. Effects of femtosecond laser and other surface treatments on the bond strength of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets to zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Verónica; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Mendoza-Yero, Omel; Doñate-Buendía, Carlos; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Femtosecond laser has been proposed as a method for conditioning zirconia surfaces to boost bond strength. However, metallic or ceramic bracket bonding to femtosecond laser-treated zirconia surfaces has not been tested. This study compared the effects of four conditioning techniques, including femtosecond laser irradiation, on shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic brackets to zirconia.Three hundred zirconia plates were divided into five groups: 1) control (C); 2) sandblasting (APA); 3) silica coating and silane (SC); 4) femtosecond laser (FS); 5) sandblasting followed by femtosecond laser (APA+SC). A thermal imaging camera measured temperature changes in the zirconia during irradiation. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups (metallic vs ceramic brackets). SBS was evaluated using a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was registered and surfaces were observed under SEM. Surface treatment and bracket type significantly affected the bracket-zirconia bond strength. SBS was significantly higher (pbrackets in all groups (APA+FS > APA > FS > SC > control) than metallic brackets (APA+FS > FS > SC > APA > control). For metallic brackets, groups SC (5.99 ± 1.86 MPa), FS (6.72 ± 2.30 MPa) and APA+FS (7.22 ± 2.73 MPa) reported significantly higher bond strengths than other groups (p brackets, the highest bond strength values were obtained in groups APA (25.01 ± 4.45 MPa), FS (23.18 ± 6.51 MPa) and APA+FS (29.22 ± 8.20 MPa).Femtosecond laser enhances bond strength of ceramic and metallic brackets to zirconia. Ceramic brackets provide significantly stronger adhesion than metallic brackets regardless of the surface treatment method.

  4. Twisted Amides: From Obscurity to Broadly Useful Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Reactions by N-C Amide Bond Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengwei; Szostak, Michal

    2017-05-29

    The concept of using amide bond distortion to modulate amidic resonance has been known for more than 75 years. Two classic twisted amides (bridged lactams) ingeniously designed and synthesized by Kirby and Stoltz to feature fully perpendicular amide bonds, and as a consequence emanate amino-ketone-like reactivity, are now routinely recognized in all organic chemistry textbooks. However, only recently the use of amide bond twist (distortion) has advanced to the general organic chemistry mainstream enabling a host of highly attractive N-C amide bond cross-coupling reactions of broad synthetic relevance. In this Minireview, we discuss recent progress in this area and present a detailed overview of the prominent role of amide bond destabilization as a driving force in the development of transition-metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions by N-C bond activation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A Real-time Evaluation Technique of Fatigue Damage in Adhesively Bonded Composite-Metal Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Oh Yang; Kim, Tae Hyun

    1999-01-01

    One of the problems for practical use of fiber-reinforced plastics is the performance degradation by fatigue damage in the joints. The study is to develop a nondestructive technique for real-time evaluation of adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. From the prior study we confirmed that the bonding strength can be estimated from the correlation between the qualify of bonded parts and AUP's. We obtained a curve showing the correlation between the degree of fatigue damage and AUP's calculated from signals acquired during fatigue loading of single-lap and double-lap joints of CFRP and Al6061. The curve is an analogy to the one showing stiffness reduction (E/Eo) of polymer matrix composites by fatigue damage. From those facts, it is plausible to predict the degree of fatigue damage in real-time. Amplitude and AUP2 appeared to be optimal parameters to provide more reliable results for single-lap joints whereas Amplitude and AUP2 did for double-lap joints. It is recommended to select optimal parameters for different geometries in the application for real structures

  6. A Real-time Evaluation Technique of Fatigue Damage in Adhesively Bonded Composite-Metal Joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Oh Yang; Kim, Tae Hyun [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    One of the problems for practical use of fiber-reinforced plastics is the performance degradation by fatigue damage in the joints. The study is to develop a nondestructive technique for real-time evaluation of adhesively bonded composite-metal joints. From the prior study we confirmed that the bonding strength can be estimated from the correlation between the qualify of bonded parts and AUP's. We obtained a curve showing the correlation between the degree of fatigue damage and AUP's calculated from signals acquired during fatigue loading of single-lap and double-lap joints of CFRP and Al6061. The curve is an analogy to the one showing stiffness reduction (E/Eo) of polymer matrix composites by fatigue damage. From those facts, it is plausible to predict the degree of fatigue damage in real-time. Amplitude and AUP2 appeared to be optimal parameters to provide more reliable results for single-lap joints whereas Amplitude and AUP2 did for double-lap joints. It is recommended to select optimal parameters for different geometries in the application for real structures

  7. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Crosara Lopes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2, Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P, Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I and Duceram (D ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01 for the MCBS test results (MPa, with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72 than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10-6 oC-1 differences were: VBI (0.54, VBD (1.33, VB2I (-0.14, VB2D (0.63, PI (1.84 and PD (2.62. Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17 was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs.

  8. Correlation between metal-ceramic bond strength and coefficient of linear thermal expansion difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Stella Crosara; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Rollo, João Manuel Domingos de Almeida; Leal, Mônica Barbosa; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond strength (MCBS) of 6 metal-ceramic pairs (2 Ni-Cr alloys and 1 Pd-Ag alloy with 2 dental ceramics) and correlate the MCBS values with the differences between the coefficients of linear thermal expansion (CTEs) of the metals and ceramics. Verabond (VB) Ni-Cr-Be alloy, Verabond II (VB2), Ni-Cr alloy, Pors-on 4 (P), Pd-Ag alloy, and IPS (I) and Duceram (D) ceramics were used for the MCBS test and dilatometric test. Forty-eight ceramic rings were built around metallic rods (3.0 mm in diameter and 70.0 mm in length) made from the evaluated alloys. The rods were subsequently embedded in gypsum cast in order to perform a tensile load test, which enabled calculating the CMBS. Five specimens (2.0 mm in diameter and 12.0 mm in length) of each material were made for the dilatometric test. The chromel-alumel thermocouple required for the test was welded into the metal test specimens and inserted into the ceramics. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed significant differences (p=0.01) for the MCBS test results (MPa), with PI showing higher MCBS (67.72) than the other pairs, which did not present any significant differences. The CTE (10(-6) oC(-1)) differences were: VBI (0.54), VBD (1.33), VB2I (-0.14), VB2D (0.63), PI (1.84) and PD (2.62). Pearson's correlation test (r=0.17) was performed to evaluate of correlation between MCBS and CTE differences. Within the limitations of this study and based on the obtained results, there was no correlation between MCBS and CTE differences for the evaluated metal-ceramic pairs.

  9. Photo-assisted cyanation of transition metal nitrates coupled with room temperature C-C bond cleavage of acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shihui; Li, Renhong; Kobayashi, Hisayoshi; Liu, Juanjuan; Fan, Jie

    2013-03-07

    It is a challenge to use acetonitrile as a cyanating agent because of the difficulty in cleaving its C-CN bond. Herein, we report a mild photo-assisted route to conduct the cyanation of transition metal nitrates using acetonitrile as the cyanating agent coupled with room-temperature C-C bond cleavage. DFT calculations and experimental observations suggest a radical-involved reaction mechanism, which excludes toxicity from free cyanide ions.

  10. Unifying Exchange Sensitivity in Transition-Metal Spin-State Ordering and Catalysis through Bond Valence Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gani, Terry Z H; Kulik, Heather J

    2017-11-14

    Accurate predictions of spin-state ordering, reaction energetics, and barrier heights are critical for the computational discovery of open-shell transition-metal (TM) catalysts. Semilocal approximations in density functional theory, such as the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), suffer from delocalization error that causes them to overstabilize strongly bonded states. Descriptions of energetics and bonding are often improved by introducing a fraction of exact exchange (e.g., erroneous low-spin GGA ground states are instead correctly predicted as high-spin with a hybrid functional). The degree of spin-splitting sensitivity to exchange can be understood based on the chemical composition of the complex, but the effect of exchange on reaction energetics within a single spin state is less well-established. Across a number of model iron complexes, we observe strong exchange sensitivities of reaction barriers and energies that are of the same magnitude as those for spin splitting energies. We rationalize trends in both reaction and spin energetics by introducing a measure of delocalization, the bond valence of the metal-ligand bonds in each complex. The bond valence thus represents a simple-to-compute property that unifies understanding of exchange sensitivity for catalytic properties and spin-state ordering in TM complexes. Close agreement of the resulting per-metal-organic-bond sensitivity estimates, together with failure of alternative descriptors demonstrates the utility of the bond valence as a robust descriptor of how differences in metal-ligand delocalization produce differing relative energetics with exchange tuning. Our unified description explains the overall effect of exact exchange tuning on the paradigmatic two-state FeO + /CH 4 reaction that combines challenges of spin-state and reactivity predictions. This new descriptor-sensitivity relationship provides a path to quantifying how predictions in transition-metal complex screening are sensitive to the

  11. Tracking metal ions with polypyrrole thin films adhesively bonded to diazonium-modified flexible ITO electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Momath; Diaw, Abdou K D; Gningue-Sall, Diariatou; Aaron, Jean-Jacques; Oturan, Mehmet A; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2018-05-09

    Adhesively bonded polypyrrole thin films doped with benzene sulfonic acid (BSA) were electrodeposited on aminobenzenediazonium-modified flexible ITO electrodes and further employed for the detection of Pb 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ metal ions in aqueous medium. The aminophenyl (AP) adhesive layer was grafted to ITO by electroreduction of the in situ generated parent diazonium compound. Polypyrrole (PPy) thin films exhibited remarkable adhesion to aminophenyl (ITO-AP). The strongly adherent polypyrrole films exhibited excellent electroactivity in the doped state with BSA which itself served to chelate the metal ions in aqueous medium. The surface of the resulting, modified flexible electrode was characterized by XPS, SEM, and electrochemical methods. The ITO-AP-PPy electrodes were then used for the simultaneous detection of Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The detection limits were 11.1, 8.95, and 0.99 nM for Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , and Pb 2+ , respectively. In addition, the modified electrodes displayed a good reproducibility, making them suitable for the determination of heavy metals in real wastewater samples.

  12. The influence of size and structure of metal orthodontic bracket base on bond strength on tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The factors which may influence the bond strength of the applied orthodontic brackets on the tooth surface are the size and structure of the bracket base. Objective. The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence of size and shape of different types of brackets on bond strength on the enamel and analyze the remaining quality of adhesive material on the tooth surface after debonding of orthodontic brackets (adhesive remnant index - ARI. Methods. In this study, three types of metal brackets of different sizes and shapes of Dentaurum manufacturer were used (Utratrimm, Equilibrium 2, Discovery, Dentaurum, Inspringen, Germany. The brackets were applied onto the middle part of the anatomic crowns of buccal surfaces of 30 premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. In addition, the pre-treatment of teeth by 37% orthophosphoric acid and adhesive material System1+ (Dentaurum, Germany were used. Results. The mean value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Discovery type after debonding was 8.67±0.32 MPa, while the value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Equilibrium 2 type amounted to 8.62±0.22 MPa. The value of the bonded brackets bond strength of Ultratrimm type after debonding was 8.22±0.49 MPa. There were no statistical differences in the values of bond strength regarding all three groups of the investigated orthodontic brackets (F=4.56; p<0.05. Conclusion. The base size and design of metal orthodontic brackets did not play a significant role in bond strength, while the values of ARI index were identical in all three investigated groups.

  13. Comparison of porcelain bond strength of different metal frameworks prepared by using conventional and recently introduced fabrication methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleli, Necati; Saraç, Duygu

    2017-07-01

    Most studies evaluating dental laser sintering systems have focused on the marginal accuracy of the restorations. However, the bond strength at the metal-ceramic interface is another important factor that affects the survival of restorations, and currently, few studies focus on this aspect. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the porcelain bond strength of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) metal frameworks prepared by using the conventional lost-wax technique, milling, direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and laser cusing, a direct process powder-bed system. A total of 96 metal frameworks (n=24 in each group) were prepared by using conventional lost-wax (group C), milling (group M), DMLS (group LS), and direct process powder-bed (group LC) methods according to International Organization for Standardization standard ISO 9693-1. After porcelain application, a 3-point bend test was applied to each specimen by using a universal testing machine. Data were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference tests (α=.05). Failure types at the metal-ceramic interfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy. Additionally, 1 specimen from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis to evaluate the surface topography of metal frameworks. The mean bond strength was 38.08 ±3.82 MPa for group C, 39.29 ±3.51 MPa for group M, 40.73 ±3.58 MPa for group LS, and 41.24 ±3.75 MPa for group LC. Statistically significant differences were observed among the 4 groups (P=.016). All groups, except for LS, exhibited adhesive and mixed type bond failure. Both of the laser sintering methods were found to be successful in terms of metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The metal-carbonyl bond in Ni(CO)4 and Fe(CO)5 - A clear-cut analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Bagus, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the metal-carbonyl bonding in Ni(CO)4 and Fe(CO)5, based on the newly developed contained space orbital variation (CSOV) method, is carried out to investigate various contributing factors to the interaction. Three aspects about the metal-CO interaction are presented: (1) the frozen orbital repulsion between the metal 4s and the CO is large; (2) the metal to CO pi donation is energetically much more important than the CO to the metal sigma donation; and (3) the metal 4s and 4p orbitals make a very small contribution (smaller than 0.4 eV) to the interaction energy; the largest portion of this contribution arises from the CO to metal sigma donation.

  15. Structure of s - p bonded metal clusters with 8, 20 and 40 valence electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1992-10-01

    From studies on some clusters of metals and semiconductors, there appear some similarities in the structure of clusters with a given number of atoms and having the number of valence electrons corresponding to a shell closing. Here we present results of the atomic and electronic structure of a few other clusters with 20 and 40 valence electrons, namely Sb 4 , Sn 5 and Sb 8 using the density functional molecular dynamics method. We suggest that the similarities in the structure and deviation from them may help to understand bonding characteristics in clusters and its evolution to bulk behaviour. Our results on Sb 8 cluster are preliminary but indicate that above room temperature its structure is two weakly interacting tetrahedra which is in general agreement with the observation of predominently antimony tetramers at T > 300 K. (author). 16 refs, 2 figs

  16. Physical and adhesive properties of dental enamel after radiotherapy and bonding of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Gabriela Cristina; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; de Oliveira, Harley Francisco; Nelson Filho, Paulo; de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino

    2015-08-01

    The increasing success rates for cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and the frequent occurrence of tooth loss during treatment have led to an increased demand for orthodontic treatment after radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate tooth enamel of irradiated teeth after the bonding and debonding of metal and ceramic brackets. Ten permanent molars were cut into enamel fragments measuring 1 mm(2) and divided into an irradiated group (total dose of 60 Gy) and a nonirradiated group. The fragments were subjected to microshear testing to evaluate whether radiotherapy altered the strength of the enamel. Furthermore, 90 prepared premolars were divided into 6 groups and subgroups (n = 15): group 1, nonirradiated and nonaged; group 2, nonirradiated and aged (thermal cycled); group 3, irradiated and aged; each group was divided into 2 subgroups: metallic and ceramic brackets. After thermal cycling and radiotherapy, the brackets were bonded onto the specimens with Transbond XT (3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). After 24 hours, the specimens were subjected to the shear tests. Images of the enamel surfaces were classified using the adhesive remnant index. The composite resin-enamel interface was also evaluated. Enamel fragments subjected to radiation had lower strength than did the nonirradiated samples (P enamel interface, resin tags were more extensive on irradiated tooth enamel. Radiation decreased tooth enamel strength, and the specimens treated with radiotherapy had higher frequencies of adhesive failure between the bracket and the composite resin as well as more extensive tags. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase stability, physical properties of rhenium diboride under high pressure and the effect of metallic bonding on its hardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Ming-Min; Kuang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhen-Hua; Shao, Peng; Ding, Li-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The transition pressure P t between the ReB 2 –ReB 2 and MoB 2 –ReB 2 phases is firstly determinate. •The single-bonded B–B feather remains in ReB 2 compounds. •A semiempirical method to evaluate the hardness of crystals with partial metallic bond is presented. •The large hardness (39.1 GPa) of ReB 2 –ReB 2 indicate that it is a superhard material. •The zigzag interconnected B–Re and B–B covalent bonds underlie the ultraincompressibilities. -- Abstract: Using first-principles calculations, the elastic constants, thermodynamic property and structural phase transition of rhenium diboride under pressure are investigated by means of the pseudopotential plane-waves method, as well as the effect of metallic bond on its hardness. Eight candidate structures of known transition-metal compounds are chosen to probe for rhenium diboride ReB 2 . The calculated lattice parameters are consistent with the experimental and theoretical values. Based on the third order Birch–Murnaghan equation of states, the transition pressure P t between the ReB 2 –ReB 2 and MoB 2 –ReB 2 phases is firstly determinate. Elastic constants, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, Poisson’s ratio and Debye temperature are derived. The single-bonded B–B feather remains in ReB 2 compounds. Furthermore, according to Mulliken overlap population analysis, a semiempirical method to evaluate the hardness of multicomponent crystals with partial metallic bond is presented. Both strong covalency and a zigzag topology of interconnected bonds underlie the ultraincompressibilities. In addition, the superior performance and large hardness (39.1 GPa) of ReB 2 –ReB 2 indicate that it is a superhard material

  18. Metal-metal bonding and aromaticity in [M2(NHCHNH)3]2 (μ-E)2 (E = O, S; M = Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiuli; Meng, Lingpeng; Sun, Zheng; Li, Xiaoyan

    2016-02-01

    The nature of M-M bonding and aromaticity of [M2(NHCHNH)3]2(μ-E)2 (E = O, S; M = Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh) was investigated using atoms in molecules (AIM) theory, electron localization function (ELF), natural bond orbital (NBO) and molecular orbital analysis. These analyses led to the following main conclusions: in [M2(NHCHNH)3]2(μ-E)2 (E = O, S; M = Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh), the Nb-Nb, Ru-Ru, and Rh-Rh bonds belong to "metallic" bonds, whereas Mo-Mo and Tc-Tc drifted toward the "dative" side; all these bonds are partially covalent in character. The Nb-Nb, Mo-Mo, and Tc-Tc bonds are stronger than Ru-Ru and Rh-Rh bonds. The M-M bonds in [M2(NHCHNH)3]2(μ-S)2 are stronger than those in [M2(NHCHNH)3]2(μ-O)2 for M = Nb, Mo, Tc, and Ru. The NICS(1)ZZ values show that all of the studied molecules, except [Ru2(NHCHNH)3]2(μ-O)2, are aromaticity molecules. O-bridged compounds have more aromaticity than S-bridged compounds. Graphical Abstract Left Molecular graph, and right electron localization function (ELF) isosurface of [M2(NHCHNH)3]2(μ-E)2(E = O, S; M = Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh).

  19. Radical bonding: structure and stability of bis(phenalenyl) complexes of divalent metals from across the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Smaranda; Donald, Kelling J

    2009-07-06

    We examine the bonding possibilities of the bis(phenalenyl) MP(2) sandwich complexes of the divalent metals M = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, and Hg, at the B3LYP level of theory. The outcome is an extraordinarily diverse class of low symmetry bis(phenalenyl)metal complexes in which bonding preferences and binding enthalpies differ dramatically. The lowest energy group 2 metal MP(2) complexes include an intriguing eta(1),eta(3) BeP(2) structure, and bent eta(6),eta(6) systems for M = Ca, Sr, and Ba. The group 12 bis(phenalenyl) complexes are thermodynamically unstable eta(1),eta(1) slip-sandwich structures. To better understand changes in the structural preferences going from the (eta(6),eta(6)) group 2 to the (eta(1),eta(1)) group 12 complexes, we explored the bonding in the bis(phenalenyl) complexes of transition metals with stable +2 oxidations states between Ca and Zn in period 4. The computed binding enthalpies are large and negative for nearly all of the minimum energy bis(phenalenyl) complexes of the group 2 and the transition metals; they are tiny for MgP(2), and are quite positive for the group 12 systems. The structural preferences and stability of the complexes is a subtle negotiation of several influences: the (un)availability of (n - 1)d and np, orbitals for bonding, the cost of the rehybridization at carbon sites in the phenalenyl rings in preparation for bonding to the metals, and the (P---P) interaction between the phenalenyl radicals.

  20. Adhesive bonding of super-elastic titanium-nickel alloy castings with a phosphate metal conditioner and an acrylic adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, H; Tanoue, N; Yanagida, H; Atsuta, M; Koike, M; Yoneyama, T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the bonding characteristics of super-elastic titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) alloy castings. Disk specimens were cast from a Ti-Ni alloy (Ti-50.85Ni mol%) using an arc centrifugal casting machine. High-purity titanium and nickel specimens were also prepared as experimental references. The specimens were air-abraded with alumina, and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C & B). A metal conditioner containing a phosphate monomer (Cesead II Opaque Primer) was also used for priming the specimens. Post-thermocycling average bond strengths (MPa) of the primed groups were 41.5 for Ti-Ni, 30.4 for Ti and 19.5 for Ni, whereas those of the unprimed groups were 21.6 for Ti, 19.3 for Ti-Ni and 9.3 for Ni. Application of the phosphate conditioner elevated the bond strengths of all alloy/metals (P elastic Ti-Ni alloy castings can be achieved with a combination of a phosphate metal conditioner and a tri-n-butylborane-initiated adhesive resin.

  1. Effect of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding characterization between porcelain and metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H-H; Lin, M-C; Lee, T-H; Yang, H-W; Chen, F-L; Wu, S-C; Hsu, C-C

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of chemical composition of Ni-Cr dental casting alloys on the bonding behaviour between porcelain and metal. A three-point bending test was used to measure the fracture load of alloy after porcelain firing. A scanning electron microscope, accompanied by an energy dispersion spectrometer, was used to analyse the morphology and chemical composition of the fracture surface. An X-ray photoelectron spectrometer and glow discharge spectrometer were used to identify the structure and cross-sectional chemical composition, respectively, of oxide layers on Ni-Cr alloys after heat treatment at 990 degrees C for 5 min. Results showed that the oxide layers formed on all Ni-Cr alloys contained mainly Cr2O3, NiO, and trace MoO3. The Ni-Cr alloy with a higher Cr content had a thicker oxide layer, as well as a weaker bonding behaviour of porcelain/metal interface. The presence of Al (as Al2O3) and Be (as BeO) on the oxide layer suppressed the growth of the oxide layer, leading to a better porcelain/metal bonding behaviour. However, the presence of a small amount of Ti (as TiO2) on the oxide layer did not have any influence on the bonding behaviour. The fracture propagated along the interface between the opaque porcelain and metal, and exhibited an adhesive type of fracture morphology.

  2. Search for a metallic dangling-bond wire on n-doped H-passivated semiconductor surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Mads; Papior, Nick Rübner; Brandimarte, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically investigated the electronic properties of neutral and n-doped dangling bond (DB) quasi-one-dimensional structures (lines) in the Si(001):H and Ge(001):H substrates with the aim of identifying atomic-scale interconnects exhibiting metallic conduction for use in on-surface cir...

  3. Bond Formation in Diatomic Transition Metal Hydrides: Insights from the Analysis of Domain-Averaged Fermi Holes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cooper, D.L.; Ponec, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 2 (2013), s. 102-111 ISSN 0020-7608 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0118 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : transition metal hydrides * bond formation * analysis of domain averaged Fermi holes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.166, year: 2013

  4. Novel manufacturing process of nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas welding by accumulative roll bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fattahi, M., E-mail: fattahi.put@gmail.com [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Noei Aghaei, V. [Aerospace Engineering Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabiri, A.R. [Technical Inspection Engineering Department, Petroleum University of Technology, Abadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirkhanlou, S. [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Najafabad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhavan, S.; Fattahi, Y. [Materials Engineering Department, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-11

    In the present work, accumulative roll bonding (ARB) was used as an effective method for manufacturing nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. After welding, the distribution of ceramic nanoparticles and mechanical properties of welds were investigated. By applying ARB, ceramic nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in the composite filler metals. Consequently, the welds produced by these filler metals had a uniform dispersion of ceramic nanoparticles in their compositions. The test results showed that the yield strength of welds was greatly increased when using the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals. The improvement in the yield strength was attributed to the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and Orowan strengthening mechanisms. Therefore, according to the results presented in this paper, it can be concluded that the nanoparticle/Al composite filler metals can serve as a novel filler metal for TIG welding of aluminum and its alloys.

  5. Unwilling U-U bonding in U-2@C-80: cage-driven metal-metal bonds in di-uranium fullerenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Foroutan-Nejad, C.; Vícha, J.; Marek, R.; Patzschke, M.; Straka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 37 (2015), s. 24182-24192 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03564S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : actinide-actinide bond * endohedral actinide fullerene * cage-driven bonding Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlepdf/2015/cp/c5cp04280a

  6. Assessment of Bond Strength between Metal Brackets and Non-Glazed Ceramic in Different Surface Treatment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Harririan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength between metal brackets and non-glazed ceramic with three different surface treatment methods.Materials and Methods: Forty-two non-glazed ceramic disks were assigned into three groups. Group I and II specimens were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid. Subsequently in group I, silane and adhesive were applied and in group II, bonding agent was used only.In group III, specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid and then silane and adhesive were applied. Brackets were bonded with light-cured composites. The specimens were stored in water in room temperature for 24 hours and then thermocycled 500 times between 5°C and 55°C.Results: The difference of tensile bond strength between groups I and III was not significant(P=0.999. However, the tensile bond strength of group II was significantly lower than groups I, and III (P<0.001. The adhesive remnant index scores between the threegroups had statistically significant differences (P<0.001.Conclusion: With the application of scotch bond multi-purpose plus adhesive, we can use phosphoric acid instead of hydrofluoric acid for bonding brackets to non-glazed ceramic restorations.

  7. Tunable differentiation of tertiary C-H bonds in intramolecular transition metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Joshua R; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-04-13

    Metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer reactions are an appealing and efficient strategy for accessing tetrasubstituted amines through the direct amination of tertiary C-H bonds. Traditional catalysts for these reactions rely on substrate control to achieve site-selectivity in the C-H amination event; thus, tunability is challenging when competing C-H bonds have similar steric or electronic features. One consequence of this fact is that the impact of catalyst identity on the selectivity in the competitive amination of tertiary C-H bonds has not been well-explored, despite the potential for progress towards predictable and catalyst-controlled C-N bond formation. In this communication, we report investigations into tunable and site-selective nitrene transfers between tertiary C(sp 3 )-H bonds using a combination of transition metal catalysts, including complexes based on Ag, Mn, Rh and Ru. Particularly striking was the ability to reverse the selectivity of nitrene transfer by a simple change in the identity of the N-donor ligand supporting the Ag(i) complex. The combination of our Ag(i) catalysts with known Rh 2 (ii) complexes expands the scope of successful catalyst-controlled intramolecular nitrene transfer and represents a promising springboard for the future development of intermolecular C-H N-group transfer methods.

  8. Effect of Adhesive Type on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Two Ceramic Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad Akhoundi; Farzaneh Aghajani; Javad Chalipa; Amir Hooman Sadrhaghighi

    2014-01-01

    Increased number of adult patients requesting orthodontic treatment result in bonding bracket to ceramic restorations more than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to two types of ceramic bases with conventional orthodontic bonding resin and a new nano-filled composite resin.Twenty four feldespathic porcelain and 24 lithium disilicate ceramic disks were fabricated. All of the samples were conditioned by sandblasting,...

  9. Contact of ZnSb thermoelectric material to metallic electrodes using S-Bond 400 solder alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Safdar Abbas; Le, Thanh Hung; Van Nong, Ngo

    2018-01-01

    and metallic electrodes. In this paper, we investigate the joining of ZnSb to Ni and Ag electrodes using a commercial solder alloy S-Bond 400 and hot-pressing technique. Ti and Cr layers are also introduced as a diffusion barrier and microstructure at the interfaces is observed by scanning electron microscopy....... We found that S-bond 400 solder reacts with Ag and Ni electrodes to form different alloys at the interfaces. Cr layer was found to be broken after joining, resulting in a thicker reaction/diffusion layer at the interface, while Ti layer was preserved....

  10. Effectiveness of different adhesive primers on the bond strength between an indirect composite resin and a base metal alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafianou, Aspasia; Seimenis, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos

    2008-05-01

    There is a need for achieving reliable chemical bond strength between veneering composites resins and casting alloys through the use of simplified procedures. The purpose of this study was to examine the shear bond strength of an indirect composite resin to a Ni-Cr alloy, using 4 primers and 2 airborne-particle-abrasion procedures. Fifty-six Ni-Cr (Heraenium NA) discs, 10 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm in height, were fabricated. Twenty-four discs were airborne-particle abraded with 50-microm Al2O3 particles, while another 24 were airborne-particle abraded with 250-microm Al2O3 particles. The following primers were applied on 6 discs of each airborne-particle-abrasion treatment group: Solidex Metal Photo Primer (MPP50, MPP250), Metal Primer II (MPII50, MPII250), SR Link (SRL50, SRL250), and Tender Bond (TB50, TB250). The Rocatec system was used on another 6 discs, airborne-particle abraded according to the manufacturer's recommendations, which served as the control group (R). Two more discs were airborne-particle abraded with 50-microm and 250-microm Al2O3 particles, respectively, to determine the Al content on their surfaces, without any bonding procedure. The indirect composite resin used was Sinfony. Specimens were thermally cycled (5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, 30-second dwell time, 5000 cycles) and tested in shear mode in a universal testing machine. The failure mode was determined with an optical microscope, and selected specimens were subjected to energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Mean bond strength values were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's multiple comparison tests (alpha=.05) and compared to the control group using 1-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's multiple comparison tests (alpha=.05). The groups abraded with 50-microm particles exhibited significantly higher bond strength compared to the groups abraded with 250-microm particles. Group MPII50 exhibited the highest mean value (17.4 +/-2 MPa). Groups MPP50, MPP250, and TB50, TB250 showed

  11. Improved methods for testing bond and intrinsic strength and fatigue of thermally sprayed metallic and ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, K.K.; Ziehl, M.H.; Schwaminger, C.

    1991-01-01

    Conventional bond strength tests for thermally sprayed coatings represent only a rough means of obtaining overall strength values, with no differentiation between adhesion at the interface and intrinsic coating properties. In order to obtain information about the influence of substrate surface preparation on the adhesion of a Tribaloy T700 coating, tensile bond strength and modified crack-opening displacement (COD) specimens were tested by deliberate crack initiation at the interface. Crack initiation was achieved by weakening of the interface at the outer diameter in the case of bond strength specimens or at the notch root in the case of COD specimens. This made it possible to look at the influence of surface roughness and grit contamination on the coating adhesion separately. Modified COD specimens with the notch in the centre of the coating were used to determine crack-opening energies and critical stress intensity factors of atmospheric plasma-sprayed NiAl and low pressure plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY bond coatings and a ZrO 2 7Y 2 O 3 thermal barrier coating (TBC). Additionally, bond strength specimens were stressed dynamically, and it could be demonstrated that Woehler (S/N) diagrams can be established for a metallic NiAl bond coating and even for a ceramic ZrO 2 7Y 2 O 3 TBC. (orig.)

  12. Relativity-Induced Bonding Pattern Change in Coinage Metal Dimers M2 (M = Cu, Ag, Au, Rg).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wan-Lu; Lu, Jun-Bo; Wang, Zhen-Ling; Hu, Han-Shi; Li, Jun

    2018-05-07

    The periodic table provides a fundamental protocol for qualitatively classifying and predicting chemical properties based on periodicity. While the periodic law of chemical elements had already been rationalized within the framework of the nonrelativistic description of chemistry with quantum mechanics, this law was later known to be affected significantly by relativity. We here report a systematic theoretical study on the chemical bonding pattern change in the coinage metal dimers (Cu 2 , Ag 2 , Au 2 , Rg 2 ) due to the relativistic effect on the superheavy elements. Unlike the lighter congeners basically demonstrating ns- ns bonding character and a 0 g + ground state, Rg 2 shows unique 6d-6d bonding induced by strong relativity. Because of relativistic spin-orbit (SO) coupling effect in Rg 2 , two nearly degenerate SO states, 0 g + and 2 u , exist as candidate of the ground state. This relativity-induced change of bonding mechanism gives rise to various unique alteration of chemical properties compared with the lighter dimers, including higher intrinsic bond energy, force constant, and nuclear shielding. Our work thus provides a rather simple but clear-cut example, where the chemical bonding picture is significantly changed by relativistic effect, demonstrating the modified periodic law in heavy-element chemistry.

  13. Nano-fabrication of molecular electronic junctions by targeted modification of metal-molecule bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafri, S. Hassan M.; Löfås, Henrik; Blom, Tobias; Wallner, Andreas; Grigoriev, Anton; Ahuja, Rajeev; Ottosson, Henrik; Leifer, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Reproducibility, stability and the coupling between electrical and molecular properties are central challenges in the field of molecular electronics. The field not only needs devices that fulfill these criteria but they also need to be up-scalable to application size. In this work, few-molecule based electronics devices with reproducible electrical characteristics are demonstrated. Our previously reported 5 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) coated with ω-triphenylmethyl (trityl) protected 1,8-octanedithiol molecules are trapped in between sub-20 nm gap spacing gold nanoelectrodes forming AuNP-molecule network. When the trityl groups are removed, reproducible devices and stable Au-thiol junctions are established on both ends of the alkane segment. The resistance of more than 50 devices is reduced by orders of magnitude as well as a reduction of the spread in the resistance histogram is observed. By density functional theory calculations the orders of magnitude decrease in resistance can be explained and supported by TEM observations thus indicating that the resistance changes and strongly improved resistance spread are related to the establishment of reproducible and stable metal-molecule bonds. The same experimental sequence is carried out using 1,6-hexanedithiol functionalized AuNPs. The average resistances as a function of molecular length, demonstrated herein, are comparable to the one found in single molecule devices.

  14. Evaluation of metal-ceramic bond characteristics of three dental Co-Cr alloys prepared with different fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongmei; Feng, Qing; Li, Ning; Xu, Sheng

    2016-12-01

    Limited information is available regarding the metal-ceramic bond strength of dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting (CAST), computer numerical control (CNC) milling, and selective laser melting (SLM). The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the metal-ceramic bond characteristics of 3 dental Co-Cr alloys fabricated by casting, computer numerical control milling, and selective laser melting techniques using the 3-point bend test (International Organization for Standardization [ISO] standard 9693). Forty-five specimens (25×3×0.5 mm) made of dental Co-Cr alloys were prepared by CAST, CNC milling, and SLM techniques. The morphology of the oxidation surface of metal specimens was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After porcelain application, the interfacial characterization was evaluated by SEM equipped with energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis, and the metal-ceramic bond strength was assessed with the 3-point bend test. Failure type and elemental composition on the debonding interface were assessed by SEM/EDS. The bond strength was statistically analyzed by 1-way ANOVA and Tukey honest significant difference test (α=.05). The oxidation surfaces of the CAST, CNC, and SLM groups were different. They were porous in the CAST group but compact and irregular in the CNC and SLM groups. The metal-ceramic interfaces of the SLM and CNC groups showed excellent combination compared with those of the CAST group. The bond strength was 37.7 ±6.5 MPa for CAST, 43.3 ±9.2 MPa for CNC, and 46.8 ±5.1 MPa for the SLM group. Statistically significant differences were found among the 3 groups tested (P=.028). The debonding surfaces of all specimens exhibited cohesive failure mode. The oxidation surface morphologies and thicknesses of dental Co-Cr alloys are dependent on the different fabrication techniques used. The bond strength of all 3 groups exceed the minimum acceptable value of 25 MPa recommended by ISO 9693; hence, dental Co-Cr alloy

  15. Metal and ligand K-edge XAS of organotitanium complexes: metal 4p and 3d contributions to pre-edge intensity and their contributions to bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Serena DeBeer; Brant, Patrick; Solomon, Edward I

    2005-01-19

    Titanium cyclopentadienyl (Cp) complexes play important roles as homogeneous polymerization catalysts and have recently received attention as potential anticancer agents. To systematically probe the contribution of the Cp to bonding in organotitanium complexes, Ti K-edge XAS has been applied to TiCl(4) and then to the mono- and bis-Cp complexes, TiCpCl(3) and TiCp(2)Cl(2). Ti K-edge XAS is used as a direct probe of metal 3d-4p mixing and provides insight into the contribution of the Cp to bonding. These data are complimented by Cl K-edge XAS data, which provide a direct probe of the effect of the Cp on the bonding to the spectator chloride ligand. The experimental results are correlated to DFT calculations. A model for metal 3d-4p mixing is proposed, which is based on covalent interactions with the ligands and demonstrates that metal K-pre-edge intensities may be used as a measure of ligand-metal covalency in molecular Ti(IV) systems in noncentrosymmetric environments.

  16. Metal-ceramic bond strength between a feldspathic porcelain and a Co-Cr alloy fabricated with Direct Metal Laser Sintering technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Spyropoulos, Konstantinos; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to record the metal-ceramic bond strength of a feldspathic dental porcelain and a Co-Cr alloy, using the Direct Metal Laser Sintering technique (DMLS) for the fabrication of metal substrates. Ten metal substrates were fabricated with powder of a dental Co-Cr alloy using DMLS technique (test group) in dimensions according to ISO 9693. Another ten substrates were fabricated with a casing dental Co-Cr alloy using classic casting technique (control group) for comparison. Another three substrates were fabricated using each technique to record the Modulus of Elasticity ( E ) of the used alloys. All substrates were examined to record external and internal porosity. Feldspathic porcelain was applied on the substrates. Specimens were tested using the three-point bending test. The failure mode was determined using optical and scanning electron microscopy. The statistical analysis was performed using t-test. Substrates prepared using DMLS technique did not show internal porosity as compared to those produced using the casting technique. The E of control and test group was 222 ± 5.13 GPa and 227 ± 3 GPa, respectively. The bond strength was 51.87 ± 7.50 MPa for test group and 54.60 ± 6.20 MPa for control group. No statistically significant differences between the two groups were recorded. The mode of failure was mainly cohesive for all specimens. Specimens produced by the DMLS technique cover the lowest acceptable metal-ceramic bond strength of 25 MPa specified in ISO 9693 and present satisfactory bond strength for clinical use.

  17. Metal-organic cooperative catalysis in C-H and C-C bond activation and its concurrent recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Jun; Park, Jung-Woo; Jun, Chul-Ho

    2008-02-01

    The development of an efficient catalytic activation (cleavage) system for C-H and C-C bonds is an important challenge in organic synthesis, because these bonds comprise a variety of organic molecules such as natural products, petroleum oils, and polymers on the earth. Among many elegant approaches utilizing transition metals to activate C-H and C-C bonds facilely, chelation-assisted protocols based on the coordinating ability of an organic moiety have attracted great attention, though they have often suffered from the need for an intact coordinating group in a substrate. In this Account, we describe our entire efforts to activate C-H or C-C bonds adjacent to carbonyl groups by employing a new concept of metal-organic cooperative catalysis (MOCC), which enables the temporal installation of a 2-aminopyridyl group into common aldehydes or ketones in a catalytic way. Consequently, a series of new catalytic reactions such as alcohol hydroacylation, oxo-ester synthesis, C-C triple bond cleavage, hydrative dimerization of alkynes, and skeletal rearrangements of cyclic ketones was realized through MOCC. In particular, in the quest for an optimized MOCC system composed of a Wilkinson's catalyst (Ph 3P) 3RhCl and an organic catalyst (2-amino-3-picoline), surprising efficiency enhancements could be achieved when benzoic acid and aniline were introduced as promoters for the aldimine formation process. Furthermore, a notable accomplishment of C-C bond activation has been made using 2-amino-3-picoline as a temporary chelating auxiliary in the reactions of unstrained ketones with various terminal olefins and Wilkinson's catalyst. In the case of seven-membered cyclic ketones, an interesting ring contraction to five- or six-membered ones takes place through skeletal rearrangements initiated by the C-C bond activation of MOCC. On the other hand, the fundamental advances of these catalytic systems into recyclable processes could be achieved by immobilizing both metal and organic

  18. Reliability Tests of Aluminium Wedge Wire Bonding on Auto-catalytic Silver Immersion Gold (ASIG) PCB Metallization

    CERN Document Server

    Drozd, A; Kaufmann, S; Manolescu, F; McGill, I

    2011-01-01

    The Auto-catalytic Silver Immersion Gold (ASIG) PCB metallization is a new process that has clear advantages for PCB assembly especially with regard to lead-free soldering. As it may become a popular process in the future for electronics used in physics experiments, the quality of this metallization for aluminium wire bonding has been studied. Aluminium wedge wire bonding continues to be the interconnection method of choice for many physics detector sensors, for high density signal routing and for unpackaged die. Although advertised as having good quality for aluminium wire bonding, this study was performed to verify this claim as well as to test the longer term reliability of the wire bonds taking into consideration the environmental conditions and life-expectancy of devices, in particular for high energy physics detector applications. The tests were performed on PCBs made with the ASIG and ENIG (Electro-less Nickel Immersion Gold) processes at the same time in order to make a comparison with the current ind...

  19. New bonding configuration on Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by the adsorption of alkali metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottermoser, L.; Landemark, E.; Smilgies, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The structure of the (3×1) reconstructions of the Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces induced by adsorption of alkali metals has been determined on the basis of surface x-ray diffraction and low-energy electron diffraction measurements and density functional theory. The (3×1) surface results primarily f...... from the substrate reconstruction and shows a new bonding configuration consisting of consecutive fivefold and sixfold Si (Ge) rings in 〈11̅ 0〉 projection separated by channels containing the alkali metal atoms. © 1998 The American Physical Society...

  20. C-N Bond Activation and Ring Opening of a Saturated N-Heterocyclic Carbene by Lateral Alkali-Metal-Mediated Metalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernán-Gómez, Alberto; Kennedy, Alan R; Hevia, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Combining alkali-metal-mediated metalation (AMMM) and N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) chemistry, a novel C-N bond activation and ring-opening process is described for these increasingly important NHC molecules, which are generally considered robust ancillary ligands. Here, mechanistic investigations on reactions of saturated NHC SIMes (SIMes=[:C{N(2,4,6-Me 3 C 6 H 2 )CH 2 } 2 ]) with Group 1 alkyl bases suggest this destructive process is triggered by lateral metalation of the carbene. Exploiting co-complexation and trans-metal-trapping strategies with lower polarity organometallic reagents (Mg(CH 2 SiMe 3 ) 2 and Al(TMP)iBu 2 ), key intermediates in this process have been isolated and structurally defined. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Improved stability of a metallic state in benzothienobenzothiophene-based molecular conductors: an effective increase of dimensionality with hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Toshiki; Ueda, Akira; Yoshida, Junya; Mori, Hatsumi

    2017-03-25

    A dihydroxy-substituted benzothienobenzothiophene, BTBT(OH) 2 , was synthesized, and its charge-transfer (CT) salt, β-[BTBT(OH) 2 ] 2 ClO 4 , was successfully obtained. Thanks to the introduced hydroxy groups, a hydrogen-bonded chain structure connecting the BTBT molecules and counter anions was formed in the CT salt, which effectively increases the dimensionality of the electronic structure and consequently leads to a stable metallic state.

  2. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; De Aguiar, Caio Rocha; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; De Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91 ± 2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22 ± 2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (pcementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68 ± 48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04 ± 26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar.

  3. Synchrotron radiation studies of local structure and bonding in transition metal aluminides and rare earth transition metal magnetic nitrides. Final report, August 1, 1990--July 14, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnick, J.I.; Pease, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The following areas of study are reported on: bonding and near neighbor force constants in NiAl, CoAl, FeAl via temperature dependent EXAFS; alloys formed when Fe or Ga is microalloyed into a NiAl matrix; EXAFS studies of nitrided versus non nitrided Y 2 Fe 17 ; and transition metal x-ray spectra as related to magnetic moments

  4. On the effects of magnetic bonding in rare earth transition metal intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, R.; Bentley, J.; Yelon, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    Neutron diffraction experiments on rare-earth transition metal magnetic alloys Er 2 Fe 14 B and Er 2 Fe 17 have been carried out at temperature above and below the ordering temperature (T c ). An anomalously large magnetic moment is observed at the crystallographic j 2 site in Er 2 Fe 14 B which is the intersection point of the major ligand lines in the crystal structure. The interatomic Fe-Fe distances are in the range of strong ferromagnetic bonds (≥ 2.66 angstrom). The analogous f site in Er 2 Fe 17 does not develop as large a magnetic moment. In addition, the same sites show strong preference for Fe atoms in the respective substituted compounds. Due to poor phase stability of Er 2 (Co x Fe 1 -x ) 14 B compounds, iron substitution has been studied in detail in Er 2 (Co x Fe 1 -x ) 17 alloys for site specific order an lattice distortion effects. However, a nonlinear change in the c lattice parameter observed in the neutron diffraction results cannot be explained on the basis of site preference alone. The neutron refinement results indicate iron rich compositions in Er 2 (Co x Fe 1 -x ) 17 materials, which is related to random substitution of Fe dumbbell pairs in the rare earth sites in the lattice. However, extensive electron microscopy (selected area electron diffraction and high resolution imaging) of Er 2 Fe 17 and Er 2 (Co .40 Fe .60 ) 17 failed to reveal any microscopic inhomogeneity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Preliminary assessment of metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrW alloy after 3 wt.% Cu addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yanjin; Zhao, Chaoqian; Ren, Ling; Guo, Sai; Gan, Yiliang; Yang, Chunguang; Wu, Songquan; Lin, Junjie; Huang, Tingting; Yang, Ke; Lin, Jinxin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by selective laser melting for dental application has been studied. For its successful application, the bonding strength of metal-porcelain is essential to be systematically investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrWCu alloy by three-point bending test, meanwhile the Ni-free CoCrW alloy was used as control. The oxygen content was investigated by an elemental analyzer; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the surface chemical composition of CoCrW based alloy after preoxidation treatment; the fracture mode was investigated by X-ray energy spectrum analysis (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Result from the oxygen content analysis showed that the content of oxygen dramatically increased after the Cu addition. And the XPS suggested that Co-oxidation, Cr_2O_3, CrO_2, WO_3, Cu_2O and CuO existed on the preoxidated surface of the CoCrWCu alloy; the three-point bending test showed that the bonding strength of the CoCrWCu alloy was 43.32 MPa, which was lower than that of the CoCrW group of 47.65 MPa. However, the average metal-porcelain bonding strength is significantly higher than the minimum value in the ISO 9693 standard. Results from the SEM images and EDS indicated that the fracture mode of CoCrWCu-porcelain was mixed between cohesive and adhesive. Based on the results obtained in this study, it can be indicated that the Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by the selective laser melting is a promising candidate for use in dental application. - Highlights: • The bonding strength of metal-porcelain was slightly decreased with Cu addition; • Cu not only led to promote the diffusion of O and W element but also inhibited the diffusivity of Co in the outward direction; • The changed oxidation behavior resulted in lowering the bonding strength;

  6. Preliminary assessment of metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrW alloy after 3 wt.% Cu addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yanjin; Zhao, Chaoqian [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 155Yangqiao Road West, Fuzhou (China); Ren, Ling [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang (China); Guo, Sai; Gan, Yiliang [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 155Yangqiao Road West, Fuzhou (China); Yang, Chunguang [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang (China); Wu, Songquan; Lin, Junjie; Huang, Tingting [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 155Yangqiao Road West, Fuzhou (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang (China); Lin, Jinxin, E-mail: franklin@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 155Yangqiao Road West, Fuzhou (China)

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by selective laser melting for dental application has been studied. For its successful application, the bonding strength of metal-porcelain is essential to be systematically investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the metal-porcelain bonding strength of CoCrWCu alloy by three-point bending test, meanwhile the Ni-free CoCrW alloy was used as control. The oxygen content was investigated by an elemental analyzer; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the surface chemical composition of CoCrW based alloy after preoxidation treatment; the fracture mode was investigated by X-ray energy spectrum analysis (EDS) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Result from the oxygen content analysis showed that the content of oxygen dramatically increased after the Cu addition. And the XPS suggested that Co-oxidation, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CrO{sub 2}, WO{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2}O and CuO existed on the preoxidated surface of the CoCrWCu alloy; the three-point bending test showed that the bonding strength of the CoCrWCu alloy was 43.32 MPa, which was lower than that of the CoCrW group of 47.65 MPa. However, the average metal-porcelain bonding strength is significantly higher than the minimum value in the ISO 9693 standard. Results from the SEM images and EDS indicated that the fracture mode of CoCrWCu-porcelain was mixed between cohesive and adhesive. Based on the results obtained in this study, it can be indicated that the Cu-bearing CoCrW alloy fabricated by the selective laser melting is a promising candidate for use in dental application. - Highlights: • The bonding strength of metal-porcelain was slightly decreased with Cu addition; • Cu not only led to promote the diffusion of O and W element but also inhibited the diffusivity of Co in the outward direction; • The changed oxidation behavior resulted in lowering the bonding strength;.

  7. Research on Lessening of Bonding Effects Between the Metallic and Non-Metallic Surfaces Through the Graphite Films Deposited with Pulsed Electrical Discharges Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, L.; Topala, P.

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental research on the physics of natural graphite film formation, the establishment of chemical composition and functional properties of the graphite films, formed on metal surfaces, as a result of the action of plasma in the air environment, at a normal pressure, under the electrical discharge in impulse conditions (EDI). The researchings were performed in the frame of doctoral thesis “Research on lessening of the bonding effects between the metallic and nonmetallic surfaces through the graphite films” and aimed to identify the phenomena that occur at the interface metal/ film of graphite, and to identify also the technological applications that it may have the surface treatment for submitting the films of graphite on metallic surfaces achieved through an innovative process of electrical pulsed discharges. After the research works from the PhD theme above mentioned, a number of interesting properties of graphite pellicle have been identified ie reducing of metal surface polarity. This led to drastic decreases for the values of adhesion when bonding of metal surfaces was performed using a structural polyurethane adhesive designed by ICECHIM. Following the thermo-gravimetric analysis, performed of the graphite film obtained by process of electrical pulsed discharges, have been also discovered other interesting properties for this, ie reversible mass additions at specific values of the working temperature Chemical and scanning electron microscopy analysis have revealed that on the metallic surface subjected to electrical pulsed discharges process, outside the graphite film, it is also obtained a series of spatial formation composed of carbon atoms fullerenes type which are responsible for the phenomenon of addition of mass.

  8. Investigation of the potential of silica-bonded macrocyclic ligands for separation of metal ions from nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camaioni, D.M.; Colton, N.G.; Bruening, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the testing of some novel separations materials known as SuperLig trademark materials for their ability to separate efficiently and selectively certain metal ions from a synthetic, nonradioactive nuclear waste solution. The materials, developed and patented by IBC Advanced Technologies, are highly selective macrocyclic ligands that have been covalently bonded to silica gel. The SuperLig trademark materials that were tested are: (1) SuperLig trademark 601 for barium (Ba 2+ ) and strontium (Sr 2+ ) separation, (2) SuperLig trademark 602 for cesium (Cs + ) and rubidium (Rb + ) separation, (3) SuperLig trademark 27 for palladium (Pd 2+ ) separation, and (4) SuperLig trademark II for silver (Ag + ) and ruthenium (Ru 3+ ) separation. Our observations show that the technology for separating metal ions using silica-bonded macrocycles is essentially sound and workable to varying degrees of success that mainly depend on the affinity of the macrocycle for the metal ion of interest. It is expected that ligands will be discovered or synthesized that are amenable to separating metal ions of interest using this technology. Certainly more development, testing, and evaluation is warranted. 3 figs., 11 tabs

  9. Effects of silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadet Atsü

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tribochemical silica coating and silane surface conditioning on the bond strength of rebonded metal and ceramic brackets. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty debonded metal and 20 debonded ceramic brackets were randomly assigned to receive one of the following surface treatments (n=10 for each group: (1 sandblasting (control; (2 tribochemical silica coating combined with silane. Brackets were rebonded to the enamel surface on the labial and lingual sides of premolars with a light-polymerized resin composite. All specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 week and then thermocycled (5,000 cycles between 5-55ºC. Shear bond strength values were measured using a universal testing machine. Student's t-test was used to compare the data (α=0.05. Failure mode was assessed using a stereomicroscope, and the treated and non-treated bracket surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Rebonded ceramic brackets treated with silica coating followed by silanization had significantly greater bond strength values (17.7±4.4 MPa than the sandblasting group (2.4±0.8 MPa, P<0.001. No significant difference was observed between the rebonded metal brackets treated with silica coating with silanization (15±3.9 MPa and the sandblasted brackets (13.6±3.9 MPa. Treated rebonded ceramic specimens primarily exhibited cohesive failure in resin and adhesive failure at the enamel-adhesive interface. CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to sandblasting, silica coating with aluminum trioxide particles followed by silanization resulted in higher bond strengths of rebonded ceramic brackets.

  10. Magnetic behavior in heterometallic one-dimensional chains or octanuclear complex regularly aligned with metal-metal bonds as -Rh-Rh-Pt-Cu-Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Kazuhiro

    2018-06-01

    Heterometallic one-dimensional chains, [{Rh2(O2CCH3)4}{Pt2Cu(piam)4(NH3)4}]n(PF6)2n (1 and 2, piam = pivalamidate) and [{Rh2(O2CCH3)4}{Pt2Cu(piam)4(NH3)4}2](CF3CO2)2(ClO4)2·2H2O (3), are paramagnetic one-dimensional chains or octanuclear complexes that are either aligned as -Rh-Rh-Pt-Cu-Pt- (1 and 2) or as Pt-Cu-Pt-Rh-Rh-Pt-Cu-Pt (3) with metal-metal bonds. Compounds 1-3 have rare structures, from the standpoint of that the paramagnetic species of Cu atoms are linked by direct metal-metal bonds. Magnetic susceptibility measurements for 1-3 performed at temperatures of 2 K-300 K indicated that the unpaired electrons localize in the Cu 3dx2-y2 orbitals, where S = 1/2 Cu(II) atoms are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled with J = -0.35 cm-1 (1), -0.47 cm-1 (2), and -0.45 cm-1 (3).

  11. Access to the meta position of arenes through transition metal catalysed C-H bond functionalisation: a focus on metals other than palladium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Madalina T; Genov, Georgi R; Phipps, Robert J

    2018-01-02

    The elaboration of simple arenes in order to access more complex substitution patterns is a crucial endeavor for synthetic chemists, given the central role that aromatic rings play in all manner of important molecules. Classical methods are now routinely used alongside stoichiometric organometallic approaches and, most recently, transition metal catalysis in the range of methodologies that are available to elaborate arene C-H bonds. Regioselectivity is an important consideration when selecting a method and, of all those available, it is arguably those that target the meta position that are fewest in number. The rapid development of transition metal-catalysed C-H bond functionalisation over the last few decades has opened new possibilities for meta-selective C-H functionalisation through the diverse reactivity of transition metals and their compatibility with a wide range of directing groups. The pace of discovery of such processes has grown rapidly in the last five years in particular and it is the purpose of this review to examine these but in doing so to place the focus on metals other than palladium, the specific contributions of which have been very recently reviewed elsewhere. It is hoped this will serve to highlight to the reader the breadth of current strategies and mechanisms that have been used to tackle this challenge, which may inspire further progress in the field.

  12. The bonding of heavy metals on nitric acid-etched coal fly ashes functionalized with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, M.I.; Aller, A.J.; Littlejohn, D.

    2014-01-01

    Coal fly ash is a waste by-product of the coal fire industry, which generates many environmental problems. Alternative uses of this material would provide efficient solutions for this by-product. In this work, nitric acid-etched coal fly ash labelled with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid was assessed for retention of Al(III), As(III), Cu(II), Cd(II), Fe(III), Mn(II), Hg(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) ions. The bonding characteristics between the organic compounds with the solid support, as well as with the metal ions, were evaluated using various surface analytical techniques. Visualization of the organically-functionalized coal fly ash particle was possible using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), while the elemental composition of the functionalized material, before and after retention of the metal ions, was obtained by energy dispersive (ED)-X ray spectrometry (XRS) and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry and Raman spectrometry were used to obtain information about the functional groups. It was found that some metal(oid) ions (As, Ni, Pb, Zn) were coordinated through the mercaptan group, while other metal(oid)s (Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn) were apparently bonded to oxygen atoms. A low-cost and effective solid phase retention system for extraction of heavy metals from aqueous solutions was thus developed. - Graphical abstract: Nitric acid-etched coal fly ash labelled with 2-mercaptoethanol or thioglycolic acid was intended for the retention of heavy metals. The bonding characteristics between the organic compounds with the solid support, as well as with the metal ions, were evaluated using surface analytical techniques. - Highlights: • Coal fly ashes were organically-functionalized. • Organically-functionalized coal fly ashes were spectrometrically characterized. • Organically-functionalized coal fly ashes can be used as an effective solid sorbent for metal(oid)s. • This retention

  13. Effects of two soft drinks on shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index of orthodontic metal brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Soodabeh Sadat; Eslami Amirabadi, Gholamreza; Sajadi, Sepideh

    2014-07-01

    Bond failure of brackets during orthodontic treatment is a common problem; which results in treatment interference, increased treatment time and prolonged clinical time for rebonding of failed brackets. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Coca-Cola and a non-alcoholic beer on the shear bond strength and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of orthodontic metal brackets in vitro. Eighty intact human premolars were divided into two experimental groups of Coca-Cola and non-alcoholic beer (Istak), and a control group of artificial saliva. Over a period of thirty days, the test groups were immersed in the respective soft drinks for 5 minutes, twice a day. For the remainder of the time, they were kept in artificial saliva at 37°C. The control group was stored in artificial saliva during the experiment. All samples were subjected to shearing forces using Universal Testing Machine. ARI was determined with a stereomicroscope at ×12 magnification. The data of shear bond strength were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's Post-Hoc test and the data of ARI scores were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test. No significant difference was observed in ARIs of the three groups (P≤ 0.552). The shear bond strength of Coke group was significantly lower than that of the two other groups (P≤ 0.035); but there was no significant difference between the shear bond strength of Istak and the control group (P≤ 0.999). Coca-Cola decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  14. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas?phase Cl?X and [HCl?X]+ complexes for X+=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl? and HCl for the various cations. The Cl?X bond becomes longer and weaker along X+?=?H+, CH3 +, Li+, and Na+. Our main purpose is to understand the heterolytic bonding mechanism behind the intrinsic (i.e., in the absence ...

  15. Investigation of Interface Bonding Mechanism of an Explosively Welded Tri-Metal Titanium/Aluminum/Magnesium Plate by Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. T.; Wang, W. X.; Zhou, J.; Cao, X. Q.; Yan, Z. F.; Wei, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2018-04-01

    A tri-metal titanium/aluminum/magnesium (Ti/Al/Mg) cladding plate, with an aluminum alloy interlayer plate, was fabricated for the first time by explosive welding. Nanoindentation tests and associated microstructure analysis were conducted to investigate the interface bonding mechanisms of the Ti/Al/Mg cladding plate. A periodic wavy bonding interface (with an amplitude of approximately 30 μm and a wavelength of approximately 160 μm) without a molten zone was formed between the Ti and Al plates. The bonding interface between the Al and the Mg demonstrated a similar wavy shape, but the wave at this location was much larger with an amplitude of approximately 390 μm and a wavelength of approximately 1580 μm, and some localized melted zones also existed at this location. The formation of the wavy interface was found to result from a severe deformation at the interface, which was caused by the strong impact or collision. The nanoindentation tests showed that the material hardness decreased with increasing distance from the bonding interface. Material hardness at a location was found to be correlated with the degree of plastic deformation at that site. A larger plastic deformation was correlated with an increase in hardness.

  16. Bond of donor-acceptor interaction in metal-ligand system with energies of Fermi electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, Yu.V.; Khentov, V.Ya.; Velikanova, L.N.; Semchenko, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Role of quantum nature of metal (W, Mo and others) in donor-acceptor interaction of metal salicylalaniline - aprotic solvent was discussed. The dependence of dissolution rate and activation energy of donor-acceptor interaction on electron energy was established

  17. Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets to Zirconia Conditioned with Various Primer-Adhesive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    adhesion to ceramic crowns through chemical bonding presents a risk of prosthesis surface damage at debond (Falkensammer et al., 2013). When bonding...enamel. Traditional protocol associated with attaching brackets to enamel must be altered for ceramic crowns due to the dissimilarity in composition. The...Uniform Services University of the Health Sciences In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements For the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE By Michael

  18. Effects of Carbonyl Bond and Metal Cluster Dissociation and Evaporation Rates on Predictions of Nanotube Production in HiPco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2002-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the co-formation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO due to its lower bond energy as compared with that ofNiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

  19. N-Heterocyclic carbenes on close-packed coinage metal surfaces: bis-carbene metal adatom bonding scheme of monolayer films on Au, Ag and Cu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li; Zhang, Bodong; Médard, Guillaume; Seitsonen, Ari Paavo; Haag, Felix; Allegretti, Francesco; Reichert, Joachim; Kuster, Bernhard; Barth, Johannes V; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C

    2017-12-01

    By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), complementary density functional theory (DFT) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) we investigate the binding and self-assembly of a saturated molecular layer of model N -heterocyclic carbene (NHC) on Cu(111), Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. XPS reveals that at room temperature, coverages up to a monolayer exist, with the molecules engaged in metal carbene bonds. On all three surfaces, we resolve similar arrangements, which can be interpreted only in terms of mononuclear M(NHC) 2 (M = Cu, Ag, Au) complexes, reminiscent of the paired bonding of thiols to surface gold adatoms. Theoretical investigations for the case of Au unravel the charge distribution of a Au(111) surface covered by Au(NHC) 2 and reveal that this is the energetically preferential adsorption configuration.

  20. Shear bond strength of metal brackets to feldspathic porcelain treated by Nd:YAG laser and hydrofluoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Sobouti, Farhad; Etemadi, Ardavan; Chiniforush, Nasim; Shariati, Mahsa

    2015-02-01

    Adult orthodontic treatment requires bonding orthodontic attachment to dental restorations. Ceramics are commonly used as esthetic restorative materials for the crowns and bridges. The present study evaluated the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces following conditioning by different powers of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and hydrofluoric acid as a conventional method. Seventy-two glazed porcelain samples were prepared and randomly attributed to six equal groups of 12. In the conventional hydrofluoric (HF) group, the specimens were etched by 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 4 min. In laser groups, samples were conditioned by 0.75-, 1-, 1.25-, 1.5-, and 2-W Nd:YAG laser for 10 s. Metal brackets were bonded to porcelain samples and after being stored in distilled water for 24 h, they were subjected to thermocycling for 500 cycles. The debonding was carried out by a Zwick testing machine. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tamhane multiple comparisons tests. The mean ± SD of the shear bond strength in the laser group 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 W and HF group was 2.2 ± 0.9, 4.2 ± 1.1, 4.9 ± 2.4, 7 ± 1.7, 9.6 ± 2.7, and 9.4 ± 2.5, respectively. Together with the increased power of laser, the mean shear bond strength was increased continuously and no significant differences were found between the HF group and the laser groups with power of 1.5 or 2 W. Also, there was no significant difference between all test groups in ARI scores. There was no significant difference between bond strength of laser groups with power of 1.5 and 2 W and HF-etched group. So, Nd:YAG laser with appropriate parameters can be used as an alternative method for porcelain etching.

  1. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs, due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1 Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2 Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3 Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4 Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC.

  2. Experimental analysis of two-layered dissimilar metals by roll bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanghui; Li, Yugui; Li, Juan; Huang, Qingxue; Ma, Lifeng

    2018-02-01

    Rolling reduction and base layers thickness have important implications for rolling compounding. A two-layered 304 stainless steel/Q345R low alloyed steel was roll bonded. The roll bonding was performed at the three thickness reductions of 25%, 40% and 55% with base layers of various thicknesses (Q345R). The microstructures of the composite were investigated by the ultra-deep microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM). Simultaneously, the mechanical properties of the composite were experimentally measured and the tensile fracture surfaces were observed by SEM. The interfaces were successfully bonded without any cracking or voids, which indicated a good fabrication of the 304/Q345R composite. The rolling reduction rate and thinning increase of the substrate contributed to the bonding effects appearance of the roll bonded sheet. The Cr and Ni enriched diffusion layer was formed by the interface elements diffusion. The Cr and Ni diffusion led to the formation of ˜10 μm wide Cr and Ni layers on the carbon steel side.

  3. Microstructural evolution during transient liquid phase bonding of Inconel 617 using Ni-Si-B filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalilian, F.; Jahazi, M.; Drew, R.A.L.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of process parameters on microstructural characteristics of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded Inconel 617 alloy was investigated. Experiments were carried out at 1065 deg. C using nickel based filler metal (Ni-4.5% Si-3% B) with B as the melting point depressant (MPD) element. Two different thickness of interlayer and various holding times were employed. The influence of these processing parameters on the characteristics of the joint area particularly size, morphology and composition of precipitates was investigated. The presence of MoB, Mo 2 B, M 23 C 6 , TiC, M 23 (B, C) 6 and Ni 3 B precipitates in the diffusion layer and Ni 3 B, Ni 3 Si and Ni 5 Si 2 precipitates in the interlayer at the interface between the base metal and interlayer were demonstrated using electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and TEM

  4. Late metal carbene complexes generated by multiple C-H activations: examining the continuum of M=C bond reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Matthew T; Grubbs, Robert H

    2009-10-20

    Unactivated C(sp(3))-H bonds are ubiquitous in organic chemicals and hydrocarbon feedstocks. However, these resources remain largely untapped, and the development of efficient homogeneous methods for hydrocarbon functionalization by C-H activation is an attractive and unresolved challenge for synthetic chemists. Transition-metal catalysis offers an attractive possible means for achieving selective, catalytic C-H functionalization given the thermodynamically favorable nature of many desirable partial oxidation schemes and the propensity of transition-metal complexes to cleave C-H bonds. Selective C-H activation, typically by a single cleavage event to produce M-C(sp(3)) products, is possible through myriad reported transition-metal species. In contrast, several recent reports have shown that late transition metals may react with certain substrates to perform multiple C-H activations, generating M=C(sp(2)) complexes for further elaboration. In light of the rich reactivity of metal-bound carbenes, such a route could open a new manifold of reactivity for catalytic C-H functionalization, and we have targeted this strategy in our studies. In this Account, we highlight several early examples of late transition-metal complexes that have been shown to generate metal-bound carbenes by multiple C-H activations and briefly examine factors leading to the selective generation of metal carbenes through this route. Using these reports as a backdrop, we focus on the double C-H activation of ethers and amines at iridium complexes supported by Ozerov's amidophosphine PNP ligand (PNP = [N(2-P(i)Pr(2)-4-Me-C(6)H(3))(2)](-)), allowing isolation of unusual square-planar iridium(I) carbenes. These species exhibit reactivity that is distinct from the archetypal Fischer and Schrock designations. We present experimental and theoretical studies showing that, like the classical square-planar iridium(I) organometallics, these complexes are best described as nucleophilic at iridium. We discuss

  5. On the nature of actinide- and lanthanide-metal bonds in heterobimetallic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Mirõ, Pere; Cramer, Christopher J.; Gagliardi, Laura; Infante, Ivan; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Eleven experimentally characterized complexes containing heterobimetallic bonds between elements of the f-block and other elements were examined by quantum chemical methods: [(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(2)(THF)LuRu(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)], [(η(5)-C(5)Me(5))(2)(I)ThRu(η(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2)],

  6. Onset of Bonding Plasmon Hybridization Preceded by Gap Modes in Dielectric Splitting of Metal Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Maj; Bochenkov, Vladimir; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    Dielectric splitting of nanoscale disks was studied experimentally and via finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations through systematic introduction of multiple ultrathin dielectric layers. Tunable, hybridized dark bonding modes were seen with first-order gap modes preceding the appearance...

  7. Alkali Metal Cation versus Proton and Methyl Cation Affinities: Structure and Bonding Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boughlala, Z.; Guerra, C.F.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the structure and bonding of gas-phase Cl X and [HCl X](+) complexes for X+ = H+, CH3+, Li+, and Na+, using relativistic density functional theory (DFT). We wish to establish a quantitative trend in affinities of the anionic and neutral Lewis bases Cl- and HCl for the various

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of diffusion bonded Al/Mg2Si metal matrix in situ composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nami, H.; Halvaee, A.; Adgi, H.; Hadian, A.

    2010-01-01

    In this research, Al/Mg 2 Si composite produced by gravity casting, was joined by diffusion welding technique at 6 MPa pressure with various welding temperatures and durations. This metal matrix composite (MMC) containing 15% Mg 2 Si particles was produced by in situ technique. Specific diffusion bonding process was introduced as a low vacuum technique. Microstructure and shear strength of the joined areas were determined. Scanning electron microscopy examination was carried out on the welded interfaces and shear tests were conducted to the samples interface to find out the effect of welding temperatures and durations on the weldability. It was found that high welding temperatures resulted in increase of shear strength. However, increase in welding duration did not make any detectable changes. The bonded interface could be developed as a wavy state depending on the amount of parent material deformation that was associated with bonding temperature. Results indicated that MMC can be joined by diffusion welding technique successfully with satisfactory shear strength.

  9. Group 13 ligand supported heavy-metal complexes: first structural evidence for gallium-lead and gallium-mercury bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabusankar, Ganesan; Gemel, Christian; Winter, Manuela; Seidel, Rüdiger W; Fischer, Roland A

    2010-05-25

    Heavy-metal complexes of lead and mercury stabilized by Group 13 ligands were derived from the oxidative addition of Ga(ddp) (ddp=HC(CMeNC(6)H(3)-2,6-iPr(2))(2), 2-diisopropylphenylamino-4-diisopropyl phenylimino-2-pentene) with corresponding metal precursors. The reaction of Me(3)PbCl and Ga(ddp) afforded compound [{(ddp)Ga(Cl)}PbMe(3)] (1) composed of Ga-Pb(IV) bonds. In addition, the monomeric plumbylene-type compound [{(ddp)Ga(OSO(2)CF(3))}(2)Pb(thf)] (2a) with an unsupported Ga-Pb(II)-Ga linkage was obtained by the reaction of [Pb(OSO(2)CF(3))(3)] with Ga(ddp) (2 equiv). Compound 2a falls under the rare example of a discrete plumbylene-type compound supported by a nonclassical ligand. Interesting structural changes were observed when [Pb(OSO(2)CF(3))(3)]2.H(2)O was treated with Ga(ddp) in a 1:2 ratio to yield [{(ddp)Ga(mu-OSO(2)CF(3))}(2)(OH(2))Pb] (2b) at below -10 degrees C. Compound 2b consists of a bent Ga-Pb-Ga backbone with a bridging triflate group between the Ga-Pb bond and a weakly interacting water molecule at the gallium center. Similarly, the reaction of mercury thiolate Hg(SC(6)F(5)) with Ga(ddp) (2 equiv) produced the bimetallic homoleptic compounds anti-[{(ddp)Ga(SC(6)F(5))}(2)Hg] (3a) and gauche-[{(ddp)Ga(SC(6)F(5))}(2)Hg] (3b), respectively, with a linear Ga-Hg-Ga linkage. Compounds 1-3 were structurally characterized and these are the first examples of compounds comprised of Ga-Pb(II), Ga-Pb(IV), and Ga-Hg bonds.

  10. Thermocompression bonding of vertically aligned carbon nanotube turfs to metalized substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R D; Bahr, D F; Richards, C D; Richards, R F; McClain, D; Green, J; Jiao, J

    2009-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube turfs (VACNTs), consisting of entwined, nominally vertical carbon nanotubes, are being proposed for use as electrical and thermal contact materials. Issues in their implementation include high contact resistance, the van der Waals interactions of carbon nanotubes, and a low temperature limit during processing. One route for circumventing the 750 deg. C temperatures required for VACNT growth using chemical vapor deposition is for the VACNTs to be grown separately, and then transferred to the device. A method of mechanical transfer, using thermocompression bonding, has been developed, allowing dry mechanical transfer of the VACNTs at 150 deg. C. This method can be used for the construction of both a thermal switch or a permanent conducting channel. The conductivity of the bonded structure is shown to be independent of the imposed strain, up to strains in excess of 100%.

  11. Structure and Bonding in Binuclear Metal Carbonyls. Classical Paradigms vs. Insights from Modern Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1053, SI (2015), s. 195-213 ISSN 2210-271X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : binuclear metal carbonyls * DAFH analysis * 18-electron rule Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.403, year: 2015

  12. [Influence of different bonding agents on traction resistance of metal alloys to dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabo, G L; da Silva Filho, F P; de Sá, D N; Rettondini, W C; dos Santos Cruz, C A

    1990-01-01

    They were casted pieces using three kinds of alloy (Ni-Cr, Ag-Sn and Cu-Al) with circular and smooth surface. They were cemented to human teeth, on occlusal surface, grounded at dentin level, through three different materials kind (zinc polycarboxylate cement, glassionomer cement and composite). After 24 hours storing, the samples were subjected to the tensile test. The results showed that the samples cemented with composite and the casts made with Ag-Sn alloy had higher bond strength.

  13. Chemical bonding of water to metal surfaces studied with core-level spectroscopies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Pettersson, L.G.M.

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the contact layer of water on surfaces is of relevance for many practical fields, including corrosion, electrochemistry, environmental science and heterogeneous catalysis. Here we focus on the geometric and electronic structure of the water contact layer on transition metal surfaces......-specific information on the partial local density of states, local atomic structure, geometrical parameters and molecular orientation, allowing general principles for water-metal interaction to be derived....

  14. A Discovery of Strong Metal-Support Bonding in Nanoengineered Au-Fe3O4 Dumbbell-like Nanoparticles by in Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chang Wan; Choksi, Tej; Milligan, Cory; Majumdar, Paulami; Manto, Michael; Cui, Yanran; Sang, Xiahan; Unocic, Raymond R; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Wang, Chao; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Greeley, Jeffrey; Ortalan, Volkan

    2017-08-09

    The strength of metal-support bonding in heterogeneous catalysts determines their thermal stability, therefore, a tremendous amount of effort has been expended to understand metal-support interactions. Herein, we report the discovery of an anomalous "strong metal-support bonding" between gold nanoparticles and "nano-engineered" Fe 3 O 4 substrates by in situ microscopy. During in situ vacuum annealing of Au-Fe 3 O 4 dumbbell-like nanoparticles, synthesized by the epitaxial growth of nano-Fe 3 O 4 on Au nanoparticles, the gold nanoparticles transform into the gold thin films and wet the surface of nano-Fe 3 O 4 , as the surface reduction of nano-Fe 3 O 4 proceeds. This phenomenon results from a unique coupling of the size-and shape-dependent high surface reducibility of nano-Fe 3 O 4 and the extremely strong adhesion between Au and the reduced Fe 3 O 4 . This strong metal-support bonding reveals the significance of controlling the metal oxide support size and morphology for optimizing metal-support bonding and ultimately for the development of improved catalysts and functional nanostructures.

  15. Elastomer toughened polyimide adhesives. [bonding metal and composite material structures for aircraft and spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.clair, A. K.; St.clair, T. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A rubber-toughened, addition-type polyimide composition is disclosed which has excellent high temperature bonding characteristics in the fully cured state and improved peel strength and adhesive fracture resistance physical property characteristics. The process for making the improved adhesive involves preparing the rubber-containing amic acid prepolymer by chemically reacting an amine-terminated elastomer and an aromatic diamine with an aromatic dianhydride with which a reactive chain stopper anhydride has been mixed, and utilizing solvent or mixture of solvents for the reaction.

  16. Factors affecting the equilibrium constant of homolysis of complexes with metal-carbon σ bonds in aqueous solutions. Pulse radiolysis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerstein, D.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1989-01-01

    Pulse-Radiolysis is a powerful technique for the determination of the equilibrium constants of the homolytic cleavage of metal-carbon σ bonds in aqueous solutions. In most systems studied the observed reaction is: L m-1 M (n+1) -R + L ↔ ML m. n + ·R. Therefore the results do not enable a direct determination of the metal-carbon bond dissociation energies. The results obtained indicate that these equilibrium constants are not directly related to the redox potential of either L .m M (n) or of ·R, or to the activation energies for the homolytic cleavage of a family of similarly substituted ethanes. (author)

  17. Orthodontic Metallic Lingual Brackets: The Dark Side of the Moon of Bond Failures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Sfondrini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lingual orthodontics, among both young and adult patients, increased in popularity during last years. The purposes of the present investigation were to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS values and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI scores of different lingual brackets compared with a vestibular control bracket. One hundred bovine teeth were extracted and embedded in resin blocks. Four different lingual brackets (Idea, Leone; STB, Ormco; TTR, RMO; 2D, Forestadent and a vestibular control bracket (Victory, 3M were bonded to the bovine enamel surfaces and subsequently shear tested to failure utilizing a Universal Testing Machine. SBS values were measured. A microscopic evaluation was performed to obtain ARI scores. Statistical analysis was performed at a statistically significant level of p < 0.05 to determine significant differences in SBS values and ARI Scores. No statistically significant variations in SBS were reported among the different groups. Conversely, significant differences were shown in ARI scores among the various groups. Clinical relevance of the present study is that orthodontists can expect similar resistance to debonding forces from lingual appliances as with vestibular brackets.

  18. Methods for surface treating metals, ceramics, and plastics before adhesive bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Althouse, L.P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for pretreating the surfaces of metals, ceramics, and plastics before they are coated with adhesive and used in assembly are described. The treatments recommended have been used successfully in the laboratory at LLL. Many are used in the assembly of nuclear devices. However, an unusual alloy or complex configuration may require trials before a specific surface treatment is chosen

  19. X-ray-emission studies of chemical bonding in transition-metal silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.W.; Leuken, H. van; Groot, R.A. de; Fuggle, J.C.; Reiter, S.; Wiech, G.; Buschow, K.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    We present Si L2,3 emission-band spectra of a series of 3d and 4d transition-metal (TM) silicides, together wtih Si K emission-band spectra of four 3d TM disilicides. The data are compared with augmented-spherical-wave density-of-states (DOS) calculations, and good agreement is found. The trends we

  20. Metal-Organic Frameworks with d-f Cyanide Bridges: Structural Diversity, Bonding Regime, and Magnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferbinteanu, M.; Cimpoesu, F.; Tanase, S.; Cheng, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a selection of metal-organic frameworks based on d-f and f-f linkages, discussing their structural features and properties from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. We give an overview of our own synthetic and modeling methodologies, highlighting the complexity of the

  1. Intriguing structures and magic sizes of heavy noble metal nanoclusters around size 55 governed by relativistic effect and covalent bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X. J.; Xue, X. L.; Jia, Yu [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Guo, Z. X. [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Department of Chemistry and London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London WC1H (United Kingdom); Li, S. F., E-mail: sflizzu@zzu.edu.cn [International Laboratory for Quantum Functional Materials of Henan and School of Physics and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); ICQD, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zhang, Zhenyu, E-mail: zhangzy@ustc.edu.cn [ICQD, Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Gao, Y. F., E-mail: ygao7@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    Nanoclusters usually display exotic physical and chemical properties due to their intriguing geometric structures in contrast to their bulk counterparts. By means of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we find that heavy noble metal Pt{sub N} nanoclusters around the size N = 55 begin to prefer an open configuration, rather than previously reported close-packed icosahedron or core-shell structures. Particularly, for Pt{sub N}, the widely supposed icosahedronal magic cluster is changed to a three-atomic-layered structure with D{sub 6h} symmetry, which can be well addressed by our recently established generalized Wulff construction principle (GWCP). However, the magic number of Pt{sub N} clusters around 55 is shifted to a new odd number of 57. The high symmetric three-layered Pt{sub 57} motif is mainly stabilized by the enhanced covalent bonding contributed by both spin-orbital coupling effect and the open d orbital (5d{sup 9}6s{sup 1}) of Pt, which result in a delicate balance between the enhanced Pt–Pt covalent bonding of the interlayers and negligible d dangling bonds on the cluster edges. These findings about Pt{sub N} clusters are also applicable to Ir{sub N} clusters, but qualitatively different from their earlier neighboring element Os and their later neighboring element Au. The magic numbers for Os and Au are even, being 56 and 58, respectively. The findings of the new odd magic number 57 are the important supplementary of the recently established GWCP.

  2. Several new phases in RE-Mg-Ge systems (RE = rare earth metal) - syntheses, structures, and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, Nian-Tzu; Bobev, Svilen

    2012-01-01

    Reported are the synthesis and structural characterization of Ce_5Mg_8Ge_8 (its own structure type), CeMg_2_-_xGe_2_+_x (BaAl_4-type structure), RE_4Mg_7Ge_6 (RE = Ce-Nd, Sm; La_4Mg_7Ge_6-type structure), and RE_4Mg_5Ge_6 (RE = Ce, Pr; Tm_4Zn_5Ge_6-type structure). The structures of these compounds have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. These compounds are closely related to each other not only in their chemical compositions but also in their structures. A common structural feature of all are MgGe_4 tetrahedra, which are connected by corner- and/or edge-sharing into complex polyanionic frameworks with the rare-earth metal atoms filling the ''empty'' space. The structures are compared to known types of structures, and we have investigated the chemical bonding in Ce_5Mg_8Ge_8 with electronic structure calculations, which were carried out by the tight-bonding linear muffin-tin orbital (TB-LMTO) method. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Thin film metal sensors in fusion bonded glass chips for high-pressure microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Martin; Ek, Johan; Hedman, Ludvig; Johansson, Fredrik; Sehlstedt, Viktor; Stocklassa, Jesper; Snögren, Pär; Pettersson, Victor; Larsson, Jonas; Vizuete, Olivier; Hjort, Klas; Klintberg, Lena

    2017-01-01

    High-pressure microfluidics offers fast analyses of thermodynamic parameters for compressed process solvents. However, microfluidic platforms handling highly compressible supercritical CO 2 are difficult to control, and on-chip sensing would offer added control of the devices. Therefore, there is a need to integrate sensors into highly pressure tolerant glass chips. In this paper, thin film Pt sensors were embedded in shallow etched trenches in a glass wafer that was bonded with another glass wafer having microfluidic channels. The devices having sensors integrated into the flow channels sustained pressures up to 220 bar, typical for the operation of supercritical CO 2 . No leakage from the devices could be found. Integrated temperature sensors were capable of measuring local decompression cooling effects and integrated calorimetric sensors measured flow velocities over the range 0.5–13.8 mm s −1 . By this, a better control of high-pressure microfluidic platforms has been achieved. (paper)

  4. Application of Ceramic Bond Coating for Reusable Melting Crucible of Metallic Fuel Slugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki-Hwan; Song, Hoon; Ko, Young-Mo; Park, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ki-Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel slugs of the driver fuel assembly have been fabricated by injection casting of the fuel alloys under a vacuum state or an inert atmosphere. Traditionally, metal fuel such as a U-Zr alloy system for SFR has been melted in slurry-coated graphite crucibles and cast in slurry-coated quartz tube molds to prevent melt/material interactions. Reactive coatings and porous coatings can be a source of melt contaminations, and fuel losses, respectively. Ceramic Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TaC coating materials showed no penetration in the protective layer after a melt dipping test. However, the ceramic coating materials showed separations in the coating interface between the substrate and coating layer, or between the coating layer and fuel melt after the dipping test. All plasma-spray coated methods maintained a sound coating state after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr melt. A single coating Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(150) layer and double coating layer of TaC(50)-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100), showed a sound state or little penetration in the protective layer after a dipping test with U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE melt. Injection casting experiments of U-10wt.%Zr and U-10wt.%Zr-5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been performed to investigate the feasibility of a reusable crucible of the metal fuel slugs. U–10wt.%Zr and U–10wt.%Zr–5wt.%RE fuel slugs have been soundly fabricated without significant interactions of the graphite crucibles. Thus, the ceramic plasma-spray coatings are thought to be promising candidate coating methods for a reusable graphite crucible to fabricate metal fuel slugs.

  5. Microstructural evolution during transient liquid phase bonding of Inconel 617 using Ni-Si-B filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalilian, F. [McGill University, Department of Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering, 3610 University St., M.H. Wong Building, Montreal Que., H3A 2B2 (Canada); Jahazi, M. [Aerospace Manufacturing Technology Center, National Research Council of Canada (Canada); Drew, R.A.L. [McGill University, Department of Mining, Metals and Materials Engineering, 3610 University St., M.H. Wong Building, Montreal Que., H3A 2B2 (Canada)]. E-mail: robin.drew@mcgill.ca

    2006-05-15

    The influence of process parameters on microstructural characteristics of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded Inconel 617 alloy was investigated. Experiments were carried out at 1065 deg. C using nickel based filler metal (Ni-4.5% Si-3% B) with B as the melting point depressant (MPD) element. Two different thickness of interlayer and various holding times were employed. The influence of these processing parameters on the characteristics of the joint area particularly size, morphology and composition of precipitates was investigated. The presence of MoB, Mo{sub 2}B, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, TiC, M{sub 23}(B, C){sub 6} and Ni{sub 3}B precipitates in the diffusion layer and Ni{sub 3}B, Ni{sub 3}Si and Ni{sub 5}Si{sub 2} precipitates in the interlayer at the interface between the base metal and interlayer were demonstrated using electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and TEM.

  6. Another way of looking at bonding on bimetallic surfaces: the role of spin polarization of surface metal d states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escano, M C; Nguyen, T Q; Nakanishi, H; Kasai, H

    2009-01-01

    The nature of electronic and chemical properties of an unstrained Pt monolayer on a 3d transition metal substrate, M (M = Cr, Mn, Fe), is studied using spin-polarized density functional theory calculations. High spin polarization of Pt d states is noted, verifying the magnetization induced on Pt, which is observed to be responsible for redirecting the analysis of bond formation on a metal surface towards a different perspective. While the shift in the Pt d band center (the average energy of the Pt d band, commonly used to predict the reactivity of surfaces) does give the expected trend in adsorbate (oxygen) chemisorption energy across the bimetallic surfaces in this work, our results show that for spin-polarized Pt d states, the variation in strength of adsorption with respect to the Fermi level density of states is more predictive of Pt chemisorption properties. Hence, this study introduces a scheme for analyzing trends in reactivity of bimetallic surfaces where adsorption energies are used as reactivity parameters and where spin polarization effects cannot be neglected. (fast track communication)

  7. A Study On The Metal Carbide Composite Diffusion Bonding For Mechanical Seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D.-K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical Seal use highly efficient alternative water having a great quantity of an aqueous solution and has an advantage no corrosion brine. Metal Carbide composites have been investigated as potential materials for high temperature structural applications and for application in the processing industry. The existing Mechanical seal material is a highly expensive carbide alloy, and it is difficult to take a price advantage. Therefore the study of replacing body area with inexpensive steel material excluding O-ring and contact area which demands high characteristics is needed.

  8. Chemical Bonding of Transition-Metal Co13 Clusters with Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2015-12-01

    We carried out density functional calculations to study the adsorption of Co13 clusters on graphene. Several free isomers were deposited at different positions with respect to the hexagonal lattice nodes, allowing us to study even the hcp 2d isomer, which was recently obtained as the most stable one. Surprisingly, the Co13 clusters attached to graphene prefer icosahedron-like structures in which the low-lying isomer is much distorted; in such structures, they are linked with more bonds than those reported in previous works. For any isomer, the most stable position binds to graphene by the Co atoms that can lose electrons. We find that the charge transfer between graphene and the clusters is small enough to conclude that the Co-graphene binding is not ionic-like but chemical. Besides, the same order of stability among the different isomers on doped graphene is kept. These findings could also be of interest for magnetic clusters on graphenic nanostructures such as ribbons and nanotubes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Hydrodesulfurization on Transition Metal Catalysts: Elementary Steps of C-S Bond Activation and Consequences of Bifunctional Synergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yik, Edwin Shyn-Lo

    convergence to a single phase is expected and predictable from thermodynamics at a given temperature and sulfur chemical potential, metastability of two phases can exist. We demonstrate, through extensive characterization and kinetic evidence, such behaviors exist in Re, where structural disparities between its phases lead to kinetic hurdles that prevent interconversions between layered ReSx nanostructures and sulfur-covered Re metal clusters. Such features allowed, for the first time, direct comparisons of reaction rates at identical conditions on two disparate phases of the same transition metal identity. Rigorous assessments of kinetic and selectivity data indicated that more universal mechanistic features persist across all catalysts studied, suggesting that differences in their catalytic activity were the result of different densities of HDS sites, which appeared to correlate with their respective metal-sulfur bond energies. Kinetic responses and product distributions indicated that the consumption of thiophene proceeds by the formation of a partially-hydrogenated surface intermediate, which subsequently produces tetrahydrothiophene (THT) and butene/butane (C4) via primary routes on similar types of sites. These sites are formed from desorption of weakly-bound sulfur adatoms on sulfur-covered metal surfaces, which can occur when the heat of sulfur adsorption is sufficiently low at high sulfur coverage as a result of increased sulfur-sulfur repulsive interactions. Relative stabilities and differences in the molecularity of the respective transition states that form THT and C4 dictate product distributions. THT desulfurization to form C4 occurs via readsorption and subsequent dehydrogenation, evidenced by secondary rates that exhibited negative H2 dependences. These behaviors suggest that C-S bond activation occurs on a partially (un)saturated intermediate, analogous to behaviors observed in C-C bond scission reactions of linear and cycloalkanes on hydrogen-covered metal

  10. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    With the semiconductor industry racing toward a historic transition, nano chips with less than 45 nm features demand I/Os in excess of 20,000 that support computing speed in terabits per second, with multi-core processors aggregately providing highest bandwidth at lowest power. On the other hand, emerging mixed signal systems are driving the need for 3D packaging with embedded active components and ultra-short interconnections. Decreasing I/O pitch together with low cost, high electrical performance and high reliability are the key technological challenges identified by the 2005 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). Being able to provide several fold increase in the chip-to-package vertical interconnect density is essential for garnering the true benefits of nanotechnology that will utilize nano-scale devices. Electrical interconnections are multi-functional materials that must also be able to withstand complex, sustained and cyclic thermo-mechanical loads. In addition, the materials must be environmentally-friendly, corrosion resistant, thermally stable over a long time, and resistant to electro-migration. A major challenge is also to develop economic processes that can be integrated into back end of the wafer foundry, i.e. with wafer level packaging. Device-to-system board interconnections are typically accomplished today with either wire bonding or solders. Both of these are incremental and run into either electrical or mechanical barriers as they are extended to higher density of interconnections. Downscaling traditional solder bump interconnect will not satisfy the thermo-mechanical reliability requirements at very fine pitches of the order of 30 microns and less. Alternate interconnection approaches such as compliant interconnects typically require lengthy connections and are therefore limited in terms of electrical properties, although expected to meet the mechanical requirements. A novel chip-package interconnection technology is

  11. Mechanistic aspects of dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation to produce ammonia in catalysis and organometallic chemistry: relevance of metal hydride bonds and dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-Peng; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra

    2014-01-21

    Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by transition-metal centers to produce ammonia is central in industry and in Nature. After an introductory section on the thermodynamic and kinetic challenges linked to N2 splitting, this tutorial review discusses three major classes of transition-metal systems (homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological) capable of achieving dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen. Molecular complexes, solid-state Haber-Bosch catalytic systems, silica-supported tantalum hydrides and nitrogenase will be discussed. Emphasis is focused on the reaction mechanisms operating in the process of dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen, and in particular on the key role played by metal hydride bonds and by dihydrogen in such reactions.

  12. K{sub 6} carbon: A metallic carbon allotrope in sp{sup 3} bonding networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Chun-Yao; Wang, Xin-Quan; Wang, Jian-Tao, E-mail: wjt@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-02-07

    We identify by first-principles calculations a new cubic carbon phase in I4{sub 1}32 (O{sup 8}) symmetry, named K{sub 6} carbon, which has a six atom primitive cell comprising sp{sup 3} hybridized C{sub 3} triangle rings. The structural stability is verified by phonon mode analysis. The calculated elastic constants show that the K{sub 6} carbon is a high ductile material with a density even lower than graphite. Electronic band and density of states calculations reveal that it is a metallic carbon allotrope with a high electronic density of states of ∼0.10 states/eV per atom at the Fermi level. These results broaden our understanding of the structural and electronic properties of carbon allotropes.

  13. What is the best bonding model of the (σ-H-BR) species bound to a transition metal? Bonding analysis in complexes [(H)2Cl(PMe3)2M(σ-H-BR)] (M = Fe, Ru, Os).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Krishna K

    2012-03-21

    Density Functional Theory calculations have been performed for the σ-hydroboryl complexes of iron, ruthenium and osmium [(H)(2)Cl(PMe(3))(2)M(σ-H-BR)] (M = Fe, Ru, Os; R = OMe, NMe(2), Ph) at the BP86/TZ2P/ZORA level of theory in order to understand the interactions between metal and HBR ligands. The calculated geometries of the complexes [(H)(2)Cl(PMe(3))(2)Ru(HBNMe(2))], [(H)(2)Cl(PMe(3))(2)Os(HBR)] (R = OMe, NMe(2)) are in excellent agreement with structurally characterized complexes [(H)(2)Cl(P(i)Pr(3))(2)Os(σ-H-BNMe(2))], [(H)(2)Cl(P(i)Pr(3))(2)Os{σ-H-BOCH(2)CH(2)OB(O(2)CH(2)CH(2))}] and [(H)(2)Cl(P(i)Pr(3))(2)Os(σ-H-BNMe(2))]. The longer calculated M-B bond distance in complex [(H)(2)Cl(PMe(3))(2)M(σ-H-BNMe(2))] are due to greater B-N π bonding and as a result, a weaker M-B π-back-bonding. The B-H2 bond distances reveal that (i) iron complexes contain bis(σ-borane) ligand, (ii) ruthenium complexes contain (σ-H-BR) ligands with a stretched B-H2 bond, and (iii) osmium complexes contain hydride (H2) and (σ-H-BR) ligands. The H-BR ligands in osmium complexes are a better trans-directing ligand than the Cl ligand. Values of interaction energy, electrostatic interaction, orbital interaction, and bond dissociation energy for interactions between ionic fragments are very large and may not be consistent with M-(σ-H-BR) bonding. The EDA as well as NBO and AIM analysis suggest that the best bonding model for the M-σ-H-BR interactions in the complexes [(H)(2)Cl(PMe(3))(2)M(σ-H-BR)] is the interaction between neutral fragments [(H)(2)Cl(PMe(3))(2)M] and [σ-H-BR]. This becomes evident from the calculated values for the orbital interactions. The electron configuration of the fragments which is shown for C in Fig. 1 experiences the smallest change upon the M-σ-H-BR bond formation. Since model C also requires the least amount of electronic excitation and geometry changes of all models given by the ΔE(prep) values, it is clearly the most appropriate choice of

  14. Adhesive bonding of resin composite to various titanium surfaces using different metal conditioners and a surface modification system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Jorge ALMILHATTI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of three metal conditioners on the shear bond strength (SBS of a prosthetic composite material to cpTi grade I having three surface treatments. Material and Methods: One hundred sixty eight rivet-shaped specimens (8.0x2.0 mm were cast and subjected to polishing (P or sandblasting with either 50 mm (50SB or 250 mm (250SB Al2O3. The metal conditioners Metal Photo Primer (MPP, Cesead II Opaque Primer (OP, Targis Link (TL, and one surface modification system Siloc (S, were applied to the specimen surfaces, which were covered with four 1-mm thick layers of resin composite. The resin layers were exposed to curing light for 90 s separately. Seven specimens from each experimental group were stored in water at 37ºC for 24 h while the other 7 specimens were subjected to 5,000 thermal cycles consisting of water baths at 4ºC and 60ºC (n=7. All specimens were subjected to SBS test (0.5 mm/min until failure occurred, and further 28 specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA followed by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05. Results: On 50SB surfaces, OP groups showed higher SBS means than MPP (P<0.05, while no significant difference was found among OP, S, and TL groups. On 250SB surfaces, OP and TL groups exhibited higher SBS than MPP and S (P<0.05. No significant difference in SBS was found between OP and TL groups nor between MPP and S groups. The use of conditioners on 250SB surfaces resulted in higher SBS means than the use of the same products on 50SB surfaces (P<0.05. Conclusion: Sandblasting associated with the use of metal conditioners improves SBS of resin composites to cpTi.

  15. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks – Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  16. Research Update: Mechanical properties of metal-organic frameworks - Influence of structure and chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Henke, Sebastian; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2014-12-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a young family of functional materials, have been attracting considerable attention from the chemistry, materials science, and physics communities. In the light of their potential applications in industry and technology, the fundamental mechanical properties of MOFs, which are of critical importance for manufacturing, processing, and performance, need to be addressed and understood. It has been widely accepted that the framework topology, which describes the overall connectivity pattern of the MOF building units, is of vital importance for the mechanical properties. However, recent advances in the area of MOF mechanics reveal that chemistry plays a major role as well. From the viewpoint of materials science, a deep understanding of the influence of chemical effects on MOF mechanics is not only highly desirable for the development of novel functional materials with targeted mechanical response, but also for a better understanding of important properties such as structural flexibility and framework breathing. The present work discusses the intrinsic connection between chemical effects and the mechanical behavior of MOFs through a number of prototypical examples.

  17. Bond deformation paths and electronic instabilities of ultraincompressible transition metal diborides: Case study of OsB2 and IrB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, R. F.; Legut, D.; Wen, X. D.; Veprek, S.; Rajan, K.; Lookman, T.; Mao, H. K.; Zhao, Y. S.

    2014-09-01

    The energetically most stable orthorhombic structure of OsB2 and IrB2 is dynamically stable for OsB2 but unstable for IrB2. Both diborides have substantially lower shear strength in their easy slip systems than their metal counterparts. This is attributed to an easy sliding facilitated by out-of-plane weakening of metallic Os-Os bonds in OsB2 and by an in-plane bond splitting instability in IrB2. A much higher shear resistance of Os-B and B-B bonds than Os-Os ones is found, suggesting that the strengthened Os-B and B-B bonds are responsible for hardness enhancement in OsB2. In contrast, an in-plane electronic instability in IrB2 limits its strength. The electronic structure of deformed diborides suggests that the electronic instabilities of 5d orbitals are their origin of different bond deformation paths. Neither IrB2 nor OsB2 can be intrinsically superhard.

  18. The estimation of H-bond and metal ion-ligand interaction energies in the G-Quadruplex ⋯ Mn+ complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Najmeh; Ebrahimi, Ali

    2018-06-01

    In order to characterize various interactions in the G-quadruplex ⋯ Mn+ (G-Q ⋯ Mn+) complexes, the individual H-bond (EHB) and metal ion-ligand interaction (EMO) energies have been estimated using the electron charge densities (ρs) calculated at the X ⋯ H (X = N and O) and Mn+ ⋯ O (Mn+ is an alkaline, alkaline earth and transition metal ion) bond critical points (BCPs) obtained from the atoms in molecules (AIM) analysis. The estimated values of EMO and EHB were evaluated using the structural parameters, results of natural bond orbital analysis (NBO), aromaticity indexes and atomic charges. The EMO value increase with the ratio of ionic charge to radius, e/r, where a linear correlation is observed between EMO and e/r (R = 0.97). Meaningful relationships are also observed between EMO and indexes used for aromaticity estimation. The ENH value is higher than EOH in the complexes; this is in complete agreement with the trend of N⋯Hsbnd N and O⋯Hsbnd N angles, the E (2) value of nN → σ*NH and nO → σ*NH interactions and the difference between the natural charges on the H-bonded atom and the hydrogen atom of guanine (Δq). In general, the O1MO2 angle becomes closer to 109.5° with the increase in EMO and decrease in EHB in the presence of metal ion.

  19. Microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and porcelain shear bond strength comparison between cast and hot pressed CoCrMo alloy for metal-ceramic dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, B; Soares, D; Silva, F S

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance and metal-porcelain bond strength of a CoCrMo dental alloy obtained by two routes, cast and hot pressing. CoCrMo alloy substrates were obtained by casting and hot pressing. Substrates' microstructure was examined by the means of Optical Microscopy (OM) and by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness tests were performed in a microhardness indenter. The electrochemical behavior of substrates was investigated through potentiodynamic tests in a saline solution (8g NaCl/L). Substrates were bonded to dental porcelain and metal-porcelain bond strength was assessed by the means of a shear test performed in a universal test machine (crosshead speed: 0.5 mm/min) until fracture. Fractured surfaces as well as undestroyed interface specimens were examined with Stereomicroscopy and SEM-EDS. Data was analyzed with Shapiro-Wilk test to test the assumption of normality. The t-test (pmicrostructures whereas hot pressed specimens exhibited a typical globular microstructure with a second phase spread through the matrix. The hardness registered for hot pressed substrates was greater than that of cast specimens, 438±24HV/1 and 324±8HV/1, respectively. Hot pressed substrates showed better corrosion properties than cast ones, i.e. higher OCP; higher corrosion potential (E(corr)) and lower current densities (i(corr)). No significant difference was found (p<0.05) in metal-ceramic bond strength between cast (116.5±6.9 MPa) and hot pressed (114.2±11.9 MPa) substrates. The failure type analysis revealed an adhesive failure for all specimens. Hot pressed products arise as an alternative to cast products in dental prosthetics, as they impart enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties to prostheses without compromising the metal-ceramic bond strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiferroic behavior associated with an order-disorder hydrogen bonding transition in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the perovskite ABX3 architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prashant; Ramachandran, Vasanth; Clark, Ronald J; Zhou, Hai Dong; Toby, Brian H; Dalal, Naresh S; Kroto, Harold W; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2009-09-30

    Multiferroic behavior in perovskite-related metal-organic frameworks of general formula [(CH(3))(2)NH(2)]M(HCOO)(3), where M = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni, is reported. All four compounds exhibit paraelectric-antiferroelectric phase transition behavior in the temperature range 160-185 K (Mn: 185 K, Fe: 160 K; Co: 165 K; Ni: 180 K); this is associated with an order-disorder transition involving the hydrogen bonded dimethylammonium cations. On further cooling, the compounds become canted weak ferromagnets below 40 K. This research opens up a new class of multiferroics in which the electrical ordering is achieved by means of hydrogen bonding.

  1. Evaluation of Surface Characteristics and Shear Bond Strength of Metal Brackets Bonded to Two Different Porcelain Systems (Feldspathic/IPS-Empress-2 treated with Different Surface Conditioning Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal S Nair

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Surface conditioning with Co-Jet sand which produced silicatization resulted in a favorable bond strength in both feldspathic and IPS-Empress-2 ceramic surfaces. It was shown that it produced the least surface roughness among all the other surface conditioning groups.

  2. Quadruple metal-metal bonds with strong donor ligands. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of M{sub 2}(form){sub 4} (M = Cr, Mo, W; form = N,N{prime}-diphenylformamidinate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.; Lynn, M.A.; Chisholm, M.H.

    1999-12-29

    The He I photoelectron spectra of M{sub 2}(form){sub 4}(M = Cr, Mo, W; form - N,N{prime}-diphenylformamidinate) and Mo{sub 2}(cyform){sub 4} (cyform = N,N{prime}-dicyclohexylformamidinate) are presented. For comparison, the Ne I, He I, and He II photoelectron spectra of Mo{sub 2}(p-CH{sub 3}-form){sub 4} have also been obtained. The valence ionization features of these molecules are interpreted based on (1) the changes that occur with the metal and ligand substitutions, (2) the changes in photoelectron cross sections with excitation source, and (3) the changes from previously studied dimetal complexes. These photoelectron spectra are useful for revealing the effects that better electron donor ligands have on the valence electronic structure of M{sub 2}(L-L){sub 4} systems. Comparison with the He I spectra of the isoelectronic M{sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 4} compounds is particularly revealing. Unlike with the more electron-withdrawing acetate ligand, several formamidinate-based ionizations derived from the nitrogen p{sub {pi}} orbitals occur among the metal-metal {sigma}, {pi}, and {delta} ionization bands. Although these formamidinate-based levels are close in energy to the occupied metal-metal bonds, they have little direct mixing interaction with them. The shift of the metal-metal bond ionizations to lower ionization energies for the formamidinate systems is primarily a consequence of the lower electronegativity of the ligand and the better {pi} donation into empty metal levels. The metal-metal {delta} orbital experiences some additional net bonding interaction with ligand orbitals of the same symmetry. Also, an additional bonding interaction from ligand-to-metal electron donation to the {delta}* orbital is identified. These spectra suggest a greater degree of metal-ligand covalency than in the related M{sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 4} systems. Fenske-Hall molecular orbital and density functional (ADF) calculations agree with the assignment and

  3. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Matteucci

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We compare ultrasonic welding (UW and thermal bonding (TB for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones obtained using TB. Parameters such as metal thickness of electrodes, depth of electrode embedding, delivered power, and height of energy directors (for UW, as well as pressure and temperature (for TB, were systematically studied to evaluate the two bonding methods and requirements for optimal electrochemical performance. The presented technology is intended for easy and effective integration of polymeric Lab-on-Chip systems to encourage their use in research, commercialization and education.

  4. Transition Metal Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Multiple Bonds: Exploration of Second Generation Ruthenium Catalysts and Extension to Copper Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Brent Gunnoe

    2011-02-17

    Catalysts provide foundational technology for the development of new materials and can enhance the efficiency of routes to known materials. New catalyst technologies offer the possibility of reducing energy and raw material consumption as well as enabling chemical processes with a lower environmental impact. The rising demand and expense of fossil resources has strained national and global economies and has increased the importance of accessing more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of hydrocarbons to useful products. The goals of the research are to develop and understand single-site homogeneous catalysts for the conversion of readily available hydrocarbons into useful materials. A detailed understanding of these catalytic reactions could lead to the development of catalysts with improved activity, longevity and selectivity. Such transformations could reduce the environmental impact of hydrocarbon functionalization, conserve energy and valuable fossil resources and provide new technologies for the production of liquid fuels. This project is a collaborative effort that incorporates both experimental and computational studies to understand the details of transition metal catalyzed C-H activation and C-C bond forming reactions with olefins. Accomplishments of the current funding period include: (1) We have completed and published studies of C-H activation and catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu{l_brace}P(pyr){sub 3}{r_brace}(NCMe)R (pyr = N-pyrrolyl) complexes. While these systems efficiently initiate stoichiometric benzene C-H activation, catalytic olefin hydroarylation is hindered by inhibition of olefin coordination, which is a result of the steric bulk of the P(pyr){sub 3} ligand. (2) We have extended our studies of catalytic olefin hydroarylation by TpRu(L)(NCMe)Ph systems to L = P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt. Thus, we have now completed detailed mechanistic studies of four systems with L = CO, PMe{sub 3}, P(pyr){sub 3} and P(OCH{sub 2}){sub 3}CEt

  5. Method Of Bonding A Metal Connection To An Electrode Including A Core Having A Fiber Or Foam Type Structure For An Electrochemical Cell, An

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustau, Marie-Therese; Verhoog, Roelof; Precigout, Claude

    1996-09-24

    A method of bonding a metal connection to an electrode including a core having a fiber or foam-type structure for an electrochemical cell, in which method at least one metal strip is pressed against one edge of the core and is welded thereto under compression, wherein, at least in line with the region in which said strip is welded to the core, which is referred to as the "main core", a retaining core of a type analogous to that of the main core is disposed prior to the welding.

  6. High-Performance Epoxy-Resin-Bonded Magnets Produced from the Sm2Fe17Nx Powders Coated by Copper and Zinc Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Machida, Ken-ichi; Adachi, Gin-ya

    2001-04-01

    Fine powders of Sm2Fe17Nx coated with copper metal reduced from CuCl2 and/or zinc metal subsequently derived by photo-decomposition of diethylzinc [Zn(C2H5)2] were prepared, and their magnetic properties were characterized in addition to those of epoxy-resin-bonded magnets produced from the coated powders (Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx, Zn/Sm2Fe17Nx and Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx). The remanence (Br) and maximum energy product [(\\mathit{BH})max] of double metal-coated Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx powders were maintained at higher levels than those of single Zn metal-coated Sm2Fe17Nx ones (Zn/Sm2Fe17Nx) even after heat treatment at 673 K since the oxidation resistance and thermal stability were effectively improved by formation of the thick and uniform protection layer on the surface of Sm2Fe17Nx particles. Moreover, the epoxy-resin-bonded magnets produced from the Zn/Cu/Sm2Fe17Nx powders possessed good corrosion resistance in air at 393 K which it resulted in the smaller thermal irreversible flux loss than that of uncoated and single Zn metal-coated Sm2Fe17Nx powders in the temperature range of above 393 K.

  7. Promotion Effect of Alkali Metal Hydroxides on Polymer-Stabilized Pd Nanoparticles for Selective Hydrogenation of C–C Triple Bonds in Alkynols

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoshvili, Linda Zh.; Bykov, Alexey V.; Khudyakova, Tatiana E.; Lagrange, Thomas; Héroguel, Florent; Luterbacher, Jeremy S.; Matveeva, Valentina G.; Sulman, Esther M.; Dyson, Paul J.; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2017-01-01

    Postimpregnation of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) stabilized within hyper-cross-linked polystyrene with sodium or potassium hydroxides of optimal concentration was found to significantly increase the catalytic activity for the partial hydrogenation of the C–C triple bond in 2-methyl-3-butyn-2-ol at ambient hydrogen pressure. The alkali metal hydroxide accelerates the transformation of the residual Pd(II) salt into Pd(0) NPs and diminishes the reaction induction period. In addition, the selectivity t...

  8. High-performance characteristics of the bonded magnets produced from the Sm2 Fe17 Nx powder stabilized by photo-induced zinc metal coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, K.; Izumi, H.; Shiomi, A.; Iguchi, M.; Adachi, G.

    1996-01-01

    Finely and uniformly ground powders of Sm 2 Fe 17 N x were stabilized by surface-coating with the zinc metal produced from Zn (C 2 H 5 ) 2 . The epoxy resin-bonded magnets produced from the Zn/Sm 2 Fe 17 N x composite powder provided high-performance permanent magnetic characteristics: (BH)max=∼ 176 kJm -3 . (author)

  9. Effects of at-home and in-office bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, M; Kumar, P Anil; Nair, Amal S; Mathew, Shino; Amaladas, Antony Shijoy; Ommen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of at-home and in-office bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal, ceramic, and composite orthodontic brackets and to compare their SBSs. A total of 96 human lower premolar teeth were used for this study. Six teeth were used for scanning electron microscopic study while the remaining ninety were divided into three equal groups. Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups with ten samples each. Three protocols were used. In the at-home bleaching group (n = 30), opalescence non-PF (potassium nitrate and fluoride) bleaching agent (10% carbamide peroxide) was applied onto the teeth daily for 14 days and left for 8 h each day. Teeth in the in-office group (n = 30) were treated twice in consecutive days with Opalescence boost PF (40% hydrogen peroxide). After bleaching, the specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 day before bonding. SBS testing was performed on all teeth using Instron universal testing machine. Analysis of variance indicated a significant difference (P brackets in control group (Ib) and minimum was shown by composite brackets of in-office bleached group (IIIc). The results showed that at-home bleaching did not affect the SBS significantly whereas in-office bleaching reduced SBS of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets significantly. It is preferable to use metal or ceramic brackets than composite brackets for bonding 24 h after bleaching.

  10. Identification of the formation of metal-vinylidene interfacial bonds of alkyne-capped platinum nanoparticles by isotopic labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peiguang; Chen, Limei; Deming, Christopher P; Bonny, Lewis W; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Chen, Shaowei

    2016-10-07

    Stable platinum nanoparticles were prepared by the self-assembly of 1-dodecyne and dodec-1-deuteroyne onto bare platinum colloid surfaces. The nanoparticles exhibited consistent core size and optical properties. FTIR and NMR measurements confirmed the formation of Pt-vinylidene (Pt[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]CH-) interfacial linkages rather than Pt-acetylide (Pt-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]C-) and platinum-hydride (Pt-H) bonds.

  11. Characterization of hot bonding of bi-metal C45/25CrMo4 by plane strain compression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enaim, Mohammed; Langlois, Laurent; Zimmer-Chevret, Sandra; Bigot, Régis; Krumpipe, Pierre

    2018-05-01

    The need to produce multifunctional parts in order to conform to complex specifications becomes crucial in today's industrial context. This is why new processes are under study to develop multi-material parts which can satisfy this kind of requirements. This paper investigates the possibility of producing hot bonding of bi-metal C45/25CrMo4 parts by forging. This manufacturing process is a solid state joining process that involves, simultaneously, the welding and shaping of multi-material part. In this study, the C45/25CrMo4 bimetal was investigated. The forging is conducted at 1100°C and the influence of reduction rate on microstructure and bonding was investigated. The bonding model is inspired from Bay's model. Following this model, two parameters govern the solid-state bonding at the interface between materials: normal contact pressure and surface expansion. The objective is to check the bonding quality under different pressure and surface expansion. To achieve this goal, the plane strain compression test is chosen as the characterization test. Finally, simulations and experiments of this test are compared.

  12. Influence of heat-pretreatments on the microstructural and mechanical properties of galfan-coated metal bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordych, Illia; Rodman, Dmytro; Nürnberger, Florian; Schmidt, Hans Christian; Orive, Alejandro Gonzalez; Homberg, Werner; Grundmeier, Guido; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, heat-treatment assisted bonding of galfan-coated low-carbon steel sheets was investigated. Steel sheets were bonded by cold rolling subsequently to a heat treatment in the temperature range from 400 °C to 550°C. The reduction ratio during cold rolling was varied in the range from 50% to 80%. Such high reduction ratios were achieved by splitting the bonding process into three stages. By employing heat-treatments, the mechanical properties of the bonds were improved. The heat-pretreatment allowed the formation of brittle intermetallic phases that were easily fractured in the rolling gap during the bonding process. Thus, juvenile non-oxidized surfaces were formed, which facilitated the bonding between the steel layers, and thus increased the bond strength. The intermetallic phases were actively formed at temperatures of 450 °C and above; however increasing temperatures resulted in decreasing mechanical properties due to oxidation processes. The local microstructure was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy in order to characterize the contact zone on the micro level with a focus on the formation of intermetallic phases. The mechanical properties were determined in tensile shear tests. Interestingly, it was found that the galfan coating allowed for bonding at room temperature, and the aluminum fraction was primarily responsible for the enhanced oxide formation during the heat-pretreatment.

  13. Photoisomerization Mechanism of Ruthenium Sulfoxide Complexes: Role of the Metal-Centered Excited State in the Bond Rupture and Bond Construction Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Lisheng; Zheng, Lvyin; Li, Xun; Fan, Xiaolin; Zhao, Yi

    2016-09-26

    Phototriggered intramolecular isomerization in a series of ruthenium sulfoxide complexes, [Ru(L)(tpy)(DMSO)](n+) (where tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide; L=2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), n=2; N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen) n=2; picolinate (pic), n=1; acetylacetonate (acac), n=1; oxalate (ox), n=0; malonate (mal), n=0), was investigated theoretically. It is observed that the metal-centered ligand field ((3) MC) state plays an important role in the excited state S→O isomerization of the coordinated DMSO ligand. If the population of (3) MCS state is thermally accessible and no (3) MCO can be populated from this state, photoisomerization will be turned off because the (3) MCS excited state is expected to lead to fast radiationless decay back to the original (1) GSS ground state or photodecomposition along the Ru(2+) -S stretching coordinate. On the contrary, if the population of (3) MCS (or (3) MCO ) state is inaccessible, photoinduced S→O isomerization can proceed adiabatically on the potential energy surface of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited states ((3) MLCTS →(3) MLCTO ). It is hoped that these results can provide valuable information for the excited state isomerization in photochromic d(6) transition-metal complexes, which is both experimentally and intellectually challenging as a field of study. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Covalent bonding and band-gap formation in ternary transition-metal di-aluminides: Al4MnCo and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajci, M.; Hafner, J.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we extend our previous study of the electronic structure of and bonding mechanism in transition-metal (TM) di-aluminides to ternary systems. We have studied the character of the bonding in Al 4 MnCo and related TM di-aluminides in the C11 b (MoSi 2 ) and C54 (TiSi 2 ) crystal structures. A peculiar feature of the electronic structure of these TM di-aluminides is the existence of a semiconducting gap at the Fermi level. In our previous work we predicted a gap in Al 2 TM compounds where the TM atoms have eight valence electrons. Here we demonstrate that the semiconducting gap does not disappear if the TM sites are occupied by two different TMs, provided that the electron-per-atom ratio is conserved. Such a replacement substantially increases the class of possibly semiconducting TM di-aluminides. Substitution for 3d TMs of 4d or 5d TMs enhances the width of the gap. From the analysis of the charge density distribution and the crystal orbital overlap population, we conclude that the bonding between atoms has dominantly covalent character. This is confirmed not only by the enhanced charge density halfway between atoms, but also by the clear bonding-antibonding splitting of the electronic states. If the gaps between split states that correspond to all bonding configurations in the crystal have a common overlap at the Fermi level, the intermetallic compound becomes a semiconductor. However, the results of the total-energy calculations suggest that the existence of a band gap does not necessarily imply a stable structure. Strong covalent bonds can exist also in Al-TM structures where no band gap is observed. (author)

  15. Low-loss integrated electrical surface plasmon source with ultra-smooth metal film fabricated by polymethyl methacrylate ‘bond and peel’ method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjie; Hu, Xiaolong; Zou, Qiushun; Wu, Shaoying; Jin, Chongjun

    2018-06-01

    External light sources are mostly employed to functionalize the plasmonic components, resulting in a bulky footprint. Electrically driven integrated plasmonic devices, combining ultra-compact critical feature sizes with extremely high transmission speeds and low power consumption, can link plasmonics with the present-day electronic world. In an effort to achieve this prospect, suppressing the losses in the plasmonic devices becomes a pressing issue. In this work, we developed a novel polymethyl methacrylate ‘bond and peel’ method to fabricate metal films with sub-nanometer smooth surfaces on semiconductor wafers. Based on this method, we further fabricated a compact plasmonic source containing a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) waveguide with an ultra-smooth metal surface on a GaAs-based light-emitting diode wafer. An increase in propagation length of the SPP mode by a factor of 2.95 was achieved as compared with the conventional device containing a relatively rough metal surface. Numerical calculations further confirmed that the propagation length is comparable to the theoretical prediction on the MIM waveguide with perfectly smooth metal surfaces. This method facilitates low-loss and high-integration of electrically driven plasmonic devices, thus provides an immediate opportunity for the practical application of on-chip integrated plasmonic circuits.

  16. In vivo effects of two acidic soft drinks on shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets with and without resin infiltration treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Shaza M; Enan, Enas T

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the in vivo effects of two acidic soft drinks (Coca-Cola and Sprite) on the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets with and without resin infiltration treatment. In addition, the enamel surface was evaluated, after debonding, using a scanning electron microscope. Sixty noncarious maxillary premolars, scheduled for extraction in 30 orthodontic patients, were used. Patients were randomly divided into two groups according to the soft drink tested (Coca-Cola or Sprite). In each group, application of resin infiltration (Icon. DMG, Hamburg, Germany) was done on one side only before bonding of brackets. Patients were told to rinse their mouth with their respective soft drink at room temperature for 5 minutes, three times a day for 3 months. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine. After shearing test, a scanning electron microscope was used to evaluate enamel erosion. Statistical analysis was performed by twoway analysis of variance followed by the least significant difference test. The Coca-Cola group without resin infiltration showed the lowest resistance to shearing forces. Scanning electron micrographs of both groups after resin application showed a significant improvement compared with results without resin use, as the enamel appeared smoother and less erosive. Pretreatment with the infiltrating resin has proved to result in a significant improvement in shear bond strength, regardless of the type of soft drink consumed.

  17. Electronic and crystal structure, EPR and magnetic investigations of YF{sub 3}:1%RE (RE = Pr, Ho, Er and Tm) and LaF{sub 3}:1%Pr nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talik, E., E-mail: talik@us.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Zajdel, P.; Guzik, A.; Skrzypek, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, ul. Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Lipińska, L.; Michalska, M. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, ul. Wólczyńska 133, 01-919 Warszawa (Poland)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The thermal decomposition method was successfully applied for the first time in order to obtain the good quality nanocrystals of YF{sub 3}:1%RE. • For YF{sub 3}:1%Pr and LaF{sub 3}:1%Pr extra phase PrF{sub 3} was found. • The XPS energy gap is about 10 eV. • Surface contamination can be responsible for the deterioration of the optical properties of the composites. - Abstract: A new chemical synthesis route by a thermal decomposition of nitrates and acetates, preceded by solution displacement reaction, was successfully applied to obtain the YF{sub 3}:1%RE (RE = Pr, Ho, Er and Tm) and LaF{sub 3}:1%Pr nanocrystals. The samples were characterized by the following methods: X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), magnetic susceptibility thermal dependence measurements and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The obtained YF{sub 3}:1%RE (RE = Pr, Ho, Er and Tm) materials crystallized with orthorhombic symmetry, whilst LaF{sub 3}:1%Pr exhibits hexagonal structure. Chemical composition determined by EDX, XPS and magnetic measurements was close to nominal formula. SEM images show the nanometric size of the grains. Surface contamination can be suggested to be responsible for the deterioration of the optical properties of the composites.

  18. Effects of carbonyl bond, metal cluster dissociation, and evaporation rates on predictions of nanotube production in high-pressure carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Carl D.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2003-01-01

    The high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process for producing single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) uses iron pentacarbonyl as the source of iron for catalyzing the Boudouard reaction. Attempts using nickel tetracarbonyl led to no production of SWNTs. This paper discusses simulations at a constant condition of 1300 K and 30 atm in which the chemical rate equations are solved for different reaction schemes. A lumped cluster model is developed to limit the number of species in the models, yet it includes fairly large clusters. Reaction rate coefficients in these schemes are based on bond energies of iron and nickel species and on estimates of chemical rates for formation of SWNTs. SWNT growth is measured by the conformation of CO2. It is shown that the production of CO2 is significantly greater for FeCO because of its lower bond energy as compared with that of NiCO. It is also shown that the dissociation and evaporation rates of atoms from small metal clusters have a significant effect on CO2 production. A high rate of evaporation leads to a smaller number of metal clusters available to catalyze the Boudouard reaction. This suggests that if CO reacts with metal clusters and removes atoms from them by forming MeCO, this has the effect of enhancing the evaporation rate and reducing SWNT production. The study also investigates some other reactions in the model that have a less dramatic influence.

  19. Composite interlayer for diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A ductile interlayer is described, which is useful for transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of metallic articles; the interlayer consisting of a melting point depressant and a plurality of ductile lamellae which are free from carbides, aluminides and borides. The composition and fabrication of the lamellae, and the process for bonding the metallic articles, depend on the composition of the metals to be bonded, and are exemplified in the specification. (U.K.)

  20. Effect of a metal primer on the bond strength of the resin-metal interface Efeito de um primer para metais sobre a força de união da interface metal-resina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Pinheiro de Freitas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength between a metallic alloy (Co-Cr-Mo - Remanium CD and a resin cement (Rely X TM and to evaluate the mode of fracture after testing, forty couples of metallic-alloy disks were melted, regularized, polished, submitted to four thermal cycles (Vacuum, 960ºC, 8 minutes and randomly separated into four groups. Each group received a different type of treatment: Group PSP: Polished with sandpaper 600; Group PCP: Polished with sandpaper 600 and application of the metal primer Alloy Primer (Kuraray; Group JSP: Sandblasted with 100µm aluminum oxide; Group JCP: Sandblasted with 100mm aluminum oxide and treated with a metal Primer. The groups were cemented and stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 36 hours and submitted to the shear bond strength test. The mean and standard deviation (in Kgf/cm² obtained for each group was: PSP 4.0/0.4; PCP 88.9/33.6; JSP 163.2/27.6; JCP 144.5/54.0. After the statistical analysis the authors concluded that: the highest values were obtained for the sandblasted groups (JSP, JCP, regardless of the primer application; the Alloy Primer increased the retention between the Rely X cement and the polished surface of the Co-Cr-Mo alloy, yet its bond strength was not greater than that obtained with sandblasting; all specimens showed adhesive failures in the tested interface.Para avaliar o efeito de diferentes tratamentos superficiais sobre a resistência ao cisalhamento da união entre uma liga metálica (Co-Cr-Mo - Remanium CD e um cimento resinoso (Rely X TM e analisar o tipo de fratura durante a separação dos espécimes, quarenta pares de discos metálicos foram fundidos, regularizados e polidos, submetidos a quatro ciclos térmicos (vácuo, 960ºC, 8 minutos e divididos aleatoriamente em quatro grupos. Cada grupo recebeu um tipo de tratamento: Grupo PSP: Polimento com lixa d'água Nº 600; Grupo PCP: Polimento com lixa 600 e aplicação do

  1. Effects of at-home and in-office bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets to enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rahul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of at-home and in-office bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS of metal, ceramic, and composite orthodontic brackets and to compare their SBSs. Subjects and Methods: A total of 96 human lower premolar teeth were used for this study. Six teeth were used for scanning electron microscopic study while the remaining ninety were divided into three equal groups. Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups with ten samples each. Three protocols were used. In the at-home bleaching group (n = 30, opalescence non-PF (potassium nitrate and fluoride bleaching agent (10% carbamide peroxide was applied onto the teeth daily for 14 days and left for 8 h each day. Teeth in the in-office group (n = 30 were treated twice in consecutive days with Opalescence boost PF (40% hydrogen peroxide. After bleaching, the specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 day before bonding. SBS testing was performed on all teeth using Instron universal testing machine. Results: Analysis of variance indicated a significant difference (P < 0.005 among the groups. Maximum SBS was shown by ceramic brackets in control group (Ib and minimum was shown by composite brackets of in-office bleached group (IIIc. Conclusions: The results showed that at-home bleaching did not affect the SBS significantly whereas in-office bleaching reduced SBS of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets significantly. It is preferable to use metal or ceramic brackets than composite brackets for bonding 24 h after bleaching.

  2. Bone bonding bioactivity of Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys with Ca ions incorporated on their surfaces by simple chemical and heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, A; Takemoto, M; Saito, T; Fujibayashi, S; Neo, M; Yamaguchi, S; Kizuki, T; Matsushita, T; Niinomi, M; Kokubo, T; Nakamura, T

    2011-03-01

    Ti15Zr4Nb4Ta and Ti29Nb13Ta4.6Zr, which do not contain the potentially cytotoxic elements V and Al, represent a new generation of alloys with improved corrosion resistance, mechanical properties, and cytocompatibility. Recently it has become possible for the apatite forming ability of these alloys to be ascertained by treatment with alkali, CaCl2, heat, and water (ACaHW). In order to confirm the actual in vivo bioactivity of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and these alloys after subjecting them to ACaHW treatment at different temperatures, the bone bonding strength of implants made from these materials was evaluated. The failure load between implant and bone was measured for treated and untreated plates at 4, 8, 16, and 26 weeks after implantation in rabbit tibia. The untreated implants showed almost no bonding, whereas all treated implants showed successful bonding by 4 weeks, and the failure load subsequently increased with time. This suggests that a simple and economical ACaHW treatment could successfully be used to impart bone bonding bioactivity to Ti metal and Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys in vivo. In particular, implants heat treated at 700 °C exhibited significantly greater bone bonding strength, as well as augmented in vitro apatite formation, in comparison with those treated at 600 °C. Thus, with this improved bioactive treatment process these advantageous Ti-Zr-Nb-Ta alloys can serve as useful candidates for orthopedic devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Diffusion bonding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of diffusion bonding at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department are briefly discussed, with particular emphasis on the gold/gold or gold/indium joints made between metallized alumina ceramic parts in the vacuum switch tube and the crystal resonator programs. Fixtures which use the differential expansion of dissimilar metals are described and compared to one that uses hydraulic pressure to apply the necessary bonding force

  4. Correlation between catalytic activity and bonding and coordination number of atoms and molecules on transition metal surfaces: theory and experimental evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falicov, L.M.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Correlation between catalytic activity and low-energy local electronic fluctuation in transition metals is proposed. A theory and calculations are presented which indicate that maximum electronic fluctuants take place at high-coordination metal sites. Either (i) atomically rough surfaces that expose to the reactant molecules atoms with large numbers of nonmagnetic or weakly magnetic neighbors in the first or second layer at the surface or (ii) stepped and kinked surfaces are the most active in carrying out structure-sensitive catalytic reactions. The synthesis of ammonia from N 2 and H 2 over iron and rhenium surfaces, 1 H 2 / 2 H 2 exchange over stepped platinum crystal surfaces at low pressures, and the hydrogenolysis (C - C bond breaking) of isobutane at kinked platinum crystal surfaces are presented as experimental evidence in support of the theory

  5. Electronic Effects on Room-Temperature, Gas-Phase C-H Bond Activations by Cluster Oxides and Metal Carbides: The Methane Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Helmut; Shaik, Sason; Li, Jilai

    2017-12-06

    This Perspective discusses a story of one molecule (methane), a few metal-oxide cationic clusters (MOCCs), dopants, metal-carbide cations, oriented-electric fields (OEFs), and a dizzying mechanistic landscape of methane activation! One mechanism is hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), which occurs whenever the MOCC possesses a localized oxyl radical (M-O • ). Whenever the radical is delocalized, e.g., in [MgO] n •+ the HAT barrier increases due to the penalty of radical localization. Adding a dopant (Ga 2 O 3 ) to [MgO] 2 •+ localizes the radical and HAT transpires. Whenever the radical is located on the metal centers as in [Al 2 O 2 ] •+ the mechanism crosses over to proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET), wherein the positive Al center acts as a Lewis acid that coordinates the methane molecule, while one of the bridging oxygen atoms abstracts a proton, and the negatively charged CH 3 moiety relocates to the metal fragment. We provide a diagnostic plot of barriers vs reactants' distortion energies, which allows the chemist to distinguish HAT from PCET. Thus, doping of [MgO] 2 •+ by Al 2 O 3 enables HAT and PCET to compete. Similarly, [ZnO] •+ activates methane by PCET generating many products. Adding a CH 3 CN ligand to form [(CH 3 CN)ZnO] •+ leads to a single HAT product. The CH 3 CN dipole acts as an OEF that switches off PCET. [MC] + cations (M = Au, Cu) act by different mechanisms, dictated by the M + -C bond covalence. For example, Cu + , which bonds the carbon atom mostly electrostatically, performs coupling of C to methane to yield ethylene, in a single almost barrier-free step, with an unprecedented atomic choreography catalyzed by the OEF of Cu + .

  6. Components of the Bond Energy in Polar Diatomic Molecules, Radicals, and Ions Formed by Group-1 and Group-2 Metal Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haoyu; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-07-14

    Although many transition metal complexes are known to have high multireference character, the multireference character of main-group closed-shell singlet diatomic molecules like BeF, CaO, and MgO has been less studied. However, many group-1 and group-2 diatomic molecules do have multireference character, and they provide informative systems for studying multireference character because they are simpler than transition metal compounds. The goal of the present work is to understand these multireference systems better so that, ultimately, we can apply what we learn to more complicated multireference systems and to the design of new exchange-correlation functionals for treating multireference systems more adequately. Fourteen main-group diatomic molecules and one triatomic molecule (including radicals, cations, and anions, as well as neutral closed-shell species) have been studied for this article. Eight of these molecules contain a group-1 element, and six contain a group-2 element. Seven of these molecules are multireference systems, and eight of them are single-reference systems. Fifty-three exchange-correlation functionals of 11 types [local spin-density approximation (LSDA), generalized gradient approximation (GGA), nonseparable gradient approximation (NGA), global-hybrid GGA, meta-GGA, meta-NGA, global-hybrid meta GGA, range-separated hybrid GGA, range-separated hybrid meta-GGA, range-separated hybrid meta-NGA, and DFT augmented with molecular mechanics damped dispersion (DFT-D)] and the Hartree-Fock method have been applied to calculate the bond distance, bond dissociation energy (BDE), and dipole moment of these molecules. All of the calculations are converged to a stable solution by allowing the symmetry of the Slater determinant to be broken. A reliable functional should not only predict an accurate BDE but also predict accurate components of the BDE, so each bond dissociation energy has been decomposed into ionization potential (IP) of the electropositive

  7. Metallic and/or oxygen ion implantation into AlN ceramics as a method of preparation for its direct bonding with copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlak, M.; Borkowska, K.; Olesinska, W.; Kalinski, D.; Piekoszewski, J.; Werner, Z.; Jagielski, J.; Sartowska, B.

    2006-01-01

    Direct bonding (DB) process is recently getting an increasing interest as a method for producing high quality joints between aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics and copper. The metallic ions were implanted using an MEVVA type TITAN implanter with unseparated beam. Oxygen ions were implanted using a semi-industrial ion implanter without mass separation equipped with a gaseous ion source. The substrate temperature did not exceed 200 o C. Ions were implanted at two acceleration voltages, i.e. 15 and 70 kV. The fluence range was between 1·E16 and 1·E18 cm -2 . After implantation, some of the samples were characterized by the Rutherford backscattering (RBS) method. In conclusion: (a) The investigations performed in the present work confirm an assumption that ion implantation is a very promising technique as a pretreatment of AlN ceramics for the formation of the joints with copper in direct bonding process. (b) It has been shown that titanium implantation gives the best results in comparison to other metals examined (Fe, Cr, Cu) but also in comparison to double Ti+O and O+Ti implantations

  8. Pressure-induced structural transition and thermodynamic properties of RhN2 and the effect of metallic bonding on its hardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jun; Kuang Xiao-Yu; Wang Zhen-Hua; Huang Xiao-Fen

    2012-01-01

    The elastic constant, structural phase transition, and effect of metallic bonding on the hardness of RhN 2 under high pressure are investigated through the first-principles calculation by means of the pseudopotential plane-wave method. Three structures are chosen to investigate for RhN 2 , namely, simple hexagonal P6/mmm (denoted as SH), orthorhombic Pnnm (marcasite), and simple tetragonal P4/mbm (denoted as ST). Our calculations show that the SH phase is energetically more stable than the other two phases at zero pressure. On the basis of the third-order Birch—Murnaghan equation of states, we find that the phase transition pressures from an SH to a marcasite structure and from a marcasite to an ST structure are 1.09 GPa and 354.57 GPa, respectively. Elastic constants, formation enthalpies, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Debye temperature of RhN 2 are derived. The calculated values are, generally speaking, in good agreement with the previous theoretical results. Meanwhile, it is found that the pressure has an important influence on physical properties. Moreover, the effect of metallic bonding on the hardness of RhN 2 is investigated. This is a quantitative investigation on the structural properties of RhN 2 , and it still awaits experimental confirmation. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  9. On the Dehydrocoupling of Alkenylacetylenes Mediated by Various Samarocene Complexes: A Charming Story of Metal Cooperativity Revealing a Novel Dual Metal σ-Bond Metathesis Type of Mechanism (DM|σ-BM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos E. Kefalidis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevailing reductive chemistry of Sm(II has been accessed and explored mostly by the use of samarocene precursors. The highly reducing character of these congeners, along with their Lewis acidity and predominantly ionic bonding, allows for the relatively facile activation of C–H bonds, as well as peculiar transformations of unsaturated substrates (e.g., C–C couplings. Among other important C–C coupling reactions, the reaction of phenylacetylene with different mono- or bimetallic samarocene complexes affords trienediyl complexes of the type {[(C5Me52Sm]2(µ-η2:η2-PhC4Ph}. In contrast, when t-butylacetylene is used, uncoupled monomers of the type (C5Me52Sm(C≡C–tBu were obtained. Although this type of reactivity may appear to be simple, the mechanism underlying these transformations is complex. This conclusion is drawn from the density functional theory (DFT mechanistic studies presented herein. The operating mechanistic paths consist of: (i the oxidation of each samarium center and the concomitant double reduction of the alkyne to afford a binuclear intermediate; (ii the C–H scission of the acetylinic bond that lies in between the two metals; (iii a dual metal σ-bond metathesis (DM|σ-SBM process that releases H2; and eventually (iv the C–C coupling of the two bridged μ-alkynides to give the final bimetallic trienediyl complexes. For the latter mechanistic route, the experimentally used phenylacetylene was considered first as well as the aliphatic hex-1-yne. More interestingly, we shed light into the formation of the mono(alkynide complex, being the final experimental product of the reaction with t-butylacetylene.

  10. Laser-Direct Writing of Silver Metal Electrodes on Transparent Flexible Substrates with High-Bonding Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiping; Bai, Shi; Ma, Ying; Ma, Delong; Hou, Tingxiu; Shi, Xiaomin; Hu, Anming

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate a novel approach to rapidly fabricate conductive silver electrodes on transparent flexible substrates with high-bonding strength by laser-direct writing. A new type of silver ink composed of silver nitrate, sodium citrate, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was prepared in this work. The role of PVP was elucidated for improving the quality of silver electrodes. Silver nanoparticles and sintered microstructures were simultaneously synthesized and patterned on a substrate using a focused 405 nm continuous wave laser. The writing was completed through the transparent flexible substrate with a programmed 2D scanning sample stage. Silver electrodes fabricated by this approach exhibit a remarkable bonding strength, which can withstand an adhesive tape test at least 50 times. After a 1500 time bending test, the resistance only increased 5.2%. With laser-induced in-situ synthesis, sintering, and simultaneous patterning of silver nanoparticles, this technology is promising for the facile fabrication of conducting electronic devices on flexible substrates.

  11. Research of dependence of ultimate strength of the bond border in solid state of dissimilar metals from their plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borts, B.V.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical model, describing the joining of dissimilar materials in solid state is presented. The model takes into account plastic deformation of materials at the joining temperature, and also shearing forces, appearing while rolling the material and playing determinant role in the process of materials solid phase joining. Experimental results of X-ray microanalysis, metallography, tension tests, micro-hardness and nano-hardness of samples bonding border are presented, which confirms the relevancy of the proposed model.

  12. Determination of metal-hydrogen bond dissociation energies by the deprotonation of transition metal hydride ions: application to MnH +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Amy E.; Beauchamp, J. L.

    1981-03-01

    ICR trapped ion techniques are used to examine the kinetics of proton transfer from MnH + (formed as a fragment ion from HMn (CO) 5 by electron impact) to bases of varying strength. Deprotonation is rapid with bases whose proton affinity exceeds 196±3 kcal mol -1. This value for PA (Mn) yields the homolytic bond dissociation energy D0(Mn +-H) = 53±5 kcal mol -1.

  13. Actinide-pnictide (An-Pn) bonds spanning non-metal, metalloid, and metal combinations (An=U, Th; Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rookes, Thomas M.; Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Gardner, Benedict M.; Wooles, Ashley J.; Gregson, Matthew; Tuna, Floriana; Liddle, Stephen T. [School of Chemistry, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Balazs, Gabor; Scheer, Manfred [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Regensburg (Germany)

    2018-01-26

    The synthesis and characterisation is presented of the compounds [An(Tren{sup DMBS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] and [An(Tren{sup TIPS}){Pn(SiMe_3)_2}] [Tren{sup DMBS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiMe{sub 2}Bu{sup t}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb, Bi; An=Th, Pn=P, As; Tren{sup TIPS}=N(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}NSiPr{sup i}{sub 3}){sub 3}, An=U, Pn=P, As, Sb; An=Th, Pn=P, As, Sb]. The U-Sb and Th-Sb moieties are unprecedented examples of any kind of An-Sb molecular bond, and the U-Bi bond is the first two-centre-two-electron (2c-2e) one. The Th-Bi combination was too unstable to isolate, underscoring the fragility of these linkages. However, the U-Bi complex is the heaviest 2c-2e pairing of two elements involving an actinide on a macroscopic scale under ambient conditions, and this is exceeded only by An-An pairings prepared under cryogenic matrix isolation conditions. Thermolysis and photolysis experiments suggest that the U-Pn bonds degrade by homolytic bond cleavage, whereas the more redox-robust thorium compounds engage in an acid-base/dehydrocoupling route. (copyright 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA.)

  14. Metal cation dependence of interactions with amino acids: bond dissociation energies of Rb(+) and Cs(+) to the acidic amino acids and their amide derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentrout, P B; Yang, Bo; Rodgers, M T

    2014-04-24

    Metal cation-amino acid interactions are key components controlling the secondary structure and biological function of proteins, enzymes, and macromolecular complexes comprising these species. Determination of pairwise interactions of alkali metal cations with amino acids provides a thermodynamic vocabulary that begins to quantify these fundamental processes. In the present work, we expand a systematic study of such interactions by examining rubidium and cesium cations binding with the acidic amino acids (AA), aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu), and their amide derivatives, asparagine (Asn) and glutamine (Gln). These eight complexes are formed using electrospray ionization and their bond dissociation energies (BDEs) are determined experimentally using threshold collision-induced dissociation with xenon in a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer. Analyses of the energy-dependent cross sections include consideration of unimolecular decay rates, internal energy of the reactant ions, and multiple ion-neutral collisions. Quantum chemical calculations are conducted at the B3LYP, MP2(full), and M06 levels of theory using def2-TZVPPD basis sets, with results showing reasonable agreement with experiment. At 0 and 298 K, most levels of theory predict that the ground-state conformers for M(+)(Asp) and M(+)(Asn) involve tridentate binding of the metal cation to the backbone carbonyl, amino, and side-chain carbonyl groups, although tridentate binding to the carboxylic acid group and side-chain carbonyl is competitive for M(+)(Asn). For the two longer side-chain amino acids, Glu and Gln, multiple structures are competitive. A comparison of these results to those for the smaller alkali cations, Na(+) and K(+), provides insight into the trends in binding energies associated with the molecular polarizability and dipole moment of the side chain. For all four metal cations, the BDEs are inversely correlated with the size of the metal cation and follow the order Asp < Glu

  15. Comparative study on the tensile bond strength and marginal fit of complete veneer cast metal crowns using various luting agents: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Devi Parameswari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Several commercially available luting agents are used to cement the dental restorations such as intra-coronal, extra-coronal, and fixed partial dentures. Tensile bond strength (TBS and accurate marginal fit are the essential factors to determine the good clinical results in fixed prosthesis. The retentivity of the luting cements is assessed by their adhesive capacity over the tooth surface and metal surface. Generally, the adhesive ability has been evaluated with in vitro testing, with tensile bond tests. The failure of fixed prosthesis may be happened as a result of incomplete seating during cementation. Most research on cementation of crowns relates seating failure to the thickness of the cement film. Materials and Methods: The study is divided into four groups with 10 samples for each of the luting cement taken up for testing TBS and four groups with 5 samples for each luting agent chosen for assessing marginal fit. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed. Results: In this in vitro study, the TBS of luting cements, and marginal fit in relation to luting cements were tested by using appropriate testing devices. The TBS of cement is measured using universal testing machine, and the results are tabulated. The marginal gap that exists between the margin of the cast metal crown, and the finish line is measured using travelling microscope before and after cementation. The difference between these two values gives the discrepancy that is due to the film thickness of cement used for luting the restoration. Summary and Conclusion: The TBS value of zinc phosphate cement and glass ionomer cement were found to be almost same. The chemical adhesiveness of the glass ionomer with calcium ions of enamel and dentin may be the attributed reason (ionic bonding. In this study, the polycarboxylate is the one that showed low TBS, and it may be attributed to the weakness of the cement due to reduced film thickness, though this cement has

  16. Silica chemically bonded N-propyl kriptofix 21 and 22 with immobilized palladium nanoparticles for solid phase extraction and preconcentration of some metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang, E-mail: m_ghaedi@mail.yu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj, 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, Khodabakhsh, E-mail: niknam@pgu.ac.ir [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Sciences, Persian Gulf University, Bushehr, 75169 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zamani, Saeed; Abasi Larki, Habib [Chemistry Department, Islamic Azad University, Omidiyeh Branch, Omidiyeh (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roosta, Mostafa [Chemistry Department, Yasouj University, Yasouj, 75914-353 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soylak, Mustafa [Chemistry Department, University of Erciyes, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2013-08-01

    Silica gel chemically bonded N-propyl kriptofix 21 (SBNPK 21) and N-propyl kriptofix 22 (SBNPK 22) and subsequently immobilized with palladium nanoparticles (PNP-SBNPK 21 and PNP-SBNPK 22) to produce two new complexing lipophilic materials. Then these novel sorbents were applied for the enrichment of some metal ions and their subsequent determination by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). The influences of the variables including pH, amount of solid phase, sample flow rate, eluent conditions and sample volume on the metal ion recoveries were investigated. The detection limit of proposed method was in the interval 2.1–2.3 and 1.7–2.8 ng mL{sup −1} for PNP-SBNPK 21 and PNP-SBNPK 22 respectively, while the preconcentration factor was 80 for two sorbents. The relative standard deviations of recoveries were between 1.23–1.31 and 1.28–1.49 for PNP-SBNPK 21 and PNP-SBNPK 22 respectively. The method has high sorption-preconcentration efficiency even in the presence of various interfering ions. Due to the reasonable selectivity of proposed method, the relative standard deviation of recoveries of all understudied metal ions in some complicated matrices was less than 3.0%. Highlights: • Highly selective sorbents for solid phase extraction were synthesized. • The method has been successfully applied for the determination of trace metals ions. • Excellent properties of the sorbent have been illustrated in detail.

  17. Atomic mobility in liquid and fcc Al-Si-Mg-RE (RE = Ce, Sc) alloys and its application to the simulation of solidification processes in RE-containing A357 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Zhao; Zhang, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    This paper first provides a critical review of experimental and theoretically-predicted diffusivities in both liquid and fcc Al-Si-Mg-RE (RE = Ce, Sc) alloys as-reported by previous researchers. The modified Sutherland equation is then employed to predict self- and impurity diffusivities in Al-Si-Mg-RE melts. The self-diffusivity of metastable fcc Sc is evaluated via the first-principles computed activation energy and semi-empirical relations. Based on the critically-reviewed and presently evaluated diffusivity information, atomic mobility descriptions for liquid and fcc phases in the Al-Si-Mg-RE systems are established by means of the Diffusion-Controlled TRAnsformation (DICTRA) software package. Comprehensive comparisons show that most of the measured and theoretically-predicted diffusivities can be reasonably reproduced by the present atomic mobility descriptions. The atomic mobility descriptions for liquid and fcc Al-Si-Mg-RE alloys are further validated by comparing the model-predicted differential scanning calorimetry curves for RE-containing A357 alloys during solidification against experimental data. Detailed analysis of the curves and microstructures in RE-free and RE-containing A357 alloys indicates that both Ce and Sc can serve as the grain refiner for A357 alloys, and that the grain refinement efficiency of Sc is much higher.

  18. Atomic mobility in liquid and fcc Al-Si-Mg-RE (RE = Ce, Sc) alloys and its application to the simulation of solidification processes in RE-containing A357 alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zhao; Zhang, Lijun [Central South Univ., Changsha (China). State Key Lab of Powder Metallurgy; Tang, Ying [Thermo-Calc Software AB, Solna (Sweden)

    2017-06-15

    This paper first provides a critical review of experimental and theoretically-predicted diffusivities in both liquid and fcc Al-Si-Mg-RE (RE = Ce, Sc) alloys as-reported by previous researchers. The modified Sutherland equation is then employed to predict self- and impurity diffusivities in Al-Si-Mg-RE melts. The self-diffusivity of metastable fcc Sc is evaluated via the first-principles computed activation energy and semi-empirical relations. Based on the critically-reviewed and presently evaluated diffusivity information, atomic mobility descriptions for liquid and fcc phases in the Al-Si-Mg-RE systems are established by means of the Diffusion-Controlled TRAnsformation (DICTRA) software package. Comprehensive comparisons show that most of the measured and theoretically-predicted diffusivities can be reasonably reproduced by the present atomic mobility descriptions. The atomic mobility descriptions for liquid and fcc Al-Si-Mg-RE alloys are further validated by comparing the model-predicted differential scanning calorimetry curves for RE-containing A357 alloys during solidification against experimental data. Detailed analysis of the curves and microstructures in RE-free and RE-containing A357 alloys indicates that both Ce and Sc can serve as the grain refiner for A357 alloys, and that the grain refinement efficiency of Sc is much higher.

  19. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  20. Accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method for non-covalent bond dissociation enthalpies from coinage metal cation complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Minenkov, Yury

    2015-08-27

    The performance of the domain based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method has been tested to reproduce the experimental gas phase ligand dissociation enthalpy in a series of Cu+, Ag+ and Au+ complexes. For 33 Cu+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies all-electron calculations with the same method result in MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol, although a MSE of 1.4 kcal/mol indicates systematic underestimation of the experimental values. Inclusion of scalar relativistic effects for Cu either via effective core potential (ECP) or Douglass-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian, reduces the MUE below 1.7 kcal/mol and the MSE to -1.0 kcal/mol. For 24 Ag+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) method results in a mean unsigned error (MUE) below 2.1 kcal/mol and vanishing mean signed error (MSE). For 15 Au+ - non-covalent ligand dissociation enthalpies the DLPNO-CCSD(T) methods provides larger MUE and MSE, equal to 3.2 and 1.7 kcal/mol, which might be related to poor precision of the experimental measurements. Overall, for the combined dataset of 72 coinage metal ion complexes DLPNO-CCSD(T) results in a MUE below 2.2 kcal/mol and an almost vanishing MSE. As for a comparison with computationally cheaper density functional theory (DFT) methods, the routinely used M06 functional results in MUE and MSE equal to 3.6 and -1.7 kca/mol. Results converge already at CC-PVTZ quality basis set, making highly accurate DLPNO-CCSD(T) estimates to be affordable for routine calculations (single-point) on large transition metal complexes of > 100 atoms.

  1. Resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes metálicos utilizando sistema adesivo autocondicionante Shear bond strength evaluation of metallic brackets using self-etching system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Aquino Melgaço

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento de braquetes metálicos colados com sistema autocondicionante utilizado imediatamente e após 2, 5 e 9 dias depois da ativação e armazenagem. MÉTODOS: utilizaram-se 64 dentes bovinos divididos igualmente em quatro grupos e devidamente preparados para receber a colagem dos braquetes. Em T1, realizou-se a ativação de 7 blisters de adesivos autocondicionantes (de acordo com as normas do fabricante e procedeu-se à colagem imediata apenas dos braquetes do grupo I. Os adesivos ativados foram, então, armazenados à temperatura de 4ºC e reutilizados em períodos de 2 dias (T2, 5 dias (T3 e 9 dias (T4 para a colagem dos braquetes dos grupos II, III e IV, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: não se observou diferença estatística quando comparados os valores médios de tensão para resistência ao cisalhamento entre os grupos I, II e III. Entretanto, diferença estatística foi encontrada quando esses valores foram comparados aos do grupo IV. CONCLUSÃO: o armazenamento do adesivo autocondicionante depois de ativado, à temperatura média de 4ºC, por até 5 dias, parece não afetar os resultados quanto às tensões de resistência ao cisalhamento; novos estudos são necessários para avaliação das demais características do material quando de sua utilização por período de tempo prolongado após sua ativação.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the shear bond strength of metallic brackets using the self-etching system after its activation and storage for 2, 5 and 9 day periods. METHODS: A total of 64 bovine teeth were divided in four groups and prepared to receive the brackets. Initially, seven self-etching primer blisters were activated and used to bond the brackets of group I. The blisters were store at a constant temperature of 4ºC for 2, 5 and 9 days and used to bond the brackets of groups II, III and IV, respectively. RESULTS: No statistic difference was found in shear bond strength comparing groups I, II

  2. Effect of different surface treatments and retainer designs on the retention of posterior Pd-Ag porcelain-fused-to-metal resin-bonded fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiwen; Zhang, Yixin; Zhou, Jinru; Chen, Chenfeng; Zhu, Zhimin; Li, Lei

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adhesive property of palladium-silver alloy (Pd-Ag) and the simulated clinical performance of Pd-Ag porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM), resin-bonded, fixed partial dentures (RBFPDs). A total of 40 Pd-Ag discs (diameter=5 mm) were prepared and divided into the following four groups (n=10): a) No sandblasting, used as a control; and b, 50 µm; c, 110 µm; and d, 250 µm aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) particles, respectively. Another 50 discs were pre-sandblasted and divided into five groups (n=10) subjected to different treatments: e) Sandblasting, used as a control; f) silane; g) alloy primer; h) silica coating + silane and i) silica coating + alloy primer. All 90 discs were bonded to enamel with Panavia F 2.0 and then subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing. The fracture surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Next, 40 missing maxillary second premolar models were restored with one of the four following RBFPD designs (n=10): I) A premolar occlusal bar combined with molar double rests (MDR); II) both occlusal bars with a wing (OBB); III) a premolar occlusal bar combined with a molar dental band (MDB); and IV) two single rests adjacent to the edentulous space with a wing (SRB) used as a control. All specimens were aged with thermal cycling and mechanical loading. Subsequently, they were loaded until broken. The data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance. Al 2 O 3 (250 µm) abrasion provided the highest SBS (P<0.05). The alloy primer and silica + silane exhibited increased SBS. Furthermore, fracture analysis revealed that the failure mode varied among the different treatments. Whereas MDB exhibited the highest retention (P<0.05), that of OBB was greater than that of MDR (P<0.05), and the control exhibited the lowest retention. Abrasion with Al 2 O 3 (250 µm) effectively increased the adhesive property of Pd-Ag. Additionally, treatment with the alloy primer and silica coating + silane was able to

  3. Bond Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  4. Pillared-layer microporous metal-organic frameworks constructed by robust hydrogen bonds. Synthesis, characterization, and magnetic and adsorption properties of 2,2'-biimidazole and carboxylate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bing-Bing; Weng, Yan-Qin; Mao, Zong-Wan; Lam, Chi-Keung; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ye, Bao-Hui

    2005-11-28

    Two new isostructural complexes [M(H2biim)3][M(btc)(Hbiim)].2H2O (M = Co, (1); M = Ni, (2)) (btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate; H2biim = 2,2'-biimidazole) have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. They present a unique structure consisting of two distinct units: the monomeric cations [M(H2biim)3]2+ and the two-dimensional (2D) anionic polymer [M(Hbiim)(btc)]2-. In the anionic moiety, the Hbiim- monoanion is simultaneously coordinated to one metal atom in a bidentate mode and further to another metal atom in a monodentate mode. The imidazolate groups bridge the two adjacent metal ions into a helical chain which is further arranged in left- and right-handed manners. These chains are bridged by btc ligands into a 2D brick wall structure. The most interesting aspect is that the [M(H2biim)3]2+ cations act as pillars and link the anionic layers via robust heteromeric hydrogen-bonded synthons (9) and (7) formed by the uncoordinated oxygen atoms of carboxylate groups and the H2biim ligands, resulting in a microporous metal-organic framework with one-dimensional (1D) channels (ca. 11.85 angstroms x 11.85 angstroms for 1 and 11.43 angstroms x 11.43 angstroms for 2). Magnetic properties of these two complexes have also been studied in the temperature range of 2-300 K, and their magnetic susceptibilities obey the Curie-Weiss law in the temperature range of 20-300 K (for 1) and 2-300 K (for 2), respectively, showing anti-ferromagnetic coupling through imidazolate bridging. Taking into consideration the Heisenberg infinite chain model as well as the possibility of chain-to-chain and chain-to-cation interactions, the anti-ferromagnetic exchange of 2 is analyzed via a correction for the molecular field, giving the values of g(cat) = 2.296, g(Ni) = 2.564, J = -13.30 cm(-1), and zJ' = -0.017 cm(-1). The microporous frameworks are stable at ca. 350 degrees C. They do not collapse after removal of the guest water molecules in the channels, and they

  5. Strength of Al and Al-Mg/alumina bonds prepared using ultrahigh vacuum diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.E.; Campbell, G.H.; Wien, W.L.; Stoner, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    The authors have measured the cross-breaking strength of Al and Al-Mg alloys bonded with alumina. Diffusion bonding of Al and Al-Mg alloys requires significantly more bonding time than previously thought to obtain complete bonding. In contrast to previous diffusion bonding studies, fracture morphologies are similar to those obtained in bonds formed by liquid phase reaction; i.e., bonds are as strong or stronger than the ceramic; and fracture tends to propagate in the metal for pure Al and near the interface in the ceramic for the alloys. There are indications that the fracture morphology depends on Mg content and therefore on plasticity in the metal

  6. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B 3 H 8 ; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds

  7. Temperature-dependent transitions between normal and inverse isotope effects pertaining to the interaction of H-H and C-H bonds with transition metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Gerard

    2009-02-17

    Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) serve as versatile tools to infer details about reaction mechanisms and the nature of transition states, while equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) associated with the site preferences of hydrogen and deuterium enable researchers to study aspects of molecular structure. Researchers typically interpret primary deuterium isotope effects based on two simple guidelines: (i) the KIE for an elementary reaction is normal (k(H)/k(D) > 1) and (ii) the EIE is dictated by deuterium preferring to be located in the site corresponding to the highest frequency oscillator. In this Account, we evaluate the applicability of these rules to the interactions of H-H and C-H bonds with a transition metal center. Significantly, experimental and computational studies question the predictability of primary EIEs in these systems based on the notion that deuterium prefers to occupy the highest frequency oscillator. In particular, the EIEs for (i) formation of sigma-complexes by coordination of H-H and C-H bonds and (ii) oxidative addition of dihydrogen exhibit unusual temperature dependencies, such that the same system may demonstrate both normal (i.e., K(H)/K(D) > 1) and inverse (i.e., K(H)/K(D) ZPE (where SYM is the symmetry factor, MMI is the mass-moment of inertia term, EXC is the excitation term, and ZPE is the zero-point energy term), and the distinctive temperature profile results from the inverse ZPE (enthalpy) and normal [SYM x MMI x EXC] (entropy) components opposing each other and having different temperature dependencies. At low temperatures, the ZPE component dominates and the EIE is inverse, while at high temperatures, the [SYM x MMI x EXC] component dominates and the EIE is normal. The inverse nature of the ZPE term is a consequence of the rotational and translational degrees of freedom of RH (R = H, CH(3)) becoming low-energy isotopically sensitive vibrations in the product, while the normal nature of the [SYM x MMI x EXC] component

  8. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  9. Spin-Polarization-Induced Preedge Transitions in the Sulfur K-Edge XAS Spectra of Open-Shell Transition-Metal Sulfates: Spectroscopic Validation of σ-Bond Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Patrick; Szilagyi, Robert K; Gramlich, Volker; Hsu, Hua-Fen; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O

    2017-02-06

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectra of the monodentate sulfate complexes [M II (itao)(SO 4 )(H 2 O) 0,1 ] (M = Co, Ni, Cu) and [Cu(Me 6 tren)(SO 4 )] exhibit well-defined preedge transitions at 2479.4, 2479.9, 2478.4, and 2477.7 eV, respectively, despite having no direct metal-sulfur bond, while the XAS preedge of [Zn(itao)(SO 4 )] is featureless. The sulfur K-edge XAS of [Cu(itao)(SO 4 )] but not of [Cu(Me 6 tren)(SO 4 )] uniquely exhibits a weak transition at 2472.1 eV, an extraordinary 8.7 eV below the first inflection of the rising K-edge. Preedge transitions also appear in the sulfur K-edge XAS of crystalline [M II (SO 4 )(H 2 O)] (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu, but not Zn) and in sulfates of higher-valent early transition metals. Ground-state density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) calculations show that charge transfer from coordinated sulfate to paramagnetic late transition metals produces spin polarization that differentially mixes the spin-up (α) and spin-down (β) spin orbitals of the sulfate ligand, inducing negative spin density at the sulfate sulfur. Ground-state DFT calculations show that sulfur 3p character then mixes into metal 4s and 4p valence orbitals and various combinations of ligand antibonding orbitals, producing measurable sulfur XAS transitions. TDDFT calculations confirm the presence of XAS preedge features 0.5-2 eV below the rising sulfur K-edge energy. The 2472.1 eV feature arises when orbitals at lower energy than the frontier occupied orbitals with S 3p character mix with the copper(II) electron hole. Transmission of spin polarization and thus of radical character through several bonds between the sulfur and electron hole provides a new mechanism for the counterintuitive appearance of preedge transitions in the XAS spectra of transition-metal oxoanion ligands in the absence of any direct metal-absorber bond. The 2472.1 eV transition is evidence for further radicalization from copper(II), which

  10. Cupriphication of gold to sensitize d10–d10 metal–metal bonds and near-unity phosphorescence quantum yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, Rossana; Ghimire, Mukunda M.; Otten, Brooke M.; Ricci, Simone; McDougald, Roy N.; Almotawa, Ruaa M.; Alhmoud, Dieaa; Ivy, Joshua F.; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Daniels, Lee M.; Burini, Alfredo; Omary, Mohammad A.

    2017-01-01

    Outer-shell s0/p0 orbital mixing with d10 orbitals and symmetry reduction upon cupriphication of cyclic trinuclear trigonal-planar gold(I) complexes are found to sensitize ground-state Cu(I)–Au(I) covalent bonds and near-unity phosphorescence quantum yields. Heterobimetallic Au4Cu2 {[Au4(μ-C2,N3-EtIm)4Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (4a)}, Au2Cu {[Au2(μ-C2,N3-BzIm)2Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)], (1) and [Au2(μ-C2,N3-MeIm)2Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)], (3a)}, AuCu2 {[Au(μ-C2,N3-MeIm)Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (3b) and [Au(μ-C2,N3-EtIm)Cu2(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)2], (4b)} and stacked Au3/Cu3 {[Au(μ-C2,N3-BzIm)]3[Cu(µ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)]3, (2)} form upon reacting Au3 {[Au(μ-C2,N3-(N-R)Im)]3 ((N-R)Im = imidazolate; R = benzyl/methyl/ethyl = BzIm/MeIm/EtIm)} with Cu3 {[Cu(μ-3,5-(CF3)2Pz)]3 (3,5-(CF3)2Pz = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)pyrazolate)}. The crystal structures of 1 and 3a reveal stair-step infinite chains whereby adjacent dimer-of-trimer units are noncovalently packed via two Au(I)⋯Cu(I) metallophilic interactions, whereas 4a exhibits a hexanuclear cluster structure wherein two monomer-of-trimer units are linked by a genuine d10–d10 polar-covalent bond with ligand-unassisted Cu(I)–Au(I) distances of 2.8750(8) Å each—the shortest such an intermolecular distance ever reported between any two d10 centers so as to deem it a “metal–metal bond” vis-à-vis “metallophilic interaction.” Density-functional calculations estimate 35–43 kcal/mol binding energy, akin to typical M–M single-bond energies. Congruently, FTIR spectra of 4a show multiple far-IR bands within 65–200 cm−1, assignable to vCu-Au as validated by both the Harvey–Gray method of crystallographic-distance-to-force-constant correlation and dispersive density functional theory computations. Notably, the heterobimetallic complexes herein exhibit photophysical properties that are favorable to those for their homometallic congeners, due to threefold-to-twofold symmetry reduction, resulting in cuprophilic

  11. Carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory examination of metal-carbon bonding in metallocene dichlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minasian, Stefan G; Keith, Jason M; Batista, Enrique R; Boland, Kevin S; Kozimor, Stosh A; Martin, Richard L; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vernon, Louis J

    2013-10-02

    Metal-carbon covalence in (C5H5)2MCl2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) has been evaluated using carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as well as ground-state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT and TDDFT). Differences in orbital mixing were determined experimentally using transmission XAS of thin crystalline material with a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM). Moving down the periodic table (Ti to Hf) has a marked effect on the experimental transition intensities associated with the low-lying antibonding 1a1* and 1b2* orbitals. The peak intensities, which are directly related to the M-(C5H5) orbital mixing coefficients, increase from 0.08(1) and 0.26(3) for (C5H5)2TiCl2 to 0.31(3) and 0.75(8) for (C5H5)2ZrCl2, and finally to 0.54(5) and 0.83(8) for (C5H5)2HfCl2. The experimental trend toward increased peak intensity for transitions associated with 1a1* and 1b2* orbitals agrees with the calculated TDDFT oscillator strengths [0.10 and 0.21, (C5H5)2TiCl2; 0.21 and 0.73, (C5H5)2ZrCl2; 0.35 and 0.69, (C5H5)2HfCl2] and with the amount of C 2p character obtained from the Mulliken populations for the antibonding 1a1* and 1b2* orbitals [8.2 and 23.4%, (C5H5)2TiCl2; 15.3 and 39.7%, (C5H5)2ZrCl2; 20.1 and 50.9%, (C5H5)2HfCl2]. The excellent agreement between experiment, theory, and recent Cl K-edge XAS and DFT measurements shows that C 2p orbital mixing is enhanced for the diffuse Hf (5d) and Zr (4d) atomic orbitals in relation to the more localized Ti (3d) orbitals. These results provide insight into how changes in M-Cl orbital mixing within the metallocene wedge are correlated with periodic trends in covalent bonding between the metal and the cyclopentadienide ancillary ligands.

  12. Water-Stable Metal-Organic Framework with Three Hydrogen-Bond Acceptors: Versatile Theoretical and Experimental Insights into Adsorption Ability and Thermo-Hydrolytic Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roztocki, Kornel; Lupa, Magdalena; Sławek, Andrzej; Makowski, Wacław; Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan; Matoga, Dariusz

    2018-03-19

    A new microporous cadmium metal-organic framework was synthesized both mechanochemically and in solution by using a sulfonyl-functionalized dicarboxylate linker and an acylhydrazone colinker. The three-dimensional framework is highly stable upon heating to 300 °C as well as in aqueous solutions at elevated temperatures or acidic conditions. The thermally activated material exhibits steep water vapor uptake at low relative pressures at 298 K and excellent recyclability up to 260 °C as confirmed by both quasi-equilibrated temperature-programmed desorption and adsorption (QE-TPDA) method as well as adsorption isotherm measurements. Reversible isotherms and hysteretic isobars recorded for the desorption-adsorption cycles indicate the maximum uptake of 0.19 g/g (at 298 K, up to p/p 0 = 1) or 0.18 g/g (at 1 bar, within 295-375 K range), respectively. The experimental isosteric heat of adsorption (48.9 kJ/mol) indicates noncoordinative interactions of water molecules with the framework. Exchange of the solvent molecules in the as-made material with water, performed in the single-crystal to single-crystal manner, allows direct comparison of both X-ray crystal structures. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction for the water-loaded framework demonstrates the orientation of water clusters in the framework cavities and reveals their strong hydrogen bonding with sulfonyl, acyl, and carboxylate groups of the two linkers. The grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations of H 2 O adsorption corroborate the experimental findings and reveal preferable locations of guest molecules in the framework voids at various pressures. Additionally, both experimental and GCMC simulation insights into the adsorption of CO 2 (at 195 K) on the activated framework are presented.

  13. Simple inorganic complexes but intricate hydrogen bonding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    We are interested in obtaining single crystals of metal-opda complexes because their crystal structures would show complex hydrogen bonding network due to the presence of. –NH2 groups in the opda ligand (hydrogen bonding donor sites) and inorganic anions having mostly oxo groups (hydrogen bonding acceptor sites) ...

  14. Comparison of Ultrasonic Welding and Thermal Bonding for the Integration of Thin Film Metal Electrodes in Injection Molded Polymeric Lab-on-Chip Systems for Electrochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteucci, Marco; Heiskanen, Arto; Zor, Kinga

    2016-01-01

    We compare ultrasonic welding (UW) and thermal bonding (TB) for the integration of embedded thin-film gold electrodes for electrochemical applications in injection molded (IM) microfluidic chips. The UW bonded chips showed a significantly superior electrochemical performance compared to the ones ...

  15. Diffusionless bonding of aluminum to Zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.

    1965-04-01

    Aluminum can be bonded to zirconium without difficulty even when a thin layer of oxide is present on the surface of the zirconium . No detectable diffusion takes place during the bonding process. The bond layer can be stretched as much. as 8% without affecting the bond. The bond can be heated for 1000 hours at 260 o C (500 o F), and can be water quenched from 260 o C (500 o F) without any noticeable change in the bond strength. An extrusion technique has been devised for making transition sections of aluminum bonded to zirconium which can then be used to join these metals by conventional welding. Welding can be done close to the bond zone without seriously affecting the integrity of the bond. This method of bonding aluminum to Zircaloy-2 is covered by Canadian patent 702,438 January 26, 1965. (author)

  16. About counterintuitive orbital mixing and bond populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, F.E.; Giambiagi, M.; Giambiagi, M.S. de

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that negative bond and orbital populations may be avoided by the introduction of a weight factor in a bond index definition, together with a suitable parameterization. The negative bond populations found for first-row metal complexes need not be ascribed to counterintuitive orbital mixing but rather, essentially, to the equipartition of the charge distribution. Different definitions of the bond population are compared for ferrocene and the effects of some parameterizations are discussed. (Author) [pt

  17. A new face of phenalenyl-based radicals in the transition metal-free C-H arylation of heteroarenes at room temperature: trapping the radical initiator via C-C σ-bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jasimuddin; P, Sreejyothi; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Jose, Anex; Raj, Manthan; Mandal, Swadhin K

    2017-11-01

    The radical-mediated transition metal-free approach for the direct C-H bond functionalization of arenes is considered as a cost effective alternative to transition metal-based catalysis. An organic ligand-based radical plays a key role by generating an aryl radical which undergoes a subsequent functionalization process. The design principle of the present study takes advantage of a relatively stable odd alternant hydrocarbon-based phenalenyl (PLY) radical. In this study, the first transition metal-free catalyzed direct C-H arylation of a variety of heteroarenes such as azoles, furan, thiophene and pyridine at room temperature has been reported using a phenalenyl-based radical without employing any photoactivation step. This protocol has been successfully applied to the gram scale synthesis of core moieties of bioactive molecules. The phenalenyl-based radical initiator has been characterized crystallographically by trapping it via the formation of a C-C σ-bond between the phenalenyl radical and solvent-based radical species.

  18. Revisiting isoreticular MOFs of alkaline earth metals: a comprehensive study on phase stability, electronic structure, chemical bonding, and optical properties of A-IRMOF-1 (A = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Ming; Vajeeston, Ponniah; Ravindran, Ponniah; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Tilset, Mats

    2011-06-07

    Formation energies, chemical bonding, electronic structure, and optical properties of metal-organic frameworks of alkaline earth metals, A-IRMOF-1 (where A = Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, or Ba), have been systemically investigated with DFT methods. The unit cell volumes and atomic positions were fully optimized with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. By fitting the E-V data into the Murnaghan, Birch and Universal equation of states (UEOS), the bulk modulus and its pressure derivative were estimated and provided almost identical results. The data indicate that the A-IRMOF-1 series are soft materials. The estimated bandgap values are all ca. 3.5 eV, indicating a nonmetallic behavior which is essentially metal independent within this A-IRMOF-1 series. The calculated formation energies for the A-IRMOF-1 series are -61.69 (Be), -62.53 (Mg), -66.56 (Ca), -65.34 (Sr), and -64.12 (Ba) kJ mol(-1) and are substantially more negative than that of Zn-based IRMOF-1 (MOF-5) at -46.02 kJ mol(-1). From the thermodynamic point of view, the A-IRMOF-1 compounds are therefore even more stable than the well-known MOF-5. The linear optical properties of the A-IRMOF-1 series were systematically investigated. The detailed analysis of chemical bonding in the A-IRMOF-1 series reveals the nature of the A-O, O-C, H-C, and C-C bonds, i.e., A-O is a mainly ionic interaction with a metal dependent degree of covalency. The O-C, H-C, and C-C bonding interactions are as anticipated mainly covalent in character. Furthermore it is found that the geometry and electronic structures of the presently considered MOFs are not very sensitive to the k-point mesh involved in the calculations. Importantly, this suggests that sampling with Γ-point only will give reliable structural properties for MOFs. Thus, computational simulations should be readily extended to even more complicated MOF systems.

  19. Amide Bond Formation Assisted by Vicinal Alkylthio Migration in Enaminones: Metal- and CO-Free Synthesis of α,β-Unsaturated Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuqing; Huang, Fei; Wu, Ping; Wang, Quannan; Yu, Zhengkun

    2018-05-18

    Amide bond formation is one of the most important transformations in organic synthesis, drug development, and materials science. Efficient construction of amides has been among the most challenging tasks for organic chemists. Herein, we report a concise methodology for amide bond (-CONH-) formation assisted by vicinal group migration in alkylthio-functionalized enaminones (α-oxo ketene N, S-acetals) under mild conditions. Simple treatment of such enaminones with PhI(OAc) 2 at ambient temperature in air afforded diverse multiply functionalized α,β-unsaturated amides including β-cyclopropylated acrylamides, in which a wide array of functional groups such as aryl, (hetero)aryl, alkenyl, and alkyl can be conveniently introduced to a ketene moiety. The reaction mechanism was investigated by exploring the origins of the amide oxygen and carbon atoms as well as isolation and structural characterization of the reaction intermediates. The amide bond formation reactions could also be efficiently performed under solventless mechanical milling conditions.

  20. Theoretical description of metal-ligand bonding within f-element complexes: A successful and necessary interplay between theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldivi, P.; Petit, L.; Vetere, V.; Petit, L.; Adamo, C.

    2007-01-01

    The quantum chemical study presented here shows various aspects of the bonding of lanthanide (La 3+ , Gd 3+ ) and actinide (U 3+ , Am 3+ , Cm 3+ ) ions with N-heterocyclic ligands (poly-azines, BTP: bis(1,2,4-triazinyl)-2,6-pyridine). Several families of complexes, differing by their coordination sphere, have been examined. Clearly, the lanthanide complexes always show a purely ionic bonding. The behaviour of U(III) is also well defined with a more or less strong back bonding interaction whatever the complex is. In contrast, the heavy actinides (Am 3+ and Cm 3+ ) are changeable, with a weak covalent character, going from donation to back donation, depending on the coordination sphere of the complex. (authors)

  1. Bonds Boom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar…

  2. Evaluation of shear bond strength of metal bracket to enamel after application of primers over bracket base-an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firuzbakht MM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of application of two types of primers over bracket bases on the shear bond strength (SBS and mode of bond failure."nMaterials and Methods: In this study, 75 human premolar teeth were divided into three equal groups. In group 1 (control, after surface preparation of enamel by conventional method (acid etching+primer brackets were bonded with Transbond XT composite. In group 2 (TX, brackets were bonded to enamel same as the first group but Transbond XT primer were used on bracket bases before placement of composite. In group 3 (PL, Transbond plus primer was applied on bracket bases before placement of composite. After 24 h, the SBS test was performed by universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Then, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores and percentage of cohesive fracture were determined using stereomicroscopy. SBS data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze ARI and cohesive fracture results."nResults: There was significant difference in SBS values among the groups (P<0.001. The highest SBS was shown in TX group and the lowest was seen in PL group. There was no significant difference between control and TX groups in ARI scores (P=0.199. No significant difference was found in cohesive fracture values between the groups (P=0.093. Both the control and TX groups showed significant difference in ARI scores and cohesive fracture compared with the PL group in all of the comparisons (P<0.001."nConclusion: Application of Transbond XT primer over bracket base affects the bond strength and failure mode. Transbond XT primer increased the bond strength but Transbond plus primer decreased it.

  3. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko; Anić-Milošević, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​: A im: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding.

  4. Analysis of factors influencing the bond strength in roll bonding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, Kavan; Wulfinghoff, Stephan; Reese, Stefanie

    2018-05-01

    Cold Roll Bonding (CRB) is recognized as an industrial technique in which the metal sheets are joined together in order to produce laminate metal composites. In this technique, a metallurgical bond resulting from severe plastic deformation is formed between the rolled metallic layers. The main objective of this paper is to analyse different factors which may affect the bond formation in rolling processes. To achieve this goal, first, an interface model is employed which describes both the bonding and debonding. In this model, the bond strength evolution between the metallic layers is calculated based on the film theory of bonding. On the other hand, the debonding process is modelled by means of a bilinear cohesive zone model. In the numerical section, different scenarios are taken into account to model the roll bonding process of metal sheets. The numerical simulation includes the modelling of joining during the roll bonding process followed by debonding in a Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) peeling test. In all simulations, the metallic layers are regarded as elastoplastic materials subjected to large plastic deformations. Finally, the effects of some important factors on the bond formation are numerically investigated.

  5. Transition Metal Free C-N Bond Forming Dearomatizations and Aryl C-H Aminations by in Situ Release of a Hydroxylamine-Based Aminating Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farndon, Joshua J; Ma, Xiaofeng; Bower, John F

    2017-10-11

    We outline a simple protocol that accesses directly unprotected secondary amines by intramolecular C-N bond forming dearomatization or aryl C-H amination. The method is dependent on the generation of a potent electrophilic aminating agent released by in situ deprotection of O-Ts activated N-Boc hydroxylamines.

  6. A comparative study of shear bond strength between metal and ceramic brackets and artificially aged composite restorations using different surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Mousavi, Nasim; Ghasemi, Amir

    2012-10-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) between ceramic brackets (CBs) and resin composite restorations (RCRs) prepared using different surface treatments. The findings were also compared with a similar study that used stainless steel brackets (SSBs). Forty-five premolars were restored with a nano-hybrid composite resin (Tetric EvoCeram) and randomly assigned to three surface treatment groups: group 1, 5 per cent hydrofluoric acid (HF); group 2, air abrasion (50 μm alumina particles); and group 3, diamond bur. Specimens were bonded with CBs (Fascination) and exposed to thermo-cycling (500 cycles). The shear force at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute was transmitted to brackets. The adhesive remnant index (ARIs) scores were recorded after bracket failure. The analysis of SBS variance (P 0.05) and bond failure occurred mainly in adhesive-bracket base and resin-adhesive interfaces. The diamond bur surface treatment is recommended as a safe and cost-effective method of bonding CBs to RCRs.

  7. The adhesive bonding of beryllium structural components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fullerton-Batten, R.C.

    1977-01-01

    Where service conditions permit, adhesive bonding is a highly recommendable, reliable means of joining beryllium structural parts. Several important programs have successfully used adhesive bonding for joining structural and non-structural beryllium components. Adhesive bonding minimizes stress concentrations associated with other joining techniques and considerably improves fatigue resistance. In addition, no degradation of base metal properties occur. In many instances, structural joints can be fabricated more cheaply by adhesive bonding or in combination with adhesive bonding than by any other method used alone. An evaluation program on structural adhesive bonding of beryllium sheet components is described. A suitable surface pretreatment for beryllium adherends prior to bonding is given. Tensile shear strength and fatigue properties of FM 1000 and FM 123-5 adhesive bonded joints are reviewed and compared with data obtained from riveted joints of similar geometry. (author)

  8. Remarkable changes in interface O vacancy and metal-oxide bonds in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by long time annealing at 250 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Um, Jae Gwang; Jang, Jin, E-mail: jjang@khu.ac.kr [Advanced Display Research Center and Department of Information Display, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-08

    We have studied the effect of long time post-fabrication annealing on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Annealing for 100 h at 250 °C increased the field effect mobility from 14.7 cm{sup 2}/V s to 17.9 cm{sup 2}/V s and reduced the NBIS instability remarkably. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen vacancy and OH were found to exist at the interfaces of a-IGZO with top and bottom SiO{sub 2}. Long time annealing helps to decrease the vacancy concentration and increase the metal-oxygen bonds at the interfaces; this leads to increase in the free carrier concentrations in a-IGZO and field-effect mobility. X-ray reflectivity measurement indicated the increment of a-IGZO film density of 5.63 g cm{sup −3} to 5.83 g cm{sup −3} (3.4% increase) by 100 h annealing at 250 °C. The increase in film density reveals the decrease of O vacancy concentration and reduction of weak metal-oxygen bonds in a-IGZO, which substantially helps to improve the NBIS stability.

  9. Remarkable changes in interface O vacancy and metal-oxide bonds in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors by long time annealing at 250 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, Md Delwar Hossain; Um, Jae Gwang; Jang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of long time post-fabrication annealing on negative bias illumination stress (NBIS) of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film-transistors. Annealing for 100 h at 250 °C increased the field effect mobility from 14.7 cm 2 /V s to 17.9 cm 2 /V s and reduced the NBIS instability remarkably. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the oxygen vacancy and OH were found to exist at the interfaces of a-IGZO with top and bottom SiO 2 . Long time annealing helps to decrease the vacancy concentration and increase the metal-oxygen bonds at the interfaces; this leads to increase in the free carrier concentrations in a-IGZO and field-effect mobility. X-ray reflectivity measurement indicated the increment of a-IGZO film density of 5.63 g cm −3 to 5.83 g cm −3 (3.4% increase) by 100 h annealing at 250 °C. The increase in film density reveals the decrease of O vacancy concentration and reduction of weak metal-oxygen bonds in a-IGZO, which substantially helps to improve the NBIS stability

  10. Diffusion bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding. At least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces is coated with nickel. A coated surface portion is positioned in a contiguous relationship with another surface portion and subjected to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure. A force is applied on the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other. The contiguous surface portions are heated to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, and the applied force is decreased while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature. A portion of the applied force is maintained at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions

  11. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of Organotin and Organolead Compounds Binding to the Organomercurial Lyase MerB Provide New Insights into Its Mechanism of Carbon–Metal Bond Cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahba, Haytham M. [Département; Faculty; Stevenson, Michael J. [Department; Mansour, Ahmed [Département; Sygusch, Jurgen [Département; Wilcox, Dean E. [Department; Omichinski, James G. [Département

    2017-01-03

    The organomercurial lyase MerB has the unique ability to cleave carbon–Hg bonds, and structural studies indicate that three residues in the active site (C96, D99, and C159 in E. coli MerB) play important roles in the carbon–Hg bond cleavage. However, the role of each residue in carbon–metal bond cleavage has not been well-defined. To do so, we have structurally and biophysically characterized the interaction of MerB with a series of organotin and organolead compounds. Studies with two known inhibitors of MerB, dimethyltin (DMT) and triethyltin (TET), reveal that they inhibit by different mechanisms. In both cases the initial binding is to D99, but DMT subsequently binds to C96, which induces a conformation change in the active site. In contrast, diethyltin (DET) is a substrate for MerB and the SnIV product remains bound in the active site in a coordination similar to that of HgII following cleavage of organomercurial compounds. The results with analogous organolead compounds are similar in that trimethyllead (TML) is not cleaved and binds only to D99, whereas diethyllead (DEL) is a substrate and the PbIV product remains bound in the active site. Binding and cleavage is an exothermic reaction, while binding to D99 has negligible net heat flow. These results show that initial binding of organometallic compounds to MerB occurs at D99 followed, in some cases, by cleavage and loss of the organic moieties and binding of the metal ion product to C96, D99, and C159. The N-terminus of MerA is able to extract the bound PbVI but not the bound SnIV. These results suggest that MerB could be utilized for bioremediation applications, but certain organolead and organotin compounds may present an obstacle by inhibiting the enzyme.

  12. Electronic structure of the alkyne-bridged dicobalt hexacarbonyl complex Co(2) micro-C(2)H(2) (CO)(6): evidence for singlet diradical character and implications for metal-metal bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, James A; Evans, Gareth J S; Coogan, Michael P; Overgaard, Jacob

    2007-08-06

    A series of ab initio calculations are presented on the alkyne-bridged dicobalt hexacarbonyl cluster Co2 micro-C2H2 (CO)6, indicating that this compound has substantial multireference character, which we interpret as evidence of singlet diradical behavior. As a result, standard theoretical methods such as restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) or Kohn-Sham (RKS) density functional theory cannot properly describe this compound. We have therefore used complete active space (CAS) methods to explore the bonding in and spectroscopic properties of Co2 micro-C2H2 (CO)6. CAS methods identify significant population of a Co-Co antibonding orbital, along with Co-pi* back-bonding, and a relatively large singlet-triplet energy splitting. Analysis of the electron density and related quantities, such as energy densities and atomic overlaps, indicates a small but significant amount of covalent bonding between cobalt centers.

  13. Terahertz spectroscopy of 25MgH (X2Σ+) and (67)ZnH (X2Σ+): bonding in simple metal hydrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchino, Matthew P; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2013-10-03

    Pure rotational spectra of (25)MgH (X(2)Σ(+)) and (67)ZnH (X(2)Σ(+)) were recorded using direct absorption techniques. These free radicals were synthesized by the reaction of metal vapor, generated in a Broida-type oven, with H2 in a dc discharge. The N = 0 → 1 and N = 1 → 2 transitions were recorded for both species in the frequency range 342-789 GHz. Spin-rotation and metal and proton hyperfine interactions were resolved in the spectra. From these data, rotational, fine structure, and hyperfine constants were determined, including the Fermi contact, dipolar, and electric quadrupole parameters of the (25)Mg and (67)Zn nuclei. Comparison of the metal and proton hyperfine terms suggests that the unpaired electron resides in a σ molecular orbital that has significant s contributions from both the metal and the hydrogen atoms. The dipolar terms for both metals are relatively large, in contrast to those of the proton, and indicate spσ and possibly sdσ (zinc only) orbital hybridization. The quadrupole constants arise principally from the p/d orbital character of the unpaired electron, although there is a non-negligible polarization contribution. These results suggest significant covalent character in both MgH and ZnH, in contrast to their fluoride analogs.

  14. Structure and bonding in clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.

    1991-10-01

    We review here the recent progress made in the understanding of the electronic and atomic structure of small clusters of s-p bonded materials using the density functional molecular dynamics technique within the local density approximation. Starting with a brief description of the method, results are presented for alkali metal clusters, clusters of divalent metals such as Mg and Be which show a transition from van der Waals or weak chemical bonding to metallic behaviour as the cluster size grows and clusters of Al, Sn and Sb. In the case of semiconductors, we discuss results for Si, Ge and GaAs clusters. Clusters of other materials such as P, C, S, and Se are also briefly discussed. From these and other available results we suggest the possibility of unique structures for the magic clusters. (author). 69 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  15. Pressure dependence of hydrogen bonding in metal deuteroxides: a neutron powder diffraction study of Mn(OD)2 and β-Co(OD)2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parise, J.B.; Theroux, B.; Li, R.; Loveday, J.S.; Marshall, W.G.; Klotz, S.

    1998-01-01

    The structures of deuterated pyrochroite, Mn(OD) 2 and β-Co(OD) 2 have been refined using the Rietveld method and neutron powder diffraction data collected in an opposed-anvil high pressure (Paris-Edinburgh) cell from room pressure to 9 GPa. The equation of state for Mn(OD) 2 was determined (K=41(3) GPa for fixed K'=4.7) and found to be consistent with previous studies of the isostructural brucite, Mg(OD) 2 . The compressibility of β-Co(OD) 2 on the other hand is apparently anomalous. The c-axis initially decreases at 3 times the rate of decrease of the a-axis; the ratio decreases to about 1.5 at an estimated 6 GPa before increasing again beyond this pressure. There is no obvious corresponding anomaly in the details of the atomic structure. In both materials there is an increase in the D-site disorder with pressure. A split-site model for the D-positions best fits the data at pressures above 8 GPa. There is no statistically significant increase in the O-D interatomic distance at increased pressure while the hydrogen bonding interaction D..O appears to increase as this distance decreases and the O-D..O angle increases. The intramolecular O-D bond valences, determined indirectly from the intermolecular D..O distances, decrease steadily for both materials as pressure is increased. (orig.)

  16. Diffusion bonding in compact heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southall, David

    2009-01-01

    Heatric's diffusion bonding process is a solid-state joining technology that produces strong, compact, all-metal heat exchanger cores. Diffusion bonding allows for a large quantity of joints to be made in geometries that would normally be inaccessible for conventional welding techniques. Since Heatric's diffusion bonding process uses no interlayer or braze alloy, the resulting heat exchanger core has consistent chemistry throughout and, under carefully controlled conditions, a return to parent metal strength can be reached. This paper will provide an overview of the diffusion bonding process and its origins, and also its application to compact heat exchanger construction. The paper will then discuss recent work that has been done to compare mechanical properties of Heatric's diffusion bonded material with material that has been conventionally welded, as well as with material tested in the as-received condition. (author)

  17. Mechanisms for the reactions of group 10 transition metal complexes with metal-group 14 element bonds, Bbt(Br)E═M(PCy3)2 (E = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; M = Pd and Pt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Hung; Ho, Pei-Yun; Su, Ming-Der

    2013-02-04

    The electronic structures of the Bbt(Br)E═M(PCy(3))(2) (E = C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb and M = Pt, Pd) complexes and their potential energy surfaces for the formation and water addition reactions were studied using density functional theory (B3LYP/LANL2DZ). The theoretical evidence suggests that the bonding character of the E═M double bond between the six valence-electron Bbt(Br)E: species and the 14 valence-electron (PCy(3))(2)M complexes has a predominantly high s-character. That is, on the basis of the NBO, this theoretical study indicates that the σ-donation from the E element to the M atom prevails. Also, theoretical computations suggest that the relative reactivity decreases in the order: Bbt(Br)C═M(PCy(3))(2) > Bbt(Br)Si═M(PCy(3))(2) > Bbt(Br)Ge═M(PCy(3))(2) > Bbt(Br)Sn═M(PCy(3))(2) > Bbt(Br)Pb═M(PCy(3))(2), irrespective of whether M = Pt or M = Pd is chosen. Namely, the greater the atomic weight of the group 14 atom (E), the larger is the atomic radius of E and the more stable is its Bbt(Br)E═M(PCy(3))(2) doubly bonded species toward chemical reactions. The computational results show good agreement with the available experimental observations. The theoretical results obtained in this work allow a number of predictions to be made.

  18. Uranyl and/or rare-earth mellitates in extended organic-inorganic networks: A unique case of hetero-metallic cation-cation interaction with U-VI=O-Ln(III) bonding (Ln = Ce, Nd)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Grandjean, Stephane; Loiseau, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    A series of uranyl and lanthanide (trivalent Ce, Nd) mellitates (mel) has been hydrothermally synthesized in aqueous solvent. Mixtures of these 4f and 5f elements also revealed the formation of a rare case of lanthanide-uranyl coordination polymers. Their structures, determined by XRD single-crystal analysis, exhibit three distinct architectures. The pure lanthanide mellitate Ln 2 (H 2 O) 6 (mel) possesses a 3D framework built up from the connection of isolated LnO 6 (H 2 O) 3 polyhedra (tri-capped trigonal prism) through the mellitate ligand. The structure of the uranyl mellitate (UO 2 ) 3 (H 2 O) 6 - (mel).11.5H 2 O is lamellar and consists of 8-fold coordinated uranium atoms linked to each other through the organic ligand giving rise to the formation of a 2D 3 6 net. The third structural type, (UO 2 ) 2 Ln(OH)(H 2 O) 3 (mel).2.5H 2 O, involves direct oxygen bondings between the lanthanide and uranyl centers, with the isolation of a hetero-metallic dinuclear motif. The 9-fold coordinated Ln cation, LnO 5 (OH)(H 2 O) 3 , is linked to the 7-fold coordinated uranyl (UO 2 )O-4(OH) (pentagonal bipyramid) via one μ 2 -hydroxo group and one μ 2 -oxo group. The latter is shared between the uranyl bonding (U=O = 1.777(4)1.779(6) angstrom) and a long Ln-O bonding (Ce-O = 2.822(4) angstrom; Nd-O = 2.792(6) angstrom). This unusual linkage is a unique illustration of the so-called cation cation interaction associating 4f and 5f metals. The dinuclear motif is then further connected through the mellitate ligand, and this generates organic inorganic layers that are linked to each other via discrete uranyl (UO 2 )O 4 units (square bipyramid), which ensure the three-dimensional cohesion of the structure. The mixed U-Ln carboxylate is thermally decomposed from 260 to 280 degrees C and then transformed into the basic uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) together with U-Ln oxide with the fluorite structural type ('(Ln,U)O 2 '). At 1400 degrees C, only fluorite type '(Ln,U)O 2 ' is formed with

  19. Bond strength of masonry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, van der R.; Vermeltfoort, A.Th.

    1992-01-01

    Bond strength is not a well defined property of masonry. Normally three types of bond strength can be distinguished: - tensile bond strength, - shear (and torsional) bond strength, - flexural bond strength. In this contribution the behaviour and strength of masonry in deformation controlled uniaxial

  20. Metal-Free Catalytic Enantioselective C–B Bond Formation: (Pinacolato)boron Conjugate Additions to α,β-Unsaturated Ketones, Esters, Weinreb Amides and Aldehydes Promoted by Chiral N-Heterocyclic Carbenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Radomkit, Suttipol; O’Brien, Jeannette M.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2012-01-01

    The first broadly applicable metal-free enantioselective method for boron conjugate addition (BCA) to α,β-unsaturated carbonyls is presented. The C–B bond forming reactions are promoted in the presence of 2.5–7.5 mol % of a readily accessible C1-symmetric chiral imidazolinium salt, which is converted, in situ, to the catalytically active diastereo- and enantiomerically pure N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) by the common organic base 1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-ene (dbu). In addition to the commercially available bis(pinacolato)diboron [B2(pin)2], and in contrast to reactions with the less sterically demanding achiral NHCs, the presence of MeOH is required for high efficiency. Acyclic and cyclic α,β-unsaturated ketones, as well as acyclic esters, Weinreb amides and aldehydes can serve as suitable substrates; the desired β-boryl carbonyls are isolated in up to 94% yield and >98:2 enantiomer ratio (er). Transformations are often carried out at ambient temperature. In certain cases, such as when the relatively less reactive unsaturated amides are used, elevated temperatures are required (50–66 °C); nonetheless, reactions remain highly enantioselective. The utility of the NHC-catalyzed method is demonstrated through comparison with the alternative Cu-catalyzed protocols; in cases involving a polyfunctional substrate, unique profiles in chemoselectivity are exhibited by the metal-free approach (e.g., conjugate addition vs reaction with an alkyne, allene or aldehyde). PMID:22559866

  1. Theoretical investigation of compounds with triple bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devarajan, Deepa

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, compounds with potential triple-bonding character involving the heavier main-group elements, Group 4 transition metals, and the actinides uranium and thorium were studied by using molecular quantum mechanics. The triple bonds are described in terms of the individual orbital contributions (σ, π parallel , and π perpendicular to ), involving electron-sharing covalent or donor-acceptor interactions between the orbitals of two atoms or fragments. Energy decomposition, natural bond orbital, and atoms in molecules analyses were used for the bonding analysis of the triple bonds. The results of this thesis suggest that the triple-bonding character between the heavier elements of the periodic table is important and worth further study and exploration.

  2. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of RMGI and Composite Resin for Orthodontic Bracket Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassaei, Soghra; Davari, Abdolrahim; Goldani Moghadam, Mahjobeh; Kamaei, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) and composite resin for bonding metal and ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: Eighty-eight human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were divided into 4 groups (n=22). In groups 1 and 2, 22 metal and ceramic brackets were bonded using composite resin (Transbond XT), respectively. Twenty-two metal and ceramic brackets in groups 3 and 4, respectively were bonded using RMGI (Fuji Ortho LC, Japan). After photo polymerization, the teeth were stored in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5° and 55°). The SBS value of each sample was determined using a Universal Testing Machine. The amount of residual adhesive remaining on each tooth was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Statistical analyses were done using two-way ANOVA. Results: RMGI bonded brackets had significantly lower SBS value compared to composite resin bonded groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between metal and ceramic brackets bonded with either the RMGI or composite resin. The comparison of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores between the groups indicated that the bracket failure mode was significantly different among groups (Porthodontic bonding purposes; however the provided SBS is still within the clinically acceptable range. PMID:25628663

  3. Diffusion and Bonding Mechanism of Protective γ-Al2O3 on FeCrAl Foil for Metallic Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feriyanto Dafit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High pollutant level contributed by mobile sources/land transportation that become main problems for the human health. Improving exhaust emission system by improving catalytic converter properties is one of the most effective way to produce healthy air in our environment. It is conducted by two methods i.e. ultrasonic during electroplating (UBDEL and electroplating process (EL which are not fully investigated yet as catalytic converter coating process. UBDEL is conducted using sulphamate types electrolyte solution, Frequency of 35 kHz, current of 1.28A, Voltage of 12 V, and various time of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 minutes. Meanwhile El method is conducted using parameters of current of 1.28A, Voltage of 12 V, stirrer speed of 60 rpm and various time of 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 minutes. Fully γ-Al2O3 bonding to the FeCrAl substrate is shown by UBDEL 75 minutes samples proved by SEM images and Ra and Rq are 4.01 μm and 5.64 μm, respectively. Ni present on the FeCrAl substrate as other protective layer generated by Ni electroplating process that will improve thermal stability of FeCrAl at high temperature of 1000 °C. From the results, can summarized that UBDEL technique is promoted as an effective catalytic converter coating technique.

  4. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of a Copper-Binding Mutant of the Organomercurial Lyase MerB: Insight into the Key Role of the Active Site Aspartic Acid in Hg-Carbon Bond Cleavage and Metal Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahba, Haytham M; Lecoq, Lauriane; Stevenson, Michael; Mansour, Ahmed; Cappadocia, Laurent; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Wilkinson, Kevin J; Sygusch, Jurgen; Wilcox, Dean E; Omichinski, James G

    2016-02-23

    In bacterial resistance to mercury, the organomercurial lyase (MerB) plays a key role in the detoxification pathway through its ability to cleave Hg-carbon bonds. Two cysteines (C96 and C159; Escherichia coli MerB numbering) and an aspartic acid (D99) have been identified as the key catalytic residues, and these three residues are conserved in all but four known MerB variants, where the aspartic acid is replaced with a serine. To understand the role of the active site serine, we characterized the structure and metal binding properties of an E. coli MerB mutant with a serine substituted for D99 (MerB D99S) as well as one of the native MerB variants containing a serine residue in the active site (Bacillus megaterium MerB2). Surprisingly, the MerB D99S protein copurified with a bound metal that was determined to be Cu(II) from UV-vis absorption, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, and electron paramagnetic resonance studies. X-ray structural studies revealed that the Cu(II) is bound to the active site cysteine residues of MerB D99S, but that it is displaced following the addition of either an organomercurial substrate or an ionic mercury product. In contrast, the B. megaterium MerB2 protein does not copurify with copper, but the structure of the B. megaterium MerB2-Hg complex is highly similar to the structure of the MerB D99S-Hg complexes. These results demonstrate that the active site aspartic acid is crucial for both the enzymatic activity and metal binding specificity of MerB proteins and suggest a possible functional relationship between MerB and its only known structural homologue, the copper-binding protein NosL.

  5. Understanding Bonds - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimmer, Nina Røhr

    2016-01-01

    Undervisningsmateriale. A bond is a debt security, similar to an ”I Owe You document” (IOU). When you purchase a bond, you are lending money to a government, municipality, corporation, federal agency or other entity known as the issuer. In return for the loan, the issuer promises to pay you...... a specified rate of interest during the life of the bond and to repay the face value of the bond (the principal) when it “matures,” or comes due. Among the types of bonds you can choose from are: Government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage and asset-backed securities, federal agency...... securities and foreign government bonds....

  6. Proposal of new bonding technique 'Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) Bonding'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue-Chang; Nakagawa, Hiroji; Matsuda, Fukuhisa.

    1987-01-01

    A new bonding technique named ''Instantaneous Liquid Phase (ILP) bonding'' suitable mainly for welding dissimilar materials was proposed by which instantaneous melting of one or two of the faying surfaces is utilized. The processes of ILP bonding are mainly consisted of three stages, namely the first stage forming thin liquid layer by rapid heating, the second stage joining both specimens by thin liquid layer, and the third stage cooling the specimens rapidly to avoid the formation of brittle layer. The welding temperatures of the specimens to be welded in ILP bonding are generally differentiated from each other. ILP bonding was applied for a variety of combinations of dissimilar materials of aluminum, aluminum alloys, titanium, titanium alloy, carbon steel, austenitic stainless steel, copper and tungsten, and for similar materials of stainless steel and nickel-base alloy. There were no microvoids in these welding joints, and the formation of brittle layer at the bonding interface was suppressed. The welded joints of Al + Ti, Cu + carbon steel and Cu + austenitic stainless steel showed the fracture in base metal having lower tensile strength. Further, the welded joints of Al + carbon steel, Al alloy + Ti, Al alloy + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel, Ti + carbon steel or + austenitic stainless steel showed better tensile properties in the comparison with diffusion welding. Furthermore, ILP bonding was available for welding same materials susceptible to hot cracking. Because of the existence of liquid layer, the welding pressure required was extremely low, and preparation of faying surface by simple tooling or polishing by no.80 emery paper was enough. The change in specimen length before and after welding was relatively little, only depending on the thickness of liquid layer. The welding time was very short, and thus high welding efficiency was obtained. (author)

  7. Synthesis of imine bond containing insoluble polymeric ligand and its transition metal complexes, structural characterization and catalytic activity on esterification reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, İlyas; Ay, Burak; Karaca, Serkan; Saribiyik, Oguz Yunus; Yildiz, Emel; Serin, Selahattin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, synthesis of insoluble polymeric ligand (L) and its transition metal complexes [Cu(L)Cl 2 ]·2H 2 O (1) , [Co(L)Cl 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] (2) and [Ni(L)Cl 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] (3) , having the azomethine groups, were synthesized by the condensation reactions of the diamines and dialdehydes. The structural properties were characterized by the analytical and spectroscopic methods using by elemental analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared, Thermo Gravimetric Analysis, Powder X-ray Diffraction, magnetic susceptibility and Inductively Coupled Plasma. The solubilities of the synthesized polymeric materials were also investigated and found as insoluble some organic and inorganic solvents. Additionally, their catalytic performance was carried out for the esterification reaction of acetic acid and butyl acetate. The highest conversion rate is 75.75% by using catalyst 1 . The esterification of butanol gave butyl acetate with 100% selectivity.

  8. Oxygen-metal bonding in Ti-bearing compounds from O 1s spectra and ab initio full multiple-scattering calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziyu Wu; Paris, E.; Langenhorst, F.; Seifert, F.

    2002-01-01

    The O K-edge spectra of a series of Ti-bearing compounds with Ti in diffrent structural and chemical environments have been measured using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and analyzed using ab initio full multiple-scattering (MS) calculations. The near-edge structures arise mainly from covalency by direct and/or indirect interaction between O and metal atoms and between O and Si atoms. The coordination number of the cation and the site symmetry also influence the spectral shape and structures. Using different size clusters around the excited atom in the full MS simulation, it is possible to interpret and assign the features present in the spectra of each compund to its specific atomic arrangement and electronic structure. (au)

  9. Manufacturing and sustainability of bonding systems for grinding tools

    OpenAIRE

    Linke, B

    2016-01-01

    © 2016, German Academic Society for Production Engineering (WGP). Grinding and honing processes are quality-defining operations in the production of many modern products. Process performance and product quality are contingent on selecting the correct abrasive tool for a specific application. Thus, tools with different bonding systems are used, namely resin bonded tools, vitrified bonded tools, and metallic bonded tools. Tool manufacturers have great knowledge in the choice and intricate prod...

  10. Nature of the metal-support interface in supported metal catalysts: results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Gates, B.C.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectra characterizing the metal-support interface in supported metal complexes and supported metal catalysts are summarized and evaluated with 29 refs. Mononuclear transition metal complexes on non-reducible metal oxide supports are bonded with metal-oxygen bonds of .apprx.2.15

  11. Evaluation of urban soils. Subproject 4: Bonding of heavy metals in technological soils - mapping of urban soils for the city of Rostock. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretschmer, H.; Coburger, E.; Kahle, P.; Neumann, A.; Surkus, A.

    1995-01-01

    Within the framework of the project a conceptional soil map for the urban area of Rostock was drawn up. The starting point was formed by the collection and analysis of available information. The following maps were digitised with the help of the geographical information system Arc/Info: Soil estimation, middle scaled map of agricultural sites, geology, maps of bogs and forest sites, map of the bog-depth sourrounding the river Warnow by Geinitz from 1887. To characterise the influence by man information about impermeable covered areas, actual land use, thrown up areas and disposal sites as well as war-destroyed sites were digitally used. Till the beginning of this project no information about impermeable covered areas and about the actual land use were available. That's why these two maps were created within the framework of the project on the base of topographical maps, aerial photographs and results of on-site-captures. Afterwards the thematic layers were overlapped. The general conceptional map for the urban area of Rostock was created out of the three separate conceptional maps about groundwater-influence, natural soil inventory and man-influence. Soil societies were assigned to the units of this general conceptional map. At the end 35 units were given for Rostock. Detailed mappings were taken on areas of the following kinds of use: Living areas, city centre, gardens, parks, graveyards, industrial and military sites. 26 main profiles were described and soil-physically and soil-chemically examined. The total contents of the heavy metals Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd were determined for the horizons of the main profiles. The subproject of Rostock is also concerned with investigations on the heavy metals (hM) Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn and Ni in technological substrates (tS) from Kiel, Eckernfoerde, Halle and Rostock (11 main soil profiles). (orig./SR) [de

  12. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  13. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  14. Transition metals in carbohydrate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This review describes the application of transition metal mediated reactions in carbohydrate synthesis. The different metal mediated transformations are divided into reaction types and illustrated by various examples on monosaccharide derivatives. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions are further ...

  15. The chemical bond as an emergent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Jon C; Ho, Vinh; Lubchenko, Vassiliy

    2017-05-07

    We first argue that the covalent bond and the various closed-shell interactions can be thought of as symmetry broken versions of one and the same interaction, viz., the multi-center bond. We use specially chosen molecular units to show that the symmetry breaking is controlled by density and electronegativity variation. We show that the bond order changes with bond deformation but in a step-like fashion, regions of near constancy separated by electronic localization transitions. These will often cause displacive transitions as well so that the bond strength, order, and length are established self-consistently. We further argue on the inherent relation of the covalent, closed-shell, and multi-center interactions with ionic and metallic bonding. All of these interactions can be viewed as distinct sectors on a phase diagram with density and electronegativity variation as control variables; the ionic and covalent/secondary sectors are associated with on-site and bond-order charge density wave, respectively, the metallic sector with an electronic fluid. While displaying a contiguity at low densities, the metallic and ionic interactions represent distinct phases separated by discontinuous transitions at sufficiently high densities. Multi-center interactions emerge as a hybrid of the metallic and ionic bond that results from spatial coexistence of delocalized and localized electrons. In the present description, the issue of the stability of a compound is that of the mutual miscibility of electronic fluids with distinct degrees of electron localization, supra-atomic ordering in complex inorganic compounds coming about naturally. The notions of electronic localization advanced hereby suggest a high throughput, automated procedure for screening candidate compounds and structures with regard to stability, without the need for computationally costly geometric optimization.

  16. Introducing a Hydrogen-Bond Donor into a Weakly Nucleophilic Brønsted Base: Alkali Metal Hexamethyldisilazides (MHMDS, M=Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs) with Ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Roman; Michel, Reent; Herbst-Irmer, Regine; Schöne, Ralf; Stalke, Dietmar

    2016-08-22

    Alkali metal 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexamethyldisilazide (MHMDSs) are one of the most utilised weakly nucleophilic Brønsted bases in synthetic chemistry and especially in natural product synthesis. Like lithium organics, they aggregate depending on the employed donor solvents. Thus, they show different reactivity and selectivity as a function of their aggregation and solvation state. To date, monomeric LiHMDS with monodentate donor bases was only characterised in solution. Since the first preparation of LiHMDS in 1959 by Wannagat and Niederprüm, all efforts to crystallise monomeric LiHMDS in the absence of chelating ligands failed. Herein, we present ammonia adducts of LiHMDS, NaHMDS, KHMDS, RbHMDS and CsHMDS with unprecedented aggregation motifs: 1) The hitherto missing monomeric key compound in the LiHMDS aggregation architectures. Monomeric crystal structures of trisolvated LiHMDS (1) and NaHMDS (2), showing unique intermolecular hydrogen bonds, 2) the unprecedented tetrasolvated KHMDS (3) and RbHMDS (4) dimers and 3) the disolvated CsHMDS (5) dimer with very close intermolecular Si-CH3 ⋅⋅⋅Cs s-block "agostic" interactions have been prepared and characterised by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Thai students' mental model of chemical bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarawan, Supawadee; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    This Research was finding the viewing about concept of chemical bonding is fundamental to subsequent learning of various other topics related to this concept in chemistry. Any conceptions about atomic structures that students have will be shown their further learning. The purpose of this study is to interviews conceptions held by high school chemistry students about metallic bonding and to reveal mental model of atomic structures show according to the educational level. With this aim, the questionnaire prepared making use of the literature and administered for analysis about mental model of chemical bonding. It was determined from the analysis of answers of questionnaire the 10th grade, 11th grade and 12th grade students. Finally, each was shown prompts in the form of focus cards derived from curriculum material that showed ways in which the bonding in specific metallic substances had been depicted. Students' responses revealed that learners across all three levels prefer simple, realistic mental models for metallic bonding and reveal to chemical bonding.

  18. Current bonding systems for resin-bonded restorations and fixed partial dentures made of silver–palladium–copper–gold alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Matsumura

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This review article describes about the bonding systems for noble metal alloys, bonding techniques of restorations and fixed partial dentures (FPDs made of Ag–Pd–Cu–Au alloys, and their clinical performance. Thione monomers, 6-(4-vinylbenzyl-n-propyl amino-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-dithione (VTD, 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl-2-thiouracil-5-carboxylate (MTU-6, and 10-methacryloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (MDDT, has been proved effective for bonding noble metal alloys. An acrylic adhesive consists of the tri-n-butylborane (TBB initiator, methyl methacrylate (MMA monomer liquid with 5% 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META, and poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA, is being used for bonding metallic restorations to abutment surfaces. Clinical performance of restorations and FPDs made of Ag–Pd–Cu–Au alloys is overall excellent when they are seated with the currently available noble metal bonding systems.

  19. Nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for the electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Ray, Siba P.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor attached to a ceramic electrode body by a metal bond on a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Ebeling, Jennifer; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Roggendorf, Matthias; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond ™ and Scotchbond ™ ) on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT ™ . Materials and Methods . A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n = 30) were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control) brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2) and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3) were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120 ™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal-Wallis test ( P ≤ 0.05). Results . Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions . Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain), with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  1. Modeling σ-Bond Activations by Nickel(0) Beyond Common Approximations: How Accurately Can We Describe Closed-Shell Oxidative Addition Reactions Mediated by Low-Valent Late 3d Transition Metal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lianrui; Chen, Kejuan; Chen, Hui

    2017-10-10

    Accurate modelings of reactions involving 3d transition metals (TMs) are very challenging to both ab initio and DFT approaches. To gain more knowledge in this field, we herein explored typical σ-bond activations of H-H, C-H, C-Cl, and C-C bonds promoted by nickel(0), a low-valent late 3d TM. For the key parameters of activation energy (ΔE ‡ ) and reaction energy (ΔE R ) for these reactions, various issues related to the computational accuracy were systematically investigated. From the scrutiny of convergence issue with one-electron basis set, augmented (A) basis functions are found to be important, and the CCSD(T)/CBS level with complete basis set (CBS) limit extrapolation based on augmented double-ζ and triple-ζ basis pair (ADZ and ATZ), which produces deviations below 1 kcal/mol from the reference, is recommended for larger systems. As an alternative, the explicitly correlated F12 method can accelerate the basis set convergence further, especially after its CBS extrapolations. Thus, the CCSD(T)-F12/CBS(ADZ-ATZ) level with computational cost comparable to the conventional CCSD(T)/CBS(ADZ-ATZ) level, is found to reach the accuracy of the conventional CCSD(T)/A5Z level, which produces deviations below 0.5 kcal/mol from the reference, and is also highly recommendable. Scalar relativistic effects and 3s3p core-valence correlation are non-negligible for achieving chemical accuracy of around 1 kcal/mol. From the scrutiny of convergence issue with the N-electron basis set, in comparison with the reference CCSDTQ result, CCSD(T) is found to be able to calculate ΔE ‡ quite accurately, which is not true for the ΔE R calculations. Using highest-level CCSD(T) results of ΔE ‡ in this work as references, we tested 18 DFT methods and found that PBE0 and CAM-B3LYP are among the three best performing functionals, irrespective of DFT empirical dispersion correction. With empirical dispersion correction included, ωB97XD is also recommendable due to its improved

  2. Unique Bond Breaking in Crystalline Phase Change Materials and the Quest for Metavalent Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Mio, Antonio M; Keutgen, Jens; Küpers, Michael; Yu, Yuan; Cho, Ju-Young; Dronskowski, Richard; Wuttig, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Laser-assisted field evaporation is studied in a large number of compounds, including amorphous and crystalline phase change materials employing atom probe tomography. This study reveals significant differences in field evaporation between amorphous and crystalline phase change materials. High probabilities for multiple events with more than a single ion detected per laser pulse are only found for crystalline phase change materials. The specifics of this unusual field evaporation are unlike any other mechanism shown previously to lead to high probabilities of multiple events. On the contrary, amorphous phase change materials as well as other covalently bonded compounds and metals possess much lower probabilities for multiple events. Hence, laser-assisted field evaporation in amorphous and crystalline phase change materials reveals striking differences in bond rupture. This is indicative for pronounced differences in bonding. These findings imply that the bonding mechanism in crystalline phase change materials differs substantially from conventional bonding mechanisms such as metallic, ionic, and covalent bonding. Instead, the data reported here confirm a recently developed conjecture, namely that metavalent bonding is a novel bonding mechanism besides those mentioned previously. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Bonding with Your Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the future bonding of the child and parent. Adoptive parents may be concerned about bonding with their ... general emotional support. And it's OK to ask family members and friends for help in the days — ...

  4. Australia's Bond Home Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Anil V. Mishra; Umaru B. Conteh

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs the float adjusted measure of home bias and explores the determinants of bond home bias by employing the International Monetary Fund's high quality dataset (2001 to 2009) on cross-border bond investment. The paper finds that Australian investors' prefer investing in countries with higher economic development and more developed bond markets. Exchange rate volatility appears to be an impediment for cross-border bond investment. Investors prefer investing in countries with ...

  5. Early-transition-metal ketenimine complexes. Synthesis, reactivity, and structural characterization of complexes with. eta. sup 2 (C,N)-ketenimine groups bound to the halogenobis((trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadienyl)niobium unit. X-ray structure of Nb(. eta. sup 5 -C sub 5 H sub 4 SiMe sub 3 ) sub 2 Cl(. eta. sup 2 (C,N)-PhN double bond C double bond CPh sub 2 )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antinolo, A.; Fajardo, M.; Lopez Mardomingo, C.; Otero, A. (Univ. de Alcala de Henares (Spain)); Mourad, Y.; Mugnier, Y. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Dijon (France)); Sanz-Aparicio, J.; Fonseca, I.; Florencio, F. (CSIC, Madrid (Spain))

    1990-11-01

    The reaction of Nb({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}X (X = Cl, Br) with 1 equiv of various ketenimines, R{sup 1}N{double bond}C{double bond}CR{sup 2}R{sup 3}, leads to the niobium derivatives Nb({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}X({eta}{sup 2}(C,N)-R{sup 1}N{double bond}C{double bond}CR{sup 2}R{sup 3}) (1, X = Cl, R{sup 1} = R{sup 2} = R{sup 3} = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; 2, X = Cl, R{sup 1} = p-CH{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, R{sup 2} = R{sup 3} = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; 3, X = Br, R{sup 1} = R{sup 2} = R{sup 3} = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; 4, X = Br, R{sup 1} = p-CH{sub 3}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, R{sup 2} = R{sup 3} = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}; 5, X = Cl, R{sup 1} = R{sup 2} = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, R{sup 3} = CH{sub 3}; 6, X = Br, R{sup 1} = R{sup 2} = C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, R{sup 3} = CH{sub 3}) with the expected ketenimine C{double bond}N bonding mode. Reduction of 1 with 1 equiv of Na/Hg gives the complex Nb({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}({eta}{sup 2}(C,N)-PhN{double bond}C{double bond}CPh{sub 2}) (9) as a paramagnetic compound. The reduction of 9 with 1 equiv of Na/Hg and the subsequent addition of a proton source (ethanol) leads to the iminoacyl compound Nb({eta}{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 4}SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}(CRNR{sup 1}) (10, R = CH(Ph{sub 2}), R{sup 1} = Ph). The one- and two-electron reductions of 1 have been studied by cyclic voltammetry experiments. The structure of 1 was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffractometry: a = 24.4904 (14) {angstrom}, b = 11.0435 (04) {angstrom}, c = 26.6130 (15) {angstrom}, {beta} = 109.890 (5){degree}, monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z = 8, V = 6,768.4 (5) {angstrom}{sup 3}, {rho}{sub calcd} = 1.3194 g/mL, R = 0.048, R{sub w} = 0.060 based on 4,806 observed reflections. The structure contains a niobium atom bonded to two cyclopentadienyl rings in a {eta}{sup 5} fashion; the coordination of the metal is completed by a Cl atom and a {eta}{sup 2}(C,N)-bonded ketenimine ligand.

  6. Phenylacetylene and H bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... all resembling H bonds. Non-linear H bonds due to secondary interactions. C-H stretching frequency shows blue shift. Heavy atom distances are longer than the sum of van der Waals radii. Formed a task group through IUPAC to come up with a modern definition of H bond. 15 international experts including Desiraju.

  7. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  8. Avaliação da resistência da união metal-resina usando sistemas de retenção mecânico e químico Evaluation of the resistance of metal-resin bond using mechanical and chemical retention systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Silva Andrade TAROZZO

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a resistência ao cisalhamento da união metal-resina empregando-se cinco tipos de retenção na estrutura metálica, em três ligas comerciais de Ni-Cr: Duceranium U, Wiron 99 e Wirocer. Um total de 90 corpos-de-prova foi submetido ao ensaio de cisalhamento e os resultados obtidos foram analisados estatisticamente, o que permitiu concluir que a interação retenção versus ligas foi estatisticamente significante em nível de 1% de probabilidade, sendo que o maior valor médio de resistência foi obtido com a liga Wirocer com retenção mecânica 0,6 mm, e o menor foi obtido com a liga Wiron 99 com retenção química.The objective of the present investigation was to evaluate the resistance of metal-resin bonding using the Silicoater® MD system (Kulzer, five types of retention in the metal structure, and three commercial Ni-Cr alloys: Duceranium U, Wiron 99 and Wirocer. A total of 90 samples were submitted to the shearing test. Statistical analysis of the results permitted us to conclude that retention versus alloy interaction was statistically significant at a 1% level of probability, the highest mean value being obtained with the Wirocer alloy with mechanical retention with 0.6 mm spheres. The lowest mean values were observed with the Wiron 99 alloy with chemical retention.

  9. METHOD AND ALLOY FOR BONDING TO ZIRCONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCuaig, F.D.; Misch, R.D.

    1960-04-19

    A brazing alloy can be used for bonding zirconium and its alloys to other metals, ceramics, and cermets, and consists of 6 to 9 wt.% Ni, 6 to 9 wn~.% Cr, Mo, or W, 0 to 7.5 wt.% Fe, and the balance Zr.

  10. Forging C-C Bonds Through Decarbonylation of Aryl Ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Rosie J; Martin, Ruben

    2017-06-06

    The ability of nickel to cleave strong σ-bonds is again in the spotlight after a recent report that demonstrates the feasibility of using nickel complexes to promote decarbonylation of diaryl ketones. This transformation involves the cleavage of two strong C-C(O) bonds and avoids the use of noble metals, hence reinforcing the potential of decarbonylation as a technique for forging C-C bonds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Creep effects in diffusion bonding of oxygen-free copper

    CERN Document Server

    Moilanen, Antti

    Diffusion is the transport of atoms or particles through the surrounding material. Various microstructural changes in metals are based on the diffusion phenomena. In solid metals the diffusion is closely related to crystallographic defects. In single-component metals the dominant mechanism of diffusion is the vacancy mechanism. Diffusion bonding is a direct technological application of diffusion. It is an advanced solidstate joining process in which the surfaces of two components are brought to contact with each other and heated under a pressing load in a controlled environment. During the process, the contact surfaces are bonded by atomic diffusion across the interface and as a result, one solid piece is formed. The condition of high temperature and low applied stress combined with relatively long process duration enables the creep effects to take place in bonded metals. Furthermore, creep causes unwanted permanent deformations in the bonded components. Some authors suggest that there could be a threshold fo...

  12. Shear Bond Strength of Three Orthodontic Bonding Systems on Enamel and Restorative Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hellak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the shear bond strength (SBS and adhesive remnant index (ARI score of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (iBond™ and Scotchbond™ on different prosthetic surfaces and enamel, in comparison with the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™. Materials and Methods. A total of 270 surfaces (1 enamel and 8 restorative surfaces, n=30 were randomly divided into three adhesive groups. In group 1 (control brackets were bonded with Transbond XT primer. In the experimental groups iBond adhesive (group 2 and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (group 3 were used. The SBS was measured using a Zwicki 1120™ testing machine. The ARI and SBS were compared statistically using the Kruskal–Wallis test (P≤0.05. Results. Significant differences in SBS and ARI were found between the control group and experimental groups. Conclusions. Transbond XT showed the highest SBS on human enamel. Scotchbond Universal on average provides the best bonding on all other types of surface (metal, composite, and porcelain, with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures on restorative materials in patients. If metal brackets have to be bonded to a metal surface, the use of a dual-curing resin is recommended.

  13. Test method to assess interface adhesion in composite bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira de Freitas, S.; Sinke, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a new type of peel tests dedicated to composite bonding: Composite Peel Tests. This test is inspired on the standard floating roller peel test widely used for metal bonding. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of the Composite Peel Test to assess interface

  14. Resin-Bonded Bridges in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Johannes Hilbrandt van der

    1988-01-01

    In this thesis in vitro and in vivo studies on the clinical application of resin-bonded bridges are described and discussed. The development of different types of resin-bonded bridges is described in chapter 1. The bridges are often made by boding a cast metal retainer fitted with and artificial

  15. Semiempirical search for oxide superconductors based on bond valence sums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, S.; Fukushima, N.; Niu, H.; Ando, K.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between crystal structures and electronic states of layered transition-metal oxides are analyzed in the light of bond valence sums. Correlations between the superconducting transition temperature T c and the bond-valence-sum parameters are investigated for the high-T c cuprate compounds. Possibility of making nonsuperconducting oxides superconducting is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Nitrogen-tuned bonding mechanism of Li and Ti adatom embedded graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sangho; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2013-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen defects on the bonding mechanism and resultant binding energy between the metal and graphene layer were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the graphitic N-doped graphene, Li adatom exhibited ionic bonding character, while Ti adatom showed features of covalent bonding similar to that of pristine graphene. However, in the cases of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures, partially covalent bonding characteristic occurred around N atoms in the process of binding with metals, and this particular bond formation enhanced the bond strength of metal on the graphene layer as much as it exceeded the cohesive energy of the metal bulk. Thus, Li and Ti metals are expected to be dispersed with atomic accuracy on the pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene layers. These results demonstrate that the bonding mechanism of metal–graphene complex can change according to the type of N defect, and this also affects the binding results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nitrogen defects changed the bonding mechanism between metal and graphene. • Bonding character and binding results were investigated using DFT calculations. • Covalent bonding character occurred around pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene. • Pyridinic and pyrrolic N atoms are effective for metal dispersion on the graphene

  17. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  18. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and chemical bonding analysis of the lithium alkaline-earth metal gallide nitrides Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Manisha; Bobnar, Matej; Ormeci, Alim; Hoehn, Peter [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Stoiber, Dominik; Niewa, Rainer [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Ovchinnikov, Alexander [Chemische Metallkunde, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2017-11-17

    Large single crystals of Li{sub 2}(Ca{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] and Li{sub 2}(Sr{sub 3}N){sub 2}[Ga{sub 4}] up to several mm in size were grown from mixtures of the respective elements and binary alkaline-earth metal nitrides in reactive lithium melts employing a modified high-temperature centrifugation-aided filtration (HTCAF) technique. The main structural features of these isotypic phases are stella quadrangula building units [Ga{sub 4}]Li{sub 4/2} and octahedra (Nae{sub 6/2}), which form two independent interpenetrating networks. The phases crystallize in the η-carbide structure and represent diamagnetic small bandgap semiconductors. Real-space chemical bonding analysis indicates predominantly ionic bonding. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...

  1. The diffusion bonding of advanced material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, T.I.

    2001-01-01

    As a joining process diffusion bonding has been used since early periods, and artifacts have been found which date back to 3000 years. However, over the last 20 years this joining process has been rediscovered and research has been carried out to understand the mechanisms of the process, and the application of the technique to advanced materials. This paper will review some of the reasons to why diffusion bonding may be preferred over other more conventional welding processes to join advanced alloy systems. It also describes in brief the different types of bonding processes, namely, solid-state and liquid phase bonding techniques. The paper demonstrates the application of diffusion bonding processes to join a range of dissimilar materials for instance: oxide dispersion strengthened superalloys, titanium to duplex stainless steels and engineering ceramics such as Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ to metal alloys. The research work highlights the success and limitations of the diffusion bonding process and is based on the experience of the author and his colleagues. (author)

  2. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...

  3. From bifluorenylidene dianion to dibenzo[g,p]chrysene dianion: sensitivity of anisotropy changes to bonding structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenhar, R.; Beust, R.; Hagen, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Five polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the C-26 series having similar bonding structure yield dianions upon reduction with lithium metal. Anisotropy changes, revealed from an advanced charge distribution analysis performed on these dianions, show a correlation to the bonding structure...

  4. Investigation of the bonding strength and bonding mechanisms of SOFCs interconnector-electrode interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Ševeček, O.; Frandsen, L. H.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Molin, S.; Cannio, M.; Hjelm, J.; Hendriksen, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 162, č. 1 (2016), s. 250-253 ISSN 0167-577X Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Metal-ceramic bond strength * Schwickerath crack-initiation test * SOC interfaces Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.572, year: 2016

  5. Physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Modern manufacturing processes of complex integrated semiconductor devices are based on wafer-level manufacturing of components which are subsequently interconnected. When compared with classical monolithic bi-dimensional integrated circuits (2D ICs), the new approach of three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs) exhibits significant benefits in terms of signal propagation delay and power consumption due to the reduced metal interconnection length and allows high integration levels with reduced form factor. Metal thermo-compression bonding is a process suitable for 3D interconnects applications at wafer level, which facilitates the electrical and mechanical connection of two wafers even processed in different technologies, such as complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Due to its high electrical conductivity, copper is a very attractive material for electrical interconnects. For Cu-Cu wafer bonding the process requires typically bonding for around 1 h at 400°C and high contact pressure applied during bonding. Temperature reduction below such values is required in order to solve issues regarding (i) throughput in the wafer bonder, (ii) wafer-to-wafer misalignment after bonding and (iii) to minimise thermo-mechanical stresses or device degradation. The aim of this work was to study the physical mechanisms of Cu-Cu bonding and based on this study to further optimise the bonding process for low temperatures. The critical sample parameters (roughness, oxide, crystallinity) were identified using selected analytical techniques and correlated with the characteristics of the bonded Cu-Cu interfaces. Based on the results of this study the impact of several materials and process specifications on the bonding result were theoretically defined and experimentally proven. These fundamental findings subsequently facilitated low temperature (LT) metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding and even room temperature direct

  6. Cleaning of diffusion bonding surface by argon ion bombardment treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Airu; Ohashi, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Norio; Aoki, Masanori; Higashi, Yasuo; Hitomi, Nobuteru

    2003-01-01

    The specimens of oxygen-free high conductivity copper, SUS304L stainless steel and pure iron were treated by argon ion bombardment and then were bonded by diffusion bonding method. The effects of argon ion bombardment treatment on faying surface morphology, tensile strength of bonding joints and inclusions at the fracture surface were investigated. The results showed that argon ion bombardment treatment was effective to remove the oxide film and contamination at the faying surface and improve the quality of joints. The tensile strength of the bonded joints was improved, and minimum bonding temperature to make the metallic bonding at the interface was lowered by argon ion bombardment treatment. At the joints with argon ion bombardment treatment, ductile fractured surface was seen and the amount of inclusions was obviously decreased

  7. Composite pipe to metal joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie, James C.; Leslie, II, James C.; Heard, James; Truong, Liem V.; Josephson, Marvin

    2017-06-27

    A method for making a metal to composite tube joint including selecting an elongated interior fitting constructed with an exterior barrel, reduced in exterior diameter to form a distally facing annular shoulder and then projecting still further distally to form an interior sleeve having a radially outwardly facing bonding surface. Selecting an elongated metal outer sleeve formed proximally with a collar constructed for receipt over the barrel and increased in interior diameter and projecting distally to form an exterior sleeve having a radially inwardly facing bonding surface cooperating with the first bonding surface to form an annulus receiving an extremity of a composite tube and a bond bonding the extremity of the tube to the bonding surfaces.

  8. Effect of Bonding Pressure and Bonding Time on the Tensile Properties of Cu-Foam / Cu-Plate Diffusion Bonded Joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Ho; Heo, Hoe-Jun; Kang, Chung-Yun; Yoon, Tae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Open cell Cu foam, which has been widely utilized in various industries because of its high thermal conductivity, lightweight and large surface area, was successfully joined with Cu plate by diffusion bonding. To prevent excessive deformation of the Cu foam during bonding process, the bonding pressure should be lower than 500 kPa at 800 ℃ for 60 min and bonding pressure should be lowered with increasing holding time. The bonding strength was evaluated by tensile tests. The tensile load of joints increased with the bonding pressure and holding time. In the case of higher bonding pressure or time, the bonded length at the interface was usually longer than the cross-sectional length of the foam, so fracture occurred at the foam. For the same reason, base metal (foam) fracture mainly occurred at the node-plate junction rather than in the strut-plate junction because the bonded surface area of the node was relatively larger than that of the strut.

  9. Bond markets in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Mu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available African bond markets have been steadily growing in recent years, but nonetheless remain undeveloped. African countries would benefit from greater access to financing and deeper financial markets. This paper compiles a unique set of data on government securities and corporate bond markets in Africa. It then applies an econometric model to analyze the key determinants of African government securities market and corporate bond market capitalization. Government securities market capitalization is directly related to better institutions and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to smaller fiscal deficits, higher interest rate spreads, exchange rate volatility, and current and capital account openness. Corporate bond market capitalization is directly linked to economic size, the level of development of the economy and financial markets, better institutions, and interest rate volatility, and inversely related to higher interest rate spreads and current account openness. Policy implications follow.

  10. The 'Invisible' Metal Particles in Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Diaz-Moreno, S.; Muñoz-Paez, A.

    1997-01-01

    An easy, reliable and straightforward method to determine the sizes of small metal particles in supported metal catalyst which are invisible for most techniques (chemisorption, XRD, HRTEM) is presented. The technique we consider more appropriate is EXAFS, because it detects metal metal bonds even

  11. Investigation of Bond Strength in Centrifugal Lining of Babbitt on Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Papa; Jones, Alan

    2010-03-01

    The quality of the bond between Babbitt metal and a cast iron substrate was evaluated for centrifugal casting and static casting using the Chalmers bond strength method and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of three different centrifugal casting parameters, the speed of revolution, the pouring rate, and the cooling rate, was investigated. The bond strength and the microstructure at the bond interface were predominantly affected by the cooling rate, with a fast cooling rate resulting in better properties. The speed of revolution and the pouring rate only had a small effect on the bond strength, with faster revolution and faster pouring rate resulting in slightly better bonds.

  12. Handbook of wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramm, Peter; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2011-01-01

    Written by an author and editor team from microsystems companies and industry-near research organizations, this handbook and reference presents dependable, first-hand information on bonding technologies.In the first part, researchers from companies and institutions around the world discuss the most reliable and reproducible technologies for the production of bonded wafers. The second part is devoted to current and emerging applications, including microresonators, biosensors and precise measuring devices.

  13. Metallizing of machinable glass ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seigal, P.K.

    1976-02-01

    A satisfactory technique has been developed for metallizing Corning (Code 9658) machinable glass ceramic for brazing. Analyses of several bonding materials suitable for metallizing were made using microprobe analysis, optical metallography, and tensile strength tests. The effect of different cleaning techniques on the microstructure and the effect of various firing temperatures on the bonding interface were also investigated. A nickel paste, used for thick-film application, has been applied to obtain braze joints with strength in excess of 2000 psi

  14. Syntheses, structures, and physicochemical properties of diruthenium compounds of tetrachlorocatecholate with metal-metal bonded Ru(3+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3+) and Ru(3.5+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3.5+) cores (R = CH(3) and C(2)H(5)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, H; Chang, H C; Mochizuki, K; Kitagawa, S

    2001-07-02

    Metal-metal bonded Ru(3+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3+) and Ru(3.5+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3.5+) (R = CH(3) and CH(3)CH(2)) compounds with tetrachlorocatecholate (Cl(4)Cat) have been synthesized in the corresponding alcohol, MeOH and EtOH, from a nonbridged Ru(2+)-Ru(3+) compound, Na(3)[Ru(2)(Cl(4)Cat)(4)(THF)].3H(2)O.7THF (1). In alcohol solvents, compound 1 is continuously oxidized by oxygen to form Ru(3+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3+) and Ru(3.5+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3.5+) species. The presence of a characteristic countercation leads to selective isolation of either Ru(3+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3+) or Ru(3.5+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3.5+) as a stable adduct species. In methanol, Ph(4)PCl and dibenzo-18-crown-6-ether afford Ru(3+)(mu-OMe)(2)Ru(3+) species, [A](2)[Ru(2)(Cl(4)Cat)(4)(mu-OMe)(2)Na(2)(MeOH)(6)] ([A](+) = Ph(4)P(+) (2), [Na(dibenzo-18-crown-6)(H(2)O)(MeOH)](+) (3)), while benzo-15-crown-5-ether provides a Ru(3.5+)(mu-OMe)(2)Ru(3.5+) species, [Na(benzo-15-crown-5)(2)][Ru(2)(Cl(4)Cat)(4)(mu-OMe)(2)Na(2)(MeOH)(6)] (4). The air oxidation of 1 in a MeOH/EtOH mixed solvent (1:1 v/v) containing benzo-15-crown-5-ether provides a Ru(3.5+)(mu-OMe)(2)Ru(3.5+) species, [Na(benzo-15-crown-5)(H(2)O)][Ru(2)(Cl(4)Cat)(2)(mu-OMe)(2)Na(2)(EtOH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)(MeOH)(2)].(benzo-15-crown-5) (5). Similarly, the oxidation of 1 in ethanol with Ph(4)PCl provides a Ru(3.5+)(mu-OEt)(2)Ru(3.5+) species, (Ph(4)P)[Ru(2)(Cl(4)Cat)(4)(mu-OEt)(2)Na(2)(EtOH)(6)] (7). A selective formation of a Ru(3+)(mu-OEt)(2)Ru(3+) species, (Ph(4)P)(2)[Ru(2)(Cl(4)Cat)(4)(mu-OEt)(2)Na(2)(EtOH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)] (6), is found in the presence of pyrazine or 2,5-dimethylpyrazine. The crystal structures of these compounds, except 2 and 7, have been determined by X-ray crystallography, and all compounds have been characterized by several spectroscopic and magnetic investigations. The longer Ru-Ru bonds are found in the Ru(3+)(mu-OR)(2)Ru(3+) species (2.606(1) and 2.628(2) A for 3 and 6, respectively) compared with those of Ru(3.5+)(mu-OMe)(2)Ru(3.5+) species (2.5260(6) A and 2

  15. Bonding brackets to porcelain: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sant'Anna Eduardo Franzotti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to verify, in vitro, the effect of various porcelain surface treatments on the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded to porcelain and the mode of fracture after debonding. Eighty-eight samples of metallic supported feldspathic porcelain were randomly divided into four groups according to their surface preparation as follows: the porcelain was maintained intact (GI, roughened with a diamond bur (GII, etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid (GIII, or sandblasted with aluminum oxide (GIV. The specimens were treated with silane (Scothprime and brackets were bonded with Concise. Each sample was subjected to a shear load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min and a recording was made at the point of failure. Bond strengths, adequate to withstand the application of orthodontic forces, were achieved in all groups. The Kruskal-Wallis statistical test showed no significant differences in bond strength between the groups (p>0.05. However, many more porcelain fractures occurred on deglazed porcelain. This study indicates that with the appropriate material selection, the silane/composite procedure alone may be adequate for bonding.

  16. A General Catalyst for Site-Selective C(sp(3))-H Bond Amination of Activated Secondary over Tertiary Alkyl C(sp(3))-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamp, Ryan J; Jirak, James G; Dolan, Nicholas S; Guzei, Ilia A; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2016-06-17

    The discovery of transition metal complexes capable of promoting general, catalyst-controlled and selective carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond amination of activated secondary C-H bonds over tertiary alkyl C(sp(3))-H bonds is challenging, as substrate control often dominates when reactive nitrene intermediates are involved. In this letter, we report the design of a new silver complex, [(Py5Me2)AgOTf]2, that displays general and good-to-excellent selectivity for nitrene insertion into propargylic, benzylic, and allylic C-H bonds over tertiary alkyl C(sp(3))-H bonds.

  17. Romanian government bond market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia POP

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to present the level of development reached by Romanian government bond market segment, as part of the country financial market. The analysis will be descriptive (the data series available for Romania are short, based on the secondary data offered by the official bodies involved in the process of issuing and trading the Romanian government bonds (Romanian Ministry of Public Finance, Romanian National Bank and Bucharest Stock Exchange, and also on secondary data provided by the Federation of European Stock Exchanges.To enhance the market credibility as a benchmark, a various combination of measures is necessary; among these measures are mentioned: the extension of the yield curve; the issuance calendars in order to improve transparency; increasing the disclosure of information on public debt issuance and statistics; holding regular meetings with dealers, institutional investors and rating agencies; introducing a system of primary dealers; establishing a repurchase (repo market in the government bond market. These measures will be discussed based on the evolution presented inside the paper.The paper conclude with the fact that, until now, the Romanian government bond market did not provide a benchmark for the domestic financial market and that further efforts are needed in order to increase the government bond market transparency and liquidity.

  18. Interstellar hydrogen bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2018-06-01

    This paper reports the first extensive study of the existence and effects of interstellar hydrogen bonding. The reactions that occur on the surface of the interstellar dust grains are the dominant processes by which interstellar molecules are formed. Water molecules constitute about 70% of the interstellar ice. These water molecules serve as the platform for hydrogen bonding. High level quantum chemical simulations for the hydrogen bond interaction between 20 interstellar molecules (known and possible) and water are carried out using different ab-intio methods. It is evident that if the formation of these species is mainly governed by the ice phase reactions, there is a direct correlation between the binding energies of these complexes and the gas phase abundances of these interstellar molecules. Interstellar hydrogen bonding may cause lower gas abundance of the complex organic molecules (COMs) at the low temperature. From these results, ketenes whose less stable isomers that are more strongly bonded to the surface of the interstellar dust grains have been observed are proposed as suitable candidates for astronomical observations.

  19. Safe and Liquid Mortgage Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Lund, Jesper

    This paper shows that strict match pass-through funding of covered bonds provides safe and liquid mortgage bonds. Despite a 30% drop in house prices during the 2008 global crisis Danish mortgage bonds remained as liquid as most European government bonds. The Danish pass-through system effectively...... eliminates credit risk from the investor's perspective. Similar to other safe bonds, funding liquidity becomes the main driver of mortgage bond liquidity and this creates commonality in liquidity across markets and countries. These findings have implications for how to design a robust mortgage bond system...

  20. Development of HIP bonding procedure and mechanical properties of HIP bonded joints for reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Kurasawa, Toshimasa; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Hatano, Toshihisa; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1997-03-01

    Structural materials of blanket components in fusion DEMO reactors will receive a neutron wall load more than 3-5MW/m 2 as well as exposed by surface heat flux more than 0.5MW/m 2 . A reduced activation ferritic steel F-82H has been developed by JAERI in collaboration with NKK from viewpoints of resistance for high temperature and neutron loads and lower radioactivity. This study intends to obtain basic performance of F-82H to establish the fabrication procedure of the first wall and blanket box by using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) bonding. Before HIP bonding tests, effects of heat treatment temperature and surface roughness on mechanical properties of joints were investigated in the heat treatment tests and diffusion bonding tests, respectively. From these results, the optimum HIP bonding conditions and the post heat treatment were selected. Using these conditions, the HIP bonding tests were carried out to evaluate HIP bondability and to obtain mechanical properties of the joints. Sufficient HIP bonding performance was obtained under the temperature of 1040degC, the compressive stress of 150MPa, the holding time of 2h, and the surface roughness ∼μ m. Mechanical properties of HIP bonded joints with these conditions were similar to those of as-received base metal. An oxide formation on the surface to be bonded would need to be avoided for sufficient bonding. The bonding ratio, Charpy impact value and fatigue performance of the joints strongly depended on the HIP conditions, especially temperature, while micro-structure, Vickers hardness and tensile properties had little dependence on the HIP temperature. The surface roughness strongly affected the bonding ratio and would be required to be in the level of a few μ m. In the HIP bonding test of the welded material, the once-melted surface could be jointed by the HIP bonding under the above-mentioned procedure. (J.P.N.)

  1. Tensile and fatigue properties of weld-bonded and adhesive-bonded magnesium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, W.; Liu, L.; Zhou, Y.; Mori, H.; Chen, D.L.

    2013-01-01

    The microstructures, tensile and fatigue properties of weld-bonded (WB) AZ31B-H24 Mg/Mg joints with different sizes of bonding area were evaluated and compared with the adhesive-bonded (AB) Mg/Mg joints. Typical equiaxed dendritic structures containing divorced eutectic Mg 17 Al 12 particles formed in the fusion zone of both WB-1 (with a bonding area of 35 mm×35 mm) and WB-0.5 (with a bonding area of 17.5 mm×35 mm) joints. Less solidification shrinkage cracking was observed in the WB-0.5 joints than WB-1 joints. While the WB-0.5 joints exhibited a slightly lower maximum tensile shear stress than the AB-0.5 joints (with a bonding area of 17.5 mm×35 mm), the energy absorption was equivalent. Although the AB-0.5 joints exhibited a higher fatigue resistance at higher cyclic stress levels, both the AB-0.5 and WB-0.5 joints showed an equivalent fatigue resistance at lower cyclic stress levels. A higher fatigue limit was observed in the WB-0.5 joints than in the WB-1 joints owing to the presence of fewer shrinkage pores. Cohesive failure mode along the adhesive layer in conjunction with partial nugget pull-out from the weld was observed at the higher cyclic loads, and fatigue failure occurred in the base metal at the lower cyclic loads

  2. Reversible conversion of valence-tautomeric copper metal-organic frameworks dependent single-crystal-to-single-crystal oxidation/reduction: a redox-switchable catalyst for C-H bonds activation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Jie; Song, Chuanjun; Ding, Ran; Qiao, Yan; Hou, Hongwei; Chang, Junbiao; Fan, Yaoting

    2015-06-28

    Upon single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) oxidation/reduction, reversible structural transformations take place between the anionic porous zeolite-like Cu(I) framework and a topologically equivalent neutral Cu(I)Cu(II) mixed-valent framework. The unique conversion behavior of the Cu(I) framework endowed it as a redox-switchable catalyst for the direct arylation of heterocycle C-H bonds.

  3. Solid state bonding of beryllium to copper and vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, D.R.; Liby, A.L.; Weaver, W.

    1993-01-01

    The intent of this effort was to demonstrate that ingot metallurgy (IM) beryllium (Be) can be bonded to dissimilar metals such as copper (Cu) or vanadium (V) at low temperatures by using silver (Ag) as a bonding aid. It is hoped that success at the coupon stage will stimulate more extensive studies of the mechanical and thermal integrity of such joints, leading ultimately to use of this technology to fabricate first wall structures for ITER. (orig.)

  4. Assessing the Bonding Properties of Individual Molecular Orbitals

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, PJ; Alexandrova, AN

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Molecular orbitals (MOs), while one of the most widely used representations of the electronic structure of a system, are often too complex to intuit properties. Aside from the simplest of cases, it is not necessarily possible to visually tell which orbitals are bonding or antibonding along particular directions, especially in cases of highly delocalized and nontrivial bonding like metal clusters or solids. We propose a method for easily assessing and comparin...

  5. A study of roll-bonding MS90 alloy to steel utilizing chromized interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolaminejad, B.; Arabi, H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a study of the application of a roll bonding technique to MS90(CuZn10) alloy strips and steel sheets using a chromized interlayer. It was found that the overall bond between these two metals resulted from two different types of bonds: a block bond, linking the MS90 alloy strips and chromium topcoat layer, and a blank bond, linking the MS90 alloy strips and bare steel surface in the area where the chromium coating has been fragmented. This study investigated the effects of plating time on the thickness of the coating layers and of the area fraction of the blank bond on the bond strength. The overall bond strength depends mainly on the strength and the area fraction of the blank bond. A linear relationship model exists between the overall bond strength and the area fraction of the blank bond. The bond strength of the blank bond was eight times greater than that of the block bond. The area fraction of the blank bond increased with increasing the coating thickness up to 55 μm, but thereafter decreased due to the rotation of the chromium blocks

  6. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  7. Continuing bonds and place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Annika; Walter, Tony

    2017-08-01

    Where do people feel closest to those they have lost? This article explores how continuing bonds with a deceased person can be rooted in a particular place or places. Some conceptual resources are sketched, namely continuing bonds, place attachment, ancestral places, home, reminder theory, and loss of place. The authors use these concepts to analyze interview material with seven Swedes and five Britons who often thought warmly of the deceased as residing in a particular place and often performing characteristic actions. The destruction of such a place, by contrast, could create a troubling, haunting absence, complicating the deceased's absent-presence.

  8. The influence of adherent surface preparation on bond durability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, A.N.; Arnott, D.R.; Olsson-Jacques, C.L.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: One of the major factors limiting the use of adhesive bonding is the problem associated with the production of adhesive joints that can maintain their initial strength over long periods of time in hostile environments. It is well known that the adherent surface preparation method is critical to the formation of a durable adhesive bond. Work presented in this paper focuses on the critical aspects of the surface preparation of aluminium employed for the manufacture of aluminium-epoxy joints. The surface preparation procedure examined is currently employed by the RAAF for repairs requiring metal to adhesive bonding. The influence of each step in the surface preparation on the ultimate bond durability performance of the adhesive joint is examined by a combination of methods. Double cantilever wedge style adhesive joints are loaded in mode 1 opening and then exposed to a humid environment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements of the aluminium adherent before bonding provides information about the adherent surface chemistry. XPS is also employed to analyse the surfaces of the bonded specimens post failure to establish the locus of fracture. This approach provides important information regarding the properties influencing bond durability as well as the bond failure mechanisms. A two step bond degradation model was developed to qualitatively describe the observed bond durability performance and fracture data. The first step involves controlled moisture ingress by stress induced microporosity of the adhesive in the interfacial region. The second step determines the locus of fracture through the relative dominance of one of three competitive processes, viz: oxide degradation, polymer desorption, or polymer degradation. A key element of the model is the control exercised over the interfacial microporosity by the combined interaction of stress and the relative densities of strong and weak linkages at the metal to adhesive interface

  9. Friedel-Crafts reaction of benzyl fluorides: selective activation of C-F bonds as enabled by hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pier Alexandre; Benhassine, Yasmine; Desroches, Justine; Paquin, Jean-François

    2014-12-08

    A Friedel-Crafts benzylation of arenes with benzyl fluorides has been developed. The reaction produces 1,1-diaryl alkanes in good yield under mild conditions without the need for a transition metal or a strong Lewis acid. A mechanism involving activation of the C-F bond through hydrogen bonding is proposed. This mode of activation enables the selective reaction of benzylic C-F bonds in the presence of other benzylic leaving groups. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Integration of European Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I investigate the time variation in the integration of EU government bond markets. The integration is measured by the explanatory power of European factor portfolios for the individual bond markets for each year. The integration of the government bond markets is stronger for EMU than non-EMU memb......I investigate the time variation in the integration of EU government bond markets. The integration is measured by the explanatory power of European factor portfolios for the individual bond markets for each year. The integration of the government bond markets is stronger for EMU than non...

  11. Bonding and structure of copper nitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundari, Thomas R; Dinescu, Adriana; Kazi, Abul B

    2008-11-03

    Copper nitrenes are of interest as intermediates in the catalytic aziridination of olefins and the amination of C-H bonds. However, despite advances in the isolation and study of late-transition-metal multiply bonded complexes, a bona fide structurally characterized example of a terminal copper nitrene has, to our knowledge, not been reported. In anticipation of such a report, terminal copper nitrenes are studied from a computational perspective. The nitrene complexes studied here are of the form (beta-diketiminate)Cu(NPh). Density functional theory (DFT), complete active space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure techniques, and hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are employed to study such species. While DFT methods indicate that a triplet (S = 1) is the ground state, CASSCF calculations indicate that a singlet (S = 0) is the ground state, with only a small energy gap between the singlet and triplet. Moreover, the ground-state (open-shell) singlet copper nitrene is found to be highly multiconfigurational (i.e., biradical) and to possess a bent geometry about the nitrene nitrogen, contrasting with the linear nitrene geometry of the triplet copper nitrenes. CASSCF calculations also reveal the existence of a closed-shell singlet state with some degree of multiple bonding character for the copper-nitrene bond.

  12. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing; Yi, Xin; Xiao, Kang; Li, Shunbo; Kodzius, Rimantas; Qin, Jianhua; Wen, Weijia

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  13. Wax-bonding 3D microfluidic chips

    KAUST Repository

    Gong, Xiuqing

    2013-10-10

    We report a simple, low-cost and detachable microfluidic chip incorporating easily accessible paper, glass slides or other polymer films as the chip materials along with adhesive wax as the recycling bonding material. We use a laser to cut through the paper or film to form patterns and then sandwich the paper and film between glass sheets or polymer membranes . The hot-melt adhesive wax can realize bridge bonding between various materials, for example, paper, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) film, glass sheets, or metal plate. The bonding process is reversible and the wax is reusable through a melting and cooling process. With this process, a three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic chip is achievable by vacuating and venting the chip in a hot-water bath. To study the biocompatibility and applicability of the wax-based microfluidic chip, we tested the PCR compatibility with the chip materials first. Then we applied the wax-paper based microfluidic chip to HeLa cell electroporation (EP ). Subsequently, a prototype of a 5-layer 3D chip was fabricated by multilayer wax bonding. To check the sealing ability and the durability of the chip, green fluorescence protein (GFP) recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria were cultured, with which the chemotaxis of E. coli was studied in order to determine the influence of antibiotic ciprofloxacin concentration on the E. coli migration.

  14. Amalgam shear bond strength to dentin using different bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M A; Denehy, G E; Ratananakin, T

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength of amalgam to dentin using five different bonding agents: Amalgambond Plus, Optibond, Imperva Dual, All-Bond 2, and Clearfil Liner Bond. Flat dentin surfaces obtained by grinding the occlusal portion of 50 human third molars were used for this study. To contain the amalgam on the tooth surface, cylindrical plastic molds were placed on the dentin and secured with sticky wax. The bonding agents were then applied according to the manufacturers' instructions or light activated and Tytin amalgam was condensed into the plastic molds. The samples were thermocycled and shear bond strengths were determined using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Analysis by one-way ANOVA indicated significant difference between the five groups (P < 0.05). The bond strength of amalgam to dentin was significantly higher with Amalgambond Plus using the High-Performance Additive than with the other four bonding agents.

  15. A comparison of finite element analysis with in vitro bond strength tests of the bracket-cement-enamel system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Algera, T.J.; Feilzer, A.J.; Prahl-Andersen, B.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro shear bond strength (SBS) and tensile bond strength (TBS) of 45 metal brackets bonded with Transbond XT to bovine enamel. The SBS was determined by loading the short and the long sides of the bracket base. Testing took place after storage of the

  16. Convertible bond valuation focusing on Chinese convertible bond market

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ke

    2010-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the methods of valuation of convertible bonds in Chinese market. Different from common convertible bonds in European market, considering the complicate features of Chinese convertible bond, this paper represents specific pricing approaches for pricing convertible bonds with different provisions along with the increment of complexity of these provisions. More specifically, this paper represents the decomposing method and binomial tree method for pricing both of Non-...

  17. Titanium Insertion into CO Bonds in Anionic Ti-CO2 Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Leah G; Thompson, Michael C; Weber, J Mathias

    2018-03-22

    We explore the structures of [Ti(CO 2 ) y ] - cluster anions using infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations. The existence of spectral signatures of metal carbonyl CO stretching modes shows that insertion of titanium atoms into C-O bonds represents an important reaction during the formation of these clusters. In addition to carbonyl groups, the infrared spectra show that the titanium center is coordinated to oxalato, carbonato, and oxo ligands, which form along with the metal carbonyls. The presence of a metal oxalato ligand promotes C-O bond insertion in these systems. These results highlight the affinity of titanium for C-O bond insertion processes.

  18. Production of metal particles and clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, S. P.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of producing novel metals or metal clusters in a low gravity environment was studied. The production of coordinately unsaturated metal carbonyls by thermolysis or photolysis of stable metal carbonyls has the potential to generate novel catalysts by this technique. Laser irradiation of available metal carbonyls was investigated. It is found that laser induced decomposition of metal carbonyls is feasible for producing a variety of coordinately unsaturated species. Formation of clustered species does occur but is hampered by weak metal-metal bonds.

  19. Research progress of III-V laser bonding to Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Ren; Yan, Hou; Yanan, Liang

    2016-12-01

    The vigorous development of silicon photonics makes a silicon-based light source essential for optoelectronics' integration. Bonding of III-V/Si hybrid laser has developed rapidly in the last ten years. In the tireless efforts of researchers, we are privileged to see these bonding methods, such as direct bonding, medium adhesive bonding and low temperature eutectic bonding. They have been developed and applied to the research and fabrication of III-V/Si hybrid lasers. Some research groups have made remarkable progress. Tanabe Katsuaki of Tokyo University successfully implemented a silicon-based InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser with direct bonding method in 2012. They have bonded the InAs/GaAs quantum dot laser to the silicon substrate and the silicon ridge waveguide, respectively. The threshold current of the device is as low as 200 A/cm2. Stevan Stanković and Sui Shaoshuai successfully produced a variety of hybrid III-V/Si laser with the method of BCB bonding, respectively. BCB has high light transmittance and it can provide high bonding strength. Researchers of Tokyo University and Peking University have realized III-V/Si hybrid lasers with metal bonding method. We describe the progress in the fabrication of III-V/Si hybrid lasers with bonding methods by various research groups in recent years. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are presented. We also introduce the progress of the growth of III-V epitaxial layer on silicon substrate, which is also a promising method to realize silicon-based light source. I hope that readers can have a general understanding of this field from this article and we can attract more researchers to focus on the study in this field.

  20. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    century and most chemists appear to think of 'chemi- cal bond' as ..... These complexes, in their global min- ima, have ... taneously act as hydrogen bond donor and acceptor displaying ... also has a local minimum, which is linear and similar to.

  1. Strength of bond with Comspan Opaque to three silicoated alloys and titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, O

    1990-06-01

    In Sweden high-gold alloys or cobalt-chromium alloys are used for resin-bonded prostheses. The bond strength between a resin cement and different sandblasted or silicoated metals were measured before and after thermocycling; in connection with this some rapid thermocycling methods were studied. The effect of different storage times and different protection coatings on bond strength were tested. Finally, the influence of rubbing and contamination with saliva on bond strength were investigated. Silicoating increased the bond strength significantly. The highest bond strengths were these of silicoated Wirobond and titanium, unsusceptible to thermal stress; the bond strengths of the sandblasted metals were the weakest, and sensitive to thermocycling as well. The influence on bond strength for silicoated gold alloys, protected with an unpolymerized composite resin coating, stored in sealed plastic bags up to 7 days, was negligible. Rubbing and contamination with saliva did not influence bond strength. Preferably, silicoated Wirobond and titanium should be used for resin-bonded prostheses, but gold alloys may still be adequate for clinical use. The experimental method described for storing, sealing, and cleaning the silicoated metal surfaces in this article can be recommended for laboratory and clinical use.

  2. Bond yield curve construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kožul Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the broadest sense, yield curve indicates the market's view of the evolution of interest rates over time. However, given that cost of borrowing it closely linked to creditworthiness (ability to repay, different yield curves will apply to different currencies, market sectors, or even individual issuers. As government borrowing is indicative of interest rate levels available to other market players in a particular country, and considering that bond issuance still remains the dominant form of sovereign debt, this paper describes yield curve construction using bonds. The relationship between zero-coupon yield, par yield and yield to maturity is given and their usage in determining curve discount factors is described. Their usage in deriving forward rates and pricing related derivative instruments is also discussed.

  3. Corporate Hybrid Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlberg, Johan; Jansson, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid securities do not constitute a new phenomenon in the Swedish capital markets. Most commonly, hybrids issued by Swedish real estate companies in recent years are preference shares. Corporate hybrid bonds on the other hand may be considered as somewhat of a new-born child in the family of hybrid instruments. These do, as all other hybrid securities, share some equity-like and some debt-like characteristics. Nevertheless, since 2013 the interest for the instrument has grown rapidly and ha...

  4. Hybrid Cat Bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Barrieu, Pauline; Louberge, Henri

    2009-01-01

    Natural catastrophes attract regularly the attention of media and have become a source of public concern. From a financial viewpoint, natural catastrophes represent idiosyncratic risks, diversifiable at the world level. But for reasons analyzed in this paper reinsurance markets are unable to cope with this risk completely. Insurance-linked securities, such as cat bonds, have been issued to complete the international risk transfer process, but their development is disappointing so far. This pa...

  5. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form 25...

  7. New metal-organic polygons involving MM quadruple bonds: M8(O2CtBu)4(mu-SC4H2-3,4-{CO2}2)6 (M=Mo, W).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Matthew J; Chisholm, Malcolm H; Patmore, Nathan J

    2005-12-12

    The reactions between M2(O2CtBu)4, where M=Mo or W, and thienyl-3,4-dicarboxylic acid (0.5-1.5 equiv) in toluene proceed via a series of detectable intermediates to the compounds M8(O2CtBu)4(mu-SC4H2-3,4-{CO2}2)6, which are isolated as air-sensitive yellow (M=Mo) or red (M=W) powders and show parent molecular ions in their mass spectra (MALDI). The structure of the molybdenum complex was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography and shown to contain an unusual M8 polygon involving four Mo2 quadruply bonded units linked via the agency of the six 3,4-thienylcarboxylate groups. The structure has crystallographically imposed S4 symmetry and may be described in terms of a highly distorted tetrahedron of Mo2 units or a bisphenoid in which two Mo2 units are linked by a thienyldicarboxylate such that intramolecular Mo2...O bonding is present, while the other thienylcarboxylate bridges merely serve to link these two [Mo2]...[Mo2] units together. The color of the compounds arises from intense M2 delta-to-thienyl pi transitions and, in THF, the complexes are redox-active and show four successive quasi-reversible oxidation waves. The [M8]+ radical cations, generated by one-electron oxidation with AgPF6, are shown to be valence-trapped (class II) by UV-vis-near-IR and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. These results are supported by the electronic structure calculations on model compounds M8(O2CH)4(mu-SC4H2-3,4-{CO}2)6 employing density functional theory that reveal only a small splitting of the M2 delta manifold via mixing with the 3,4-thienylcarboxylate pi system.

  8. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  9. Physical mechanisms of copper-copper wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebhan, B.; Hingerl, K.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the physical mechanisms driving Cu-Cu wafer bonding allowed for reducing the bonding temperatures below 200 °C. Metal thermo-compression Cu-Cu wafer bonding results obtained at such low temperatures are very encouraging and suggest that the process is possible even at room temperature if some boundary conditions are fulfilled. Sputtered (PVD) and electroplated Cu thin layers were investigated, and the analysis of both metallization techniques demonstrated the importance of decreasing Cu surface roughness. For an equal surface roughness, the bonding temperature of PVD Cu wafers could be even further reduced due to the favorable microstructure. Their smaller grain size enhances the length of the grain boundaries (observed on the surface prior bonding), acting as efficient mass transfer channels across the interface, and hence the grains are able to grow over the initial bonding interface. Due to the higher concentration of random high-angle grain boundaries, this effect is intensified. The model presented is explaining the microstructural changes based on atomic migration, taking into account that the reduction of the grain boundary area is the major driving force to reduce the Gibbs free energy, and predicts the subsequent microstructure evolution (grain growth) during thermal annealing

  10. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-07

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  11. Mullite/Mo interfaces formed by Intrusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolome, Jose F.; Diaz, Marcos; Moya, Jose S.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-04-30

    The microstructure and strength of Mo/mullite interfaces formed by diffusion bonding at 1650 C has been analyzed. Interfacial metal-ceramic interlocking contributes to flexural strength of approx. 140 MPa as measured by 3 point bending. Saturation of mullite with MoO2 does not affect the interfacial strength.

  12. Visualizing phosphodiester-bond hydrolysis by an endonuclease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Rafael; Stella, Stefano; Redondo, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of DNA phosphodiester bonds has been widely studied, but the chemical reaction has not yet been observed. Here we follow the generation of a DNA double-strand break (DSB) by the Desulfurococcus mobilis homing endonuclease I-DmoI, trapping sequential stages of a two-metal-...

  13. Mullite/Mo interfaces formed by Intrusion bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Bartolome, Jose F.; Diaz, Marcos; Moya, Jose S.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and strength of Mo/mullite interfaces formed by diffusion bonding at 1650oC has been analyzed. Interfacial metal-ceramic interlocking contributes to flexural strength of approx. 140 MPa as measured by 3 point bending. Saturation of mullite with MoO2 does not affect the interfacial strength.

  14. Process for protecting bonded components from plating shorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarte, Lisa A.; Bonde, Wayne L.; Carey, Paul G.; Contolini, Robert J.; McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2000-01-01

    A method which protects the region between a component and the substrate onto which the components is bonded using an electrically insulating fillet of photoresist. The fillet protects the regions from subsequent plating with metal and therefore shorting the plated conductors which run down the sides of the component and onto the substrate.

  15. Molecular orbital studies of the bonding in heavy element organometallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursten, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    This progress report contains highlights of research projects in actinide chemistry. Projects covered are bonding in Np, Pu, and transplutonium organometallic compounds, applications of the discrete variational Xα method to actinide chemistry, ab initio calculations on actinide molecules, and experimental comparisons of organoactinide and organotransition metal chemistry. Also included is brief discussions on budgets, funding, invited papers and invited presentations. (JL)

  16. Method of bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saller, H.A.; Hodge, E.S.; Paprocki, S.J.; Dayton, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    A method of making a fuel-containing structure for nuclear reactors is described comprising providing an assembly comprising fuel units consisting of a core plate containing thermal-neutron-fissionable material, sheets of cladding metal on its bottom and top surfaces, the cladding sheets being of greater width and length than the core plates whereby recesses are formed at the ends and sides of the core plate, and end pieces and first side pieces of cladding metal of the same thickness as the core plate positioned in the recesses. The assembly further comprises second side pieces of cladding metal engaging the cladding sheets so as to space the fuel units from one another, and filler plates of an acid-dissolvable nonresilient material whose melting point is above 2000 0 F, arranged between a pair of the second side pieces and the cladding plates of two adjacent fuel units. The filler plates have the same thickness as the second side pieces. The method further comprises enclosing the entire assembly in an envelope; evacuating the interior of the entire assembly through the envelope; applying inert gas under a pressure of about 10,000 psi to the outside of the envelope while at the same time heating the assembly to a temperature above the flow point of the cladding metal but below the melting point of any material of the assembly, slowly cooling the assembly to room temperature; removing the envelope; and dissolving the filler plates without attacking the cladding metal

  17. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B......-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had...... in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus...

  18. A study on the bonding residual thermal stress analysis of dissimilar materials using boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Won; Yu, Yeong Chul; Jeong, Eui Seob; Lee, Chang Ho

    1995-01-01

    It is very important to evaluate the bonding residual thermal stress in dissimilar materials such as LSI package. In this study, the bonding residual thermal stress was calculated using the boundary element method, varing with the sub-element, geometry of specimen and adhesive thickness. The present results reveal a stress singularity at the edge of the interface, therefore the bonding strength of metal/resin interface can be estimated by taking into account it.

  19. Investigations on organolead compounds V. Lead---lead bond cleavage reactions of hexaphenyldilead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsens, L.C.; Kerk, G.J.M. van der

    1968-01-01

    It has been shown that a number of nucleophilic and weakly electrophilic reagents (organolithium and organomagnesium compounds, metallic lithium, potassium permanganate, sodium ethoxide, diaryl disulphides, sulphur, ozone, hypochlorous acid and iodine/iodide) selectively cleave the lead---lead bond

  20. Non-bonding interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects play a critical role in the relative stability of group 12 complexes arising from interaction of diethanoldithiocarbamate with the cations of transition metals Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II): a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Homayoon; Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-07-01

    The chelating properties of diethanoldithiocarbamate (DEDC) and π-electron flow from the nitrogen atom to the sulfur atom via a plane-delocalized π-orbital system (quasi ring) was studied using a density functional theory method. The molecular structure of DEDC and its complexes with Zn(II), Cd(II), and Hg(II) were also considered. First, the geometries of this ligand and DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) were optimized, and the formation energies of these complexes were then calculated based on the electronic energy, or sum of electronic energies, with the zero point energy of each species. Formation energies indicated the DEDC-Zn(II) complex as the most stable complex, and DEDC-Cd(II) as the least stable. Structural data showed that the N1-C2 π-bond was localized in the complexes rather than the ligand, and a delocalized π-bond over S7-C2-S8 was also present. The stability of DEDC-Zn(II), DEDC-Cd(II), and DEDC-Hg(II) complexes increased in the presence of the non-specific effects of the solvent (PCM model), and their relative stability did not change. There was π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 and along S7-C2-S8 in the ligand. The π-electron flow or resonance along N1-C2-S7 was abolished when the metal interacted with sulfur atoms. Energy belonging to van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand was calculated for each complex. The results of nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) indicated a decreasing trend as Zn(II) Hg(II) for the aromaticity of the quasi-rings. Finally, by ignoring van der Waals interactions and non-covalent delocalization effects between the metal and sulfur atoms of the ligand, the relative stability of the complexes was changed as follows:[Formula: see text] Graphical Abstract Huge electronic cloud localized on Hg(II) in the Hg(II)-DEDC complex.

  1. Bonding mechanisms in spot welded three layer combinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghadam, Marcel; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Seyyedian Choobi, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    this interface. It has been shown previously that such a joint can reach relatively high strength resulting in plug failure in tensileshear testing. Additional strength due to these bonding mechanisms is also obtained in common spot welds in the so-called corona band around the weld nugget.......The strength of a spot weld generally stems from fusion bonding of the metal layers, but other solid state bonding mechanisms also contribute to the overall strength. Metallographic analyses are presented to identify the phases formed near and across the weld interfaces and to identify...... the occurring bonding mechanisms. When welding a combination of three galvanized steel layers where one outer layer is a thin low-carbon steel it is a common challenge to obtain nugget penetration into the thin low-carbon steel. It therefore happens in real production that no nugget is formed across...

  2. Quantum Devices Bonded Beneath a Superconducting Shield: Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Corey Rae; Abdallah, Adel; Bejanin, Jeremy; Earnest, Carolyn; McConkey, Thomas; Pagel, Zachary; Mariantoni, Matteo

    The next-generation quantum computer will rely on physical quantum bits (qubits) organized into arrays to form error-robust logical qubits. In the superconducting quantum circuit implementation, this architecture will require the use of larger and larger chip sizes. In order for on-chip superconducting quantum computers to be scalable, various issues found in large chips must be addressed, including the suppression of box modes (due to the sample holder) and the suppression of slot modes (due to fractured ground planes). By bonding a metallized shield layer over a superconducting circuit using thin-film indium as a bonding agent, we have demonstrated proof of concept of an extensible circuit architecture that holds the key to the suppression of spurious modes. Microwave characterization of shielded transmission lines and measurement of superconducting resonators were compared to identical unshielded devices. The elimination of box modes was investigated, as well as bond characteristics including bond homogeneity and the presence of a superconducting connection.

  3. Bonding of radioactive contamination. IV. Effect of surface finish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankin, W.N.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanisms by which radioactive contamination would be bonded to a DWPF canister are being investigated. Previous investigations in this series have examined the effects of temperature, oxidation before contamination, and atmosphere composition control on the bonding of contamination. This memorandum describes the results of tests to determine the effect of special surface finishes on the bonding of contamination to waste glass canisters. Surface pretreatments which produce smoother canister surfaces actually cause radioactive contamination to be more tightly bonded to the metal surface than on an untreated surface. Based on the results of these tests it is recommended that the canister surface finish be specified as having a bright cold rolled mill finish equivalent to ASTM No. 2B. 7 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  4. Porous Hydrogen-Bonded Organic Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fei Han

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ordered porous solid-state architectures constructed via non-covalent supramolecular self-assembly have attracted increasing interest due to their unique advantages and potential applications. Porous metal-coordination organic frameworks (MOFs are generated by the assembly of metal coordination centers and organic linkers. Compared to MOFs, porous hydrogen-bonded organic frameworks (HOFs are readily purified and recovered via simple recrystallization. However, due to lacking of sufficiently ability to orientate self-aggregation of building motifs in predictable manners, rational design and preparation of porous HOFs are still challenging. Herein, we summarize recent developments about porous HOFs and attempt to gain deeper insights into the design strategies of basic building motifs.

  5. Structure and bonding in gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in chemical applications of 197 Au Moessbauer spectroscopy are reviewed. For gold(I) and gold(III), systematic variations in isomer shift and quadrupole splitting are seen as the ligands are changed; the effects of change in coordination number of the gold atoms are also systematic. Data for gold(II) systems involving gold-gold bonds lie between those for corresponding gold(I) and gold(III) materials, showing a small increase in isomer shift and a larger increase in quadrupole splitting as the oxidation state decreases; these trends are explained in terms of the structures. Data for mixed-metal cluster compounds are much more sensitive to structural effects than in homonuclear clusters. Both sets of data show systematic changes with increase in the number of metal atoms to which the gold atom is bound. The connectivity also influences the recoil-free fraction. (orig.)

  6. Sequential C-Si Bond Formations from Diphenylsilane: Application to Silanediol Peptide Isostere Precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lone; Skrydstrup, Troels

    2008-01-01

    and the first new carbon-silicon bond. The next step is the reduction of this hydridosilane with lithium metal providing a silyl lithium reagent, which undergoes a highly diastereoselective addition to an optically active tert-butanesulfinimine, thus generating the second C-Si bond. This method allows...

  7. Diffusion welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Stephen C.; Vasudevan, Asuri K.

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor diffusion welded to a portion of a ceramic electrode body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect a metal bond.

  8. Prediction of fracture toughness and durability of adhesively bonded composite joints with undesirable bonding conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaramthota, Vishal

    Advanced composite materials have enabled the conventional aircraft structures to reduce weight, improve fuel efficiency and offer superior mechanical properties. In the past, materials such as aluminum, steel or titanium have been used to manufacture aircraft structures for support of heavy loads. Within the last decade or so, demand for advanced composite materials have been emerging that offer significant advantages over the traditional metallic materials. Of particular interest in the recent years, there has been an upsurge in scientific significance in the usage of adhesively bonded composite joints (ABCJ's). ABCJ's negate the introduction of stress risers that are associated with riveting or other classical techniques. In today's aircraft transportation market, there is a push to increase structural efficiency by promoting adhesive bonding to primary joining of aircraft structures. This research is focused on the issues associated with the durability and related failures in bonded composite joints that continue to be a critical hindrance to the universal acceptance of ABCJ's. Of particular interest are the short term strength, contamination and long term durability of ABCJ's. One of the factors that influence bond performance is contamination and in this study the influence of contamination on composite-adhesive bond quality was investigated through the development of a repeatable and scalable surface contamination procedure. Results showed an increase in the contaminant coverage area decreases the overall bond strength significantly. A direct correlation between the contaminant coverage area and the fracture toughness of the bonded joint was established. Another factor that influences bond performance during an aircraft's service life is its long term strength upon exposure to harsh environmental conditions or when subjected to severe mechanical loading. A test procedure was successfully developed in order to evaluate durability of ABCJ's comprising severe

  9. Asymmetrical bonding in cold spraying of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht, R.; Seyedein, S. H.; Kheirandish, S.; Assadi, H.; Jodoin, B.

    2018-06-01

    Characteristics of particle bonding, especially for dissimilar materials, remains a key question in cold spray deposition. There are limited reports in direct correlation to particle/substrate bonding and peripheral shear zones. Cold spraying experiments and numerical simulations are conducted to characterise and analyse the correlation between bonding and peripheral shear zones for asymmetric particle/substrate pairs of intermetallic-forming elements of nickel and titanium. The correlation between metallic bonding and highly strained areas is explored in view of the growth of the intermetallic phase at the particle/substrate interface during subsequent heat treatments. Characterisation of the as-sprayed samples reveal that for the Ni(particle)/Ti(substrate) pair, plastic deformation of the particle is dominating over substrate deformation. However, for the Ti(particle)/Ni(substrate) pair, it is observed that the substrate and particle deform to similar extents. Characterisation of the samples after a brief heat treatment at 700 °C indicate that intermetallic formation, and hence metallurgical bonding of the pairs is more likely to occur at the particle peripheries where the interface areas are highly strained, and rarely achieved at the particle base. Results also reveal that bonding extends from peripheries toward the central part of the interfaces with increasing the impact velocity. The kinetics of interfacial intermetallic formation at peripheral areas and its correlation to particle bonding is discussed in view of deformation-enhanced interdiffusion.

  10. V{sub 1+x}Nb{sub 1-x}IrB{sub 2} (x ∼ 0.1), the first quaternary metal-rich -boride adopting the Mo{sub 2}IrB{sub 2}-type structure: Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure and bonding analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerens, Christian; Fokwa, Boniface P.T. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Polycrystalline samples and single crystals of the new metal-rich boride V{sub 1+x}Nb{sub 1-x}IrB{sub 2} (x ∼ 0.1), were synthesized by arc-melting the elements in a water-cooled copper crucible under an argon atmosphere and characterized by X-ray diffraction and EDX measurements. The crystal structure was refined on the basis of single crystal data. The new phase adopts the Mo{sub 2}IrB{sub 2}-type structure (space group Pnnm, no. 58) with the lattice parameters a = 7.301(7) Aa, b = 9.388(9) Aa and c = 3.206(5) Aa. It is the first quaternary representative of Mo{sub 2}IrB{sub 2}-type structure. The structure contains zigzag B{sub 4}-fragments with boron-boron distances of 1.83-1.85 Aa. The electronic density of states and crystal orbital Hamilton population (for bonding analysis) were calculated, using the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation (LMTO-ASA) method. According to these calculations, this metal-rich compound should be metallic, as expected. Furthermore, very strong boron-boron interactions are observed in the zigzag B{sub 4}-fragment and two significantly different Ir-B interactions are observed in the new phase and the prototype Mo{sub 2}IrB{sub 2}. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Orthodontic bracket bonding without previous adhesive priming: A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Aline Segatto Pires; Degrazia, Felipe Weidenbach; Celeste, Roger Keller; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2016-05-01

    To determine the consensus among studies that adhesive resin application improves the bond strength of orthodontic brackets and the association of methodological variables on the influence of bond strength outcome. In vitro studies were selected to answer whether adhesive resin application increases the immediate shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets bonded with a photo-cured orthodontic adhesive. Studies included were those comparing a group having adhesive resin to a group without adhesive resin with the primary outcome measurement shear bond strength in MPa. A systematic electronic search was performed in PubMed and Scopus databases. Nine studies were included in the analysis. Based on the pooled data and due to a high heterogeneity among studies (I(2)  =  93.3), a meta-regression analysis was conducted. The analysis demonstrated that five experimental conditions explained 86.1% of heterogeneity and four of them had significantly affected in vitro shear bond testing. The shear bond strength of metal brackets was not significantly affected when bonded with adhesive resin, when compared to those without adhesive resin. The adhesive resin application can be set aside during metal bracket bonding to enamel regardless of the type of orthodontic adhesive used.

  12. Bismuth-boron multiple bonding in BiB_2O"- and Bi_2B"-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, Tian; Cheung, Ling Fung; Chen, Teng-Teng; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Despite its electron deficiency, boron is versatile in forming multiple bonds. Transition-metal-boron double bonding is known, but boron-metal triple bonds have been elusive. Two bismuth boron cluster anions, BiB_2O"- and Bi_2B"-, containing triple and double B-Bi bonds are presented. The BiB_2O"- and Bi_2B"- clusters are produced by laser vaporization of a mixed B/Bi target and characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. Well-resolved photoelectron spectra are obtained and interpreted with the help of ab initio calculations, which show that both species are linear. Chemical bonding analyses reveal that Bi forms triple and double bonds with boron in BiB_2O"- ([Bi≡B-B≡O]"-) and Bi_2B"- ([Bi=B=Bi]"-), respectively. The Bi-B double and triple bond strengths are calculated to be 3.21 and 4.70 eV, respectively. This is the first experimental observation of Bi-B double and triple bonds, opening the door to design main-group metal-boron complexes with multiple bonding. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Load-Displacement Curves of Spot Welded, Bonded, and Weld-Bonded Joints for Dissimilar Materials and Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Al-Bahkali

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional finite element models of spot welded, bonded and weld-bonded joints are developed using ABAQUS software. Each model consists of two strips with dissimilar materials and thickness and is subjected to an axial loading. The bonded and weld-bonded joints have specific adhesive thickness. A detailed experimental plan to define many properties and quantities such as, the elastic - plastic properties, modulus of elasticity, fracture limit, and properties of the nugget and heat affected zones are carried out. Experiments include standard testing of the base metal, the adhesive, the nugget and heat affected zone. They also include employing the indentation techniques, and ductile fracture limits criteria, using the special notch tests. Complete load-displacement curves are obtained for all joining models and a comparison is made to determine the best combination.

  14. Stability of a metabolizable ester bond in radioimmunoconjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arano, Yasushi; Wakisaka, Kouji; Mukai, Takahiro; Uezono, Takashi; Motonari, Hiroshi; Akizawa, Hiromichi; Kairiyama, Claudia; Ohmomo, Yoshiro; Tanaka, Chiaki; Ishiyama, Munetaka; Sakahara, Harumi; Konishi, Junji; Yokoyama, Akira

    1996-01-01

    Ester bonds have been used as metabolizable linkages to reduce radioactivity levels in non-target tissues following the administration of antibodies labeled with metallic radionuclides. In this radiochemical design of antibodies, while the ester bonds should be cleaved rapidly in non-target tissues, high stability of the ester bonds in plasma is also required to preserve target radioactivity levels. To assess the structural requirements to stabilize the ester bond, a new benzyl-EDTA-derived bifunctional chelating agent with an ester bond, (1-[4-[4-(2-maleimidoethoxy)succinamido]benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'- tetraacetic acid; MESS-Bz-EDTA), was developed. MESS-Bz-EDTA was coupled with a thiolated monoclonal antibody (OST7, IgG 1 ) prepared by reducing its disulfide bonds to introduce the ester bond close and proximal to the antibody molecule. For comparison, 1-[4-(5-maleimidopentyl)aminobenzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EMCS-Bz-EDTA) and meleimidoethyl 3-[ 131 I]iodohippurate (MIH) was coupled to OST7 under the same conjunction chemistry. When incubated in 50% murine plasma or a buffered-solution of neutral pH, OST7-MESS-Bz-EDTA- 111 In rapidly released the radioactivity, and more than 95% of the initial radioactivity was liberated after a 24 h incubation in both solutions, due to a cleavage of the ester bond. On the other hand, only about 20% of the radioactivity was released from OST7-MIH- 131 I in both solutions during the same incubation period. In mice biodistribution studies, while a slightly faster radioactivity clearance from the blood with less radioactivity levels in the liver and kidneys was observed with OST7-MIH- 131 I than with OST7-EMCS-Bz-EDTA- 111 In, OST7-MESS-Bz-EDTA- 111 In indicated radioactivity clearance from the blood much faster than and almost comparable to that of OST7-MIH- 131 I and succinamidobenzyl-EDTA- 111 In, respectively. These findings as well as previous findings on radiolabeled antibodies with ester bonds

  15. Enamel shear bond strength of two orthodontic self-etching bonding systems compared to Transbond™ XT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellak, Andreas; Rusdea, Patrick; Schauseil, Michael; Stein, Steffen; Korbmacher-Steiner, Heike Maria

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores of two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances to the commonly used total etch system Transbond XT™ (in combination with phosphoric acid). In all, 60 human premolars were randomly divided into three groups of 20 specimens each. In group 1 (control), brackets were bonded with Transbond™ XT primer. Prompt L-Pop™ (group 2) and Scotchbond™ Universal (group 3) were used in the experimental groups. Lower premolar brackets were bonded by light curing the adhesive. After 24 h of storage, the shear bond strength (SBS) was measured using a Zwicki 1120 testing machine. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined under 10× magnification. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to statistically compare the SBS and the ARI scores. No significant differences in the SBS between any of the experimental groups were detected (group 1: 15.49 ± 3.28 MPa; group 2: 13.89 ± 4.95 MPa; group 3: 14.35 ± 3.56 MPa; p = 0.489), nor were there any significant differences in the ARI scores (p = 0.368). Using the two self-etching no-mix adhesives (Prompt L-Pop™ and Scotchbond™) for orthodontic appliances does not affect either the SBS or ARI scores in comparison with the commonly used total-etch system Transbond™ XT. In addition, Scotchbond™ Universal supports bonding on all types of surfaces (enamel, metal, composite, and porcelain) with no need for additional primers. It might therefore be helpful for simplifying bonding in orthodontic procedures.

  16. Instantaneous fluxless bonding of Au with Pb-Sn solder in ambient atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.K.; Zhang, Sam; Wong, C.C.; Tan, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    A fluxless bonding technique has been developed as a method of flip-chip bonding for microelectronic packaging. The fluxless bonding technique can be achieved instantaneously in an ambient environment between metallic stud bumps and predefined molten solder. This paper describes the mechanics of the bonding action and verifies the effectiveness of this bonding method through wetting balance tests and scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. This technique has been demonstrated by using a gold stud bump to break the tin oxide layer over molten solder. This allows for a fast, solid liquid interdiffusion between gold (Au) and the fresh molten eutectic lead-tin (Pb-Sn) solder for joint formation during solidification. This bonding method has been successfully tested with 130-μm-pitch flip-chip bond pads on a joint-in-via flex substrate architecture

  17. Diffusion bonding of reduced activation ferritic steel F82H for demo blanket application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurasawa, T.; Tamura, M.

    1996-01-01

    A reduced activation ferritic steel, a grade F82H developed by JAERI, is a promising candidate structural material for the blanket and the first wall of DEMO reactors. In the present study, diffusion bonding of F82H has been investigated to develop the fabrication procedures of the blanket box and the first wall panel with cooling channels embedded by F82H. The parameters examined are the bonding temperature (810-1050 C), bonding pressure (2-10 MPa) and roughness of the bonding surface (0.5-12.8 μR max ), and metallurgical examination and mechanical tests of the diffusion bonded joints have been conducted. From the tests, sufficient bonding was obtained under the temperatures of 840-1 050 C (compressive stress of 3-12 MPa), and it was found that heat treatment following diffusion bonding is essential to obtain the mechanical properties similar to that of the base metal. (orig.)

  18. A numerical model for cold welding of metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    1996-01-01

    at the weld interface. Accordingly, the general model for bond strength in cold welding earlier developed by Bay has been extended and modified. The new model presented in this paper simulates the whole cold welding process including the deformation of base metals and the establishment of welds bonding......Based on experimental investigations of cold welding of different metal combinations applying various surface preparation methods, the understanding of the mechanisms of bond formation in cold welding has been improved by introducing two parameters representing the properties of surface layers...... similar as well as dissimilar metals The calculated bond strengths are verified by comparing with experimental measurements....

  19. Exploration of the catalytic use of alkali metal bases

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis project was concerned with the use of alkali metal amide Brønsted bases and alkali metal alkoxide Lewis bases in (asymmetric) catalysis. The first chapter deals with formal allylic C(sp3)–H bond activation of aromatic and functionalized alkenes for subsequent C–C and C–H bond formations. The second chapter is focused on C(sp3)–Si bond activation of fluorinated pro-nucleophiles in view of C–C bond formations. In the first chapter, a screening of various metal amides...

  20. Effects of surface treatment of provisional crowns on the shear bond strength of brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Xavier de Almeida

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the adhesive resistance of metallic brackets bonded to temporary crowns made of acrylic resin after different surface treatments. METHODS: 180 specimens were made of Duralay and randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 30 according to surface treatment and bonding material: G1 - surface roughening with Soflex and bonding with Duralay; G2 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Duralay; G3 - application of monomer and bonding with Duralay; G4 - roughening with Soflex and bonding with Transbond XT; G5 - roughening with aluminum oxide blasting and bonding with Transbond XT and G6: application of monomer and bonding with Transbond. The results were statistically assessed by ANOVA/Games-Howell. RESULTS: The means (MPa were: G1= 18.04, G2= 22.64, G3= 22.4, G4= 9.71, G5= 11.23, G6= 9.67. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI ranged between 2 and 3 on G1, G2 and G3 whereas in G4, G5 and G6 it ranged from 0 to 1, showing that only the material affects the pattern of adhesive flaw. CONCLUSION: The surface treatment and the material influenced adhesive resistance of brackets bonded to temporary crowns. Roughening by aluminum blasting increased bond strength when compared to Soflex, in the group bonded with Duralay. The bond strength of Duralay acrylic resin was superior to that of Transbond XT composite resin.

  1. BOND: A quantum of solace for nebular abundance determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale Asari, N.; Stasińska, G.; Morisset, C.; Cid Fernandes, R.

    2017-11-01

    The abundances of chemical elements other than hydrogen and helium in a galaxy are the fossil record of its star formation history. Empirical relations such as mass-metallicity relation are thus seen as guides for studies on the history and chemical evolution of galaxies. Those relations usually rely on nebular metallicities measured with strong-line methods, which assume that H II regions are a one- (or at most two-) parameter family where the oxygen abundance is the driving quantity. Nature is however much more complex than that, and metallicities from strong lines may be strongly biased. We have developed the method BOND (Bayesian Oxygen and Nitrogen abundance Determinations) to simultaneously derive oxygen and nitrogen abundances in giant H II regions by comparing strong and semi-strong observed emission lines to a carefully-defined, finely-meshed grid of photoionization models. Our code and results are public and available at http://bond.ufsc.br.

  2. Fatigue aging of adhesive bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLollis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    A year long study has been made of the effect of fatigue on the bond between two epoxy encapsulant formulations and a fused alumina disc. The variables studied included isothermal aging at temperatures up to and including the cure temperature and cyclic thermal aging from +74 to -54 0 C. The encapsulants were glass microballoon filled epoxies differing only in curing agents. One was cured with an aromatic amine eutectic (Shell Curing Agent Z). The other was cured with diethanolamine. The Z cured encapsulant bond failed completely at the bond interface with little or no aging; infrared evidence indicated a soluble interlayer as a possible cause of failure. The diethanolamine cured encapsulant survived a year of isothermal aging with little or no evidence of bond degradation. Cyclic thermal aging resulted in gradual bond failure with time. An extrapolation of the cyclic aging data indicates that the stresses induced by thermal cycling would result in complete bond failure in about 1200 days

  3. The impact of metal transport processes on bioavailability of free and complex metal ions in methanogenic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartacek, J.; Fermoso, F.G.; Vergeldt, F.; Gerkema, E.; Maca, J.; As, van H.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2012-01-01

    Bioavailability of metals in anaerobic granular sludge has been extensively studied, because it can have a major effect on metal limitation and metal toxicity to microorganisms present in the sludge. Bioavailability of metals can be manipulated by bonding to complexing molecules such as

  4. Z-H Bond Activation in (Di)hydrogen Bonding as a Way to Proton/Hydride Transfer and H2 Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Natalia V; Filippov, Oleg A; Shubina, Elena S

    2018-02-01

    The ability of neutral transition-metal hydrides to serve as a source of hydride ion H - or proton H + is well appreciated. The hydride ligands possessing a partly negative charge are proton accepting sites, forming a dihydrogen bond, M-H δ- ⋅⋅⋅ δ+ HX (M=transition metal or metalloid). On the other hand, some metal hydrides are able to serve as a proton source and give hydrogen bond of M-H δ+ ⋅⋅⋅X type (X=organic base). In this paper we analyse recent works on transition-metal and boron hydrides showing i) how formation of an intermolecular complex between the reactants changes the Z-H (M-H and X-H) bond polarity and ii) what is the implication of such activation in the mechanisms of hydrides reactions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. What is a hydrogen bond?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. What is a hydrogen bond? Precise definition of a hydrogen bond is still elusive!1. Several criteria are listed usually for X-H•••Y, X and Y initially thought to be F, O and N only1. Structural: The X-Y bond length is less than the sum of their van der Waals radii. X-H•••Y is ...

  6. Wafer bonding applications and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Gösele, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade direct wafer bonding has developed into a mature materials integration technology. This book presents state-of-the-art reviews of the most important applications of wafer bonding written by experts from industry and academia. The topics include bonding-based fabrication methods of silicon-on-insulator, photonic crystals, VCSELs, SiGe-based FETs, MEMS together with hybrid integration and laser lift-off. The non-specialist will learn about the basics of wafer bonding and its various application areas, while the researcher in the field will find up-to-date information about this fast-moving area, including relevant patent information.

  7. A simplified indirect bonding technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Katiyar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of lingual orthodontics, indirect bonding technique has become an integral part of practice. It involves placement of brackets initially on the models and then their transfer to teeth with the help of transfer trays. Problems encountered with current indirect bonding techniques used are (1 the possibility of adhesive flash remaining around the base of the brackets which requires removal (2 longer time required for the adhesive to gain enough bond strength for secure tray removal. The new simplified indirect bonding technique presented here overcomes both these problems.

  8. Human Bond Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Ramjee

    2016-01-01

    Modern dexterous communication technology is progressively enabling humans to communicate their information through them with speech (aural) and media (optical) as underpinning essence. Humans realize this kind of aural and optical information by their optical and auditory senses. However, due...... to certain constraints, the ability to incorporate the other three sensory features namely, olfactory, gustatory, and tactile are still far from reality. Human bond communication is a novel concept that incorporates olfactory, gustatory, and tactile that will allow more expressive and holistic sensory...... information exchange through communication techniques for more human sentiment centric communication. This concept endorses the need of inclusion of other three senses and proposes an innovative approach of holistic communication for future communication network....

  9. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yongling [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Bo, Maolin [Yangtze Normal University, College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing 408100 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Information and Electronic Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Hunan 411201 (China); Liu, Yonghui [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Sun, Chang Q. [NOVITAS, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Huang, Yongli, E-mail: huangyongli@xtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Materials and Application Technologies (Ministry of Education), Hunan Provincial Key Laboratory of Thin Film Materials and Devices, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O{sup 2−} lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta{sup +} electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta{sup +}; the sp{sup 3}-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent

  10. Tantalum surface oxidation: Bond relaxation, energy entrapment, and electron polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yongling; Bo, Maolin; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yonghui; Sun, Chang Q.; Huang, Yongli

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The bond, electron and energy relaxation result in core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Highlights: • Increasing the oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. • Electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to sp-hydrated oxygen, creating dipole moment that decreases the work function. • Oxygen chemisorption modified valence density-of-state (DOS) for Ta with four excessive DOS features: O−Ta bonding, O"2"− lone pairs, Ta+ electron holes, and the lone-pair polarized Ta dipoles. • The bond, electron and energy relaxation between surface undercoordinated atoms are responsible for core level energy shift, local densification, quantum entrapment and electron polarization of bonding electrons. - Abstract: A combination of photoelectron spectrometric analysis and density functional theory calculations has enabled reconciliation of the bond-energy-electron relaxation for the Ta(100, 110, 111) surfaces chemisorbed with oxygen at different coverages. Results show that increasing oxygen coverage lowers the adsorption energy associated with lattice reconstruction. Valence electrons transfer from Ta surface atoms to oxygen to create four excessive DOS features in terms of O−Ta bonding, lone pairs of oxygen, Ta"+ electron holes, and polarized Ta dipoles. Oxidation proceeds in the following dynamics: oxygen gets electrons from two neighboring Ta atoms left behind Ta"+; the sp"3-orbital hybridization takes place with additional two electron lone pairs, the lone pairs polarize the other two Ta neighbors becoming dipoles. X-ray photoelectron spectral analysis results in the 4f binding energy of an isolated Ta atom and its shift upon bond formation and oxidation. Exercises provide not only a promising numerical approach for the quantitative information about the bond and electronic behavior but also consistent insight into the

  11. 30 CFR 281.33 - Bonds and bonding requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bonds and bonding requirements. 281.33 Section 281.33 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.33...

  12. 29 CFR 2580.412-19 - Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-19 Term of the bond, discovery... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses... new bond must be obtained each year. There is nothing in the Act that prohibits a bond for a term...

  13. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of microtensile bond strength of total-etch, self-etch, and glass ionomer adhesive to human dentin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelima Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of Single Bond, AdheSE, and Fuji Bond LC to human dentin. Fifteen non-carious third molars were selected for the study. The teeth were randomly divided into three groups of five teeth each. Each group was given a different bonding treatment. Group I was treated with Single Bond (3M, ESPE, group II with AdheSE (Ivoclar, Vivadent, and group III was treated with Fuji Bond LC (GC America. A T-band metal matrix was placed and composite resin bonded on to the tooth surface using appropriate bonding agents. The composite resin was packed in increments and light cured. Each tooth was sectioned to obtain 1 mm x 1 mm beams of dentin-resin samples. Tensile bond testing was done using a universal testing machine (Instron at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Results: The mean bond strength of Single Bond (35.5 MPa was significantly higher than that of AdheSE (32.8 MPa and Fuji Bond LC (32.6 MPa. The difference between the microtensile bond strength values of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was statistically insignificant. Inference: Though the bond strength of AdheSE and Fuji Bond LC was above 30 MPa, it was less than that of Single Bond as evaluated by testing of microtensile bond strength.

  15. Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the following nine chapters: lanthanide metal-organic frameworks: syntheses, properties, and potential applications (Stephen Fordham, Xuan Wang, Mathieu Bosch, Hong-Cai Zhou); 2. chiral lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Weisheng Liu, Xiaoliang Tang); 3. Porous lanthanide metal-organic frameworks for gas storage and separation (Bin Li, Banglin Chen); 4. Luminescent lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Xue-Zhi Song, Shu-Yan Song, Hong-Jie Zhang); 5. Metal-organic frameworks based on lanthanide clusters (Lian Chen, Feilong Jiang, Kang Zhou, Mingyan Wu, Maochun Hong); 6. metal-organic frameworks with d-f cyanide bridges: structural diversity, bonding regime, and magnetism (Marilena Ferbinteanu, Fanica Cimpoesu, Stefania Tanase); 7. transition-lanthanide heterometal-organic frameworks: synthesis, structures, and properties (Wei Shi, Ke Liu, Peng Cheng); 8: MOFs of uranium and the actinides (Juan Su, Jiesheng Chen); 9. Nanostructured and/or nanoscale lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Zhonghao Zhang, Zhiping Zheng).

  16. Lanthanide metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Peng (ed.) [Nankai Univ., Tianjin (China). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-03-01

    This book contains the following nine chapters: lanthanide metal-organic frameworks: syntheses, properties, and potential applications (Stephen Fordham, Xuan Wang, Mathieu Bosch, Hong-Cai Zhou); 2. chiral lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Weisheng Liu, Xiaoliang Tang); 3. Porous lanthanide metal-organic frameworks for gas storage and separation (Bin Li, Banglin Chen); 4. Luminescent lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Xue-Zhi Song, Shu-Yan Song, Hong-Jie Zhang); 5. Metal-organic frameworks based on lanthanide clusters (Lian Chen, Feilong Jiang, Kang Zhou, Mingyan Wu, Maochun Hong); 6. metal-organic frameworks with d-f cyanide bridges: structural diversity, bonding regime, and magnetism (Marilena Ferbinteanu, Fanica Cimpoesu, Stefania Tanase); 7. transition-lanthanide heterometal-organic frameworks: synthesis, structures, and properties (Wei Shi, Ke Liu, Peng Cheng); 8: MOFs of uranium and the actinides (Juan Su, Jiesheng Chen); 9. Nanostructured and/or nanoscale lanthanide metal-organic frameworks (Zhonghao Zhang, Zhiping Zheng).

  17. Comparison of bond strengths of ceramic brackets bonded to zirconia surfaces using different zirconia primers and a universal adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jaechan; An, Sang In; Park, Jeong-Won

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the shear bond strengths of ceramic brackets bonded to zirconia surfaces using different zirconia primers and universal adhesive. Fifty zirconia blocks (15 × 15 × 10 mm, Zpex, Tosoh Corporation) were polished with 1,000 grit sand paper and air-abraded with 50 µm Al 2 O 3 for 10 seconds (40 psi). They were divided into 5 groups: control (CO), Metal/Zirconia primer (MZ, Ivoclar Vivadent), Z-PRIME Plus (ZP, Bisco), Zirconia Liner (ZL, Sun Medical), and Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SU, 3M ESPE). Transbond XT Primer (used for CO, MZ, ZP, and ZL) and Transbond XT Paste was used for bracket bonding (Gemini clear ceramic brackets, 3M Unitek). After 24 hours at 37°C storage, specimens underwent 2,000 thermocycles, and then, shear bond strengths were measured (1 mm/min). An adhesive remnant index (ARI) score was calculated. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni test ( p = 0.05). Surface treatment with primers resulted in increased shear bond strength. The SU group showed the highest shear bond strength followed by the ZP, ZL, MZ, and CO groups, in that order. The median ARI scores were as follows: CO = 0, MZ = 0, ZP = 0, ZL = 0, and SU = 3 ( p < 0.05). Within this experiment, zirconia primer can increase the shear bond strength of bracket bonding. The highest shear bond strength is observed in SU group, even when no primer is used.

  18. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  19. Syntheses of rare-earth metal oxide nanotubes by the sol-gel method assisted with porous anodic aluminum oxide templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Qin; Lin Zhiwei; Lian Wei; Jiang Zhiyuan; Xie Zhaoxiong; Huang Rongbin; Zheng Lansun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report a versatile synthetic method of ordered rare-earth metal (RE) oxide nanotubes. RE (RE=Y, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) oxide nanotubes were successfully prepared from corresponding RE nitrate solution via the sol-gel method assisted with porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been employed to characterize the morphology and composition of the as-prepared nanotubes. It is found that as-prepared RE oxides evolve into bamboo-like nanotubes and entirely hollow nanotubes. A new possible formation mechanism of RE oxide nanotubes in the AAO channels is proposed. These high-quantity RE oxide nanotubes are expected to have promising applications in many areas such as luminescent materials, catalysts, magnets, etc. - Graphical abstract: A versatile synthetic method for the preparation of ordered rare-earth (RE) oxide nanotubes is reported, by which RE (RE=Y, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb) oxide nanotubes were successfully prepared from corresponding RE nitrate solution via the sol-gel method assisted with porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates

  20. Low temperature bonding of heterogeneous materials using Al2O3 as an intermediate layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahoo, Hitesh Kumar; Ottaviano, Luisa; Zheng, Yi

    2018-01-01

    Integration of heterogeneous materials is crucial for many nanophotonic devices. The integration is often achieved by bonding using polymer adhesives or metals. A much better and cleaner option is direct wafer bonding, but the high annealing temperatures required make it a much less attractive...... atomic layer deposited Al2O3 an excellent choice for the intermediate layer. The authors have optimized the bonding process to achieve a high interface energy of 1.7 J/m2 for a low temperature annealing of 300 °C. The authors also demonstrate wafer bonding of InP to SiO2 on Si and GaAs to sapphire using...

  1. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.

  2. Adhesive bone bonding prospects for lithium disilicate ceramic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennila Thirugnanam, Sakthi Kumar

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) implants articulating mandible with temporal bone in humans have a very high failure rate. Metallic TMJ implants available in the medical market are not osseointegrated, but bond only by mechanical interlocking using screws which may fail, mandating a second surgery for removal. Stress concentration around fixture screws leads to aseptic loosening or fracture of the bone. It has been proposed that this problem can be overcome by using an all-ceramic TMJ implant bonded to bone with dental adhesives. Structural ceramics are promising materials with an excellent track record in the field of dentis.

  3. Evaluación de la adherencia de uniones adhesivas metálicas con adhesivos epoxídicos modificados Evaluation of the adherence of bonded metallic joints with modified epoxy adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiberto González Garcia

    2008-03-01

    agents. The adhesive properties were investigated using the epoxy resins as independent systems as well as the modified resin. The adhesive properties of modified and unmodified epoxy resins were studied using steel alloy (ASTM A36 as adherent. The adherence has been evaluated using three geometric assays of steel-steel bonded joints. The rheological behavior of the adhesives was investigated under isothermal conditions. The rheological parameters associated with the curing reaction such as reaction rate, pot life and gel time of the pure adhesives were related to the chemical structure of the curing agents. The cloud point and the gel time of the modified adhesives were related to the morphology and the reaction rate, respectively. The morphology was characterized by scanning electronic microscopy. The adherence of the adhesive joints at different mechanical solicitations was related to the generated morphology by the dispersed phase of each modifier and the networks structures of the epoxy adhesives.

  4. O hydrogen bonds in alkaloids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An overview of general classification scheme, medicinal importance and crystal structure analysis with emphasis on the role of hydrogen bonding in some alkaloids is presented in this paper. The article is based on a general kind of survey while crystallographic analysis and role of hydrogen bonding are limited to only ...

  5. Distance criterion for hydrogen bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Distance criterion for hydrogen bond. In a D-H ...A contact, the D...A distance must be less than the sum of van der Waals Radii of the D and A atoms, for it to be a hydrogen bond.

  6. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    2012-01-01

    of the article is to provide possible explanations for the puzzle of why small retail investors hold structured bonds. The investment universe consists of a stock index, a risk-free bank account, and a structured bond containing an option written on another index. We apply expected utility maximization...

  7. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazal, I.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are

  8. Ab Initio Ligand Field Molecular Mechanics and the Nature of Metal-Ligand π-Bonding in Fe(II) 2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine Spin Crossover Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeth, Robert J; Halcrow, Malcolm A; Kershaw Cook, Laurence J; Raithby, Paul R

    2018-04-06

    A ligand field molecular mechanics (LFMM) force field has been constructed for the spin states of [Fe(bpp) 2 ] 2+ (bpp=2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine) and related complexes. A new charge scheme is employed which interpolates between partial charges for neutral bpp and protonated [H 3 bpp] 3+ to achieve a target metal charge. The LFMM angular overlap model (AOM) parameters are fitted to fully ab initio d orbital energies. However, several AOM parameter sets are possible. The ambiguity is resolved by calculating the Jahn-Teller distortion mode for high spin, which indicates that in [Fe(bpp) 2 ] 2+ pyridine is a π-acceptor and pyrazole a weak π-donor. The alternative fit, assumed previously, where both ligands act as π-donors leads to an inconsistent distortion. LFMM optimisations in the presence of [BF 4 ] - or [PF 6 ] - anions are in good agreement with experiment and the model also correctly predicts the spin state energetics for 3-pyrazolyl substituents where the interactions are mainly steric. However, for 4-pyridyl or 4-pyrazolyl substituents, LFMM only treats the electrostatic contribution which, for the pyridyl substituents, generates a fair correlation with the spin crossover transition temperatures, T 1/2 , but in the reverse sense to the dominant electronic effect. Thus, LFMM generates its smallest spin state energy difference for the substituent with the highest T 1/2 . One parameter set for all substituted bpp ligands is insufficient and further LFMM development will be required. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Laser-heating wire bonding on MEMS packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuetao Liu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Making connections is critical in fabrication of MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems. It is also complicated, because the temperature during joining affects both the bond produced and the structure and mechanical properties of the moving parts of the device. Specifications for MEMS packaging require that the temperature not exceed 240 °C. However, usually, temperatures can reach up to 300 °C during conventional thermosonic wire bonding. Such a temperature will change the distribution of dopants in CMOS (Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor circuits. In this paper we propose a new heating process. A semiconductor laser (wavelength 808 nm is suggested as the thermal source for wire bonding. The thermal field of this setup was analyzed, and specific mathematical models of the field were built. Experimental results show that the heating can be focused on the bonding pad, and that much lower heat conduction occurs, compared with that during the normal heating method. The bond strength increases with increasing laser power. The bond strengths obtained with laser heating are slightly lower than those obtained with the normal heating method, but can still meet the strength requirements for MEMS.

  10. Steel bonded dense silicon nitride compositions and method for their fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landingham, Richard L.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    A two-stage bonding technique for bonding high density silicon nitride and other ceramic materials to stainless steel and other hard metals, and multilayered ceramic-metal composites prepared by the technique are disclosed. The technique involves initially slurry coating a surface of the ceramic material at about 1500.degree. C. in a vacuum with a refractory material and the stainless steel is then pressure bonded to the metallic coated surface by brazing it with nickel-copper-silver or nickel-copper-manganese alloys at a temperature in the range of about 850.degree. to 950.degree. C. in a vacuum. The two-stage bonding technique minimizes the temperature-expansion mismatch between the dissimilar materials.

  11. SOCIAL BONDING: REGULATION BY NEUROPEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eLieberwirth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Affiliative social relationships (e.g., among spouses, family members, and friends play an essential role in human society. These relationships affect psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. As positive and enduring bonds are critical for the overall well-being of humans, it is not surprising that considerable effort has been made to study the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie social bonding behaviors. The present review details the involvement of the nonapeptides, oxytocin (OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP, in the regulation of social bonding in mammals including humans. In particular, we will discuss the role of OT and AVP in the formation of social bonds between partners of a mating pair as well as between parents and their offspring. Furthermore, the role of OT and AVP in the formation of interpersonal bonding involving trust is also discussed.

  12. Fusion-bonded fluidic interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazal, I; Elwenspoek, M C

    2008-01-01

    A new approach to realize fluidic interconnects based on the fusion bonding of glass tubes with silicon is presented. Fusion bond strength analyses have been carried out. Experiments with plain silicon wafers and coated with silicon oxide and silicon nitride are performed. The obtained results are discussed in terms of the homogeneity and strength of fusion bond. High pressure testing shows that the bond strength is large enough for most applications of fluidic interconnects. The bond strength for 525 µm thick silicon, with glass tubes having an outer diameter of 6 mm and with a wall thickness of 2 mm, is more than 60 bars after annealing at a temperature of 800 °C

  13. Sibling bereavement and continuing bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, Wendy; Horsley, Heidi; Davies, Betty; Kramer, Robin

    2006-11-01

    Historically, from a Freudian and medical model perspective, emotional disengagement from the deceased was seen as essential to the successful adaptation of bereavement. A major shift in the bereavement literature has occurred and it is now generally accepted that despite the permanence of physical separation, the bereaved remains involved and connected to the deceased and can be emotionally sustained through continuing bonds. The majority of literature has focused on adults and on the nature of continuing bonds following the death of a spouse. In this article, the authors demonstrate how the continuing bonds concept applies to the sibling relationship. We describe the unique continued relationship formed by bereaved children and adolescents following a sibling loss, highlight the factors that influence the siblings continuing bonds expressions, and offer clinical interventions. In our view, mental health professionals can play an important role in helping parents encourage activities that may facilitate the creation and maintenance of continuing bonds in their children.

  14. Application of infrared spectroscopy for study of chemical bonds in complexes of rare earth nitrates with alkylammonium nitrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, V.D.; Chudinov, Eh.G.

    1974-01-01

    The IR absorption spectra for the tri-n-octylamine, methyl-di-n-octylamine, their nitrates and complexes with the rare element nitrates are obtained. The IR spectra analysis of the complexes has suggested that the degree of covalent character bond of a nitrate with a metal grows with the atomic number of the element. Based on the comparison of the obtained data with those available in literature for various rare-earth complexes a conclusion is made that the bond character of a metal with nitrate groups is influenced by all ligands constituting the inner coordinating sphere. As the donor capacity of a ligand grows the covalent character of the metal-nitrate bond is enhanced. The replacement of the outer-sphere cations (trioctylammonium or methyldioctylammonium) only slightly affects the bond character of a metal with the nitrate group. The distribution coefficients in the rare-earth series are shown to decrease as the electrostatic part in the metal-nitrate declines. The phenomenon is attributed to the competition between nitrate and water for the metal bond as concurrently with the intensification of metal-nitrate covalent bond in the organic phase the strength of metal hydrates in aqueous phase grows much faster. (author)

  15. Structure phenomena in the bond zone of explosively bonded plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livne, Z.

    1979-12-01

    In the bond areas of couples of explosively bonded plates, there are often zones, generally designated as ''molten pockets'', which have undergone melting and solidification. The object of the present study was to investigate molten pockets, which have a decisive effect on bond quality. The experimental samples for the study were chosen in consideration of the mutual behaviour of the plates constituting the couples, according to their equilibrium phase diagrams. To facilitate the investigation, large plates were bonded under conditions that enabled to to obtain wavy bond zones that included relatively large molten pockets. To clarify the complex nature of molten pockets and their surroundings, a wide variety of methods were employed. It was found that the shape and composition of molten pockets largely depend upon the mechanism of formation of both the bond wave and the molten pockets. It was also found that the composition of molten pockets is not homogeneous, which is manifest in the modification of the composition of the pockets, the solidification morphology, the phases, which have been identified by X-ray diffraction, and the bond strenght and hardness. Moreover, the different solidification morphologies revealed by metallography were found to depend upon the types of plates bonded, the bonding conditions and the location of pockets in the wavy interface. For molten pockets, cooling rates of 10 4 to 10 5 (degC/sec) have been deduced from interdendritic spacing, and found to be in good agreement with calculations after a mathematical model. It seems that the fast cooling rates and the steep temperature gradients are at the origin of the particular solidification phenomena observed in molten pockets

  16. Dentin-bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New dental restorative materials have been developed to meet not only the functional demands, but esthetics as well, and in the last few years an enormous range of new materials has appeared for use in dentistry. Among them, several adhesive systems, and different operative techniques for each group materials. Therefore, is indispensable for the professional to know about the properties, characteristics, and association of these materials with the dental structures, in order to select and use them correctly. Should conventional self-etching adhesive systems be used? This question encouraged this literature review to be conducted, with the aim of comparing the conventional adhesive systems with the self-etching systems and to look for scientific data that would help professionals to choose which adhesive system to use. When compared to conventional systems, it was noted that the self-etching systems show less sensitivity to technique, especially as regards errors the operator could commit. The self-etching systems, particularly the 2-step type, have shown equivalent values of bond strength, marginal microleakage and performance, therefore, will be an option for direct composite resin restorations in posterior teeth.

  17. Effect of surface treatment of titanium posts on the tensile bond strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmage, P; Sohn, J; Ozcan, M; Nergiz, [No Value

    Objectives. Retention of composite resins to metal can be improved when metal surfaces are conditioned. The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the effect of two conditioning treatments on the tensile bond strength of four resin-based luting cements and zinc phosphate cement to titanium

  18. New Concept of C–H and C–C Bond Activation via Surface Organometallic Chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Samantaray, Manoja; Dey, Raju; Kavitake, Santosh Giridhar; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we describe the recent applications of well-defined oxidesupported metal alkyls/alkylidenes/alkylidynes and hydrides of group IV, V, and VI transition metals in the field of C–H and C–C bond activation. The activation of ubiquitous C

  19. Chain formation of metal atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahn, Sune Rastad; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of formation of single-atomic chains by manipulation of nanocontacts is studied for a selection of metals (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au). Molecular dynamics simulations show that the tendency for chain formation is strongest for Au and Pt. Density functional theory calculations indicate...... that the metals which form chains exhibit pronounced many-atom interactions with strong bonding in low coordinated systems....

  20. Correlation of mechanical properties with nondestructive evaluation of babbitt metal/bronze composite interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Y.; Liaw, P. K.; Taszarek, B. J.; Frohlich, S.; Gungor, M. N.

    1988-09-01

    Interfaces of the babbitt metal-bronze composite were examined ultrasonically and were fractured using the Chalmers test method. It was found that the ultrasonic results correlated with the bond strength, the ductility, and the degree of bonding at the tested interface. Specifically, high ultrasonic reflection percentages were associated with low bond strength, low ductility, and low percentages of bonded regions. The fracture mechanism in the bonded area of the babbitt-bronze interface is related to the presence of the intermetallic compound, Cu6Sn5, at the interface. It is suggested that the non-destructive ultrasonic technique can detect the bond integrity of babbitted metals.

  1. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  2. Composite adhesive bonds reinforced with microparticle filler based on egg shell waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Miroslav; Valášek, Petr

    2018-05-01

    A research on composite adhesive bonds reinforced with waste from hen eggs processing, i.e. egg shell waste (ESW) is based on an assumption of the utilization of agricultural/food production waste. The aim of the research is to gain new pieces of knowledge about the material utilization of ESW, i.e. to evaluate possibilities of the use of various concentrations of ESW microparticles smaller than 100 µm based on hen egg shells as the filler in a structural resin used for a creation of adhesive bonds from bearing metal elements. An adhesive bond strength, an elongation at break and a fracture surface were evaluated within the research on adhesive bonds. The experiment results proved the efficiency of ESW filler in the area of composite adhesive bonds. The adhesive bond strength was increased up of more than 17 % by adding 40 wt.% of ESW microparticles.

  3. Investigation of bracket bonding for orthodontic treatments using en-face optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda L.; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Roxana; Dodenciu, Dorin; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-04-01

    Despite good diagnosis and treatment planning, orthodontic treatment can fail if bonding fails. It is now common practice to address the aesthetic appearance of patients using aesthetic brackets instead of metal ones. Therefore, bonding aesthetic brackets has become an issue for orthodontists today. Orthodontic bonding is mainly achieved using composite resin but can also be performed with glass ionomer or resin cements. For improving the quality of bonding, the enamel is acid etched for 30 seconds with 38% phosphoric acid and then a bonding agent is applied. In our study we investigated and compared the quality of bonding between ceramic brackets, polymeric brackets and enamel, respectively using a new investigation method-OCT. The aim of our study was to evaluate the resin layer at the bracket base-tooth interface.

  4. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... of the cross rolled volume fraction is found. To further asses this effect, and the anisotropy, it is necessary to acquire knowledge about both texture and microstructure, e.g. by TEM. Roll bonding of pre-strained aluminium is found to be a possible alternative to ARB in the quest for ultra-fine grained...

  5. Direct Bonded Pontic (Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhandi Sidjaja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced science and technology in dentistry enable dental practitioners to modified she bonding techniques in tooth replacement. A pontic made of composite resin bonded to etched enamel of the adjacent teeth can be used in the replacement of one missing anterior tooth with a virgin or sowed adpicent tooth. The advantages of this technique include a one visit treatment, cow cost, good esthetics, less side effects and easy repair or rebounding. Clinical evaluation showed a high success rate therefore with a proper diagnosis and a perfect skill of the direct bonded technique this treatment can be used as an alternative restoration.

  6. Phosphate bonded ceramics as candidate final-waste-form materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, D.; Wagh, A.S.; Cunnane, J.; Sutaria, M.; Kurokawa, S.; Mayberry, J.

    1994-04-01

    Room-temperature setting phosphate-bonded ceramics were studied as candidate materials for stabilization of DOE low-level problem mixed wastes which cannot be treated by other established stabilization techniques. Phosphates of Mg, Mg-Na, Al and Zr were studied to stabilize ash surrogate waste containing RCRA metals as nitrates and RCRA organics. We show that for a typical loading of 35 wt.% of the ash waste, the phosphate ceramics pass the TCLP test. The waste forms have high compression strength exceeding ASTM recommendations for final waste forms. Detailed X-ray diffraction studies and differential thermal analyses of the waste forms show evidence of chemical reaction of the waste with phosphoric acid and the host matrix. The SEM studies show evidence of physical bonding. The excellent performance in the leaching tests is attributed to a chemical solidification and physical as well as chemical bonding of ash wastes in these phosphate ceramics

  7. Influence of the temperature on the composites' fusion bonding quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkous, Ali; Jurkowski, Tomasz; Bailleul, Jean-Luc; Le Corre, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Thermoplastic composite parts are increasingly used to replace metal pieces in automotive field due to their mechanical properties, chemical properties and recycling potential [1]. To assemble and give them new mechanical functions, fusion bonding is often used. It is a type of welding carried out at a higher temperature than the fusion one [2]. The mechanical quality of the final adhesion depends on the process parameters like pressure, temperature and cycle time [3]. These parameters depend on two phenomena at the origin of the bonding formation: intimate contact [4] and reptation and healing [5]. In this study, we analyze the influence of the temperature on the bonding quality, disregarding in this first steps the pressure influence. For that, two polyamide composite parts are welded using a specific setup. Then, they undergo a mechanical test of peeling in order to quantify the adhesion quality.

  8. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-09-04

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

  9. Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

    2013-10-15

    Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10 C.

  10. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  11. Transition Metal Complexes and Catalysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    approaches towards the study of bonding in transition metal complexes. Despite .... industrial scale reactions for the production of organic compounds using transition ..... It has found several applications as an engineering thermoplastic. .... and processes of interest to the company, that is, applied research. It is this very ...

  12. Superconductivity and the magnetic electron bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szurek, P.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of the magnetic electron bond as the fundamental characteristic of superconductivity was first introduced during a presentation at the 1988 Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Postulates describing the role of the electron and the magnetic bond were suggested to explain in a consistent manner known observations. What may becoming clear is that a boundary set of conditions may exist above and below the transition temperature at which a material superconducts. Prior to recent history, scientists have concentrated on postulating, experimenting, and learning about the set of conditions that exist above the transition temperature, which has set the standard for todays quantum theory. Above the transition temperature they have learned about the interrelationships that exist between the electron, a small magnetic and negatively charged body, and the nucleus, a large positively charged body. By grouping common general characteristics due to the interaction between the outer shell electrons and the nucleus of different elements, three bond types have been established, covalent, ionic, and metallic. They may now be in the process of determining those conditions that lie below the transition temperature, a realm where charge effects may no longer dominate magnetic effects. This may involve updating the quantum theory to reflect those conditions that exist above and below the transition temperature. The following discussion reviews, updates, and attempts to answer some preliminary questions regarding postulates that may define some of the conditions that lie below the transition temperature. As an introduction, figure 1 depicts what may occur to loosely held outer shell electrons below the transition temperature due to increased inner electron shielding. 7 refs., 9 figs

  13. dimensional architectures via hydrogen bonds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    organization and has potential applications in the field of magnetism ... The concepts of crystal engineering ... 4. However, the utilization of hydrogen bond supramolecular syn- ... sembling the coordination networks by designing the ligands ...

  14. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  15. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  16. Surface modification for bonding between amalgam and orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsamut, Wittawat; Satrawaha, Sirichom; Wayakanon, Kornchanok

    2017-01-01

    Testing of methods to enhance the shear bond strength (SBS) between orthodontic metal brackets and amalgam by sandblasting and different primers. Three hundred samples of amalgam restorations (KerrAlloy ® ) were prepared in self-cured acrylic blocks, polished, and divided into two groups: nonsandblasted and sandblasted. Each group was divided into five subgroups with different primers used in surface treatment methods, with a control group of bonded brackets on human mandibular incisors. Following the surface treatments, mandibular incisor brackets (Unitek ® ) were bonded on the amalgam with adhesive resin (Transbond XT ® ). The SBS of the samples was tested. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) and failure modes were then determined under a stereo-microscope. Two-way analysis of variance, Chi-square, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were performed to calculate the correlations between and among the SBS and ARI values, the failure modes, and surface roughness results. There were statistically significant differences of SBS among the different adhesive primers and sandblasting methods ( P 0.05). Using adhesive primers with sandblasting together effectively enhances the SBS between orthodontic metal brackets and amalgam. The two primers with the ingredient methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP) monomer, Alloy Primer ® and Assure Plus ® , were the most effective. Including sandblasting in the treatment is essential to achieve the bonding strength required.

  17. Method to improve commercial bonded SOI material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, Humphrey John; Sadana, Devendra Kumar

    2000-07-11

    A method of improving the bonding characteristics of a previously bonded silicon on insulator (SOI) structure is provided. The improvement in the bonding characteristics is achieved in the present invention by, optionally, forming an oxide cap layer on the silicon surface of the bonded SOI structure and then annealing either the uncapped or oxide capped structure in a slightly oxidizing ambient at temperatures greater than 1200.degree. C. Also provided herein is a method for detecting the bonding characteristics of previously bonded SOI structures. According to this aspect of the present invention, a pico-second laser pulse technique is employed to determine the bonding imperfections of previously bonded SOI structures.

  18. Influence of 5f electrons on structure and bonding in the actinide-hydrogen intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Complexa phases form for the Th + H and U + H systems that are found with no other metals. In the Pa + H system, simple bcc C15 Laves and A15 phases can form, dependent on temperature and composition. The phase transformations appear to b magnetically driven, as a resutl of the decoupling of the metallic 5f electron bonding that occurs during hydriding; the C15 phases contain two kinds of Pa atoms-the one sublattice being still fully f-bonded and the other magnetic. This is a unique situation in solid state physics which defies a valence description. A similar situation obtains for A15 β - UH 3 structure. The parent metals themselves exhibit electronegativities not unlike those of the mid-3d transition metals (e.g., Fe) because the valence electrons re tied up in metallic bonding. However, under the driving force for hydriding, the lattices can open up, decoupling the f-bonding and inducing magnetism. The systems then aggressively form very stable hydrides typical of highly-electropositive metals. Beyond uranium the trivalent metallic state is favored and rare-earth-like hydrides are found for Np + H and Pu + H. Nevertheless, the solid-state and transport properties are markedly different than for the rare-earth hydrides, showing that the latent influence of the 5f electrons is still strong

  19. [Differential study of the bonding characterization of dental porcelain to Ni-Cr alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhan, De-song; Wang, Yan-yan

    2008-10-01

    To study the bonding capability when Ni-Cr porcelain alloy was added with Ti, compound rare earth metals and removed the element of Be. Ni-Cr-Ti porcelain alloys manufactured by Institute of Metal Research of Chinese Academy of Sciences were tested. The test alloys were divided into three groups according to whether containing Be and compound rare earth metals or not. And HI BOND Ni-Cr base-metal alloy was chosen as control. The metal-ceramic specimens were prepared for shear test, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy spectrum analysis. The shear bond strength of the four groups were analyzed. No significant difference were observed among them (P > 0.05). No crackle was found and they were contacted tightly between the porcelain and metal. The composition and contents of the four groups' interfaces were closed. The shear bond strength of the self-made Ni-Cr-Ti porcelain alloys all can satisfy the clinical requirements. Experimental groups containing Ti, compound rare earth metals and removing the element of Be can be used as better recommendation for clinical practice.

  20. Uranium(III)-carbon multiple bonding supported by arene δ-bonding in mixed-valence hexauranium nanometre-scale rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooles, Ashley J; Mills, David P; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J L; Law, Gareth T W; Fuller, Adam J; Kremer, Felipe; Ridgway, Mark; Lewis, William; Gagliardi, Laura; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Liddle, Stephen T

    2018-05-29

    Despite the fact that non-aqueous uranium chemistry is over 60 years old, most polarised-covalent uranium-element multiple bonds involve formal uranium oxidation states IV, V, and VI. The paucity of uranium(III) congeners is because, in common with metal-ligand multiple bonding generally, such linkages involve strongly donating, charge-loaded ligands that bind best to electron-poor metals and inherently promote disproportionation of uranium(III). Here, we report the synthesis of hexauranium-methanediide nanometre-scale rings. Combined experimental and computational studies suggest overall the presence of formal uranium(III) and (IV) ions, though electron delocalisation in this Kramers system cannot be definitively ruled out, and the resulting polarised-covalent U = C bonds are supported by iodide and δ-bonded arene bridges. The arenes provide reservoirs that accommodate charge, thus avoiding inter-electronic repulsion that would destabilise these low oxidation state metal-ligand multiple bonds. Using arenes as electronic buffers could constitute a general synthetic strategy by which to stabilise otherwise inherently unstable metal-ligand linkages.

  1. Superplastic forming and diffusion bonding: Progress and trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarized recent progress in metal superplasticity and the application of Superplastic Forming/Diffusion Bonding (SPF/DB or SPF/Welding in typical structures. Various aerospace components such as three dimensional lattice structures made by SPF/DB have been demonstrated. In addition, some newly developed technologies, such as melt droplet spreading/thermo-mechanical forming (MDS/TMF, were also included. Finally, the future potential of SPF/DB technology was predicted.

  2. Muon-oxygen bonding in V2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, K.C.B.; Lichti, R.L.; Boekema, C.

    1986-01-01

    A muon site search using calculated internal fields has been performed for V 2 O 3 , where purely dipolar fields allow a site determination free from covalent complications. The obtained sites are a subset of the Rodriguez and Bates sites found in α-Fe 2 O 3 and indicate muon oxygen bond formation. The sites missing at low temperatures are consistent with the vanadium pairing mechanism for the metal-to-insulator (corundum-to-monoclinic) phase transition. (orig.)

  3. Activation of C-H bond in methane by Pd atom from the bonding evolution theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizovtsev, Anton S

    2013-08-15

    We report detailed study focused on the electron density redistribution during the simple oxidative addition reaction being the crucial stage of various catalytic processes. The bonding evolution theory based on the electron localization function and Thom's catastrophe theory shows that activation of methane's C-H bond by Pd atom consist of six elementary steps. The important feature revealed is the pronounced reorganization of Pd's outer core maxima corresponding to N-shell electrons of metal. Electronic rearrangements identified in this model reaction are likely to be the case in the more complex reactions of the same type involving transition metal compounds and, in principle, can be observed by modern ultrafast spectroscopy and diffraction techniques. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. All diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 {mu}m thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency. (author)

  5. Solid state bonding of beryllium-copper for an ITER first wall application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odegard, B.C. Jr.; Cadden, C.H.

    1998-02-01

    Several different joint assemblies were evaluated in support of a manufacturing technology for diffusion bonding a beryllium armor tile to a copper alloy heat sink for fusion reactor applications. Because beryllium reacts with all but a few elements to form intermetallic compounds, this study considered several different surface treatments as a means of both inhibiting these reactions and promoting a good diffusion bond between the two substrates. A diffusion bonded assemblies used aluminum or an aluminum-beryllium composite (AlBeMet-150) as the interfacial material in contact with beryllium. In most cases, explosive bonding was utilized as a technique for joining the copper alloy heat sink to an aluminum or AlBeMet-150 substrate, which was subsequently diffusion bonded to an aluminum coated beryllium tile. In this approach, a 250 microm thick titanium foil was used as a diffusion barrier between the copper and aluminum to prevent the formation of Cu-Al intermetallic phases. In all cases, a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) furnace was used in conjunction with canned assemblies in order to minimize oxidation and apply sufficient pressure on the assembly for excellent metal-to-metal contact and subsequent bonding. Several different processing schedules were evaluated during the course of this study; bonded assemblies were produced that failed outside the bond area indicating a 100% joint efficiency

  6. Influence of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zeng, Jishan; Wang, Shaoan; Yang, Zheng; Huang, Qian; Chen, Pixiu; Zhou, Shujuan; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments after different storage time and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces. 128 disc-shaped porcelain specimens were randomly assigned to the following surface treatments: 9.6% HFA, 9.6% HFA combined with silane, 50 μ aluminum trioxide sandblasting followed by silane and application of silane after 37% phosphoric acid. Metal or ceramic brackets were bonded onto each treated porcelain facet with light cured resin. The samples were stored in 37 °C water 1 day or 7 days, thermocycled 500 times from 5 to 55 °C. The shear bond strengths were measured (1 mm/min), and statistically analyzed. The bond failure sites were classified according to ARI system. The surface of the glazed, sandblasted, hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid etched porcelain were examined with SEM. All groups achieved reasonable bond strengths to withstand the application of orthodontic forces. Water storage for 7 days caused lower shear bond strength than that of 1 day. But there is no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean shear bond strength provided by ceramic bracket with mechanical retention had no statistical difference with that of metal bracket. Therefore, the optimal treatment for orthodontic brackets bonding to feldspathic porcelain was to apply phosphoric acid combined with silane.

  7. Voltage-assisted polymer wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varsanik, J S; Bernstein, J J

    2012-01-01

    Polymer wafer bonding is a widely used process for fabrication of microfluidic devices. However, best practices for polymer bonds do not achieve sufficient bond strength for many applications. By applying a voltage to a polymer bond in a process called voltage-assisted bonding, bond strength is shown to improve dramatically for two polymers (Cytop™ and poly(methyl methacrylate)). Several experiments were performed to provide a starting point for further exploration of this technique. An optimal voltage range is experimentally observed with a reduction in bonding strength at higher voltages. Additionally, voltage-assisted bonding is shown to reduce void diameter due to bond defects. An electrostatic force model is proposed to explain the improved bond characteristics. This process can be used to improve bond strength for most polymers. (paper)

  8. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature distorting the internal bonding state. A problem arises when studying hydrogen bonding in wood since matched wood specimens of the same species will have very different internal bonding states. Thus, possible changes in the bonding state due to some applied treatment such as conditioning...... maintaining 100 % moisture content of the wood. The hypothesis was that this would enable a fast stress relaxation as a result of reorganization of bonds, since moisture plasticizes the material and temperature promotes faster kinetics. Hereby, all past bond distortions caused by various moisture, temperature...

  9. Diffusion bonding of 9Cr ODS ferritic/martensitic steel with a phase transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon, E-mail: shnoh@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Diffusion bonding was employed to join 9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel under uniaxial hydrostatic pressure, and the microstructure and tensile properties of the joints were investigated. • ODS steel was successfully diffusion bonded at an austenization temperature to migrate a residual diffusion bonding interface. • The tensile properties of the joint region were comparable with that of the base metal with a ductile fracture occurred far from the bonding interface. • It is considered that diffusion bonding with a phase transformation can be a very useful joining method for fabricating components in next-generation nuclear systems using 9Cr ODS ferritic/martensitic steel. - Abstract: Diffusion bonding was employed to join oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel under uniaxial hydrostatic pressure using a high vacuum hot press, and the microstructure and tensile properties of the joints were investigated. 9Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was successfully diffusion bonded at 1150 °C for 1 h to migrate a residual bonding interface. Following heat treatment, including normalising at 1050 °C and tempering at 800 °C for 1 h, comparable results without inclusions or micro-voids at the bonding interface, or degradation in the base metal were achieved. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation revealed that the nano-oxide particles in the bonding region were uniformly distributed in the matrix. At room temperature, the joint had nearly the same tensile properties with that of the base metal. The tensile strength of the joint region at elevated temperatures was comparable with that of the base metal. The total elongation of the joint region decreased slightly, but reached 80% of the base metal at 700 °C, and a ductile fracture occurred far from the bonding interface. Therefore, it is considered that diffusion bonding with a phase transformation can be a very useful joining method for

  10. Mo-Mo Quintuple Bond is Highly Reactive in H-H, C-H, and O-H σ-Bond Cleavages Because of the Polarized Electronic Structure in Transition State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yue; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2017-04-03

    The recently reported high reactivity of the Mo-Mo quintuple bond of Mo 2 (N ∧ N) 2 (1) {N ∧ N = μ-κ 2 -CH[N(2,6-iPr 2 C 6 H 3 )] 2 } in the H-H σ-bond cleavage was investigated. DFT calculations disclosed that the H-H σ-bond cleavage by 1 occurs with nearly no barrier to afford the cis-dihydride species followed by cis-trans isomerization to form the trans-dihydride product, which is consistent with the experimental result. The O-H and C-H bond cleavages by 1 were computationally predicted to occur with moderate (ΔG° ⧧ = 9.0 kcal/mol) and acceptable activation energies (ΔG° ⧧ = 22.5 kcal/mol), respectively, suggesting that the Mo-Mo quintuple bond can be applied to various σ-bond cleavages. In these σ-bond cleavage reactions, the charge-transfer (CT Mo→XH ) from the Mo-Mo quintuple bond to the X-H (X = H, C, or O) bond and that (CT XH→Mo ) from the X-H bond to the Mo-Mo bond play crucial roles. Though the HOMO (dδ-MO) of 1 is at lower energy and the LUMO + 2 (dδ*-MO) of 1 is at higher energy than those of RhCl(PMe 3 ) 2 (LUMO and LUMO + 1 of 1 are not frontier MO), the H-H σ-bond cleavage by 1 more easily occurs than that by the Rh complex. Hence, the frontier MO energies are not the reason for the high reactivity of 1. The high reactivity of 1 arises from the polarization of dδ-type MOs of the Mo-Mo quintuple bond in the transition state. Such a polarized electronic structure enhances the bonding overlap between the dδ-MO of the Mo-Mo bond and the σ*-antibonding MO of the X-H bond to facilitate the CT Mo→XH and reduce the exchange repulsion between the Mo-Mo bond and the X-H bond. This polarized electronic structure of the transition state is similar to that of a frustrated Lewis pair. The easy polarization of the dδ-type MOs is one of the advantages of the metal-metal multiple bond, because such polarization is impossible in the mononuclear metal complex.

  11. Enhancement of surface integrity of titanium alloy with copper by means of laser metal deposition process

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The laser metal deposition process possesses the combination of metallic powder and laser beam respectively. However, these combinations create an adhesive bonding that permanently solidifies the laser-enhanced-deposited powders. Titanium alloys (Ti...

  12. Design, Synthesis and Characterization of Functional Metal-Organic Framework Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Alamer, Badriah

    2015-01-01

    are known as Metal Organic Framework (MOFs). This exceptional new family of porous materials is fabricated by linkage of metal ions or clusters and organic linkers via strong bonds. MOFs have been awarded with remarkable interest and widely studied due

  13. Reliable and repeatable bonding technology for high temperature automotive power modules for electrified vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Won; Shiozaki, Koji; Glover, Michael D; Mantooth, H Alan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the feasibility of highly reliable and repeatable copper–tin transient liquid phase (Cu–Sn TLP) bonding as applied to die attachment in high temperature operational power modules. Electrified vehicles are attracting particular interest as eco-friendly vehicles, but their power modules are challenged because of increasing power densities which lead to high temperatures. Such high temperature operation addresses the importance of advanced bonding technology that is highly reliable (for high temperature operation) and repeatable (for fabrication of advanced structures). Cu–Sn TLP bonding is employed herein because of its high remelting temperature and desirable thermal and electrical conductivities. The bonding starts with a stack of Cu–Sn–Cu metal layers that eventually transforms to Cu–Sn alloys. As the alloys have melting temperatures (Cu 3 Sn: > 600 °C, Cu 6 Sn 5 : > 400 °C) significantly higher than the process temperature, the process can be repeated without damaging previously bonded layers. A Cu–Sn TLP bonding process was developed using thin Sn metal sheets inserted between copper layers on silicon die and direct bonded copper substrates, emulating the process used to construct automotive power modules. Bond quality is characterized using (1) proof-of-concept fabrication, (2) material identification using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis, and (3) optical analysis using optical microscopy and scanning acoustic microscope. The feasibility of multiple-sided Cu–Sn TLP bonding is demonstrated by the absence of bondline damage in multiple test samples fabricated with double- or four-sided bonding using the TLP bonding process. (paper)

  14. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Mittal, Sanjeev; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non-significant (p > 0.05). Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement.

  15. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  16. Avaliação da resistência de união metalocerâmica em função de diferentes tempos de oxidação prévia Evaluation of the bond resistance between metal and ceramics, resulting from different previous oxidation times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fiuza de Carvalho DEKON

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a resistência de união metal/porcelana utilizando-se uma liga de Ni-Cr, submetida a diferentes tempos de oxidação prévia com o sistema cerâmico Vita-VMK, através do teste preconizado por CHIODI NETTO3. A análise dos resultados permitiu as seguintes conclusões: a ausência da oxidação prévia possibilitou os melhores resultados, sendo que a diferença foi estatisticamente significante; diferentes tempos de oxidação prévia provocaram redução acentuada nos valores obtidos e foram semelhantes entre si; o grupo submetido ao processo de jateamento após a oxidação prévia por cinco minutos mostrou resultados similares aos grupos que também passaram pelo processo de oxidação e não sofreram jateamento posterior.The objective of this research was to evaluate the porcelain-alloy bonding strength using a local-made alloy under different times of pre-oxidation with a ceramic system. The test used was preconized by CHIODI NETTO. The results lead to the following conclusions: the control group (no pre-oxidation showed the best values, statistically significant, when compared with others groups. The different times of pre-oxidation procedures reduced the values significantly, and the groups were similar to each other. The group submitted to the sandblasting process after a pre-oxidation of 5 minutes, showed similar values when compared with the other groups treated with pre-oxidation without sandblasting.

  17. "Vibrational bonding": a new type of chemical bond is discovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher J; Macrae, Roderick M

    2015-01-01

    A long-sought but elusive new type of chemical bond, occurring on a minimum-free, purely repulsive potential energy surface, has recently been convincingly shown to be possible on the basis of high-level quantum-chemical calculations. This type of bond, termed a vibrational bond, forms because the total energy, including the dynamical energy of the nuclei, is lower than the total energy of the dissociated products, including their vibrational zero-point energy. For this to be the case, the ZPE of the product molecule must be very high, which is ensured by replacing a conventional hydrogen atom with its light isotope muonium (Mu, mass = 1/9 u) in the system Br-H-Br, a natural transition state in the reaction between Br and HBr. A paramagnetic species observed in the reaction Mu +Br2 has been proposed as a first experimental sighting of this species, but definitive identification remains challenging.

  18. Enamel Bond Strength of New Universal Adhesive Bonding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, D E; Meyers, E J; Guillory, V L; Vandewalle, K S

    2015-01-01

    Universal bonding agents have been introduced for use as self-etch or etch-and-rinse adhesives depending on the dental substrate and clinician's preference. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of composite to enamel using universal adhesives compared to a self-etch adhesive when applied in self-etch and etch-and-rinse modes over time. Extracted human third molars were used to create 120 enamel specimens. The specimens were ground flat and randomly divided into three groups: two universal adhesives and one self-etch adhesive. Each group was then subdivided, with half the specimens bonded in self-etch mode and half in etch-and-rinse mode. The adhesives were applied as per manufacturers' instructions, and composite was bonded using a standardized mold and cured incrementally. The groups were further divided into two subgroups with 10 specimens each. One subgroup was stored for 24 hours and the second for six months in 37°C distilled water and tested in shear. Failure mode was also determined for each specimen. A three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) found a significant difference between groups based on bonding agent (p0.05). Clearfil SE in etch-and-rinse and self-etch modes had more mixed fractures than either universal adhesive in either mode. Etching enamel significantly increased the SBS of composite to enamel. Clearfil SE had significantly greater bond strength to enamel than either universal adhesive, which were not significantly different from each other.

  19. Common Factors in International Bond Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, J.J.A.G.; Melenberg, B.; Nijman, T.E.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we estimate and interpret the factors that jointly determine bond returns of different maturities in the US, Germany and Japan.We analyze both currency-hedged and unhedged bond returns.For currency-hedged bond returns, we find that five factors explain 96.5% of the variation of bond

  20. 7 CFR 1726.27 - Contractor's bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contractor's bonds. 1726.27 Section 1726.27... AGRICULTURE ELECTRIC SYSTEM CONSTRUCTION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES General § 1726.27 Contractor's bonds. (a) RUS Form 168b, Contractor's Bond, shall be used when a contractor's bond is required by RUS Forms 200, 257...